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Sample records for celiac disease prevention

  1. Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune thyroid or liver disease, Addison’s disease, or Sjogren’s syndrome.Have a genetic disorder such ... results will confirm that you have celiac disease. Diagnosis of dermatitis herpetiformis with a positive blood test ...

  2. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  3. Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Celiac Disease › Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease It is estimated that up to 30% of ... continuing to ingest gluten. Causes of Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease Continuing Gluten Ingestion The most common reason for ...

  4. Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wheat. However, wheat-free doesn't mean gluten-free . Lawmakers are working to make labels easier for people with celiac disease by requiring companies to identify other components, such as hidden ingredients ...

  5. Pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawahir, Shamila; Safta, Anca; Fasano, Alessio

    2009-10-01

    Celiac disease is an extremely common, although underdiagnosed, disorder. Knowledge about the varied clinical manifestations and the proper approach to screening and diagnosing celiac disease will lead to appropriate early intervention in affected children New age-dependent algorithms are emerging to properly screen for celiac disease. There is new evidence on the patchy nature of celiac disease supporting the practice of multiple duodenal biopsies including the bulb of the duodenum. Therapeutic dietary compliance, particularly in asymptomatic children, can be poor, and therefore, the involvement of a dietician trained in celiac disease is instrumental in keeping patients up to date with dietary guidelines and to improve their compliance to the diet. Expanding knowledge about the pathogenesis of celiac disease has led to the development of investigational therapeutic alternatives to the gluten-free diet. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating methods of celiac disease prevention in at-risk infants. This review aims at outlining the different manifestations of celiac disease in children as well as a step-wise approach to screen and diagnose the disease. A better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of celiac disease is paving the way to innovative diagnostic tools, preventive strategies, and therapeutic interventions alternative to a gluten-free diet.

  6. Screening for Celiac Disease: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Ebell, Mark; Epling, John W; Herzstein, Jessica; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-03-28

    Celiac disease is caused by an immune response in persons who are genetically susceptible to dietary gluten, a protein complex found in wheat, rye, and barley. Ingestion of gluten by persons with celiac disease causes immune-mediated inflammatory damage to the small intestine. To issue a new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for celiac disease. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of screening in asymptomatic adults, adolescents, and children; the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening and targeted vs universal screening; and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. The USPSTF also reviewed contextual information on the prevalence of celiac disease among patients without obvious symptoms and the natural history of subclinical celiac disease. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence on the accuracy of screening for celiac disease, the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening or targeted vs universal screening, and the potential benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic persons. (I statement).

  7. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  8. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Celiac Disease Many kids have sensitivities to certain foods, and ... protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, consuming gluten ...

  9. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  10. Screening for Celiac Disease: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Bougatsos, Christina; Blazina, Ian; Mackey, Katherine; Grusing, Sara; Selph, Shelley

    2017-03-28

    Silent or subclinical celiac disease may result in potentially avoidable adverse health consequences. To review the evidence on benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic adults, adolescents, and children 3 years and older for the US Preventive Services Task Force. Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, searched to June 14, 2016. Randomized clinical trials and cohort or case-control studies on clinical benefits and harms of screening vs no screening for celiac disease or treatment vs no treatment for screen-detected celiac disease; studies on diagnostic accuracy of serologic tests for celiac disease. One investigator abstracted data, a second checked data for accuracy, and 2 investigators independently assessed study quality using predefined criteria. Cancer incidence, gastrointestinal outcomes, psychological outcomes, child growth outcomes, health outcomes resulting from nutritional deficiencies, quality of life, mortality, and harms of screening. No meta-analytic pooling was done. One systematic review and 3 primary studies met inclusion criteria. No trials of screening for celiac disease were identified. One recent, good-quality systematic review of 56 original studies and 12 previous systematic reviews (sample sizes of primary studies ranging from 62 to more than 12 000 participants) found IgA tissue transglutaminase was associated with high accuracy (sensitivity and specificity both >90%) for diagnosing celiac disease. IgA endomysial antibodies tests were associated with high specificity. Only 2 studies of serologic tests for celiac disease involving 62 and 158 patients were conducted in asymptomatic populations and reported lower sensitivity (57% and 71%). One fair-quality, small (n = 40) Finnish treatment trial of asymptomatic adults with screen-detected celiac disease based on positive serologic findings found initiation of a gluten-free diet associated with

  11. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins......, which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers...... the small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include...

  12. Postmenopausal osteoporosis and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiechi, L M; Valerio, T; Loizzi, P

    2002-01-01

    Individualizing risk factors is the most important tool to prevent late consequences of menopause. Celiac disease is a predisposing condition not very considered for some postmenopausal diseases, such as postmenopausal osteoporosis. In this review the authors examine climacteric conditions that could be heightened by a celiac status especially if disregarded and untreated.

  13. Celiac disease - sprue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gluten intolerance; Gluten-sensitive enteropathy; Gluten-free diet celiac disease ... The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown. The lining of the intestines have small areas called villi which project outward into the opening of the ...

  14. Celiac disease - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002443.htm Celiac disease - nutritional considerations To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Celiac disease is an immune disorder passed down through families. ...

  15. Celiac disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier-Lengliné, Hélène; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Ruemmele, Frank M

    2015-10-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy, triggered by ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Since the use of anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysium antibodies in the early 1990s, two main groups of clinical presentation can be identified: patients with a symptomatic form of the disease, and patients with a pauci (a)-symptomatic form detected during the work-up of another autoimmune disease or due to a family history of celiac disease. The prevalence of both forms of the disease is currently estimated between 1/100 and 1/400. Classical form of the disease is characterized by occurrence of diarrhoea, failure to thrive, and abdominal bloating in young infants in the months following gluten introduction. Serological tests show high level of anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysium antibodies. Until recently, the diagnosis required duodenal biopsies that show villous atrophy. HLA genotype can help for diagnosis: the absence of the HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 alleles has a high negative predictive value. European guidelines recently proposed to reconsider the need for systematic endoscopy in typical symptomatic forms with high level of anti-transglutaminase and positive anti-endomysium. These recommendations are being assessed now. Currently, the gluten-free diet remains the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Children with celiac disease have to exclude from their diet all products containing wheat, barley and rye. Gluten-free diet causes clinical remission within a few weeks, but normalization of the small bowel mucosa and negativity of anti-transglutaminase antibodies are obtained in several months or even years. Gluten-free diet is useful to obtain clinical assessment, but also to prevent long-term complications of celiac disease, mainly osteoporosis, other autoimmune diseases, decreased fertility and cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Celiac Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... Contents What are some of the symptoms of celiac disease? Some people with celiac disease may not feel ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Celiac disease Celiac disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Celiac disease is a condition in which the immune system ...

  18. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina I Shehab

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion Mortality rates among patients with untreated CD increase two-fold every year as they age (gastrointestinal malignancies and most can be prevented/reversed with early diagnosis and initiation of a gluten-free diet. CD is a global health problem that requires a multidisciplinary and increasingly cooperative multinational research effort.

  19. Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in Children Lactose Intolerance Ménétrier’s Disease Microscopic Colitis Ostomy Surgery of the ...

  20. Celiac disease: clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Emel’yanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented clinical cases of patients with a diagnosis of gluten enteropathy in treatment in the department of gastroenterology Regional Clinical Hospital. The case is of interest to doctors of different specialties for the differential diagnosis of anemia and malabsorption syndrome, demonstrate both the classic version, and atypical forms of the disease course. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on three key positions: clinical findings, histology and serological markers. The clinical picture of celiac disease is characterized by pronounced polymorphism, by going beyond the a gastroenterological pathology. For screening of gluten sensitive celiac typically used an antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Morphological research of the mucous membrane of the small intestine is the determining criterion in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The use of specific gluten-free diet leads to the positive dynamics of the disease and improve the quality of life of patients.

  1. Presentation of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Norelle Rizkalla; Fasano, Alessio; Green, Peter H R

    2012-10-01

    The mode of presentation of patients with celiac disease has changed dramatically over the recent decades, with diarrheal or classic presentations becoming less common. This trend is most markedly seen in children, whose main presentations include recurrent abdominal pain, growth issues, and screening groups at risk. Among adults, presentations include diarrhea, anemia, osteoporosis, and recognition at endoscopy performed for gastroesophageal reflux disease, as well as screening. The groups most commonly screened include family members of patients with celiac disease, Down syndrome, and autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Hepatobiliary Disorders in Celiac Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal K. Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication reviews recent literature and summarizes hepatobiliary abnormalities that may complicate the clinical course of celiac disease. A wide spectrum of hepatobiliary diseases has been described, including asymptomatic elevations of liver enzyme levels, nonspecific hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease. Moreover, in the majority of patients, liver enzyme levels will normalize on a gluten-free diet. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma. Because many celiac patients do not have overt gastrointestinal symptoms, a high index of suspicion is required. Simple methods of detecting celiac disease such as serum antibody tests help in the early identification of the disease, thus preventing serious complications of the disorder. The IgG DGP antibody test and IgA tTG antibody test used in combination are an excellent screening test for suspected cases of celiac disease.

  3. Celiac Disease Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is one of the most prevalent autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders but as the case of Ms. J illustrates, diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Based on serology studies, the prevalence of celiac disease in many populations is estimated to be approximately 1% and has been increasing steadily over the last 50 years. Evaluation for celiac disease is generally straightforward, and uses commonly available serologic tests, however the signs and symptoms of celiac disease are nonspecific and highly heterogeneous making diagnosis difficult. While celiac disease is often considered a mild disorder treatable with simple dietary changes, in reality celiac disease imparts considerable risks including reduced bone mineral density, impaired quality of life, and increased overall mortality. In addition, the gluten free diet is highly burdensome and can profoundly affect patients and their families. For these reasons, care of individuals with celiac disease requires prompt diagnosis and ongoing multidisciplinary management. PMID:21990301

  4. Symptoms of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the following: • Recurring abdominal bloating and pain • Chronic diarrhea/constipation • Vomiting • Liver and biliary tract disorders (“Transaminitis”, ... celiac disease, including growth problems (failure to thrive, chronic diarrhea/constipation, recurring abdominal bloating and pain, fatigue and ...

  5. Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease Past Issues / Spring 2015 ... Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring ...

  6. Hepatic manifestations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hugh James FreemanDepartment of Medicine (Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaAbstract: Different hepatic and biliary tract disorders may occur with celiac disease. Some have been hypothesized to share genetic or immunopathogenetic factors, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune hepatitis. Other hepatic changes in celiac disease may occur with malnutrition resulting from impaired nutrient absorption, including hepatic steatosis. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma.Keywords: celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, fatty liver, gluten-free diet

  7. Celiac disease in first degree relatives of celiac children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Oliveira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT - The first degree relatives of celiac patients represent a high risk group for the development of this disorder, so their screening may be crucial in the prevention of long-term complications. OBJECTIVE - In order to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a group of first degree relatives of children with proven gluten intolerance, we conducted a prospective study that consisted in the screening of celiac disease, using a capillary immunoassay rapid test that allows a qualitative detection of IgA antibody to human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TTG. METHODS - When the screening test was positive subjects were advised to proceed with further investigation. The screening test was performed in 268 first degree relatives (143 mothers, 89 fathers, 36 siblings corresponding to 163 children with celiac disease. RESULTS - Screening test was positive in 12 relatives (4.5%, of which 1 refused to continue the investigation. In the remaining 11 relatives celiac disease was diagnosed in 7 cases (2.6%, 5 mothers, 2 fathers who had a median age of 39 years (27-56 years, mild gastrointestinal symptoms, high titre of IgA-TTG and histology abnormalities confirming the diagnosis. All these patients are currently on a gluten-free diet. CONCLUSION - The prevalence of celiac disease among first degree relatives (2.6% was 5 times higher than that in the general population. Although the recommendations for screening asymptomatic high risk groups, such as first degree relatives, are not unanimous the early diagnosis is crucial in preventing complications, including nutritional deficiency and cancer.

  8. Bone in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M-L; Bardella, M T

    2008-12-01

    Chronic inflammation and malabsorption in celiac disease (CD) can cause bone metabolism alterations and bone mineral loss in children and adults. Bone status before and after gluten-free diet, epidemiology of fractures, and possible treatment options for CD-related osteoporosis are presented. Controversial aspects of this complication of CD are discussed. The relationship between bone derangements and celiac disease (CD) was recognized almost 50 years ago, but many questions are still open. We are now aware that osteoporosis is a relatively frequent atypical presentation of CD, especially in adults, and that undiagnosed CD can be the cause of osteoporosis and related fractures. Chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases, including CD, can affect bone and mineral metabolism because of alterations in both systemic and local regulatory factors. The pathogenetic processes are still controversial, but two main mechanisms seem to be involved: intestinal malabsorption and the presence of chronic inflammation. This review analyzes the published data on bone involvement in children, adolescents, and adults either before or after a gluten-free diet. Special attention is paid to the epidemiology of fractures in celiac patients, considering that fractures are a major complication of osteoporosis and an important problem in the management of a chronic disease like CD. The usefulness of screening osteoporotic patients systematically for CD is still an open question, but some rules can be given. Finally, the current treatment options for children and adults are discussed. Recommendations for future clinical research are proposed.

  9. Bone and Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, María Belén; Longobardi, Vanesa; Bai, Julio César

    2016-04-01

    More than 50% of untreated patients with celiac disease (CD) have bone loss detected by bone densitometry (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry:DXA). Moreover, patients with CD are more likely to have osteoporosis and fragility fractures, especially of the distal radius. Although still controversial, we recommend DXA screening in all celiac disease patients, particularly in those with symptomatic CD at diagnosis and in those who present risk factors for fracture such as older age, menopausal status, previous fracture history, and familial hip fracture history. Bone microarchitecture, especially the trabecular network, may be deteriorated, explaining the higher fracture risk in these patients. Adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation are also recommended to optimize bone recovery, especially during the first years of gluten free diet (GFD). If higher fracture risk persists after 1 or 2 years of GFD, specific osteoactive treatment may be necessary to improve bone health.

  10. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Series Urinary Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac disease provide an effective first step in identifying candidates ...

  11. Celiac disease and the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Lee A; Trojian, Thomas; Mancini, Angela C

    2011-01-01

    With the diagnosis of celiac disease rising in the past decade and with increased public awareness, team physicians are faced with both managing and diagnosing athletes with celiac disease. Sports medicine physicians need to recognize that celiac disease can present with a number of different symptoms and, therefore, should consider celiac disease as part of their differential in evaluating athletes with prolonged unexplained illnesses. Sports medicine physicians must be familiar with the appropriate laboratory tests and diagnostic procedures used to establish the diagnosis of celiac disease. A multidisciplinary approach in helping the newly diagnosed athlete with celiac disease is important to the successful treatment of the disease. Athletes with celiac disease often have problems with iron absorption (leading to anemia) and/or vitamin D and calcium absorption (leading to osteoporosis and poor bone health). Even athletes with known and long-standing celiac disease need additional care and supervision in ensuring there is no disruption in their gluten-free diet, which can lead to a flare-up of symptoms or a decrease in performance.

  12. [A case of celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gweon, Tae-Geun; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Byeon, Seoug-Wook; Baeg, Myong-Ki; Lee, Jong-Yul; Moon, Sung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Su; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2013-06-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic absorptive disorder of the small intestine caused by gluten. The prevalence rate of celiac disease is 1% in Western countries. But, it is rare in Asian countries, and there is no celiac disease reported in Korea. Here, we report a case of celiac disease. An 36-years-old woman complained non-specific abdominal pain and diarrhea. She had anemia and was taking medication for osteoporosis. Colonoscopy showed no abnormality except shallow ulcer at the terminal ileum. Gastroduodenoscopy showed micronodularity at the duodenum 2nd and 3rd portion. Capsule endoscopy and enteroscopy showed villous atrophy and blunting of villi from the duodenum. Small intestinal pathology showed villous atrophy with lymphocyte infiltration. After gluten free diet, diarrhea, abdominal pain, anemia and osteoporosis were improved. And, she felt well-being sensation. This is a first case of celiac disease in Korea.

  13. Celiac disease : towards new therapeutic modalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitea, Doina Cristina

    2011-01-01

    What is known about celiac disease? Celiac disease is one of the most common food intolerances, approximately 1% of the population being a celiac disease patient. It is now known that celiac disease is precipitated by ingestion of gluten, the major storage proteins in wheat, and similar proteins in

  14. Refractory Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Khatami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Refractory celiac disease (RCD is when malabsorption symptoms and villous atrophy persist despite strict adherence to a gluten free diet (GFD for more than 12 months and other causes of villous atrophy have been ruled out.  RCD is considered a rare disease and almost exclusively occurs in adults. Persistent diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss are the most common symptoms in RCD. Also, anemia, fatigue, malaise, thromboembolic events and coexisting autoimmune disorders are frequent. Diagnosis of RCD is based on other causes of unresponsiveness to the GFD, particularly collagenous sprue, ulcerative jejunitis, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Many disorders such as autoimmune enteropathy, tropical sprue, common variable immunodeficiency, and intolerance to non-gluten dietary proteins may have similar histological findings but not necessarily identical with CD and therefore should be excluded. Repeat intestinal biopsy may help to differentiate causes of non-responsive CD associated with ongoing villous atrophy (e.g., gluten contamination, small-bowel bacterial overgrowth, RCD. There are 2 subtypes of RCD according to absence (type I or presence (type II of an abnormal intraepithelial lymphocyte population. RCD type 1 usually becomes better with a combination of aggressive nutritional support, adherence to GFD, and pharmacologic therapies such as prednisone, budesonide and azathioprine. For RCD type 2, more aggressive therapeutic approach is needed since clinical response to therapies is less certain and may evolve into aggressive enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma and the prognosis is poor.   Key words: Celiac Disease, Refractory.  

  15. Celiac disease and its histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pudasaini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is gluten induced enteropathy and is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine characterized by malabsorption. It is a common immune mediated disorder which is triggered by consumption of wheat (gluten. It occurs in genetically predisposed individuals (carriers of HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes. It is characterized by inflammation of the small-intestinal mucosa and myriad gastrointestinal and systemic manifestations. A duodenal biopsy with positive serology is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Celiac disease. As there are changing presentation for Celiac disease, communication of pathologist and gastroenterologists is essential for appropriate interpretation of duodenal biopsy.

  16. Prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of Iranian patients with celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Chomeili

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Celiac disease, one of the best-known autoimmune human leukocyte antigen-dependent disorders, has a relatively increased prevalence in first-degree relatives. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease. METHODS: Siblings of confirmed celiac disease patients in our center were identified and enrolled in this study. Their serum immunoglobulin A and tissue transglutaminase antibody-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (anti-tissue transglutaminase, immunoglobulin A, and immunoglobulin G were measured and multiple endoscopic duodenal biopsy specimens were obtained with parental consensus. Celiac disease was confirmed by observation of characteristic histological changes. RESULTS: A total of 49 children (male, 29; female, 20; age, 2-16 years with confirmed celiac disease in a pediatric gastroenterology ward were studied from 1999 to 2006. We found 30 siblings (female, 16 all shared in both parents. The only measurement available was for immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase antibody. A duodenal biopsy was performed in all 30 siblings. Clinical findings such as abdominal pain, fatigue, growth retardation and diarrhea were found in 53.3% of the completely studied siblings, and positive serology without histological changes was identified in four cases. Both serology and biopsy (confirmed new cases were positive in 2 of the 30 siblings. CONCLUSION: High prevalence of celiac disease among siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease necessitates serologic screening (and confirmatory biopsy if indicated in families having celiac disease. It is advantageous to diagnose the disease as soon as possible because early diagnosis and diet intervention may prevent serious complications such as growth retardation, short stature, chronic diarrhea, and malignancy.

  17. Atypical presentations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasa Adriana Luminita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the association of celiac disease in 81 children with autoimmune disease and genetic syndromes over a two years periods (January 2014 to July 2016 in Pediatric Clinic in Constanta. Because the extraintestinal symptoms are an atypical presentation of celiac disease we determined in these children the presence of celiac disease antibodies: Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgA and IgA total serum level as a screening method followeds in selective cases by Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgG, anti-endomysial antibodies, deamidated gliadin antibodies IgA and IgG and intestinal biopsia. In our study 8 patients had been diagnosed with celiac disease with extraintestinal symptoms, of which 4 with type 1 diabetes, 1 patient with ataxia, 2 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and 1 patient with Down syndrome that associate also autoimmune thyroiditis, alopecia areata, enamel hypoplasia.

  18. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diagnosis If antibody tests and symptoms suggest celiac disease, the physician needs to establish the diagnosis by obtaining tiny pieces of tissue from the upper small intestine to check for damage to ...

  19. Gliadin-reactive T cells in Italian children from preventCD cohort at high risk of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarca, Alessandra; Auricchio, Renata; Picascia, Stefania; Fierro, Olga; Maglio, Mariantonia; Miele, Erasmo; Malamisura, Basilio; Greco, Luigi; Troncone, Riccardo; Gianfrani, Carmen

    2017-06-01

    Newborns at high risk of celiac disease (CD) were recruited in Italy in the context of the PreventCD study and closely monitored for CD, from 4 months up to a mean age of 8 years at follow-up. The aim of our study was to investigate intestinal T-cell reactivity to gliadin at the first clinical and/or serological signs of CD. Gliadin-reactive T-cell lines were generated from intestinal biopsies of 19 HLA-DQ2-or HLA-DQ8-positive children. At biopsy, 11 children had a diagnosis of acute CD, two of potential CD, and six were non-celiac controls. Immune reactivity was evaluated against gliadin and known immunogenic peptides from α-, γ-, or ω-gliadins. The role of deamidation by transglutaminase (tTG) in determining the immunogenicity of gliadin was also investigated. Most of the children with CD (either acute or potential) had an inflammatory response to gliadin. Notably, signs of T-cell reactivity to gliadin were also found in some non-celiac subjects, in which IFN-γ responses occurred mainly when regulatory IL-10 and TGF-β cytokines were blocked. Interestingly, PreventCD children reacted to gliadin peptides found active in adult CD patients, and tTG deamidation markedly enhanced gliadin recognition. T cells reactive to gliadin can be detected in the intestine of children at high risk of developing CD, in some cases also in the presence of a normal mucosa and negative CD-associated antibodies. Furthermore, children at a very early stage of CD recognize the same gliadin epitopes that are active in adult CD patients. Tissue transglutaminase strongly enhances gluten T-cell immunogenicity in early CD. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  20. Atypical Celiac Disease Resistant to Thyroxine Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Oguzhan Aksu

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease, an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in susceptible individuals upon ingestion of gluten containing diet, is closely associated with other autoimmune endocrine disorders, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease. Celiac disease and hypothyroidism ( especially due to Hashimoto disease) cooccurence is frequently mentioned in the literature. The relationship between celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease was first described three decades ago. Patients usually have...

  1. Gut Microbiota and Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Giovanni; Di Biase, Anna Rita; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Ravaioli, Federico; Scaioli, Eleonora; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence regarding celiac disease has increasingly shown the role of innate immunity in triggering the immune response by stimulating the adaptive immune response and by mucosal damage. The interaction between the gut microbiota and the mucosal wall is mediated by the same receptors which can activate innate immunity. Thus, changes in gut microbiota may lead to activation of this inflammatory pathway. This paper is a review of the current knowledge regarding the relationship between celiac disease and gut microbiota. In fact, patients with celiac disease have a reduction in beneficial species and an increase in those potentially pathogenic as compared to healthy subjects. This dysbiosis is reduced, but might still remain, after a gluten-free diet. Thus, gut microbiota could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, as described by studies which link dysbiosis with the inflammatory milieu in celiac patients. The use of probiotics seems to reduce the inflammatory response and restore a normal proportion of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Additional evidence is needed in order to better understand the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and the clinical impact and therapeutic use of probiotics in this setting.

  2. Celiac Disease: Four Inches and Seven Pounds...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Four Inches and Seven Pounds… Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents Maghann and Stella—managing celiac disease. Photo courtesy of Maghann Ruiz Much to her ...

  3. Celiac Disease and Thyroid Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolism to significantly increase. This is called hyperthyroidism. Hashimoto’s disease and Grave’s Disease are two common causes ... the dietitian? Celiac Disease and Thyroid Conditions | continued Hashimoto’s Disease (Also called Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis) •Your body’s ...

  4. Celiac disease: towards new therapeutic modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Mitea, Doina Cristina

    2011-01-01

    What is known about celiac disease? Celiac disease is one of the most common food intolerances, approximately 1% of the population being a celiac disease patient. It is now known that celiac disease is precipitated by ingestion of gluten, the major storage proteins in wheat, and similar proteins in related cereals like barley, rye and triticale (hybrid between wheat and rye). The most common complains of patients consuming gluten are abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting. Also neurological sy...

  5. Celiac disease : how complicated can it get?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjon, Jennifer May-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common inflammatory disorder of the small intestine which is triggered by ingested gluten proteins. Previous studies identified crucial steps in the development of celiac disease and based on this knowledge, we propose a threshold model for the development of celiac disease

  6. A Randomized, Double-Blind Study of Larazotide Acetate to Prevent the Activation of Celiac Disease During Gluten Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Daniel A; Kelly, C P; Abdallah, H Z; Colatrella, A M; Harris, L A; Leon, F; Arterburn, L A; Paterson, B M; Lan, Z H; Murray, J A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In patients with celiac disease, enteropathy is caused by the entry of gluten peptides into the lamina propria of the intestine, in which their immunogenicity is potentiated by tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and T-helper type 1–mediated immune responses are triggered. Tight junction disassembly and paracellular permeability are believed to have an important role in the transport of gluten peptides to the lamina propria. Larazotide acetate is a tight-junction regulator peptide that, in vitro, prevents the opening of intestinal epithelial tight junctions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of larazotide acetate in protecting against gluten-induced intestinal permeability and gastrointestinal symptom severity in patients with celiac disease. METHODS: In this dose-ranging, placebo-controlled study, 86 patients with celiac disease controlled through diet were randomly assigned to larazotide acetate (0.25, 1, 4, or 8 mg) or placebo three times per day with or without gluten challenge (2.4 g/day) for 14 days. The primary efficacy outcome was the urinary lactulose/mannitol (LAMA) fractional excretion ratio. Secondary endpoints included gastrointestinal symptom severity, quality-of-life measures, and antibodies to tTG. RESULTS: LAMA measurements were highly variable in the outpatient setting. The increase in LAMA ratio associated with the gluten challenge was not statistically significantly greater than the increase in the gluten-free control. Among patients receiving the gluten challenge, the difference in the LAMA ratios for the larazotide acetate and placebo groups was not statistically significant. However, larazotide acetate appeared to limit gluten-induced worsening of gastrointestinal symptom severity as measured by the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale at some lower doses but not at the higher dose. Symptoms worsened significantly in the gluten challenge–placebo arm compared with the placebo–placebo arm

  7. Potential Celiac Patients : A Model of Celiac Disease Pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tosco, Antonella; Izzo, Valentina; Tucci, Francesca; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Renata; Romanos, Jihane; Trynka, Gosia; Auricchio, Salvatore; Jabri, Bana; Greco, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim: Potential celiacs have the 'celiactype' HLA, positive anti-transglutaminase antibodies but no damage at small intestinal mucosa. Only a minority of them develops mucosal lesion. More than 40 genes were associated to Celiac Disease (CD) but we still do not know how those pathways

  8. Borrelia infection and risk of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaedini, Armin; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Wormser, Gary P; Green, Peter H; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-09-15

    Environmental factors, including infectious agents, are speculated to play a role in the rising prevalence and the geographic distribution of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder. In the USA and Sweden where the regional variation in the frequency of celiac disease has been studied, a similarity with the geographic distribution of Lyme disease, an emerging multisystemic infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes, has been found, thus raising the possibility of a link. We aimed to determine if infection with Borrelia contributes to an increased risk of celiac disease. Biopsy reports from all of Sweden's pathology departments were used to identify 15,769 individuals with celiac disease. Through linkage to the nationwide Patient Register, we compared the rate of earlier occurrence of Lyme disease in the patients with celiac disease to that in 78,331 matched controls. To further assess the temporal relationship between Borrelia infection and celiac disease, we also examined the risk of subsequent Lyme disease in patients with a diagnosis of celiac disease. Twenty-five individuals (0.16%) with celiac disease had a prior diagnosis of Lyme disease, whereas 79 (0.5%) had a subsequent diagnosis of Lyme disease. A modest association between Lyme disease and celiac disease was seen both before (odds ratio, 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-2.47) and after the diagnosis of celiac disease (hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.40-2.35), with the risk of disease being highest in the first year of follow-up. Only a minor fraction of the celiac disease patient population had a prior diagnosis of Lyme disease. The similar association between Lyme disease and celiac disease both before and after the diagnosis of celiac disease is strongly suggestive of surveillance bias as a likely contributor. Taken together, the data indicate that Borrelia infection is not a substantive risk factor in the development of celiac disease.

  9. Investigational therapies for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Luis

    2009-12-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition affecting genetically susceptible individuals. It is produced by the ingestion of gluten contained in wheat, rye, barley, and related products. The only treatment currently available is strict adherence to a gluten-free diet for life. This requirement for dietary compliance is difficult, especially for adolescents and adults, and better alternatives are needed. Recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of celiac disease indicate that there are several attractive targets for new pharmacologic treatments. These therapies involve oral enzyme supplementation, tissue transglutaminase inhibition, blockage of HLA-DQ presentation, and silencing of gluten-reactive T cells using cytokines or other methods. All of these therapies are in the experimental phase of development, and it is not clear if they will be approved for clinical studies. Meanwhile, a strict gluten-free diet remains a safe and effective treatment for celiac patients.

  10. Interest in medical therapy for celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Christina A.; Simpson, Suzanne; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Lewis, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A gluten-free diet is the treatment for celiac disease, but pharmaceutical agents are being developed. The level of interest amongst patients in using a medication to treat celiac disease is unknown. This study examined the level of interest amongst patients in medication to treat celiac disease. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to celiac disease patients and data were collected on demographics, presentation, and interest in medication. Three validated celiac disease-specific instruments were incorporated: Celiac Disease Associated Quality of Life, the Celiac Symptom Index, and the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test. Results: Responses were received from 365 individuals with biopsy-proven celiac disease. Respondents were 78% (n = 276) female, 48% (n = 170) over 50 years of age, and experienced a classical (diarrhea predominant) presentation in 44% (n = 154). Of the 339 individuals answering the question regarding use of a medication to treat celiac disease, 66% were interested. Interest was greatest in older individuals (71% >50 years of age versus 60% celiac disease are interested in using a medication. Interest was highest among men, older individuals, frequent restaurant customers, individuals dissatisfied with their weight or concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet, and those with a worse quality of life. PMID:24003336

  11. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  12. Neuropsychiatric symptoms and celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urban-Kowalczyk M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Małgorzata Urban-Kowalczyk,1 Janusz Śmigielski,2 Agnieszka Gmitrowicz3 1Affective and Psychotic Disorders Department, Medical University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland; 2Department of Geriatric Medicine Medical University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland; 3Department of Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland Background: Neuropsychiatric symptoms may represent an atypical manifestation of celiac disease that occur before a gastroenterological diagnosis is made. Some studies suggest that a gluten-free diet is effective in treating the depression, anxiety, and neurological complications associated with celiac disease.Method: The article describes the case of a patient suffering from chronic, treatment-resistant symptoms of depression and anxiety. The diagnosis of celiac disease and introduction of an elimination diet caused a significant improvement in mental state and everyday functioning in the presenting patient.Conclusion: The presence of persistent anxiety and depressive symptoms, with a poor reaction to pharmacological treatment, indicates a need to identify somatic reasons for the underlying condition. It is important to remember that celiac disease can occur at any age, not only in childhood. The presence of this somatic cause of persistent depressive and anxiety symptoms should be considered in the diagnostic process in adults. Keywords: gluten, depression, anxiety, anemia, neurological complications

  13. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The prevalence of celiac disease has risen in recent decades and is currently about 1% in most Western populations. The reason for this rise is unknown, although environmental factors related to the hygiene hypothesis are suspected. The pathophysiology of celiac disease involves both the innate and adaptive immune response to dietary gluten. Clinical features are diverse and include gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic bone disease, infertility, and many other manifestations. Although a gluten-free diet is effective in most patients, this diet can be burdensome and can limit quality of life; consequently, non-dietary therapies are at various stages of development. This review also covers non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The pathophysiology of this clinical phenotype is poorly understood, but it is a cause of increasing interest in gluten-free diets in the general population. PMID:26438584

  14. What is Celiac Disease? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents Celiac ... people choose the right foods. How common is celiac disease? Celiac disease affects people in all parts of ...

  15. Celiac disease, rare symptoms, autoimmune patology

    OpenAIRE

    Volta, Umberto; Parisi, Claudia; Piscaglia, Maria; Fabbri, Angela; Fiorini, Erica

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of a 42-years-old woman with constipation, anemia and recurrent itch. After several investigations, celiac disease was diagnosed and a treatment with a gluten-free diet was applied with beneficial effects. Recognizing celiac disease can be difficult because some of its symptoms are similar to those of other diseases. In fact, sometimes it is confused with irritable bowel syndrome or iron-deficiency anemia or intestinal infections: as a result, celiac disease is commonly under...

  16. Dysbiosis a risk factor for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girbovan, Anamaria; Sur, Genel; Samasca, Gabriel; Lupan, Iulia

    2017-04-01

    Celiac disease remains one of the most challenging pathologies of the small intestine. It involves multiple pathogenic pathways and there are no disease-changing pharmacological agents available against it yet. The term microbiota refers to the community of microorganisms that inhabit a particular region of the body. Normal gut microbiota has a vital role in maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and promoting health. Celiac disease is associated with microbiota alteration, especially with an increase in the number of Gram-negative bacteria and a decrease in the number of Gram-positive bacteria. There is a strong relationship between intestinal dysbiosis and celiac disease, and recent studies are aimed at determining whether the celiac disease is a risk factor for dysbiosis or dysbiosis is for celiac disease. Therefore, the aim of this review was to assess the latest findings regarding the gut microbiota and its impact on the celiac disease, including therapeutic aspects.

  17. Celiac Disease Changes Everything | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Celiac Disease Changes Everything Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of ... your thoughts when you were told you had celiac disease? I was actually thrilled when I was finally ...

  18. Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Celiac Disease Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Tuesday, January 21, 2014 8: ... to the gluten-free diet of patients with celiac disease is well-tolerated, and does not exacerbate the ...

  19. What People with Celiac Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People With Celiac Disease Need to Know About Osteoporosis What Is Celiac Disease? Celiac disease, sometimes called ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  20. Celiac disease, rare symptoms, autoimmune patology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Volta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 42-years-old woman with constipation, anemia and recurrent itch. After several investigations, celiac disease was diagnosed and a treatment with a gluten-free diet was applied with beneficial effects. Recognizing celiac disease can be difficult because some of its symptoms are similar to those of other diseases. In fact, sometimes it is confused with irritable bowel syndrome or iron-deficiency anemia or intestinal infections: as a result, celiac disease is commonly underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. This case report is described to address the physician to a correct diagnosis of celiac disease.

  1. Autoantibody frequency in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Caglar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: In our study, we investigated the levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (anti-GAD, islet cell antibody (ICA, thyroperoxidase antibody (anti-TPO, thyroglobulin antibody (anti-TG, antinuclear antibodies (FANA, antibodies to double-stranded DNA (anti-ds DNA, antibody to Sjögren syndrome A antigen (anti-SSA, antibody to Sjögren syndrome B antigen (anti-SSB, Smith antibody (anti-Sm, smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA, and antimitochondrial antibody liver-kidney microsome (AMA-LKM in patients with celiac disease as compared to healthy controls and autoimmune hypothyroid patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 31 patients with celiac disease, 34 patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism and 29 healthy subjects were included in this study. Anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-Sm, anti-ds DNA, anti-GAD, anti-TPO and anti-TG were studied by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA, and AMA-LKM, ASMA, ANA and ICA were studied by immunofluorescence. Clinical data and the results of free thyroxine-thyroid stimulating hormone (FT4-TSH were collected from the patients' files by retrospective analysis. SPSS ver 13.0 was used for data analysis, and the χ2 method was used for comparisons within groups. RESULTS: The frequency of anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-GAD, anti-Sm, anti-ds DNA, AMA-LKM, ASMA, ANA and ICA were not significantly different between the groups. Levels of anti-TPO and anti-TG antibodies were found to be significantly higher (<0.001 in autoimmune hypothyroid patients when compared with other groups. CONCLUSION: In previous studies, an increased frequency of autoimmune diseases of other systems has been reported in patients with celiac disease. We found that the frequency of autoimmune antibodies specific for other autoimmune diseases was not higher in celiac disease.

  2. Case management implications of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Liza

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to educate case managers on an autoimmune disorder, celiac disease, that is seen with increased frequency due to recent improvements in diagnostic testing. After reading this article, case managers will Outpatient case management, although patients with celiac disease may be encountered in any setting. Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disease affecting up to 1% of the population. The majority of people with celiac disease do not know they have it. With new diagnostic tests available on the marketplace, increasing numbers of people are being diagnosed with celiac disease. Case managers are likely to encounter patients with celiac disease as either a primary or secondary diagnosis. Celiac disease may cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as gas, diarrhea, or bloating, and is also associated with osteoporosis, other autoimmune disorders, and certain types of cancer. For children, it is a common disorder underlying growth delays. Celiac disease is present in 3%-8% of persons with diabetes and may affect glycemic control in these patients. The only known treatment of celiac disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet. The increased number of individuals diagnosed with celiac disease has led to an increase in products available, as well as in research on treatment alternatives. People with celiac disease report challenges in adhering to the gluten-free diet. Case managers can assist patients in accessing appropriate therapy, including nutrition counseling and monitoring services. They may also advocate for testing of patients in high-risk groups such as persons with diabetes, and those with unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms. In working with celiac patients, case managers should address psychosocial issues as well as knowledge deficits. Patients may need particular support integrating the gluten-free diet with other requirements, including heart healthy or diabetic diets. Case managers can help patients identify reliable sources of

  3. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid diseas...

  4. Diagnostic challenges in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Karol; Mulak, Agata; Jasińska, Maria; Paradowski, Leszek

    2017-07-01

    Diagnosis of celiac disease in adults is currently based on serologic tests in combination with histopathological assessment of small intestinal biopsy specimens. High titers of celiac-specific antibodies in immunocompetent patients with villous atrophy in a good quality biopsy sample allow us to state a confident diagnosis. The relief of symptoms and histological improvement after embarking on a gluten free diet further support the initial diagnosis. However, in some cases, these conditions are not fulfilled, which requires a critical evaluation of laboratory and histopathology results and a consideration of other potential causes for the observed pathologies. To avoid diagnostic uncertainty, both biopsy and laboratory testing should be performed on a diet containing gluten. Immune deficiency, cross reaction of antibodies and possibilities of seronegative or latent celiac disease should be considered while evaluating serology results. Uneven distribution and variable intensity of histopathological changes in the small intestine along with multiple disorders presenting a similar specimen image may lead to invalid biopsy results. Additional laboratory testing and careful examination of a patient's history may deliver important data for a differential diagnosis and a more specific biopsy evaluation. Persistence or recurrence of symptoms, despite the ongoing treatment, requires a revision of the initial diagnosis, an evaluation of the gluten free diet and a search for concurrent disorders or complications.

  5. Early and Correct Diagnosis of Celiac Disease in the Prevention of Growth Disorders and Child Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigic, Esad; Hadzic, Devleta; Mladina, Nada

    2012-01-01

    Coeliac, in ordinary people known as “flour allergy” and in medicine world known as gluten enteropathy which means enteric damage caused by gluten. Data about incidence of gluten enteropathy is different in different countries around the World and depend on is it or is it not the right diagnosis for enteric disorder. Sometimes, this disease is unrecognized because of unspecific clinical signs. This disease is happening in every moment of a lifetime, most common during the childhood when the children try to eat any food which contains gluten. Anyway, if children had no symptoms it doesn’t¢t mean that disease not exists, and that¢is because we have to do diagnostic tests to confirm gluten enteropathy. Gluten intolerance is chronic disease and demand use of the specific non gluten food during the lifetime. Early diagnosis is right way to prevent unregularly growth. Aim of this study was to show the influence of early diagnostic about growth. For each patient we had a permission of parents and we showed our original results for three month we investigated. PMID:23678328

  6. Atypical Celiac Disease Resistant to Thyroxine Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguzhan Aksu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease, an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in susceptible individuals upon ingestion of gluten containing diet, is closely associated with other autoimmune endocrine disorders, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease. Celiac disease and hypothyroidism ( especially due to Hashimoto disease cooccurence is frequently mentioned in the literature. The relationship between celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease was first described three decades ago. Patients usually have the classical presentation of diarrhoea and steatorrhoea but hypothyroidism with weight loss and increased dose requirement of L Thyroxine are two well recognised presentations of celiac disease in hypothyroidism. It is known that these cases are resistant to thyroxine replacement. Herein we presented a 35 year old female patient with atypical celiac disease and needed an extremely high dose of thyroxine such as 1600 mcg/day for treatment.

  7. Osteoarticular manifestations of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Stéphanie; Lioté, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune enteropathy based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The global prevalence of 1% to 2% represents only the tip of the iceberg. The diagnosis is confirmed by positive specific antibody, anti-transglutaminase or anti-endomysium, specific lesions of the small intestine and a response to strict gluten-free diet. The diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because the clinical variability is very large, ranging from digestive clinical presentation "classic" to "atypical" symptoms, often extra-intestinal, that are sometimes attributed to a concomitant disease or a complication. Among them, there are frequent musculoskeletal manifestations such as osteoporosis and osteomalacia. In the absence of risk factor, osteoporosis, in a premenopausal women or in a man less than 55 years, more is if it is severe and refractory to medications, need to rheumatologists on the track of celiac disease in the absence of digestive symptoms. Osteomalacia is related to secondary hypovitaminosis D malabsorption. Supplementation by calcifediol, water-soluble vitamin D, may be indicated. Celiac disease is associated with an autoimmune disease in almost 1/3 of the cases. Knowing these potential associations allows earlier diagnosis in patients whose only manifestation, a concomitant disease. Anemia, chronic fatigue or unexplained polyarthralgia are symptoms associated with celiac disease to look for specific antibodies. The aim of early diagnosis is to prevent the emergence of other systemic disorders and avoid complications such as bone fractures and cancer, especially intestinal lymphoma. Non-celiac gluten intolerance is a new entity defined by symptomatology similar to that of celiac disease induced by the ingestion of gluten and disappearing after crowding-out, among patients without specific antibodies and without intestinal lesion of celiac disease. This entity is a cause, at

  8. Interest in medical therapy for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Christina A; Simpson, Suzanne; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Lewis, Suzanne; Green, Peter H R

    2013-09-01

    A gluten-free diet is the treatment for celiac disease, but pharmaceutical agents are being developed. The level of interest amongst patients in using a medication to treat celiac disease is unknown. This study examined the level of interest amongst patients in medication to treat celiac disease. A questionnaire was distributed to celiac disease patients and data were collected on demographics, presentation, and interest in medication. Three validated celiac disease-specific instruments were incorporated: Celiac Disease Associated Quality of Life, the Celiac Symptom Index, and the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test. Responses were received from 365 individuals with biopsy-proven celiac disease. Respondents were 78% (n = 276) female, 48% (n = 170) over 50 years of age, and experienced a classical (diarrhea predominant) presentation in 44% (n = 154). Of the 339 individuals answering the question regarding use of a medication to treat celiac disease, 66% were interested. Interest was greatest in older individuals (71% >50 years of age versus 60% women, p = 0.0083), frequent restaurant customers (76% versus 58%, p = 0.0006), those dissatisfied with their weight (73% versus 51%, p = 0.0003) and those concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet (77% versus 64%, p = 0.0176). Length of time since diagnosis, education, presentation, and symptoms with gluten exposure did not demonstrate any effect. Interest in medication was associated with a worse quality of life (CD-QOL 69.4 versus 80.1, p celiac disease are interested in using a medication. Interest was highest among men, older individuals, frequent restaurant customers, individuals dissatisfied with their weight or concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet, and those with a worse quality of life.

  9. Clinical and Histologic Mimickers of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Amrit K; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2017-08-17

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small bowel, classically associated with diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption. The diagnosis of celiac disease is made when there are compatible clinical features, supportive serologic markers, representative histology from the small bowel, and response to a gluten-free diet. Histologic findings associated with celiac disease include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hyperplasia, villous atrophy, and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate in the lamina propria. It is important to recognize and diagnose celiac disease, as strict adherence to a gluten-free diet can lead to resolution of clinical and histologic manifestations of the disease. However, many other entities can present with clinical and/or histologic features of celiac disease. In this review article, we highlight key clinical and histologic mimickers of celiac disease. The evaluation of a patient with serologically negative enteropathy necessitates a carefully elicited history and detailed review by a pathologist. Medications can mimic celiac disease and should be considered in all patients with a serologically negative enteropathy. Many mimickers of celiac disease have clues to the underlying diagnosis, and many have a targeted therapy. It is necessary to provide patients with a correct diagnosis rather than subject them to a lifetime of an unnecessary gluten-free diet.

  10. Optimizing the diagnosis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Michelle Shui Yee; Sanders, David S

    2017-05-01

    The diagnostic approach in celiac disease is continuously evolving as our understanding of its pathophysiology improves. This review aims to provide a summary of contemporary work that supports optimization of the diagnosis of this common yet underdiagnosed condition. The recently updated National Institute of Clinical Excellence and European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines and the contentious biopsy-free diagnostic approach will be discussed. We will review the evidence advocating optimal biopsy techniques such as single bite biopsy and controversial bulb biopsy sampling to increase diagnostic yield. Recent data providing phenotypical characterization and clinical outcomes of celiac subtypes such as potential celiac disease, seronegative celiac disease and ultrashort celiac disease will be covered. We will present emerging evidence on novel case finding strategies with point of care tests. Promising novel markers for celiac disease such as serum intestinal fatty acid binding protein and in-vitro gluten challenge will be included. Recent work has demonstrated the clinical significance of the celiac disease subtypes, emphasizing the importance of careful diagnosis and recognition. There is a move toward a less invasive and perhaps more cost-effective diagnostic approach in celiac disease, but duodenal biopsy remains the gold standard at present for all adults and the majority of pediatric patients.

  11. Celiac Disease Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acidosis and Alkalosis Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison Disease Alcoholism Allergies Alzheimer Disease Anemia Angina Ankylosing Spondylitis Anthrax ... Seems to Be on the Rise, Mainly in Elderly: Study Blood markers for the disease rose from ...

  12. Celiac Disease and Other Causes of Duodenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Daniel R; Owen, David A

    2018-01-01

    - Patients who receive an upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination frequently have biopsies taken from the duodenum. Accurate interpretation of duodenal biopsies is essential for patient care. Celiac disease is a common clinical concern, but pathologists need to be aware of other conditions of the duodenum that mimic celiac disease. - To review the normal histologic features of duodenal mucosa and describe the clinical and histologic findings in celiac disease and its mimics, listing the differentiating features of biopsies with villous atrophy and epithelial lymphocytosis. - The study comprises a literature review of pertinent publications as of November 30, 2016. - Celiac disease is a common cause of abnormal duodenal histology. However, many of the histologic features found in the duodenal biopsy of patients with celiac disease are also present in other conditions that affect the small bowel. Diagnostic precision may be enhanced by obtaining a careful patient history and by ancillary laboratory testing, particularly for the presence of antitissue transglutaminase antibodies.

  13. Symptoms and biomarkers associated with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kårhus, Line L; Thuesen, Betina H; Rumessen, Juri J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify possible early predictors (symptoms and biomarkers) of celiac disease, compare symptoms before and after screening, and evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of serologic screening for celiac disease in an adult Danish population. METHODS: This cross-sectional population......-based study was based on the 5-year follow-up of the Health2006 cohort, where 2297 individuals were screened for celiac disease; 56 were antibody positive and thus invited to clinical evaluation. Eight were diagnosed with biopsy-verified celiac disease. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to antibody......-positive individuals 19 months after the clinical evaluation to obtain information on their symptoms and their experience with participation in the screening. RESULTS: Before screening, participants subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease did not differ from the rest of the population with respect to symptoms...

  14. Osteoporosis in adult patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, T; Kröger, H; Janatuinen, E; Arnala, I; Kosma, V M; Pikkarainen, P; Julkunen, R; Jurvelin, J; Alhava, E; Uusitupa, M

    1999-03-01

    We investigated the bone mineral density (BMD) and prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis in adult celiac patients with varying disease states. In this cross-sectional study the data on the severity of celiac disease and BMD were collected from 77 celiac patients (28 newly diagnosed and 49 previously diagnosed celiac patients), and BMD results were compared with those of 157 control subjects matched for age, gender, and menopausal status. The celiac patients had significantly lower BMD than the control subjects at the lumbar spine (-6%) and femoral neck (-5%). The mean BMD did not differ significantly among celiac patients classified by severity of disease. Based on Z scores, 35% of the celiac patients and 17% of the control subjects had low BMDs for age at the lumbar spine (p = 0.005), whereas 31% of celiac patients and 16% of control subjects had Z scores of celiac patients, but only 5% of control subjects, were classified as having osteoporosis (T score osteoporosis was rare at the femoral neck in both groups (3% vs. 1%, p = 1.00). Prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis was highest in newly diagnosed celiac patients and in patients with disease not in remission. A low 25-(OH)D vitamin concentration was a typical biochemical abnormality in our patients (64% of men and 71% of women). The main associated variables of low BMD were age (men), low serum vitamin D level, low body weight, and postmenopausal status (women). The present study suggests that celiac disease constitutes a risk factor for osteoporosis. This finding applies particularly to untreated and poorly treated patients.

  15. Birth outcomes of women with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente; Fonager, Kirsten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine birthweight, low birthweight (celiac disease in relation to their first hospitalization for the disease. METHODS: This was a historical cohort study based on The Danish Medical Birth Registry...... data of celiac women discharged from Danish hospitals from 1977-1992. The study included 211 newborns to 127 mothers with celiac disease, and 1260 control deliveries. RESULTS: Before celiac women were first hospitalized the mean birthweight of their newborns was 238 g (95% confidence interval [95% CI......] = 150, 325 g) lower than that of the control women, after adjustment for potential confounders. After the first hospitalization the mean birthweight for newborns of diseased women was higher than that of controls, by 67 g (95% CI = -88, 223 g) after adjustment for potential confounders. Before celiac...

  16. Celiac disease and obstetrical-gynecological contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Giovanni; Orfanotti, Guido; Giacomantonio, Loredana; Bella, Camillo Di; Crisafulli, Valentina; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) shows an increased prevalence in female, particularly during the fertile period. Celiac disease should be researched in infertility, spontaneous and recurrent abortions, delayed menarche, amenorrhea, early menopause, and children with low birth-weight. Celiac disease is still little considered during the evaluation of infertility. Up to 50% of women with untreated CD refer an experience of miscarriage or an unfavorable outcome of pregnancy. Celiac patients taking a normal diet (with gluten) have a shorter reproductive period. Women with undiagnosed CD had a higher risk of small for gestation age infants very small for gestational age infants and pre-term birth when compared with women with noted CD. The link between NCGS and infertility is actually unknown. The goal of our work is to perform an actual review about this topic and to increase the awareness in the medical population to research celiac disease in selected obstetric and gynecological disorders.

  17. Therapeutic approaches for celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plugis, Nicholas M.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common, lifelong autoimmune disorder for which dietary control is the only accepted form of therapy. A strict gluten-free diet is burdensome to patients and can be limited in efficacy, indicating there is an unmet need for novel therapeutic approaches to supplement or supplant dietary therapy. Many molecular events required for disease pathogenesis have been recently characterized and inspire most current and emerging drug-discovery efforts. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) confirm the importance of human leukocyte antigen genes in our pathogenic model and identify a number of new risk loci in this complex disease. Here, we review the status of both emerging and potential therapeutic strategies in the context of disease pathophysiology. We conclude with a discussion of how genes identified during GWAS and follow-up studies that enhance susceptibility may offer insight into developing novel therapies. PMID:26060114

  18. Emerging drugs for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-03-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated gluten-dependent disorder, primarily affecting the small intestine in genetically predisposed individuals. The disorder has a very heterogeneous clinical and histopathological spectrum. Current treatment with a gluten-free diet is very effective, but the diet is difficult to maintain and remains costly. Alternatives to the gluten-free diet have been proposed to either replace this current treatment, or at least, to supplement use of the gluten-free diet. Studies in the published English language literature relevant to this review were examined for this report. Most recent published double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials have focused on an orally administered recombinant glutenase (ALV003) showing significant but limited benefit to celiac disease patients already compliant with a gluten-free diet. Other studies have addressed other immune mechanisms that may play a role in its pathogenesis and have not been so positive. Added investigations, particularly over the long-term, in other larger and more heterogeneous populations are needed.

  19. Minimally symptomatic hypocalcaemia unmasking celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridis, A; Drosou, M E; Fontalis, A; Prousali, E; Hadwe, S E; Giouleme, O; Petidis, K

    2016-11-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease of the small intestine which occurs in genetically predisposed people of all ages. A large clinical spectrum of manifestations accompanies the onset of the disease with diarrhoea, flatulence and weight loss being the most common. However, findings like osteoporosis, iron deficiency, anaemia and hypocalcaemia could also insinuate the existence of the disease. We report the case of a 55-year-old man with numbness and tingling of the upper extremities due to hypocalcaemia that proved to be an uncommon case of celiac disease. A non-negligible number of adult patients with celiac disease can present with only minor and subclinical manifestations of the disease. As such, hypocalcaemia may be the sole manifestation of celiac disease. A high index of suspicion is needed for prompt diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Undiagnosed celiac disease in women with infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ana Paula de Souza Lobo; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues; Zausner, Bela; Oliveira, Joventina de Araújo; Diniz, Daniel Rui; de Oliveira, Juliana

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a group of Brazilian women with infertility. This was a cross-sectional study of 170 infertile Brazilian women tested for immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase (IgA anti-tTG), endomysial antibody and total IgA. Women with positive serologies were recommended for intestinal biopsy. Patients with positive serology and villous atrophy on biopsy had the diagnosis of celiac disease, while those with positive serology but no villous atrophy were identified as having latent celiac disease. All of these women were typed for HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8. The prevalence of celiac disease confirmed by biopsy in the study group was 1.2% (2 out of 170) (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-4.2). Considering also those with latent celiac disease, the prevalence was estimated at 2.9% (5 out of 170) (95% CI, 1.0-6.7) and in the subgroup of unexplained infertility the prevalence was 10.3% (3 out of 29) (95% CI, 2.2-27.4). All seropositive patients were also HLA-DQ2 positive. Further studies are required to define the role of routine serological screening for celiac disease in infertile women as well as to elucidate the underlying mechanism for infertility in active celiac disease.

  1. Sourdough lactobacilli and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbetti, Marco; Giuseppe Rizzello, Carlo; Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria

    2007-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common food intolerance. The only effective treatment for CD is a strict adherence to a gluten-free diet throughout the patient's lifetime. Gluten-free products are not widely available and are usually more expensive than their gluten-containing counterparts. There is, therefore, an urgent need to develop safe and effective therapeutic alternatives, to develop high-quality gluten-free products and to investigate the potential of the bread making biotechnology following ancient protocols which include long-time fermentation by selected sourdough lactic acid bacteria. This review describes the most relevant results related to biotechnologies that use selected sourdough lactic acid bacteria and probiotics as starters for sourdough fermentation to investigate their potential to decrease the risk of gluten contamination in gluten-free products. As shown by studies in vitro on celiac intestinal tissue and in vivo on CD patients, the bacterial proteolytic activity is rather promising not only as currently demonstrated for eliminating traces of contaminant gluten but probably also in perspective for the manufacture of tolerated baked goods.

  2. Role of Alendronate in Managing Osteoporosis in Celiac Disease ? Illustrative Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Widjaja, David; Kanneganti, Kalyan C.; Patel, Madanmohan; Chilimuri, Sridhar S.

    2011-01-01

    Management of bone density loss, as the result of calcium malabsorption in celiac disease, is critical in preventing premature bone fracture. As many of these patients need follow-up with primary care providers, internists are expected to be aware of screening and prompt management of osteopenia or osteoporosis in celiac disease. We present a case of a 32-year-old man with celiac disease who was diagnosed with osteoporosis. He was treated with calcium, vitamin D and alendronate which improved...

  3. Diagnosis and Updates in Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannahan, Sarah; Leffler, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. It can result in intraintestinal and extraintestinal manifestations of disease including diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, osteoporosis, or lymphoma. Diagnosis of celiac disease is made through initial serologic testing and then confirmed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. Generally celiac disease is a benign disorder with a good prognosis in those who adhere to a gluten-free diet. However, in refractory disease, complications may develop that warrant additional testing with more advanced radiologic and endoscopic methods. This article reviews the current strategy to diagnose celiac disease and the newer modalities to assess for associated complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lymphadenopathy in celiac disease: computed tomographic observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.; Bayless, T.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Lymphadenopathy in patients with celiac disease is generally viewed with alarm due to the association between celiac disease and intestinal lymphoma. Four patients with celiac disease are described in whom significant mesenteric and paraaortic adenopathy was demonstrated by computed tomogrophy (CT). The subsequent clinical course of these patients revealed no evidence of lymphoma. In two patients with longstanding celiac disease and recent relapse, exploratory laparotomy revealed reactive hyperplasia in the enlarged glands; in one patient this was associated with intestinal ulceration, and in the other no underlying pathology was found. Follow-up CT scans in both these patients demonstrated regression of the findings with clinical improvement. In the other two patients, CT was performed as part of the initial evaluation.

  5. Celiac disease: From pathophysiology to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzanese, Ilaria; Qehajaj, Dorina; Patrinicola, Federica; Aralica, Merica; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Stifter, Sanja; Elli, Luca; Grizzi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as “celiac sprue”, is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine, produced by the ingestion of dietary gluten products in susceptible people. It is a multifactorial disease, including genetic and environmental factors. Environmental trigger is represented by gluten while the genetic predisposition has been identified in the major histocompatibility complex region. Celiac disease is not a rare disorder like previously thought, with a global prevalence around 1%. The reason of its under-recognition is mainly referable to the fact that about half of affected people do not have the classic gastrointestinal symptoms, but they present nonspecific manifestations of nutritional deficiency or have no symptoms at all. Here we review the most recent data concerning epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, available diagnostic tests and therapeutic management of celiac disease. PMID:28573065

  6. New aspects in celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, MI; López Casado, MA; Ríos, A

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder characterized by an immune response to ingested gluten and has a strong HLA association with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules, but human HLA-DQ risk factors do not explain the entire genetic susceptibility to gluten intolerance. CD is caused by the lack of immune tolerance (oral tolerance) to wheat gluten. In this sense, the expression of soluble HLA-G in CD is of special interest because the molecule plays an important role in the induction of immune tolerance. The enhanced expression of soluble HLA-G found in CD may be part of a mechanism to restore the gluten intolerance. In this editorial, we review recent progress in understanding CD in relation to its prevalence, diagnosis and possible mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:17451193

  7. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  8. Screening Detected Celiac Disease in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Charlotta

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) is estimated to be around 1%, but most CD cases are undiagnosed. Sweden experienced an epidemic of clinically detected celiac disease in children younger than 2 years of age, partly due to changes in infant feeding practices, were the amount of gluten and age at introduction was changed. However, it was not clear if the increase in clinically detected children was due to more CD cases being detected due to symptoms and thus previously undia...

  9. Role of Alendronate in Managing Osteoporosis in Celiac Disease - Illustrative Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, David; Kanneganti, Kalyan C; Patel, Madanmohan; Chilimuri, Sridhar S

    2011-02-01

    Management of bone density loss, as the result of calcium malabsorption in celiac disease, is critical in preventing premature bone fracture. As many of these patients need follow-up with primary care providers, internists are expected to be aware of screening and prompt management of osteopenia or osteoporosis in celiac disease. We present a case of a 32-year-old man with celiac disease who was diagnosed with osteoporosis. He was treated with calcium, vitamin D and alendronate which improved bone mineral density. This case illustrates the importance of using bisphosphonate in treating osteoporosis in celiac disease.

  10. Role of Alendronate in Managing Osteoporosis in Celiac Disease – Illustrative Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, David; Kanneganti, Kalyan C.; Patel, Madanmohan; Chilimuri, Sridhar S.

    2011-01-01

    Management of bone density loss, as the result of calcium malabsorption in celiac disease, is critical in preventing premature bone fracture. As many of these patients need follow-up with primary care providers, internists are expected to be aware of screening and prompt management of osteopenia or osteoporosis in celiac disease. We present a case of a 32-year-old man with celiac disease who was diagnosed with osteoporosis. He was treated with calcium, vitamin D and alendronate which improved bone mineral density. This case illustrates the importance of using bisphosphonate in treating osteoporosis in celiac disease. PMID:27957009

  11. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-10-14

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid disease, particularly hypothyroidism, may commonly co-exist. In some with CD, multiple glandular endocrinopathies may also occur and complicate the initial presentation of the intestinal disease. In others presenting with an apparent isolated endocrine disorder, serological screening for underlying subclinical CD may prove to be positive, particularly if type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid or other autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as Addison's disease are first detected. A number of reports have also recorded hypoparathyroidism or hypopituitarism or ovarian failure in CD and these may be improved with a strict gluten-free diet.

  12. Association between Diabetes Mellitus type 1 and Celiac Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gluten sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease (CD)) has a strong association with diabetes mellitus (type 1DM). Since, 2-3% of CD patients have selective IgA deficiency, the majority of the available tests may fail to show the auto-antibodies (the IgA endomysial antibody (EMA). To prevent such a false negativity, ...

  13. Neurologic presentation of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushara, Khalafalla O

    2005-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) long has been associated with neurologic and psychiatric disorders including cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, epilepsy, dementia, and depression. Earlier reports mainly have documented the involvement of the nervous system as a complication of prediagnosed CD. However, more recent studies have emphasized that a wider spectrum of neurologic syndromes may be the presenting extraintestinal manifestation of gluten sensitivity with or without intestinal pathology. These include migraine, encephalopathy, chorea, brain stem dysfunction, myelopathy, mononeuritis multiplex, Guillain-Barre-like syndrome, and neuropathy with positive antiganglioside antibodies. The association between most neurologic syndromes described and gluten sensitivity remains to be confirmed by larger epidemiologic studies. It further has been suggested that gluten sensitivity (as evidenced by high antigliadin antibodies) is a common cause of neurologic syndromes (notably cerebellar ataxia) of otherwise unknown cause. Additional studies showed high prevalence of gluten sensitivity in genetic neurodegenerative disorders such as hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia and Huntington's disease. It remains unclear whether gluten sensitivity contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders or whether it represents an epiphenomenon. Studies of gluten-free diet in patients with gluten sensitivity and neurologic syndromes have shown variable results. Diet trials also have been inconclusive in autism and schizophrenia, 2 diseases in which sensitivity to dietary gluten has been implicated. Further studies clearly are needed to assess the efficacy of gluten-free diet and to address the underlying mechanisms of nervous system pathology in gluten sensitivity.

  14. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina Søndergård; Nielsen, Anne Staal

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by an inappropriate immunological reaction against gluten driven by gluten-specific CD4+ T cells. We screened 25 proteases and tested 10 for their potential to degrade gluten in vitro. Five proteases were further tested for their ability to prevent...

  15. Some Immunological Parameters in Women With Celiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Abbas Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease is one of an autoimmune diseasein the world and  genetically linked . This disease may be cause many problems for pregnant women and their children . Tthere are many markers specific for celiac disease like anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-gliadin antibodies which associated with development of celiac disease.In this study, we wished to determine whether there are relationship between  celiac disease and fertility , effect on newborn and to identify the possible implicatio...

  16. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  17. Psychiatric comorbidities in women with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arigo, Danielle; Anskis, Alicia M; Smyth, Joshua M

    2012-03-01

    Although the physical consequences of Celiac Disease are well studied, less is known about co-occurring psychiatric symptoms. This study examines psychiatric risk and comorbidities of women with Celiac Disease, who may be at increased risk for psychiatric symptoms (e.g. depression, and disordered eating behaviours). Women (N = 177) with Celiac Disease responded to an extensive web-mediated survey assessing dietary compliance, illness symptoms, psychiatric functioning, and disordered eating. Despite high reported dietary compliance, patients reported marked illness symptoms and impaired quality of life. A substantial minority endorsed symptoms that met criteria for the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders: 37% (n = 65) met the threshold suggesting depression, and 22% (n = 39) for disordered eating. Participants whose symptoms exceeded these clinical thresholds reported greater perceived stress and reduced overall mental health, relative to women below the clinical cutoffs. Despite largely adhering to a gluten-free diet, a substantial subset of women with Celiac Disease report clinically relevant symptoms of depression and disordered eating; such symptoms are associated with increased psychosocial distress in other domains. These results suggest potential to improve the patient well-being through attention to psychosocial care, in addition to existing dietary recommendations for individuals with Celiac Disease.

  18. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind K Makharia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAt present, strict and lifelong gluten free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50mg/day can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of compliance by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase-2, immune-modulation and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoides, budesonides and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appears very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten free diet.

  19. High frequency of celiac disease in Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, EK; Mearin, ML; Bouquet, J; vonBlomberg, ME; Stapel, SO; vanElburg, RM; deGraaf, EAB

    We screened 115 children with Down syndrome for celiac disease, using antigliadin, antiendomysium, and antireticulin serum antibodies and an intestinal permeability test, Celiac disease was diagnosed in eight children, giving a frequency of 7.0%. We recommend screening for celiac disease in all

  20. High frequency of celiac disease in Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, E. K.; Mearin, M. L.; Bouquet, J.; von Blomberg, B. M.; Stapel, S. O.; van Elburg, R. M.; de Graaf, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    We screened 115 children with Down syndrome for celiac disease, using antigliadin, antiendomysium, and antireticulin serum antibodies and an intestinal permeability test, Celiac disease was diagnosed in eight children, giving a frequency of 7.0%. We recommend screening for celiac disease in all

  1. Celiac Disease Diet: How Do I Get Enough Grains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiac disease diet: How do I get enough grains? I have celiac disease, and I find it difficult to get enough ... Michael F. Picco, M.D. Because people with celiac disease must avoid gluten — a protein found in foods ...

  2. What Is Celiac Disease? How Do I Live with It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaska, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, is a hereditary, autoimmune disease that causes a sensitivity to gluten, which is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. The key symptoms of celiac disease are diarrhea, constipation, gas, bloating, backaches, stomachaches, nausea, anemia, fatigue, osteoporosis, stunted growth in children, and weight…

  3. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  4. Inflammatory bowel diseases, celiac disease, and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Maria Luisa

    2010-11-01

    The article summarizes the current knowledge on the pathogenesis, clinical aspects and treatment of bone problems in the major inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) and celiac disease. It presents the physiological relationship between intestine and bone as well as the alterations determined by disease-disrupted intestinal integrity. Two hypotheses about the pathogenetic mechanisms of bone metabolism derangements and bone loss are discussed: the classical one, that indicates calcium malabsorption as the main culprit, and the new one, that emphasizes the role of inflammation. The article summarizes the available epidemiological data about osteopenia/osteoporosis and fragility fractures in these chronic intestinal diseases and presents the state-of-the-art treatment options. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased rates of pregnancy complications in women with celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Moleski, Stephanie M.; Lindenmeyer, Christina C.; Veloski, J. Jon; Miller, Robin S.; Miller, Cynthia L.; Kastenberg, David; DiMarino, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is an immune-mediated small bowel disorder that develops in genetically susceptible individuals upon exposure to dietary gluten. Celiac disease could have extra-intestinal manifestations that affect women?s reproductive health. The aim of this study was to investigate fertility and outcomes of pregnancy among women with celiac disease. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, we analyzed information collected from patients at a tertiary care celiac center and from me...

  6. Elderly Onset Celiac Disease: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cappello

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Celiac sprue is a chronic disease, which usually occurs in children and young adults. However, it can develop in any age group, and the prevalence is increasing even in the elderly population. The atypical patterns of clinical presentation in this age group sometimes can cause a delay in diagnosis. Given the lower sensitivity and specificity of serological tests in the aged population, clinical suspect often arises in the presence of complications (autoimmune disorders, fractures, and finally, malignancy and must be supported by endoscopic and imaging tools. In this review, we highlight the incidence and prevalence of celiac disease in the elderly, the patterns of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and the most frequent complications, with the aim of increasing awareness and reducing the diagnostic delay of celiac disease even in the elderly population.

  7. Celiac Disease Presenting with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Sarbay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immunological disorder. Clinical manifestations occur as a result of intestinal mucosa damage and malabsorption. CD is also associated with extraintestinal manifestations and autoimmune disorders. The coexistence of CD and autoimmune diseases has been described before. In this article, a patient with CD presenting with thrombocytopenia is discussed.

  8. Cardiovascular involvement in celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Lewis, Suzanne K; Biviano, Angelo B; Iyer, Vivek; Garan, Hasan; Green, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune response to ingestion of gluten protein, which is found in wheat, rye, and barley grains, and results in both small intestinal manifestations, including villous atrophy, as well as systemic manifestations. The main treatment for the disease is a gluten-free diet (GFD), which typically results in the restoration of the small intestinal villi, and restoration of other affected organ systems, to their normal functioning. In an increasing number of recently published studies, there has been great interest in the occurrence of alterations in the cardiovascular system in untreated CD. Herein, published studies in which CD and cardiovascular terms appear in the title of the study were reviewed. The publications were categorized into one of several types: (1) articles (including cohort and case-control studies); (2) reviews and meta-analyses; (3) case studies (one to three patient reports); (4) letters; (5) editorials; and (6) abstracts (used when no full-length work had been published). The studies were subdivided as either heart or vascular studies, and were further characterized by the particular condition that was evident in conjunction with CD. Publication information was determined using the Google Scholar search tool. For each publication, its type and year of publication were tabulated. Salient information from each article was then compiled. It was determined that there has been a sharp increase in the number of CD - cardiovascular studies since 2000. Most of the publications are either of the type “article” or “case study”. The largest number of documents published concerned CD in conjunction with cardiomyopathy (33 studies), and there have also been substantial numbers of studies published on CD and thrombosis (27), cardiovascular risk (17), atherosclerosis (13), stroke (12), arterial function (11), and ischemic heart disease (11). Based on the published research, it can be concluded that many types of cardiovascular

  9. Emerging Therapeutic Options for Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Anita; Stephen, Sindu; Borum, Marie L.

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine that is more common than was previously thought. This disease is caused by an inappropriate immune response to wheat gluten, barley, and rye. Three main pathways cause celiac disease: the environmental trigger (gluten), genetic susceptibility, and unusual gut permeability. The only treatment currently available is a strict gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, a majority of patients have difficulty complying with this diet, and the response to therapy is poor. Therefore, alternative treatments are being developed, and new insights into the pathophysiology of celiac disease have led to research into novel therapies. New treatments include engineering gluten-free grains, decreasing intestinal permeability by blockage of the epithelial zonulin receptor, inducing oral tolerance to gluten with a therapeutic vaccine, and degrading immunodominant gliadin peptides using probiotics with endopeptidases or transglutaminase inhibitors. These nondiet-based therapies provide hope for enhanced, lifelong celiac disease management with improved patient compliance and better quality of life. PMID:23483819

  10. Modern diagnostic approach to celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Dolinšek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease, also known as genetic gluten intolerance is a chronic disease that affects genetically predisposed individuals after the gluten ingestion. It affects about 1 % of population regardless of the age, and can manifest with diverse clinical picture. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on criteria adopted and later revised by European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN. These criteria consider intestinal biopsy as a gold standard. The number of biopsies has decreased after the introduction of serological tests, which are considered in revised criteria. Genetic tests have also proven to be very valuable in diagnostic procedure, especially HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 determination. Bedside or point-of-care tests, which enable quick determination of anti tissue transglutaminase antibodies in capillary blood, are a promising new tool. Many reports have shown that adverse immunological response to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals is systemic, which can lead to a decreased importance of intestinal biopsy in future.Conclusions: Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on specific serological markes and reversible mucosal changes of small intestine. Lately developed genetic tests and new quick serological tests are also used. Intensive research focused on pathogenesis and manifestations of celiac disease will show whether definite diagnosis could be confirmed without the use of intestinal biopsy in future.

  11. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development.

  12. Magnetic resonance enterography in pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Gonca; Doganay, Selim; Sevinc, Eylem; Deniz, Kemal; Chavhan, Govind; Gorkem, Sureyya B; Karacabey, Neslihan; Dogan, Mehmet S; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Aslan, Duran

    To assess if magnetic resonance enterography is capable of showing evidence/extent of disease in pediatric patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease by comparing with a control group, and to correlate the magnetic resonance enterography findings with anti-endomysial antibody level, which is an indicator of gluten-free dietary compliance. Thirty-one pediatric patients (mean age 11.7±3.1 years) with biopsy-proven celiac disease and 40 pediatric patients as a control group were recruited in the study. The magnetic resonance enterography images of both patients with celiac disease and those of the control group were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists in a blinded manner for the mucosal pattern, presence of wall thickening, luminal distention of the small bowel, and extra-intestinal findings. Patient charts were reviewed to note clinical features and laboratory findings. The histopathologic review of the duodenal biopsies was re-conducted. The mean duration of the disease was 5.6±1.8 years (range: 3-7.2 years). In 24 (77%) of the patients, anti-endomysial antibody levels were elevated (mean 119.2±66.6RU/mL). Magnetic resonance enterography revealed normal fold pattern in all the patients. Ten (32%) patients had enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes. Although a majority of the patients had elevated anti-endomysial antibody levels indicating poor dietary compliance, magnetic resonance enterography did not show any mucosal abnormality associated with the inability of magnetic resonance enterography to detect mild/early changes of celiac disease in children. Therefore, it may not be useful for the follow-up of pediatric celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel perspectives in celiac disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Yolanda

    2009-03-01

    Currently the only treatment for celiac disease is adherence to a strict gluten-free diet; however, compliance with this diet is complex and other alternatives are called for. Herein, we review recent developments in the design of novel therapeutic strategies to counteract the pathogenic effects of the interactions between gluten peptides and their specific biological targets.

  14. Primary care management of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Brittani Ledford; Davis, Stephanie C; Vess, Joy; Lebel, Joseph

    2015-02-15

    : Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder with genetic predisposition that affects as many as 1 in 100 individuals. Treatment is a lifelong, strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. Management by a primary care provider may lead to increased adherence and can minimize effects of nonadherence to the diet.

  15. Screening for celiac disease in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwitz, Anna; Skaaby, Tea; Karhus, Line Lund

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) as recorded in the Danish National Patient Registry is ∼50/100,000 persons. This is much lower than the reported prevalence of CD in other Nordic countries and underdiagnosis is suspected. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of CD in a population...

  16. Influenza and risk of later celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kårhus, Line Lund; Gunnes, Nina; Størdal, Ketil

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Influenza has been linked to autoimmune conditions, but its relationship to subsequent celiac disease (CD) is unknown. Our primary aim was to determine the risk of CD after influenza. A secondary analysis examined the risk of CD following pandemic influenza vaccination. METHODS...

  17. Celiac Disease: Diagnostic Standards and Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaswala, Dharmesh H.; Veeraraghavan, Gopal; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) affects at least 1% of the population and evidence suggests that prevalence is increasing. The diagnosis of CD depends on providers being alert to both typical and atypical presentations and those situations in which patients are at high risk for the disease. Because of variable presentation, physicians need to have a low threshold for celiac testing. Robust knowledge of the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease has served as a catalyst for the development of novel diagnostic tools. Highly sensitive and specific serological assays including Endomysial Antibody (EMA), tissue transglutaminase (tTG), and Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) have greatly simplified testing for CD and serve as the foundation for celiac diagnosis. In addition, genetic testing for HLA DQ2 and DQ8 has become more widely available and there has been refinement of the gluten challenge for use in diagnostic algorithms. While diagnosis is usually straightforward, in special conditions including IgA deficiency, very young children, discrepant histology and serology, and adoption of a gluten free diet prior to testing, CD can be difficult to diagnose. In this review, we provide an overview of the history and current state of celiac disease diagnosis and provide guidance for evaluation of CD in difficult diagnostic circumstances. PMID:28943611

  18. Everyday life for women with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Susanne; Hellström, Ingrid; Hallert, Claes; Wilhelmsson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore how women with celiac disease experience everyday life. It is important that healthcare professionals understand what it is like to live with a chronic illness, and also the factors that affect the lives of women who have celiac disease. The study has a qualitative approach and the data were collected using interviews with 16 women. A conventional content analysis was used for the subjective interpretation of the qualitative interviews. Three main themes emerged in the analysis: illness trajectory and treatment, socializing with others, and feelings of loneliness and worry. The findings indicate that living with celiac disease affects the person's entire life from the past, in the present, and into the future, especially when daily routines must be altered. The women expressed a sense of loneliness and invisibility, especially when socializing with others. The diet could be a friend, enemy, obstacle, or opportunity in terms of enjoying a good life. Supporting women diagnosed with celiac disease appears to be a major task for healthcare professionals. Such professionals need to pay attention to women's symptoms, worries, and their feeling of being invisible.

  19. [Bone and Joint Involvement in Celiac Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmanová, I; Sánchez, D; Džupa, V

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (gluten-sensitive enteropathy) is currently regarded as a multisystem autoimmune disorder; its clinical signs and symptoms do not involve merely the gastrointestinal tract but are associated with several other medical specialties, including orthopaedics and traumatology. In orthopaedic and trauma patients, celiac disease should be suspected in the following diagnoses: osteomalacia, premenopausal osteoporosis, post-menopausal osteoporosis more severe than expected and refractory to medication, osteoporosis in men under 55 years of age, recurrent bone fractures in the limbs, large joint arthralgia or arthritis of unclear aetiology, erosive spondyloarthropathy particularly in patients with the history of chronic diarrhoea, anaemia or associated autoimmune disorders (type 1 diabetes mellitus or autoimmune thyreopathy), and in women with secondary amenorrhea or early menopause. The orthopaedist or trauma surgeon should be aware of suspected celiac disease in patients who do not respond adequately to the standard treatment of pain related to the musculoskeletal system, in patients with recurrent fractures of the limb bones and in young patients with suspected secondary osteoporosis. With the use of appropriate screening methods, celiac disease as-yet undiagnosed can be revealed. A long-life gluten-free diet in these patients results in the alleviation of metabolic osteopathy and joint and muscle problems, in reduced requirements of analgesic and antiphlogistic drugs as well as in reduced risks of fracture.

  20. Celiac Disease: Diagnostic Standards and Dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmesh H. Kaswala

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD affects at least 1% of the population and evidence suggests that prevalence is increasing. The diagnosis of CD depends on providers being alert to both typical and atypical presentations and those situations in which patients are at high risk for the disease. Because of variable presentation, physicians need to have a low threshold for celiac testing. Robust knowledge of the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease has served as a catalyst for the development of novel diagnostic tools. Highly sensitive and specific serological assays including Endomysial Antibody (EMA, tissue transglutaminase (tTG, and Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP have greatly simplified testing for CD and serve as the foundation for celiac diagnosis. In addition, genetic testing for HLA DQ2 and DQ8 has become more widely available and there has been refinement of the gluten challenge for use in diagnostic algorithms. While diagnosis is usually straightforward, in special conditions including IgA deficiency, very young children, discrepant histology and serology, and adoption of a gluten free diet prior to testing, CD can be difficult to diagnose. In this review, we provide an overview of the history and current state of celiac disease diagnosis and provide guidance for evaluation of CD in difficult diagnostic circumstances.

  1. [Osteoporosis and bone alterations in celiac disease in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmanová, Iva; Anděl, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Both celiac disease and osteoporosis are common diseases which are considered an emerging problem in medicine. Celiac disease is a condition at high risk for secondary osteoporosis. Osteoporosis or osteopenia are typically present in untreated adult symptomatic celiac disease with an overt malabsorption syndrome, but is found in about 50 % in suboptimally treated celiac patients, subclinical patients and asymptomatic adult celiac patients, too. Etiology of pathologic bone alteration in celiac disease is multifactorial; however, two main mechanisms are involved: intestinal malabsorption and chronic inflammation. The evaluation of bone mineral metabolism (total calcium/albumin, 25-OH vitamin D3 and parathormone levels in serum) and bone mineral density (densitometry) is recommended in the clinical management of celiac patients. Many studies have demonstrated that bone mineral density values in adults show a good improvement in the first period after the institution of gluten-free diet, the improvement is then unsatisfactory and treatment with a mineral-active drug should probably be considered.

  2. Celiac disease and new diseases related to gluten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Ortega, Ana Isabel; Martínez García, Rosa María; Quiles Blanco, María José; Majid Abu Naji, Jamil Abdel; González Iglesias, María José

    2016-07-12

    Celiac disease is the most common chronic intestinal disease. Nowadays it´s known that this is a multisistemic pathology of immune mechanism, triggered by gluten, which occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. It affects approximately 1% of the world population, which is a very high prevalence, affects all age groups and has symptoms both digestive and extra-digestive. Since it is a disease that requires maintaining a gluten-free diet and medical monitoring for life, it is important to know it and establish its diagnosis properly. Along with celiac disease a number of new diseases related to gluten are diagnosed increasingly, including the non celiac gluten sensitivity or wheat allergy. The suffering of celiac disease, or other related diseases, by conditioning diet changes of the affected individual, it may be associated with nutritional imbalances that need to monitor and try to solve. Therefore patients with this problem need special nutritional advice.

  3. Celiac crisis is a rare but serious complication of celiac disease in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamma, Shailaja; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Murray, Joseph; Sheth, Sunil; Schuppan, Detlef; Dennis, Melinda; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Celiac crisis is a life-threatening syndrome in which patients with celiac disease have profuse diarrhea and severe metabolic disturbances. Celiac crisis is rare among adults and not well documented. To improve awareness of this condition and to facilitate diagnosis, we reviewed cases of celiac crisis to identify presenting features, formulate diagnostic criteria, and develop treatment strategies. Methods Cases of biopsy-proven celiac disease were reviewed. Celiac crisis was defined as acute onset or rapid progression of gastrointestinal symptoms that could be attributed to celiac disease and required hospitalization and/or parenteral nutrition, along with signs or symptoms of dehydration or malnutrition. Results Twelve patients met preset criteria for celiac crisis; 11 developed celiac crisis before they were diagnosed with celiac disease. Eleven patients had increased titres of tTG and 1 had immunoglobulin A deficiency. Results of biopsy analyses of duodenum samples from all patients were consistent with a Marsh 3 score (33% with total villous atrophy). Patients presented with severe dehydration, renal dysfunction, and electrolyte disturbances. All patients required hospitalization and intravenous fluids, 6 required corticosteroids, and 5 required parenteral nutrition. All patients eventually had a full response to a gluten-free diet. Conclusion Celiac crisis has a high morbidity and, although rarely described, occurs in adults and often has a clear precipitating factor. Patients that present with severe unexplained diarrhea and malabsorption should be tested for celiac disease; treatment with systemic steroids or oral budesonide should be considered. Nutritional support is often required in the short term but most patients ultimately respond to gluten avoidance. PMID:20417725

  4. Celiac Disease in The Netherlands: Demographic Data of Members of the Dutch Celiac Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gils, Tom; Rootsaert, Bianca; Bouma, Gerd; Mulder, Chris J J

    2016-12-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease induced by the intake of gluten with a female to male ratio of 2-4:1. Female predominance has not been recognized in serological mass screening studies. Limited data are available on gender and age distribution in the daily clinical practice of celiac disease. The aim of this study is to describe differences in gender and age at the time of celiac disease diagnosis in the Netherlands. Data was obtained from a prospectively maintained database of members of the Dutch Celiac Society in whom celiac disease was diagnosed between 1980 and August 2015. retrospective database study; Setting: database of members of the Dutch Celiac Society; Participants: out of the total number of 26,986 current and ex-members, the data of 7,886 members could be used for analysis. Age at celiac disease diagnosis ranged between 0 and 88 years; the minority (36%) were diagnosed in childhood. In children, the majority (52%) were diagnosed before the age of 4 years. Median age did not differ in children when compared for gender (3 years). In adults, median age differed between males (52 years, IQR 41-61) and females (44 years, IQR 32-56), pceliac disease patients are diagnosed during adulthood, with males diagnosed at an older age. Only one-third of the patients were diagnosed at childhood. Celiac disease is less frequently diagnosed in young adult males.

  5. Celiac disease: pathogenesis of a model immunogenetic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagnoff, Martin F.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by small-intestinal mucosal injury and nutrient malabsorption in genetically susceptible individuals in response to the dietary ingestion of wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye. Disease pathogenesis involves interactions among environmental, genetic, and immunological factors. Although celiac disease is predicted by screening studies to affect approximately 1% of the population of the United States and is seen both in children and in adults, 10%–15% or fewer of these individuals have been diagnosed and treated. This article focuses on the role of adaptive and innate immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of celiac disease and how current concepts of immunopathogenesis might provide alternative approaches for treating celiac disease. PMID:17200705

  6. Increased rates of pregnancy complications in women with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleski, Stephanie M; Lindenmeyer, Christina C; Veloski, J Jon; Miller, Robin S; Miller, Cynthia L; Kastenberg, David; DiMarino, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated small bowel disorder that develops in genetically susceptible individuals upon exposure to dietary gluten. Celiac disease could have extra-intestinal manifestations that affect women's reproductive health. The aim of this study was to investigate fertility and outcomes of pregnancy among women with celiac disease. In a retrospective cohort study, we analyzed information collected from patients at a tertiary care celiac center and from members of 2 national celiac disease awareness organizations. Women without celiac disease were used as controls. Women completed an anonymous online survey, answering 43 questions about menstrual history, fertility, and outcomes of pregnancy (329 with small bowel biopsy-confirmed celiac disease and 641 controls). Of the 970 women included in the study, 733 (75.6%) reported that they had been pregnant at some point; there was no significant difference between women with celiac disease (n=245/329, 74.5%) and controls (488/641, 76.1%; P=0.57). However, fewer women with celiac disease than controls (79.6% vs. 84.8%) gave birth following 1 or more pregnancies (P=0.03). Women with celiac disease had higher percentages of spontaneous abortion than controls (50.6% vs. 40.6%; P=0.01), and of premature delivery (23.6% vs. 15.9% among controls; P=0.02). The mean age at menarche was higher in the celiac disease group (12.7 years) than controls (12.4 years; P=0.01). In a retrospective cohort analysis examining reproductive features of women with celiac disease, we associated celiac disease with significant increases in spontaneous abortion, premature delivery, and later age of menarche.

  7. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  8. Celiac Disease Presenting with Bone Pain: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Nural Albayrak Aydın; Kamil Yazıcıoğlu

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease or gluten sensitive enteropathy is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of the small-bowel mucosa. As can be asymptomatic, involvement of the hematologic, gastrointestinal system, musculosceletal system, nervous system or endocrine system may occur as well. The presence of osteoporosis in celiac disease, may be the only sign of patients who have not been diagnosed yet. The direct effect of celiac disease on bones happens secondary to decreased absorbsion of calci...

  9. Anesthesia experience along with familial Mediterranean fever and celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sargın

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available (Anesthetic management in patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac Disease Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive transmitted disease which often seen at Mediterranean origin society and it goes by deterioration at inflammation control. Celiac disease is a proximal small intestine disease which develops gluten intolerance by autoimmune mechanism in sensitive people. Association of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease is a rare situation. In this article we present our anesthesia experience on a bilateral septic arthritis case who also have Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease association.

  10. Leonardo da Vinci meets celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Chiara; Ventura, Giovanna; Di Leo, Grazia; Orzes, Nicoletta; Ronfani, Luca; Not, Tarcisio; Ventura, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Leonardo da Vinci's face symmetry derives from 3 equal craniofacial segments: trichion-nasion (tn), which represents the superior third of the face, nasion-subnasal (ns) that is the medium third of the face, and subnasal-gnathion (sg) that is the length of the lower third of the face. It has been reported that adult subjects with celiac disease (CD) can be identified on the basis of a greater extension of the forehead in comparison to the medium third of the face, with a high tn/ns ratio. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between facial asymmetry and CD in childhood and adulthood. We studied 126 biopsy-proven patients with CD (76 children and 50 adults) and 102 healthy controls (43 children and 59 adults). Their faces were photographed; the pictures were edited using a software program to calculate the facial segments. The tn length was significantly different between adult celiac and adult controls (7.43 ± 1.46 cm vs 6.38 ± 1.73 cm, P = 0.001). The cutoff of 6.5 cm tn, derived from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, identified 43 of 50 patients (sensitivity 86%), but 34 of 59 controls were positive (specificity 54.2%). The positive predictive value was 56%; however, the tn/ns ratio was not significantly different between celiacs and controls. Neither the tn length nor the tn/ns ratio in celiacs correlated to the time of gluten exposure. Adults, but not children, with celiac disease show a forehead extension significantly greater than controls, but this test's specificity appears too low to be used in the screening of CD.

  11. Exploring the Celiac Disease Mystery | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Celiac Disease Mystery Follow us Exploring the Celiac Disease Mystery Research looks at what’s causing the rise ... abdominal pain, rashes, and even death. Choice vs. celiac disease Dr. Murray said there are pros and cons ...

  12. [Reproduction, endocrine disorders and celiac disease: risk factors of osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stazi, A V; Trinti, B

    2006-04-01

    In genetically predisposed individuals, celiac disease (CD) is permanent intolerance to gluten. Besides the overt enteropathy, there are clinical and subclinical forms which appear later in life; target organs include liver, thyroid, skin and reproductive systems. CD interference is related to the different concurrent genetic-environmental factors, showing multifactorial nature. CD induces malabsorption with consequent deficiencies of micronutrients essential for organogenesis, spermatogenesis and bone structure, such as vitamin D and calcium. In fact, among extraintestinal manifestations of CD, osteoporosis deserves attention because it can be a sign of silent CD. In celiac patients' serum, cytochinic imbalance related to bone loss is present; in vitro these sera act on the osteoblastic activity. The IL-1b is also present in celiac patients' relatives, confirming the genetic predisposition to its etiopathogenesis which is also regulated by endocrine-environmental factors. In females, CD acts indirectly on the bone, determining early menopause and amenorrhea. Even frequent pregnancies and long periods of lactation can bring to bone loss; in such periods, silent CD can appear, suggesting the presence of endocrine-immunology factors. In celiac males, osteoporosis presence, besides calcium and vitamin D deficiencies, is associated to growth hormone deficit and hypogonadism, which is related to hyperprolactinemia, endocrine factors which affect the reproduction. Osteoporosis is relevant among the elderly and vitamin D and calcium supplementations are important to people diagnosed with CD later in life. Thus, to prevent damages such as osteoporosis, early CD screening among people with reproductive problems is necessary.

  13. Diagnosis and management of refractory celiac disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, Asma; Serghini, Meriem; Karoui, Sami; Boubaker, Jalel; Filali, Azza

    2013-01-01

    Refractory celiac disease is defined by persisting malabsorptive symptoms in spite of a strict gluten free diet for at least 6 to 12 months. Alternatives to gluten free diet seem to be still controversial. To describe the clinical and epidemiologic aspects of refractory celiac disease, and to identify therapeutic options in this condition. Systematic review and critical analysis of observational studies, clinical trials and case reports that focused on diagnosis and management of refractory celiac disease. Refractory celiac disease can be classified as type 1 or type 2 according to the phenotype of intraepithelial lymphocytes. Great complications such as enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma may occur in a subgroup of these patients mainly in refractory celiac disease type 2. Curative therapies are still lacking. Refractory celiac disease remains a diagnosis of exclusion. Its prognosis remains still dismal by the absence yet of curative therapies. However, some new treatments seem to hold promise during few cohort-studies.

  14. Celiac Disease Presenting with Bone Pain: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nural Albayrak Aydın

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease or gluten sensitive enteropathy is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of the small-bowel mucosa. As can be asymptomatic, involvement of the hematologic, gastrointestinal system, musculosceletal system, nervous system or endocrine system may occur as well. The presence of osteoporosis in celiac disease, may be the only sign of patients who have not been diagnosed yet. The direct effect of celiac disease on bones happens secondary to decreased absorbsion of calcium and vitamin D. Here, two cases with celiac disease along with ongoing bone pain secondary to osteoporosis presented. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2011;17:24-5

  15. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  16. Quick Start Gluten Free Diet Guide for Celiac Disease and Non Celiac Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick Start Gluten-Free Diet Guide for Celiac Disease & Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity The Quick Start Guide is designed to provide a basic understanding ... ones, until the small intestine has healed and starts to absorb nutrients normally. It may be helpful ...

  17. Hepatobiliary Tract and Pancreatic Disorders in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of hepatobiliary tract and pancreatic disorders have been documented in patients with celiac disease. Some disorders have shared immunological or genetic factors, including chronic hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and sclerosing cholangitis. Other hepatic or pancreatic pathological changes in celiac disease have been documented with severe malnutrition and malabsorption, including hepatic steatosis and pancreatic insufficiency, sometimes with pancreatic calcification. Finally, celiac disease may be associated with other very rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T cell lymphoma.

  18. [Pulmonary hemorrhage associated with celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, María Eugenia; Maffey, Alberto; Colom, Alejandro; Agüero, Luis; Rogé, Ignacio; Andrewartha, María Sol; Teper, Alejandro

    2012-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a severe and potentially fatal disease characterized by recurrent episodes of alveolar hemorrhage, hemoptysis, and anemia. His association with celiac disease, described as Lane- Hamilton syndrome, could be due to the fact that both entities share a common pathogenic immune pathway. We report two patients of 13 years who consulted for hemoptysis and severe anemia that had not responded to immunosuppressive treatment with pulses of methyl prednisolone, oral meprednisone and hydroxychloroquine. Although both children highlight the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms at the time of consultation, the dosage of anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies was positive and biopsy confirmed the presence of intestinal enteropathy. It is emphasized that in patients with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms, the concomitant presence of celiac disease should be evaluated. If celiac disease is present, the incorporation of a gluten-free diet helps to control the symptoms, allows reducing the immunosuppressive treatment and improves the clinical course of both entities.

  19. Celiac disease and gluten-free diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mikulajová

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmunity inflammatory disorder of the small intestine caused by the ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The prevalence of the disorder is around 1 % of the Western population and is still increasing. The symptoms of celiac disease include chronic abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and growth retardation in children, and chronic fatigue and headache, bowel complaints, reduced fertility, dermatitis herpetiformis, osteoporosis, nerve and brain disorders, increasing risk of intestinal cancer. The clinical diagnosis of the disease is based on the serological tests and bowel biopsy. The treatment is a long-life gluten-free diet. It is necessary exclude from the diet wheat, rye, barley and probably oats and buckwheat and their products. The novel approaches for celiac disease are focused on the genetic manipulation of nontoxic gluten proteins, enzyme therapy, immune modulation, and induction of oral tolerance to gluten.doi:10.5219/276 Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE

  20. Celiac disease presenting as rickets in Saudi children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiri, Asaad; Saeed, Anjum; AlSarkhy, Ahmed; El Mouzan, Mohammed Issa; El Matary, Wael

    2013-01-01

    Rickets is commonly seen as a sign of malabsorption like celiac disease if it is not treated appropriately with vitamin D and calcium supplements. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency of diagnosis of celiac disease among children with unexplained rickets in Saudi children at a tertiary hospital setting. Retrospective review of records of patients referred over 10 years to a pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology unit. The study included all patients referred for evaluation of unexplained rickets and osteomalacia and screened for celiac disease. The diagnosis of rickets was made on the basis of history, physical examination, biochemical and radiological investigations. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made based on the ESPGHAN (European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) criteria. Twenty-six children with a mean (SD) age of 9.5 (4.6) years (5 males, range 1-15 years) were referred for evaluation of unexplained rickets and were screened for celiac disease. The diagnosis of celiac disease based on small bowel biopsy findings was confirmed in 10 (38.4%) patients with rickets. Serological markers for celiac disease including antiendomyseal antibodies and antitissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in all ten children. Rickets is not an uncommon presentation of celiac disease in Saudi children and pediatricians should consider celiac disease as an underlying cause for rickets.

  1. Screening for celiac disease in patients with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legroux-Gérot, Isabelle; Leloire, Olivier; Blanckaert, Franck; Tonnel, François; Grardel, Bruno; Ducrocq, Jean-Louis; Cortet, Bernard

    2009-03-01

    Whether patients with osteoporosis should be screened for celiac disease is controversial. The objective of this study was to measure the prevalence of asymptomatic celiac disease in a cohort of patients with osteoporosis. We studied 140 patients (133 postmenopausal women and 7 men) aged 40-75 years (mean age, 62.9+/-9.4 years) with primary osteoporosis diagnosed by absorptiometry (spine or hip T-score celiac disease in our cohort of patients with osteoporosis. Despite the small sample size, our results cast doubt on the need for celiac-disease screening in osteoporotic patients who have no gastrointestinal symptoms.

  2. Elderly Onset Celiac Disease: A Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Cappello; Morreale, Gaetano C.; Anna Licata

    2016-01-01

    Celiac sprue is a chronic disease, which usually occurs in children and young adults. However, it can develop in any age group, and the prevalence is increasing even in the elderly population. The atypical patterns of clinical presentation in this age group sometimes can cause a delay in diagnosis. Given the lower sensitivity and specificity of serological tests in the aged population, clinical suspect often arises in the presence of complications (autoimmune disorders, fractures, and finally...

  3. World perspective and celiac disease epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catassi, Carlo; Gatti, Simona; Lionetti, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In Europe and the USA, the mean frequency of celiac disease (CD) in the general population is approximately 1%, with some regional differences, the reasons for which remain elusive. A similar disease prevalence has been found in other countries mostly populated by individuals of European origin, e.g. Australia and Argentina. In Western countries, a true rise in overall CD prevalence of CD has been documented. CD is a common disorder in North Africa, the Middle East and India; however, the diagnostic rate is low in these countries due to low availability of diagnostic facilities and poor disease awareness. The highest CD prevalence in the world (5.6%) has been described in an African population originally living in Western Sahara, the Saharawi, of Arab-Berber origin. The reasons for this high CD frequency are unclear but could be primarily related to recent dietary changes and genetic factors, given the high level of consanguinity of this population. Further studies are needed to quantify the incidence of the celiac condition in apparently 'celiac-free' areas such as Sub-Saharan Africa and the Far East. In many developing countries, the frequency of CD is likely to increase in the near future given the diffuse tendency to adopt Western, gluten-rich dietary patterns. As most cases currently escape diagnosis all over the world, an effort should be made to increase the awareness of CD polymorphism. A cost-effective case-finding policy and new strategies of mass CD screening could significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with untreated disease. The current high prevalence of CD is just the last link in a chain of events started about 10,000 years ago after wheat domestication and diffusion from the Middle East. We hypothesize different mechanisms to explain the so-called evolutionary celiac paradox of co-localization of gluten consumption and HLA CD-predisposing genotypes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Floating-Harbor syndrome and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudley, A E; Moroz, S P

    1991-03-15

    We report on a 17-year-old young woman with a speech impediment, developmental delay, short stature, and facial anomalies consistent with the Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS). In addition, she has clinical and histological evidence of celiac disease, which was observed in 1 of the 6 previously reported cases of FHS, suggesting a possible association between the 2 conditions or pleiotropism of a presumed autosomal recessive disorder.

  5. Vitiligo and autoantibodies of celiac disease

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    Zabihollah Shahmoradi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: There may be a relationship between celiac disease and vitiligo. This may indicate a common basic autoimmune mechanism that is an explanation for few case reports that gluten free diets were effective in the treatment of vitiligo patients. Both T test and exact fisher test showed no effect of age, sex and job on seropositivity of these patients (P = 0.56 and P = 0.74, respectively

  6. Serological Testing in Screening for Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Rachel Gillett

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Assays for celiac-related antibodies are becoming widely available, and the present review aims to clarify the use of these investigations in the diagnosis of, management of and screening for adult celiac disease. The sensitivities and specificities of various antibody tests are discussed, along with their clinical use as an adjunct to small bowel biopsy, and as a first-line investigation for patients with atypical symptoms of celiac disease or patients at high risk of developing sprue.

  7. Celiac Disease--What Parents and Caregivers Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disorder characterized by a heightened sensitivity to gluten, the protein in wheat, barley and rye. The disease is more common than most people think, affecting approximately 3 million in the United States, about 1 in 100. One of the most notable things about celiac disease is that up to 97 percent of…

  8. Intraepithelial lymphocytes in refractory celiac disease : lost in transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Frederike

    2014-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease type II (RCDII) is a severe complication of coeliac disease. Whereas celiac disease can successfully be treated by the strict avoidance of gluten, refractory celiac patients show no remission despite a gluten-free diet. The pathology of RCDII is only partially understood,

  9. Prevalence of mucocutaneous findings in Celiac disease patients

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    Derya Yayla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy which develops as a result of exposure to gluten in food products in individuals with a genetic predisposition. Gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal clinical findings can be seen in these patients. An increased frequence of autoimmune diseases has been reported in patients with celiac disease. Some dermatological diseases, such as dermatitis herpetiformis, vitiligo, psoriasis, alopecia areata and recurrent aphthous stomatitis have been reported to be more common among patients with celiac disease. However, there are no controlled studies on this subject. The aim of this study was to identify the mucocutaneous symptoms seen in celiac patients and to compare these findings with a control group. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine celiac patients and 54 age-and sex-matched healthy volunteers were included in the study. In the patient group, celiac disease history, height and weight parameters, the medications of the patients, compliance to a gluten-free diet, concomitant skin disorders and additional illnesses were questioned; height and weight parameters, diagnosed illnesses, and medications were questioned in the control group. Dermatological analyses were performed in all participants. Results: Mucocutaneous findings were found to be present in 38 patients (77.6% in the celiac patient group and in 31 (57.4% individuals in the control group. The presence of mucocutaneous findings in celiac patients was significantly more common than in the control group. While immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases were detected in 8 celiac patients (16.3%, none of the individuals in the control group had immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups. Conclusion: In celiac patients, the frequency of immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and all mucocutaneous diseases were found to be increased. Therefore, we suggest

  10. Celiac Disease and Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Malorie; Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Risech-Neyman, Yesenia; Moss, Steven F; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with hyposplenism, and multiple case reports link celiac disease and pneumococcal infections; however, increased risk of pneumococcal infection in celiac disease has not been confirmed. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review to determine the risk of pneumococcal infections in celiac disease. Relevant studies were identified using electronic bibliographic searches of PubMed, OVID, Medline, and EMBASE (1980 to February 2017) and reviewing abstracts from major conferences in gastroenterology. Using number of events in celiac patients and referent patients, we calculated a summary relative risk of pneumococcal infections. All analyses were conducted in Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software using random-effects assumptions. Of a total of 156 articles, 3, representing 3 large databases (the Swedish National Inpatient Register; the Oxford Record Linkage Study; and the English National Hospital Episode Statistics) were included. Each compared patients with celiac disease and confirmed pneumococcal infection to a specific reference group: inpatients and/or the general population. Overall, the odds of pneumococcal infection were higher among hospitalized celiac patients compared with controls (odds ratio 1.66; 95% confidence interval 1.43-1.92). There was no evidence of heterogeneity (Q[1] = 1.17, P = .56, I 2  = 0%). Celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of pneumococcal infection. Preventive pneumococcal vaccination should be considered for those with celiac disease, with special attention to those aged 15-64 years who have not received the scheduled pneumococcal vaccination series as a child. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-06-21

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind's history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient's clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis.

  12. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind’s history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient’s clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis. PMID:26109797

  13. The immunopathogenesis of celiac disease reveals possible therapies beyond the gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Christopher S; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2012-07-01

    Celiac disease is a T cell-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the small intestine that is activated by gluten. The diagnosis of celiac disease is challenging as patients display a wide range of symptoms and some are asymptomatic. A lifelong gluten-free diet is the only currently approved treatment of celiac disease. Although the diet is safe and effective, the compliance rates and patient acceptance vary. Furthermore, many patients treated with a gluten-free diet continue to be mildly to severely symptomatic with persistent histological abnormalities, and a small number of patients develop refractory celiac disease. New therapeutic adjuncts and potential alternatives to the gluten-free diet could improve the treatment options for these patients. Advances in understanding the immunopathogenesis of celiac disease have suggested several types of therapeutic strategies that may augment or supplant the gluten-free diet. Some of these strategies attempt to decrease the immunogenicity of gluten-containing grains by manipulating the grain itself or by using oral enzymes to break down immunogenic peptides that normally remain intact during digestion. Other strategies focus on preventing the absorption of these peptides, preventing tissue transglutaminase from rendering gluten peptides more immunogenic, or inhibiting their binding to celiac disease-specific antigen-presenting molecules. Strategies that limit T cell migration to the small intestine or that reestablish mucosal homeostasis and tolerance to gluten antigens are also being explored. Additionally, it is vital to develop new therapeutic options for refractory celiac disease patients. This review highlights therapeutic strategies that may ultimately improve the health and well-being of individuals with celiac disease.

  14. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasi, Carlos; Tejerina, Eva; Morán, Luz M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disease having among its clinical manifestations frequent symptoms common to rheumatologic diseases such as musculoskeletal pain, asthenia, and cognitive fatigue. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like Sjögren disease. It is a well-characterized disease with specific diagnostic tests. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is an emerging entity with symptoms similar to celiac disease, but without specific diagnostic tests. The concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity and its diagnostic problems are reviewed, and the hypothesis of its association with fibromyalgia, spondyloarthritis, and autoimmune conditions is proposed. Clinical observations supporting the hypothesis are described, highlighting the benefit of treating non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  15. Celiac crisis in adults: a case report and review of the literature focusing in the prevention of refeeding syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de-Almeida-Menezes

    Full Text Available Introduction: Celiac crisis is a life-threatening complication of celiac disease that is rarely described in adults. Case report: We report the case of a 31-year-old man with celiac crisis as a first manifestation of celiac disease. The patient presented with severe diarrhea, metabolic acidosis, and electrolyte disturbances accompanied by electrocardiographic alterations. A satisfactory clinical response was obtained after the correction of electrolyte abnormalities, hydration, and nutritional support with a gluten-free diet according to recommendations for patients at high risk of refeeding syndrome. Discussion: Celiac crisis generally occurs in patients with no previous diagnosis of celiac disease. The physician should therefore be aware of this diagnosis and consider celiac crisis in cases of unexplained intense secretory diarrhea, metabolic acidosis and severe electrolyte alterations in adults. The risk of refeeding syndrome should be assessed when a gluten-free diet is introduced and treatment of celiac crisis should include prevention and management of this possible complication.

  16. Review and practice guidelines for celiac disease in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadhem, Omar N; Azeez, Ghassan; Smalligan, Roger D; Urban, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is defined as a state of heightened immunologic responsiveness to ingested gluten (from wheat, barley, or rye) in genetically susceptible individuals. Ingestion of the offending proteins leads to inflammation and intestinal mucosal damage, which may result in a spectrum of gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional abnormalities, and systemic complications ranging from anemia and osteoporosis to secondary autoimmunity and malignancy. The genetic influence in the pathogenesis of celiac disease is indicated by its familial occurrence. Celiac disease does not develop unless a person has alleles that encode for human leukocyte antigen DQ2 or DQ8 proteins. The clinical picture of celiac disease has changed considerably during the past 30 years. Diarrhea, which was the presenting symptom in > 90% of celiac disease patients before 1981, is now the chief complaint in celiac disease presentations, including anemia and bone disease, is revealed by the widespread availability of serologic testing. An association between celiac disease and autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, and Sjögren's syndrome, has been well documented. The tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin antibody and the endomysial immunoglobulin antibody are the most sensitive and specific serologic tests, respectively, for identifying individuals who need to undergo an intestinal biopsy. If the suspicion of celiac disease is high, intestinal biopsy should be pursued even if serologic tests are negative. The gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease is a small bowel biopsy showing villous atrophy. The treatment for celiac disease is lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Despite the proven benefits of the GFD, it can be exceedingly difficult to completely avoid gluten-containing foods, and adherence to a GFD is estimated to be only 45% to 80%.

  17. Osteoporosis in a north american adult population with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D; Stavropolous, S; Diamond, B; Shane, E; Green, P H

    2001-01-01

    Osteoporosis, common in European and South American adults with celiac disease, has not been reported in those patients with celiac disease residing in North America. We therefore evaluated bone density in a group of patients from the United States. Patients (105 women and 23 men) with celiac disease, who had completed a questionnaire and had bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, were evaluated. The patients were an average age of 56 yr old (range 21-83 yr) and had been on a gluten-free diet from 0 months to 46 yr (mean 7.5 yr). Osteoporosis (T score Osteoporosis and low bone mass often affect North American adults with celiac disease, whether or not they are on dietary therapy. Routine screening for osteoporosis is indicated in patients with celiac disease.

  18. [Frequency of celiac disease among patients with psoriasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón H, Perla; Valdés A, Pilar; Zemelman D, Viviana; Poniachik T, Jaime; Hurtado H, Carmen; Garmendia M, María Luisa; Abumohor G, Patricia; Echavarri P, María Cristina

    2007-10-01

    A possible relationship has been reported between psoriasis and celiac disease, with common pathogenic mechanisms that may need further investigation. To investigate the presence of clinical and serological markers for celiac disease in a group of Chilean psoriatic patients. We included 80 psoriatic patients (42 males) aged 16 to 79 years, whose serum was tested for antitransglutaminase antibodies (ATGA) and antiendomysial antibodies (AEMA). Patients with weakly positive AEMA tests were also tested for antigliadin antibodies (AGA). In six patients (7.5%), AEMA and AGA were positive and one patient was positive for ATGA. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal biopsy was offered to these six patients and five accepted the procedure. Only one had a pathological diagnosis of celiac disease. Only one of 80 patients with psoriasis had celiac disease (1.2%). Other four patients with positive serologic markers had a normal duodenal biopsy. This group of patients may have latent celiac disease and they should be followed up.

  19. Celiac Disease and Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Maureen M; Sapone, Anna; Catassi, Carlo; Fasano, Alessio

    2017-08-15

    The prevalence of gluten-related disorders is rising, and increasing numbers of individuals are empirically trying a gluten-free diet for a variety of signs and symptoms. This review aims to present current evidence regarding screening, diagnosis, and treatment for celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity. Celiac disease is a gluten-induced immune-mediated enteropathy characterized by a specific genetic genotype (HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 genes) and autoantibodies (antitissue transglutaminase and antiendomysial). Although the inflammatory process specifically targets the intestinal mucosa, patients may present with gastrointestinal signs or symptoms, extraintestinal signs or symptoms, or both, suggesting that celiac disease is a systemic disease. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity is diagnosed in individuals who do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy but who have intestinal symptoms, extraintestinal symptoms, or both, related to ingestion of gluten-containing grains, with symptomatic improvement on their withdrawal. The clinical variability and the lack of validated biomarkers for nonceliac gluten sensitivity make establishing the prevalence, reaching a diagnosis, and further study of this condition difficult. Nevertheless, it is possible to differentiate specific gluten-related disorders from other conditions, based on currently available investigations and algorithms. Clinicians cannot distinguish between celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity by symptoms, as they are similar in both. Therefore, screening for celiac disease must occur before a gluten-free diet is implemented, since once a patient initiates a gluten-free diet, testing for celiac disease is no longer accurate. Celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity are common. Although both conditions are treated with a gluten-free diet, distinguishing between celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity is important for long-term therapy. Patients with celiac disease should be followed up

  20. Latest In vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoven, Samantha; Murray, Joseph A.; Marietta, Eric V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is a gluten free diet, and there is an increased desire for alternative therapies. In vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease have been generated in order to better understand the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and this review will discuss these models as well as the testing of alternative therapies using these models. Areas Covered The research discussed describes the different in vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease that currently exist and how they have contributed to our understanding of how gluten can stimulate both innate and adaptive immune responses in celiac patients. We also provide a summary on the alternative therapies that have been tested with these models and discuss whether subsequent clinical trials were done based on these tests done with these models of celiac disease. Expert Opinion Only a few of the alternative therapies that have been tested with animal models have gone on to clinical trials; however, those that did go on to clinical trial have provided promising results from a safety standpoint. Further trials are required to determine if some of these therapies may serve as an effective adjunct to a gluten free diet to alleviate the adverse affects associated with accidental gluten exposure. A “magic-bullet” approach may not be the answer to celiac disease, but possibly a future cocktail of these different therapeutics may allow celiac patients to consume an unrestricted diet. PMID:23293929

  1. Eye disorders in children with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urganci, Nafiye; Kalyoncu, Derya

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of eye disorders in children with celiac disease (CD). A total of 67 patients with CD aged from 1 to 16 years and 38 age- and sex-matched healthy children were screened for decreased visual acuity, cataract, uveitis, and diabetic retinopathy at diagnosis and during follow-up. None of the patients had eye disorders at diagnosis. Only 2 of the patients had accommodative dysfunction and the others had no change in visual function during the follow-up. One of the controls had accommodative dysfunction. No significant association was found between CD and eye disorders such as visual acuity, cataract, and uveitis among children.

  2. Celiac disease prevalence is not increased in patients with functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Juan; Spallone, Liliana; Gandara, Silvina; Chaar, Elsa; Berman, Saul; Zagalsky, David

    2017-01-01

    - Previous evidence trying to assess the risk of celiac disease among dyspeptic patients has been inconclusive, showing in some cases notorious discrepancies. - To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with dyspepsia compared to healthy controls without dyspepsia. - Adult patients under evaluation for dyspepsia were invited to participate. These patients were offered an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. On the other hand, asymptomatic adult volunteers who performed a preventive visit to their primary care physician were invited to participate and agreed to undertake an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsies as well. Those patients with histologic signs of villous atrophy were furtherly evaluated and serological tests were performed in order to determine celiac disease diagnosis. Celiac disease prevalence was compared between groups. - Overall, 320 patients with dyspepsia and 320 healthy controls were recruited. There were no significant differences in terms of gender or age between groups. Celiac disease diagnosis was made in 1.25% (4/320) of patients in the dyspepsia group versus 0.62% (2/320) in the control group. - Patients with dyspepsia who underwent routine duodenal biopsies did not show an increased risk for celiac disease when compared to healthy individuals.

  3. Some Immunological Parameters in Women With Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abbas Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is one of an autoimmune diseasein the world and  genetically linked . This disease may be cause many problems for pregnant women and their children . Tthere are many markers specific for celiac disease like anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-gliadin antibodies which associated with development of celiac disease.In this study, we wished to determine whether there are relationship between  celiac disease and fertility , effect on newborn and to identify the possible implications of these factors to disease course.Thirty female patients with a celiac disease  with ages ranged between (15- 46 years were taken from (Al-Hussein Medical  City/Kerbala.Control group consisted of 20 healthy people who were free from signs and symptoms of celiac disease who matched in age and gender with patients, and had no history for any celiac disease  problem. TTG  IgA & IgG ,AGA EASIA Kit, Generic assay and  was studied using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. T-test and ANOVA and Pearson correlation used to analyze results by using SPSS version 24. P-value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant.TTG and AGA levels were increased significantly (p< 0.05 in patients compared with the control group .TTG and AGA levels were increased significantly (p< 0.05 in patients compared with  the control group. Also, there were  significant abnormality and complication when compared with control groups. So there was significant correlation between celiac disease and infertility and there is some effect on baby of women with celiac disease

  4. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

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    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  5. The role of gluten consumption at an early age in celiac disease development: a further analysis of the prospective PreventCD cohort study.

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    Crespo-Escobar, Paula; Mearin, Maria Luisa; Hervás, David; Auricchio, Renata; Castillejo, Gemma; Gyimesi, Judit; Martinez-Ojinaga, Eva; Werkstetter, Katharina; Vriezinga, Sabine Lisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma Rita; Polanco, Isabel; Troncone, Riccardo; Stoopman, Els; Kolaček, Sanja; Shamir, Raanan; Szajewska, Hania; Koletzko, Sibylle; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen

    2017-04-01

    Background: We previously found that the introduction of small quantities of gluten at 4-6 mo of age did not reduce the risk of celiac disease (CD) in a group of high-risk children. However, the consumption of high amounts of gluten early in life has been suggested to increase CD risk. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate this hypothesis by using data from the previous study of the PreventCD trial (www.preventcd.com). Design: Gluten intake was prospectively quantified by using specific food records between 11 and 36 mo of age in 715 children positive for the human leukocyte antigen ( HLA )- DQ2 and/or HLA -DQ8 from 5 European countries. According to the PreventCD protocol, infants received 100 mg immunologically active gluten/d or placebo from 4 to 6 mo of age, with a stepwise and fixed gluten increase until age 10 mo and unrestricted intake thereafter. The primary outcome of the present study was the impact of the amount of gluten consumed from age 10 mo onward on CD development. Results: Mean daily gluten intakes from 10 mo onward were significantly different between countries for children at all ages ( P 0.05). The variables country, sex, intervention group, and gluten consumption pattern did not show significant associations with CD development risk (HRs not significant). In addition, the interaction between HLA risk group and gluten consumption pattern showed no significant risk on CD development, except for the DQ2.2/DQ7 haplotype (HR: 5.81; 95% CI: 1.18, 28.74; P = 0.031). Conclusions: Gluten consumption patterns as well as the amount of gluten consumed at 11-36 mo of age do not influence CD development for most related HLA genotypes in children with a genetic risk. This study reports the gluten consumption pattern in children at risk of CD from different European countries. This trial was registered at www.controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN74582487. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Celiac disease prevalence in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

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    Çekın, Ayhan Hilmi; Çekın, Yeşim; Sezer, Cem

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia may be the first presenting finding of celiac disease, which is a common autoimmune disorder triggered by the intake of certain proteins. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron deficiency anemia of obscure origin. Eighty-four patients with the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia of obscure origin were included in the study. Histologic findings for celiac disease were investigated in biopsy specimens taken from the second part of the duodenum of all subjects. Patients were also screened using anti-endomysial and anti-gliadin antibodies. The diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed by both serological positivity and histopathological findings. In 6 of 84 patients (7.14%), both serologic and histopathologic findings were correlated with celiac disease. After six months under a gluten-free diet, their mean hemoglobin levels increased from 10.3 ± 0.64 to 12.97 ± 1.48 g/dl (p=0.002). One patient with positive serology for celiac disease but normal duodenal mucosal biopsies also improved clinically after a gluten-free diet at the end of the follow-up and was considered as celiac disease. Six of these 7 celiac disease patients (85.7%) were premenopausal women, with a mean age of 37.5 ± 8.45 years. Clinicians should consider celiac disease as a possible cause of anemia in all patients with iron deficiency anemia of obscure origin, even in menstruating women. Serologic screening tests should be performed in premenopausal women with iron deficiency anemia, especially when anemia is refractory to oral iron treatment.

  7. Management of eosinophilic esophagitis and celiac disease.

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    Choung, Rok Seon; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Katzka, David A; Murray, Joseph A

    2017-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and celiac disease (CeD) are chronic immune mediated gastrointestinal disorders characterized by mucosal inflammation, both of which are related to food antigens, but with differences in clinical and histopathological features. When untreated, both diseases lead to destruction of the epithelium. While a strict gluten-free diet is the only effective therapy for CeD, several therapeutic options, such as proton pump inhibitors, topical steroids and diet elimination therapy are available for EoE. For EoE patients, all can be efficacious in achieving remission, but the looming question is whether all patients should be on maintenance therapy. New biologic therapies are being studied under study in both diseases, but none are ready for clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Elevated serum antiphospholipid antibodies in adults with celiac disease.

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    Laine, Outi; Pitkänen, Katariina; Lindfors, Katri; Huhtala, Heini; Niemelä, Onni; Collin, Pekka; Kurppa, Kalle; Kaukinen, Katri

    2017-12-02

    An increased incidence of thrombosis is suggested in celiac disease. We explored serum levels of antiphospholipid antibodies in untreated and treated adult celiac disease patients. A cohort of 179 biopsy-proven celiac disease patients (89 untreated, 90 on long-term gluten-free diet) and 91 non-celiac controls underwent clinical examination, assessment of celiac serology and enzyme immunoassay testing for anticardiolipin IgG and IgM, prothrombin IgG, and phosphatidylserine-prothrombin IgG and IgM. The level of antiphospholipid antibodies was higher in celiac disease patients compared with controls: anticardiolipin IgG 4.9 (0.7-33.8) vs 2.2 (0.4-9.6) U/ml, antiprothrombin IgG 2.9 (0.3-87.8) vs 2.1 (0.5-187.0) U/ml, antiphosphatidylserine-prothrombin IgG 6.9 (0.0-54.1) vs 2.3 (0.5-15.1) U/ml; p celiac disease at presentation (gastrointestinal symptoms, malabsorption or anemia, and extraintestinal symptoms or screen-detected disease) had no effect on the level of serum antiphospholipid antibodies. The serum level of antiphospholipid antibodies is increased in adults with celiac disease. The higher level of antibodies in treated patients suggests that the increase is not gluten-dependent. The prothrombotic role of antiphospholipid antibodies in celiac disease warrants further studies. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Celiac Disease: Role of the Epithelial Barrier.

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    Schumann, Michael; Siegmund, Britta; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2017-03-01

    In celiac disease (CD) a T-cell-mediated response to gluten is mounted in genetically predisposed individuals, resulting in a malabsorptive enteropathy histologically highlighted by villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia. Recent data point to the epithelial layer as an under-rated hot spot in celiac pathophysiology to date. This overview summarizes current functional and genetic evidence on the role of the epithelial barrier in CD, consisting of the cell membranes and the apical junctional complex comprising sealing as well as ion and water channel-forming tight junction proteins and the adherens junction. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms are discussed, including apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, biology of intestinal stem cells, alterations in the apical junctional complex, transcytotic uptake of gluten peptides, and possible implications of a defective epithelial polarity. Current research is directed toward new treatment options for CD that are alternatives or complementary therapeutics to a gluten-free diet. Thus, strategies to target an altered epithelial barrier therapeutically also are discussed.

  10. Osteoporosis in celiac disease and in endocrine and reproductive disorders.

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    Stazi, Anna-Velia; Trecca, Antonello; Trinti, Biagino

    2008-01-28

    As the increase in lifespan brings to light diseases that were previously not clinically detectable, osteoporosis has become an issue of worldwide significance. The disease is marked by a loss of bone mass; the bones become less dense, fragile and more prone to fracturing. Because it is regulated by endocrine and environmental factors, osteoporosis presents a multifactorial etiopathogenesis, with the genetic component accounting for 70% of an individual variation in bone mass density (BMD), the principal determinant, with age, of fracture risk. Pathological conditions such as celiac disease (CD) exacerbate the process of bone loss, so that the occurrence of osteoporosis in celiac subjects is of particular note: indeed, the screening of osteoporosis patients for this disease is advisable, since it may be the only sign of undiagnosed CD. An increase in interleukin IL-1beta, of the IL-1 system, in the relatives of celiac patients confirms the genetic predisposition to osteoporosis and its presence is evidence of an association between the two conditions. The direct effect on the bones of CD is secondary to poor absorption of calcium and vitamin D. In women osteoporosis is indirectly associated with early menopause and amenorrhea, and it may follow prolonged breast-feeding and frequent pregnancies, while in men it is associated with hypogonadism and GH deficit. These endocrine and non-endocrine factors exert their effects on bones by modulating the RANK/RANK-L/OPG system. An appropriate lifestyle from adolescence onwards, together with early diagnosis of and treatment for CD and primary and secondary endocrine pathologies are important for the prevention of damage to the bones.

  11. CLINICAL AND GENETIC PARALLELS ALONG CELIAC DISEASE AMONG TOMSK CHILDREN

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    E.I. Kondrat’eva; Puzyrev, V.P.; L.P. Nazarenko; A. A. Rudko; G.N. Yankina; E.V. Loshkova

    2007-01-01

    The article is devoted to the analysis of the genetic predisposition to celiac disease. The authors studied the associations of the HLA genes and modifier genes of the immune response (interleukine 1, inter leukine 1 receptor antagonist, inter leukine 4, α-subunits of interleukine 4 receptor, receptor to D vitamin) along with predisposition to the disease, as well as the variants of its run and accompanied autoimmune diseases (autoimmune thyroiditis, insular diabetes type 1).Key words: celiac...

  12. Association between celiac disease and chronic hepatitis C

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    Casella, Giovanni; Viganò, Davide; Romano Settanni, Carlo; Morelli, Olivia; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by a gluten-induced damage of the small bowel in sensitive individuals that may cause malabsorption. Non-intestinal inflammatory diseases may trigger immunologic gluten intolerance in susceptible people and the HCV virus may be considered as a suitable candidate. Interferon therapy could precipitate symptom onset in subjects with silent celiac disease. In fact, symptoms such as diarrhea, anemia, and weight loss may occur during interferon therapy and are associated with serological positivity of anti-tranglutaminase antibodies. To date, considering the available literature data, it is very difficult to support a firm association between HCV chronic hepatitis and celiac disease. Thus, such a serological screening in HCV patients before starting interferon therapy should not be recommended. However, serology for celiac disease must be considered in patients who develop diarrhea and/or weight loss during such therapy. PMID:27458507

  13. Small bowel ultrasound in patients with celiac disease

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    Bartusek, D. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: dbartusek@fnbrno.cz; Valek, V. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Husty, J. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: jhusty@fnbrno.cz; Uteseny, J. [Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: juteseny@fnbrno.cz

    2007-08-15

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is a common, lifelong disease with small bowel malabsorption based on genetically conditioned gluten intolerance. The clinical manifestation could be very heterogeneous. The proof of celiac disease is now based mainly on clinical and laboratory (antibodies and enterobiopsy) signs, which are in some cases problematic and inconvenient. Materials and methods: In our study we have examined 250 patients with suspection or with proven celiac disease and we evaluated specific ultrasound small bowel changes in this group. In the next step, we chose 59 patients with laboratory proved celiac disease and we statistically compared ultrasound, other laboratory and clinical findings in different forms and stages of the disease. Results: Specific small bowel pathologies in patients with celiac disease (like changes of intestinal villi in different parts of small bowel, abnormal peristalsis and mesenterial lymphadenopathy) can be well visualized by ultrasound and in combination with clinical and laboratory signs ultrasound examination could have an important role in screening, determination of diagnosis and monitoring of patients with different forms of celiac disease.

  14. Celiac Disease and Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Watkins, Runa D; Zawahir, Shamila

    2017-06-01

    Gluten-related disorders include celiac disease (CD), wheat allergy, and nonceliac gluten sensitivity. CD is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by damage to small intestinal mucosa when gluten is ingested in genetically susceptible individuals. Currently, the only available treatment of CD is gluten-free diet. Several potential treatments are being researched. Wheat allergy is a hypersensitivity reaction caused by IgE-mediated and/or non-IgE-mediated immune response, and can involve the gastrointestinal tract, skin, or respiratory tract. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity is one of a variety of immunologic, morphologic, or symptomatic manifestations precipitated by ingestion of gluten in individuals in whom CD and wheat allergy are excluded. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Psychological dimensions of celiac disease: toward an integrated approach.

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    Ciacci, Carolina; Iavarone, Alessandro; Siniscalchi, Monica; Romano, Rita; De Rosa, Antonio

    2002-09-01

    Psychic alterations have been reported in celiac disease. Our aim was to evaluate the emotional impact of celiac disease diagnosis in adulthood, the patient/doctor relationship, and the patients' cooperation with disease treatment and diet. The patients were 114 adult celiac patients on a gluten-free diet, there were 25 untreated celiac patients. Self-administered questionnaires aimed to evaluate the patients' level of knowledge of disease, the emotional impact at diagnosis, and feelings during follow-up. Celiac patients showed good knowledge of the disease, directly correlated to their socioeconomic level (P = 0.011). At diagnosis, relief was most intense feeling (Mean +/- SD, 10.82 +/- 7.63), demographics, time latency of diagnosis, and the duration of the disease had no effect on the intensity of all feelings. The scores of the self-rated emotions were entered into a principal component analysis that generated three factors: 1 (fear, anger, anxiety and sadness), 2 (reassurance and resignation), and 3 (relief); patients judged the clinicians presenting the disease "in the right way" (F = 33.279; P psychological aspects must be taken into account to understand the celiac patient and for better clinical management.

  16. Clinical presentation of adult celiac disease in Western Saudi Arabia.

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    Qari, Faiza A

    2002-12-01

    To study the clinical presentation of adult celiac disease. A retrospective study of adult patients who were diagnosed with celiac disease based on findings of small intestinal biopsy, response to gluten free diet and exclusion of other causes of malabsorption or vitamin deficiency over a period of 5 years from 1998-2002. The study was carried out at the King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Sixteen patients were diagnosed with celiac disease. Osteomalacia and iron deficiency anemia were common clinical presentations. Diarrhea, malabsorption associated with growth failure was observed in 3 patients with a mean age of 14.5 years. Celiac disease associated with other autoimmune diseases was reported in 6 patients. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in 3 patients, Hashimoto's hypothyroidism in 2 patients and dermatitis herpetiformis in one patient. No malignancy was observed during the follow-up of our patients. There was a good clinical and biochemical response to gluten free diet in 12 cases. Osteomalacia and iron deficiency anemia were common clinical presentations of celiac disease. Hence, the presence of either one of them in a female patient should raise the possibility of celiac disease.

  17. Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Children With Potential Celiac Disease.

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    Repo, Marleena; Lindfors, Katri; Mäki, Markku; Huhtala, Heini; Laurila, Kaija; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Saavalainen, Päivi; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2017-01-01

    Active screening for celiac disease frequently detects seropositive children with normal villous morphology (potential celiac disease). It remains unclear whether these subjects should be treated. We here investigated the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in children with potential and mucosal atrophy celiac disease. The prospective study involved 19 children with potential disease, 67 with partial or subtotal villous atrophy (P/SVA), and 16 with total villous atrophy (TVA). Twenty-three healthy children comprised the control group. The groups were compared for various clinical, histological, and laboratory parameters and hepcidin. The prevalence of abnormal parameters was as follows (controls, potential celiac disease, P/SVA, and TVA, respectively): anemia 0%, 15%, 22%, and 63%; low iron 5%, 0%, 14%, and 50%; increased transferrin receptor 1 5%, 16%, 20%, and 47%; low ferritin 0%, 21%, 35%, and 87%; and low transferrin saturation 10%, 11%, 41%, and 71%. One subject had low folate and none had low vitamin B12. The median values for hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation were significantly lower and transferrin receptor 1 values higher in TVA group compared with other groups. After a median of 7 months on a gluten-free diet hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and albumin in children with P/SVA exceeded the baseline values in the potential celiac disease group. The development of anemia and iron deficiency in celiac disease is a continuum and may already be present in children with normal villous morphology, advocating an early diagnosis and possible dietary treatment of these patients.

  18. Osteoporosis in celiac disease: a Hispanic pilot study.

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    Ojeda-Rivera, Joel; Rosado Carrión, Bárbara; Antommattei Frontera, Osvaldo; Bredy-Domínguez, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis has become an issue of worldwide significance. This condition has been demonstrated in Celiac disease (CD) populations in Europe, South America and the United States. However, data from the Hispanic population is limited. Record review containing patients with Celiac disease in a Gastroenterology Clinic to evaluate the association of decreased bone density such as Osteoporosis and Osteopenia in subjects with Celiac disease in the southern population of Puerto Rico. We compared the results of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Clinical manifestations of CD in Hispanic population are described. Celiac disease data was available for seven patients; of those 6 were female (86%). The average age was 46 yr Most patients were overweight with a body mass index value of 29. CD patients showed abnormalities in hemoglobin, TSH and 25-Hydroxyvitamin D. The screening markers for CD showed a high value on IgA. The data to excel is the association of IgA vs. TSH showing strength of 90%. There was significantly lower bone density in women with Celiac Disease accounting for 86% of the cases. Women with Celiac Disease were associated with lower bone density and a higher prevalence of Osteopenia but not Osteoporosis.

  19. PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE IN CHILDREN WITH EPILEPSY

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    Camilo VIEIRA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Neurological symptoms have been well-documented in patients with celiac disease, nevertheless, the presumption of a greater prevalence of epilepsy in celiac patients remains controversial. Objectives To determine the frequency of celiac disease in children and adolescents with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy. Methods A cross-sectional study. One hundred pediatric patients with non-symptomatic epilepsy were followed-up at two public pediatric neurology clinics in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Screening for celiac disease was performed by serial measurements of IgA anti-transglutaminase and IgA anti-endomysium antibodies, followed by bowel biopsy in positive cases. HLA DQ02 and DQ08 were investigated in seropositive individuals, assessing the type of seizures, the number of antiepileptic drugs used and the presence gastrointestinal symptoms. Results Three (3.0% patients tested anti-tTG-positive, two with normal duodenal mucosa (Marsh 0 and one with intraepithelial infiltrate (Marsh I. No villous atrophy of the duodenal mucosa (Marsh III celiac disease was found. Two patients tested positive for HLA DQ02; none were DQ08 positive. Conclusion The present study failed to prove the association between celiac disease and epilepsy.

  20. Celiac is a social disease: family challenges and strategies.

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    Bacigalupe, Gonzalo; Plocha, Aleksandra

    2015-03-01

    Celiac disease is the most common autoimmune inherited disorder in the United States, affecting approximately 1% of the population. Little research exists on the impact of family processes on adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD), the only treatment for celiac disease. The objective of this qualitative study was to examine the barriers that families with a celiac child face and the strategies they use to adhere to the recommended diet. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 families with a child between the ages of 6 and 12 diagnosed with celiac disease. Grounded theory and narrative analysis were used to analyze interview transcripts. Social isolation and misunderstandings about celiac disease and the GFD emerged as the most significant barriers to diet adherence including the reproduction of traditional gender relations among parents. Diet adherence facilitators included various types of institutional and societal support and idiosyncratic family arrangements. Successful diet adherence strategies used by families included planning ahead and taking their own food to social functions. Family processes play a critical role in GFD adherence. Implications for health care clinicians working with families with a child with celiac disease are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune-Associated Conditions

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    Eugenia Lauret

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D; others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage.

  2. Atypical Celiac Disease: From Recognizing to Managing

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    B. Admou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic clinical presentation of celiac disease (CD becomes increasingly common in physician’s daily practice, which requires an awareness of its many clinical faces with atypical, silent, and latent forms. Besides the common genetic background (HLA DQ2/DQ8 of the disease, other non-HLA genes are now notably reported with a probable association to atypical forms. The availability of high-sensitive and specific serologic tests such as antitissue transglutuminase, antiendomysium, and more recent antideamidated, gliadin peptide antibodies permits to efficiently uncover a large portion of the submerged CD iceberg, including individuals having conditions associated with a high risk of developing CD (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases, Down syndrome, family history of CD, etc., biologic abnormalities (iron deficiency anemia, abnormal transaminase levels, etc., and extraintestinal symptoms (short stature, neuropsychiatric disorders, alopecia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent aphtous stomatitis, etc.. Despite the therapeutic alternatives currently in developing, the strict adherence to a GFD remains the only effective and safe therapy for CD.

  3. Association of celiac disease with multiple sclerosis

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    Abolfazli.R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS and the gluten intolerance disease, celiac disease, (CD are immune-mediated diseases. Better testing for antibodies associated with CD, including anti-gliadin antibody [AGA], as well as anti-endomysial and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies, has improved the diagnosis of CD. Certain neurologic conditions have a reported association with CD. Previous researchers have investigated the role of a gluten-free diet in the treatment of MS and found no benefits. Here, we investigate the possible immunological association of CD with MS.Methods: Using ELISA, we estimated serum IgG and IgA anti-gliadin and IgA anti-endomysial antibodies in 34 MS patients, who were new or previous cases without immunosuppressant treatment for at least the last six months. The mean age was 29.6 years (range 15-46 years, with 30 patients relapsing-remitting, and four secondary-progressive MS. Thirty-four random anonymous blood donors were used as serologic controls (mean age 31.4 years, range 19-50 years. The individuals in both groups with elevated AGA (IgG or IgA or anti-endomysial antibody (IgA underwent duodenal biopsy.Results: In the MS group, high levels of IgG AGA were found in 5.9% of the subjects, and 5.9% had elevated IgA AGA. In the controls, elevated IgG AGA was detected in 5.9% of the subjects and IgA AGA in 2.9% (p=0.051 and 0.48, respectively. For IgG and IgA AGA levels, no significant differences were found between the patient and control groups. IgA anti-endomysial antibodies were not found in either group. Upon biopsy, the specific pathological features of celiac were absent.Conclusion: The same number of MS patients and controls had high levels of AGA, with normal levels of IgA anti-endomysial antibodies, which is more specific for CD, while the GI biopsies from both groups were not specific for CD. Therefore, AGA levels in any neurologic case should be interpreted with caution. The present study showed no

  4. Rare Neurological Manifestation of Celiac Disease

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    Uzma Rani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated disease characterized by permanent gastrointestinal tract sensitivity to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has varied clinical manifestations, ranging from gastrointestinal to extraintestinal, including neurological, skin, reproductive and psychiatric symptoms, which makes its diagnosis difficult and challenging. Known neurological manifestations of CD include epilepsy with or without occipital calcification, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and ataxia, headache, neuropathies and behavior disorders. We present the case of a 14-year-old female with headaches and blurred vision for 1 year; she was noted to have papilledema on ophthalmic examination with increased cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure on lumber puncture and was diagnosed as a case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC. Meanwhile her workup for chronic constipation revealed elevated tissue transglutaminase IgA and antiendomysial IgA antibodies. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of CD. The patient was started on a gluten-free diet, leading to resolution of not only gastrointestinal symptoms but also to almost complete resolution of symptoms of PTC. This report describes the correlation of CD and PTC as its neurological manifestation.

  5. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Children with Autoimmune Hepatitis and vice versa.

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    Najafi, Mehri; Sadjadei, Nooshin; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Khodadad, Ahmad; Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholam-Hossain; Farahmand, Fatemeh

    2014-12-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the risk of autoimmune liver disease is high. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic and progressive entity and the risk of its being associated with other autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease is high also. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and vice versa. In a cross-sectional study children with autoimmune hepatitis underwent serological screening and endoscopy for celiac disease. In patients with celiac disease, serum aminotransferases were measured and, if abnormal, autoantibodies related to autoimmune hepatitis were checked and needle liver biopsy was performed. Of the 96 patients, 64 had autoimmune hepatitis and 32 celiac disease. Among patients with autoimmune hepatitis only three (4.7%) were compatible with celiac disease. In the group of patients with celiac disease, autoimmune hepatitis was confirmed in four (12.5%) cases. We consider important to state that 3.1% of this group had celiac hepatitis. Autoimmune liver disease is sometimes associated with latent celiac disease. Serological screening for celiac disease should be routinely done in patients with abnormal serum aminotransferases, particularly those with chronic liver disease. On the other hand, celiac disease is often accompanied by other autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune hepatitis.

  6. Chronic Urticaria: A Cutaneous Manifestation of Celiac Disease

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    Jessica Haussmann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is an immune-mediated disease of the small bowel that results in malabsorption. It classically presents with gastrointestinal symptoms including chronic diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal bloating and anorexia. It is becoming more frequently identified in asymptomatic patients with a diagnosis of deficiencies related to malabsorption of iron, folic acid, vitamin B12 and vitamin D. It is increasingly identified as a cause for early or refractory osteoporosis. Occasionally, celiac disease presents with cutaneous manifestations alone. Dermatitis herpetiformis is a well-recognized cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease. Other cutaneous manifestations include alopecia, angular stomatitis and aphthous ulcerations. Described here is a case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with intermittent urticaria and gastrointestinal complaints. She was found to have celiac disease on small-bowel biopsy. Both her gastrointestinal symptoms and urticaria resolved when she was put on a gluten-free diet, suggesting that her urticaria was a cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease.

  7. Is it necessary to screen for celiac disease in adult idiopathic osteoporosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Aletaha, Najmeh; khonche, Ahmad; Farahvash, Benyamin; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Aim: the aim of this study was to investigate the necessity of screening for celiac disease in idiopathic osteoporotic patients. Background: Osteopenia and osteoporosis are well-known and prevalent complications of celiac disease. However, the relative prevalence of celiac disease among osteoporotic populations is not known, and the benefit of screening for celiac disease among the osteoporotic population remains controversial. Patients and methods: We evaluated a total of 560 individuals, 46...

  8. Remission of severe aphthous stomatitis of celiac disease with etanercept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disease triggered by gluten-containing foods (wheat, barley and rye) in genetically predisposed individuals. We present a patient with celiac disease complicated by severe aphthous stomatitis resulting in impairing swallowing, chewing and speaking. This led to weight loss, psychosocial problems as well as inability to perform her work. A variety of topical and systemic medications used resulted in either no improvement or only partial alleviation of the patient’s symptoms. After informed consent, etanercept was initiated and resulted in complete remission of aphthous stomatitis, decrease in arthralgia and fatigue and considerable improvement in her quality of life. The use of newer biological agents for selected and severe manifestations of celiac disease may lead to improved morbidity in these patients, but more studies are needed to determine long-term efficacy as well as safety of these drugs in the mucosal and/or systemic complications of this disease. PMID:24365222

  9. Isotretinoin Exposure and Risk of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashtak, Shadi; Khaleghi, Shahryar; Marietta, Eric V; Pittelkow, Mark R; Larson, Joseph J; Lahr, Brian D; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) is a metabolite of vitamin A and has anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects; however, a recent publication by DePaolo et al. demonstrated that in the presence of IL-15, retinoic acid can act as an adjuvant and promote inflammation against dietary proteins. To evaluate the risk of overt and latent celiac disease (CD) among users of isotretinoin. Medical records of patients from 1995 to 2011 who had a mention of isotretinoin in their records (N = 8393) were searched for CD diagnosis using ICD-09CM codes. Isotretinoin exposure was compared across overt CD patients and their age- and gender-matched controls from the same pool. To evaluate the risk of latent CD with isotretinoin exposure, patients were overlapped with a community-based list of patients with waste serum samples that were tested for CD serology, excluding those with overt CD (2006-2011). Isotretinoin exposure was defined as the use of isotretinoin prior to CD diagnosis or serology. Of 8393 patients, 25 had a confirmed CD diagnosis. Compared to matched controls (N = 75), isotretinoin exposure was not significantly different between overt CD patients versus controls (36% versus 39%, respectively; P = 0.712). Likewise, latent CD defined as positive serology was not statistically different between isotretinoin exposed (N = 506) versus non-exposed (N = 571) groups (1.8% versus 1.4%, respectively; P = 0.474). There was no association between isotretinoin use and risk of either overt or latent CD.

  10. [Irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease and gluten].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Montoro, Miguel

    2014-08-04

    For many years irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and celiac disease (CD) have been considered 2 completely separate entities, with CD being clearly related to a permanent gluten intolerance and IBS having no relation with gluten ingestion. However IBS and CD symptoms may be indistinguishable, especially when diarrhea, bloating or abdominal pain predominate. In the last decade several studies have shown that the separation between CD and IBS is not so clear. Thus, some patients who have been diagnosed of IBS suffer in fact from CD. In addition, it seems that there is a group of patients who, without having CD, suffer gluten intolerance that cause them digestive symptoms similar to those of IBS. Gluten sensitivity is defined as the spectrum of morphological, immunological and functional abnormalities that respond to a gluten-free diet. This concept includes histological, immunological and clinical manifestations in the absence of evident morphological abnormalities. Therefore, it is mandatory to establish in a scientific way in which patients a gluten-free diet will be beneficial as well as when this is not justified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

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    V. Passananti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2, Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, and Symptom Check List (SCL-90. Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC.

  12. Sarcoidosis, Celiac Disease and Deep Venous Thrombosis: a Rare Association

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    Gökhan Çelik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology and it may rarely be associated with a second disorder. Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy characterized with malabsorption caused by gluten intolerance, and several reports indicate an association between celiac disease and sarcoidosis. In addition, although celiac disease is associated with several extraintestinal pathologies, venous thrombosis has been rarely reported. Herein we present a rare case report of a patient with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis, celiac disease and deep venous thrombosis because of the rare association of these disorders. The patient was admitted with abdominal pain, weight loss, chronic diarrhea and a 5-day history of swelling in her right leg. A diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis was achieved by doppler ultrasonographic examination. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made by biopsy of duodenal mucosa and supported with elevated serum level of anti-gliadin IgA and IgG, and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was achieved by transbronchial needle aspiration from the subcarinal lymph node during flexible bronchoscopy.

  13. Rare association of celiac disease with myasthenia gravis in a patient with other immune disorders: a Case Report

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    Marcela de Almeida-Menezes

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease is described in association with several autoimmune diseases, but rarely with myasthenia gravis. Case Report: We describe the case of a 31-year-old white woman with celiac disease who presented manifestations related to a hyperactive immune system, including macroamylasemia, false-positive anti-HCV, positive antinuclear antibody, and Raynaud's phenomenon. The Introduction of a gluten-free diet (GFD resolved these features, but myasthenia gravis (MG symptoms unexpectedly occurred on that occasion. Discussion: The role of a GFD in the course of autoimmune diseases has been studied and improvement has been reported in many diseases. However, there is no consensus in the literature regarding the course of neurological disorders associated with celiac disease. In the present case, a GFD did not prevent the appearance of symptoms related to myasthenia gravis. There are few reports on the association of celiac disease with myasthenia gravis and therefore little is known about the course and time of onset of myasthenia in celiac patients. The present case increases the knowledge about this unusual autoimmune neurological disease associated with celiac disease.

  14. A major non-HLA locus in celiac disease maps to chromosome 19.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, van MJ; Meijer, JW; Sandkuijl, L.A.; Bardoel, A.F.; Mulder, C.J.J.; Pearson, PL; Houwen, RH; Wijmenga, C.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The pathogenesis of celiac disease is still unknown despite its well-known association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and DQ8. It is clear that non-HLA genes contribute to celiac disease development as well, but none of the previous genome-wide screens in celiac disease

  15. Celiac Disease Is Associated with Childhood Psychiatric Disorders: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butwicka, Agnieszka; Lichtenstein, Paul; Frisén, Louise; Almqvist, Catarina; Larsson, Henrik; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-05-01

    To determine the risk of future childhood psychiatric disorders in celiac disease, assess the association between previous psychiatric disorders and celiac disease in children, and investigate the risk of childhood psychiatric disorders in siblings of celiac disease probands. This was a nationwide registry-based matched cohort study in Sweden with 10 903 children (aged celiac disease and 12 710 of their siblings. We assessed the risk of childhood psychiatric disorders (any psychiatric disorder, psychotic disorder, mood disorder, anxiety disorder, eating disorder, psychoactive substance misuse, behavioral disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD], autism spectrum disorder [ASD], and intellectual disability). HRs of future psychiatric disorders in children with celiac disease and their siblings was estimated by Cox regression. The association between previous diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder and current celiac disease was assessed using logistic regression. Compared with the general population, children with celiac disease had a 1.4-fold greater risk of future psychiatric disorders. Childhood celiac disease was identified as a risk factor for mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, behavioral disorders, ADHD, ASD, and intellectual disability. In addition, a previous diagnosis of a mood, eating, or behavioral disorder was more common before the diagnosis of celiac disease. In contrast, siblings of celiac disease probands were at no increased risk of any of the investigated psychiatric disorders. Children with celiac disease are at increased risk for most psychiatric disorders, apparently owing to the biological and/or psychological effects of celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Review Article: Celiac Disease, New Approaches to Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashtak, Shahrooz; Murray, Joseph A

    2014-01-01

    STRUCTURED SUMMARY Background Celiac disease is managed by life-long gluten withdrawal from the diet. However strict adherence to a gluten-free diet is difficult and is not always effective. Novel therapeutic approaches are needed to supplement or even replace the dietary treatment. Aims To review recent advances in new therapeutic options for celiac disease. Methods A literature search was performed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Scopus, DDW.org and ClinicalTrial.gov for English articles and abstracts. The search terms used include but not limited to “Celiac disease”, “new”, “novel”, Advances”, “alternatives” and “Drug therapy”. The cited articles were selected based on the relevancy to the review objective. Results Several new therapeutic approaches for celiac disease are currently under development by targeting its underlying pathogenesis. Alternative therapies range from reproduction of harmless wheat strains to immunomodulatory approaches. Some of these therapies such as enzymatic cleavage of gluten and permeability inhibitors have shown promise in clinical studies. Conclusion Gluten-free diet is still the only practical treatment for patients with celiac disease. Novel strategies provide promise of alternative adjunctive approaches to diet restriction alone for patients with this disorder. PMID:22324389

  17. Celiac disease: the situation on the Slovak market

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    Ľudmila Nagyová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, non‐tropical sprue, idiopathic sprue, idiopathic steatorrhoea and gluten‐sensitive enteropathy, is a serious genetic autoimmune disease, which damages the villi of the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. The latest researches show that while in the 1970s the prevalence of celiac disease in the world was 0.03%, in the present years the estimated prevalence is 1%. In average, the prevalence of celiac disease in the Western countries is close to 1:100. The celiac disease occurs more often in the case of women than of men, at a ratio of 2.8:1. The aim of the present paper was to bring few information about the celiac disease, highlight the increasing number of celiacs, as well as to determine the Slovak celiacs opinion about the situation on Slovak market and their consumer behaviour on the market of gluten free products. As research methods, there have been used the methods of survey and structured questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. The total number of respondents was 130 randomly selected celiacs from all over the Slovak republic. For a deeper analysis of the obtained results, there have been set out four assumptions and ten hypotheses, which have been tested with the use of Pearson´s chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-Test and Cramer´s contingency coefficient. The results of the present paper show, that despite the fact that few of our findings are pleasing - almost 52% of our respondents stay that the labelling of gluten free products is sufficient, over 74% of respondents think that they have enough information about the availability of gluten free products and more than 89% of respondents think that the present scope of range of gluten free products is better as before; there are still some shortcomings, which has to be reduced or eliminated - only less than 7% of respondents think that the price of gluten free products is adequate, over 45% of respondents

  18. Celiac disease arthropathy and autoimmunity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Tariq; Zaidi, Mukarram A; Wells, George A; Karsh, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate presence of sero-negative spondyloarthritis (SpA) in celiac disease (CD) patients, and whether compliance with a gluten free diet (GFD) improved arthritis manifestations in these patients. We undertook a prospective, questionnaire based, cross-sectional cohort study to evaluate the presence or absence of SpA simultaneously in both CD and non-CD cohorts. 356/590 (60.3%) patients with CD participated in this study. 99% had diagnosis confirmed by a diagnostic test (79% small bowel biopsy, 19.8% blood test, 3.9% stool test). Approximately 131 (37%) cases of arthritis were reported in CD patients. Of the 6/356 CD patients with seronegative spondyloarthritides, four had sacroiliitis, two ankylosing spondylitis, and one psoriatic arthritis, compared to one ankylosing spondylitis and five psoriatic arthritis in non-CD. Osteoarthritis (89 vs 59, P = 0.93) was the most common diagnosis reported by respondents. More CD patients with diarrhea (94%) and anemia (81%) improved on GFD, compared to arthritis symptoms (30%). Autoimmune thyroiditis (10.6% vs 0.4%), insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) (2.2% vs 1.7%), systemic Lupus erythematosus (SLE) (1.1% vs 0), and psoriasis (12.9% vs 5.5%) occurred more frequently in CD patients. The prevalence of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, Sjogren's syndrome, primary biliary cirrhosis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis was around 1% each. Univariate Logistic regression analysis showed ≤ high school education (odds ratio [OR] 2.01, P osteoporosis (OR 2.78, P < 0.001) to be significantly associated with report of arthritis in CD patients. We did not find a high rate of SpA in CD patients. In contrast, increased rates of autoimmune thyroiditis, SLE, IDDM, and psoriasis were seen in CD. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Celiac disease in non-clinical populations of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Mai; Ishimura, Norihisa; Fukuyama, Chika; Izumi, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Nahoko; Araki, Asuka; Oka, Akihiko; Mishiro, Tomoko; Ishihara, Shunji; Maruyama, Riruke; Adachi, Kyoichi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2018-02-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic autoimmune enteropathy caused by gluten ingestion. While its prevalence in Western countries is reported to be as high as 1%, the prevalence has not been evaluated in a large-scale study of a Japanese population. The aim of our study was to clarify the possible presence of celiac disease in a Japanese non-clinical population as well as in patients showing symptoms suggestive of the disease. Serum samples were collected from 2008 non-clinical adults and 47 patients with chronic unexplained abdominal symptoms between April 2014 and June 2016. The anti-tissue transglutaminase (TTG) immunoglobulin A antibody titer was determined as a screening test for celiac disease in all subjects, and individuals with a value of >2 U/mL subsequently underwent testing for the presence of serum endomysial IgA antibody (EMA) as confirmation. Those testing positive for EMA or with a high concentration (>10 U/mL) of TTG were further investigated by histopathological examinations of duodenal mucosal biopsy specimens and HLA typing tests. Of the 2008 non-clinical adults from whom serum samples were collected, 161 tested positive for TTG, and all tested negative for EMA. Four subjects who had a high TTG titer were invited to undergo confirmatory testing, and the histopathological results confirmed the presence of celiac disease in only a single case (0.05%). Of the 47 symptomatic patients, one (2.1%) was found to have a high TTG titer and was diagnosed with celiac disease based on duodenal histopathological findings. The presence of celiac disease in a non-clinical Japanese population was low at 0.05% and was rarely found in patients with unexplained chronic abdominal symptoms.

  20. Celiac disease and obstetric complications: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo; Sarno, Laura; Maruotti, Giuseppe M; Cetin, Irene; Greco, Luigi; Khashan, Ali S; McCarthy, Fergus; Martinelli, Domenico; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Pasquale

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this metaanalysis was to evaluate the risk of the development of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease. We searched electronic databases from their inception until February 2015. We included all cohort studies that reported the incidence of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease compared with women without celiac disease (ie, control group). Studies without a control group and case-control studies were excluded. The primary outcome was defined a priori and was the incidence of a composite of obstetric complications that included intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low birthweight, preeclampsia and preterm birth. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, stillbirth, preeclampsia, small for gestational age, and low birthweight. The review was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015017263) before data extraction. All authors were contacted to obtain the original databases and perform individual participant data metaanalysis. Primary and secondary outcomes were assessed in the aggregate data analysis and in the individual participant data metaanalysis. We included 10 cohort studies (4,844,555 women) in this metaanalysis. Four authors provided the entire databases for the individual participant data analysis. Because none of the included studies stratified data for the primary outcome (ie, composite outcome), the assessment of this outcome for the aggregate analysis was not feasible. Aggregate data analysis showed that, compared with women in the control group, women with celiac disease (both treated and untreated) had a significantly higher risk of the development of preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.66), intrauterine growth restriction (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-4.67), stillbirth (odds ratio, 4.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-21.75), low birthweight (odds ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1

  1. Occult Celiac Disease Associated with Lymphocytic Sclerosing Cholangitis

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    Hugh J Freeman

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old male with dermatitis herpetiformis and a previously treated lymphoma involving an inguinal lymph node developed abnormal liver chemistry tests. Because of intermittent diarrhea, additional studies revealed lymphocytic colitis and occult celiac disease that responded to a gluten-free diet. A liver biopsy done to explore persistently abnormal liver chemistry tests showed a portal tract-centred inflammatory process characterized by biliary ductal proliferation, epithelial lymphocytosis and concentric lamellar fibrosis. Quantitation of immunoglobulins was normal and antimitochondrial antibodies were negative. Retrograde cholangiograms showed radiological features typical of primary sclerosing cholangius. The epithelial lymphocycosis reported in gastric, small and large intestinal mucosa of some patients with celiac disease may also be present in the biliary ductal columnar epithelium. This report provides additional evidence that celiac disease may be a far more extensive pathological process.

  2. Clinical characteristics in children with celiac disease: a single center results

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    Halil Haldun Emiroglu

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: The age of gluten introduction to the diet is important to the risk of developing celiac disease. Breast-feeding at the time of gluten introduction may reduce the risk of developing celiac disease. Growth retardation and chronic diarrhea are classic findings suggestive of celiac disease. However, it should be remembered that the patients with celiac disease may also be exposed to overweight, obese, constipation, or various other findings. When the gluten-free diet is followed, all symptoms associated with celiac disease are resolved. The treatment of the disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(4.000: 333-339

  3. Autoimmune Disease in First-Degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals With Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emilsson, Louise; Wijmenga, Cisca; Murray, Joseph A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk for this disorder, but little is known about their risk for other autoimmune diseases. We assessed the risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease in first-degree relatives and spouses of people with celiac

  4. Prevalence and Morbidity of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease From a Community-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, Rok Seon; Larson, Scott A; Khaleghi, Shahryar; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; King, Katherine S; Larson, Joseph J; Lahr, Brian D; Poland, Gregory A; Camilleri, Michael J; Murray, Joseph A

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about the prevalence and burden of undiagnosed celiac disease in individuals younger than age 50. We determined the prevalence and morbidity of undiagnosed celiac disease in individuals younger than age 50 in a community. We tested sera from 31,255 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota (celiac disease assay using an assay for IgA against tissue transglutaminase; in subjects with positive test results, celiac disease was confirmed using an assay for endomysial IgA. We performed a nested case-control study to compare the proportion of comorbidities between undiagnosed cases of celiac disease and age- and sex-matched seronegative controls (1:2). Medical records were abstracted to identify potential comorbidities. We identified 338 of 30,425 adults with positive results from both serologic tests. Based on this finding, we estimated the prevalence of celiac disease to be 1.1% (95% confidence interval, 1.0%-1.2%); 8 of 830 children tested positive for IgA against tissue transglutaminase (1.0%; 95% confidence interval, 0.4%-1.9%). No typical symptoms or classic consequences of diagnosed celiac disease (diarrhea, anemia, or fracture) were associated with undiagnosed celiac disease. Undiagnosed celiac disease was associated with increased rates of hypothyroidism (odds ratio, 2.2; P celiac disease at 5 years after testing was 10.8% in persons with undiagnosed celiac disease vs 0.1% in seronegative persons (P Celiac disease status was not associated with overall survival. Based on serologic tests of a community population for celiac disease, we estimated the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease to be 1.1%. Undiagnosed celiac disease appeared to be clinically silent and remained undetected, but long-term outcomes have not been determined. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Celiac disease : from basic insight to therapy development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stępniak, Dariusz Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to gluten, proteins found in wheat and related cereals. In this study two major questions were addressed: i) which specific properties of gluten contribute to its disease-inducing characteristics ii) how can gluten

  6. Celiac Disease – Advances in Treatment via Gluten Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoven, Samantha; Murray, Joseph A; Marietta, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy which occurs in genetically susceptible individuals carrying the prerequisite genetic markers HLA DQ2 or DQ8. These genetic markers are present in approximately 30% of the population, and the worldwide prevalence of CD is estimated to be approximately 1-2%. Currently a gluten-free diet is the only treatment for CD, but novel therapies aimed at gluten modification are underway. This review will discuss gluten based therapies including wheat alternatives and wheat selection, enzymatic alteration of wheat, oral enzyme supplements, and polymeric binders as exciting new therapies for treatment of Celiac Disease. PMID:22728383

  7. Digestive and nutritional considerations in celiac disease: could supplementation help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malterre, Tom

    2009-09-01

    Due to the increased immune activation in the intestinal tract of people with celiac disease, the digestive and absorptive processes of those affected may be compromised. Individuals with celiac disease are more susceptible to pancreatic insufficiencies, dysbiosis, lactase insufficiencies, and folic acid, vitamin B12, iron, and vitamin D deficiencies, as well as accelerated bone loss due to an increase in inflammatory signaling molecules. Beyond strict maintenance of a gluten-free diet, research has shown benefit with additional nutritional supplementation to assist in regulation of several of these complications.

  8. Celiac disease: is it really possible to overcome duodenal biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Elisabetta; Ferranti, Silvia; Gaggiano, Carla; Di Virgilio, Nicola; Vascotto, Marina

    2016-05-06

    We report the case of a two-year-five-month-old child who underwent screening for celiac disease due to strong familiarity. During the first observation body weight and height were at 25th and 50th centile for gender and age. Physical examination did not reveal any sign of disease. Blood tests showed increased transaminases levels and antibodies research showed: tTG IgA: 100 UI/ml, tTG IgG: 36,6 UI/ml, EMA IgA: positive. HLA study revealed homozygous allelic combination DRB1*07;DQA102:01; DQB1* 02:02 with presence of a double copy of beta chain in the composition of the  DQ2 heterodymer. Biopsy with histological examination did find neither mucosal alteration  nor lymphocytic infiltrates (Marsh 0). During follow up with free diet the patient remained asymptomatic and all antibody titers decreased up to normalization. According to ESPGHAN guidelines the finding of hypertransaminasemia as sign of celiac hepatic inflammation, a more than 10-fold increase of tTG IgA and a high-risk HLA would permit diagnosis of celiac disease but histological examination done due to mismatch between paucity of clinical sings and a "multiple risk combination" excluded it, allowing diagnosis of potential celiac disease.  We believe that this case is interesting because of its being in contrast with current literature data that suggest a linear relationship between antibodies levels and histological damage with tTG IgA at the upper reference range in case of potential celiac disease. According to guidelines we could have avoided intestinal biopsy but we would have considered as celiac a patient who is maybe just potentially affected.

  9. Celiac disease diagnosed after uncomplicated pregnancy in a patient with history of bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisavljević, Nemanja; Cvetković, Mirjana; Nikolić, Goran; Filipović, Branka; Milinić, Nikola

    2013-01-01

    The association between celiac disease and eating disorders has been very rarely reported. This is the first report on celiac disease associated with bulimia in this part of Europe. An adult female patient with history of bulimia and one uncomplicated pregnancy was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department, due to long lasting dyspeptic symptoms, constipation, major weight loss and fatigue. After positive serological screening, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with histopathology examination of duodenal biopsy specimen. Complicated interactions between celiac disease and bulimia can make them difficult to diagnose and treat. It is important to consider the presence of celiac disease in patients with bulimia and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  10. Celiac sprue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Andrés; Kelly, Ciarán P

    2002-10-01

    Celiac sprue, celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is a malabsorption disorder of the small intestine that occurs after ingestion of wheat gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. This disease is characterized by intestinal malabsorption associated with villous atrophy of the small intestinal mucosa, clinical and histological improvement after adherence to strict gluten free diet, and relapse when gluten is reintroduced. Celiac sprue has a high prevalence in Western Europe and North America where it is estimated to affect 1:120 to 1:300 individuals. The pathogenesis of celiac sprue is related to inappropriate intestinal T-cell activation in HLA-DQ2 positive individuals triggered by antigenic peptides from wheat gluten or prolamins from barley and rye. Although previously thought to be mainly a disease of childhood onset, the diagnosis is increasingly being made in adults. There are a wide variety of presentations, which range from asymptomatic forms to severe diarrhea, weight loss and nutritional deficiencies. Extraintestinal manifestations including anemia, osteopenia or neurological disorders and associated conditions such as diabetes or hypothyroidism are commonly present. The availability of highly sensitive and specific serologic markers has dramatically facilitated the diagnosis of celiac sprue. However, the demonstration of characteristic histological abnormalities in a biopsy specimen of the small intestine remains the mainstay of diagnosis. Treatment consists of life-long avoidance of dietary gluten to control symptoms and to prevent both immediate and long-term complications.

  11. Management of celiac disease: from evidence to clinical practice

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    Tiziana M. Attardo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a complex polygenic disorder, which involves genetic factors human leukocyte complex (HLA and non-HLA genes, environmental factors, innate and adoptive immunity, and a robust chronic T-mediated autoimmune component. The main goal of the present monograph is to define a methodological approach for the disease, characterized by frequent late diagnosis, in order for the physician to become aware of the disease management, the diversity of the clinical presentation itself and in different patients. A unique attention is payed to the specific diagnostic tests to define a correct and accurate application of them, and in addition, to disease follow-up and possible complications. Moreover, a dedicated space is assigned to refractory CD, to potential CD and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Legislative aspects of the celiac disease in Italy are addressed, too. The celiac disease guidelines and their evaluation by means of Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II instrument allow us to classify the different recommendations and to apply them according to the stakeholders’ involvement, pertinence, methodological accuracy, clarity and publishing independence. Finally, the most current scientific evidence is taken into account to create a complete updated monograph.

  12. Correlation between antibodies and histology in celiac disease: Incidence of celiac disease is higher than expected in the pediatric population

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Makovický, P.; Rimárová, K.; Boor, A.; Makovický, P.; Vodička, Pavel; Samasca, G.; Kruzliak, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), s. 1079-1083 ISSN 1791-2997 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13424 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : celiac disease * autoimmune disease * enterobiopsy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.484, year: 2013

  13. Principles of Proper Nutrition in Children with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Khajavikia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is a hereditary disorder of the immune system which damages the mucosa of the small intestine caused by gluten consumption(even very small amounts. Villous atrophy, leads to malabsorption, which is due to decreased absorption levels. The first bowel symptoms are seen during the first 2 years of life. Currently, the only treatment is to compliance with a gluten-free diet lifelong. The purpose of this study was to introduce the principles of proper nutrition in children with CD to prevent complications of malabsorption.   Results: The patients do not tolerate the proteins of cereals in bread such as wheat, barley, black barley and rye. Substituting wheat flour with rice flour, corn and potatoes and using olive oil, sunflower, corn oil and peanut oil for cooking is recommended. Until the disappearance of symptoms, consumption of milk, fat and high-fiber foods should be avoided. Deficiency of folic acid, iron, vitamin B12 and calcium are common. If necessary, iron, folic acid and multivitamin can be used. These children need proper energy according to their personal needs and should have a diet high in protein. Consumption of potatoes, corn, vegetables, fruits, meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy and nuts (non- roasted in any form is allowed. Identifying foods which contain gluten (prepared sauces, sausages, salami, herbal supplements, all canned meat products, crushed barbecue, prepared soups, espresso and coffee , white vinegar, curd, dried milk, pasta, pastries prepared by wheat flour, compote and food supplements is recommended.   Conclusions: The identification of substances containing gluten by parents and children, and removal of harmful substances from the diet causes the intestines to quickly begin to rebuild itself. Keywords: Nutrition, Child, Celiac, Diet.

  14. Risk of osteoporosis in endocrine disorders and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stazi, Anna Velia; Trinti, Biagino

    2007-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by a loss of bone mass; the bones become less dense, fragile and prone to fracturing. It is regulated by endocrine-environmental factors with the genetic component accounting for 70% of an individual's variation in bone mass density (BMD). Pathological conditions such as celiac disease (CD) exacerbate the process of bone loss and the presence of osteoporosis in celiac subjects may be the only sign of undiagnosed CD. The interleukins IL-1alpha and IL-1beta are stimulators of bone resorption; the relatives of celiac patients shown the increased IL-1beta supporting the genetic susceptibility. In women osteoporosis is indirectly associated with early menopause and amenorrhea, while in men it is associated with hypogonadism and GH deficit. The direct effect on the bones of CD is secondary to poor absorption of calcium and vitamin D. These endocrine and non-endocrine factors exert their effects on bones by modulating the RANK/RANK-L/OPG system.

  15. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective of Analysis The objective of this evidence-based evaluation is to assess the accuracy of serologic tests in the diagnosis of celiac disease in subjects with symptoms consistent with this disease. Furthermore the impact of these tests in the diagnostic pathway of the disease and decision making was also evaluated. Celiac Disease Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that develops in genetically predisposed individuals. The immunological response is triggered by ingestion of gluten, a protein that is present in wheat, rye, and barley. The treatment consists of strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Patients with celiac disease may present with a myriad of symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, iron deficiency anemia, dermatitis herpetiformis, among others. Serologic Testing in the Diagnosis Celiac Disease There are a number of serologic tests used in the diagnosis of celiac disease. Anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) Anti-endomysial antibody (EMA) Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (tTG) Anti-deamidated gliadin peptides antibodies (DGP) Serologic tests are automated with the exception of the EMA test, which is more time-consuming and operator-dependent than the other tests. For each serologic test, both immunoglobulin A (IgA) or G (IgG) can be measured, however, IgA measurement is the standard antibody measured in celiac disease. Diagnosis of Celiac Disease According to celiac disease guidelines, the diagnosis of celiac disease is established by small bowel biopsy. Serologic tests are used to initially detect and to support the diagnosis of celiac disease. A small bowel biopsy is indicated in individuals with a positive serologic test. In some cases an endoscopy and small bowel biopsy may be required even with a negative serologic test. The diagnosis of celiac disease must be performed on a gluten-containing diet since the small intestine abnormalities and the serologic antibody levels may resolve or improve

  16. Positive predictive value of serological diagnostic measures in celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftedal, Peter; Nielsen, Christian; Madsen, Jonas Trolle

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) antibodies, immunoglobulin A (IgA) anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), IgA endomysium antibody (EMA), IgA and IgG anti-gliadin antibodies (IgA and IgG AGA) are first-line diagnostic tools used in selecting patients for duodenal biopsy. The goal of this study was to evaluate...

  17. Prevalence, incidence, and autoimmune comorbidities of celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grode, Louise; Bech, Bodil H; Jensen, Thomas Møller

    2018-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to describe and identify potential trends with respect to prevalence, incidence, age, sex, and autoimmune comorbidity of celiac disease (CD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A Danish nationwide cohort study of CD using data from The National Patient Register. Patients...

  18. The intestinal microflora of childhood patients with indicated celiac disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Fliegerová, Kateřina; Frühauf, P.; Tučková, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2008), s. 214-216 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * intestinal microflora Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  19. Anemia: monosymptomatic celiac disease. A report of 3 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depla, A. C.; Bartelsman, J. F.; Mulder, C. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with monosymptomatic celiac disease (CD) can escape diagnosis for a long period. Anemia is a common finding in CD, although anemia as the sole symptom is relatively unknown. We report on three patients who presented with iron deficiency anemia and no other symptom, in whom CD was considered

  20. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Patrick C. A.; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Curtotti, Alessandra; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Heap, Graham A. R.; Adany, Roza; Aromaa, Arpo; Bardella, Maria Teresa; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Bockett, Nicholas A.; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Dema, Barbara; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Fernandez-Arquero, Miguel; Fiatal, Szilvia; Grandone, Elvira; Green, Peter M.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Gwilliam, Rhian; Houwen, Roderick H. J.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kaukinen, Katri; Kelleher, Dermot; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Kurppa, Kalle; MacMathuna, Padraic; Maki, Markku; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; McCann, Owen T.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Mein, Charles A.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Mistry, Vanisha; Mora, Barbara; Morley, Katherine I.; Mulder, Chris J.; Murray, Joseph A.; Nunez, Concepcion; Oosterom, Elvira; Ophoff, Roel A.; Polanco, Isabel; Peltonen, Leena; Platteel, Mathieu; Rybak, Anna; Salomaa, Veikko; Schweizer, Joachim J.; Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tack, Greetje J.; Turner, Graham; Veldink, Jan H.; Verbeek, Wieke H. M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Wolters, Victorien M.; Urcelay, Elena; Cukrowska, Bozena; Greco, Luigi; Neuhausen, Susan L.; McManus, Ross; Barisani, Donatella; Deloukas, Panos; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Saavalainen, Paivi; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    We performed a second-generation genome-wide association study of 4,533 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 10,750 control subjects. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with P(GWAS) <10(-4) and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions

  1. [Helicobacter pylori infection in children with celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimpu, Silvia; Bozomitu, Laura; Cârdei, E; Oltean, Carmen; Burlacu, M; Anton, Dana; Trandafir, Laura; Mihăilă, Doina; Moraru, D

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate symptomatology, endoscopic and histopathologic changes of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastritis lesions without Helicobacter pylori infection on children diagnosed with celiac disease. 15 children under gluten-free diet were selected and, because of the recurrence of the dyspeptic syndrome, an upper digestive endoscopy associated with histopathologic exam was performed. Considering the histopathologic result we made two groups: first group (8 children with celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection) and second group (7 children with celiac disease without Helicobacter pylori infection, but associated with gastritis lesions). The main symptom was diffuse abdominal pain in both groups. The endoscopic antrum aspects were congestive with striped aspect (first group--12.5%, second group--42.9%) and congestive with nodulation (first group--25%, second group--14.3%). The histopathologic diagnosis were: moderate active chronic pangastritis (first group--25%, second group--14.3%) moderate active chronic gastritis (first group--25%,second group--14.3%), lymphocytic gastritis (first group--12.5%, second group--14.3%). The histopathologic exam remains the gold standard for celiac disease, gastritis lesions and Helicobacter pylori infection.

  2. Celiac disease and diabetes mellitus diagnosed in a pediatric patient with Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchise, Alexandra Nicole; Condino, Adria A; Levitt, Marc A; Hebra, Andre; Wilsey, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Hirschsprung disease is a disorder of neural crest migration characterized by intestinal aganglionosis along a variable segment of the gastrointestinal tract. It is a complex disorder associated with several syndromes. Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy characterized by dietary intolerance to gluten proteins and can be associated with autoimmune conditions such as diabetes mellitus. Celiac disease can mimic Hirschsprung disease when presenting with constipation and abdominal distention. We present the case of celiac disease diagnosed in a patient with Hirschsprung disease who subsequently developed type one diabetes mellitus.

  3. [Celiac disease in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haladová, Iva; Cechurová, Daniela; Lacigová, Silvie; Gruberová, J; Rušavý, Zdeněk; Balihar, Karel

    2014-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of celiac disease in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Influence the new started treatment of celiac disease on glycemic control and body mass index (BMI) of the patients. Prevail the anti-transglutaminase antibody (atTG) positivity one year after commencement of the therapy. A retrospective assessment of celiac disease targeted screening in 465 adult T1DM patients at Diabetes Center, 1st Medical Department, University Hospital in Pilsen (80 % of all T1DM patients) from 1. 1. 2007 until 1. 7. 2011. Enterobiopsy was indicated in case of atTG-A (or atTG-G) positivity. In patients with newly started gluten-free diet, HbA1c and BMI within a year after diagnosis of celiac disease were compared to a year period six months after treatment commencement (3-4 visits), atTG was evaluated one year after treatment beginning. Paired T-test was used for statistical evaluation. The prevalence of all forms of celiac disease in the studied group was 10.5 %. Celiac disease diagnosed in childhood was found in 1.1 % patients (5/465). Positivity of atTG was newly observed in 9.5 % (44/465) patients. Three patients with atTG > 300 kIU/l refused the enterobiopsy examination. Celiac disease is highly plausible. The influence of gluten-free diet on BMI and HbA1c could not be evaluated due to the lack of compliance. 22 patients had a potential form of celiac disease (negative histology). Positive enterobiopsy was found in 19 patients (4.1 %). Another 3 patients had to be excluded from the subgroup of 22 patients (newly indicated gluten-free diet) as the HbA1c values and BMI were affected by the primary diagnosis of T1DM. Subgroup characteristics: 9 women and 7 men, mean age 38 ± 12 years, diabetes duration 21 ± 13 years, celiac disease diagnosed 20.7 ± 13 years since first diagnosis of T1DM. No statistically significant change in HbA1c (67 ± 11.4 vs 69 ± 13.9 mmol/mol) was observed in the studied period, however and a significant change of BMI

  4. Risk of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients With Celiac Disease: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Nobel, Yael R; Green, Peter H R; Blaser, Martin J; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-12-01

    Patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for infections such as tuberculosis, influenza, and pneumococcal pneumonia. However, little is known about the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients with celiac disease. We identified patients with celiac disease based on intestinal biopsies submitted to all pathology departments in Sweden over a 39-year period (from July 1969 through February 2008). We compared risk of CDI (based on stratified Cox proportional hazards models) among patients with celiac disease vs. without celiac disease (controls) matched by age, sex, and calendar period. We identified 28,339 patients with celiac disease and 141,588 controls; neither group had a history of CDI. The incidence of CDI was 56/100,000 person-years among patients with celiac disease and 26/100,000 person-years among controls, yielding an overall hazard ratio (HR) of 2.01 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.64-2.47; Pceliac disease (HR, 5.20; 95% CI, 2.81-9.62; Pceliac disease and controls. In a large population-based cohort study, patients with celiac disease had significantly higher incidence of CDI than controls. This finding is consistent with prior findings of higher rates of other infections in patients with celiac disease, and suggests the possibility of altered gut immunity and/or microbial composition in patients with celiac disease.

  5. Do celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity have the same effects on reproductive disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczyńska, Joanna

    2017-12-08

    The wide spectrum of clinical symptoms of celiac disease (CD) is partly due to the malnourished state caused by the malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. It has been suggested that fertility problems and obstetric complications may be a consequence of the endocrine disorders caused by selective nutrient deficiencies. The same selective nutrient deficiencies as in CD could be a reason for fertility problems in non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nutrient deficiencies in CD and NCGS on fertility problems. A literature review of fertility problems in men and women and nutrient deficiencies associated with CD and NCGS, was performed up to May 2017. The same selective nutrient deficiencies (folate, iron, vitamin B 12 , and vitamin D) in CD and NCGS could be a reason for fertility problems. CD is postulated to be considered in the preconceptional screening of patients with reproductive disorders, but for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, the effect on fertility is not yet proven. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Screening of celiac disease in patients with osteoporosis and osteopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtík, P; Novosad, P; Kliment, M; Hrdý, P; Bóday, A; Richterová, R; Urban, O

    2011-12-01

    The celiac disease is traditionally viewed as the children's disease with a typical form accompanied mainly by intestinal symptoms and malabsorption. This opinion is still generally accepted by the medical community. Findings based on the area-wide screening show that the prevalence has risen from the original 1 : 1 000-1 500 to 1 : 70-550. The average prevalence in the western countries is nearly 1 : 100. The prevalence of the celiac disease in the Czech republic is estimated to be approximately 1 : 200-250. It means that the number of people in the Czech republic who are likely to be affected is about 40,000-50,000 people. Currently only 10-15% of the total number of the ill people are diagnosed and monitored. Adult patients represent the main diagnostic problem because their clinical pictures are individual and the main symptoms are atypical (nonenteral). These are anaemia (mainly sideropnic), early/premature osteoporosis, herpetiformic (Duhring) dermatitis, polyneurititis, ataxia, depression, behavioural disorders, menstrual cycle disorders and infertility. Therefore our attention is currently focused on the screening of these groups of subjects. The purpose of our study was to check the frequency of the celiac disease with patients with diagnosed osteoporosis and osteopenia. In our study we have confirmed the assumption that the prevalence ofthe celiac disease in the group of subjects was 1 : 50, which means that 2.2% of patients with osteoporosis and osteopenia are affected by celiac sprue and therefore screening examination of these patients with the subsequent causal treatment (gluten-free diet) is recommended.

  7. Factors associated with number of duodenal samples obtained in suspected celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamban, Leonid; Sorser, Serge; Naydin, Stan; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Shukr, Mousa; Wiemann, Charlotte; Yevsyukov, Daniel; Piper, Michael H; Warren, Bradley; Green, Peter H R

    2017-12-01

     Many people with celiac disease are undiagnosed and there is evidence that insufficient duodenal samples may contribute to underdiagnosis. The aims of this study were to investigate whether more samples leads to a greater likelihood of a diagnosis of celiac disease and to elucidate factors that influence the number of samples collected.  We identified patients from two community hospitals who were undergoing duodenal biopsy for indications (as identified by International Classification of Diseases code) compatible with possible celiac disease. Three cohorts were evaluated: no celiac disease (NCD, normal villi), celiac disease (villous atrophy, Marsh score 3), and possible celiac disease (PCD, Marsh score celiac disease had a median of 4 specimens collected. The percentage of patients diagnosed with celiac disease with one sample was 0.3 % compared with 12.8 % of those with six samples ( P  = 0.001). Patient factors that positively correlated with the number of samples collected were endoscopic features, demographic details, and indication ( P  = 0.001). Endoscopist factors that positively correlated with the number of samples collected were absence of a trainee, pediatric gastroenterologist, and outpatient setting ( P  celiac disease significantly increased with six samples. Multiple factors influenced whether adequate biopsies were taken. Adherence to guidelines may increase the diagnosis rate of celiac disease.

  8. Genetic variants associated with celiac disease and the risk for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Henning; Willenborg, Christina; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Ferrario, Paola G; König, Inke R; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Genetic-epidemiological analyses identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with celiac disease. If there is a causal relation between celiac disease and CAD, one might expect that risk alleles primarily associated with celiac disease also increase the risk of CAD. In this study we identified from literature 41 SNPs that have been previously described to be genome-wide associated with celiac disease (p DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) dataset, a meta-analysis comprising genome-wide SNP association data from 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. 24 out of 41 (58.5 %) risk alleles for celiac disease displayed a positive association with CAD (CAD-OR range 1.001-1.081). The remaining risk alleles for celiac disease (n = 16) revealed CAD-ORs of ≤1.0 (range 0.951-1.0). The proportion of CAD associated alleles was greater but did not differ significantly from the proportion of 50 % expected by chance (p = 0.069). One SNP (rs653178 at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus) displayed study-wise statistically significant association with CAD with directionality consistent effects on celiac disease and CAD. However, the effect of this locus is most likely driven by pleiotropic effects on multiple other diseases. In conclusion, this genetically based approach provided no convincing evidence that SNPs associated with celiac disease contribute to the risk of CAD. Hence, common non-genetic factors may play a more important role explaining the coincidence of these two complex disease conditions.

  9. RISK OF INFERTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Sebastian LASA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with several extra-intestinal features, such as reproductive disorders. The relationship between celiac disease and infertility has been previously assessed, with conflicting results. Objectives We seek to determine the relationship between celiac disease and infertility. Methods Data was extracted from case-control or cohort design studies from 1966 to December 2013 using the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Library databases. We analyzed two kinds of trials: those assessing the risk of infertility in subjects with already diagnosed celiac disease, and those evaluating the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease in subjects with a diagnosis of infertility. Results The search yielded 413 potentially relevant studies for revision, 12 of which were finally included for analysis. A significant association was found between women with a diagnosis of infertility and undiagnosed celiac disease [OR 3.09 (95% CI 1.74-5.49]. When considering those studies assessing the occurrence of infertility in subjects with already-diagnosed celiac disease, no difference was found between celiac disease patients and control subjects [OR 0.99 (0.86-1.13]. Conclusions Undiagnosed celiac disease is a risk factor for infertility. Women seeking medical advice for this particular condition should be screened for celiac disease. Adoption of a gluten-free diet could have a positive impact on fertility in this group of patients.

  10. Risk of infertility in patients with celiac disease: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Juan Sebastian; Zubiaurre, Ignacio; Soifer, Luis Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with several extra-intestinal features, such as reproductive disorders. The relationship between celiac disease and infertility has been previously assessed, with conflicting results. We seek to determine the relationship between celiac disease and infertility. Data was extracted from case-control or cohort design studies from 1966 to December 2013 using the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Library databases. We analyzed two kinds of trials: those assessing the risk of infertility in subjects with already diagnosed celiac disease, and those evaluating the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease in subjects with a diagnosis of infertility. The search yielded 413 potentially relevant studies for revision, 12 of which were finally included for analysis. A significant association was found between women with a diagnosis of infertility and undiagnosed celiac disease [OR 3.09 (95% CI 1.74-5.49)]. When considering those studies assessing the occurrence of infertility in subjects with already-diagnosed celiac disease, no difference was found between celiac disease patients and control subjects [OR 0.99 (0.86-1.13)]. Undiagnosed celiac disease is a risk factor for infertility. Women seeking medical advice for this particular condition should be screened for celiac disease. Adoption of a gluten-free diet could have a positive impact on fertility in this group of patients.

  11. Celiac disease and issues of kid's eating habits in school canteens

    OpenAIRE

    Valachová, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is focused on catering for pupils with celiac disease in school canteens. The first part, the theoretical one, deals with the disease itself; it gives basic information about the disease, its history, main symptoms, anatomy of healthy digestive system, and the most common health problems occurring when suffering from celiac disease. At the end of the theoretical part diagnosis of the disease is described as well as suitable and unsuitable diet food for celiac and food legislation....

  12. Increased prevalence of celiac disease and need for routine screening among patients with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, William F; Newberry, Rodney; Lorenz, Robin; Baldus, Christine; Civitelli, Roberto

    2005-02-28

    There is an increased prevalence of osteoporosis among patients with celiac disease. However, the relative prevalence of celiac disease among osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic populations is not known, and the benefit of screening the osteoporotic population for celiac disease remains controversial. We evaluated 840 individuals, 266 with and 574 without osteoporosis, from the Washington University Bone Clinic by serologic screening for celiac disease. Individuals with positive serologic test results for antitissue transglutaminase or antiendomysial antibody were offered endoscopic intestinal biopsy to confirm the diagnosis of celiac disease. Individuals with biopsy-proven celiac disease were treated with a gluten-free diet and followed up for improvement in bone mineral density. Twelve (4.5%) of 266 patients with osteoporosis and 6 (1.0%) of 574 patients without osteoporosis tested positive by serologic screening for celiac disease. All but 2 serologically positive individuals underwent in-testinalbiopsy. Nine osteoporotic patients and 1 nonosteoporotic patient had positive biopsy results. The prevalence of biopsy-proven celiac disease was 3.4% among the osteoporotic population and 0.2% among the nonosteoporotic population. All biopsy-positive individuals tested positive by antitissue transglutaminase and antiendomysial antibody. The antitissue transglutaminase levels correlated with the severity of osteoporosis as measured by T score, demonstrating that the more severe the celiac disease the more severe the resulting osteoporosis. Treatment of the patients with celiac disease with a gluten-free diet resulted in marked improvement in T scores. The prevalence of celiac disease among osteoporotic individuals (3.4%) is much higher than that among nonosteoporotic individuals (0.2%). The prevalence of celiac disease in osteoporosis is high enough to justify a recommendation for serologic screening of all patients with osteoporosis for celiac disease.

  13. Understanding Celiac Disease From Genetics to the Future Diagnostic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Salazar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the permanent inflammation of the small bowel, triggered by the ingestion of gluten. It is associated with a number of symptoms, the most common being gastrointestinal. The prevalence of this illness worldwide is 1%. One of the main problems of CD is its difficulty to be diagnosed due to the various presentations of the disease. Besides, in many cases, CD is asymptomatic. Celiac disease is a multifactorial disease, HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 haplotypes are predisposition factors. Nowadays, molecular markers are being studied as diagnostic tools. In this review, we explore CD from its basic concept, manifestations, types, current and future methods of diagnosis, and associated disorders. Before addressing the therapeutic approaches, we also provide a brief overview of CD genetics and treatment.

  14. Chronic urticaria: A cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Haussmann, Jessica; Sekar, Arni

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is an immune-mediated disease of the small bowel that results in malabsorption. It classically presents with gastrointestinal symptoms including chronic diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal bloating and anorexia. It is becoming more frequently identified in asymptomatic patients with a diagnosis of deficiencies related to malabsorption of iron, folic acid, vitamin B12 and vitamin D. It is increasingly identified as a cause for early or refractory o...

  15. Tooth Wear Is Frequent in Adult Patients with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Amato

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Celiac disease (CD patients can be affected by mouth and tooth disorders, which are influenced by their gluten-free diet. The aim of our research was to evaluate the pathological conditions of the stomatognathic system observed in celiac patients on a gluten-free diet. (2 Methods: we consecutively recruited celiac patients on a gluten-free diet at our celiac center, as well as healthy volunteers. Two dentists examined all patients/controls and checked them for any mouth disorder. (3 Results: Forty-nine patients affected by celiac disease (age at test 31.8 ± 11.58, time on GFD 8.73 ± 7.7 and 51 healthy volunteers (age at test 30.5 ± 8.7 were included. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis was reported in 26 patients (53.0% and in 13 (25.5% controls (p = 0.005. Dental enamel disorders were reported in 7 patients (14.3% and in 0 controls (p = 0.002, with none having geographic tongue. We found non-specific tooth wear, characterized by loss of the mineralized tissue of the teeth, in 9 patients (18.3% and in 3 (5.9% controls (p = 0.05. (4 Conclusion: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and enamel hypoplasia are “risk indicators” that may suggest that an individual has CD. We detected a high prevalence of non-specific tooth wear that can be caused by several factors such as malocclusion, sleep bruxism, parafunctional activity, and age.

  16. Celiac Crisis: A Rare Or Rarely Recognized Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Nadia; Cheema, Huma Arshad; Suleman, Hassan; Fayyaz, Zafar; Mushtaq, Iqra; Muhammad; Hashmi, Almas

    2016-01-01

    Celiac crisis is a serious life threatening complication of celiac disease characterized by profuse diarrhoea, severe dehydration and metabolic disturbances leading to neuromuscular weakness, cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. It has been described as rare condition and not well documented in the literature. To improve awareness and facilitate diagnosis of this condition, we studied risk factors, pattern of presentation and management plans of celiac crisis. It was a descriptive cross sectional study. Patients presenting in emergency room(ER) with profuse diarrhoea leading to severe dehydration, neuromuscular weakness, and metabolic acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities enrolled in the studies after positive serology and small bowel biopsy suggestive of celiac disease. Total 126 patients out of 350 fulfilled the criteria including 54 (42.8%) male and 71 (56.3%) female. The mean age at presentation was 5.25±1.18 years. Risk factors were poor social status (97.60%), consanguinity (96.77%), early weaning with gluten contained diet (93.54%), and Presenting complaints were loose motion (100%), loss of neck holding (96.77%), dehydration (96.77%), polyuria (95.96%), inability to walk (67.74%), abdominal distension (85.86%). Electrolytes imbalances were hypokalaemia (2.4±0.55), hypocalcaemia (7.29±0.66), hypomagnesaemia (1.89±0.50), hypophosphatemia (2.8±0.68), hypoalbuminemia (3.05±0.48) and metabolic acidosis (96%). One hundred & twenty patients were stabilized with GFD and correction of dehydration, acidosis and electrolyte imbalance. Six patients needed parenteral steroids ant total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Recovery time from crisis was mean 5.4±2.73 days (range 3-20 days). Celiac crisis is a common but under recognized problem in developing countries. Commonest presenting feature is neuromuscular paralysis and biochemical abnormality is hypokalaemia.

  17. Celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies in patients undergoing renal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Rakel; Metso, Martti; Pörsti, Ilkka; Niemelä, Onni; Huhtala, Heini; Mustonen, Jukka; Kaukinen, Katri; Mäkelä, Satu

    2018-01-01

    An association between celiac disease and renal diseases has been suggested, but the results are controversial. To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity among individuals undergoing renal biopsies and to evaluate whether co-existent celiac autoimmunity influences the clinical outcome of the renal disease. The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity (previous diagnosis of celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies) was determined in 827 consecutive patients undergoing kidney biopsies due to clinical indications. Up to 15 years' follow-up data on kidney function and co-morbidities were obtained. Celiac autoimmunity was found in 45 (5.4%) patients. Among the IgA nephropathy patients, 8.2% of had celiac autoimmunity. At the time of kidney biopsy and after a median follow-up of 5 to 6 years, renal function measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was inferior in IgA nephropathy patients with celiac autoimmunity compared to those without it (P=0.048 and P=0.022, respectively). The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity seems to be high in patients undergoing renal biopsies, especially in patients with IgA nephropathy. Such autoimmunity may be associated with worse renal function in IgA nephropathy. Hence the co-existence of celiac disease should be taken into consideration when treating patients with renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Celiac disease and dysfunctional uterine bleeding; the efficiency of gluten free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani-Ardakani, M J; Fallahian, M; Rostami, K; Rostami-Nejad, M; Lotfi, S; Mohaghegh-Shalmani, H; Dabiri, R; Norouzinia, M; Azizpour-Shoobi, F; Zali, M R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between Celiac disease (CD) and unexplained dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) in celiac women. The celiac patients were selected from women who were referred to celiac department. Controls were selected from those women without any signs of celiac disease and matched with age. Meanwhile, a trained physician was ready to explain the study, and then in case of their allowance, a questionnaire was completed by the physician. 24 % of celiac women reported a past history of at least one menstrual cycle disorder vs 10 % of controls reported these problems (p=0.038) and higher percentage of unexplained DUB has been observed in celiac women. All celiac patients were undertaking gluten free diet for at least 3 months and the celiac patients who reported the history of DUB were again interviewed for any signs of unexplained DUB. From 12 celiac women with DUB, 10 patients reported no more unexplained DUB after getting gluten-free diet (83.3 %). The occurrence of a significant correlation between CD and DUB suggests the possibility of considering CD as one of the potential causes of abnormal uterine bleeding. Therefore, celiac disease must be seriously considered in the screening of patients with reproductive disorders (Tab. 2,Ref. 23).

  19. Features of Adult Autoimmune Enteropathy Compared With Refractory Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ayush; Choung, Rok Seon; Wang, Xiao Jing; Russo, Pierre A; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Nehra, Vandana; Murray, Joseph A

    2018-01-04

    Little is known about the features of immune-mediated non-celiac villous atrophies, such as autoimmune enteropathy (AIE). We investigated the demographic, clinical, and histologic features of adults with AIE compared to adults with refractory celiac disease type 1. We also report outcomes of treatment with open-label budesonide. We performed a retrospective case-control of patients with AIE (n=30) seen at the Mayo Clinic (in Rochester, Minnesota) from 2000 through 2015. Patients with refractory celiac disease type 1 who were treated with open-label budesonide served as controls (n=42). Biopsy specimens were reviewed for all patients. We collected demographic, clinical, biochemical and histologic data from patients. We also collected data on responses to open-capsule budesonide from patients with AIE (available from 22 patients) and controls (available from 42 patients); the median duration of follow up was 28 months (range, 0-1421 months). Patients with AIE had a higher proportion of men (60%) and were younger (mean, 44±18 years) than patients with refractory celiac disease type 1 (29% men; P=.002 and mean age, 57±16 years; P=.007). A higher proportion of patients with AIE presented with chronic diarrhea (100%) and weight loss (90%) than patients with refractory celiac disease type 1 (71%; P40 per 100 epithelial cells in 100%) compared with patients with AIE (in 50%) (P=.003). Conventional therapy (systemic steroids) had failed in most patients with AIE (a complete clinical response was reported in only 7 patients) before treatment with open-capsule budesonide was initiated. A clinical response to open-capsule budesonide was reported for 85% of patients with AIE (50% complete response, 35% partial response) compared to 92% of controls (68% complete response, 24% partial response). In a retrospective study of 30 patients with AIE, followed for a median 28 months, we found this disease to have has distinct demographic, clinical, and histologic characteristics

  20. Motility alterations in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gut motility is complex and involves neuromuscular, immune and environmental mechanisms. It is well established that patients with celiac disease (CD) often display gut dysmotility. Studies have shown the presence of disturbed esophageal motility, altered gastric emptying, and dysmotility of the small intestine, gallbladder and colon in untreated CD. Most of these motor abnormalities resolve after a strict gluten-free diet, suggesting that mechanisms related to the inflammatory condition and disease process are responsible for the motor dysfunction. Motility abnormalities are also a hallmark of functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where it has been proposed as underlying mechanism for symptom generation (diarrhea, constipation, bloating). Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a poorly defined entity, mostly self-diagnosed, that presents clinically with IBS symptoms in the absence of specific celiac markers. Patients with NCGS are believed to react symptomatically to wheat components, and some studies have proposed the presence of low-grade inflammation in these patients. There is little information regarding the functional characterization of these patients before and after a gluten-free diet. A study suggested the presence of altered gastrointestinal transit in NCGS patients who also have a high prevalence of nonspecific anti-gliadin antibodies. Results of an ongoing clinical study in NCGS patients with positive anti-gliadin antibodies before and after a gluten-free diet will be discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms for symptom generation in NCGS patients is important to find new therapeutic alternatives to the burden of imposing a strict gluten-free diet in patients who do not have CD. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Omani Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Siham Al-Sinani; Sharef Waadallah Sharef; Saif Al-Yaarubi,2; Ibrahim Al-Zakwani; Khalid Al-Naamani; Aisha Al-Hajri; Said Al-Hasani

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Published studies on the prevalence of celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus from the Arab World are scant. We aim to report the prevalence of celiac disease in Omani children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.Methods: Children with type 1 diabetes mellitus were prospectively screened for celiac disease, at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman over a period of one year (June 2011 - May 2012). Serum anti tissue transglutaminase IgA, endomysial IgA antibodies and total Ig...

  2. Clinical Aspects of Screening Detected Celiac Disease among 12-year-olds

    OpenAIRE

    van Gilse van der Pals, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sweden experienced an epidemic (1984-96) of celiac disease in children, partly attributed to changes in infant feed- ing. Our aim was to compare the total prevalence of celiac disease in two birth cohorts of 12-year-olds and relate the findings to each cohort’s ascertained infant feeding. Furthermore, we compared the growth parameters in the children with screening-detected celiac disease with their healthy peers. We also investigated the association of thyroid auto- immunity and ...

  3. Meta-analysis on anxiety and depression in adult celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, D F; Gerdes, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We used meta-analysis to test hypotheses concerning whether adult celiac disease is reliably linked with anxiety and/or depression. METHOD: We examined published reports on anxiety and depression in adult celiac disease. RESULTS: Eighteen studies on depression and eleven studies...... on anxiety in adult celiac disease met selection criteria. They show that depression is reliably more common and/or more severe in adults with celiac disease than in healthy adults (overall meta-analysis effect size: 0.97). The fail-safe margin of unpublished reports that would be required to negate...... the finding exceeds 8000. Adults with celiac disease do not, however, differ reliably in terms of depression from adults with other physical illnesses, nor do they differ reliably from healthy adults or adults with other physical illnesses in terms of anxiety. CONCLUSION: Depression is common in adult celiac...

  4. A Case of Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Batur-Caglayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS. Since a correlation between gluten intake and incidence of MS had been reported, the relationship of antigliadin antibodies and MS was debated. Case Report. We report the case of a 45-year-old female MS patient who is under interferon treatment. After seven years of monitoring, during her routine gastroenterological assessment, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Conclusion. Beside the neurological manifestations that have been demonstrated in about 10% of celiac disease (CD patients, white-matter abnormalities in brain MRI are uncommon and controversial. But in the literature, MS seems to be associated with CD as in our patient. We suggest that MS patients with gastroenterological complaints should undergo an assessment for CD.

  5. Small bowel villous atrophy: celiac disease and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Sidhu, Reena; Guandalini, Stefano; Assiri, Asaad; Rinawi, Firas; Shamir, Raanan; Das, Prasenjit; Makharia, Govind K

    2017-02-01

    Small bowel villous atrophy can represent a diagnostic challenge for gastroenterologists and pathologists. In Western countries small bowel atrophy and mild non-atrophic alterations are frequently caused by celiac disease. However, other pathology can mimic celiac disease microscopically, widening the differential diagnosis. The several novelties on this topic and the introduction of the device-assisted enteroscopy in the diagnostic flowchart make an update of the literature necessary. Areas covered: In this review, a description of the different clinical scenarios when facing with small bowel mucosal damage, particularly small bowel atrophy, is described. The published literature on this subject has been summarized and reviewed. Expert commentary: When an intestinal mucosal alteration is histologically demonstrated, the pathology report forms part of a more complex workup including serological data, clinical presentation and clinical history. A multidisciplinary team, including pathologists and enteroscopy-devoted endoscopists, is frequently required to manage patients with small bowel alterations, especially in cases of severe malabsorption syndrome.

  6. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina S; Staal, Anne; Roggen, Erwin L; Sollid, Ludvig M; Lillevang, Søren T; Barington, Torben; Husby, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by an inappropriate immunological reaction against gluten driven by gluten-specific CD4+ T cells. We screened 25 proteases and tested 10 for their potential to degrade gluten in vitro. Five proteases were further tested for their ability to prevent the proliferative response by a gluten-specific CD4+ T cell clone and seven gluten-reactive T cell lines to protease-digested gluten peptides. A proline-specific endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger (AnP2) was particularly efficient at diminishing proliferation after stimulation with cleaved antigen, and could completely block the response against both native and deamidated gluten peptides. We found that AnP2 was efficient down to a 1:64 protease:substrate ratio (w:w). When AnP2 was tested in assays using seven gluten-reactive T cell lines from individual CD patients (three adults and four children), the response to gluten was diminished in all cases. Our study indicates a therapeutic benefit of AnP2 to CD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Celiac Disease in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM): A Hospital Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniwal, Neetu; Ameta, Gaurav; Chahar, Chandra Kumar

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and clinical features of Celiac disease among children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). This prospective observational study was conducted in PBM Children Hospital, Bikaner from July 2012 through December 2013. All consecutively admitted children with SAM were recruited. All subjects were screened for Celiac disease by serological test for IgA-anti tissue Transglutaminase (IgA tTG) antibodies. All seropositive children underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for small bowel biopsy for the confirmation. Clinical features of patients with and without celiac disease were compared. The sero-prevalence (IgA tTg positivity) of Celiac disease was found to be 15.38% while prevalence of biopsy confirmed Celiac disease was 14.42% among SAM children. Abdominal distension, diarrhea, anorexia, constipation, pain in abdomen, vitamin deficiencies, edema, clubbing and mouth ulcers were more common in patients of Celiac disease compared to patients without Celiac disease but the difference was statistically significant only for abdominal distension and pain abdomen. There is a high prevalence of Celiac disease in SAM. Screening for Celiac disease (especially in presence of pain abdomen and abdominal distension) should be an essential part of work-up in all children with SAM.

  8. Association between celiac disease and iron deficiency in Caucasians, but not non-Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Joseph A; McLachlan, Stela; Adams, Paul C; Eckfeldt, John H; Garner, Chad P; Vulpe, Chris D; Gordeuk, Victor R; Brantner, Tricia; Leiendecker-Foster, Catherine; Killeen, Anthony A; Acton, Ronald T; Barcellos, Lisa F; Nickerson, Debbie A; Beckman, Kenneth B; McLaren, Gordon D; McLaren, Christine E

    2013-07-01

    Celiac disease is an increasingly recognized disorder in Caucasian populations of European origin. Little is known about its prevalence in non-Caucasians. Although it is thought to be a cause of iron-deficiency anemia, little is known about the extent to which celiac disease contributes to iron deficiency in Caucasians, and especially non-Caucasians. We analyzed samples collected from participants in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening study to identify individuals with iron deficiency and to assess the frequency of celiac disease. We analyzed serum samples from white men (≥25 y) and women (≥50 y) who participated in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening study; cases were defined as individuals with iron deficiency (serum ferritin level, ≤12 μg/L) and controls were those without (serum ferritin level, >100 μg/L in men and >50 μg/L in women). All samples also were analyzed for human recombinant tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A; positive results were confirmed by an assay for endomysial antibodies. Patients with positive results from both celiac disease tests were presumed to have untreated celiac disease, and those with a positive result from only 1 test were excluded from analysis. We analyzed HLA genotypes and frequencies of celiac disease between Caucasians and non-Caucasians with iron deficiency. Celiac disease occurred in 14 of 567 cases (2.5%) and in only 1 of 1136 controls (0.1%; Fisher exact test, P = 1.92 × 10(-6)). Celiac disease was more common in Caucasian cases (14 of 363; 4%) than non-Caucasian cases (0 of 204; P = .003). Only 1 Caucasian control and no non-Caucasian controls had celiac disease. The odds of celiac disease in individuals with iron deficiency was 28-fold (95% confidence interval, 3.7-212.8) that of controls; 13 of 14 cases with celiac disease carried the DQ2.5 variant of the HLA genotype. Celiac disease is associated with iron deficiency in Caucasians. Celiac disease is rare among non

  9. Celiac disease patients presenting with anemia have more severe disease than those presenting with diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Daya, Hussein; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2013-11-01

    Anemia is considered to be an atypical or silent presentation of celiac disease, compared with the classic presentation with diarrhea. However, little information is available about how these groups compare in terms of disease severity. We compared the severity of celiac disease between patients who present with anemia vs those who present with diarrhea. The study cohort was selected from a database of patients with celiac disease who were evaluated at a tertiary referral center between 1990 and 2011. Severity of celiac disease was assessed by the degree of villous atrophy and clinical and serologic parameters. Patients were compared according to mode of presentation and sex. Multivariable analyses, adjusting for age and sex, were conducted to assess the association between the mode of celiac disease presentation and cholesterol level, bone density, severity of villous atrophy, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and level of anti-tissue transglutaminase. Of 727 patients, 77% presented with diarrhea and 23% with anemia (92% iron deficient). On multiple regression analysis, presentation with anemia was associated with lower levels of total cholesterol (P = .02) and high-density lipoprotein (P = .002) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P = .001) and level of anti-tissue transglutaminase (P = .01). Presentation with anemia was associated with lower level of cholesterol only in women. Anemic patients were more than 2-fold more likely to have severe villous atrophy and a low bone mass density at the time they were diagnosed with celiac disease than patients who presented with diarrhea. Celiac disease patients who present with anemia have more severe disease than those who present with diarrhea. There also appear to be sex-specific differences with regard to the association between anemia and the different features of celiac disease. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease after diagnosis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Norelle R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Green, Peter H R; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common cause of chronic liver disease. Celiac disease alters intestinal permeability and treatment with a gluten-free diet often causes weight gain, but so far there are few reports of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with celiac disease. Population-based cohort study. We compared the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease diagnosed from 1997 to 2009 in individuals with celiac disease (n = 26,816) to matched reference individuals (n = 130,051). Patients with any liver disease prior to celiac disease were excluded, as were individuals with a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol-related disorder to minimize misclassification of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Cox regression estimated hazard ratios for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were determined. During 246,559 person-years of follow-up, 53 individuals with celiac disease had a diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (21/100,000 person-years). In comparison, we identified 85 reference individuals diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease during 1,488,413 person-years (6/100,000 person-years). This corresponded to a hazard ratio of 2.8 (95% CI 2.0-3.8), with the highest risk estimates seen in children (HR = 4.6; 95% CI 2.3-9.1). The risk increase in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis was 13.3 (95% CI 3.5-50.3) but remained significantly elevated even beyond 15 years after the diagnosis of celiac disease (HR = 2.5; 95% CI 1.0-5.9). Individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease compared to the general population. Excess risks were highest in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis, but persisted through 15 years after diagnosis with celiac disease. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Celiac disease: Alternatives to a gluten free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingone, Fabiana; Capone, Pietro; Ciacci, Carolina

    2010-02-06

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine caused by the ingestion of gluten or related rye and barley proteins. At present, the only available treatment is a strict gluten-exclusion diet. However, recent understanding of the molecular basis for this disorder has improved and enabled the identification of targets for new therapies. This article aims to critically summarize these recent studies.

  12. Celiac Disease – Advances in Treatment via Gluten Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Stoven, Samantha; Murray, Joseph A.; Marietta, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy which occurs in genetically susceptible individuals carrying the prerequisite genetic markers HLA DQ2 or DQ8. These genetic markers are present in approximately 30% of the population, and the worldwide prevalence of CD is estimated to be approximately 1-2%. Currently a gluten-free diet is the only treatment for CD, but novel therapies aimed at gluten modification are underway. This review will discuss gluten based therapies including wheat alte...

  13. Celiac disease: Alternatives to a gluten free diet

    OpenAIRE

    Zingone, Fabiana; Capone, Pietro; Ciacci, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine caused by the ingestion of gluten or related rye and barley proteins. At present, the only available treatment is a strict gluten-exclusion diet. However, recent understanding of the molecular basis for this disorder has improved and enabled the identification of targets for new therapies. This article aims to critically summarize these recent studies.

  14. Immunohistochemical CD3 staining detects additional patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Amani; Wolters, Victorien M; Houwen, Roderick H J; ten Kate, Fiebo J W

    2015-06-28

    To investigate whether performing immunohistochemical CD3 staining, in order to improve the detection of intra-epithelial lymphocytosis, has an additional value in the histological diagnosis of celiac disease. Biopsies obtained from 159 children were stained by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and evaluated using the Marsh classification. CD3 staining was subsequently evaluated separately and independently. Differences in evaluation between the routine HE sections and CD3 staining were present in 20 (12.6%) cases. In 10 (6.3%) patients the diagnosis of celiac disease (Marsh II and III) changed on examination of CD3 staining: in 9 cases, celiac disease had initially been missed on the HE sections, while 1 patient had been over-diagnosed on the routine sections. In all patients, the final diagnosis based on CD3 staining, was concordant with serological results, which was not found previously. In the other 10 (12.3%) patients, the detection of sole intra-epithelial lymphocytosis (Marsh I) improved. Nine patients were found to have Marsh I on CD3 sections, which had been missed on routine sections. Interestingly, the only patient with negative serology had Giardiasis. Finally, in 1 patient with negative serology, in whom Marsh I was suspected on HE sections, this diagnosis was withdrawn after evaluation of the CD3 sections. Staining for CD3 has an additional value in the histological detection of celiac disease lesions, and CD3 staining should be performed when there is a discrepancy between serology and the diagnosis made on HE sections.

  15. Celiac disease serum markers and recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharshiner, Rita; Romero, Stephanie T; Bardsley, Tyler R; Branch, D Ware; Silver, Robert M

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with numerous unfavorable health outcomes, including pregnancy complications such as infertility, preterm birth, and preeclampsia. However, the association between celiac disease and recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) remains uncertain. Our purpose was to compare serum markers of celiac disease in women with and without RPL. Therefore, we performed a case-control study of 116 women with unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss and 116 age-matched controls. Maternal sera were analyzed for immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies and endomysial (EM) antibodies. Groups were similar with regard to age, race and ethnicity, and BMI. One case and one control tested positive (≥20 Units) for IgA tTG antibodies and mean levels of IgA tTG antibodies were similar in cases and controls (5.5±2.86 versus 6.0±12.45; p=0.16). No cases or controls were positive for IgG tTG antibodies. However, cases had higher levels of IgG tTG antibody compared with controls (4.0±2.40 versus 3.3±1.30; p=0.0064). One subject (a control) tested positive for IgA EM antibodies and no subjects tested positive for IgG EM antibodies. In conclusion, positive results for tTG and EM antibodies were similar in women with and without RPL. Given these results, testing for occult celiac disease is not recommended in the evaluation of women with idiopathic RPL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Potential blood-based markers of celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bragde, Hanna; Jansson, Ulf; Fredrikson, Mats; Grodzinsky, Ewa; Soederman, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood-based diagnostics has the potential to simplify the process of diagnosing celiac disease (CD). Although high levels of autoantibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-TG2) are strongly indicative of active CD, several other scenarios involve a need for additional blood-based CD markers. Methods We investigated the levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) in whole blood (n?=?49) and protein in plasma (n?=?22) from cases with active CD (n?=?20), with confirmed CD and normalized hist...

  17. Celiac disease: A missed cause of metabolic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease. The symptoms of CD are varied and atypical, with many patients having no gastrointestinal symptoms. Metabolic bone disease (MBD is a less recognized manifestation of CD associated with spectrum of musculoskeletal signs and symptoms, viz. bone pains, proximal muscle weakness, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fracture. We here report five patients who presented with severe MBD as the only manifestation of CD. Materials and Methods: Records of 825 patients of CD diagnosed during 2002-2010 were retrospectively analyzed for clinical features, risk factors, signs, biochemical, and radiological parameters. Results: We were able to identify five patients (0.6% of CD who had monosymptomatic presentation with musculoskeletal symptoms and signs in the form of bone pains, proximal myopathy, and fragility fractures without any gastrointestinal manifestation. All the five patients had severe MBD in the form of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fragility fractures. Four of the five patients had additional risk factors such as antiepileptic drugs, chronic alcohol consumption, malnutrition, and associated vitamin D deficiency which might have contributed to the severity of MBD. Conclusion: Severe metabolic disease as the only presentation of CD is rare. Patients show significant improvement in clinical, biochemical, and radiological parameters with gluten-free diet, calcium, and vitamin D supplementation. CD should be looked for routinely in patients presenting with unexplained MBD.

  18. Intestinal T-cell Responses in Celiac Disease – Impact of Celiac Disease Associated Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Veronika; Sandström, Olof; Hedberg, Maria; Hammarström, Sten; Hernell, Olle; Hammarström, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD), an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the “Swedish CD epidemic” and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8+ T cells (Tc17) and CD4+ T cells (Th17), with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten. PMID:23326425

  19. Clinical and Laboratory Features and Extraintestinal Manifestations of Celiac Disease in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mete Akın

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Celiac disease an autoimmune disorder resulting from an immune response to the gluten in genetically predisposed patients. Although, diarrhea is the most common finding at presentation in adults, disease may present with extraintestinal manifestations such as anemia, osteoporosis, elevated transaminase levels and growth retardation. In this article, symptoms, extraintestinal manifestations and coexistence with other autoimmune disorders of adult patients with celiac disease were evaluated. Material and Method: 22 patients whose followed with the diagnosis of celiac disease in Suleyman Demirel University Department of Gastroenterology, between January 2007 and Semptember 2010, were evaluated retrospectively. Symptoms, extraintestinal manifestations and coexistence with other autoimmune disorders of patients at presentation were investigated. Results: 13 (59% of all cases were female and 9 (41% were male. Mean age at presentation was 38,5 years. Most common complaints were diarrhea and weakness . Tissue transglutaminase and/or antiendomysium antibody were positive, and diagnosis was confirmed by histopathologic examination in all patients. Iron deficiency, vitamine B12 deficiency and folic acid deficiency were detected in 17 (77%, 8 (36% and 6 (27% patients, respectively. There were elevated transaminase levels in 8 (36% patients. Osteoporosis was detected in 4 female and 1 male patients. Sensorimotor polineuropathy was detected in 2 patients. There was growth retardation in 2 patients. Autoimmune hypothyroidism and Type 1 diabetes mellitus were detected in 2 and 1 patients, respectively. Coexistence with Crohn%u2019s disease was detected in a patient. Discussion: Celiac disease may present with extraintestinal manifestations in adults. It should be remembered, especially in patients with iron deficiency and mild to moderate transaminase elevations with unexplained etiology. It should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and

  20. The Spectrum of Differences between Childhood and Adulthood Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Kruzliak, Peter; Cangemi, Giuseppina C.; Pohanka, Miroslav; Betti, Elena; Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2015-01-01

    An old saying states that ‘’children are not little adults” and this certainly holds true for celiac disease, as there are many peculiar aspects regarding its epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical presentations, associated diseases, and response to treatment in pediatric compared to adult populations, to such an extent that it merits a description of its own. In fact, contrary to the past when it was thought that celiac disease was a disorder predominantly affecting childhood and characterized by a malabsorption syndrome, nowadays it is well recognized that it affects also adult and elderly people with an impressive variability of clinical presentation. In general, the clinical guidelines for diagnosis recommend starting with specific serologic testing in all suspected subjects, including those suffering from extraintestinal related conditions, and performing upper endoscopy with appropriate biopsy sampling of duodenal mucosa in case of positivity. The latter may be omitted in young patients showing high titers of anti-transglutaminase antibodies. The subsequent management of a celiac patient differs substantially depending on the age at diagnosis and should be based on the important consideration that this is a lifelong condition. PMID:26506381

  1. Latent celiac disease in reproductive performance of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Meena, Mamta; Begum, Nargis; Kumar, Nirmal; Gupta, Ram Kumar; Aggarwal, Sarita; Prasad, Sudha; Batra, Swaraj

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence of positive serologic findings for celiac disease in Indian women with poor reproductive performance. Cross-sectional except that the women with intrauterine growth restriction were followed prospectively until delivery. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of a tertiary teaching hospital, New Delhi. Eight hundred ninety-three women (104 women with idiopathic recurrent abortion, 104 women with unexplained stillbirth, 230 cases of unexplained infertility, 150 pregnant women with idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction, 305 control cases). None. The presence of antigliadin IgA and IgG, anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA by ELISA, and IgA antiendomysium antibody by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The seroprevalence of transglutaminase IgA was 6.70% in the group with recurrent abortion, 5.70% in the group with stillbirth, 5.65% in the group with infertility, 9.33% in the group with intrauterine growth restriction, and 1.30% in the control group. Rates of previous preterm births, low-birth-weight infants, and cesarean section were higher in seropositive women compared with seronegative subjects. Women having poor reproductive performance had subclinical celiac disease. The serology for celiac disease can be considered in idiopathic cases. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The evaluation of hearing loss in children with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bükülmez, Ayşegül; Dalgiç, Buket; Gündüz, Bülent; Sari, Sinan; Bayazit, Yildirim Ahmet; Kemaloğlu, Yusuf Kemal

    2013-02-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy. The disease may be presented with extraintestinal manifestations including neurological findings. Epilepsy and ataxia are well known neurological disorders in CD. But there are very limited numbers of reports on sensory-neural hearing loss in CD in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate the hearing functions in children with newly diagnosed CD. Ninety-seven (194 ears) [56 girls, 41 boys (age range: 1.5-17 years)] newly diagnosed celiac disease patients and 85 sex and age-matched controls (170 ears) were included in this study. Hearing function was assessed by pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, tympanometry and otoacoustic emissions measurements. No significant difference were found between the patients and control groups measurements including the pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, tympanometry and otoacoustic emissions No significant difference was found for pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, tympanometry and otoacoustic emissions measurements in celiac patients according to the Marsh-Oberhuber classification (P>0.05). Our results showed that hearing functions of children with newly diagnosed CD were similar to healthy controls. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Spectrum of Differences between Childhood and Adulthood Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele Ciccocioppo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An old saying states that ‘’children are not little adults” and this certainly holds true for celiac disease, as there are many peculiar aspects regarding its epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical presentations, associated diseases, and response to treatment in pediatric compared to adult populations, to such an extent that it merits a description of its own. In fact, contrary to the past when it was thought that celiac disease was a disorder predominantly affecting childhood and characterized by a malabsorption syndrome, nowadays it is well recognized that it affects also adult and elderly people with an impressive variability of clinical presentation. In general, the clinical guidelines for diagnosis recommend starting with specific serologic testing in all suspected subjects, including those suffering from extraintestinal related conditions, and performing upper endoscopy with appropriate biopsy sampling of duodenal mucosa in case of positivity. The latter may be omitted in young patients showing high titers of anti-transglutaminase antibodies. The subsequent management of a celiac patient differs substantially depending on the age at diagnosis and should be based on the important consideration that this is a lifelong condition.

  4. The Burden of Depressive and Bipolar Disorders in Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Conti, Alessandra; Lecca, Federica; Sancassiani, Federica; Cossu, Giulia; Carruxi, Rossana; Boccone, Alessandro; Cadoni, Michela; Pisanu, Anna; Francesca Moro, Maria; Demelia, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    to measure the association between Celiac Disease (CD) and affective disorders, particularly Bipolar Disorder (BD), since it has not been studied yet, and to measure how much the quality of life (QoL) of a person with CD is affected by comorbidity with these disorders. Case-control study. 60 consecutive patients with CD. 240 subjects without CD, randomly selected after sex- and age-matching from a database of an epidemiological study. Psychiatric diagnoses according to DSM-IV carried out by physicians using structured interview tools (ANTAS-SCID). QoL was measured by means of SF-12. The lifetime prevalence of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) was higher in CD than in controls (30.0% vs 8.3%, P<0.0001) as well as Panic Disorder (PD) (18.3% vs 5.4%, P<0.001) and BD (4.3% vs 0.4%, P<0.005). Patients with CD show a lower mean score than controls on SF12 (35.8±5.7 vs. 38.2±6.4; p=0.010), but those without comorbidity with MDD, PD and BD do not. The attributable burden of CD in worsening QoL - when comorbid with these disorders - was found comparable to that of serious chronic diseases like Wilson's Disease, and lower than Multiple Sclerosis only. MDD, PD and BD are strictly associated with CD. The comorbidity with these disorders is the key determinant of impaired quality of life in CD. Thus a preventive action on mood and anxiety disorders in patients suffering from CD is required. Moreover a screening for CD in people with affective disorders and showing key symptoms or family history of CD is recommended.

  5. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos – Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet ... Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bone Health Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac ...

  6. From genome-wide association studies to disease mechanisms : celiac disease as a model for autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Withoff, Sebo

    Celiac disease is characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction in the intestine and is triggered by gluten, a constituent derived from grains which is present in the common daily diet in the Western world. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms behind celiac disease etiology are still not

  7. Advances in Diagnosis and Management of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ciarán P.; Bai, Julio C.; Liu, Edwin; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has a prevalence of ∼1% in many populations worldwide. New diagnoses have increased substantially, due to increased awareness, better diagnostic tools, and probable, real increases in incidence. The breadth of recognized clinical presentations continues to expand, making the disorder highly relevant to all physicians. Newer diagnostic tools, including serologic tests for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptide, greatly facilitate diagnosis. Tests for celiac-permissive HLA DQ2 and DQ8 molecules are useful in defined clinical situations. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. However, according to recent controversial guidelines, a diagnosis can be made without biopsy in certain circumstances, especially for children. Symptoms, mortality, and risk for malignancy can each be reduced by adherence to a gluten-free diet. This treatment is a challenge, however, as the diet is expensive, socially isolating, and not always effective in controlling symptoms or intestinal damage. Hence, there is increasing interest in developing non-dietary therapies. PMID:25662623

  8. The broad spectrum of celiac disease and gluten sensitive enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOCAN, OANA; DUMITRAŞCU, DAN L.

    2016-01-01

    The celiac disease is an immune chronic condition with genetic transmission, caused by the intolerance to gluten. Gluten is a protein from cereals containing the following soluble proteins: gliadine, which is the most toxic, and the prolamins. The average prevalence is about 1% in USA and Europe, but high in Africa: 5.6% in West Sahara. In the pathogenesis several factors are involved: gluten as external trigger, genetic predisposition (HLA, MYO9B), viral infections, abnormal immune reaction to gluten. Severity is correlated with the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, cryptic hyperplasia and villous atrophy, as well as with the length of intestinal involvement. The severity is assessed according to the Marsh–Oberhuber staging. Diagnostic criteria are: positive serological tests, intestinal biopsy, the reversal after gluten free diet (GFD). Beside refractory forms, new conditions have been described, like the non celiac gluten intolerance. In a time when more and more people adhere to GFD for nonscientific reasons, practitioners should be updated with the progress in celiac disease knowledge. PMID:27547052

  9. Is MYO9B the missing link between schizophrenia and celiac disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, Bart J.; Bakker, Steven C.; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Sinke, Richard J.; Kahn, Rene S.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2008-01-01

    There has long been discussion on the correlation between schizophrenia and autoimmune diseases (especially celiac disease), which makes the recently discovered celiac disease risk factor, MYO9B, an attractive functional and positional candidate gene for schizophrenia. To test this hypothesis we

  10. Epidemiologic and demographic survey of celiac disease in khuzestan province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavinejad, Pezhman; Hajiani, Eskandar; Masjedizadeh, Rahim; Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Faramarzi, Mohammad; Sebghatollahi, Vahid; Shayesteh, Ali Akbar; Kadkhodae, Ahmad; Jasemi Zergani, Farzad; Asghari, Shahnaz; Farsi, Farnaz

    2014-04-01

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease presents with a wide spectrum of symptoms. This study clarifies different aspects of celiac disease along with the most common patterns of celiac presentation in Khuzestan Province, Iran. METHODS Patients' information was obtained by evaluation of their files from the archives of the Khuzestan Celiac Society and records at gastroenterologists' offices in this province. RESULTS Overall, there were 103 (40 males, 63 females) patients included in this study. Patients' mean ages were 33 ± 11 years (males) and 31.6 ± 11.7 years (females). In terms of geographic distribution, 54.1% resided in the center of the province followed by 26.5% who were residents of the northern area. The rate of employment among men was 70.6% whereas it was 8.3% for women. In terms of education, 21.9% of men and 33.3% of women had academic educations. The rate of matrimony was 80.6% (n=29) for men, 65.4% (n=38) for women and 3.4% (n=2) who were divorced. Mean height was 164 ± 14 cm in men and 157.5 ± 10 cm in women. Mean BMI at the time of presentation was 22.7 in men and 22.6 in women. The most common gastrointestinal (GI) complaints in male patients were diarrhea (35%), reflux (20%), bloating (17.5%), abdominal pain (15%), vomiting (15%) and constipation (7.5%). Female patients experienced diarrhea (49.2%), abdominal pain (31.7%), bloating (31.7%), vomiting (19%), constipation(9.5%) and reflux (7.9%). The most common concomitant non-GI disorders among male patients were anemia (17.1%), thyroid disease (14.3%), and weight loss (14.3%); women experienced anemia (33.9%), thyroid disease (12.5%), and weight loss (7.1%). Approximately half of the patients exhibited symptoms for more than five years prior to diagnosis and 90% were diagnosed by gastroenterologists. Of these, 43% had normal endoscopy results. The most common serologic markers were anti-TTG (69.9%), anti-EMA (27.7%). CONCLUSION Physicians, prior to attributing patients' symptoms to irritable bowel

  11. Celiac disease: understanding the gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascuñán, Karla A; Vespa, María Catalina; Araya, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    The only effective and safe treatment of celiac disease (CD) continues being strict exclusion of gluten for life, the so-called gluten-free diet (GFD). Although this treatment is highly successful, following strict GFD poses difficulties to patients in family, social and working contexts, deteriorating his/her quality of life. We aimed to review main characteristics of GFD with special emphasis on factors that may interfere with adherence to it. We conducted a search of various databases, such as PubMed, Google Scholar, Embase, and Scielo, with focus on key words such as "gluten-free diet", "celiac disease", "gluten" and "gluten-free diet adherence". Available literature has not reached definitive conclusions on the exact amount of gluten that is harmless to celiac patients, although international agreements establish cutoff points for gluten-free products and advise the use of clinical assessment to tailor the diet according to individual needs. Following GFD must include eliminating gluten as ingredient as well as hidden component and potential cross contamination in foods. There are numerous grains to substitute wheat but composition of most gluten-free products tends to include only a small number of them, especially rice. The diet must be not only free of gluten but also healthy to avoid nutrient, vitamins and minerals deficiencies or excess. Overweight/obesity frequency has increased among celiac patients so weight gain deserves attention during follow up. Nutritional education by a trained nutritionist is of great relevance to achieve long-term satisfactory health status and good compliance. A balanced GFD should be based on a combination of naturally gluten-free foods and certified processed gluten-free products. How to measure and improve adherence to GFD is still controversial and deserves further study.

  12. Association between maternal iron supplementation during pregnancy and risk of celiac disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størdal, Ketil; Haugen, Margaretha; Brantsæter, Anne Lise; Lundin, Knut E A; Stene, Lars C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of our study was to determine whether the use of iron supplements during pregnancy affects the risk for celiac disease in children. We assessed data from the prospective Norwegian Mother and Child cohort study, in which individuals with celiac disease were identified by answers on questionnaires and linkage to the Norwegian Patient Register. Complete data were available for 78,846 children (mean age 5.9 years, range 2-12 years); 314 children were identified with celiac disease. Questionnaires were given to pregnant women to collect information on use of iron-containing supplements, diet, anemia, and levels of hemoglobin. Celiac disease was diagnosed in 4.65 of 1000 children whose mothers took iron supplements while they were pregnant, compared with 3.15 of 1000 children whose mothers did not. After adjusting for children's age, sex, and age of gluten introduction, and the presence of celiac disease in mothers, iron supplementation during pregnancy remained significantly associated with celiac disease in children (odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.68; P = .019). However, celiac disease was not associated with the mothers' intake of iron from foods (adjusted OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.97-1.03). Anemia before or during the early stages of pregnancy was not significantly associated with the risk of celiac disease in children (adjusted OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.84-2.00; P = .24). The use of iron supplements during pregnancy remained significantly associated with celiac disease in children after adjusting for children who were given iron supplements before 18 months of age, which itself was associated with celiac disease. In a prospective Norwegian Mother and Child cohort study, we found an increased risk of celiac disease in children whose mothers used iron supplements during pregnancy; this association does not appear to arise from maternal anemia. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ages of celiac disease: From changing environment to improved diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Tommasini, Alberto; Not, Tarcisio; Ventura, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    From the time of Gee’s landmark writings, the recent history of celiac disease (CD) can be divided into many ages, each driven by a diagnostic advance and a deeper knowledge of disease pathogenesis. At the same time, these advances were paralleled by the identification of new clinical patterns associated with CD and by a continuous redefinition of the prevalence of the disease in population. In the beginning, CD was considered a chronic indigestion, even if the causative food was not known; l...

  14. HELICOBACTER PYLORI PREVALENCE IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: results from a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan LASA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Some previously published studies have suggested an inverse relationship between celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori, raising the possibility of the protective role Helicobacter pylori could have against celiac disease development. Nevertheless, this association is inconclusive. Objectives To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in celiac subjects. Methods Between January 2013 and June 2014, patients over 18 years old undergoing upper endoscopy who required both gastric and duodenal biopsies were included for analysis. Enrolled subjects were divided in two groups: those with a diagnosis of celiac disease and those without a celiac disease diagnosis. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence was compared between groups. Among celiac patients, endoscopic markers of villous atrophy as well as histological damage severity were compared between those with and without Helicobacter pylori infection. Results Overall, 312 patients were enrolled. Seventy two of them had a diagnosis of celiac disease. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence among celiac disease patients was 12.5%, compared to 30% in non-celiac patients [OR=0.33 (0.15-0.71]. There was not a significant difference in terms of the severity of villous atrophy in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection compared to those without it. There was a slight increase in the prevalence of endoscopic markers in those Helicobacter pylori-negative celiac subjects. Conclusion Helicobacter pylori infection seems to be less frequent in celiac patients; among those celiac subjects with concomitant Helicobacter pylori infection, histological damage degree and presence of endoscopic markers suggesting villous atrophy seem to be similar to those without Helicobacter pylori infection.

  15. Pediatric Celiac Disease: Follow-Up in the Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valitutti, Francesco; Trovato, Chiara Maria; Montuori, Monica; Cucchiara, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    The follow-up of celiac disease (CD) is challenging due to the scarcity of published data and the lack of standardized evidence-based protocols. The worldwide frequency and methods of CD follow-up appear to be heavily influenced by expert opinions of the individual physicians who assess children with CD. The aim of this review was to summarize the available studies on CD follow-up in children. We conducted a literature search with the use of PubMed, Medline, and Embase (from 1900 to 15 December 2016) for terms relevant to this review, including CD, follow-up, dietary adherence or dietary compliance, nutrition, comorbidities, complications, and quality of life. The aims of follow-up are as follows: to ensure strict adherence to a gluten-free diet, to ensure nutritional adequacy, to improve quality of life, and to prevent disease complications. For the correct evaluation of children with CD at follow-up, a clinical and biochemical evaluation is necessary on a regular basis. It is advisable to assess compliance, nutrition, comorbidities, or possible complications once a year at the referral center. Laboratory tests might be useful for a thorough evaluation of any patient with CD to rule out a micronutrient deficiency (full blood count, ferritin, folic acid, vitamin B-6, and vitamin B-12) and possible cardiovascular risk factors (glucose, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides). Biochemical evaluation is essential when there are clinical problems and should be customized on the basis of the specific clinical suspicion. Associated autoimmune thyroiditis should also be screened for yearly by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid autoantibody concentrations, regardless of symptoms, because hypothyroidism is often subtle and methods for early treatment are available and desirable. Although evidence-based recommendations for follow-up of pediatric patients with CD have not yet been established, we advise a yearly follow-up visit as the safest approach. © 2017 American

  16. Is it necessary to screen for celiac disease in adult idiopathic osteoporosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Aletaha, Najmeh; Khonche, Ahmad; Farahvash, Benyamin; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    the aim of this study was to investigate the necessity of screening for celiac disease in idiopathic osteoporotic patients. Osteopenia and osteoporosis are well-known and prevalent complications of celiac disease. However, the relative prevalence of celiac disease among osteoporotic populations is not known, and the benefit of screening for celiac disease among the osteoporotic population remains controversial. We evaluated a total of 560 individuals, 460 with osteoporosis and 100 healthy subjects, from the rheumatology clinic in Imam Khomeini and Shariati hospital by IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) for celiac disease. Then individuals with positive serologic test underwent upper GI Endoscopy & 2nd part duodenum biopsies. The clinical findings were evaluated in both groups and were compared with each other. Five (1.08%) of 460 patients with osteoporosis and 1 (1%) of 100 subjects without osteoporosis had celiac disease by positive serologic & pathology results. Three patients with positive serology & pathology results were female. All patients in osteoporotic group had at least one other symptom of celiac disease. Two of them had anemia and others had chronic abdominal pain, recurrent oral aphtous lesion & chronic bloating. In the present study, the prevalence of celiac disease in osteoporotic patients is not high enough to justify recommendation for serologic screening of celiac disease in all patients with idiopathic osteoporosis; but in osteoporotic patients with other celiac or gastrointestinal symptoms and signs, for example iron deficiency anemia, chronic dyspepsia and bloating, constipation or diarrhea and recurrent aphtous lesions, it is necessary to evaluate for celiac disease.

  17. Celiac Disease: Role of the Epithelial BarrierSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schumann

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD a T-cell–mediated response to gluten is mounted in genetically predisposed individuals, resulting in a malabsorptive enteropathy histologically highlighted by villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia. Recent data point to the epithelial layer as an under-rated hot spot in celiac pathophysiology to date. This overview summarizes current functional and genetic evidence on the role of the epithelial barrier in CD, consisting of the cell membranes and the apical junctional complex comprising sealing as well as ion and water channel-forming tight junction proteins and the adherens junction. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms are discussed, including apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, biology of intestinal stem cells, alterations in the apical junctional complex, transcytotic uptake of gluten peptides, and possible implications of a defective epithelial polarity. Current research is directed toward new treatment options for CD that are alternatives or complementary therapeutics to a gluten-free diet. Thus, strategies to target an altered epithelial barrier therapeutically also are discussed. Keywords: Celiac Sprue, Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy, Tight Junction, Epithelial Polarity, Partitioning-Defective Proteins, α-Gliadin 33mer

  18. Clinical Spectrum of Biopsy-Defined Celiac Disease in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty patients (17 females and 13 males with adult celiac disease initially diagnosed after age 60 were seen during a 12-year period. Diagnosis in each patient was based on small intestinal biopsy and a clinical as well as histological response to a strict gluten-free diet. Diarrhea, weight loss and/or anemia, usually due to iron deficiency, were present in the majority of patients and often lead to other diagnostic considerations, including colon cancer, prior to definition of celiac disease. No patient in this series had a known family history of celiac disease. Dermatitis herpetiformis and thyroid hypofunction were frequently detected in this elderly population, possibly reflecting the autoimmune and systemic nature of celiac disease. Neoplastic disease was common in this age group, suggesting that particular vigilance in follow-up is required, especially for lymphoma, in elderly patients with celiac disease.

  19. Prevalence of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity Among Adolescents and Young Adults in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Juanli; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Jinyan; Li, Jingjing; Yu, Fenglian; Lu, Jun; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaozhong; Tong, Ping; Wu, Zhihua; Yang, Anshu; Yao, Yonghong; Nadif, S.; Shu, Heng; Jiang, Xu; Wu, Yujie; Gilissen, Luud; Chen, Hongbing

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims: In China, epidemiologic information on celiac disease autoimmunity is scarce and fragmented. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in the general Chinese population. Methods: In a cross-sectional prospective study, 19,778 undiagnosed Chinese

  20. Asymptomatic Celiac Disease in Children with Trisomy 21 at 26 Months of Age or Less

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Roizen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of asymptomatic celiac disease identified in children with Down syndrome after being screened at around twenty-four months of age.  These cases raise the question as to what age is screening for celiac disease indicated in a child with Down syndrome and no symptoms.

  1. Positive Celiac Disease Serology and Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Adult Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R Duerksen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low bone density and osteoporosis have been demonstrated in celiac disease populations in Europe, South America and the United States. Serological testing with tissue transglutaminase (TTG and immunoglobulin A endomysial (EMA antibodies is highly specific for celiac disease, while antigliadin antibody (AGA testing is less specific.

  2. The Relationship Between Child Mortality Rates and Prevalence of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Federico; Raiteri, Alberto; Schiepatti, Annalisa; Klersy, Catherine; Corazza, Gino R

    2018-02-01

    Some evidence suggests that prevalence of celiac disease in the general population is increasing over time. Because the prognosis of celiac disease was a dismal one before discovering the role of gluten, our aim was to investigate a possible relationship between children under-5 mortality rates and prevalence rates of celiac disease. Thanks to a literature review, we found 27 studies performed in 17 different countries describing the prevalence of celiac disease in schoolchildren; between 1995 and 2011, 4 studies were performed in Italy. A meta-analysis of prevalence rates was performed. Prevalence was compared between specific country under-5 mortality groups, publication year, and age. In the last decades, under-5 mortality rates have been decreasing all over the world. This reduction is paralleled by an increase of the prevalence of celiac disease. The Spearman correlation coefficient was -63%, 95% confidence interval -82% to -33% (P celiac disease in the general population. In the near future, the number of patients with celiac disease will increase, thanks to the better environmental conditions that nowadays allow a better survival of children with celiac disease.

  3. Importance of diastolic velocities in the detection of celiac and mesenteric artery disease by duplex ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Just, S; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease.......To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease....

  4. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF GASTROENTEROLOGY CLINICAL GUIDELINE: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Hill, Ivor D; Kelly, Ciarán P; Calderwood, Audrey H; Murray, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease is an immune-based reaction to dietary gluten (storage protein for wheat, barley and rye) that primarily affects the small intestine in those with a genetic predisposition and resolves with exclusion of gluten from the diet. There has been a substantial increase in the prevalence of celiac disease over the last 50 years and an increase in the rate of diagnosis in the last 10 years. Celiac disease can present with many symptoms, including typical gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain) and also non-gastrointestinal abnormalities (e.g. abnormal liver function tests, iron deficiency anemia, bone disease, skin disorders, and many other protean manifestations). Indeed, many individuals with celiac disease may have no symptoms at all. Celiac disease is usually detected by serologic testing of celiac-specific antibodies. The diagnosis is confirmed by duodenal mucosal biopsies. Both serology and biopsy should be performed on a gluten-containing diet. The treatment for celiac disease is primarily a gluten-free diet (GFD), which requires significant patient education, motivation, and follow-up. Non-responsive celiac disease occurs frequently, particularly in those diagnosed in adulthood. Persistent or recurring symptoms should lead to a review of the patient’s original diagnosis to exclude alternative diagnoses, a review of the GFD to ensure there is no obvious gluten contamination, and serologic testing to confirm adherence with the GFD. In addition, evaluation for disorders associated with celiac disease that could cause persistent symptoms, such as microscopic colitis, pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, and complications of celiac disease, such as enteropathy-associated lymphoma or refractory celiac disease, should be entertained. Newer therapeutic modalities are being studied in clinical

  5. Flow cytometry of duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytes improves diagnosis of celiac disease in difficult cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Julio; Morgado, José Mario T; Ruiz-Martín, Juan; Guardiola, Antonio; Lopes-Nogueras, Miriam; García-Vela, Almudena; Martín-Sacristán, Beatriz; Sánchez-Muñoz, Laura

    2017-10-01

    Diagnosis of celiac disease is difficult when the combined results of serology and histology are inconclusive. Studies using flow cytometry of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) have found that celiac patients have increased numbers of γδ IELs, along with a decrease in CD3-CD103 + IELs. The objective of this article is to assess the role of flow cytometric analysis of IELs in the diagnosis of celiac disease in difficult cases. A total of 312 patients with suspicion of celiac disease were included in the study. Duodenal biopsy samples were used for histological assessment and for flow cytometric analysis of IELs. In 46 out of 312 cases (14.7%) the combination of serology and histology did not allow the confirmation or exclusion of celiac disease. HLA typing had been performed in 42 of these difficult cases. Taking into account HLA typing and the response to a gluten-free diet, celiac disease was excluded in 30 of these cases and confirmed in the remaining 12. Flow cytometric analysis of IELs allowed a correct diagnosis in 39 out of 42 difficult cases (92.8%) and had a sensitivity of 91.7% (95% CI: 61.5% to 99.8%) and a specificity of 93.3% (95% CI: 77.9% to 99.2%) for the diagnosis of celiac disease in this setting. Flow cytometric analysis of IELs is useful for the diagnosis of celiac disease in difficult cases.

  6. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Stine Dydensborg; Stordal, Ketil; Hansen, Tine Plato

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease......-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports...... on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. RESULTS: We identified 2,247 children who were...

  7. Dermatomyositis Associated with Celiac Disease: Response to a Gluten-Free Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soo Song

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between dermatomyositis and celiac disease in children has been well documented. In the adult population, however, the association has not been clearly established. A rare case of concomitant dermatomyositis and celiac disease in a 40-year-old woman is presented. After having been diagnosed with dermatomyositis and iron deficiency anemia, this patient was referred to the gastroenterology clinic to exclude a gastrointestinal malignancy. Blood tests revealed various vitamin deficiencies consistent with malabsorption. The results of gastroscopy with duodenal biopsy were consistent with celiac disease. After she was put on a strict gluten-free diet, both nutritional deficiencies and the dermatomyositis resolved. The patient’s human leukocyte antigen haplotype study was positive for DR3 and DQ2, which have been shown to be associated with both juvenile dermatomyositis and celiac disease. It is suggested that patients with newly diagnosed dermatomyositis be investigated for concomitant celiac disease even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.

  8. Celiac disease diagnosed after uncomplicated pregnancy in a patient with history of bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milisavljević Nemanja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The association between celiac disease and eating disorders has been very rarely reported. This is the first report on celiac disease associated with bulimia in this part of Europe. Case report. An adult female patient with history of bulimia and one uncomplicated pregnancy was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department, due to long lasting dyspeptic symptoms, constipation, major weight loss and fatigue. After positive serological screening, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with histopathology examination of duodenal biopsy specimen. Conclusion. Complicated interactions between celiac disease and bulimia can make them difficult to diagnose and treat. It is important to consider the presence of celiac disease in patients with bulimia and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  9. Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma as a complication of silent celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Dantas Brito

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which a genetic predisposition and the ingestion of wheat gluten triggers a deleterious immune response. This response is complex and may lead to manifestations other than enteropathyha: hepatitis, dermatitis and neuropathy. There is higher risk for neoplasia. We observed an atypical case, corresponding to a 69-year old female presenting with complicated celiac disease. The patient was referred following the histological examination of an enterectomy specimen, which unexpectedly revealed an enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma in a background of celiac disease. Patient’s previous medical history comprised several abdominal surgical procedures, without other prior symptoms suggestive of celiac disease. Indeed, the patient was obese and no signs of malabsortion were apparent. This case draws our attention to clinically silent celiac disease, which represents a diagnostic challenge. Thus, this should be kept in mind whenever a patient presents with abdominal relapsing complications, otherwise unexplained.

  10. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page is best accessed via your desktop. Celiac Disease Program Home > Centers + Services > Programs and Services > Celiac ... Bone Health Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1- ...

  11. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This page is best accessed via your desktop. Celiac Disease Program Home > Centers + Services > Programs and Services > Celiac ... Nutrition Bone Health Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1- ...

  12. Celiac disease and fulminant T lymphoma detected too late in a 35-year-old female patient: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinko Marušić

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is the most common chronic gastroenterological autoimmune disease characterized by gluten intolerance. The diagnosis of celiac disease and enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma is often made when it is too late.Case report describes a 35-year-old female patient managed for one year under the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease and admitted to our hospital for exacerbation of the underlying disease. However, inflammatory bowel disease was ruled out by diagnostic work-up, while the clinical picture and the findings obtained raised suspicion of lymphoma. The patient’s condition was additionally complicated by fulminant course of the disease and ileus.Conclusion:Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the disease, and follow up of family members are crucial to prevent intestinal lymphoma development.

  13. Immunopathology of childhood celiac disease-Key role of intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietz, Grzegorz; De, Rituparna; Hedberg, Maria; Sjöberg, Veronika; Sandström, Olof; Hernell, Olle; Hammarström, Sten; Hammarström, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the small intestine mucosa due to permanent intolerance to dietary gluten. The aim was to elucidate the role of small intestinal epithelial cells in the immunopathology of celiac disease in particular the influence of celiac disease-associated bacteria. Duodenal biopsies were collected from children with active celiac disease, treated celiac disease, and clinical controls. Intestinal epithelial cells were purified and analyzed for gene expression changes at the mRNA and protein levels. Two in vitro models for human intestinal epithelium, small intestinal enteroids and polarized tight monolayers, were utilized to assess how interferon-γ, interleukin-17A, celiac disease-associated bacteria and gluten influence intestinal epithelial cells. More than 25 defense-related genes, including IRF1, SPINK4, ITLN1, OAS2, CIITA, HLA-DMB, HLA-DOB, PSMB9, TAP1, BTN3A1, and CX3CL1, were significantly upregulated in intestinal epithelial cells at active celiac disease. Of these genes, 70% were upregulated by interferon-γ via the IRF1 pathway. Most interestingly, IRF1 was also upregulated by celiac disease-associated bacteria. The NLRP6/8 inflammasome yielding CASP1 and biologically active interleukin-18, which induces interferon-γ in intraepithelial lymphocytes, was expressed in intestinal epithelial cells. A key factor in the epithelial reaction in celiac disease appears to be over-expression of IRF1 that could be inherent and/or due to presence of undesirable microbes that act directly on IRF1. Dual activation of IRF1 and IRF1-regulated genes, both directly and via the interleukin-18 dependent inflammasome would drastically enhance the inflammatory response and lead to the pathological situation seen in active celiac disease.

  14. Celiac disease diagnosis: impact of guidelines on medical prescription in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Bach Nga; Musset, Lucile; Chyderiotis, Georges; Olsson, Nils Olivier; Fabien, Nicole

    2014-08-01

    Celiac disease is a complex autoimmune disease affecting patients of any age, who may present a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Different guidelines for the diagnosis and management of celiac disease have been recently published. The aim of this study was to determine whether the recommendations issued in these guidelines have been adopted by physicians in France when celiac disease was suspected. A total of 5521 physicians were asked to fill in a detailed questionnaire on diagnosing celiac disease to evaluate their medical practice, as to the type of symptoms leading to the suspicion of celiac disease, the prescription of duodenal biopsy or serological tests, the type of serological tests (anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-endomysium, anti-gliadin and anti-reticulin antibodies, total immunoglobulin A measurement) prescribed to diagnose celiac disease. The analysis of the responses of 256 general practitioners (GPs), 221 gastroenterologists and 227 pediatricians showed that the protean clinical presentations of celiac disease might be better recognized by gastroenterologists and pediatricians than by GPs. Gastroenterologists asked for duodenal biopsy much more often than GPs and pediatricians when celiac disease was suspected. Serological testing and knowledge of critical markers, prescribed to diagnose celiac disease, differed among GPs, gastroenterologists and pediatricians. Analysis of medical prescriptions showed that the recommendations for celiac disease diagnosis are not necessarily followed by physicians, emphasizing the fact that the impact of national or international guidelines on medical behavior should be evaluated. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Women with celiac disease present with fertility problems no more often than women in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhalwani, Nafeesa N; West, Joe; Sultan, Alyshah Abdul; Ban, Lu; Tata, Laila J

    2014-12-01

    Studies have associated infertility with celiac disease. However, these included small numbers of women attending infertility specialist services and subsequently screened for celiac disease, and therefore may not have been representative of the general population. We performed a large population-based study of infertility and celiac disease in women from the United Kingdom. We identified 2,426,225 women with prospective UK primary care records between 1990 and 2013 during their child-bearing years from The Health Improvement Network database. We estimated age-specific rates of new clinically recorded fertility problems among women with and without diagnosed celiac disease. Rates were stratified by whether celiac disease was diagnosed before the fertility problem or afterward and compared with rates in women without celiac disease using Poisson regression, adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidities, and calendar time. Age-specific rates of new clinically recorded fertility problems in 6506 women with celiac disease were similar to the rates in women without celiac disease (incidence rate ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-1.42 among women age 25-29 years). Rates of infertility among women without celiac disease were similar to those of women with celiac disease before and after diagnosis. However, rates were 41% higher among women diagnosed with celiac disease when they were 25-29 years old, compared with women in the same age group without celiac disease (incidence rate ratio, 1.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.92). Women with celiac disease do not have a greater likelihood of clinically recorded fertility problems than women without celiac disease, either before or after diagnosis, except for higher reports of fertility problems between 25-39 years if diagnosed with CD. These findings should assure most women with celiac disease that they do not have an increased risk for fertility problems. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier

  16. Elevated Total Iron-Binding Capacity Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letner, Dorothea; Peloquin, Joanna; Durand, Jacquelyn; Rutherford, Anna; Yajnik, Vijay; Khalili, Hamed; Garber, John

    2015-12-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that abnormal iron homeostasis may itself play an important role in the development of celiac disease. We sought to determine whether abnormalities in iron status could be detected prior to the diagnosis of celiac disease, and to understand the relationship between altered iron indices and the natural history of celiac disease. We conducted a case-control study at two major tertiary referral hospitals. Cases were comprised of patients with celiac disease in whom iron status was assessed prior to the diagnosis. Each case was matched to five controls without known gastrointestinal disease according to age and sex. Information on potential covariates and laboratory values within 1, 1-3, and 3-5 years prior to diagnosis was collected. We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the effect of iron indices on risk of celiac disease. We identified 157 celiac cases and 695 matched controls. Compared to participants with normal TIBC, the age-adjusted risk of celiac disease was significantly elevated among patients with elevated TIBC. For each 10 μg/dL increase in TIBC, the risk of celiac disease increased by 4.6, 3.8, and 7.9% within 1, 1-3, and 3-5 years prior to diagnosis, respectively. Patients with elevated pre-diagnosis TIBC were more likely to have abnormal liver enzymes and osteoporosis. Elevated TIBC is associated with an increased risk of celiac disease. Further investigation into the potential role of altered iron homeostasis may uncover important environmental factors that contribute to the development of celiac disease.

  17. Celiac-Associated Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Study of 16 Patients with Overt Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports have suggested that autoimmune thyroid disorders (including Hashimoto’s or lymphocytic thyroiditis may occur in patients with celiac disease. In this study, the prevalence of thyroid disease was explored in a series of 96 consecutive patients seen with biopsy-defined adult celiac disease (average age 47.3 years. Sixteen celiac patients (average age 58.1 years were detected with hypothyroidism, including four treated with radio-iodine ablation or thyroidectomy for Grave’s disease. In addition to celiac disease, almost half had dermatitis herpetiformis, a small intestinal neoplasm (particularly lymphoma or both. Diagnosis of thyroid disease preceded diagnosis of celiac disease in 13 patients or was made concurrently in two patients. In only one patient was thyroid disease detected after celiac disease was diagnosed. This indicates that thyroid diseases occur more commonly in celiac disease than is currently appreciated, possibly due to shared embryological origins or common immunopathological features, and may be the presenting clinical manifestation in adults especially if there is coexistent dermatitis herpetiformis. Careful monitoring of this subgroup may be warranted because of the frequency of neoplastic intestinal diseases, particularly lymphoma.

  18. The perspective of celiac disease patients on emerging treatment options and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuter, Thomas; Schmidlin, Sandra; Lattmann, Jaqueline; Stotz, Matthias; Lehmann, Romina; Zeitz, Jonas; Scharl, Michael; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Pohl, Daniel; Fried, Michael; Tutuian, Radu; Fasano, Alessio; Schoepfer, Alain M; Rogler, Gerhard; Biedermann, Luc; Vavricka, Stephan R

    2017-03-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and emerging treatment options are hot topics in the celiac disease (CeD) scientific literature. However, very little is known about the perspective on these issues of CeD patients. We performed a large patient survey among unselected CeD patients in Switzerland. A total of 1689 patients were analyzed. 57.5% have previously heard of NCGS. 64.5% believe in the existence of this entity. Regarding a potential influence of NCGS on CeD awareness, 31.7% show a positive and 27.5% a negative perception. Patients with prior use of alternative medicine and women more often have heard of and believe in the existence of NCGS vs. those never having used alternative methods and men, respectively (66.9 vs. 56.9%, p=0.001 and 78.5 vs. 69.0%, p=0.001; 60.7 vs. 44.2%, pWomen and patients ≥30 years more often show a negative attitude towards NCGS (32.2% vs. 24.8%, p=0.024 and 32.2% vs. 24.2%, p=0.018). With regard to emerging treatment options for CeD, 43.3% have previously heard of novel agents, more women than men (46.0 vs. 38.0%, p=0.019). Perception of and attitude towards NCGS differ depending on sex, age and prior use of alternative medicine. Knowledge of the progress towards emerging treatment options is currently limited. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    MCMANUS, ROSS; KELLEHER, DERMOT

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED We performed a second-generation genome-wide association study of 4,533 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 10,750 control subjects. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with P(GWAS) < 10(-4) and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions reached genome-wide significance (P(combined) < 5 x 10(-8)); most contain genes with immune functions (BACH2, CCR4, CD80, CIITA-SOCS1-CLEC16A, ICOSLG and ZMIZ1), with ETS1, RUNX3, THEMI...

  20. Variable activation of immune response by quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) prolamins in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevallos, Victor F; Ellis, H Julia; Suligoj, Tanja; Herencia, L Irene; Ciclitira, Paul J

    2012-08-01

    Celiac disease is an enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten found in wheat, barley, and rye. The current treatment is a strict gluten-free diet. Quinoa is a highly nutritive plant from the Andes, with low concentrations of prolamins, that has been recommended as part of a gluten-free diet; however, few experimental data support this recommendation. We aimed to determine the amount of celiac-toxic prolamin epitopes in quinoa cultivars from different regions of the Andes and the ability of these epitopes to activate immune responses in patients with celiac disease. The concentration of celiac-toxic epitopes was measured by using murine monoclonal antibodies against gliadin and high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits. Immune response was assessed by proliferation assays of celiac small intestinal T cells/interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and production of IFN-γ/IL-15 after organ culture of celiac duodenal biopsy samples. Fifteen quinoa cultivars were tested: 4 cultivars had quantifiable concentrations of celiac-toxic epitopes, but they were below the maximum permitted for a gluten-free food. Cultivars Ayacuchana and Pasankalla stimulated T cell lines at levels similar to those for gliadin and caused secretion of cytokines from cultured biopsy samples at levels comparable with those for gliadin. Most quinoa cultivars do not possess quantifiable amounts of celiac-toxic epitopes. However, 2 cultivars had celiac-toxic epitopes that could activate the adaptive and innate immune responses in some patients with celiac disease. These findings require further investigation in the form of in vivo studies, because quinoa is an important source of nutrients for patients with celiac disease.

  1. Risk of Pediatric Celiac Disease According to HLA Haplotype and Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Edwin; Lee, Hye-Seung; Aronsson, Carin A.; Hagopian, William A.; Koletzko, Sibylle; Rewers, Marian J.; Eisenbarth, George S.; Bingley, Polly J.; Bonifacio, Ezio; Simell, Ville; Agardh, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The presence of HLA haplotype DR3–DQ2 or DR4–DQ8 is associated with an increased risk of celiac disease. In addition, nearly all children with celiac disease have serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG). METHODS We studied 6403 children with HLA haplotype DR3–DQ2 or DR4–DQ8 prospectively from birth in the United States, Finland, Germany, and Sweden. The primary end point was the development of celiac disease autoimmunity, which was defined as the presence of tTG antibodies on two consecutive tests at least 3 months apart. The secondary end point was the development of celiac disease, which was defined for the purpose of this study as either a diagnosis on biopsy or persistently high levels of tTG antibodies. RESULTS The median follow-up was 60 months (interquartile range, 46 to 77). Celiac disease autoimmunity developed in 786 children (12%). Of the 350 children who underwent biopsy, 291 had confirmed celiac disease; an additional 21 children who did not undergo biopsy had persistently high levels of tTG antibodies. The risks of celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease by the age of 5 years were 11% and 3%, respectively, among children with a single DR3–DQ2 haplotype, and 26% and 11%, respectively, among those with two copies (DR3–DQ2 homozygosity). In the adjusted model, the hazard ratios for celiac disease autoimmunity were 2.09 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.70 to 2.56) among heterozygotes and 5.70 (95% CI, 4.66 to 6.97) among homozygotes, as compared with children who had the lowest-risk genotypes (DR4–DQ8 heterozygotes or homozygotes). Residence in Sweden was also independently associated with an increased risk of celiac disease autoimmunity (hazard ratio, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.61 to 2.25). CONCLUSIONS Children with the HLA haplotype DR3–DQ2, especially homozygotes, were found to be at high risk for celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease early in childhood. The higher risk in Sweden than in other countries

  2. High Incidence of Celiac Disease in a Long-term Study of Adolescents With Susceptibility Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Edwin; Dong, Fran; Barón, Anna E; Taki, Iman; Norris, Jill M; Frohnert, Brigitte I; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Rewers, Marian

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the incidence of celiac disease in the general population of children in the United States. We aimed to estimate the cumulative incidence of celiac disease in adolescents born in the Denver metropolitan area. We collected data on HLA-DR, DQ genotypes of 31,766 infants, born from 1993 through 2004 at St. Joseph's Hospital in Denver, from the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. Subjects with susceptibility genotypes for celiac disease and type 1 diabetes were followed up for up to 20 years for development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). Outcomes were the development of celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA) or celiac disease. CDA was defined as persistence of tTGA for at least 3 months or development of celiac disease. Celiac disease was defined based on detection of Marsh 2 or greater lesions in biopsy specimens or persistent high levels of tTGA. For each genotype, the cumulative incidence of CDA and celiac disease were determined. To estimate the cumulative incidence in the Denver general population, outcomes by each genotype were weighted according to the frequency of each of these genotypes in the general population. Of 1339 subjects followed up, 66 developed CDA and met criteria for celiac disease and 46 developed only CDA. Seropositivity for tTGA resolved spontaneously, without treatment, in 21 of the 46 subjects with only CDA (46%). The estimated cumulative incidence for CDA in the Denver general population at 5, 10, and 15 years of age was 2.4%, 4.3%, and 5.1%, respectively, and incidence values for celiac disease were 1.6%, 2.8%, and 3.1%, respectively. In a 20-year prospective study of 1339 children with genetic risk factors for celiac disease, we found the cumulative incidence of CDA and celiac disease to be high within the first 10 years. Although more than 5% of children may experience a period of CDA, not all children develop celiac disease or require gluten-free diets. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published

  3. Increased Risk of Esophageal Eosinophilia and Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Patients With Active Celiac Disease on Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Elizabeth T; Eluri, Swathi; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Genta, Robert M; Dellon, Evan S

    2015-08-01

    The possible association between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and celiac disease is controversial because prior results have been contradictory. We aimed to determine the relationship between EoE and celiac disease among patients with concomitant esophageal and duodenal biopsies. We conducted a cross-sectional study in a U.S. national pathology database by using data from January 2009 through June 2012. Our primary case definition was defined by the presence of esophageal eosinophilia with ≥15 eosinophils per high-power field. The crude and adjusted (for age and sex) odds of esophageal eosinophilia for patients with active celiac disease were compared with those without celiac disease. Sensitivity analyses were performed by using more stringent case definitions and by estimating the associations between celiac disease and reflux esophagitis and celiac disease and Barrett's esophagus. Of 292,621 patients in the source population, 88,517 with both esophageal and duodenal biopsies were studied. Four thousand one hundred one (4.6%) met criteria for EoE, and 1203 (1.4%) met criteria for celiac disease. Odds of EoE were 26% higher in patients with celiac disease than in patients without celiac disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-1.60). The magnitude of association varied according to EoE case definition, but all definitions showed a weak positive association between the 2 conditions. There was no association between celiac disease and reflux esophagitis (aOR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.85-1.07) or Barrett's esophagus (aOR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.69-1.14) and celiac disease. There is a weak increase in EoE in patients with celiac disease. This association strengthened with increasingly stringent definitions of EoE and was not observed for other esophageal conditions. In patients with celiac disease, concomitant EoE should be considered in the correct clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Is Dietitian Use Associated with Celiac Disease Outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. R. Green

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A gluten-free diet (GFD is the treatment for celiac disease (CD, but due to its complexity, dietitian referral is uniformly recommended. We surveyed patients with CD to determine if dietitian use is associated with quality of life, symptom severity, or GFD adherence. The survey utilized three validated CD-specific instruments: the CD quality of life (CD-QOL, CD symptom index (CSI and CD adherence test (CDAT. Four hundred and thirteen patients with biopsy-proven CD were eligible for inclusion. The majority (77% were female and mean BMI was 24.1. Over three-quarters of patients (326, 79% had seen a dietitian, however, 161 (39% had seen a dietitian only once. Age, sex, and education level were not associated with dietitian use; nor was BMI (24.6 vs. 24.0, p = 0.45. On multivariate analysis, adjusting for age gender, education, duration of disease, and body mass index, dietitian use was not associated with CD-QOL, CSI, or CDAT scores. Our survey did not show an association between dietitian use and symptom severity, adherence, or quality of life. Delay in diagnosis was associated with poorer outcomes. This is a preliminary study with several limitations, and further prospective analysis is needed to evaluate the benefits and cost-effectiveness of dietitian-referral in the care of celiac disease patients.

  5. [Causes of osteoporosis: don't forget celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharla, S

    2003-04-25

    A 60-year old woman presented with osteoporosis. Because clinical symptoms did not improve after treatment, further diagnostic procedures were performed in order to further characterize the metabolic bone disease. The patient reported loss of weight,nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms (recurrent abdominal pain),and constipation. The diet history revealed a milk intolerance. Several family members were suffering from autoimmune diseases. During physical examination the patient exhibited clinical signs of osteoporosis(back pain, change of stature), but otherwise no pathological findings. The technical examinations showed low bone mineral density at the spine. The routine laboratory examination (including serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase)was normal. However, further testing revealed low concentrations for 25-hydroxy-vitamin D, folic acid, vitamin B 12, an increased IgA and significantly elevated antigliadin antibodies and antiendomysial antibodies. Histopathological examination of the duodenal mucosa was in accordance with the diagnosis celiac sprue. The histopathologic examination of a transiliac bone biopsy exhibited high bone turnover, osteopenia, but no osteomalacia. Therefore, the diagnosis of celiac sprue with metabolic bone disease was established. Treatment with gluten-free diet and supplementation of calcium and vitamin D was initiated. This case demonstrates that careful diagnostic evaluation of patients with osteoporosis is necessary,because therapeutic consequences are the result.

  6. Celiac Disease, Inflammation and Oxidative Damage: A Nutrigenetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Saturni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD, a common heritable chronic inflammatory condition of the small intestine caused by permanent intolerance to gluten/gliadin (prolamin, is characterized by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Developments in proteomics have provided an important contribution to the understanding of the biochemical and immunological aspects of the disease and the mechanisms involved in toxicity of prolamins. It has been demonstrated that some gliadin peptides resistant to complete proteolytic digestion may directly affect intestinal cell structure and functions by modulating gene expression and oxidative stress. In recent years, the creation of the two research fields Nutrigenomics and Nutrigenetics, has enabled the elucidation of some interactions between diet, nutrients and genes. Various dietary components including long chain ω-3 fatty acids, plant flavonoids, and carotenoids have been demonstrated to modulate oxidative stress, gene expression and production of inflammatory mediators. Therefore their adoption could preserve intestinal barrier integrity, play a protective role against toxicity of gliadin peptides and have a role in nutritional therapy of celiac disease.

  7. Autoimmune thyroid disease and celiac disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldi, Nicoletta; Palmas, Tiziana; Corrias, Andrea; Barbato, Maria; D'Altiglia, Mario Rocco; Campanozzi, Angelo; Baldassarre, Mariella; Rea, Francesco; Pluvio, Rosanna; Bonamico, Margherita; Lazzari, Rosanna; Corrao, Giovanni

    2003-07-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may be associated with other immunologic disorders in adults and children. Previous studies linking CD and autoimmune thyroid disease in children have included very few patients with limited biochemical and immunologic screening tests. The aim of this multicenter study was to establish the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid involvement in a large series of pediatric patients with CD. Five hundred seventy-three consecutive pediatric patients were enrolled from clinics in Torino, Bologna, Foggia, Rome (two clinics), Naples, and Bari. Three hundred forty-three patients with CD were studied, 230 girls and 113 boys (median age, 8.5 years). Two hundred fifty-six of the patients with CD (median age, 9 years) had been following a gluten-free diet for 3 months to 16 years; 87 patients were untreated (median age, 6.2 years). The diagnosis of CD was made using the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) criteria. A control group of 230 subjects (median age, 8.3 years) was enrolled. Serum free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), antithyroperoxidase, antithyroglobulin, anti-TSH receptor antibodies, and thyroid echographic pattern were considered. Autoimmune thyroid disease was found in 90 of 343 (26.2%) patients with CD (62 on a gluten-free diet) and in 20 (10%) of the control subjects (P = 0.001). Fifty-four (15.7%) patients with CD and autoimmune markers had normal thyroid function (euthyroidism) as did 12 (6.0%) of the control subjects; hypothyroidism was observed in 28 (8.1%) patients with CD and in 7 (3.5%) of the control subjects. Hyperthyroidism was diagnosed in four patients with CD and in none of the control subjects with autoimmune markers. An abnormal echographic pattern was seen in 37 patients with CD (16.8%) and only in 1 (1.6%) of the control subjects (P = 0.002). The high frequency of autoimmune thyroid disease found among patients with CD, even those on a gluten

  8. Metabolic osteopathy in celiac disease: importance of a gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriles, Vanessa D; Martini, Ligia A; Arêas, José Alfredo G

    2009-10-01

    Reduced bone mineral density (BMD) is frequently found in individuals with untreated celiac disease (CD), possibly due to calcium and vitamin D malabsorption, release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and misbalanced bone remodeling. A gluten-free diet (GFD) promotes a rapid increase in BMD that leads to complete recovery of bone mineralization in children. Children may attain normal peak bone mass if the diagnosis is made and treatment is given before puberty, thereby preventing osteoporosis in later life. A GFD improves, but rarely normalizes, BMD in patients diagnosed with CD in adulthood. In some cases, nutritional supplementation may be necessary. More information on therapeutic alternatives is needed.

  9. Celiac disease in Saudi children. Evaluation of clinical features and diagnosis

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    Anjum Saeed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To characterize the clinical presentations and diagnosis including serological tests and histopathological findings in children with celiac disease. Methods: All children (less than 18 years with confirmed celiac disease diagnosed over a 6 year period at a private tertiary care health care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were studied retrospectively. Information collected included demographics, clinical presentation and diagnostic modalities with serology and small intestinal histology reported by Marsh grading. Results: A total of 59 children had confirmed celiac disease. Thirty (50.8% were male. Median age was 8 years (range 1 to 16 years. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 2.3 (±1.5 years. Classical disease was present only in 30.5%, whereas 69.5% had either non-classical presentations or belonged to high risk groups for celiac disease such as those with type-1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, Down syndrome and siblings. Failure to thrive was the most common presentation followed by short stature, abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody was positive in 91.5%, and titers were no different between those with classical and non-classical disease. All had Marsh-graded biopsy findings consistent with celiac disease. Conclusion: Children with celiac disease usually present with non-classical features. A high index of suspicion needs to be maintained to consider this disorder in the diagnostic workup of pediatric patients. High risk group should be screened early to avoid complications associated with untreated celiac disease.

  10. Association of celiac disease and hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency. Screening patients with hereditary angioedema for celiac disease: is it worth the effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Kelemen, Zsuzsanna; Czaller, Ibolya; Molnár, Katalin; Füst, George; Varga, Lilian; Rajczy, Katalin; Szabó, Zsófia; Miklós, Kata; Bors, András; Farkas, Henriette

    2011-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency is a life-threatening condition, which manifests as edematous attacks involving subcutaneous tissues and/or the upper airway/gastrointestinal mucosa. Celiac disease is a gluten-sensitive small intestinal disorder that can lead to severe villous atrophy, malabsorption, and malignancy. Both hereditary angioedema and celiac disease may present with abdominal symptoms. Our aim was to study the occurrence of celiac disease in the hereditary angioedema population, as well as to analyze the clinical course of cases with both diseases. One hundred and twenty-eight patients with hereditary angioedema were screened for celiac disease, using serological methods [antiendomysial antibodies-immunoglobulin A (IgA), antiendomysial antibodies-IgG and tissue transglutaminase-IgA, tissue transglutaminase-IgG]. Clinical data of a child with hereditary angioedema and celiac disease diagnosed earlier were added to the dataset to be analyzed. Thus, the total number of patients was 129, comprising 107 adults and 22 pediatric patients. In patients with celiac disease, molecular genetics analysis (human leukocyte antigen-DQA1, human leukocyte antigen-DQB1) was carried out along with the introduction of a gluten-free diet and regular follow-up. Four out of the 22 children were diagnosed with celiac disease in our hereditary angioedema population. The prevalence of celiac disease among our pediatric patients with hereditary angioedema (22 children) was higher than in the general population (18.1 vs. 1.2%). Switching from the wheat starch-containing tranexamic acid product to danazol and introducing a gluten-free diet mitigated abdominal symptoms of hereditary angioedema. Similarities between the symptoms of hereditary angioedema and celiac disease may cause difficulties in differential diagnosis, as well as in choosing the appropriate therapy. In our opinion, screening hereditary angioedema patients for celiac disease is warranted if

  11. Increased Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Patients with Unexplained Infertility in the United States: A Prospective Study

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    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Wang, Jeffrey; Lee, Susie K.; Murray, Joseph A.; Sauer, Mark V.; Green, Peter H. R.

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder which can present with a variety of non-gastrointestinal manifestations. In women, it may manifest with an assortment of gynecologic or obstetric disorders. Some reports have linked female infertility with undiagnosed celiac disease. Though there are a number of studies from Europe and the Middle East, only two prior American studies have examined the prevalence of “silent” celiac disease in a female infertility population. We prospectively performed serologic screening for celiac disease in 188 infertile women (ages 25–39). While we did not demonstrate an increased prevalence of celiac disease in our overall infertile female population, we were able to detect a significantly increased prevalence (5.9%) of undiagnosed celiac disease among women presenting with unexplained infertility (n=51). Our findings suggest the importance of screening infertile female patients, particularly those with unexplained infertility, for celiac disease. PMID:21682114

  12. Folate Insufficiency Due to Celiac Disease in a 49-Year-Old Woman of Southeast Asian-Indian Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta Mitra, Ananya; Gupta, Asha; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2016-08-01

    The clinical presentation of celiac disease has evolved from chronic diarrhea and malnutrition to mild nutrient insufficiencies. Recently diagnosed adults with celiac disease should be assessed for micronutrient deficiencies because early institution of a gluten-free diet (GFD) prevents morbidity and reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal malignant neoplasms and osteoporosis. In this report, we present the case of a 49-year-old woman of Southeast Asian-Indian descent living in the United States who had folate insufficiency, as manifested by low serum and red blood cell (RBC) folate levels. Further investigation, including serologic testing and intestinal biopsy, confirmed a diagnosis of celiac disease and other nutrient deficiencies. Managing the condition of this patient with folate supplements and implementation of a recommended GFD reversed the folate insufficiency. In conclusion, when serum and/or RBC levels are low in a person of Southeast Asian-Indian descent living in a country with folate fortification of the grain supply, such as the United States, the medical team needs to look for an organic cause, as in our patient, to diagnose and manage celiac disease early and, hopefully, forestall complications. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Life events and the onset of celiac disease from a patient's perspective.

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    Ciacci, Carolina; Siniscalchi, Monica; Bucci, Cristina; Zingone, Fabiana; Morra, Ivonne; Iovino, Paola

    2013-08-28

    Stressful events have been investigated in various immune-mediated diseases but not in celiac disease. Our aim was to examine the relationship of stressful events assessed by the standardized interview of Paykel with the diagnosis of celiac disease in comparison to patients, with a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease used as the control group. Adults with celiac disease (n = 186) reported more frequent and more severe life events in the years prior to the diagnosis than control patients (n = 96) (67.2% vs. 37.5%, p celiac disease and control patients for the time lapse between the event and the diagnosis (mean 5.5 vs. 5.7 months). Pregnancy was defined as a negative event by 20.3% of celiac women, but never by control women. Findings were confirmed when analyses were repeated in the subgroup of patients of both groups with diagnosis made within one year of onset of symptoms. Data indicate that, before diagnosis, the number of stressful events in celiac disease was more frequent although less severe than in the control group suggesting that life events may favor the clinical appearance of celiac disease or accelerate its diagnosis.

  14. Life Events and the Onset of Celiac Disease from a Patient’s Perspective

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    Paola Iovino

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stressful events have been investigated in various immune-mediated diseases but not in celiac disease. Our aim was to examine the relationship of stressful events assessed by the standardized interview of Paykel with the diagnosis of celiac disease in comparison to patients, with a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease used as the control group. Adults with celiac disease (n = 186 reported more frequent and more severe life events in the years prior to the diagnosis than control patients (n = 96 (67.2% vs. 37.5%, p < 0.001, mean Paykel score 11.5 vs. 13.4, p = 0.001, respectively. Findings were not significantly different between celiac disease and control patients for the time lapse between the event and the diagnosis (mean 5.5 vs. 5.7 months. Pregnancy was defined as a negative event by 20.3% of celiac women, but never by control women. Findings were confirmed when analyses were repeated in the subgroup of patients of both groups with diagnosis made within one year of onset of symptoms. Data indicate that, before diagnosis, the number of stressful events in celiac disease was more frequent although less severe than in the control group suggesting that life events may favor the clinical appearance of celiac disease or accelerate its diagnosis.

  15. Transcultural adaptation and validation of the Celiac Disease Quality of Life (CD-QOL survey, a specific questionnaire to measure quality of life in patients with celiac disease

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    Francesc Casellas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: celiac disease is a chronic condition that requires continued treatment, with the resultant impact on health-related quality of life (HRQOL of people who suffer it. Most studies in this field have used generic questionnaires to measure HRQOL in celiac patients. It was therefore decided to conduct a study to translate into Spanish and validate a specific questionnaire for celiac disease, the Celiac Disease Quality Of Life Survey (CD-QOL. Objectives: to translate and validate in Spanish the specific celiac disease questionnaire CD-QOL. Methods: a multicenter, prospective, observational study was designed consisting of two phases: In the first phase, the questionnaire was translated and adapted into Spanish using the translation/back translation procedure and an understandability study. In the second phase, internal consistency of the translated questionnaire was analyzed. For this, results of the CD-QOL were compared to those of EuroQol and the Daily Fatigue Impact Scale (D-FIS. Understandability of the translated and adapted questionnaire was tested in six patients, and the validation study was done in 298 celiac patients (201 treated with a gluten-free diet and 97 at diagnosis. Results: in both celiac groups, Cronbach's alpha coefficient was high (0.90, feasibility was excellent (99.2 % of patients completed all questions, and there were no ceiling and floor effects. Spearman correlation to EuroQol and D-FIS was statistically significant (p < 0.05. CD-QOL score was different depending on whether state of health was good, fair, or poor based on the EuroQol score. Conclusion: the Spanish version of the CD-QOL is a valid tool for measuring HRQOL in celiac patients.

  16. Symptoms and Causes of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed June 5, 2016. June 2016 Share Previous: Definition & Facts Next: Diagnosis This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of ...

  17. Prevalence of Celiac Disease and its Effects on Pregnancy

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    E Nazemalhosseini-Mojarad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the coeliac disease(CD symptoms is infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Furthermore, we are not cognizant of any CD reports in pregnancy in Iran. Therefore, this study aims to prospectively estimate the prevalence of undiagnosed CD in a population of pregnant women as well as its complications in pregnancy. Methods: 796 pregnant women with mean age of 26 years(SD= 26 and mean pregnancy duration of 5.4 months participated in this descriptive study from 2007 to 2008. Total IgA test and antitissue transglutaminase(tTGA antibodies were measured. Those with positive TGA underwent histological biopsy specimens according to modified Marsh classification. Results: A positive CD serology for tTGA was obderved in 17(2.1% out of 796 pregnant women. Out of the 17 seropositive patients, 10 had abnormal histology compatible with CD(Marsh I-IIIc symptoms. Two pregnant women had already experienced miscarriage. Moreover, 3 patients had born low birth weight babies. Conclusion: In this study, there was no significant relationship between CD and high incidence of adverse outcomes. Overall, 1 out of 66 pregnant women(1.5% rate of prevalence suffered from CD. Celiac disease shows different severity in different individuals. In other words, not every celiac patient is at high risk for its complications. This may propose that gluten free diet could be avoided in the patients who have a normal pregnancy

  18. Clinical benefit of a gluten-free diet in type 1 diabetic children with screening-detected celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte; Brock-Jacobsen, Bendt; Lund, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to 1) determine the prevalence of celiac disease in Danish children with type 1 diabetes and 2) estimate the clinical effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) in patients with diabetes and celiac disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a region comprising 24......% of the Danish population, all patients celiac disease was suspected in patients with endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in serum and confirmed by intestinal biopsy. Patients with celiac...... disease were followed for 2 years while consuming a GFD. RESULTS: In 28 of 33 patients with celiac antibodies, an intestinal biopsy showed villous atrophy. In 5 patients, celiac disease had been diagnosed previously, giving an overall prevalence of 12.3% (95% CI 8.6-16.9). Patients with celiac disease had...

  19. Delay in Diagnosis of Celiac Disease in Patients Without Gastrointestinal Complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Marco A; Gramelspacher, Anna Maria; Sinacore, James; Winterfield, Laura; Venu, Mukund

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of our study is to investigate the delay in diagnosis of patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease in those who present with gastrointestinal complaints vs nongastrointestinal complaints at our tertiary care center. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Celiac disease can have variable clinical presentations; it can be characterized by predominately gastrointestinal symptoms, or it may present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 687 adult patients who carried the diagnosis of celiac disease. Patients included had biopsy-proven celiac disease and were categorized based on presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms prior to their diagnosis. There were 101 patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease that met inclusion criteria. Fifty-two patients presented with gastrointestinal symptoms and 49 had nongastrointestinal complaints. Results from Mann-Whitney statistical analysis showed a median delay in diagnosis of 2.3 months for the gastrointestinal symptoms group and 42 months for the nongastrointestinal group (P celiac disease, the delay in diagnosis for patients without gastrointestinal symptoms remains prolonged, with an average delay of 3.5 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisavljević, Nemanja; Cvetković, Mirjana; Nikolić, Goran; Filipović, Branka; Milinić, Nikola

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestinal mucosa induced by gluten consumption in genetically susceptible individuals, leading to a spectrum of gastrointestinal presentation. A number of autoimmune and other disorders are highly associated with celiac disease. Cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease has been rarely reported in the literature. We present a case of a 27-year-old male with one month history of diarrhea, weight loss, fatigue, dyspeptic symptoms, peripheral edema, and cardiac palpitations. After positive serological screening with immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody test, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with histopathology examination of duodenal biopsy specimen. Echocardiographic findings were consistent with acute myocarditis. After common causes of myocarditis had been excluded, probable celiac disease-associated autoimmune myocarditis was diagnosed. The patient was recommended to undergo a strict life-long gluten-free diet. IgA anti-transglutaminase antibodies, and anti-gliadin antibodies, were both significantly elevated during the 6-, 12- and 18-month follow-up. Low compliance to gluten-free diet in our patient led to progressive worsening of the left ventricular ejective fraction and other serious cardiac complications which warranted invasive cardiac interventions. Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease is a serious condition which requires multidisciplinary approach involving gastroenterologist and cardiologist. Compliance with gluten-free diet is mandatory if patients are to avoid progression of cardiomyopathy. Screening of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy for celiac disease is advisable.

  1. Dilated cardiomiopathy associated with celiac disease: Case report and literature review

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    Milisavljević Nemanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestinal mucosa induced by gluten consumption in genetically susceptible individuals, leading to a spectrum of gastrointestinal presentation. A number of autoimmune and other disorders are highly associated with celiac disease. Cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease has been rarely reported in the literature. Case Outline. We present a case of a 27-year-old male with one month history of diarrhea, weight loss, fatigue, dyspeptic symptoms, peripheral edema, and cardiac palpitations. After positive serological screening with immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody test, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with histopathology examination of duodenal biopsy specimen. Echocardiographic findings were consistent with acute myocarditis. After common causes of myocarditis had been excluded, probable celiac disease-associated autoimmune myocarditis was diagnosed. The patient was recommended to undergo a strict life-long gluten-free diet. IgA anti-transglutaminase antibodies, and anti-gliadin antibodies, were both significantly elevated during the 6-, 12- and 18-month follow-up. Low compliance to gluten-free diet in our patient led to progressive worsening of the left ventricular ejective fraction and other serious cardiac complications which warranted invasive cardiac interventions. Conclusion. Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease is a serious condition which requires multidisciplinary approach involving gastroenterologist and cardiologist. Compliance with gluten-free diet is mandatory if patients are to avoid progression of cardiomyopathy. Screening of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy for celiac disease is advisable.

  2. Perinuclear Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies in Collagenous or Lymphocytic Colitis with or without Celiac Disease

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    Hugh James Freeman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic forms of colitis, including lymphocytic and collagenous colitis, have been observed in both those with and without celiac disease. Although perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (p-ANCA occur in most patients with ulcerative colitis, investigations in microscopic, particularly lymphocytic, colitis are still needed. In this study atypical p-ANCA was evaluated in 55 patients, including 27 with celiac disease alone, 13 with celiac disease and concomitant lymphocytic colitis, and 15 with microscopic forms of colitis, including lymphocytic and collagenous colitis. Nine patients (16.3% had atypical p-ANCA, including six with celiac disease and three with a microscopic form of colitis alone. Although five of the six positive celiac disease patients had lymphocytic colitis, all three celiac disease patients with associated primary sclerosing cholangitis - a separate risk factor for a positive assay result - were serologically positive for atypical p-ANCA. These results indicate for the first time that this serological marker may occur in histologically defined celiac disease with or without concomitant lymphocytic colitis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis differs from that of lymphocytic colitis and further emphasizes the heterogeneous nature of these newly recognized types of colonic inflammatory mucosal disorders.

  3. [Adolescents and celiac disease: psychological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquetti, M; Micelli, S; Zoppi, G

    1997-01-01

    Many studies have been carried out on different aspects of coeliac disease in children and adolescents. However, little has been done on how these patients experience their situation and how they cope with dietary treatment. A group of 39 children and adolescents with coeliac disease participated in a controlled questionnaire study. Conclusions are that the acceptance of a gluten-free diet is problematic for the majority of children and adolescents affected by coeliac disease; in particular in the 12 to 17 year old group, that is in that period of life in which the individual tends to oppose the adult world, in search of an individual personality. This search is disturbed in the majority of coeliac patients. The feelings of difficulty connected to the gluten-free diet appear to be almost absent in the family environment, whereas they emerge significantly at times of meeting and sharing with friends.

  4. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Omani Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross Sectional Study

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    Siham Al-Sinani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Published studies on the prevalence of celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus from the Arab World are scant. We aim to report the prevalence of celiac disease in Omani children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.Methods: Children with type 1 diabetes mellitus were prospectively screened for celiac disease, at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman over a period of one year (June 2011 - May 2012. Serum anti tissue transglutaminase IgA, endomysial IgA antibodies and total IgA were measured for screening of celiac disease. Children with positive anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or endomysial IgA antibodies underwent endoscopy.Results: A total of 103 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus were initially included. Ten patients were lost to follow up. Ninety-three patients aged 2-17 years underwent screening for celiac disease. Sixteen patients had positive anti-tissue transglutaminase (17%. Fourteen patients underwent endoscopy with duodenal biopsies, while two were lost to follow-up. Five patients with positive anti-tissue transglutaminase had intestinal biopsy proven celiac disease. The prevalence of celiac disease is 5.5% in our cohort of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.Conclusions: The prevalence of celiac disease in Omani children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus is similar to the World’s reported prevalence, but is less than that reported for Middle Eastern Arab children. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study on the prevalence of celiac disease in Omani children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  5. The molecular basis for oat intolerance in patients with celiac disease.

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    Helene Arentz-Hansen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is a small intestinal inflammatory disorder characterized by malabsorption, nutrient deficiency, and a range of clinical manifestations. It is caused by an inappropriate immune response to dietary gluten and is treated with a gluten-free diet. Recent feeding studies have indicated oats to be safe for celiac disease patients, and oats are now often included in the celiac disease diet. This study aimed to investigate whether oat intolerance exists in celiac disease and to characterize the cells and processes underlying this intolerance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We selected for study nine adults with celiac disease who had a history of oats exposure. Four of the patients had clinical symptoms on an oats-containing diet, and three of these four patients had intestinal inflammation typical of celiac disease at the time of oats exposure. We established oats-avenin-specific and -reactive intestinal T-cell lines from these three patients, as well as from two other patients who appeared to tolerate oats. The avenin-reactive T-cell lines recognized avenin peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2. These peptides have sequences rich in proline and glutamine residues closely resembling wheat gluten epitopes. Deamidation (glutamine-->glutamic acid conversion by tissue transglutaminase was involved in the avenin epitope formation. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that some celiac disease patients have avenin-reactive mucosal T-cells that can cause mucosal inflammation. Oat intolerance may be a reason for villous atrophy and inflammation in patients with celiac disease who are eating oats but otherwise are adhering to a strict gluten-free diet. Clinical follow-up of celiac disease patients eating oats is advisable.

  6. Prevalence of celiac disease in Germany: a prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzer, Wolfgang; Kibele, Monika; Akinli, Atilla; Porzner, Marc; Boehm, Bernhard O; Koenig, Wolfgang; Oeztuerk, Suemeyra; Mason, Richard A; Mao, Ren; Haenle, Mark H

    2013-05-07

    To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a randomly selected population sample. A total of 2157 subjects (1036 males; 1121 females) participating in a population-based cross-sectional study underwent laboratory testing for tissue transglutaminase and antibodies to immunoglobulin A, endomysium and antigliadin. In a second step, all subjects who had been examined serologically were surveyed using a questionnaire that included questions specific to celiac disease. Subjects with positive antibody titers and those with histories positive for celiac disease then underwent biopsy. At the first follow up, antibody titers were again determined in these subjects and subjects were questioned regarding symptoms specific for celiac disease and disorders associated with celiac disease. The second follow up consisted of a telephone interview with subjects positive for celiac disease. Antibody tests consistent with celiac disease were reported in eight subjects, corresponding to an overall prevalence of 1:270 (8/2157). The prevalence among women was 1:224 and 1:518 in men. Classical symptoms were observed in 62.5% of subjects. Atypical celiac disease was present in 25.0%, and transient celiac disease in 12.5%. False-negative test results were returned in three subjects. This yields a sensitivity and specificity of 62.5% and 50.0%, respectively, for tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin-A antibody; of 62.5% and 71.4% respectively, for endomysium antibody; and of 62.5% and 71.4%, respectively, for antigliadin antibody. The prevalence rate in our collective lies within the middle tertile of comparable studies in Europe. The use of a single antibody test for screening purposes must be called into question.

  7. The roles of MHC class II genes and post-translational modification in celiac disease.

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    Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-08-01

    Our increasing understanding of the etiology of celiac disease, previously considered a simple food hypersensitivity disorder caused by an immune response to cereal gluten proteins, challenges established concepts of autoimmunity. HLA is a chief genetic determinant, and certain HLA-DQ allotypes predispose to the disease by presenting posttranslationally modified (deamidated) gluten peptides to CD4 + T cells. The deamidation of gluten peptides is mediated by transglutaminase 2. Strikingly, celiac disease patients generate highly disease-specific autoantibodies to the transglutaminase 2 enzyme. The dual role of transglutaminase 2 in celiac disease is hardly coincidental. This paper reviews the genetic mapping and involvement of MHC class II genes in disease pathogenesis, and discusses the evidence that MHC class II genes, via the involvement of transglutaminase 2, influence the generation of celiac disease-specific autoantibodies.

  8. Celiac disease and alcohol use disorders: increased length of hospital stay, overexpenditures and attributable mortality

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    Miguel Gili

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: alcohol use disorders are associated with a greater incidence of certain comorbidities in patients with celiac disease. Currently there is no available information about the impact that these disorders may have on length of hospital stays, overexpenditures during hospital stays, and excess mortality in these patients. Methods: a case-control study was conducted with a selection of patients 18 years and older hospitalized during 2008-2010 in 87 hospitals in Spain. Estimations of excess length of stays, costs, and attributable mortality were calculated using a multivariate analysis of covariance, which included age, gender, hospital group, alcohol use disorders, tobacco related disease and 30 other comorbidities. Results: patients who had both celiac disease and alcohol use disorders had an increased length of hospital stay, an average of 3.1 days longer in women, and 1.7 days longer in men. Excess costs per stay ranged from 838.7 euros in female patients, to 389.1 euros in male patients. Excess attributable mortality was 15.1% in women, 12.2% in men. Conclusions: apart from a gluten-free diet and other medical measures, the prevention of alcohol abuse is indicated in these patients. Patients hospitalized who present these disorders should receive specialized attention after leaving the hospital. Early detection and treatment should be used to prevent the appearance of organic lesions and should not be solely focused on male patients.

  9. Thyroid disorders in Brazilian patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Kotze, Lorete Maria; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori; da Rosa Utiyama, Shirley Ramos; Piovezan, Gislaine Custodio; Kotze, Luiz Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) can develop a gluten related autoimmune disorder that affects not only the small intestine but other tissues as well. An increased prevalence of autoimmune diseases has been reported, particularly autoimmune thyroiditis. The aim of this study was to characterize thyroid disorders in patients with CD. Fifty-two patients with CD (43 female, 9 male; mean age, 41.1 years) were studied. Nine were on a gluten-free diet (GFD). They were divided into four groups: Group 1, without thyroid involvement (n=30); Groups 2A-C, with thyroid involvement (n=22); Group 2A, subclinical hypothyroidism (n=11); Group 2B, clinical hypothyroidism (n=10); and Group 2C, other thyroid disorders (n=1). CD was confirmed by serologic and histologic criteria. Thyroid involvement was detected by measurement of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO). Increased levels of TSH and/or anti-TPO levels were detected in Groups 2A (21.1%) and 2B (19.2%). The patients of Group 2B presented clinical symptoms of hypothyroidism before the diagnosis of CD, and 5 of these patients were receiving levothyroxine. One woman (Group 2C; 1.92%) had a medullary carcinoma. There was statistical significance between the age when thyroid disease was diagnosed (current age) and the age of CD diagnosis between Groups 1 and 2B. Patients with thyroid involvement presented associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus (2), Down's syndrome (2), ulcerative colitis (1), and dermatitis herpetiformis (2). Our findings demonstrated an increased prevalence of thyroid disorders (hypothyroidism, 19.2%; and subclinical hypothyroidism, 21.2%), and other associated diseases in celiac patients, even on a GFD, increasing with the age of the patients. Screening for associated diseases is recommended for patients with CD, independent of age at diagnosis or treatment duration.

  10. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce differential effects in fibroblasts from celiac disease patients and from healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolella, Gaetana; Lepretti, Marilena; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Nanayakkara, Merlin; Di Zenzo, Marina; Sblattero, Daniele; Auricchio, Salvatore; Esposito, Carla; Caputo, Ivana

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 transglutaminase (TG2) has an important pathogenic role in celiac disease (CD), an inflammatory intestinal disease that is caused by the ingestion of gluten-containing cereals. Indeed, TG2 deamidates specific gliadin peptides, thus enhancing their immunogenicity. Moreover, the transamidating activity seems to provoke an autoimmune response, where TG2 is the main autoantigen. Many studies have highlighted a possible pathogenetic role of anti-TG2 antibodies, because they modulate TG2 enzymatic activity and they can interact with cell-surface TG2, triggering a wide range of intracellular responses. Autoantibodies also alter the uptake of the alpha-gliadin peptide 31-43 (p31-43), responsible of the innate immune response in CD, thus partially protecting cells from p31-43 damaging effects in an intestinal cell line. Here, we investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies protect cells from p31-43-induced damage in a CD model consisting of primary dermal fibroblasts. We found that the antibodies specifically reduced the uptake of p31-43 by fibroblasts derived from healthy subjects but not in those derived from CD patients. Analyses of TG2 expression and enzymatic activity did not reveal any significant difference between fibroblasts from healthy and celiac subjects, suggesting that other features related to TG2 may be responsible of such different behaviors, e.g., trafficking or subcellular distribution. Our findings are in line with the concept that a "celiac cellular phenotype" exists and that TG2 may contribute to this phenotype. Moreover, they suggest that the autoimmune response to TG2, which alone may damage the celiac mucosa, also fails in its protective role in celiac cells.

  11. Celiac disease and pulmonary hemosiderosis in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartl, Dominik; Belohradsky, Bernd H.; Griese, Matthias; Nicolai, Thomas; Krauss-Etschmann, Susanne; Roos, Dirk; Wintergerst, Uwe

    2004-01-01

    We report on a patient with the hitherto undescribed combination of chronic granulomatous disease, pulmonary hemosiderosis, and celiac disease. The hemosiderosis resolved with a gluten-free diet and glucocorticosteroid pulse therapy, but the restrictive lung function pattern remained unchanged. Lung

  12. Celiac disease biodetection using lossy-mode resonances generated in tapered single-mode optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, A. B.; Corres, J. M.; Del Villar, I.; Matias, I. R.; Arregui, F. J.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents the development and test of an anti-gliadin antibodies biosensor based on lossy mode resonances (LMRs) to detect celiac disease. Several polyelectrolites were used to perform layer-by-layer assembly processes in order to generate the LMR and to fabricate a gliadin-embedded thin-film. The LMR shifted 20 nm when immersed in a 5 ppm anti-gliadin antibodies-PBS solution, what makes this bioprobe suitable for detecting celiac disease. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that LMRs are used to detect celiac disease and these results suppose promising prospects on the use of such phenomena as biological detectors.

  13. Self-compassion directly and indirectly predicts dietary adherence and quality of life among adults with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, A Justine; Jung, Mary E

    2017-06-01

    Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only treatment for preventing both short- and long-term consequences of celiac disease. Given that following a strict GFD can be difficult, evidence-based strategies are needed to improve the psychological experience of living with celiac disease and following the GFD. Self-compassion appears to be an important component of effectively self-regulating one's behavior to cope with a chronic disease. The main goal of this study was to examine the relationships between self-compassion and management of celiac disease as assessed by (a) adherence to a strict GFD and (b) celiac-specific quality of life (CQoL). The secondary goal of this study was to explore self-regulatory efficacy (i.e., confidence in one's ability to self-manage behavior to follow a strict GFD) and concurrent self-regulatory efficacy (i.e., one's confidence to self-manage other valued life goals while following a strict GFD) as mediators of the relationship between self-compassion and the primary outcomes (adherence and CQoL). In this prospective study, 200 North American adults diagnosed with celiac disease completed online questionnaires at two time points (baseline and 1 month later). Self-compassion at baseline directly predicted stricter adherence (at Time 2; b = -0.63, p = 0.006) and enhanced CQoL (at Time 2; b = -0.50, p = 0.001). Further, self-compassion (at Time 1) also indirectly predicted stricter Time 2 adherence through self-regulatory efficacy (at Time 1; b = -0.26, 95% CI [-0.58, -0.04], R 2  = 0.29) and enhanced Time 2 CQoL through concurrent self-regulatory efficacy (at Time 1; b = -0.07, 95% CI [-0.14, -0.03], R 2  = 0.33). This was the first study to assess the effects of self-compassion in relation to the psychological experience of coping with celiac disease and following a GFD. The findings indicate that self-compassion, self-regulatory efficacy and concurrent self-regulatory efficacy are important cognitions in

  14. Treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis in a patient with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Dalkin, Alan C; Crowe, Sheila E; Wilson, Barbara B; Stelow, Edward B

    2010-03-01

    A 62-year-old postmenopausal woman with a family history of breast cancer, mild gastroesophageal reflux disease, iron-deficient anemia and declining BMD was seen in a specialist center for the evaluation and management of osteoporosis. Analysis of tissue transglutaminase IgA, endoscopic biopsy, serial BMD scans, FRAX calculation of osteoporotic fracture risk, Gail model calculation of breast cancer risk, assessment of blood vitamin D concentration and secondary evaluation for osteoporosis. Osteoporosis, persistent after 12 years of hormone replacement therapy, and celiac disease. The patient was initially treated for bone loss with postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy. DXA analyses showed a continued decline in BMD despite adequate replacement of calcium and vitamin D levels and withdrawal of gluten from the patient's diet. An oral bisphosphonate was recommended with plans to reassess BMD after 1 year.

  15. Physiopathology and Management of Gluten-Induced Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Manoj; Pandey, Rajesh; Chauhan, Nar Singh

    2017-02-01

    Proline- and glutamine-rich gluten proteins are one of the major constituents of cereal dietary proteins, which are largely resistant to complete cleavage by the human gastrointestinal (GI) digestive enzymes. Partial digestion of gluten generates approximately 35 amino acids (aa) immunomodulatory peptides which activate T-cell-mediated immune system, followed by immunological inflammation of mucosa leading to the onset of celiac disease (CD). CD is an autoimmune disease associated with HLA-DQ2/DQ8 polymorphism and dysbiosis of gut microbiota. CD is either diagnosed using duodenal mucosal biopsis or serological testing for transglutaminase 2 (TG2) specific antibodies (IgA and IgG). Current therapy for CD management is gluten-free diet, while other therapies like glutenase, probiotics, immunomodulation, jamming of HLA-DQ2, inhibition of TG2, and gluten tolerance aided by gluten tolerizing vaccines are being developed. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  16. Celiac disease: an underappreciated issue in women’s health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sveta; Leffler, Daniel

    2010-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy that is secondary to gluten ingestion and classically associated with gastrointestinal symptoms. Diagnosis is based on serology and confirmatory duodenal biopsy, and the only treatment is lifelong avoidance of gluten. CD has been increasingly recognized to encompass a wide variety of manifestations that are relevant to women’s health, including infertility, adverse pregnancy outcomes and reduced BMD. Currently, CD is underdiagnosed, largely owing to lack of recognition of the diverse manifestations by general practitioners. Increased awareness of the clinical spectrum of this disease, as well as targeted testing in at-risk individuals (including women with unexplained infertility and previous adverse pregnancy outcomes, and in specific populations with reduced BMD) is greatly needed in order to improve rates of diagnosis.

  17. Celiac Disease and Myointimal Proliferation: A Possible Correlation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Merra

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune disorder of the small bowel that occurs in genetically predisposed people of all ages, from middle infancy, and is caused by a reaction to gliadin, a gluten protein. Some patients are diagnosed with symptoms related to the decreased absorption of nutrients or with various symptoms which, although statistically linked, have no clear relationship with the malfunctioning bowel. Classic symptoms of CD include diarrhea, weight loss, and fatigue; bowel symptoms may be limited or even absent. In this article we describe the case of a young woman with CD who presents with myointimal proliferation. However multiple cases of vessel thrombosis have been reported in patients with CD. Despite the fact that no definitive relationship between these diseases could be explained, we think this association must be remembered especially in cases of young and tenuous women with these vascular abnormalities.

  18. Celiac disease: an underappreciated issue in women’s health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sveta; Leffler, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy that is secondary to gluten ingestion and classically associated with gastrointestinal symptoms. Diagnosis is based on serology and confirmatory duodenal biopsy, and the only treatment is lifelong avoidance of gluten. CD has been increasingly recognized to encompass a wide variety of manifestations that are relevant to women’s health, including infertility, adverse pregnancy outcomes and reduced BMD. Currently, CD is underdiagnosed, largely owing to lack of recognition of the diverse manifestations by general practitioners. Increased awareness of the clinical spectrum of this disease, as well as targeted testing in at-risk individuals (including women with unexplained infertility and previous adverse pregnancy outcomes, and in specific populations with reduced BMD) is greatly needed in order to improve rates of diagnosis. PMID:20887172

  19. Emerging Therapeutic Options for Celiac Disease: Potential Alternatives to a Gluten-Free Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Bakshi, Anita; Stephen, Sindu; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine that is more common than was previously thought. This disease is caused by an inappropriate immune response to wheat gluten, barley, and rye. Three main pathways cause celiac disease: the environmental trigger (gluten), genetic susceptibility, and unusual gut permeability. The only treatment currently available is a strict gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, a majority of patients have difficulty complying with this diet, and the re...

  20. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    Bone mineral density (/sup 125/I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.

  1. Improving outcomes of refractory celiac disease – current and emerging treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodward J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jeremy Woodward Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Intestinal inflammation and symptoms of celiac disease (CD usually respond well to gluten withdrawal, but rare cases are refractory to diet. Two types of refractory CD are discriminated on the basis of the presence or absence of an atypical population of mucosal lymphocytes that may progress to enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Challenges remain in the secure diagnosis of both types of refractory disease, and evidence on which to base treatment recommendations is flawed by the small numbers of reported patients and the use of different diagnostic strategies. Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of the condition in conjunction with the development of immunomodulatory agents for managing other inflammatory diseases are helping to shape future approaches to targeted therapy. Progression will depend on collaboration and recruitment to trials. In the meantime, there is evidence to suggest that earlier diagnosis and better follow-up and management of CD may prevent the development of refractoriness. Keywords: celiac disease, gluten, small intestine, lymphoma, lymphocytes

  2. Emerging therapeutic options for celiac disease: potential alternatives to a gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Anita; Stephen, Sindu; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2012-09-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine that is more common than was previously thought. This disease is caused by an inappropriate immune response to wheat gluten, barley, and rye. Three main pathways cause celiac disease: the environmental trigger (gluten), genetic susceptibility, and unusual gut permeability. The only treatment currently available is a strict gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, a majority of patients have difficulty complying with this diet, and the response to therapy is poor. Therefore, alternative treatments are being developed, and new insights into the pathophysiology of celiac disease have led to research into novel therapies. New treatments include engineering gluten-free grains, decreasing intestinal permeability by blockage of the epithelial zonulin receptor, inducing oral tolerance to gluten with a therapeutic vaccine, and degrading immunodominant gliadin peptides using probiotics with endopeptidases or transglutaminase inhibitors. These nondiet-based therapies provide hope for enhanced, lifelong celiac disease management with improved patient compliance and better quality of life.

  3. [Simultaneous presentation of autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac disease in an adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubiella, J; Bustamante, J; Sans, M; Ramírez, A; Feu, F; Piqué, J M

    1998-11-01

    Celiac disease may be associated with other underlying autoimmune diseases. Among these, thyroid disease has been described in around 10% of the cases with hypothyroidism being the most frequently reported. Clinical suspicion of thyroid involvement in patients with celiac disease is difficult since the symptomatology is scarce or is masked by the picture of malabsorption. Nonetheless, its detection is important since it is not solved by gluten free diet and its correction requires specific treatment. Thyroid function studies, in addition to determination of antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies, should be considered in celiac patients refractory to conventional dietetic treatment. We herein present the case of a 65-year-old woman who consulted for a malabsorption syndrome in whom celiac disease of the adult was simultaneously presented with hyperthyroidism secondary to autoimmune thyroiditis.

  4. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup(®), is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate's strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate's known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of "ripening" sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent

  5. [Influence of gender on the clinical presentation and associated diseases in adults with celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Jansson-Knodell, Claire L; Rahim, Mussarat W; See, Jacalyn A; Murray, Joseph A

    2016-10-01

    Celiac disease is diagnosed predominantly in women. We investigated the influence of gender on (i) age at diagnosis, (ii) clinical manifestations, and (iii) prevalence of associated disorders. Clinical data were abstracted from the medical record of adults with biopsy-proven celiac disease. The cohort consisted of 385 patients (women, 71%). Women were diagnosed at a younger age (women, 46.1 years; men, 52.6 years; p = 0.001). The prevalence of the following symptoms was higher in women: nausea/vomiting (women, 31%; men, 16%; p = 0.001), constipation (women, 21%; men, 10%; p = 0.007), and malaise/fatigue (women, 43%; men, 33%; p = 0.06). Greasy stools were more prevalent in men (women, 11%; men, 22%; p = 0.006). Autoimmune diseases were observed in 127 (33%) patients with a female to male ratio of 1.6 (women, 37%; men, 23%; p = 0.006). Depression, osteoporosis, and fibromyalgia predominated in women. Our findings suggest clinically relevant gender-related differences in celiac disease. These gender differences should be taken into account when managing adult patients with celiac disease.

  6. Celiac disease and immigration in Northeastern Italy: the "drawn double nostalgia" of "cozonac" and "panettone" slices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parco, Sergio; Città, Angelo; Vascotto, Fulvia; Tamaro, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    ... distress in children's projective drawings. In this report, we describe screening tests in children coming to the Friuli Venezia Giulia region in Northeastern Italy from non-European Union regions and suspected to have celiac disease...

  7. Pre-endoscopic screening for Helicobacter pylori and celiac disease in young anemic women

    OpenAIRE

    Vannella, Lucy; Gianni, Debora; Lahner, Edith; Amato, Antonio; Grossi, Enzo; Fave, Gianfranco Delle; Annibale, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the usefulness of pre-endoscopic serological screening for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and celiac disease in women aged < 50 years affected by iron-deficiency anemia (IDA).

  8. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: diagnostic value of specific radiographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomoschitz, F.; Schima, W.; Schober, E.; Turetschek, K. [Department of Radiology and Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Radiologic Research, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kaider, A. [Department of Medical Computer Sciences, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Vogelsang, H. [Department of Internal Medicine IV, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various radiographic findings at enteroclysis in adult patients with untreated celiac disease. Twenty-seven adult patients underwent enteroclysis because of unspecific intestinal symptoms before definitive biopsy proof of celiac disease. Enteroclysis of 123 subjects with similar clinical presentation, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, occult intestinal bleeding, and weight loss, who had a definitive diagnosis other than celiac disease, served as controls. The radiographic features previously described in the literature as indicative of adult celiac disease (i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds, increase of ileal folds, small bowel dilatation, flocculation) were evaluated in blinded fashion in all studies and the subjective likelihood of diagnosis of celiac disease was assessed. Assessing every finding separately, each feature proved to have a high specificity (78-100%) but low sensitivity (19-59%) for celiac disease. Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern was the single best feature (specificity 100%, 95% CI 97-100%; sensitivity 59%, 95% CI 40-78%); however, combination of criteria enables establishment of the diagnosis of celiac disease quite accurately (specificity 100%, 95% CI 98-100%; sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 58-91%). Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern as a single finding as well as combination at least three of the following features, i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds (''colonization''), increase of ileal folds (''jejunization''), dilatation, and flocculation, make enteroclysis an accurate tool for diagnosis of celiac disease in adult patients with suspected intestinal disease. (orig.)

  9. Celiac disease: advances in treatment via gluten modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoven, Samantha; Murray, Joseph A; Marietta, Eric

    2012-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals carrying the prerequisite genetic markers HLA DQ2 or DQ8. These genetic markers are present in approximately 30% of the population, and the worldwide prevalence of CD is estimated to be approximately 1%-2%. Currently a gluten-free diet is the only treatment for CD, but novel therapies aimed at gluten modification are underway. This review will discuss gluten-based therapies including wheat alternatives and wheat selection, enzymatic alteration of wheat, oral enzyme supplements, and polymeric binders as exciting new therapies for treatment of CD. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gliadin peptides activate blood monocytes from patients with celiac disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cinová, Jana; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Smythies, L.; Černá, M.; Pecharová, Barbara; Dvořák, M.; Fruhauf, P.; Tlaskalová, Helena; Smith, P.; Tučková, Ludmila

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2007), s. 201-209 ISSN 0271-9142 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/05/2245; GA ČR GD310/03/H147; GA AV ČR IAA5020210; GA AV ČR IAA5020205; GA AV ČR 1QS500200572; GA AV ČR KJB5020407; GA MZe 1B53002 Grant - others:US(US) DK-064400; US(US) DK-47322; US(US) DK-54495; US(US) HD-41361; US(US) DK-064400 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Source of funding: N - neverejné zdroje ; N - neverejné zdroje ; N - neverejné zdroje ; N - neverejné zdroje ; N - neverejné zdroje Keywords : celiac disease * innate immunity * blood monocytes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.886, year: 2007

  11. Celiac disease screening in Brazilian patients with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusso, Luiza; Simões, Mariana Cionek; Skare, Thelma L; Nisihara, Renato; Burkiewicz, Claudine C; Utiyama, Shirley

    2014-04-01

    To analyze if it is worthwhile to screen Brazilian osteoporotic patients for celiac disease (CD). One hundred patients with osteoporosis and 97 controls were evaluated for IgA-EmA (IgA anti-endomysial antibodies) by indirect immunofluorescence method and IgG-anti-tTG (tissue transglutaminase) by ELISA assay. Positive patients were invited to have gastrointestinal endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. Two patients had positive IgG-anti-tTG test and one of them also showed positive IgA-EmA. Only the latter had a positive duodenal biopsy for CD. None of the controls were positive for either auto-antibodies. We observed low prevalence of CD in osteoporotic Brazilian patients. This finding does not support routine screening for CD in patients with osteoporosis in our geographic region.

  12. Regression of conjunctival tumor during dietary treatment of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncer Samuray

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old girl presented with a hemorrhagic conjunctival lesion in the right eye. The medical history revealed premature cessation of breast feeding, intolerance to the ingestion of baby foods, anorexia, and abdominal distention. Prior to her referral, endoscopic small intestinal biopsy had been carried out under general anesthesia with a possible diagnosis of Celiac Disease (CD. Her parents did not want their child to undergo general anesthesia for the second time for the excisional biopsy. We decided to follow the patient until all systemic investigations were concluded. In evaluation, the case was diagnosed with CD and the conjunctival tumor showed complete regression during gluten-free dietary treatment. The clinical fleshy appearance of the lesion with spider-like vascular extensions and subconjunctival hemorrhagic spots, possible association with an acquired immune system dysfunction due to CD, and spontaneous regression by a gluten-free diet led us to make a presumed diagnosis of conjunctival Kaposi sarcoma.

  13. Hereditary fructose intolerance and celiac disease: a novel genetic association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciacci, Carolina; Gennarelli, Daniela; Esposito, Gabriella; Tortora, Raffaella; Salvatore, Francesco; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2006-05-01

    Celiac disease (CD) has been associated with several genetic disorders, but has not been associated with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). We identified CD in 4 female patients affected by HFI from among 38 Italian HFI patients. Three of these patients were children in whom the CD-associated signs were hypertransaminasemia, failure to thrive, low weight, and short stature, whereas the adult patient had protracted diarrhea notwithstanding a fructose-free diet. The incidence of CD in our group of HFI patients was higher (>10%) than in the general population (1%-3%) (P<.02). The possibility of an association between these 2 gastrointestinal disorders is important, particularly in the management of HFI patients with persisting symptoms.

  14. The present and the future in the diagnosis and management of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Natalia E.; Theethira, Thimmaiah G.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. In celiac disease, adaptive and innate immune activation results in intestinal damage and a wide range of clinical manifestations. In the past, celiac disease was thought to result in signs and symptoms solely related to the gastrointestinal tract. Now, more than half of the adult population presents with extra-intestinal manifestations that can also be expected to improve on a gluten-free diet. For this reason, it is recommended that physicians have a low threshold of suspicion for celiac disease. Current knowledge of the immune pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease has served as a catalyst for the development of novel diagnostic tools and therapeutics. Over the years, highly sensitive and specific serological assays, in addition to genetic markers, have been found to target specific steps in the cascade pathway of celiac disease. Also the advent of the gluten challenge has enabled experts to design diagnostic algorithms and monitor clinical responses in clinical trials. The gluten challenge has provided substantial benefit in the advance of novel therapeutics as an adjuvant treatment to the gluten free diet. Generally, a strict gluten-free diet is highly burdensome to patients and can be limited in its efficacy. Alternative therapies—including gluten modification, modulation of intestinal permeability and immune response—could be central to the future treatment of celiac disease. PMID:25326000

  15. [Psychological alterations in patients with adult celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Cerezo, Francisco J; Castillejo, Gemma; Guillen, Núria; Morente, Vanessa; Simó, Josep M; Tena, Francisco J; Marsal, Joan; Pascual, Domingo

    2014-04-01

    Patients with recently-diagnosed adult celiac disease were evaluated with the Gastrointestinal Symptom rating Scale (GSRS) and Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) to evaluate their psychological alterations, the association between any alterations and gastrointestinal symptoms, and their outcome after starting a gluten-free diet. The patients underwent nutritional assessment and then started a gluten-free diet; they were reassessed 6 months later. Quantitative variables are expressed as the median and 25th-75th percentiles. We included 21 patients, 17 women and 4 mena, with a mean age of 43 years (31-47). The results of histological analysis were compatible with Marsh I lesions in 6 patients, Marsh IIIa in 6 and Marsh IIIb in 9. At baseline, 8 patients showed severe psychological distress, 4 showed moderate distress and 9 showed no distress. The GSRS score was 34 (17-43) and the PGWBI was 64 (48-87), with a significant correlation between the 2 indexes (rho=-.58, P=.006). At 6 months, 3 patients had severe psychological distress, 5 had moderate distress, 9 showed no distress and 4 showed psychological well-being. The GSRS score at 6 months was 13 (8-17) and the PGWBI was 83 (68-95) (P<.05 compared with baseline data for the 3 indicators). The 6 axes of the PGWBI showed significant improvement. At 6 months, no correlation was found between the GSRS and PGWBI. Patients with celiac disease have psychological alterations whose intensity is related to gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms improve after the start of a gluten-free diet. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  16. Diagnostic Yield of Isolated Deamidated Gliadin Peptide Antibody Elevation for Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerter, Nicholas A; Shannahan, Sarah E; Suarez, Jorge; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H R; Leffler, Daniel A; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Serologic testing for celiac disease includes tissue transglutaminase and endomysial antibodies. In addition to these tools, assays for deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies have been shown to have sensitivity and specificity that are comparable to tissue transglutaminase testing, and are increasingly being used for celiac disease testing. The goal of this study is to evaluate the utility of deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) testing in the setting of a negative tissue transglutaminase (TTG) IgA test. We reviewed the records of all patients seen at two U.S. celiac disease referral centers and identified those who had an elevated DGP IgA and/or IgG in the setting of a negative TTG IgA. Of these patients, those who underwent duodenal biopsy while on a gluten-containing diet were included. Patients with prior biopsy-proven celiac disease or prior TTG IgA positivity were excluded. The results of the biopsy were used as the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis, and patients with villous atrophy (Marsh class 3) on duodenal biopsy were considered to have celiac disease. Between the two institutions, 84 patients were identified with negative TTG IgA and positive DGP IgA or IgG who also had duodenal biopsies performed while maintaining a gluten-containing diet. Of these patients, 13 patients (15.5%; 95% CI 8.5-25.0%) were found to have celiac disease on duodenal biopsy. DGP antibody testing can identify cases of celiac disease in TTG-negative individuals, although the low positive predictive value suggests that the yield may be low.

  17. Risk of colorectal adenomas in patients with celiac disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, J; Rausch, A; Zubiaurre, I

    2018-02-05

    Whether celiac disease increases the risk of presenting with colorectal adenoma or not, has not been extensively evaluated. This question becomes relevant when considering early screening methods in patients with the disease. The aim of our article was to determine the risk of colorectal adenomas in celiac disease patients. A computer-assisted search of the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases was carried out, encompassing the time frame of 1966 to December 2016. The search strategy consisted of the following MESH terms: 'celiac disease' OR 'celiac sprue' AND 'colorectal' OR 'colorectal neoplasia' OR 'colorectal adenoma'. A fixed-effect model was used for the analyses. The first analysis dealt with the prevalence of all presentations of colorectal adenoma in patients with celiac disease and the second was on the prevalence of advanced adenomas. The outcomes were described as odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals. The search identified 480 bibliographic citations, 17 of which were chosen for evaluation. Fourteen of those studies were rejected, leaving a final total of three for the analysis. Those studies included 367 cases of celiac disease and 682 controls. No significant heterogeneity was observed (I 2 =26%). There was no increased prevalence of colorectal adenomas in the celiac disease patients, when compared with the controls (OR: 0.94 [0.65-1.38]), and no significant difference was observed when assessing the prevalence of advanced adenomas (OR: 0.97 [0.48-1.97]). Celiac disease was not associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas. However, due to the limited evidence available, more studies are necessary to determine whether there is an actual association. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Children With Screening-detected Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björck, Sara; Brundin, Charlotte; Karlsson, Magnus; Agardh, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether bone mass and metabolism are impaired in genetically at-risk children with screening-detected celiac disease. Included were 71 children with screening-detected celiac disease diagnosed at 10.0 ± 0.7 (mean ± standard deviation) years and 142 matched controls and 30 children with screening-detected celiac disease diagnosed at 3.3 ± 0.4 years of age presently on a gluten-free diet for 6.9 ± 1.1 years and 60 matched controls. All participants were assessed for bone mineral density (BMD) of total body and spine by dual x-ray absorptiometry, serum 25(OH) vitamin D3, parathyroid hormone (PTH), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-15, interferon gamma, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. At diagnosis, screening-detected celiac disease children as compared to controls had a mean -0.03 g/cm reduced BMD of both total body and spine (P = 0.009 and P = 0.005, respectively), a mean -11.4 nmol/L lower level of 25(OH) vitamin D3 (P celiac disease as compared to controls (P celiac disease have reduced BMD, lower levels of vitamin D3, higher levels of PTH, and signs of systemic inflammation compared with controls. These differences were not found in celiac disease children on a gluten-free diet, indicating that children with screening-detected celiac disease benefit from an early diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Age-related differences in celiac disease: Specific characteristics of adult presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Santiago; Vaquero, Luis; Rodríguez-Martín, Laura; Caminero, Alberto

    2015-11-06

    Celiac disease may appear both in early childhood and in elderly subjects. Current knowledge of the disease has revealed some differences associated to the age of presentation. Furthermore, monitoring and prognosis of celiac subjects can vary depending on the pediatric or adult stage. The main objective of this review is to provide guidance for the adult diagnostic and follow-up processes, which must be tailored specifically for adults and be different from pediatric patients.

  20. Looking for Celiac Disease in Italian Women with Endometriosis: A Case Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Santoro, Luca; Campo, Sebastiano; D'Onofrio, Ferruccio; Gallo, Antonella; Covino, Marcello; Campo, Vincenzo; Palombini, Guglielmo; Santoliquido, Angelo; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Montalto, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, a potential link between endometriosis and celiac disease has been hypothesized since these disorders share some similarities, specifically concerning a potential role of oxidative stress, inflammation, and immunological dysfunctions. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease among Italian women with endometriosis with respect to general population. Consecutive women with a laparoscopic and histological confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis were enrolled; female nurse...

  1. Maternal and neonatal vitamin D status, genotype and childhood celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårild, Karl; Tapia, German; Haugen, Margareta; Dahl, Sandra R; Cohen, Arieh S; Lundqvist, Marika; Lie, Benedicte A; Stene, Lars C; Størdal, Ketil

    2017-01-01

    Low concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D during pregnancy may be associated with offspring autoimmune disorders. Little is known about environmental triggers except gluten for celiac disease, a common immune-mediated disorder where seasonality of birth has been reported as a risk factor. We therefore aimed to test whether low maternal and neonatal 25-hydroxyvitamin D predicted higher risk of childhood celiac disease. In this Norwegian nationwide pregnancy cohort (n = 113,053) and nested case-control study, we analyzed 25-hydroxyvitamin D in maternal blood from mid-pregnancy, postpartum and cord plasma of 416 children who developed celiac disease and 570 randomly selected controls. Mothers and children were genotyped for established celiac disease and vitamin D metabolism variants. We used mixed linear regression models and logistic regression to study associations. There was no significant difference in average 25-hydroxyvitamin D between cases and controls (63.1 and 62.1 nmol/l, respectively, p = 0.28), and no significant linear trend (adjusted odds ratio per 10 nM increase 1.05, 95% CI: 0.93-1.17). Results were similar when analyzing the mid-pregnancy, postpartum or cord plasma separately. Genetic variants for vitamin D deficiency were not associated with celiac disease (odds ratio per risk allele of the child, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.10, odds ratio per risk allele of the mother 0.94; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.04). Vitamin D intake in pregnancy or by the child in early life did not predict later celiac disease. Adjustment for established genetic risk markers for celiac disease gave similar results. We found no support for the hypothesis that maternal or neonatal vitamin D status is related to the risk of childhood celiac disease.

  2. In vitro gliadin challenge: diagnostic accuracy and utility for the difficult diagnosis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Raffaella; Russo, Ilaria; De Palma, Giovanni D; Luciani, Alessandro; Rispo, Antonio; Zingone, Fabiana; Iovino, Paola; Capone, Pietro; Ciacci, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of celiac disease is difficult when treatment with gluten-free diet (GFD) is started before diagnosis and/or when the results of tests are inconsistent. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro gliadin challenge. The study cohort included patients without celiac disease (negative controls, n=57), patients with celiac disease (positive controls, n=166 untreated and n=55 on GFD), and patients with difficult diagnosis (n=59). All patients underwent endoscopy for collection of duodenal samples, which served for the diagnosis of celiac disease and for the in vitro evaluation of the gliadin-induced mucosal expression of seven inflammatory markers: PY99, ICAM-1 (intercellular cell adhesion molecule), HLA-DR, CD3, CD25, CD69, and transglutaminase 2 IgA. Diagnostic work-up for celiac disease included the search of specific serum antibodies. Patients of the difficult diagnosis group were asked to stop GFD for repeated search of these antibodies under untreated conditions. The area under the receptor-operated curve (ROC) was used for statistical analyses on accuracy. HLA-DR had the highest accuracy for celiac disease diagnosis in analyses on negative controls and positive controls also excluding patients on GFD (area under ROC=0.99). Accuracy of test did not increase combining data of HLA-DR with data of other markers. Findings were similar in the 39 patients of the difficult diagnosis group undergoing the search celiac disease-specific antibodies under untreated conditions. The in vitro response of mucosal HLA-DR to gliadin is an accurate tool for the diagnosis of celiac disease also in patients with difficult diagnosis.

  3. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: people without celiac disease avoiding gluten-is it due to histamine intolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnedl, Wolfgang J; Lackner, Sonja; Enko, Dietmar; Schenk, Michael; Mangge, Harald; Holasek, Sandra J

    2017-11-27

    Food intolerance/malabsorption is caused by food ingredients, carbohydrates (mainly lactose and fructose), proteins (gluten), and biogenic amines (histamine) which cause nonspecific gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms. Here we focus on possible etiologic factors of intolerance/malabsorption especially in people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) or the so-called people without celiac disease avoiding gluten (PWCDAG) and histamine intolerance. Recognizing the recently described symptoms of NCGS (PWCDAG) we review correlations and parallels to histamine intolerance (HIT). We show that intestinal and extra-intestinal NCGS (PWCDAG) symptoms are very similar to those which can be found in histamine intolerance. After a detailed diagnostic workup for all possible etiologic factors in every patient, a targeted dietary intervention for single or possibly combined intolerance/malabsorption might be more effective than a short-term diet low in fermentable oligo-, di- and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) or the untargeted uncritical use of gluten-free diets.

  4. Beta-cell autoimmunity in pediatric celiac disease: the case for routine screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Annunzio, Giuseppe; Giannattasio, Alessandro; Poggi, Elena; Castellano, Emanuela; Calvi, Angela; Pistorio, Angela; Barabino, Arrigo; Lorini, Renata

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of beta-cell autoimmunity and the usefulness of a type 1 diabetes screening in patients with celiac disease. We measured GAD antibodies (GADAs), insulinoma-associated protein 2 antigens (IA-2As), and insulin autoantibodies (IAAs) in 188 young Italian patients with celiac disease (66 male [35.1%]). Mean age at celiac disease diagnosis was 5.4 years (0.5-17.1), and mean celiac disease duration was 4.2 years (0-28.8). Celiac disease was diagnosed by jejunal biopsy after positivity for endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibody was confirmed. GADAs were positive in seven patients (3.7%), and IA-2As were positive in two patients. IAAs were negative in all cases. Metabolic evaluation was normal, and no patients developed diabetes during follow-up. There was no significant association among beta-cell autoimmunity and sex, age, pubertal stage, family history, or coexistence of other autoimmune disorders; compliance to a gluten-free diet was confirmed. Our results showed a low prevalence of beta-cell autoimmunity and do not support a precocious screening for beta-cell autoimmunity in young celiac disease patients.

  5. Celiac disease is not increased in women with hip fractures and low vitamin D levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboff, M S; Cobb, H; Gao, L Y; Hawkes, W; Yu-Yahiro, J; Kolatkar, N S; Magaziner, J

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density; however, the risk of fractures in celiac disease patients is unclear. We compared the prevalence of celiac disease between a group of women with hip fractures and a group of women undergoing elective joint replacement surgery and the association between celiac disease and vitamin D levels. Two hundred eight community dwelling and postmenopausal women were recruited from Boston, MA (n=81) and Baltimore, MD (n=127). We measured tissue transglutaminase IgA by ELISA to diagnose celiac disease and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by radioimmunoassay in both women with hip fractures (n=157) and a control group (n=51) of total hip replacement subjects from Boston. Subjects were excluded if they took any medications or had medical conditions that might affect bone. Median serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower (pwomen with hip fractures versus the control group (1.91% vs. 1.96%, respectively). Vitamin D levels are markedly reduced in women with hip fractures, however hip fracture patients did not show a higher percentage of positive tissue transglutaminase levels compared with controls. These data suggest that routine testing for celiac disease among hip fracture patients may not be necessary in the absence of clinical signs and symptoms, although data from larger studies among hip fracture subjects are needed.

  6. Celiac disease, collagenous sprue and microscopic colitis in IBD. Observations from a population-based cohort of IBD (ICURE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnblom, Anders; Holmström, Tommy; Tanghöj, Hans; Wanders, Alkwin; Sjöberg, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), microscopic colitis and celiac disease are all diseases with worldwide distribution and increased incidence has been reported from many areas. There is a shortage of studies investigating the occurrence of these diseases in the same individual and whether those affected demonstrate any particular phenotype. The aim of the study was to describe the concomitant incidence of microscopic colitis and celiac disease in a population-based IBD cohort. All 790 individuals in a prospective population-based cohort included 2005-09 from Uppsala region, Sweden, were reviewed regarding the appearance of microscopic or celiac disease before or after IBD diagnosis. Fifty percent (396/790) of the patients had been examined for the possibility of celiac disease. Seventeen patients with celiac disease were found, representing 2.2% of the cohort. Patients with celiac disease were younger compared to the non-celiac patients and those with colitis had more often an extensive inflammation of the colon. Seventy-one percent (12/17) were women. The majority of the patients were diagnosed with celiac disease before IBD. Five patients with IBD had an earlier diagnosis of microscopic colitis or developed it after the IBD diagnosis. One teenager developed collagenous sprue, misinterpreted as a severe relapse of ulcerative colitis (UC) resulting in colectomy. The risk for celiac disease seems not to be increased in IBD, but those affected by both diseases seem to be predominantly women with extensive UC. There is a potential association between microscopic colitis and IBD.

  7. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes in celiac disease: prevalence and effect on clinical and histological presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylökäs, Antti; Kaukinen, Katri; Huhtala, Heini; Collin, Pekka; Mäki, Markku; Kurppa, Kalle

    2016-07-25

    Association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes in adults is still somewhat unclear, and that between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes even less known. We studied these issues in a large cohort of adult celiac disease patients. The prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in 1358 celiac patients was compared with the population-based values. Furthermore, patients with celiac disease and concomitant type 1 or type 2 diabetes and those with celiac disease only underwent comparisons of clinical and histological features and adherence to gluten-free diet. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes (men/women) was 8.0 % /1.8 % in celiac patients and 0.7 % /0.3 % in the population, and that of type 2 diabetes 4.3 % /2.5 % and 4.4 % /3.0 %, respectively. Celiac patients with concomitant type 1 diabetes were younger (45 years vs 65 years and 52 years, P celiac patients with concomitant type 2 diabetes and patients with celiac disease only. Patients with concomitant type 2 diabetes had more hypercholesterolemia than the other groups (8 % vs 6 % and 4 %, P = 0.024), and both diabetes groups more hypertension (47 % and 31 % vs 15 %, P celiac disease only. Type 1 diabetes was markedly overrepresented in celiac disease, especially in men, whereas the prevalence of type 2 diabetes was comparable with the population. Concomitant type 1 or type 2 diabetes predisposes celiac patients to severe co-morbidities and type 1 diabetes also to poor dietary adherence.

  8. Validation of Antibody-Based Strategies for Diagnosis of Pediatric Celiac Disease Without Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Johannes; Petroff, David; Richter, Thomas; Auth, Marcus K H; Uhlig, Holm H; Laass, Martin W; Lauenstein, Peter; Krahl, Andreas; Händel, Norman; de Laffolie, Jan; Hauer, Almuthe C; Kehler, Thomas; Flemming, Gunter; Schmidt, Frank; Rodrigues, Astor; Hasenclever, Dirk; Mothes, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    A diagnosis of celiac disease is made based on clinical, genetic, serologic, and duodenal morphology features. Recent pediatric guidelines, based largely on retrospective data, propose omitting biopsy analysis for patients with concentrations of IgA against tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TTG) >10-fold the upper limit of normal (ULN) and if further criteria are met. A retrospective study concluded that measurements of IgA-TTG and total IgA, or IgA-TTG and IgG against deamidated gliadin (IgG-DGL) could identify patients with and without celiac disease. Patients were assigned to categories of no celiac disease, celiac disease, or biopsy required, based entirely on antibody assays. We aimed to validate the positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of these diagnostic procedures. We performed a prospective study of 898 children undergoing duodenal biopsy analysis to confirm or rule out celiac disease at 13 centers in Europe. We compared findings from serologic analysis with findings from biopsy analyses, follow-up data, and diagnoses made by the pediatric gastroenterologists (celiac disease, no celiac disease, or no final diagnosis). Assays to measure IgA-TTG, IgG-DGL, and endomysium antibodies were performed by blinded researchers, and tissue sections were analyzed by local and blinded reference pathologists. We validated 2 procedures for diagnosis: total-IgA and IgA-TTG (the TTG-IgA procedure), as well as IgG-DGL with IgA-TTG (TTG-DGL procedure). Patients were assigned to categories of no celiac disease if all assays found antibody concentrations celiac disease if at least 1 assay measured antibody concentrations >10-fold the ULN. All other cases were considered to require biopsy analysis. ULN values were calculated using the cutoff levels suggested by the test kit manufacturers. HLA typing was performed for 449 participants. We used models that considered how specificity values change with prevalence to extrapolate the PPV and NPV to populations with lower

  9. Why Oats Are Safe and Healthy for Celiac Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luud J. W. J. Gilissen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The water-insoluble storage proteins of cereals (prolamins are called “gluten” in wheat, barley, and rye, and “avenins” in oat. Gluten can provoke celiac disease (CD in genetically susceptible individuals (those with human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 serotypes. Avenins are present at a lower concentration (10%–15% of total protein content in oat as compared to gluten in wheat (80%–85%. The avenins in the genus Avena (cultivated oat as well as various wild species of which gene bank accessions were analyzed are free of the known CD immunogenic epitopes from wheat, barley, and rye. T cells that recognize avenin-specific epitopes have been found very rarely in CD patients. CD patients that consume oats daily do not show significantly increased levels of intraepithelial lymphocyte (EIL cells. The safety and the positive health effects of the long-term inclusion of oats in the gluten-free diet have been confirmed in long-term studies. Since 2009 (EC 41/2009 and 2013 (FDA oat products may be sold as gluten-free in several countries provided a gluten contamination level below 20 ppm. Introduction of oats in the gluten-free diet of celiac patients is advised after the recovery of the intestine. Health effects of oat consumption are reflected in European Food Safety Authority (EFSA- and Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved health claims. Oats can form a healthy, nutritious, fiber-rich, and safe complement to the gluten-free diet.

  10. Clinical utility of celiac disease associated HLA testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallav, Kumar; Kabbani, Toufic; Tariq, Sohaib; Vanga, Rohini; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Negative predictive value (NPV) of Celiac Disease (CD) related human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DQ2 and DQ8 approaches 100% in individual patients. However, studies evaluating its exclusionary utility in patient groups are lacking. Aim We aim to assess the performance of HLA testing when applied to patient groups with varying characteristics and propose evidence-based recommendations for its clinical use. Methods Demographic and clinical information was recorded in patients undergoing HLA testing. Using predetermined criteria, patients were classified as CD, Non CD or indeterminate. Diagnostic yield of HLA testing was defined as the percentage of patients in whom CD could be excluded based on negative HLA test. Results 256 patients underwent testing for CD related HLA DQ2 and DQ8. 102 (100 Non CD, 2 CD) patients tested HLA negative for a 98% NPV and 39% diagnostic yield. Diagnostic yield was highest (60%) in patients with intraepithelial lymphocytosis plus normal IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody (IgA-tTG) and lowest in patients with positive IgA-tTG plus villous atrophy (0%). CD was diagnosed in 2 HLA negative patients, who carried half of DQ2.5 trans genotype. Conclusions Diagnostic yield of CD related HLA testing varies widely depending on clinical indication. HLA testing is a practical and valuable test for most patients in whom initial evaluation for CD is inconclusive. A negative HLA result usually obviates the need for further celiac testing including endoscopy and gluten challenge. Rarely, in patients reported as HLA negative, half of HLA DQ2.5 (cis or trans) is sufficient for development of CD. PMID:24705698

  11. MicroRNAs: an epigenetic tool to study celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla A. Bascuñán-Gamboa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes recent findings on the role of microRNAs (miRNAs in biological processes associated with the regulation of chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that have been recently emerged as a new class of modulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs bind to complementary sequences of specific targets of messengers RNA, which can interfere with protein synthesis. We reviewed studies that evaluated the expression patterns of miRNAs in different autoimmune diseases, especially in celiac disease (CD. CD is a chronic enteropathy triggered by gluten proteins, characterized by altered immune responses in genetically susceptible individuals that results in damage to the bowel mucosa. CD has a high prevalence and an effective treatment by a specific diet ("gluten free diet". Genetic factors confer susceptibility but do not explain the whole disease, suggesting that environmental factors do play a relevant role in the development of the condition. The evaluation of the potential role of miRNA is of particular interest in CD given that these epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases have been recently described. Improving our understanding of miRNAs in CD will contribute to clarify the role of altered epigenetic regulation in the development and course of this disease.

  12. Women with celiac disease present with fertility problems no more often than women in the general population

    OpenAIRE

    Dhalwani, Nafeesa N.; West, Joe; Sultan, Alyshah Abdul; Ban, Lu; Tata, Laila J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Studies have associated infertility with celiac disease. However, these included small numbers of women attending infertility specialist services and subsequently screened for celiac disease, and therefore may not have been representative of the general population. We performed a large population-based study of infertility and celiac disease in women from the United Kingdom. \\ud \\ud METHODS: We identified 2,426,225 women with prospective UK primary care records between 1990...

  13. Increased Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Patients with Unexplained Infertility in the United States: A Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Janet M.; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Wang, Jeffrey; Lee, Susie K.; Murray, Joseph A.; Sauer, Mark V.; Green, Peter H. R.

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder which can present with a variety of non-gastrointestinal manifestations. In women, it may manifest with an assortment of gynecologic or obstetric disorders. Some reports have linked female infertility with undiagnosed celiac disease. Though there are a number of studies from Europe and the Middle East, only two prior American studies have examined the prevalence of “silent” celiac disease in a female infertility population. We prospectively performed s...

  14. Celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection in children: Is there any Association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Manish; Puri, Amarender Singh; Sachdeva, Sanjeev; Singh, Jatinderpal; Kumar, Ajay; Saran, Ravindra K

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection can influence the inflammatory and immune responses in the gut and may therefore play a role in the development of gluten-related enteropathy in genetically susceptible individuals. Our objective was to assess the relationship between celiac disease and HP infection in children. Children (1-18 years) diagnosed as celiac disease (CD) (n = 324) with submission of gastric and duodenal biopsies and duodenal histology having Marsh grade III features were eligible for the study. Non-celiac patients referred for endoscopy were selected as controls. We studied proportion of HP prevalence in children with confirmed CD as compared with HP prevalence in reference group comprising non-celiac children referred for endoscopy. We also evaluated predictors of HP infection in children with celiac disease. Of the 324 participants with CD, gastric HP was seen in 37 (11.4%) patients. The prevalence of HP in patients without CD (50%, P Celiac disease and gastric HP infection have inverse relationship that raises the question whether development of HP infection confers protection against CD. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Altered Expression of Type-1 and Type-2 Cannabinoid Receptors in Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tommaso, Monia; Biancheri, Paolo; Rapino, Cinzia; Giuffrida, Paolo; Papadia, Cinzia; Montana, Chiara; Pasini, Alessandra; Vanoli, Alessandro; Lanzarotto, Francesco; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Anandamide (AEA) is the prominent member of the endocannabinoid family and its biological action is mediated through the binding to both type-1 (CB1) and type-2 (CB2) cannabinoid receptors (CBR). The presence of AEA and CBR in the gastrointestinal tract highlighted their pathophysiological role in several gut diseases, including celiac disease. Here, we aimed to investigate the expression of CBR at transcriptional and translational levels in the duodenal mucosa of untreated celiac patients, celiac patients on a gluten-free diet for at least 12 months and control subjects. Also biopsies from treated celiac patients cultured ex vivo with peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin were investigated. Our data show higher levels of both CB1 and CB2 receptors during active disease and normal CBR levels in treated celiac patients. In conclusion, we demonstrate an up-regulation of CB1 and CB2 mRNA and protein expression, that points to the therapeutic potential of targeting CBR in patients with celiac disease. PMID:23620805

  16. Focus on Inclusive Education: The Educational and Social Challenges of Children with Celiac Disease: What Educators Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, Kay A.

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disease in which gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and contaminated oats, attacks the lining of the small intestine. Children with this disease must eliminate gluten from their diet. This article provides educators with essential information on celiac disease and the federal laws that protect the…

  17. Asymptomatic celiac sprue in juvenile rheumatic diseases children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheita, Tamer A; Fawzy, Samar M; Nour El-Din, Abeer M; Gomaa, Howaida E

    2012-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is the most frequent enteropathy in adults and its coexistence with other autoimmune diseases is frequent. To detect asymptomatic CD in children with rheumatic diseases by measuring tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies and finding any relation to disease activity. Setting and study design: The study included 60 children with juvenile rheumatic diseases consecutively from those attending the Rheumatology Clinics of Cairo University Hospitals: 30 juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), 10 juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 12 juvenile seronegative spondyloarthropathy and eight juvenile systemic sclerosis/polymyositis (SSc/PM) overlap syndrome were recruited during 2010. There were 22 male and 38 female patients. Thirty matched healthy controls were included. All children were subjected to thorough history taking, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. The body mass index (BMI) for age was used. All subjects had no gastrointestinal tract symptoms suggestive of CD and the tTG antibodies (IgA and IgG) were assessed. The mean age of patients was 12.03 ± 3.3 years and disease duration 4.18 ± 3.24 years. The demographic, clinical and laboratory features of the children were studied and compared. The tTG was positive in 32 (53.3%) patients compared to 20% of the controls (P = 0.03), being higher in females. In tTG-positive patients, the BMI was significantly lower, while white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and disease activity were significantly higher. tTG antibodies may be used as a screening test to identify asymptomatic CD associated with juvenile rheumatic diseases, especially those with active JRA or marked reduction in BMI. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, K; Yayla, Ç; Yüksel, M; Açar, B; Ünal, S; Ertem, A G; Kaplan, M; Akpinar, M Y; Kiliç, Z M Y; Kayaçetin, E

    2017-11-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the small intestine. It has been known that dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic coronary artery disease have become more frequent in patients with celiac disease. The aim of the study was to assess Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with celiac disease. This study was conducted at a single center in collaboration with gastroenterology and cardiology clinics. Between January 2014 and June 2015, a total of 76 consecutive patients were enrolled (38 patients with celiac disease and 38 control subjects). Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratio were measured from the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Tp-e interval (64.2±11.0 vs. 44.5±6.0; pceliac disease than control subjects. There was a significant positive correlation between Tp-e/QTc ratio and disease duration in patients with celiac disease (r=0.480, p=0.003) and also there was a significant positive correlation between Tp-e/QTc ratio and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=0.434, pceliac disease. Whether these changes increase the risk of ventricular arrhythmia deserve further studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity Among Adolescents and Young Adults in China.

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    Yuan, Juanli; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Jinyan; Li, Jingjing; Yu, Fenglian; Lu, Jun; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaozhong; Tong, Ping; Wu, Zhihua; Yang, Anshu; Yao, Yonghong; Nadif, Sarah; Shu, Heng; Jiang, Xu; Wu, Yujie; Gilissen, Luud; Chen, Hongbing

    2017-10-01

    In China, epidemiologic information on celiac disease autoimmunity is scarce and fragmented. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in the general Chinese population. In a cross-sectional prospective study, 19,778 undiagnosed Chinese adolescents and young adults (age, 16-25 y) were recruited from consecutive new students who underwent routine physical examinations at 2 universities in Jiangxi, China, from September 2010 through October 2013; the students were from 27 geographic regions in China. All subjects were tested for serum IgG, IgG against deamidated gliadin peptides (IgG anti-DGP), and IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA anti-tTG). We also analyzed HLA genotypes in subgroups of participants with different results from tests for serum markers of celiac disease. A total of 434 students (2.19%) tested positive for serum markers for celiac disease (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.99%-2.41%), 0.36% of the students tested positive for anti-tTG IgA (95% CI, 0.28%-0.46%), and 1.88% tested positive for anti-DGP IgG (95% CI, 1.70%-2.09%). The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity (positive results in assays for anti-tTG IgA and anti-DGP-IgG) was 0.06% (95% CI, 0.03%-0.10%). Celiac disease autoimmunity was associated with the consumption of wheat and female sex. The prevalence in the Shandong province in north China, where wheat is a staple in the diet, was 0.76% (95% CI, 0.21%-1.95%). The frequencies of the HLA-DQ2/-DQ8 genotypes associated with celiac disease were higher in subjects with celiac disease autoimmunity, based on detection of both serum markers, than in subjects with positive results from a single test (P celiac disease. The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in the Shandong province in north China, where wheat is a staple in the diet, was 0.76%. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Factors That Increase Risk of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity After a Gastrointestinal Infection in Early Life.

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    Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Lynch, Kristian F; Liu, Edwin; Lönnrot, Maria; Simell, Ville; Briese, Thomas; Koletzko, Sibylle; Hagopian, William; Rewers, Marian; She, Jin-Xiong; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Ziegler, Anette-G; Akolkar, Beena; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Lernmark, Åke; Hyöty, Heikki; Triplett, Eric W; Agardh, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of gluten immunogenicity in patients with celiac disease. We studied temporal associations between infections and the development of celiac disease autoimmunity, and examined effects of HLA alleles, rotavirus vaccination status, and infant feeding. We monitored 6327 children in the United States and Europe carrying HLA risk genotypes for celiac disease from 1 to 4 years of age for presence of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (the definition of celiac disease autoimmunity), until March 31, 2015. Parental reports of gastrointestinal and respiratory infections were collected every third month from birth. We analyzed time-varying relationships among reported infections, rotavirus vaccination status, time to first introduction of gluten, breastfeeding, and risk of celiac disease autoimmunity using proportional hazard models. We identified 13,881 gastrointestinal infectious episodes (GIE) and 79,816 respiratory infectious episodes. During the follow-up period, 732 of 6327 (11.6%) children developed celiac disease autoimmunity. A GIE increased the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity within the following 3 months by 33% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-1.59). This risk increased 2-fold among children born in winter and introduced to gluten before age 6 months (HR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.46-2.98), and increased 10-fold among children without HLA-DQ2 alleles and breastfed for fewer than 4 months (HR, 9.76; 95% CI, 3.87-24.8). Risk of celiac disease autoimmunity was reduced in children vaccinated against rotavirus and introduced to gluten before age 6 months (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.36-0.88). Gastrointestinal infections increase the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity in children with genetic susceptibility to this autoimmune disorder. The risk is modified by HLA genotype, infant gluten consumption, breastfeeding, and rotavirus vaccination, indicating complex interactions among infections, genetic factors

  1. Early infections are associated with increased risk for celiac disease: an incident case-referent study

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    Myléus Anna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease is defined as a ‘chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals’. Sweden has experienced an “epidemic” of celiac disease in children below two years of age. Celiac disease etiology is considered multifactorial; however, little is known regarding potential risk- or protecting factors. We present data on the possible association between early infectious episodes and celiac disease, including their possible contribution to the Swedish celiac disease epidemic. Methods A population-based incident case-referent study (475 cases, 950 referents with exposure information obtained via a questionnaire (including family characteristics, infant feeding, and the child’s general health was performed. Celiac disease cases were diagnosed before two years of age, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. Referents were randomly selected from the national population register after fulfilling matching criteria. The final analyses included 954 children, 373 (79% cases and 581 (61% referents, with complete information on main variables of interest in a matched set of one case with one or two referents. Results Having three or more parental-reported infectious episodes, regardless of type of infection, during the first six months of life was associated with a significantly increased risk for later celiac disease, and this remained after adjusting for infant feeding and socioeconomic status (odds ratio [OR] 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.0; P=0.014. The celiac disease risk increased synergistically if, in addition to having several infectious episodes, infants were introduced to dietary gluten in large amounts, compared to small or medium amounts, after breastfeeding was discontinued (OR 5.6; 95% CI, 3.1-10; P Conclusion This study suggests that having

  2. Selenium status and over-expression of interleukin-15 in celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid diseases

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    Anna Velia Stazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, for its multifactorial nature, the target organs are not limited to the gut, but include thyroid, liver, skin and reproductive and nervous systems. Between the extraintestinal symptoms associated with CD, autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs are more evident, underlining as CD-related autoimmune alterations can be modulated not only by gluten but also by various concurrent endogenous (genetic affinity, over-expression of cytokines and exogenous (environment, nutritional deficiency factors. In their pathogenesis a central role for over-expression of interleukin-15 (IL-15 is shown, by inhibiting apoptosis, leading to the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue destruction. Thyroid is particularly sensitive to selenium deficiency because selenoproteins are significant in biosynthesis and activity of thyroid hormones; besides, some selenoproteins as glutathione peroxidase are involved in inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, selenium malabsorption in CD can be thought as a key factor directly leading to thyroid and intestinal damage. Considering the complexity of this interaction and on the basis of available evidence, the aim of this review is to assess as preventive and therapeutic target the role of IL-15 and selenium in the pathogeneses of both CD and AITD.

  3. Celiac disease in Saudi children. Evaluation of clinical features and diagnosis.

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    Saeed, Anjum; Assiri, Asaad; Assiri, Hebah; Ullah, Anhar; Rashid, Mohsin

    2017-09-01

     Objectives: To characterize the clinical presentations and diagnosis including serological tests and histopathological findings in children with celiac disease. Methods: All children (less than 18 years) with confirmed celiac disease diagnosed over a 6 year period at a private tertiary care health care center in Riyadh,  Saudi Arabia were studied retrospectively. Information collected included demographics, clinical presentation and diagnostic modalities with serology and small intestinal histology reported by Marsh grading. Results: A total of 59 children had confirmed celiac disease. Thirty (50.8%) were male. Median age was 8 years (range 1 to 16 years). The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 2.3 (±1.5) years. Classical disease was present only in 30.5%, whereas 69.5% had either non-classical presentations or belonged to high risk groups for celiac disease such as those with type-1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, Down syndrome and siblings. Failure to thrive was the most common presentation followed by short stature, abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody was positive in 91.5%, and titers were no different between those with classical and non-classical disease. All had Marsh-graded biopsy findings consistent with celiac disease. Conclusion: Children with celiac disease usually present with non-classical features. A high index of suspicion needs to be maintained to consider this disorder in the diagnostic workup of pediatric patients. High risk group should be screened early to avoid complications associated with untreated celiac disease.

  4. Celiac disease: 10-year experience in a Romanian tertiary center.

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    Maxim, Roxana; Pleşa, Alina; Ciortescu, Irina; Gîrleanu, Irina; Stoica, Oana; Trifan, Anca-Victoriţa

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the experience of a single coeliac center over a 10-year-observational period. Between January 2003 and December 2013 a total of 195 consecutive patients admitted with celiac disease were tested by multiple duodenal biopsies, anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-gliadin antibodies, and baseline demographic, clinical, biological and immunological parameters. Patients were divided into two major groups according to the clinical features and number of signs and symptoms present upon admission: gastrointestinal (131, 67.17%) and non-gastrointestinal (64, 32.8%). Anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-gliadin antibodies showed seropositivity in 109/158. Histological samples were available in 152 cases, according to Marsh-Oberhuber classification 11.18% being type 0, 17.76%, type I-II, and 71.05% type III. Correlations between anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody titers and Marsh-Oberhuber classification were found to be statistically significant. Body mass index was available in 96 cases. We found that severe atrophy was predominant in patients with a BMICeliac disease has an increasing prevalence and can be diagnosed at any age. Histology samples were indicative of different stages of villous atrophy. The disease prevalence is significantly higher among women. There was no statistically significant correlation between Marsh classification and BMI values.

  5. Th17-related genes and celiac disease susceptibility.

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    Luz María Medrano

    Full Text Available Th17 cells are known to be involved in several autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In celiac disease (CD, recent studies suggest an implication of those cells in disease pathogenesis. We aimed at studying the role of genes relevant for the Th17 immune response in CD susceptibility. A total of 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, mainly selected to cover most of the variability present in 16 Th17-related genes (IL23R, RORC, IL6R, IL17A, IL17F, CCR6, IL6, JAK2, TNFSF15, IL23A, IL22, STAT3, TBX21, SOCS3, IL12RB1 and IL17RA, were genotyped in 735 CD patients and 549 ethnically matched healthy controls. Case-control comparisons for each SNP and for the haplotypes resulting from the SNPs studied in each gene were performed using chi-square tests. Gene-gene interactions were also evaluated following different methodological approaches. No significant results emerged after performing the appropriate statistical corrections. Our results seem to discard a relevant role of Th17 cells on CD risk.

  6. Celiac disease in children: is it a problem in Kuwait?

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    Al-Qabandi W

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wafa'a Al-Qabandi,1 Eman Buhamrah,2 Dalia Al-Abdulrazzaq,1 Khaled Hamadi,2 Fawaz Al Refaee3 1Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait; 2Department of Pediatrics, Al Amiri Hospital, Kuwait; 3Department of Pediatrics, Al Adan Hospital, Kuwait  All authors contributed equally to the study Background: Celiac disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory disease of the small intestine triggered by gluten ingestion. The objective of this study is to describe our experience with CD children in Kuwait. Methods: The records of children with CD seen in the pediatric gastroenterology unit between February 1998 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were referred because of symptoms or positive CD antibody screening of a high-risk group (type 1 diabetes and Down syndrome. Results: Forty-seven patients were diagnosed: 53% were symptomatic and 47% were identified by screening. The median age at diagnosis was 66 (range 7–189 months. All cases were biopsy-proven except one. The symptomatic patients were significantly younger than those identified following screening (P<0.004. In the whole group, 66% were females and 77% were Kuwaitis; 9% had a positive family history of CD. The estimated cumulative incidence was 6.9/105. The median duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 8.5 (range 2–54 months. Failure to thrive was the most common presenting complaint (72% followed by diarrhea (64% and abdominal distension (56%. Atypical manifestations were seen in 60% of patients. Underweight and short stature were confirmed in 19% and 17% of patients, respectively. Overweight and obesity were detected in 14% and 6%, respectively. CD serology was based on a combination of antiendomysial and antigliadin antibodies. The median follow up was 24 (range 12–144 months. All patients were commenced on a gluten free diet, but good compliance was only achieved in 78%. Conclusion: The low frequency of childhood CD in Kuwait could

  7. Classification of videocapsule endoscopy image patterns: comparative analysis between patients with celiac disease and normal individuals

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    Ciaccio Edward J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative disease markers were developed to assess videocapsule images acquired from celiac disease patients with villous atrophy, and from control patients. Method Capsule endoscopy videoclip images (576 × 576 pixels were acquired at 2/second frame rate (11 celiacs, 10 controls at regions: 1. bulb, 2. duodenum, 3. jejunum, 4. ileum and 5. distal ileum. Each of 200 images per videoclip (= 100s were subdivided into 10 × 10 pixel subimages for which mean grayscale brightness level and its standard deviation (texture were calculated. Pooled subimage values were grouped into low, intermediate, and high texture bands, and mean brightness, texture, and number of subimages in each band (nine features in all were used for quantifying regions 1-5, and to determine the three best features for threshold and incremental learning classification. Classifiers were developed using 6 celiac and 5 control patients' data as exemplars, and tested on 5 celiacs and 5 controls. Results Pooled from all regions, the threshold classifier had 80% sensitivity and 96% specificity and the incremental classifier had 88% sensitivity and 80% specificity for predicting celiac versus control videoclips in the test set. Trends of increasing texture from regions 1 to 5 occurred in the low and high texture bands in celiacs, and the number of subimages in the low texture band diminished (r2 > 0.5. No trends occurred in controls. Conclusions Celiac videocapsule images have textural properties that vary linearly along the small intestine. Quantitative markers can assist in screening for celiac disease and localize extent and degree of pathology throughout the small intestine.

  8. Symptoms of Functional Intestinal Disorders Are Common in Patients with Celiac Disease Following Transition to a Gluten-Free Diet.

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    Silvester, Jocelyn A; Graff, Lesley A; Rigaux, Lisa; Bernstein, Charles N; Leffler, Daniel A; Kelly, Ciarán P; Walker, John R; Duerksen, Donald R

    2017-09-01

    Celiac disease and functional intestinal disorders may overlap, yet the natural history of functional symptoms in patients with celiac disease is unknown. To investigate the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD), and functional bloating (FB) symptoms among patients with celiac disease at diagnosis and during the first year of a gluten-free diet. Adults with a new diagnosis of celiac disease were surveyed at baseline, 6 months and 1 year using standardized measures for intestinal symptoms [Rome III diagnostic questionnaire and celiac symptom index (CSI)] and gluten-free diet adherence [gluten-free eating assessment tool (GF-EAT) and celiac diet adherence test]. At diagnosis, two-thirds fulfilled Rome III diagnostic questionnaire symptom criteria for IBS (52%), functional dyspepsia (27%), and/or functional bloating (9%). One year post-diagnosis, there was high adherence to a gluten-free diet as 93% reported gluten exposure less than once per month on the GF-EAT and only 8% had ongoing celiac disease symptoms (CSI score >45). The rates of those meeting IBS (22%) and functional dyspepsia (8%) symptom criteria both decreased significantly on a gluten-free diet. The prevalence of functional symptoms (any of IBS, FD or FB) at 1 year was 47%. Long-term follow-up of patients with celiac disease is necessary because many patients with celiac disease who are adherent to a gluten-free diet have persistent gastrointestinal symptoms.

  9. Dietary Patterns After the Weaning and Lactation Period Associate with Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Children.

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    Barroso, Monica; Beth, Sytske A; Voortman, Trudy; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; van Zelm, Menno C; Moll, Henriette A; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C

    2018-02-23

    There have been many studies of associations between infant feeding practices and development of celiac disease during childhood, but few studies have focused on overall diets of young children following the weaning period. We aimed to examine the association between common dietary patterns in infants and the occurrence of celiac disease autoimmunity during childhood. We performed a prospective analysis of data from the Generation R Study that comprised 1997 children born from April 2002 through January 2006 in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Food consumption around 1 year of age was assessed with a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Dietary data were examined using a priori (based on existing guidelines) and a posteriori (Principal Component Analysis and Reduced Rank Regression) dietary pattern analyses. Five dietary patterns were compared. Celiac disease autoimmunity, determined based on serum concentration of transglutaminase-2 autoantibody (TG2A) below or above 7 U/mL, was evaluated at 6 years. Associations between dietary pattern adherence scores and celiac disease autoimmunity were examined using multivariable logistic regression models. Higher adherence to the a posteriori-derived prudent dietary pattern (high intake of vegetables, vegetable oils, pasta, and grains and low consumption of refined cereals and sweet beverages) at 1 year was significantly associated with lower odds of celiac disease autoimmunity at 6 years (odds ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54-0.84). No significant associations were found for other 4 dietary patterns. In a prospective study of dietary patterns of young children in the Netherlands, we associated a diet with high consumption of vegetables and grains, and low consumption of refined cereals and sweet beverages, with lower odds of celiac disease autoimmunity. Early-life dietary patterns might therefore be involved in the development of celiac disease during childhood. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Gluten-Free Diet Does Not Appear to Induce Endoscopic Remission of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children with Coexistent Celiac Disease

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    Joseph R Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis are usually considered to be separate gastrointestinal diseases; however, it appears that they may coexist more often than would be expected. It is unknown whether eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with celiac disease responds to a gluten-free diet.

  11. The opioid effects of gluten exorphins: asymptomatic celiac disease.

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    Pruimboom, Leo; de Punder, Karin

    2015-11-24

    Gluten-containing cereals are a main food staple present in the daily human diet, including wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten intake is associated with the development of celiac disease (CD) and related disorders such as diabetes mellitus type I, depression, and schizophrenia. However, until now, there is no consent about the possible deleterious effects of gluten intake because of often failing symptoms even in persons with proven CD. Asymptomatic CD (ACD) is present in the majority of affected patients and is characterized by the absence of classical gluten-intolerance signs, such as diarrhea, bloating, and abdominal pain. Nevertheless, these individuals very often develop diseases that can be related with gluten intake. Gluten can be degraded into several morphine-like substances, named gluten exorphins. These compounds have proven opioid effects and could mask the deleterious effects of gluten protein on gastrointestinal lining and function. Here we describe a putative mechanism, explaining how gluten could "mask" its own toxicity by exorphins that are produced through gluten protein digestion.

  12. Neurological manifestations of atypical celiac disease in childhood.

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    Sel, Çiğdem Genç; Aksoy, Erhan; Aksoy, Ayşe; Yüksel, Deniz; Özbay, Ferda

    2017-09-01

    Various typical and atypical neurological manifestations can be seen as the initial symptoms of celiac disease (CD). We suggest that gluten toxicity is the most suspicious triggering risk factor for probable pathophysiological pathways of neurological involvement in atypical CD. The medical charts of 117 patients diagnosed with atypical CD were retrieved from a tertiary center in Ankara, Turkey. Eight patients reported as having neurologic manifestations as initiating symptoms were evaluated in detail. The initial neurological manifestations of CD in our study included atypical absence, which was reported first in this study, generalized tonic-clonic seizures, complex partial seizures, severe axial hypotonia and down phenotype, multifocal leukoencephalopathy, mild optic neuritis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and short duration headaches. Seizures mostly emphasizing atypical absence could be the initial presentation manifestation of CD, first described in this literature. Gluten toxicity could be one of the most powerful triggering factors for developing epilepsy in CD. Learning disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, short duration headaches, mild optic neuritis, encephalopathy, and DS could also be the initial neurological manifestations of atypical CD. A gluten-restricted diet may improve neurological complaints, epileptic discharges, and neuropsychiatric symptoms. All we found may be a small part of the full range of neurological disorders of unknown origin related to CD. Clinical suspicion should be the rule for accurate diagnosis of the disease.

  13. Clinical importance of celiac disease in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

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    Yaşar, Sirin; Yaşar, Bülent; Abut, Evren; Aşiran Serdar, Zehra

    2012-02-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common disease of the oral mucosa that is characterized by recurrent, painful ulcers of unknown etiology. The association between celiac disease and recurrent aphthous stomatitis has been evaluated in several studies, but variable results have been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The study group consisted of 82 patients, all of whom had a history of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The control group included 82 patients who did not have aphthous stomatitis. Patients were screened for IgA anti-endomysial antibodies, IgG anti-endomysial antibodies, IgA anti-gliadin antibodies, and IgG anti-gliadin antibodies. Patients with positive serology underwent endoscopic biopsies of the duodenal mucosa. Patients in both groups were also questioned regarding gastrointestinal symptoms. One patient (1.2%) out of 82 in the study group was diagnosed with celiac disease by biopsy. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, heartburn and regurgitation were determined to be of higher incidence in the study group (paphthous stomatitis and celiac disease and that screening recurrent aphthous stomatitis patients for celiac disease has little clinical value. Additionally, regurgitation of gastric acid to the oral cavity may precipitate the formation of aphthous stomatitis.

  14. Presentation of Celiac Disease in Finnish Children Is No Longer Changing: A 50-Year Perspective.

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    Kivelä, Laura; Kaukinen, Katri; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Huhtala, Heini; Ashorn, Merja; Ruuska, Tarja; Hiltunen, Pauliina; Visakorpi, Jarmo; Mäki, Markku; Kurppa, Kalle

    2015-11-01

    To chart trends in the presentation of celiac disease in a large cohort of Finnish children diagnosed over a period of 48 years. Clinical and serologic data, severity of small-bowel mucosal damage, and presence of associated conditions were gathered from 596 children diagnosed with celiac disease in 1966-2013. The children were divided into 4 groups based on the year of diagnosis (before 1980, 1980-1999, 2000-2009, and 2010-2013), and the variables were compared between the periods. The incidence of celiac disease autoimmunity in 2001-2013 was calculated based on the number of new antibody-positive cases in each year. Age at diagnosis rose from median 4.3 years before 1980 to between 7.6 and 9.0 years in the later periods. The severity of clinical presentation, in general, became milder and poor growth less common during the entire study period of 50 years. Percentages of children with classical gastrointestinal presentation decreased, and those with atypical or subclinical presentation increased after the 1990s, these changes leveling off in 2000-2013. Similarly, the severity of small-bowel mucosal damage was milder after the 1990s. The incidence of celiac disease autoimmunity increased in the early 2000s but then fluctuated without a clear trend. There were no significant secular changes in sex distribution, presence of anemia, levels of celiac antibodies, or celiac disease-associated conditions. The clinical and histologic presentation of celiac disease in children became milder, especially in the 1980s and 1990s. However, most of these changes have reached a plateau in recent years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nutritional status variation and intestinal and extra intestinal symptomatology in patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity given specialized dietary advice

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    Priscila Vaz de Melo RIBEIRO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the nutritional status variation and symptomatology of patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity after specialized dietary advice Methods: This prospective study included 80 patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Clinical, metabolic, and nutritional variables were collected from medical records, and the symptomatology was investigated by the Metabolic Screening Questionnaire. The variables were assessed on two occasions (T1 - before dietary advice and T2 - after dietary advice with an interval of three months between T1 and T2 Results: The median age was 42 years. The prevalences of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity were 66.2% and 33.8%, respectively. Normal weight prevailed at T1 (58.8% and T2 (56.3%, but 30.0% of the patients at T1 and 34.9% of the patients at T2 had excess weight. The two conditions had similar symptomatology. The most frequent signs and symptoms on both occasions involved the gastrointestinal tract, followed by energy/activity and emotions. All symptoms decreased significantly after the introduction of a proper diet Conclusion: The patients were normal weight on both study occasions (T1 and T2, and the symptoms improved after dietary advice. Thus, we reinforce the importance of proper dietary management in both clinical conditions to make dietary adjustments that improve these individuals' symptomatology.

  16. The Role of Celiac Disease in Severity of Liver Disorders and Effect of a Gluten Free Diet on Diseases Improvement

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    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Haldane, Thea; AlDulaimi, David; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Rostami, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    Context Celiac disease (CD) is defined as a permanent intolerance to ingested gluten. The intolerance to gluten results in immune-mediated damage of small intestine mucosa manifested by villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia. These abnormalities resolve with initiationa gluten-free diet. Evidence Acquisition PubMed, Ovid, and Google were searched for full text articles published between 1963 and 2012. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of celiac disease on severity of liver disorder were identified. Results Recently evidence has emerged revealingthat celiac disease not only is associated with small intestine abnormalities and malabsorption, but is also a multisystem disorder affecting other systems outside gastrointestinal tract, including musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular and nervous systems. Some correlations have been assumed between celiac and liver diseases. In particular, celiac disease is associated with changes in liver biochemistry and linked to alter the prognosis of other disorders. This review will concentrate on the effect of celiac disease and gluten-free diets on the severity of liver disorders. Conclusions Although GFD effect on the progression of CD associated liver diseases is not well defined, it seems that GFD improves liver function tests in patients with a hypertransaminasemia. PMID:24348636

  17. Carpal spasm in a girl as initial presentation of celiac disease: a case report.

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    Ramosaj-Morina, Atifete; Keka-Sylaj, A; Hasbahta, V; Baloku-Zejnullahu, A; Azemi, M; Zunec, R

    2017-09-04

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder elicited by ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible persons. This disorder is characterized by specific histological changes of the small intestine mucosa resulting in malabsorption. This case was written up as it was an unusual and dramatic presentation of celiac disease. We report the case of a 3-year-old Albanian girl who presented at our clinic with carpal spasms and hand paresthesia. A physical examination at admission revealed a relatively good general condition and body weight of 10.5 kg (10 percentile). Carpal spasms and paresthesias of her extremities were present. Neuromuscular irritability was demonstrated by positive Chvostek and Trousseau signs. Blood tests showed severe hypocalcemia with a total serum calcium of 1.2 mmol/L (normal range 2.12 to 2.55 mmol/L), ionized calcium of 0.87 (normal range 1.11 to 1.30 mmol/L), and 24-hour urine calcium excretion of 9.16 mmol (normal range female celiac disease was performed: antigliadin immunoglobulin A, anti-tissue transglutaminase, and anti-endomysial immunoglobulin A antibodies were positive. A duodenal biopsy revealed lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy compatible with celiac disease grade IIIb according to the Marsh classification. Following the diagnosis of celiac disease, human leukocyte antigen typing was performed, giving a definite diagnosis of celiac disease. She was started on a gluten-free diet. Due to failure to follow a gluten-free diet, episodes of carpal spasms appeared again. Unfortunately, at the age of 7 years she presents with delayed psychophysical development. Although hypocalcemia is a common finding in celiac disease, hypocalcemic carpal spasm is a rare initial manifestation of the disease. Therefore, the possibility of celiac disease should be considered in patients with repeated carpal spasms that seem unduly difficult to treat. This should be evaluated even in the absence of gastrointestinal

  18. Measurement and purification of Alanine aminotransferase (ALT enzyme activity in patients with celiac disease

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    Taghreed U. Mohammed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is the most common genetically - based disease in correlation with food intolerance. The aim of this study is to measure the activity of ALT enzyme and purify enzyme from sera women with celiac disease. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity has been assayed in (30 women serum samples with celiac disease, age range between (20-40 year and (30 serum of healthy women as control group, age range between (22-38 year. In the present study, the mean value of ALT activity was significantly higher in patients with celiac disease than healthy group (p<0.01. The ALT enzyme was partial purified from sera women with celiac disease by dialysis, gel filtration using Sephadex G- 50 and ion exchange chromatography using DEAE- cellulose A-50 . The results showed a single peak by using gel filtration and the activity reached 31-15 U/L .Two isoenzymes were obtained by using ion exchange chromatography and the purity degree of isoenzymse (I, II were (5.7 and (5.53 fold respectively

  19. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: cross-sectional study

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    Aline Ventura

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder with an average prevalence of 1% in Europe and the United States. Because of strong European ancestry in southern Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of celiac disease among autoimmune thyroiditis patients.DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study in a public university hospital.METHODS: This cross-sectional prevalence study included autoimmune thyroiditis patients who were tested for anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies between August 2010 and July 2011.RESULTS: Fifty-three patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were included; 92.5% were women, with mean age of 49.0 ± 13.5 years. Five patients (9.3% were serologically positive for celiac disease: three of them (5.6% were reactive for anti-endomysial antibodies and two (3.7% for anti-transglutaminase. None of them exhibited anemia and one presented diarrhea. Endoscopy was performed on two patients: one with normal histology and the other with lymphocytic infiltrate and villous atrophy.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of celiac disease among patients with autoimmune thyroid disease was 9.3%; one patient complained of diarrhea and none presented anemia. Among at-risk populations, like autoimmune thyroiditis patients, the presence of diarrhea or anemia should not be used as a criterion for indicating celiac disease investigation. This must be done for all autoimmune thyroiditis patients because of its high prevalence.

  20. Managing Celiac Disease for Women: Implications for the Primary Care Provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Megan; Grossman, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Although many people have symptoms of celiac disease, it can take a while to diagnose. Villous atrophy may be present long before any gastrointestinal symptoms. An important point to acknowledge is that celiac disease could be identified earlier in some women with a positive family history. The disease also could be the cause of some women's reproductive problems. Primary care providers, using comprehensive history taking, are in the unique position to identify individuals who may have celiac disease, assist women in gaining knowledge about a gluten-free diet, order diagnostic testing, and refer to a gastroenterologist. The positive change in fertility with a simultaneous improvement of nutrient deficiencies shortly after adopting a gluten-free diet indicates a possible link between such nutrients and sex hormone function. High levels of homocysteine, which can negatively impact fertility, have also been linked to individuals with problems, such as celiac disease, that decrease vitamin B12 absorption. The purpose of this article is to review the literature and the evidence-based care guidelines for comprehensive screening, diagnostics, and pathophysiology of celiac disease, with a specific focus on the female reproductive system, anemia management, and gluten-free diet integration.

  1. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Aline; Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Shiozawa, Maria Beatriz Cacese; Dantas-Corrêa, Esther Buzaglo; Canalli, Maria Heloisa Busi da Silva; Schiavon, Leonardo de Lucca; Narciso-Schiavon, Janaína Luz

    2014-12-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder with an average prevalence of 1% in Europe and the United States. Because of strong European ancestry in southern Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of celiac disease among autoimmune thyroiditis patients. Cross-sectional study in a public university hospital. This cross-sectional prevalence study included autoimmune thyroiditis patients who were tested for anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies between August 2010 and July 2011. Fifty-three patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were included; 92.5% were women, with mean age of 49.0 ± 13.5 years. Five patients (9.3%) were serologically positive for celiac disease: three of them (5.6%) were reactive for anti-endomysial antibodies and two (3.7%) for anti-transglutaminase. None of them exhibited anemia and one presented diarrhea. Endoscopy was performed on two patients: one with normal histology and the other with lymphocytic infiltrate and villous atrophy. The prevalence of celiac disease among patients with autoimmune thyroid disease was 9.3%; one patient complained of diarrhea and none presented anemia. Among at-risk populations, like autoimmune thyroiditis patients, the presence of diarrhea or anemia should not be used as a criterion for indicating celiac disease investigation. This must be done for all autoimmune thyroiditis patients because of its high prevalence.

  2. [Prevalence of celiac disease in children with chronic diarrhea in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-qiong; Liu, Wei; Xu, Jun-jie; Mei, Hong; Peng, Han-ming; Gao, Yuan; Yuan, Lan; Xu, Chun-di

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease in children with chronic diarrhea in China. Inpatients of the pediatric hospitals in Shanghai, Jinan, Wuhan and Chengdu who were diagnosed as chronic diarrhea were recruited from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2008. Their clinical history, physical examination and laboratory data were collected. The SPSS version 11.5 statistical package for Microsoft Windows was used for statistical analysis. Data of 199 patients and finally enrolled 118 hospitalized chronic diarrhea inpatients during the observation period were collected and 14 (12%) of the chronic diarrhea patients were suspected as having celiac disease and in one the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed. Gluten-free diet (GFD) treatment was effective. M/F: 12/2, the age ranged from 6 months to 12 years; 43% (6/14) had malnutrition, 29% (4/14) had anemia, villous atrophy was found in 4 patients by endoscopy. Duodenal biopsies revealed stage I in 1, stage II in 2, stage IIIa in 7, stage IIIb in 3 and stage IIIc in 1 patient according to the modified Marsh classification. This study was the first time to report the research of celiac disease in children with chronic diarrhea in China. The percentage of suspicious celiac disease patients was 12% (14/118) in children and one was confirmed. CD exists in China. Chinese pediatricians should pay attention to the disease.

  3. THE PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE AMONG PATIENTS WITH FAMILIAL MEDITERRANEAN FEVER

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    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Familial Mediterranean Fever and celiac disease are both related to auto-inflammation and/or auto-immunity and they share some common clinical features such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating and flatulence. Objectives We aimed to determine the association of these two diseases, if present. Methods Totally 112 patients diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 cases as healthy control were included in the study. All participants were examined for the evidence of celiac disease, with serum tissue transglutaminase IgA levels (tTG IgA. Results Totally 144 cases, 112 with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 healthy control cases were included in the study. tTG IgA positivity was determined in three cases with Familial Mediterranean Fever and in one case in control group. In that aspect there was no significant difference regarding the tTG IgA positivity between groups (P=0.81. Duodenum biopsy was performed to the tTG IgA positive cases and revealed Marsh Type 3b in two Familial Mediterranean Fever cases and Marsh Type 3c in the other one while the biopsy results were of the only tTG IgA positive case in control group was Marsh Type 3b. In HLA evaluation of the celiac cases; HLA DQ2 was present in two celiac cases of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group and in the only celiac case of the control group while HLA DQ8 was present in one celiac case of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group. Conclusions We did not determine an association of Familial Mediterranean Fever with celiac disease. Larger studies with subgroup analysis are warranted to determine the relationship of these two diseases.

  4. Genome-wide association study of celiac disease in North America confirms FRMD4B as new celiac locus.

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    Chad Garner

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS of 1550 North American celiac disease cases and 3084 controls. Twelve SNPs, distributed across four regions (3p21.31, 4q27, 6q15, 6q25, were significantly associated with disease (p-value <1.0×10-7, and a further seven SNPs, across four additional regions (1q24.3, 10p15.1, 6q22.31, 17q21.32 had suggestive evidence (1.0×10-7 < p-value < 1.0×10-6. This study replicated a previous suggestive association within FRMD4B (3p14.1, confirming it as a celiac disease locus. All four regions with significant associations and two regions with suggestive results (1q24.3, 10p15.1 were known disease loci. The 6q22.31 and 10p11.23 regions were not replicated. A total of 410 SNPs distributed across the eight significant and suggestive regions were tested for association with dermatitis herpetiformis and microscopic colitis. Preliminary, suggestive statistical evidence for association with the two traits was found at chromosomes 3p21.31, 6q15, 6q25, 1q24.3 and 10p11.23, with future studies being required to validate the reported associations.

  5. Pathologic bone alterations in celiac disease: etiology, epidemiology, and treatment.

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    Krupa-Kozak, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD), osteopenia, and osteoporosis are frequent complications of celiac disease (CD). The etiology of pathologic bone alterations in CD is multifactorial; however, two main mechanisms are involved: intestinal malabsorption and chronic inflammation. A strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is thought to be the only effective treatment for CD; but treating bone complications related to CD remains complex. The objective of this review is to elucidate the bones problems related to CD and to increase awareness of osteoporosis development, considered as a sign of atypical CD presentation. Currently, a question of whether GFD alone is an effective treatment to correct the bone alterations in patients with CD is under debate. This review presents factors contributing to pathologic bone derangement, recent research on the epidemiology of low BMD, osteoporosis, and fractures, and the treatment of bone problems in patients with CD. The roles of calcium and transport mechanisms are additionally presented. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Retrospective evaluation of pregnant women with celiac disease.

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    Beksaç, Kemal; Örgül, Gökçen; Çağan, Murat; Karaağaoğlu, Ergun; Arslan, Serap; Beksaç, Mehmet Sinan

    2017-03-15

    To show celiac disease (CD) and its poor pregnancy outcome relationship, and to demonstrate the importance of a gluten-free diet together with low-dose low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and low-dose corticosteroid (LDC) in the management of pregnancies with CD. This study consisted of 2 groups of patients. Six patients with CD (control group) on a gluten-free diet were monitored during their first pregnancies within the framework of antenatal care program and their pregnancy outcomes were compared with eight poorly-treated pregnant patients with CD (study group) who were referred from other medical institutions. LMWH (enoxaparine 1x2000 Anti-XA IU/0.2 mL/day), and LDC (methylprednisolone 1x4 mg p.o/day) were used in the control group. Their obstetric histories and outcomes of their last pregnancies were compared. The patients' obstetric risk levels were evaluated using the "Beksac Obstetrics Index" (BOI). There were miscarriages in 50% of the study group. There were also 50% and 75% preterm deliveries in the control and study groups, respectively. The BOI of the study group was significantly worse than the control group (1.31 vs. 0.31±0.21, pwomen with CD.

  7. Celiac disease: Serologic prevalence in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

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    Zobeiri Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS in the community is 10%-20% and have symptom based diagnostic criteria. Many symptoms of celiac disease (CD with 1% prevalence in some communities can mimic IBS. Sensitive and specific serologic tests of CD can detect asymptomatic cases. The purpose of this study was to compare the level of anti-tissue-transglutaminase (tTG IgA in IBS patients and controls group. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed at a University hospital in which 107 patients with IBS who met the Rome II criteria for their diagnosis were compared with 126 healthy age and sex-matched controls. Both groups were investigated for CD by analysis of their serum tTG IgA antibody with human recombinant antigen. Titers were positive containing over 10u/ml and borderline if they were between 4 and 10 u/ml. Result: 86 percent of IBS patients were female. The mean antibody level was 0.837 u/ml in IBS group and 0.933 u/ml in control group without any significant difference. Discussion and Conclusion: Results of this study may intensify disagreement on the situation of CD in IBS patients.

  8. Prevalence of celiac disease in patients with severe food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, R; Ziberna, F; Badina, L; Ventura, A; Longo, G; Quaglia, S; De Leo, L; Vatta, S; Martelossi, S; Patano, G; Not, T; Berti, I

    2015-10-01

    The association between food allergy and celiac disease (CD) is still to be clarified. We screened for CD 319 patients with severe food allergy (IgE > 85 kU/l against food proteins and a history of severe allergic reactions) who underwent specific food oral immunotherapy (OIT), together with 128 children with mild allergy who recovered without OIT, and compared the prevalence data with our historical data regarding healthy schoolchildren. Sixteen patients (5%) with severe allergy and one (0.8%) with mild allergy tested positive for both genetic and serological CD markers, while the prevalence among the schoolchildren was 1%. Intestinal biopsies were obtained in 13/16 patients with severe allergy and in the one with mild allergy, confirming the diagnosis of CD. Sufferers from severe food allergy seem to be at a fivefold increased risk of CD. Our findings suggest that routine screening for CD should be recommended in patients with severe food allergy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Iron deficiency anemia in newly diagnosed celiac disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanseviero, Maria T; Mazza, Giuseppe A; Pullano, Maria N; Oliveiro, Antonella C; Altomare, Federica; Pedrelli, Luca; Dattilo, Bruno; Miniero, Roberto; Meloni, Gianfranco; Giancotti, Laura; Talarico, Valentina

    2016-02-01

    Celiac disease (CD) in children may occur with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations: anemia is the most frequent extraintestinal manifestation, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the common presentation. In our study we aimed to assess IDA condition in a large cohort of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed CD. Our study includes a cohort of 518 children (340 females and 178 males), 6 months-18 years old, joined between January 1990 and January 2013. We have analyzed hematological parameters and iron balance: serum iron, serum ferritin and serum transferrin levels. The diagnosis of IDA was considered on the basis of hemoglobin levels below -2SD, associated with serum iron and ferritin reduction, serum transferrin increase; all compared with the normal reference values for age. Of all patients, 156 patients (30.1%) had anemia, including 103 females (19.8%) and 53 males (10.2%); of these, 112 (21.62%) had IDA (in 18 cases associated with α- or β-thalassemia trait), 22 were thalassemic trait without iron deficiency and the remaining 19 suffered from other forms of anemia. One hundred fifteen patients (22.20%) with low ferritin levels but normal hemoglobin levels were considered as preanemic iron deficient patients. Our data confirm that iron depletion and IDA represent a frequent finding at the diagnosis of CD. This significant relation existing between CD and iron deficiency should be considered by pediatricians at the diagnosis of CD in order to treat the patients.

  10. Is Celiac Disease an Etiological Factor in Children with Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Taner; Balcı, Oya; Özçay, Figen; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Alehan, Füsun

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with nonsyndromic intellectual disability, we investigated serum levels of tissue transglutaminase antibody and total IgA from 232 children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and in a healthy control group of 239 children. Study participants who were positive for tissue transglutaminase antibody underwent a duodenal biopsy. A total of 3 patients in the nonsyndromic intellectual disability group (5.45%) and 1 in the control group (0.41%) had positive serum tissue transglutaminase antibody (P > .05). Duodenal biopsy confirmed celiac disease in only 1 patient who had nonsyndromic intellectual disability. In this present study, children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability did not exhibit a higher celiac disease prevalence rate compared with healthy controls. Therefore, we suggest that screening test for celiac disease should not be necessary as a part of the management of mild and moderate nonsyndromic intellectual disability. However, cases of severe nonsyndromic intellectual disability could be examined for celiac disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Celiac disease in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadibakhsh, Roghayeh; Sohrabi, Rahim; Salemi, Morteza; Mirghaed, Masood Taheri; Behzadifar, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic autoimmune-mediated disorder with both intestinal and systemic manifestations. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in Iran. Methods We conducted a systematic search on Embase, Pub Med, Web of Science, Google Scholar, MagIran, Scientific Information database (SID) and Iranmedex from 2003 through to November 2015. The Der-Simonian/Laird’s (DL), with a 95% confidence interval employed to estimate the overall pooled prevalence. Heterogeneity was investigated by using subgroup analysis based on sample size and time of study. Results Sixty-three studies with 36,833 participants met inclusion criteria for analysis. The overall prevalence of celiac disease in 63 studies that had used serological tests for the diagnosis was observed as 3% (95% CI: 0.03–0.03) and the overall prevalence of celiac disease in studies that had used biopsy method for diagnosis was observed as 2% (95% CI: 0.01–0.02). Conclusion The prevalence of celiac disease in Iran was similar or even higher than world-wide reported. PMID:28461861

  12. Celiac disease in an elite female collegiate volleyball athlete: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberman, Lindsey E; Cleary, Michelle A

    2005-01-01

    To present the case of an elite female volleyball player who complained of diarrhea and fatigue after preseason training. The athlete lost 8.1 kg during the first 20 days of training, and we initially suspected an eating disorder. The sports medicine team interviewed the athlete and found she did not have psychological symptoms indicative of an eating disorder. The results of routine blood tests revealed critically high platelet counts; in conjunction with the physical findings, the athlete was referred to a gastroenterologist. Our initial suggestion was an eating disorder. Therefore, the differential diagnosis included anorexia athletica, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa. On referral, the differential diagnosis was anemia, gastrointestinal dysfunction, lymphoma, or bowel adenocarcinoma. Diarrhea, weight loss, and blood test results were suggestive of active celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy specimen confirmed this diagnosis. The athlete was treated with a gluten-free diet, which excludes wheat, barley, and rye. Dietary substitutions were incorporated to maintain adequate caloric intake. The presence of active celiac disease may not be uncommon. However, elite athletes who face celiac disease present a new challenge for the athletic trainer. The athletic trainer can help guide the athlete in coping with the lifestyle changes associated with a gluten-free diet. One in every 200 to 400 individuals has celiac disease; many of these individuals are asymptomatic and, therefore, their conditions are undiagnosed. Undiagnosed, untreated celiac disease and patients who fail to follow the gluten-free diet increase the risk of further problems.

  13. Frequency of Celiac Disease in Patients With Increased Intestinal Gas (Flatulence).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Mohsen; Mokhtare, Marjan; Agah, Shahram; Sina, Mohammad; Soltani-Kermanshahi, Mojtaba

    2015-10-26

    Excessive flatulence which impairs social performance in patients is one of the common reasons for referrals to gastroenterology clinics. Celiac Disease is a rare but important cause of increased intestinal gas (bloating) and if not diagnosed, patients face complications such as malabsorption, anemia, osteoporosis and even intestinal lymphoma. This study aimed to determine the frequency of Celiac Disease in patients with excessive flatulence.One hundred and fifty patients with a chief complaint of experiencing flatulence more than 15 times a day and lasting for three months were referred to the gastroenterology clinic of Rasoul-e-Akram Teaching Hospital. Serological tests for Celiac Disease, Anti TTG Ab (IgA-IgG) were requested and the patients with positive tests underwent upper GI endoscopy. Biopsies of the second part of the duodenum were then sent to the laboratory.From one hundred and thirty patients who completed the study, 92 (70.7%) were female. Mean age of the patients was 32 ± 13 years. Anti TTG Ab was found in 5 patients (3.85%). Only 2 patients (1.5%) had a documented positive pathology for Celiac Disease.According to the results of this study and other studies, we conclude that Celiac Disease is an uncommon etiology for excessive flatulence but it is of importance to investigate it in excessive flatulence patients.

  14. [Clinical pattern of celiac disease in a population residing in North Sardinia (Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Maria Pina; Cuccu, Marianna; Pes, Gianni Mario; Mameli, Laura; Manca, Allesandra; Vidili, Gian Paolo; Togniotti, Eugenia

    2012-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) was first described by Aretaeus from Cappadocia in II century after C. The impressive clinical picture of a patient with life-threatening diarrhea, malabsorption, weight loss, neurologic disorders and osteopenia is now often replaced by the mostly atypical symptoms or an asymptomatic presentation. When unrecognized and untreated, the celiac disease is associated with increased mortality. In order to collect information on the clinical presentation of celiac disease in North Sardinia, Italy, data on 287 patients with biopsy examination-proven celiac disease were obtained. Women predominated (87%). Overall 78,2%, 53,2% and 44,7% of patients showed classical, subclinical/silent or atypical, and no gastrointestinal features of celiac disease, respectively. Anemia was the main mode of presentation, occurring in 53% of patients. Diarrhea was less frequent (41,5%), although never severe. In conclusion, in North Sardinia a significant proportion of patients with CD are seen more commonly with non-diarrheal presentations than those with diarrhea. To recognize atypical symptoms could be the most important step in the diagnosis and further treatment.

  15. Association of LPP and TAGAP Polymorphisms with Celiac Disease Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Qi; Zhang, Na; Zhou, Zi-Xing; Huang, Chui-Can; Zeng, Cheng-Li; Xiao, Di; Guo, Cong-Cong; Han, Ya-Jing; Ye, Xiao-Hong; Ye, Xing-Guang; Ou, Mei-Ling; Zhang, Bao-Huan; Liu, Yang; Zeng, Eddy Y; Yang, Guang; Jing, Chun-Xia

    2017-02-10

    Background: Lipoma preferred partner (LPP) and T-cell activation Rho GTPase activating protein (TAGAP) polymorphisms might influence the susceptibility to celiac disease. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis by identifying relevant studies to estimate the risks of these polymorphisms on celiac disease. Methods: The PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases were searched (up to October 2016) for LPP rs1464510 and TAGAP rs1738074 polymorphisms. Results: This meta-analysis included the same 7 studies for LPP rs1464510 and TAGAP rs1738074. The minor risk A allele at both rs1464510 and rs1738074 carried risks (odds ratios) of 1.26 (95% CI: 1.22-1.30) and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.14-1.21), respectively, which contributed to increased risks in all celiac disease patients by 10.72% and 6.59%, respectively. The estimated lambdas were 0.512 and 0.496, respectively, suggesting that a co-dominant model would be suitable for both gene effects. Conclusions: This meta-analysis provides robust estimates that polymorphisms in LPP and TAGAP genes are potential risk factors for celiac disease in European and American. Prospective studies and more genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed to confirm these findings, and some corresponding molecular biology experiments should be carried out to clarify the pathogenic mechanisms of celiac disease.

  16. Celiac disease associated antibodies in persons with latent autoimmune diabetes of adult and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, J C; Cruz, Julio Cesar Sánchez; Cabrera-Rode, E; Rode, Eduardo Cabrera; Sorell, L; Gómez, Luis Sorell; Galvan, J A; Cabrera, José A Galvan; Hernandez, A; Ortega, Ania Hernandez; Molina, G; Mato, Gisela Molina; Perich, P A; Amador, Pedro A Perich; Licea, M E; Puig, Manuel E Licea; Domínguez, E; Alonso, Emma Domínguez; Díaz-Horta, O; Díaz-Horta, Oscar

    2007-03-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) is present in 1-16.4% of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The most important serological markers of CD are anti-endomysial (EMA), anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTGA) and antigliadin antibodies (AGA). The objective of this work is to determine the frequency of tTGA and/or AGA in latent autoimmune diabetes of adult (LADA) and subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), as well as to evaluate their relation with several clinical and biochemical characteristics. Forty three subjects with LADA and 99 with T2DM were studied. The presence of AGA, tTGA was determined in the sera of these patients. The variables: sex, age, duration of diabetes, treatment, body mass index (BMI) and fasting blood glucose concentration were also recorded. No differences were found in the frequency of celiac disease associated antibodies between LADA and T2DM subjects. The presence of celiac disease related antibodies was more frequent in patients with a normal or low BMI. Celiac disease does not seem to be related with pancreatic autoimmunity in type 2 diabetes. Celiac disease causes a decrease of body mass index in type 2 diabetes while pancreatic islet autoimmunity in this entity masks this effect.

  17. Prevalence of celiac disease in children with idiopathic epilepsy in southeast Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işıkay, Sedat; Kocamaz, Halil

    2014-05-01

    We examined the prevalence of celiac disease in children with idiopathic epilepsy. Patients were screened for celiac disease using the immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and small intestinal biopsy were offered to all antibody-positive patients. The control group consisted of 400 healthy children. A total of 600 patients (332 boys, 268 girls; 8 months-15 years; 9.40 ± 4.09 years) were studied. In 38 patients, the diagnosis was childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms. Six of the 38 patients with childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms (15.7%) had positive immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. The frequency of biopsy-proven celiac disease was 15.7% (6/38) among children with childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms. None of the control patients had positive immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody results. These findings suggest that the prevalence of celiac disease in children with partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms may be higher than with other types of epilepsies. It may be reasonable to screen individuals with this type of epilepsy for celiac disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Skepticism Regarding Vaccine and Gluten-Free Food Safety Among Patients with Celiac Disease and Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Loren G; Zylberberg, Haley M; Levinovitz, Alan; Stockwell, Melissa S; Green, Peter H R; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2017-12-14

    There has been a marked increase in the adoption of the gluten-free (GF) diet. To query individuals with celiac disease (CD) and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) on their beliefs toward the health effects of gluten, and safety of vaccines and GF food products. We distributed a Web-based survey to individuals with CD and NCGS on a CD center e-mail list. We used univariate and multivariate analysis to compare responses of respondents with CD and NCGS. The overall response rate was 27% (NCGS n = 217, CD n = 1291). Subjects with NCGS were more likely than those with CD to disagree with the statement that "vaccines are safe for people with celiac disease" (NCGS 41.3% vs. CD 26.4% (p < 0.0001), and were more likely to decline vaccination when offered (30.9 vs. 24.2%, p = 0.007). After adjusting for age and gender, NCGS subjects were more likely than CD subjects to avoid genetically modified (GMO) foods (aOR 2.30; 95% CI 1.71-3.10), eat only organic products (aOR 2.87; 95% CI 2.04-4.03), believe that the FDA is an unreliable source of information (aOR 1.82, 95% CI 1.26-2.64), and believe a GF diet improves energy and concentration (aOR 2.52; 95% CI 1.86-3.43). Subjects with NCGS were more likely than those with CD to have doubts about vaccine safety and believe in the value of non-GMO and organic foods. Our findings suggest that the lack of reliable information on gluten and its content in food and medications may reinforce beliefs that result in a detriment to public health.

  19. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1-617-355- ... live happy and productive lives. Each of our video segments provides practical information about celiac disease from ...

  20. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... This page is best accessed via your desktop. Celiac Disease Program Home > Centers + Services > Programs and Services > ... Nutrition Bone Health Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program ...

  1. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos – Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking + School Eating Out ... What is Celiac Disease? : Diagnosis and treatment III. Diet Information : How to start and maintain a gluten- ...

  2. Rationale for Using Social Media to Collect Patient-Reported Outcomes in Patients with Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kt; Harris, Merissa; Khavari, Nasim; Khosla, Chaitan

    2014-02-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) are increasingly interconnected through social media, exchanging patient experiences and health-tracking information between individuals through various web-based platforms. Social media represents potentially unique communication interface between gastroenterologists and active social media users - especially young adults and adolescents with celiac disease-regarding adherence to the strict gluten-free diet, gastrointestinal symptoms, and meaningful discussion about disease management. Yet, various social media platforms may be underutilized for research purposes to collect patient-reported outcomes data. In this commentary, we summarize the scientific rationale and potential for future growth of social media in patient-reported outcomes research, focusing on college freshmen with celiac disease as a case study and provide overview of the methodological approach. Finally, we discuss how social media may impact patient care in the future through increasing mobile technology use.

  3. [Reproductive disorders in women with celiac disease: effect of etiotropic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykova, S V

    2011-01-01

    The study included 132 women (average age 38.5 +/- 1.17 years) with HC observed in the CSRIG from 2000 to 2010. Comparison group consisted of 105 women (average age 38.7 +/- 1.6 years) mainly with functional bowel disorders (irritable bowel syndrome, functional constipation, functional meteorism, inert colon). Take into account the information relating to obstetric and gynecological history, Physical and laboratory signs of malabsorption syndrome (MS), studies of antibodies to alpha-gliadin immunoglobulin (IG), Class A (AHA) and tissue transglutaminase (AtTG). Reproductive disorders in women with celiac disease are significantly more frequently than in women with functional bowel disease. One of the causes of reproductive disorders in patients with HC might be malabsorption disorders of essential nutrients in the small intestine. The presence of reproductive disorders should be considered as a risk factor for celiac disease, so these women should be screened for celiac disease.

  4. Screening detected celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus : Effect on the clinical course - (A case control study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rami, B; Sumnik, Z; Schober, E; Waldhor, T; Battelino, T; Bratanic, N; Kurti, K; Lebl, J; Limbert, C; Madacsy, L; Odink, RJH; Paskova, M; Soltesz, G

    Objective: To investigate clinical and metabolic characteristics of diabetic children with screening detected celiac disease in a multicenter case-control study. Methods: Cases: 98 diabetic patients were diagnosed as having silent celiac disease by screening with endomysial antibodies and subsequent

  5. Celiac disease on YouTube - a study of the Polish content available on the popular video-sharing website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedrowski, Mirosław; Mróz, Andrzej; Gajewska, Danuta; Nurzyński, Paweł; Deptała, Andrzej

    2017-10-23

    Celiac disease affects about 1% of the population. Since most Polish households have a broadband Internet connection, a lot of people use web resources to learn about health and disease. YouTube service (www.youtube.com) offers a lot of videos concerning celiac disease. However, the credibility of the Polish videos available on YouTube and concerning celiac disease has never been analyzed. The aim of the study was to determine whether the YouTube service offers valuable content for Polish people affected by celiac disease. One hundred and fifty-four unique videos devoted to celiac disease and available in the Polish language were identified and critically assessed. Each video was categorized due to its topic(s), and evaluated for its credibility by two independent researchers. In general, 127 (82.5%) videos were found to be credible. The most credible categories of content presented organizations and events related to celiac disease/celiac society, followed by culinary recipes (100.0, 100.0, and 95.6% of credible videos, respectively). The least trustworthy categories were devoted to pathobiology and advertisements (55.6 and 54.3% of credible videos, respectively). YouTube service can serve as a supplementary source of knowledge for people affected by celiac disease, after careful selection of trustworthy content.

  6. Osteoporosis reversibility in a patient with celiac disease and primary autoimmune hypothyroidism on gluten free diet: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kovačev-Zavišić Branka; Ičin Tijana; Novaković-Paro Jovanka; Medić-Stojanoska Milica; Bajkin Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Secondary osteoporosis occurs in many diseases. Celiac disease-induced osteoporosis is the consequence of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Biochemical bone markers show predominance of bone resorption, thus making the bisphosphonates the first line therapy option. Intestinal mucosal changes are reversible on gluten-free diet. Osteoporosis reversibility is also possible, provided postmenopausal osteoporosis risk factors independent from celiac di...

  7. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE AND RELATIVES OF PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, R. M.; Uil, J. J.; Mulder, C. J.; Heymans, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    The functional integrity of the small bowel is impaired in coeliac disease. Intestinal permeability, as measured by the sugar absorption test probably reflects this phenomenon. In the sugar absorption test a solution of lactulose and mannitol was given to the fasting patient and the

  8. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE AND RELATIVES OF PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANELBURG, RM; UIL, JJ; MULDER, CJJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    The functional integrity of the small bowel is impaired in coeliac disease. Intestinal permeability, as measured by the sugar absorption test probably reflects this phenomenon. In the sugar absorption test a solution of lactulose and mannitol was given to the fasting patient and the

  9. LOWER BIFIDOBACTERIA COUNTS IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE ON A GLUTEN-FREE DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisléia GOLFETTO

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context The ingestion of gluten is responsible for the symptoms of Celiac disease, but other environmental factors can also influence. Strains of the Bifidobacterium genus have been shown to afford protection against the inflammatory response and mucosal damage caused by gliadin peptides in vitro. Objectives This study was designed to compare the concentration of fecal bifidobacteria and pH of patients with celiac disease on gluten-free diet and control subjects in order to identify if the imbalance on fecal microbiota still remain during the treatment of celiac disease and identify the necessity of dietary supplementation with pre- or probiotics. Methods It was analyzed the feces of 42 healthy subjects and 14 celiac patients. The bifidobacteria count in feces was done in selective medium BIM-25. Microscopic analysis of the colonies was performed by Gram stain. The identification of the genus Bifidobacterium was performed by determination of fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase. Fecal pH was measured using a pH meter. Results The concentration of bifidobacteria per gram of feces was significantly higher in healthy subjects (controls (1.5 ± 0.63 x108 CFU/g when compared to celiac patients (2.5 ± 1.5 x107 CFU/g. The fecal pH was not different between celiac patients (7.19 ± 0.521 and controls (7.18 ± 0.522. Conclusions These results suggest that with lower levels of bifidobacteria, celiac patients have an imbalance in the intestinal microbiota, regardless of pH, even while on a gluten-free diet. This fact could favor the pathological process of the disorder.

  10. Anxiety and depression in adult patients with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Winfried; Huser; Karl-Heinz; Janke; Bodo; Klump; Michael; Gregor; Andreas; Hinz

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To compare anxiety and depression levels in adult patients with celiac disease (CD) on a gluten-free diet (GFD) with controls.METHODS: The levels of anxiety, depression and of a probable anxiety or depressive disorder were assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in 441 adult patients with CD recruited by the German Celiac Society, in 235 age-and sex-matched patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in remission or with slight disease activity, and in 441 adult persons of a representa...

  11. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Justin; Leonard Puppa, Elaine; Greenwald, Bruce; Goldberg, Eric; Guerrerio, Anthony; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD), celiac patients in remission (RCD), non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS) and non-celiac controls (NC). Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6), RCD (n = 6), GS (n = 6), and NC (n = 5)) demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity. PMID:25734566

  12. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Hollon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD, celiac patients in remission (RCD, non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS and non-celiac controls (NC. Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6, RCD (n = 6, GS (n = 6, and NC (n = 5 demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity.

  13. Celiac Disease in Women With Infertility: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Arora, Shubhangi; Lal, Suman; Strand, Tor A; Makharia, Govind K

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CeD) is a systemic disease with manifestations not limited to small intestine. The data on association between CeD and infertility is contradictory. There are no recommendations for the screening of female patients with infertility for CeD. We conducted a meta-analysis to find out whether women with infertility are at higher risk of CeD. Literature search was performed using the MeSH keywords "CeD," "gluten," and "infertility." Diagnosis of CeD was based on positive serology and biopsies showing villous atrophy. Data were extracted about CeD patients in 3 groups-women with infertility (including unexplained infertility), unexplained infertility, and controls. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and prevalence, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), were calculated. Of 105 relevant studies, 5 studies were included for calculation of pooled OR. Four additional studies, where data on controls were not available, were also considered for calculation of pooled prevalence of CeD. Women with infertility had 3.5 times higher odds of having CeD in comparison with control population (OR=3.5; 95% CI, 1.3-9; Pwomen with "unexplained infertility" had 6 times higher odds of having CeD than controls (OR=6; 95% CI, 2.4-14.6). Of 884 women with infertility, 20 had CeD indicating a pooled prevalence of 2.3% (95% CI, 1.4-3.5). Of 623 women with "unexplained infertility," 20 had CeD. The pooled prevalence of CeD in women with unexplained infertility was 3.2 (95% CI, 2-4.9). CeD is more prevalent in women with "all-cause" infertility and "unexplained" infertility than that in general population.

  14. Celiac disease in childhood: evaluation of 140 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Vildan; Selimoglu, M Ayse; Altinkaynak, Sevin

    2009-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a lifelong gluten-sensitive intestinal enteropathy that is multifactorial in its etiology. In the present study, we evaluated basic anthropometric, clinical, laboratory, and histological features of 140 Turkish children with CD. We particularly underscored the association of CD with other autoimmune diseases. During the period from 1999 to 2005, CD was diagnosed in 140 children according to ESPGAN criteria. The age, gender, clinical findings, hematological, and biochemical parameters at diagnosis were noted. Symptoms and signs were recorded. Endoscopic intestinal biopsies were taken from all children. Of the 140 children with CD, 75 (53.6%) were female, and 65 (46.4%) were male. Mean age was 8.56 ± 4.43 years (range 13 months to 18 years). The most frequent symptom was failure to thrive (81.4%), followed by chronic diarrhea (60%). Of the children with CD, nine (6.4%) had type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM), six (4.3%) had familial Mediterranean fever, three (2.1%) had alopecia areata, three (2.1%) had vitiligo, three (2.1%) had Down syndrome, two (1.4%) had lung tuberculosis, two (1.4 %) had autoimmune hepatitis, two (1.4%) had growth hormone deficiency, one (0.7%) had osteogenesis imperfecta, and one (0.7%) had Floating Harbor Syndrome. Elevated serum levels of ALT, CK and AST were detected in 48(34.8%), 50 (38.2%) and 67 (48.6%) children, respectively. The spectrum of clinical findings is very wide. In order to avoid overlooking CD in patients with extra intestinal symptoms and signs, physicians, especially pediatricians, should be informed about new atypical manifestations of CD.

  15. Quantitative analysis of patients with celiac disease by video capsule endoscopy: A deep learning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Teng; Han, Guoqiang; Li, Bing Nan; Lin, Zhizhe; Ciaccio, Edward J; Green, Peter H; Qin, Jing

    2017-06-01

    Celiac disease is one of the most common diseases in the world. Capsule endoscopy is an alternative way to visualize the entire small intestine without invasiveness to the patient. It is useful to characterize celiac disease, but hours are need to manually analyze the retrospective data of a single patient. Computer-aided quantitative analysis by a deep learning method helps in alleviating the workload during analysis of the retrospective videos. Capsule endoscopy clips from 6 celiac disease patients and 5 controls were preprocessed for training. The frames with a large field of opaque extraluminal fluid or air bubbles were removed automatically by using a pre-selection algorithm. Then the frames were cropped and the intensity was corrected prior to frame rotation in the proposed new method. The GoogLeNet is trained with these frames. Then, the clips of capsule endoscopy from 5 additional celiac disease patients and 5 additional control patients are used for testing. The trained GoogLeNet was able to distinguish the frames from capsule endoscopy clips of celiac disease patients vs controls. Quantitative measurement with evaluation of the confidence was developed to assess the severity level of pathology in the subjects. Relying on the evaluation confidence, the GoogLeNet achieved 100% sensitivity and specificity for the testing set. The t-test confirmed the evaluation confidence is significant to distinguish celiac disease patients from controls. Furthermore, it is found that the evaluation confidence may also relate to the severity level of small bowel mucosal lesions. A deep convolutional neural network was established for quantitative measurement of the existence and degree of pathology throughout the small intestine, which may improve computer-aided clinical techniques to assess mucosal atrophy and other etiologies in real-time with videocapsule endoscopy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Accuracy in Diagnosis of Celiac Disease Without Biopsies in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkstetter, Katharina Julia; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma Rita; Popp, Alina; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Heilig, Gabriele; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Mearin, Maria Luisa; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Thomas, Adrian; Troncone, Riccardo; Filipiak, Birgit; Mäki, Markku; Gyimesi, Judit; Najafi, Mehri; Dolinšek, Jernej; Dydensborg Sander, Stine; Auricchio, Renata; Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Vécsei, Andreas; Szitanyi, Peter; Donat, Ester; Nenna, Rafaella; Alliet, Philippe; Penagini, Francesca; Garnier-Lengliné, Hélène; Castillejo, Gemma; Kurppa, Kalle; Shamir, Raanan; Hauer, Almuthe Christine; Smets, Françoise; Corujeira, Susana; van Winckel, Myriam; Buderus, Stefan; Chong, Sonny; Husby, Steffen; Koletzko, Sibylle

    2017-10-01

    The guidelines of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition allow for diagnosis of celiac disease without biopsies in children with symptoms and levels of immunoglobulin A against tissue-transglutaminase (TGA-IgA) 10-fold or more the upper limit of normal (ULN), confirmed by detection of endomysium antibodies (EMA) and positivity for HLA-DQ2/DQ8. We performed a large, international prospective study to validate this approach. We collected data from consecutive pediatric patients (18 years or younger) on a gluten-containing diet who tested positive for TGA-IgA from November 2011 through May 2014, seen at 33 pediatric gastroenterology units in 21 countries. Local centers recorded symptoms; measurements of total IgA, TGA, and EMA; and histopathology findings from duodenal biopsies. Children were considered to have malabsorption if they had chronic diarrhea, weight loss (or insufficient gain), growth failure, or anemia. We directly compared central findings from 16 antibody tests (8 for TGA-IgA, 1 for TGA-IgG, 6 for IgG against deamidated gliadin peptides, and 1 for EMA, from 5 different manufacturers), 2 HLA-DQ2/DQ8 tests from 2 manufacturers, and histopathology findings from the reference pathologist. Final diagnoses were based on local and central results. If all local and central results were concordant for celiac disease, cases were classified as proven celiac disease. Patients with only a low level of TGA-IgA (threefold or less the ULN) but no other results indicating celiac disease were classified as no celiac disease. Central histo-morphometry analyses were performed on all other biopsies and cases were carefully reviewed in a blinded manner. Inconclusive cases were regarded as not having celiac disease for calculation of diagnostic accuracy. The primary aim was to determine whether the nonbiopsy approach identifies children with celiac disease with a positive predictive value (PPV) above 99% in clinical practice. Secondary

  17. A trichobezoar in a child with undiagnosed celiac disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irastorza, Iñaki; Tutau, Carlos; Vitoria, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-07

    Celiac disease is a chronic, immune-mediated enteropathy caused by a permanent sensitivity to ingested gluten cereals that develops in genetically susceptible individuals. The classic presentation of celiac disease includes symptoms of malabsorption but has long been associated with cognitive, emotional, and behavioral disorders. We describe an 8-year-old patient with non-scarring alopecia and diagnosed with trichotillomania. Furthermore, she presented with a 3-year history of poor appetite and two or three annual episodes of mushy, fatty stools. Laboratory investigations showed a normal hemoglobin concentration and a low ferritin level. Serologic studies showed an elevated tissue immunoglobulin G anti-tissue transglutaminase level. A duodenal biopsy showed subtotal villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, and a large gastric trichobezoar was found in the stomach. Immediately after beginning a gluten-free diet, complete relief of trichotillomania and trichophagia was achieved. In this report, we describe a behavioral disorder as a primary phenomenon of celiac disease, irrespective of nutritional status.

  18. Refractory Celiac Disease Type II: A Case Report that Demonstrates the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Fernandes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Refractory celiac disease is an uncommon but serious complication of celiac disease. We describe a case of a severe refractory celiac disease type II, complicated with ulcerative jejunoileitis, in a 68 years old female, unresponsive to consecutive treatments with budesonide, prednisolone, cladribine and autologous stem cell transplantation. The patient maintained severe malnutrition, advanced osteoporosis, anaemia, vitamin deficiencies and hydro-electrolytic imbalances, necessitating consecutive hospitalizations for total parenteral nutrition. The patient also developed life-threatening complications, namely respiratory and urinary septic shock and also episodes of haemorrhagic shock secondary to ulcerative jejunoileitis. The progression to enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma was never demonstrated, but the patient died 7 years after the diagnosis due to a septic shock secondary to a nosocomial pneumonia and osteomyelitis related to a spontaneous hip fracture. This case highlights the difficulties in the diagnostic process, therapeutic management and surveillance of this rare condition associated with very poor prognosis.

  19. Dietary compliance in Iranian children and adolescents with celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghdir M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Maryam Taghdir,1 Naser Honar,2 Seyed Mohammad Mazloomi,3 Mojtaba Sepandi,4 Mahkameh Ashourpour,1 Musa Salehi5 1Student Research Committee, Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 2Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 3Nutrition Research Center, Department of Food Hygiene and Quality Control, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 4Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Baqyiatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Nutrition Research Center, Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is caused due to intake of gluten, a protein component in wheat, barley, and rye. The only treatment currently available for CD is strict lifetime adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD which is a diet that excludes wheat, barley, and rye. There is limited information on barriers to following a GFD. The present study aimed to investigate the compliance with a GFD, barriers to compliance, and the impact of compliance on the quality of life (QOL in Iranian children and adolescents suffering from CD.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 65 known cases of CD (both males and females, diagnosed in Namazi Hospital, a large referral center in south of Iran, selected by census were studied in 2014. Dietary compliance was assessed using a questionnaire. A disease-specific QOL questionnaire for children with CD (the celiac disease DUX [CDDUX] was used. Comparisons between categorical variables were performed using chi-square test.Results: Sixty-five patients, 38 females (58.5% and 27 (41.5% males, were surveyed. Mean (± standard deviation [SD] age of the respondents was 11.3 (±3.8 years. Dietary compliance was reported by

  20. Quantification of peptides causing celiac disease in historical and modern hard red spring wheat cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiac disease (CD) is prevalent in 0.5 to 1.26% of adolescents and adults. The disease develops in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of ingestion of gluten forming proteins found in cereals such as, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), rye (Secale cereale L.) and barley (Hordeum sativum L.)...

  1. Similarities and differences between older and young adult patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Çağdaş; Karakaya, Fatih; Soykan, Irfan

    2017-11-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy with variable clinical symptoms. Elderly patients can have different manifestations from those of young patients. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether any differences or similarities exist between older and young patients with celiac disease with a special emphasis on concurrent autoimmune diseases. Celiac disease patients were stratified as older and younger patients. These two groups were then compared by means of clinical symptoms, laboratory parameters and concurrent autoimmune diseases. Factors associated with the presence of an autoimmune disease were identified by univariate and multivariate analysis. There were 66 older patients (mean age 67.7 ± 3.2 years, 50 women), and 277 younger patients (mean age 35.9 ± 11.7 years, 207 women). Of the 66 older patients, eight patients had gastrointestinal symptoms and 58 patients had extradigestive symptoms. In the younger group, the number of patients referred due to gastrointestinal symptoms was higher (8 [12.2%] vs 200 (72.2%), P celiac disease clinically, histologically and by means of laboratory parameters is different in older and young patients. Polyautoimmunity and multiple autoimmune syndrome are more common in older patients compared with younger patients. A biopsy score of Marsh score type, antinuclear antibody positivity, high serum anti-tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A level and low hemoglobin level were risk factors for having an autoimmune disease. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2060-2067. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Dense genotyping identifies and localizes multiple common and rare variant association signals in celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trynka, G.; Hunt, K.A.; Bockett, N.A.; Romanos, J.; Mistry, V.; Szperl, A.; Bakker, S.F.; Bardella, M.T.; Bhaw-Rosun, L.; Castillejo, G.; Concha, E. de la; Almeida, R.C. de; Dias, K.R.; Diemen, C.C. van; Dubois, P.C.; Duerr, R.H.; Edkins, S.; Franke, L.; Fransen, K.; Gutierrez, J.; Heap, G.A.; Hrdlickova, B.; Hunt, S.; Izurieta, L.P.; Izzo, V.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Langford, C.; Mazzilli, M.C.; Mein, C.A.; Midah, V.; Mitrovic, M.; Mora, B.; Morelli, M.; Nutland, S.; Nunez, C.; Onengut-Gumuscu, S.; Pearce, K.; Platteel, M.; Polanco, I.; Potter, S.; Ribes-Koninckx, C.; Ricano-Ponce, I.; Rich, S.S.; Rybak, A.; Santiago, J.L.; Senapati, S.; Sood, A.; Szajewska, H.; Troncone, R.; Varade, J.; Wallace, C.; Wolters, V.M.; Zhernakova, A.; Thelma, B.K.; Cukrowska, B.; Urcelay, E.; Bilbao, J.R.; Mearin, M.L.; Barisani, D.; Barrett, J.C.; Plagnol, V.; Deloukas, P.; Wijmenga, C.; Heel, D.A. van

    2011-01-01

    Using variants from the 1000 Genomes Project pilot European CEU dataset and data from additional resequencing studies, we densely genotyped 183 non-HLA risk loci previously associated with immune-mediated diseases in 12,041 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 12,228 controls. We identified

  3. Shared and Distinct Genetic Variants in Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smyth, Deborah J.; Plagnol, Vincent; Walker, Neil M.; Cooper, Jason D.; Downes, Kate; Yang, Jennie H. M.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Stevens, Helen; McManus, Ross; Wijmenga, Cisca; Heap, Graham A.; Dubois, Patrick C.; Clayton, David G.; Hunt, Karen A.; van Heel, David A.; Todd, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Two inflammatory disorders, type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, cosegregate in populations, suggesting a common genetic origin. Since both diseases are associated with the HLA class II genes on chromosome 6p21, we tested whether non-HLA loci are shared. Methods: We evaluated the

  4. Health-related quality of life in children and adolescents with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjerning, Halfdan; Mahony, Ruth O; Husby, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease requiring constant management with a gluten-free diet (GFD). Little is known about how CD impacts on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children and adolescents, and how they feel about and cope with CD and GFD. This qualitative study e...

  5. [Assessment of an algorithm to identify paediatric-onset celiac disease cases through administrative healthcare databases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitter, Gisella; Gnavi, Roberto; Romor, Pierantonio; Zanotti, Renzo; Simonato, Lorenzo; Canova, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    to assess the role of four administrative healthcare databases (pathology reports, copayment exemptions, hospital discharge records, gluten-free food prescriptions) for the identification of possible paediatric cases of celiac disease. population-based observational study with record linkage of administrative healthcare databases. SETTING AND PARTICIPANT S: children born alive in the Friuli Venezia Giulia Region (Northern Italy) to resident mothers in the years 1989-2012, identified using the regional Medical Birth Register. we defined possible celiac disease as having at least one of the following, from 2002 onward: 1. a pathology report of intestinal villous atrophy; 2. a copayment exemption for celiac disease; 3. a hospital discharge record with ICD-9-CM code of celiac disease; 4. a gluten-free food prescription. We evaluated the proportion of subjects identified by each archive and by combinations of archives, and examined the temporal relationship of the different sources in cases identified by more than one source. RESULT S: out of 962 possible cases of celiac disease, 660 (68.6%) had a pathology report, 714 (74.2%) a copayment exemption, 667 (69.3%) a hospital discharge record, and 636 (66.1%) a gluten-free food prescription. The four sources coexisted in 42.2% of subjects, whereas 30.2% were identified by two or three sources and 27.6% by a single source (16.9% by pathology reports, 4.2% by hospital discharge records, 3.9% by copayment exemptions, and 2.6% by gluten-free food prescriptions). Excluding pathology reports, 70.6% of cases were identified by at least two sources. A definition based on copayment exemptions and discharge records traced 80.5% of the 962 possible cases of celiac disease; whereas a definition based on copayment exemptions, discharge records, and gluten-free food prescriptions traced 83.1% of those cases. The temporal relationship of the different sources was compatible with the typical diagnostic pathway of subjects with celiac

  6. Intestinal deposits of anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA in childhood celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglio, Mariantonia; Tosco, Antonella; Auricchio, Renata; Paparo, Francesco; Colicchio, Barbara; Miele, Erasmo; Rapacciuolo, Luciano; Troncone, Riccardo

    2011-08-01

    High serum levels of anti-tissue-transglutaminase-2 IgA antibodies (anti-TG2), which are produced and deposited in the intestine, characterize celiac disease. To assess the diagnostic value of intestinal deposits of anti-TG2 IgA for celiac disease in a paediatric population. 344 children underwent duodenal biopsy for the suspicion of CD, and were divided into 3 groups: group A, 144 celiac subjects with villous atrophy (Marsh 3b-c); group B, 109 subjects with high serum levels of anti-TG2 but normal intestinal mucosa (Marsh 0-1) (potential celiac disease patients); group C, 91 subjects with normal levels of serum anti-TG2: 70 with Marsh 0-1 and 21 with Marsh 3a mucosa. All duodenal sections were evaluated for the presence of intestinal deposits of anti-TG2 IgA by double immunofluorescence. Deposits of anti-TG2 IgA were present in 96%, 68%, 12% of patients from groups A, B, C, respectively. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for celiac disease were 96% and 88% vs. 97% and 100% for serum anti-TG2, respectively. The degree of concordance with serum anti-TG2 was 85%. Detection of intestinal deposits of anti-TG2 IgA is a useful diagnostic tool. Further research is needed regarding their ability to predict evolution to villous atrophy in potential celiac disease. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Positive celiac disease serology and reduced bone mineral density in adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Donald R; Leslie, William D

    2010-02-01

    Low bone density and osteoporosis have been demonstrated in celiac disease populations in Europe, South America and the United States. Serological testing with tissue transglutaminase (TTG) and immunoglobulin A endomysial (EMA) antibodies is highly specific for celiac disease, while antigliadin antibody (AGA) testing is less specific. To evaluate the association of celiac serology with reduced bone density in adult women. A clinical database containing all bone density testing data in the province of Manitoba was linked to a database containing all celiac serology data for the province. The study cohort consisted of 376 women older than 20 years of age with bone density measurements preceding initial celiac serology by six months or less. Bone density was assessed in relation to TTG/EMA and AGA seropositivity, and compared with seronegative controls in age-, height- and weight-adjusted models. There was significantly lower bone density in TTG/EMA seropositive women than with seronegative controls for all sites tested (lumbar spine, total hip, trochanter, femoral neck; all Pwomen also had a significantly higher prevalence of osteoporosis (67.7% versus 44.8%; Pwomen, but after excluding TTG/EMA seropositive women, isolated AGA seropositivity showed no significant association with any bone density measurements. TTG/EMA seropositivity was associated with lower bone density and a higher prevalence of osteoporosis compared with seronegative controls.

  8. Morbidity and mortality among older individuals with undiagnosed celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Jonathan D; Brantner, Tricia L; Brinjikji, Waleed; Christensen, Kevin N; Brogan, Deanna L; Van Dyke, Carol T; Lahr, Brian D; Larson, Joseph J; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Melton, L Joseph; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Kyle, Robert A; Murray, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    Outcomes of undiagnosed celiac disease (CD) are unclear. We evaluated the morbidity and mortality of undiagnosed CD in a population-based sample of individuals 50 years of age and older. Stored sera from a population-based sample of 16,886 Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents 50 years of age and older were tested for CD based on analysis of tissue transglutaminase and endomysial antibodies. A nested case-control study compared serologically defined subjects with CD with age- and sex-matched, seronegative controls. Medical records were reviewed for comorbid conditions. We identified 129 (0.8%) subjects with undiagnosed CD in a cohort of 16,847 older adults. A total of 127 undiagnosed cases (49% men; median age, 63.0 y) and 254 matched controls were included in a systematic evaluation for more than 100 potentially coexisting conditions. Subjects with undiagnosed CD had increased rates of osteoporosis and hypothyroidism, as well as lower body mass index and levels of cholesterol and ferritin. Overall survival was not associated with CD status. During a median follow-up period of 10.3 years after serum samples were collected, 20 cases but no controls were diagnosed with CD (15.2% Kaplan-Meier estimate at 10 years). With the exception of reduced bone health, older adults with undiagnosed CD had limited comorbidity and no increase in mortality compared with controls. Some subjects were diagnosed with CD within a decade of serum collection, indicating that although most cases of undiagnosed CD are clinically silent, some result in symptoms. Undiagnosed CD can confer benefits and liabilities to older individuals. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Abnormal Skeletal Strength and Microarchitecture in Women With Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Emily M; Rogers, Halley; Leib, Alexa; McMahon, Donald J; Young, Polly; Nishiyama, Kyle; Guo, X Edward; Lewis, Suzanne; Green, Peter H; Shane, Elizabeth

    2015-06-01

    Osteoporosis is often a presenting sign of celiac disease (CD). Whether skeletal fragility in CD is associated with microarchitectural abnormalities is not known. The objective of the study was to evaluate microarchitecture and biomechanical properties of bone in CD. This was a case-control study. The study was conducted at a university hospital outpatient facility. Patients included premenopausal women with newly diagnosed CD (n = 33) and healthy controls (n = 33). Areal bone mineral density by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was measured as was trabecular and cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and microarchitecture by high-resolution peripheral computed tomography of the distal radius and tibia. Whole-bone stiffness estimated by finite element analysis. PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and bone turnover markers were also measured. Groups had similar age, race, and body mass index. Both groups had sufficient 25-hydroxyvitamin D and normal calcium and PTH. Areal bone mineral density was lower in CD. By high-resolution peripheral computed tomography, CD had lower trabecular vBMD, fewer, more widely, and irregularly spaced trabeculae at both the radius and tibia (8%-33%). At the tibia, they also had lower total density (8%) and thinner cortices (10%). Whole-bone stiffness and failure load were lower (11%-21%) in CD at both sites. Biomechanical deficits were associated with trabecular abnormalities. Women with CD had abnormal vBMD and microarchitecture at both the radius and tibia. Trabecular bone was preferentially affected. These deficits were associated with lower estimates of skeletal strength. These findings suggest a potential structural mechanism for skeletal fragility in CD and support further research into the pathogenesis of fracture in this population.

  10. Enterocyte Proliferation and Signaling Are Constitutively Altered in Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglio, Mariantonia; Kosova, Roberta; Sarno, Marco; Gaito, Alessandra; Discepolo, Valentina; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) occurs frequently, and is caused by ingestion of prolamins from cereals in subjects with a genetic predisposition. The small intestinal damage depends on an intestinal stress/innate immune response to certain gliadin peptides (e.g., A-gliadin P31-43) in association with an adaptive immune response to other gliadin peptides (e.g., A-gliadin P57-68). Gliadin and peptide P31-43 affect epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and CD enterocyte proliferation. The reason why the stress/innate immune and proliferative responses to certain gliadin peptides are present in CD and not in control intestine is so far unknown. The aim of this work is to investigate if, in CD, a constitutive alteration of enterocyte proliferation and signaling exists that may represent a predisposing condition to the damaging effects of gliadin. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry were used to study signaling in CD fibroblasts and intestinal biopsies. Western blot (WB) analysis, immunoprecipitation, and quantitative PCR were also used. We found in CD enterocytes enhancement of both proliferation and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/ligand system. In CD enterocytes and fibroblasts we found increase of the phosphorylated downstream signaling molecule Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase (ERK); block of the ERK activation normalizes enterocytes proliferation in CD mucosa. In conclusion the same pathway, which gliadin and gliadin peptide P31-43 can interfere with, is constitutively altered in CD cells. This observation potentially explains the specificity of the damaging effects of certain gliadin peptides on CD intestine. PMID:24204586

  11. Enterocyte proliferation and signaling are constitutively altered in celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin Nanayakkara

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD occurs frequently, and is caused by ingestion of prolamins from cereals in subjects with a genetic predisposition. The small intestinal damage depends on an intestinal stress/innate immune response to certain gliadin peptides (e.g., A-gliadin P31-43 in association with an adaptive immune response to other gliadin peptides (e.g., A-gliadin P57-68. Gliadin and peptide P31-43 affect epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling and CD enterocyte proliferation. The reason why the stress/innate immune and proliferative responses to certain gliadin peptides are present in CD and not in control intestine is so far unknown. The aim of this work is to investigate if, in CD, a constitutive alteration of enterocyte proliferation and signaling exists that may represent a predisposing condition to the damaging effects of gliadin. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry were used to study signaling in CD fibroblasts and intestinal biopsies. Western blot (WB analysis, immunoprecipitation, and quantitative PCR were also used. We found in CD enterocytes enhancement of both proliferation and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ligand system. In CD enterocytes and fibroblasts we found increase of the phosphorylated downstream signaling molecule Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase (ERK; block of the ERK activation normalizes enterocytes proliferation in CD mucosa. In conclusion the same pathway, which gliadin and gliadin peptide P31-43 can interfere with, is constitutively altered in CD cells. This observation potentially explains the specificity of the damaging effects of certain gliadin peptides on CD intestine.

  12. Label-free SPR detection of gluten peptides in urine for non-invasive celiac disease follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Maria; Estevez, M-Carmen; Moreno, Maria de Lourdes; Cebolla, Angel; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-05-15

    Motivated by the necessity of new and efficient methods for dietary gluten control of celiac patients, we have developed a simple and highly sensitive SPR biosensor for the detection of gluten peptides in urine. The sensing methodology enables rapid and label-free quantification of the gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP) by using G12 mAb. The overall performance of the biosensor has been in-depth optimized and evaluated in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility, reaching a limit of detection of 0.33 ng mL(-1). Besides, the robustness and stability of the methodology permit the continuous use of the biosensor for more than 100 cycles with excellent repeatability. Special efforts have been focused on preventing and minimizing possible interferences coming from urine matrix enabling a direct analysis in this fluid without requiring extraction or purification procedures. Our SPR biosensor has proven to detect and identify gluten consumption by evaluating urine samples from healthy and celiac individuals with different dietary gluten conditions. This novel biosensor methodology represents a novel approach to quantify the digested gluten peptides in human urine with outstanding sensitivity in a rapid and non-invasive manner. Our technique should be considered as a promising opportunity to develop Point-of-Care (POC) devices for an efficient, simple and accurate gluten free diet (GFD) monitoring as well as therapy follow-up of celiac disease patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... get the care they need. Learn about giving This page is best accessed via your desktop. Celiac ... Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1-617-355-6058 Visit the Celiac Support Group ...

  14. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... they need. Learn about giving This page is best accessed via your desktop. Celiac Disease Program Home ... Resources + Videos – Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac ...

  15. B vitamins related to homocysteine metabolism in adults celiac disease patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Flávia Xavier; Campos, Tatiana do Nascimento; Moraes, Luís Fernando de Sousa; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda; Cardoso, Leandro de Morais; Pinheiro-Sant'Ana, Helena Maria; Gilberti, Flávio Augusto Barros; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo Gouveia

    2015-10-20

    The only treatment for celiac disease is the gluten-free diet. Few studies have assessed the nutritional adequacy of this diet, especially of B vitamins related to homocysteine metabolism. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status and serum concentrations of B vitamins involved in homocysteine metabolism, and to determine whether the dietary intake of these vitamins are meeting Dietary Reference Intakes in celiac patients. A cross-sectional study enrolled a total of 20 celiac patients (36.3 ± 13.7 years old; 65% women), following strict gluten-free diet (GFD) and 39 healthy controls matched by sex and age. The dietary intake was assessed by 3-day food records, and serum concentrations of homocysteine and vitamins B6, B12, and folate were determined after overnight fasting. Comparisons between the two groups were performed by Student's t test or Mann-Whitney U-test, for continuous variables. Pearson's chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used for categorical variables. An alpha level of 5% were considered significant. Celiac patients had lower serum folate concentrations (7.7 ± 3.5 ng/mL, P celiac patients had folate intake below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) (130.8 ± 53.6 μg/d). However, only a small proportion of celiac patients had hyperhomocysteinemia. Celiac patients treated with GFD presented inadequacy of dietary folate intake and low-serum concentrations of folate, suggesting that more attention should be given to the quality of the nutrients offered by the GFD, as it constitutes a lifelong treatment.

  16. LOW BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN BRAZILIAN PATIENTS AT DIAGNOSIS OF CELIAC DISEASE

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    Joyce Timmermans Pires da SILVA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLow bone mineral density is considered an extra-intestinal manifestation of celiac disease with reduced bone mass, increased bone fragility, and risk of fractures. Celiac disease is considered a condition at high risk for secondary osteoporosis and the evaluation of bone density is very important in the clinical management of these patients.ObjectiveThe present study aimed to investigate bone alterations in celiac patients from Curitiba, South Region of Brazil at diagnosis, correlating the findings with age and gender.MethodsPatients who were included in the study were attended to in a private office of the same physician from January 2009 to December 2013. The diagnosis of celiac disease was done through clinical, serological and histological findings. All data were collected from the medical charts of the patients. After the diagnosis of celiac disease, evaluation for low bone mineral density was requested by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA. DEXA bone densitometer was used to estimate low bone mineral density at the lumbar spine and femur.ResultsA total of 101 patients, 82 (81.2% female and 19 (18.8% male subjects, with mean age of 39.0±3.03 years were included. At celiac disease diagnosis, 36 (35.6% were younger than 30 years, 41 (40.6% were between 31 and 50 years, and 24 (23.8% were older than 50 years. Among the evaluated patients, 69 (68.3% presented low bone mineral density, being 47% with osteopenia and 32% with osteoporosis. Patients who were older than 51 years and diagnosed with celiac disease presented low bone mineral density in 83.3% (20/24 of the cases. As expected, age influenced significantly the low bone mineral density findings. Among women, low bone mineral density was present with high frequency (60% from 30 to 50 years. In patients diagnosed older than 60 years (n=8, all the women (n=5 and two of the three men had osteoporosis.ConclusionThis study demonstrated that 69% of Brazilian patients with celiac

  17. LOW BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN BRAZILIAN PATIENTS AT DIAGNOSIS OF CELIAC DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Joyce Timmermans Pires da; Nisihara, Renato M; Kotze, Luís Roberto; Olandoski, Márcia; Kotze, Lorete Maria da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Low bone mineral density is considered an extra-intestinal manifestation of celiac disease with reduced bone mass, increased bone fragility, and risk of fractures. Celiac disease is considered a condition at high risk for secondary osteoporosis and the evaluation of bone density is very important in the clinical management of these patients. The present study aimed to investigate bone alterations in celiac patients from Curitiba, South Region of Brazil at diagnosis, correlating the findings with age and gender. Patients who were included in the study were attended to in a private office of the same physician from January 2009 to December 2013. The diagnosis of celiac disease was done through clinical, serological and histological findings. All data were collected from the medical charts of the patients. After the diagnosis of celiac disease, evaluation for low bone mineral density was requested by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). DEXA bone densitometer was used to estimate low bone mineral density at the lumbar spine and femur. A total of 101 patients, 82 (81.2%) female and 19 (18.8%) male subjects, with mean age of 39.0±3.03 years were included. At celiac disease diagnosis, 36 (35.6%) were younger than 30 years, 41 (40.6%) were between 31 and 50 years, and 24 (23.8%) were older than 50 years. Among the evaluated patients, 69 (68.3%) presented low bone mineral density, being 47% with osteopenia and 32% with osteoporosis. Patients who were older than 51 years and diagnosed with celiac disease presented low bone mineral density in 83.3% (20/24) of the cases. As expected, age influenced significantly the low bone mineral density findings. Among women, low bone mineral density was present with high frequency (60%) from 30 to 50 years. In patients diagnosed older than 60 years (n=8), all the women (n=5) and two of the three men had osteoporosis. This study demonstrated that 69% of Brazilian patients with celiac disease at diagnosis had low bone mineral density

  18. Celiac Crisis in an Adult on Immunosuppressive Therapy

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    Owayed Al Shammeri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘Celiac crisis’ is a rare presentation of celiac disease with manifestations that include severe diarrhea, and severe metabolic and electrolyte abnormalities. It is most frequently seen in children younger than two years of age and has been rarely described in adults. A case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with diarrhea, severe dehydration, hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis is described. Based on positive serology and small bowel biopsy, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. She also had histological evidence of lymphocytic colitis. Microscopic colitis has not previously been described in association with celiac crisis, but it may have contributed to the presentation of celiac crisis in the current case. The patient was on corticosteroids and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis at the time of her presentation. The current case demonstrates that modest immunosuppression does not prevent a celiac crisis, although previous reports have shown that patients may respond rapidly to high-dose corticosteroids.

  19. The unknown burden and cost of celiac disease in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogul, Douglas; Nakamura, Yusuke; Seo, Jaein; Blauvelt, Barri; Bridges, John F P

    2017-04-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that results from exposure to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals and leads to a range of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms. Areas covered: In order to evaluate the literature with respect to burden associated with celiac disease in the U.S. and identify any knowledge gaps, we performed a literature review of journal articles published between 2000-2016. We note that celiac disease is a prevalent condition associated with a significant burden of disease through its impact on morbidity, quality of life, as well as through increased costs associated with its diagnosis and management. At the same time, knowledge gaps exist in our understanding of the precise epidemiologic burden in the U.S.; the trade-offs between burden and benefit of a gluten-free diet; and better estimation of the costs of diagnosis, treatment and management.Expert commentary: Additional research is necessary to better understand these gaps to be able to reduce burden of celiac disease, particularly the impact on health-related quality of life and the costs associated with inaccurate or delayed diagnoses and insufficient treatment of disease.

  20. Small bowel carcinomas in celiac or Crohn's disease: distinctive histophenotypic, molecular and histogenetic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanoli, Alessandro; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Martino, Michele; Klersy, Catherine; Grillo, Federica; Mescoli, Claudia; Nesi, Gabriella; Volta, Umberto; Fornino, Daniele; Luinetti, Ombretta; Fociani, Paolo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; D'Armiento, Francesco P; Cannizzaro, Renato; Latella, Giovanni; Ciacci, Carolina; Biancone, Livia; Paulli, Marco; Sessa, Fausto; Rugge, Massimo; Fiocca, Roberto; Corazza, Gino R; Solcia, Enrico

    2017-10-01

    Non-familial small bowel carcinomas are relatively rare and have a poor prognosis. Two small bowel carcinoma subsets may arise in distinct immune-inflammatory diseases (celiac disease and Crohn's disease) and have been recently suggested to differ in prognosis, celiac disease-associated carcinoma cases showing a better outcome, possibly due to their higher DNA microsatellite instability and tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes. In this study, we investigated the histological structure (glandular vs diffuse/poorly cohesive, mixed or solid), cell phenotype (intestinal vs gastric/pancreatobiliary duct type) and Wnt signaling activation (β-catenin and/or SOX-9 nuclear expression) in a series of 26 celiac disease-associated small bowel carcinoma, 25 Crohn's disease-associated small bowel carcinoma and 25 sporadic small bowel carcinoma cases, searching for new prognostic parameters. In addition, non-tumor mucosa of celiac and Crohn's disease patients was investigated for epithelial precursor changes (hyperplastic, metaplastic or dysplastic) to help clarify carcinoma histogenesis. When compared with non-glandular structure and non-intestinal phenotype, both glandular structure and intestinal phenotype were associated with a more favorable outcome at univariable or stage- and microsatellite instability/tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte-inclusive multivariable analysis. The prognostic power of histological structure was independent of the clinical groups while the non-intestinal phenotype, associated with poor outcome, was dominant among Crohn's disease-associated carcinoma. Both nuclear β-catenin and SOX-9 were preferably expressed among celiac disease-associated carcinomas; however, they were devoid, per se, of prognostic value. We obtained findings supporting an origin of celiac disease-associated carcinoma in SOX-9-positive immature hyperplastic crypts, partly through flat β-catenin-positive dysplasia, and of Crohn's disease-associated carcinoma in a metaplastic (gastric and

  1. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

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    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  2. Hypocalcemia after alendronate therapy in a patient with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Shon E; Nix, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    To describe a patient with osteoporosis who was treated with alendronate and developed hypocalcemia, which ultimately led to the diagnosis of celiac sprue. We present the clinical and laboratory findings in a patient with osteoporosis, in whom hypocalcemia developed after treatment with alendronate. This patient was subsequently diagnosed with celiac sprue. The pertinent literature regarding orally administered bisphosphonate-induced hypocalcemia is reviewed. A 79-year-old man who was diagnosed with osteoporosis was treated with alendronate. He was subsequently found to have asymptomatic hypocalcemia (serum calcium concentration, 8.3 mg/dL), which resolved after alendronate therapy was discontinued. He was then treated with calcium, vitamin D, and calcitonin nasal spray, which did not cause hypocalcemia. Because of his reduced bone density, however, he was subsequently referred for endocrine consultation. Evaluation at that time showed normal levels of serum calcium, phosphorus, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, thyrotropin, and parathyroid hormone as well as 24-hour urine calcium excretion. An endomysial antibody titer was dramatically elevated. Upper endoscopy showed villous atrophy, and small bowel biopsy confirmed the presence of villous blunting and chronic inflammation, consistent with celiac sprue. He was treated with a gluten-free diet and then subsequently treated with orally administered risedronate, which he tolerated well without evidence of hypocalcemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of orally administered bisphosphonate-induced hypocalcemia, which subsequently led to the diagnosis of previously unrecognized, otherwise asymptomatic celiac sprue. Patients with unexplained hypocalcemia should be screened for celiac sprue, even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.

  3. Screening for celiac disease in average-risk and high-risk populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease is rising. As a result there is increasing interest in the associated mortality and morbidity of the disease. Screening of asymptomatic individuals in the general population is not currently recommended; instead, a strategy of case finding is the preferred approach, taking into account the myriad modes of presentation of celiac disease. Although a gluten-free diet is the treatment of choice in symptomatic patients with celiac disease, there is no consensus on whether institution of a gluten-free diet will improve the quality of life in asymptomatic screen-detected celiac disease patients. A review of the studies that have been performed on this subject is presented. Certain patient groups such as those with autoimmune diseases may be offered screening in the context of an informed discussion regarding the potential benefits, with the caveat that the data on this issue are sparse. Active case finding seems to be the most prudent option in most clinical situations. PMID:22282707

  4. Looking for celiac disease in Italian women with endometriosis: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Luca; Campo, Sebastiano; D'Onofrio, Ferruccio; Gallo, Antonella; Covino, Marcello; Campo, Vincenzo; Palombini, Guglielmo; Santoliquido, Angelo; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Montalto, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, a potential link between endometriosis and celiac disease has been hypothesized since these disorders share some similarities, specifically concerning a potential role of oxidative stress, inflammation, and immunological dysfunctions. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease among Italian women with endometriosis with respect to general population. Consecutive women with a laparoscopic and histological confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis were enrolled; female nurses of our institution, without a known history of endometriosis, were enrolled as controls. IgA endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies measurement and serum total IgA dosage were performed in both groups. An upper digestive endoscopy with an intestinal biopsy was performed in case of antibodies positivity. Presence of infertility, miscarriage, coexistence of other autoimmune diseases, and family history of autoimmune diseases was also investigated in all subjects. Celiac disease was diagnosed in 5 of 223 women with endometriosis and in 2 of 246 controls (2.2% versus 0.8%; P = 0.265). Patients with endometriosis showed a largely higher rate of infertility compared to control group (27.4% versus 2.4%; P celiac disease among patients with endometriosis is found, although this trend does not reach the statistical significance.

  5. Looking for Celiac Disease in Italian Women with Endometriosis: A Case Control Study

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    Luca Santoro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, a potential link between endometriosis and celiac disease has been hypothesized since these disorders share some similarities, specifically concerning a potential role of oxidative stress, inflammation, and immunological dysfunctions. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease among Italian women with endometriosis with respect to general population. Consecutive women with a laparoscopic and histological confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis were enrolled; female nurses of our institution, without a known history of endometriosis, were enrolled as controls. IgA endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies measurement and serum total IgA dosage were performed in both groups. An upper digestive endoscopy with an intestinal biopsy was performed in case of antibodies positivity. Presence of infertility, miscarriage, coexistence of other autoimmune diseases, and family history of autoimmune diseases was also investigated in all subjects. Celiac disease was diagnosed in 5 of 223 women with endometriosis and in 2 of 246 controls (2.2% versus 0.8%; P=0.265. Patients with endometriosis showed a largely higher rate of infertility compared to control group (27.4% versus 2.4%; P<0.001. Our results confirm that also in Italian population an increased prevalence of celiac disease among patients with endometriosis is found, although this trend does not reach the statistical significance.

  6. Translation, cultural adaptation, and validation of the celiac disease DUX (CDDUX

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    Manuela Torres Camara Lins

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To translate, cross-culturally adapt, and validate a specific questionnaire for the evaluation of celiac children and adolescents, the celiac disease DUX (CDDUX. METHODS: The steps suggested by Reichenheim and Moraes (2007 were followed to obtain conceptual, item, semantic, operational, and measurement equivalences. Four pediatric gastroenterologists; a researcher with tool validation background; three English teachers; and 33 celiac patients, aged 8-18 years, and their caregivers participated in the study. The scores of celiac patients and those obtained from their caregivers were compared. Among the patients, the scores were compared in relation to gender and age. RESULTS: All items were considered relevant to the construct and good semantic equivalence of the version was acquired. During measurement equivalence, the exploratory factor analysis showed appropriate weight of all items and good internal consistency, with Cronbach's a of 0.81. Significant difference was found among the final scores of children and their caregivers. There was no difference among the final scores in relation to gender or age. CONCLUSION: The questionnaire was translated and adapted according to all the proposed steps, with all equivalences adequately met. It is a valid tool to access the QoL of celiac children and adolescents in the translated language.

  7. Translation, cultural adaptation, and validation of the celiac disease DUX (CDDUX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Manuela Torres Camara; Tassitano, Rafael Miranda; Brandt, Kátia Galeão; Antunes, Margarida Maria de Castro; Silva, Giselia Alves Pontes da

    2015-01-01

    To translate, cross-culturally adapt, and validate a specific questionnaire for the evaluation of celiac children and adolescents, the celiac disease DUX (CDDUX). The steps suggested by Reichenheim and Moraes (2007) were followed to obtain conceptual, item, semantic, operational, and measurement equivalences. Four pediatric gastroenterologists; a researcher with tool validation background; three English teachers; and 33 celiac patients, aged 8-18 years, and their caregivers participated in the study. The scores of celiac patients and those obtained from their caregivers were compared. Among the patients, the scores were compared in relation to gender and age. All items were considered relevant to the construct and good semantic equivalence of the version was acquired. During measurement equivalence, the exploratory factor analysis showed appropriate weight of all items and good internal consistency, with Cronbach's α of 0.81. Significant difference was found among the final scores of children and their caregivers. There was no difference among the final scores in relation to gender or age. The questionnaire was translated and adapted according to all the proposed steps, with all equivalences adequately met. It is a valid tool to access the QoL of celiac children and adolescents in the translated language. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of the adaptive, innate and regulatory immune responses in the intestinal mucosa of celiac disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diosdado, Begoña; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2005-09-01

    Celiac disease is a complex genetic disorder that affects the small intestine of genetically predisposed individuals when they ingest gluten, a dietary protein. Although several genome screens have been successful in identifying susceptibility loci in celiac disease, the only genetic contributors identified so far are the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2/DQ8 molecules. One of the most important aspects in the pathogenesis of celiac disease is the activation of a T-helper 1 immune response, when the antigen-presenting cells that express HLA-DQ2/DQ8 molecules present the toxic gluten peptides to reactive CD4(+) T-cells. Recently, new insights into the activation of an innate immune response have also been described. It is generally accepted that the immune response triggers destruction of the mucosa in the small intestine of celiac disease patients. Hence, the activation of a detrimental immune response in the intestine of celiac disease patients appears to be key in the initiation and progression of the disease. This review summarizes the immunologic pathways that have been studied in celiac disease thus far, and will point to new potential candidate genes and pathways involved in the etiopathogenesis of celiac disease, which should lead to novel alternatives for diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Quality of life in children with celiac disease: A paediatric cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagetti, Chiara; Gesuita, Rosaria; Gatti, Simona; Catassi, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    Few studies investigated factors influencing the quality of life of children with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. To investigate the impact of the gluten-free diet on the psycho-physical well-being of celiac children. In this cross-sectional study, we interviewed 76 celiac and 143 non-celiac children (2-18 years) by using a non-disease specific questionnaire (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Test) and we explored the impact of the diet on social life with an open-ended questionnaire. Scores were compared by Wilcoxon rank-sum test. A quantile regression analysis was used to evaluate the impact of celiac disease on score distribution. No significant differences in quality of life were found between the two groups (total score: 84.1 (81.1-87.2) vs 81.5 (79.7-83.4), median (95% CI), patients and controls respectively, p=0.4). Treatment positively affected quality of life in children that showed "intermediate" scores in the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Test. Lowest scores were observed in children reporting a higher number of diet difficulties or co-morbidities. Although celiac patients showed an overall good quality of life in comparison with a control group, by using appropriate analytical methods we elicited specific factors contributing to a lower quality of life in patients, such as co-morbidities and difficulties with the diet. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. HLA-DQ-Gluten Tetramer Blood Test Accurately Identifies Patients With and Without Celiac Disease in Absence of Gluten Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, Vikas K; Lundin, Knut E A; Mørkrid, Lars; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Sollid, Ludvig M; Christophersen, Asbjørn

    2017-11-14

    Celiac disease is characterized by HLA-DQ2/8-restricted responses of CD4+ T cells to cereal gluten proteins. A diagnosis of celiac disease based on serologic and histologic evidence and duodenal histology requires patients to be on gluten-containing diets. The growing number of individuals adhering to a gluten-free diet (GFD) without exclusion of celiac disease complicates its detection. HLA-DQ-gluten tetramers can be used to detect gluten-specific T cells in blood of patients with celiac disease, even if they are on a GFD. We investigated whether an HLA-DQ-gluten tetramer-based assay accurately identifies patients with celiac disease. We produced HLA-DQ-gluten tetramers and added them to peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from 143 HLA-DQ2.5+ subjects (62 subjects with celiac disease on a GFD, 19 subjects without celiac disease on a GFD [due to self-reported gluten sensitivity], 10 subjects with celiac disease on a gluten-containing diet, and 52 presumed healthy individuals [controls]). T cells that bound HLA-DQ-gluten tetramers were quantified by flow cytometry. Laboratory tests and flow cytometry gating analyses were performed by researchers blinded to sample type, except for samples from subjects with celiac disease on a gluten-containing diet. Test precision analyses were performed using samples from 10 subjects. For the HLA-DQ-gluten tetramer-based assay, we combined flow-cytometry variables in a multiple regression model that identified individuals with celiac disease on a GFD with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89-1.00) vs subjects without celiac disease on a GFD. The assay detected individuals with celiac disease on a gluten-containing diet vs controls with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.95 (95% CI 0.90-1.00). Optimized cutoff values identified subjects with celiac disease on a GFD with 97% sensitivity (95% CI 0.92-1.00) and 95

  11. Oversecretion of soluble CTLA-4 in various autoimmune diseases overlapping celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Giampaola; Auricchio, Renata; Bagnasco, Marcello; Saverino, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the levels of soluble CTLA-4 (sCTLA-4) in sera of celiac disease (CD) patients with overlapping autoimmune diseases (OAD; diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroid diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes). Sera from Italian patients with CD were obtained and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure sCTLA-4. Consistently high serum sCTLA-4 levels were observed in CD (13.20 ng/mL, pautoimmune disease (namely, CD and OAD) versus patients with CD alone. Previously, the potential genetic associations of several CTLA-4 polymorphisms to susceptibility to autoimmune diseases have been described, although the relationship between CTLA-4 polymorphisms and the ability to produce the soluble form is not fully clarified. CTLA-4 is a strong actor in the adaptive response: our data give supportive evidence of the common background of autoimmune diseases.

  12. Gluten consumption during late pregnancy and risk of celiac disease in the offspring: the TEDDY birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusitalo, Ulla; Lee, Hye-Seung; Aronsson, Carin Andrén; Yang, Jimin; Virtanen, Suvi M; Norris, Jill; Agardh, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Maternal diet during pregnancy has been proposed to increase the risk of autoimmune diseases. The objective was to investigate the association between maternal consumption of gluten-containing foods during late pregnancy and subsequent risk of celiac disease in the offspring. Genetically susceptible children prospectively followed from birth were screened annually for tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGAs). Children testing persistently positive for tTGAs were further evaluated for celiac disease. Diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed by intestinal biopsy or was considered likely if the mean tTGA concentration was >100 units in 2 consecutive samples. A questionnaire on the mother's diet in late pregnancy was completed by 3-4.5 mo postpartum. Mothers were divided into 3 groups based on the tertiles of their consumption of gluten-containing foods (servings/d). The association between maternal gluten-containing food consumption and the risk of celiac disease was studied by using a time-to-event analysis. At the time of analysis, 359 (5%) of the 6546 children developed celiac disease. Compared with the middle category of maternal gluten-containing food consumption (servings/d), low (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.67, 1.13; P = 0.296) and high (HR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.65, 1.09; P = 0.202) consumption was not associated with risk of celiac disease in the child after adjustment for country, human leukocyte antigen genotype, family history of celiac disease, maternal education, and sex of the child. Median maternal daily consumption frequency of gluten-containing foods was higher (P gluten-containing foods in relation to risk of celiac disease. The frequency of gluten-containing food consumption during late pregnancy is not associated with risk of celiac disease in the offspring. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with hepatitis B virus infection in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Luciana Nau

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that involves gluten intolerance and can be triggered by environmental factors including hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of celiac disease in individuals with HBV infection and to describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics of celiac disease associated with HBV. Methods This cross-sectional study included 50 hepatitis B patients tested for IgA anti-endomysial antibodies (EMAs and tissue anti-transglutaminase (TTG between August 2011 and September 2012. Results Fifty patients were included with a mean age of 46.0 ± 12.6 (46.0 years; 46% were female and 13% were HBeAg+. Six patients had positive serology for celiac disease, four were EMA+, and five were TTG+. When individuals with positive serology for celiac disease were compared to those with negative serology, they demonstrated a higher prevalence of abdominal pain (100% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.008, lower median creatinine (0.7mg/dL vs. 0.9mg/dL, p = 0.007 and lower mean albumin (3.6 ± 0.4g/L vs. 3.9 ± 0.3g/L, p = 0.022. All individuals with positive serology for celiac disease underwent upper digestive endoscopy, and three of the patients exhibited a macroscopic pattern suggestive of celiac disease. Histologically, five patients demonstrated an intra-epithelial lymphocytic infiltrate level > 30%, and four patients showed villous atrophy associated with crypt hyperplasia on duodenal biopsy. Conclusions An increased prevalence of celiac disease was observed among hepatitis B patients. These patients were symptomatic and had significant laboratory abnormalities. These results indicate that active screening for celiac disease among HBV-infected adults is warranted.

  14. Newly identified genetic risk variants for celiac disease related to the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunt, Karen A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Turner, Graham; Heap, Graham A. R.; Franke, Lude; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Romanos, Jihane; Dinesen, Lotte C.; Ryan, Anthony W.; Panesar, Davinder; Gwilliam, Rhian; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; McLaren, William M.; Holmes, Geoffrey K. T.; Howdle, Peter D.; Walters, Julian R. F.; Sanders, David S.; Playford, Raymond J.; Trynka, Gosia; Mulder, Chris J. J.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Verbeek, Wieke H. M.; Trimble, Valerie; Stevens, Fiona M.; O'Morain, Colm; Kennedy, Nicholas P.; Kelleher, Dermot; Pennington, Daniel J.; Strachan, David P.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Mein, Charles A.; Wapenaar, Martin C.; Deloukas, Panos; McGinnis, Ralph; McManus, Ross; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    Our genome-wide association study of celiac disease previously identified risk variants in the IL2-IL21 region. To identify additional risk variants, we genotyped 1,020 of the most strongly associated non-HLA markers in an additional 1,643 cases and 3,406 controls. Through joint analysis including

  15. Specific nongluten proteins of wheat are novel target antigens in celiac disease humoral response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy that is generally understood to be triggered by the ingestion of gluten proteins of wheat and related cereals. The skin manifestation of the condition is known as dermatitis herpetiformis. Antibody response to native and deamidated seque...

  16. Co-morbidity of cystic fibrosis and celiac disease in Scandinavian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Gilljam, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The co-morbidity of cystic fibrosis (CF) and celiac disease (CD) has been reported sporadically since the 1960s. To our knowledge, this is the first time a systematic screening is performed in a large cohort of CF patients. METHODS: Transglutaminase-IgA (TGA), endomysium-IgA (EMA...

  17. Urinary NOx:creatinine ratios during gluten challenge in children with celiac disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster-Kamphuis, L.; Straaten, E.A. van; Kors, W.A.; Schrijver, J.E. de; Bovee-Oudenhoven, I.M.; Meer, R. van der; Forget, P.P.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Celiac disease is a gluten-induced small bowel enteropathy. Inflammation is known to be associated with enhanced nitric oxide (NO) production. An increase in urinary nitrate and nitrite (NOx) reflects increased NO production. The urinary NOx:creatinine ratio can be used as an indicator

  18. Co-morbidity of cystic fibrosis and celiac disease in Scandinavian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, Gjermund; Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Giljam, Mari