WorldWideScience

Sample records for celestial south pole

  1. ASTEP South: An Antarctic Search for Transiting ExoPlanets around the celestial South pole

    CERN Document Server

    Crouzet, Nicolas; Agabi, Karim; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Bondoux, Erick; Challita, Zalpha; Fanteï-Caujolle, Yan; Fressin, François; Mékarnia, Djamel; Schmider, François-Xavier; Valbousquet, Franck; Blazit, Alain; Bonhomme, Serge; Abe, Lyu; Daban, Jean-Baptiste; Gouvret, Carole; Fruth, Thomas; Rauer, Heike; Erikson, Anders; Barbieri, Mauro; Aigrain, Suzanne; Pont, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    ASTEP South is the first phase of the ASTEP project (Antarctic Search for Transiting ExoPlanets). The instrument is a fixed 10 cm refractor with a 4kx4k CCD camera in a thermalized box, pointing continuously a 3.88 degree x 3.88 degree field of view centered on the celestial South pole. ASTEP South became fully functional in June 2008 and obtained 1592 hours of data during the 2008 Antarctic winter. The data are of good quality but the analysis has to account for changes in the point spread function due to rapid ground seeing variations and instrumental effects. The pointing direction is stable within 10 arcseconds on a daily timescale and drifts by only 34 arcseconds in 50 days. A truly continuous photometry of bright stars is possible in June (the noon sky background peaks at a magnitude R=15 arcsec-2 on June 22), but becomes challenging in July (the noon sky background magnitude is R=12.5 arcsec?2 on July 20). The weather conditions are estimated from the number of stars detected in the field. For the 2008...

  2. Brightness and color of the integrated starlight at celestial, ecliptic and galactic poles

    CERN Document Server

    Nawar, S; Mikhail, J S; Morcos, A B

    2010-01-01

    From photoelectric observations of night sky brightness carried out at Abu-Simbel, Asaad et al. (1979) have obtained values of integrated starlight brightness at different Galactic latitudes. These data have been used in the present work to obtain the brightness and color of the integrated starlight at North and South Celestial, Ecliptic and Galactic Poles. The present values of the brightness are expressed in S10 units and mag/arcsec2. Our results have been compared with that obtained by other investigators using photometric and star counts techniques. The B-V and B-R have been calculated and the results are compared with that obtained by other investigators.

  3. The South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ruhl, J E; Carlstrom, J E; Cho, H M; Crawford, T; Dobbs, M; Greer, C H; Halverson, W; Holzapfel, W L; Lanting, T M; Lee, A T; Leong, J; Leitch, E M; Lu, W; Lueker, M; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C L; Schwan, D; Sharp, M K; Runyan, M C; Spieler, H; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A

    2004-01-01

    A new 10 meter diameter telescope is being constructed for deployment at the NSF South Pole research station. The telescope is designed for conducting large-area millimeter and sub-millimeter wave surveys of faint, low contrast emission, as required to map primary and secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. To achieve the required sensitivity and resolution, the telescope design employs an off-axis primary with a 10m diameter clear aperture. The full aperture and the associated optics will have a combined surface accuracy of better than 20 microns rms to allow precision operation in the submillimeter atmospheric windows. The telescope will be surrounded with a large reflecting ground screen to reduce sensitivity to thermal emission from the ground and local interference. The optics of the telescope will support a square degree field of view at 2mm wavelength and will feed a new 1000-element micro-lithographed planar bolometric array with superconducting transition-edge sensors and frequency...

  4. The South Pole Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhl, J.E.; Ade, P.A.R.; Carlstrom, J.E.; Cho, H.M.; Crawford,T.; Dobbs, M.; Greer, C.H.; Halverson, N.W.; Holzapfel, W.L.; Lanting,T.M.; Lee, A.T.; Leitch, E.M.; Leong, J.; Lu, W.; Lueker, M.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S.S.; Mohr, J.J.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Runyan, M.C.; Schwan, D.; Sharp, M.K.; Spieler, H.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A.A.

    2004-11-04

    A new 10 meter diameter telescope is being constructed for deployment at the NSF South Pole research station. The telescope is designed for conducting large-area millimeter and sub-millimeter wave surveys of faint, low contrast emission, as required to map primary and secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. To achieve the required sensitivity and resolution, the telescope design employs an off-axis primary with a 10 m diameter clear aperture. The full aperture and the associated optics will have a combined surface accuracy of better than 20 microns rms to allow precision operation in the submillimeter atmospheric windows. The telescope will be surrounded with a large reflecting ground screen to reduce sensitivity to thermal emission from the ground and local interference. The optics of the telescope will support a square degree field of view at 2mm wavelength and will feed a new 1000-element micro-lithographed planar bolometric array with superconducting transition-edge sensors and frequency-multiplexed readouts. The first key project will be to conduct a survey over 4000 degrees for galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect. This survey should find many thousands of clusters with a mass selection criteria that is remarkably uniform with redshift. Armed with redshifts obtained from optical and infrared follow-up observations, it is expected that the survey will enable significant constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy.

  5. The impact of celestial pole offset modelling on VLBI UT1 Intensive results

    CERN Document Server

    Malkin, Zinovy

    2011-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Intensive sessions are scheduled to provide operational Universal Time (UT1) determinations with low latency. UT1 estimates obtained from these observations heavily depend on the model of the celestial pole motion used during data processing. However, even the most accurate precession-nutation model, IAU 2000/2006, is not accurate enough to realize the full potential of VLBI observations. To achieve the highest possible accuracy in UT1 estimates, a celestial pole offset (CPO), which is the difference between the actual and modelled precession-nutation angles, should be applied. Three CPO models are currently available for users. In this paper, these models have been tested and the differences between UT1 estimates obtained with those models are investigated. It has been shown that neglecting CPO modelling during VLBI UT1 Intensive processing causes systematic errors in UT1 series of up to 20 microarcseconds. It has been also found that using different CPO models causes...

  6. Spectrum of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the North Celestial Pole with WMAP 7-Year data

    CERN Document Server

    Bonaldi, Anna; 10.1155/2012/853927

    2013-01-01

    We estimate the frequency spectrum of the diffuse anomalous microwave emission (AME) on the North Celestial Pole (NCP) region of the sky with the Correlated Component Analysis (CCA) component separation method applied to WMAP 7-yr data. The NCP is a suitable region for this analysis because the AME is weakly contaminated by synchrotron and free-free emission. By modeling the AME component as a peaked spectrum we estimate the peak frequency to be $21.7\\pm0.8$\\,GHz, in agreement with previous analyses which favored $\

  7. Spectrum of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the North Celestial Pole with WMAP 7-Year Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bonaldi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the frequency spectrum of the diffuse anomalous microwave emission (AME on the North Celestial Pole (NCP region of the sky with the Correlated Component Analysis (CCA component separation method applied to WMAP 7-yr data. The NCP is a suitable region for this analysis because the AME is weakly contaminated by synchrotron and free-free emission. By modeling the AME component as a peaked spectrum we estimate the peak frequency to be 21.7±0.8 GHz, in agreement with previous analyses which favored νp < 23 GHz. The ability of our method to correctly recover the position of the peak is verified through simulations. We compare the estimated AME spectrum with theoretical spinning dust models to constrain the hydrogen density nH. The best results are obtained with densities around 0.2–0.3 cm−3, typical of warm ionised medium (WIM to warm neutral medium (WNM conditions. The degeneracy with the gas temperature prevents an accurate determination of nH, especially for low hydrogen ionization fractions, where densities of a few cm−3 are also allowed.

  8. Initial deep LOFAR observations of Epoch of Reionization windows: I. The North Celestial Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Yatawatta, S; Brentjens, M A; Labropoulos, P; Pandey, V N; Kazemi, S; Zaroubi, S; Koopmans, L V E; Offringa, A R; Jelic, V; Rubi, O Martinez; Veligatla, V; Wijnholds, S J; Brouw, W N; Bernardi, G; Ciardi, B; Daiboo, S; Harker, G; Mellema, G; Schaye, J; Thomas, R; Vedantham, H; Chapman, E; Abdalla, F B; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Avruch, I M; Batejat, F; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Bregman, J; Breitling, F; van de Brink, R H; Broderick, J W; Bruggen, M; Conway, J; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Duscha, S; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Griessmeier, J M; Gunst, A W; Hassall, T E; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Maat, P; Mann, G; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Mol, J D; Munk, H; Nijboer, R; Noordam, J E; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Rottgering, H J A; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Vermeulen, R; van Weeren, R J; Wise, M; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the LOFAR Epoch of Reionization (EoR) project is to detect the spectral fluctuations of the redshifted HI 21cm signal. This signal is weaker by several orders of magnitude than the astrophysical foreground signals and hence, in order to achieve this, very long integrations, accurate calibration for stations and ionosphere and reliable foreground removal are essential. One of the prospective observing windows for the LOFAR EoR project will be centered at the North Celestial Pole (NCP). We present results from observations of the NCP window using the LOFAR highband antenna (HBA) array in the frequency range 115 MHz to 163 MHz. The data were obtained in April 2011 during the commissioning phase of LOFAR. We used baselines up to about 30 km. With about 3 nights, of 6 hours each, effective integration we have achieved a noise level of about 100 microJy/PSF in the NCP window. Close to the NCP, the noise level increases to about 180 microJy/PSF, mainly due to additional contamination from unsubtracted nea...

  9. The 10 Meter South Pole Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Carlstrom, J. E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aird, K. A.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Busetti, S.; Chang, C. L.; Chauvin, E; Cho, H. -M.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Halverson, N. W.; Heimsath, S.; Holzapfel, W. L.

    2009-01-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10 m diameter, wide-field, offset Gregorian telescope with a 966-pixel, multi-color, millimeter-wave, bolometer camera. It is located at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in Antarctica. The design of the SPT emphasizes careful control of spillover and scattering, to minimize noise and false signals due to ground pickup. The key initial project is a large-area survey at wavelengths of 3, 2 and 1.3 mm, to detect clusters of galaxies via the Sunyaev-Zeldov...

  10. Joint analysis of celestial pole offset and free core nutation series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Zinovy

    2016-10-01

    Three combined celestial pole offset (CPO) series computed at the Paris Observatory (C04), the United States Naval Observatory (USNO), and the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), as well as six free core nutation (FCN) models, were compared from different perspectives, such as stochastic and systematic differences, and FCN amplitude and phase variations. The differences between the C04 and IVS CPO series were mostly stochastic, whereas a low-frequency bias at the level of several tens of μ as was found between the C04 and USNO CPO series. The stochastic differences between the C04 and USNO series became considerably smaller when computed at the IVS epochs, which can indicate possible problems with the interpolation of the IVS data at the midnight epochs during the computation of the C04 and USNO series. The comparison of the FCN series showed that the series computed with similar window widths of 1.1-1.2 years were close to one another at a level of 10-20 μ as, whereas the differences between these series and the series computed with a larger window width of 4 and 7 years reached 100 μ as. The dependence of the FCN model on the underlying CPO series was investigated. The RMS differences between the FCN models derived from the C04, USNO, and IVS CPO series were at a level of approximately 15 μ as, which was considerably smaller than the differences among the CPO series. The analysis of the differences between the IVS, C04, and USNO CPO series suggested that the IVS series would be preferable for both precession-nutation and FCN-related studies.

  11. Ulysses Passes South Pole of Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程林

    1995-01-01

    On the 14th of September,1994, the fastest scientific instrument in space passed the south pole of the Sun,a place where no human-made object has been before. A spaceprobe called Ulysses made the polar pass at about midday as it continued to collect data on the solar wind,a stream of high-energy sub-atomic

  12. The 10 Meter South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Carlstrom, J E; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Busetti, S; Chang, C L; Chauvin, E; Cho, H -M; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Dobbs, M A; Halverson, N W; Heimsath, S; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Lanting, T M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leong, J; Lu, W; Lueker, M; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Schwan, D; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Vieira, K Vanderlinde J D

    2009-01-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10 m diameter, wide-field, offset Gregorian telescope with a 966-pixel, multi-color, millimeter-wave, bolometer camera. It is located at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in Antarctica. The design of the SPT emphasizes careful control of spillover and scattering, to minimize noise and false signals due to ground pickup. The key initial project is a large-area survey at wavelengths of 3, 2 and 1.3 mm, to detect clusters of galaxies via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect and to measure the high-l angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The data will be used to characterize the primordial matter power spectrum and to place constraints on the equation of state of dark energy.

  13. The South Pole and the Ross Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This image shows a rare clear view of the South Pole (lower right) and the Ross Sea, Antarctica. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) acquired the scene on December 26, 2001. The geographic South Pole is located in the center of Antarctica, at an altitude of 2,900 meters (9,300 feet). It rests on a continent-wide ice sheet that is 2,870 m thick, with the underlying bedrock only 30 m (98 feet) above sea level. The ice underlying the South Pole is as much as 140,000 years old, and is currently accumulating at about 82 cm (32 inches) per year. Roughly 2,500 km (1,550 miles) away is the green water of the Ross Sea, which indicates the presence of large numbers of phytoplankton. This is a highly productive part of the world's oceans. Also note the ice gathered around McMurdo Sound, seen toward the lefthand shoreline of the Ross Sea, at the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf. According to National Science Foundation researchers, this ice is making it difficult for penguins to reach their food supply. Separating the continental Antarctic ice sheet from the Ross Sea are the Queen Maud Mountains and the Ross Ice Shelf. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  14. Dynamics of Enceladus South Pole Ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Martin; Schmidt, J.; Spahn, F.

    2007-10-01

    The Saturnian moon Enceladus was recently found to be a potent source of gas and dust particles. There was an active region observed on the south pole of Enceladus with jets spraying material in the space. The ejected dust particles are considered to be the main source of the faint E ring. In our work we investigate the long-term dynamics of icy particles ejected from the south pole of Enceladus. The motion of the ejected grains, being subject to many perturbation forces, strongly depends on particle properties (e.g. size, charge etc.). We study the resulting spatial distribution of particles in the E ring. Primarily we focus on the structure of the ring in the vicinity of Enceladus. In our study we also concentrated on processes limiting particle lifetime. These are mainly collisions with Enceladus and other Saturnian satellites or main ring, as well as the sputtering of particles by plasma ions bombardment. Modeling the equilibrium between particle sources and sinks we found the size distribution which is expected to be observed in the E ring.

  15. Helioseismology from the South Pole: 1987 campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jefferies, S.; Pomerantz, M.A. (Univ. of Delaware, Newark (USA)); Duvall, T.L. Jr. (Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA)); Harvey, J.W.; Jaksha, D. (National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Helioseismology is the study of the Sun's interior by means of observations of its global oscillations. The Sun constantly oscillates, at periods of about 5 minutes, in millions of different modes which probe different depth and latitude ranges. Helioseismological observations have been made from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station nearly every year since 1980. This site offers the unique advantage of uninterrupted sunlight during the austral summer (except for clouds, of course) and otherwise generally good atmospheric conditions for astronomical observations. Thus, it is possible to measure oscillations without long nighttime gaps which confuse measurements made at low-latitude observatories. Measurements from the South Pole and elsewhere have shown that the solar interior is roughly similar to the predictions of the theory of stellar structure and evolution. This theory is one of the key foundations of our present picture of the universe. It is, therefore, disturbing that there are small, but highly significant, discrepancies between theory and observations and that these discrepancies have not been resolved by reasonable adjustments of theoretical parameters and physics. Currently, the source of these discrepancies is not at all clear. Helioseismology, however, not only revealed the problem but offers excellent prospects for solving it.

  16. South Pole Region of the Moon as Seen by Clementine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Lunar mosaic of 1500 Clementine images of the south polar region of the moon. The projection is orthographic, centered on the south pole. The Schrodinger Basin (320 km in diameter) is located in the lower right of the mosaic. Amundsen-Ganswindt is the more subdued circular basin between Schrodinger and the pole. The polar regions of the moon are of special interest because of the postulated occurrence of ice in permanently shadowed areas. The south pole is of greater interest because the area that remains in shadow is much larger than that at the north pole.

  17. CMB Observations with the South Pole Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keisler, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    I will describe a program of cosmological research centered on using measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to address questions relevant to physics: What is the absolute mass scale of neutrinos? How many species of neutrino-like particles were present in the early Universe? How does gravity behave on cosmological scales? Did inflation occur, and, if so, at what energy scale? A new generation of CMB experiments is targeting these questions, and I will focus on recent results from the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The SPT is a ground-based mm-wave observatory located at the geographic south pole in Antarctica, and in 2011 finished its initial, 2500 square-degree ``SPT-SZ'' survey. The data from this survey provided an unprecedented combination of resolution, area, and sensitivity, and has been used to make ground-breaking measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the gravitational lensing of the CMB. These measurements have, in conjunction with data from the WMAP satellite, led to strong constraints on the number of neutrino-like particle species present in the early universe and the shape of the power spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. The SPT-SZ data overlaps with the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES) footprint, and the joint dataset will provide new probes of large-scale structure, such as the relative velocities of massive galaxy clusters. In 2012, a new polarization-sensitive camera, SPTpol, was installed on the SPT, and I will summarize its performance and prospects for detecting the B-mode CMB polarization pattern. Finally, I will touch on what will be possible with a third-generation camera, SPT-3G. The leap in sensitivity provided by this camera will yield, for example, a constraint on the sum of the neutrino masses relevant for exploring the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  18. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in South Pole ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.; Alba, J.L.B.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J.J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J.K.; Becker, K.H.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D.J.; Bohm, C.; Boser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradley, L.; Braun, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D.F.; D'Agostino, M.V.; Danninger, M.; Clercq, C. De; Demirors, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; Vries-Uiterweerd, G. de; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J.P.; Duvoort, M.R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Engdegard, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P.A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A.R.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M.M.; Fox, B.D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glusenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J.A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R.M.; Gurtner, M.; Gustafsson, L.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G.C.; Hoffman, K.D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Lafebre, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) and a retrievable transmitter deployed in holes drilled for the IceCube experiment, we have measured the attenuation of acoustic signals by South Pole ice at depths between 190 m and 500 m. Three data sets, using different acoustic sources, have been

  19. LOFAR MSSS: Detection of a low-frequency radio transient in 400 hrs of monitoring of the North Celestial Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, A J; Broderick, J W; Hassall, T E; Muñoz-Darias, T; Rowlinson, A; Swinbank, J D; Staley, T D; Molenaar, G J; Scheers, B; Grobler, T L; Pietka, M; Heald, G; McKean, J P; Bell, M E; Bonafede, A; Breton, R P; Carbone, D; Cendes, Y; Clarke, A O; Corbel, S; de Gasperin, F; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Ferrari, C; Grießmeier, J -M; Hardcastle, M J; Heesen, V; Hessels, J W T; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Jonker, P; Karastergiou, A; Kokotanekov, G; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Law, C J; van Leeuwen, J; Markoff, S; Miller-Jones, J C A; Mulcahy, D; Orru, E; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pratley, L; Rol, E; Röttgering, H J A; Scaife, A M M; Shulevski, A; Sobey, C A; Stappers, B W; Tasse, C; van der Horst, A J; van Velzen, S; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wijnands, R; Wise, M; Zarka, P; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Breitling, F; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J E; Corstanje, A; de Geus, E; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Gunst, A W; van Haarlem, M P; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Juette, E; Kuper, G; Loose, M; Maat, P; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Moldon, J; Munk, H; Norden, M J; Paas, H; Polatidis, A G; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Thoudam, S; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wijnholds, S J; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a four-month campaign searching for low-frequency radio transients near the North Celestial Pole with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), as part of the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS). The data were recorded between 2011 December and 2012 April and comprised 2149 11-minute snapshots, each covering 175 deg^2. We have found one convincing candidate astrophysical transient, with a duration of a few minutes and a flux density at 60 MHz of 15-25 Jy. The transient does not repeat and has no obvious optical or high-energy counterpart, as a result of which its nature is unclear. The detection of this event implies a transient rate at 60 MHz of 3.9 (+14.7, -3.7) x 10^-4 day^-1 deg^-2, and a transient surface density of 1.5 x 10^-5 deg^-2, at a 7.9-Jy limiting flux density and ~10-minute time-scale. The campaign data were also searched for transients at a range of other time-scales, from 0.5 to 297 min, which allowed us to place a range of limits on transient rates at 60 MHz as a funct...

  20. Results from the South Pole InfraRed EXplorer Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Rathborne, J.M.; Burton, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    The SPIREX telescope, located at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, was a prototype system developed to exploit the excellent conditions for IR observing at the South Pole. Observations over two winter seasons achieved remarkably deep, high-resolution, wide-field images in the 3-5um wavelength regime. Several star forming complexes were observed, including NGC 6334, Chamaeleon I, eta Chamaeleontis, the Carina Nebula, 30 Doradus, RCW 57, RCW 38, as well as the Galactic Centre. Images were ...

  1. Upper mesosphere dynamical behavior near South Pole

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Gonzalo; Smith,Roger W.

    1997-01-01

    Recent ground-based measurements of the neutral winds and temperatures at mesospheric heights near the Earth's rotational pole, at Amundsen-Scott Station, show that the neutral atmosphere has a restricted zonal wavenumber behavior at very-high latitudes. This can be interpreted as the natural response of the atmosphere to the boundary conditions at the rotational pole (s). Experimentally, mostly planetary-scale waves have been observed during the austral winter.

  2. Design and performance of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup

    CERN Document Server

    Abdou, Yasser; Berdermann, Jens; Bissok, Martin; Bohm, Christian; Boeser, Sebastian; Bothe, Martin; Carson, Michael; Descamps, Freija; Fischer-Wolfarth, Jan-Hendrik; Gustafsson, Leif; Hallgren, Allan; Heinen, Dirk; Helbing, Klaus; Heller, Reinhart; Hundertmark, Stephan; Karg, Timo; Krieger, Kevin; Laihem, Karim; Meures, Thomas; Nahnhauer, Rolf; Naumann, Uwe; Oberson, Filip; Paul, Larissa; Pohl, Mario; Price, Buford; Ribordy, Mathieu; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Schunck, Matthias; Semburg, Benjamin; Stegmaier, Jutta; Sulanke, Karl-Heinz; Tosi, Delia; Vandenbroucke, Justin; Wiebusch, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) was built to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of the South Pole ice in the 10 kHz to 100 kHz frequency range, for the purpose of assessing the feasibility of an acoustic neutrino detection array at the South Pole. The SPATS hardware consists of four vertical strings deployed in the upper 500 m of the South Pole ice cap. The strings form a trapezoidal array with a maximum baseline of 543 m. Each string has 7 stages equipped with one transmitter and one sensor module. Sound is detected or generated by piezoelectric ceramic elements inside the modules. Analogue signals are sent to the surface on electric cables where they are digitized by a PC-based data acquisition system. The data from all strings are collected on a central computer in the IceCube Laboratory from where they are send to a central data storage facility via a satellite link or stored locally on tape. A technical overview of SPATS and its performance is presented.

  3. Direct detection of variable tropospheric clouds near Titan's south pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael E; Bouchez, Antonin H; Griffith, Caitlin A

    Atmospheric conditions on Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, allow the possibility that it could possess a methane condensation and precipitation cycle with many similarities to Earth's hydrological cycle. Detailed imaging studies of Titan have hitherto shown no direct evidence for tropospheric condensation clouds, although there has been indirect spectroscopic evidence for transient clouds. Here we report images and spectra of Titan that show clearly transient clouds, concentrated near the south pole, which is currently near the point of maximum solar heating. The discovery of these clouds demonstrates the existence of condensation and localized moist convection in Titan's atmosphere. Their location suggests that methane cloud formation is controlled seasonally by small variations in surface temperature, and that the clouds will move from the south to the north pole on a 15-year timescale.

  4. Narrow-band ELF events observed from South Pole Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavisides, J.; Weaver, C.; Lessard, M.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) waves are typically in the range of 3 Hz - 3 kHz and can play a role in acceleration and pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles in the radiation belts. Observations of a not uncommon, but not well studied ELF phenomenon are presented with ground-based data from South Pole Station. The narrow-band waves last approximately one or two minutes maintaining bandwidth over the course of the event, begin around 100 Hz, decrease to about 70 Hz, and typically show a higher frequency harmonic. The waves have only been documented at four locations - Heacock, 1974 (Alaska); Sentman and Ehring, 1994 (California); Wang et al, 2005 and Wang et al, 2011 (Taiwan); and Kim et al, 2006 (South Pole). The waves observed at the South Pole are not detected when the Sun drops below a 10 degree elevation angle, which is not true for the other locations. We extend the study of Kim et al, 2006, and explore possible generation mechanisms including sunlit ionosphere and ion cyclotron wave modes, as well as correspondence with energetic particle precipitation.

  5. Background studies for acoustic neutrino detection at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdrmann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Denger, T; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K -H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stössl, A; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Stür, M; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2011-01-01

    The detection of acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions is a promising method to measure the tiny flux of cosmogenic neutrinos expected on Earth. The energy threshold for this process depends strongly on the absolute noise level in the target material. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), deployed in the upper part of four boreholes of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, has monitored the noise in Antarctic ice at the geographic South Pole for more than two years down to 500 m depth. The noise is very stable and Gaussian distributed. Lacking an in-situ calibration up to now, laboratory measurements have been used to estimate the absolute noise level in the 10 to 50 kHz frequency range to be smaller than 20 mPa. Using a threshold trigger, sensors of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup registered acoustic pulse-like events in the IceCube detector volume and its vicinity. Acoustic signals from refreezing IceCube holes and from anthropogenic sources have been used to localize acoustic e...

  6. Autumn at Titan's South Pole: The 220 cm-1 Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Achterberg, R. K.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; de Kok, R. J.; Teanby, N. A.; Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S.

    2015-10-01

    Beginning in 2012 an atmospheric cloud known by its far-infrared emission has formed rapidly at Tit an's South Pole [1, 2]. The build-up of this condensate is a result of deepening temperatures and a gathering of gases as Winter approaches. Emission from the cloud in the south has been doubling each year since 2012, in contrast to the north where it has halved every 3.8 years since 2004. The morphology of the cloud in the south is quite different from that in the north. In the north, the cloud has extended over the whole polar region beyond 55 N, whereas in the south the cloud has been confined to within about 10 degrees of the pole. The cloud in the north has had the form of a uniform hood, whereas the southern cloud has been much more complex. A map from December 2014,recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini, showed the 220 cm-1 emission coming from a distinct ring with a maximum at about 80 S. In contrast, emissions from the gases HC3N, C4H2 and C6H6 peaked near the pole and had a ring at 70 S. The 220 cm-1 ring at 80 S coincided with the minimum in the gas emission pattern. The80 S condensate ring encompassed the vortex cloud seen by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS)[3, 4]. Both the 220 cm-1 ring and the gas "bull's-eye" pattern were centered on a point that was shifted from the geographic South Pole by 4 degrees in the direction of the Sun. This corresponds to the overall tilt of Titan's atmosphere discovered from temperature maps early in the Cassini mission by Achterberg et al. [5]. The tilt may be reinforced by the presumably twice-yearly (north and south) spin-up of the atmosphere at the autumnal pole. The bull's-eye pattern of the gas emissions can be explained by the retrieved abundance distributions, which are maximum near the pole and decrease sharply toward lower latitudes, together with temperatures that are minimum at the pole and increase toward lower latitudes

  7. A new air-Cherenkov array at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, J E; Hart, S P; Hill, G C; Hinton, J A; Lloyd-Evans, J; Potter, D; Pryke, C L; Rochester, K; Schwarz, R; Watson, A A

    2000-01-01

    VULCAN comprises a 9 element array of air-Cherenkov radiation detectors established at the South Pole. VULCAN operates in coincidence with the air-shower array SPASE-2 and the two Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Arrays, AMANDA A and B, supplementing the data gathered by these instruments with a measurement of the lateral distribution of air-Cherenkov light from extensive air-showers. An overview of the aims and methods of the whole coincidence experiment (SPASE-2, VULCAN and AMANDA) can be found in an accompanying paper (Dickinson et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A (1999), to be published).

  8. Distribution and anomaly of microwave emission at Lunar South Pole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Investigation on Lunar polar area is almost every lunar mission’s primary objective in recent years. The rationale behind it is that illumination and ice resources in this area can be potentially very helpful for constructing lunar human base. In this paper, we analyze microwave radiometric characteristics of the Moon by using the newly acquired Chang’E-1 Lunar Microwave Sounder (CELMS) data. Microwave brightness temperature at Lunar South Pole (LSP) is distributed regularly with a style of "ring-in-ring", decreasing from equator to pole. Regolith temperature gradient is bigger at lunar equator than at polar area. Brightness temperature diurnal difference decreases with observation frequency. Microwave brightness temperature distribution maps at LSP and Lunar North Pole (LNP) have been made based on the analysis. It is found that microwave brightness temperature becomes to synchronize with elevation beyond -85° latitude. This phenomenon is related to lightening condition and indicates temperature distribution at LSP. The brightness temperature anomaly cold points are potentially cold trap areas for water or ice while hot points imply plenty of illumination resources there.

  9. Results from the South Pole InfraRed EXplorer Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Rathborne, J M

    2003-01-01

    The SPIREX telescope, located at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, was a prototype system developed to exploit the excellent conditions for IR observing at the South Pole. Observations over two winter seasons achieved remarkably deep, high-resolution, wide-field images in the 3-5um wavelength regime. Several star forming complexes were observed, including NGC 6334, Chamaeleon I, eta Chamaeleontis, the Carina Nebula, 30 Doradus, RCW 57, RCW 38, as well as the Galactic Centre. Images were obtained of lines at 2.42um H2, 3.29um PAH and 4.05um Bra, as well as 3.5um L-band and 4.7um M-band continuum emission. These data, combined with near-IR, mid-IR, and radio continuum maps, reveal the environments of these star forming sites, as well as any protostars lying within them. The SPIREX project, its observing and reduction methods, and some sample data are summarized here.

  10. Foregrounds for observations of the cosmological 21 cm line: II. Westerbork observations of the fields around 3C196 and the North Celestial Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardi, G; Brentjens, M A; Ciardi, B; Jelić, V; Koopmans, L V E; Labropoulos, P; Offringa, A; Pandey, V N; Schaye, J; Thomas, R M; Yatawatta, S; Zaroubi, S

    2010-01-01

    In the coming years a new insight into galaxy formation and the thermal history of the Universe is expected to come from the detection of the highly redshifted cosmological 21 cm line. The cosmological 21 cm line signal is buried under Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds which are likely to be a few orders of magnitude brighter. Strategies and techniques for effective subtraction of these foreground sources require a detailed knowledge of their structure in both intensity and polarization on the relevant angular scales of 1-30 arcmin. We present results from observations conducted with the Westerbork telescope in the 140-160 MHz range with 2 arcmin resolution in two fields located at intermediate Galactic latitude, centred around the bright quasar 3C196 and the North Celestial Pole. They were observed with the purpose of characterizing the foreground properties in sky areas where actual observations of the cosmological 21 cm line could be carried out. The polarization data were analysed through the rotatio...

  11. Position of the South Magnetic Pole, January 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C. E.

    The present location of the South Magnetic Pole (SMP) in the southern ocean provides an opportunity to determine its position well removed from local (coastal) anomalies. An experiment is being conducted jointly by the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources and Antarctic Division, Department of Science to make direct shipboard observations of the position and daily motion of the SMP. The technique involves determination of the horizontal component of the field (H) by using a gimbal-mounted three-axis fluxgate magnetometer. First-order compensation for the magnetic effects of the vessel is provided by a system of Helmholtz coils. During observations, the vessel is spun about a vertical axis so that any residual horizontal field due to the vessel can be eliminated by integration along two horizontal axes fixed in space.

  12. Lunar South Pole space water extraction and trucking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuppero, A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.]|[Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Zupp, G. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Johnson Space Center; Schnitzler, B.; Larson, T.K.; Rice, J.W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

    1998-03-01

    This concept proposes to use thermal processes alone to extract water from the lunar South Pole and launch payloads to low lunar orbit. Thermal steam rockets would use water propellant for space transportation. The estimated mass of a space water tanker powered by a nuclear heated steam rocket suggests it can be designed for launch in the Space Shuttle bay. The performance depends on the feasibility of a nuclear reactor rocket engine producing steam at 1,100 degrees Kelvin, with a power density of 150 Megawatts per ton of rocket, and operating for thousands of 20 minute cycles. An example uses reject heat from a small nuclear electric power supply to melt 17,800 tons per year of lunar ice. A nuclear heated steam rocket would use the propellant water to launch and deliver 3,800 tons of water per year to a 100 km low lunar orbit.

  13. Persistent parainfluenza virus shedding during isolation at the South Pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchmore, H G; Parkinson, A J; Humphries, J E; Scott, E N; McIntosh, D A; Scott, L V; Cooney, M K; Miles, J A

    1981-01-15

    Persistent parainfluenza virus shedding in healthy young adults occurred throughout the 8 1/2-month winter isolation period at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station during 1978. Two episodes of respiratory illness were observed after 10 and 29 weeks of complete social isolation. Throat swabs collected both routinely, and during each outbreak of respiratory illness, were directly inoculated into cell cultures. Parainfluenza virus types 1 and 3 were recovered from both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects throughout the winter. No other viruses were obtained by these efforts. The presence of parainfluenza virus in these subjects long after the accepted incubation period for viral upper respiratory illness, and when the introduction of new virus to this community was impossible, suggests its persistence in man.

  14. Aerosol measurements at the south pole during 1987. Data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodhaine, B.A.; Harris, J.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates an atmospheric monitoring observatory at Amundsen-Scott Station, South Pole. The aerosol measurement program consists of the continuous measurement of condensation nuclei (CN) concentration and aerosol scattering extinction coefficient. During 1987, a special aerosol experiment was conducted that included filter samples for subsequent analysis by the proton induced x-ray emission technique, diffusion battery measurements for size information in the sub-0.1 micrometer size range, and aerosol absorption measurements using an aethalometer. Surface and upper air meteorological data were also available. The purpose of the report is to present all of the aerosol data obtained during 1987.

  15. South Pole submillimeter isotropy measurements of the cosmic microwave background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragovan, M. (Joseph Henry Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (USA)); Platt, S.R.; Pernic, R.J. (The University of Chicago, Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, WI 531191 (USA)); Stark, A.A. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, NJ 07733 (USA))

    1990-01-15

    Observations were made from the United States Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station during the austral summer of 1988--89 to search for spatial anisotropy in the submillimeter Cosmic Microwave Background. Three 30{prime}{times}30{prime} regions of the sky were observed at 350 {mu}m, 450 {mu}m, and 600 {mu}m with the University of Chicago 32-Channel Submillimeter Photometer and a 1.2-meter off-axis parabolic telescope, designed and constructed at AT T Bell Laboratories. Reimaging optics gave each of the 32 bolometers in the array a 5-arc minute field of view. The search is sensitive to fluctuations on all angular scales between 5- and 30-arc minutes.

  16. Intermittency of riometer auroral absorption observed at South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, M. V.; Antonova, E. E.; Foppiano, A. J.; Rosenberg, T. J.; Ovalle, E. M.

    2005-12-01

    Auroral radio-wave absorption values measured at South Pole for 3 years using a riometer are analyzed in order to test whether they show evidence of intermittency. The properties of the parameters of the probability density functions determined for several magnetic local time sectors are found to be significantly different. The probability density functions for the pre-midnight sector show the typical shape associated to intermittency. No results are given for the afternoon sector because few auroral absorption events meet the selection criteria to give statistically significant results. It is suggested that if the precipitating particle population responsible for the riometer auroral absorption shared the intermittency features of the absorption then the present results would allow the study of the properties of the induction component of magnetospheric turbulence.

  17. Evolution of the Far-Infrared Cloud at Titan's South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Cottini, V.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; Nixon, C. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Kunde, V. G.; Carlson, R. C.; Guandique, E.; Kaelberer, M. S.; Tingley, J. S.; Albright, S. A.; Segura, M. E.; de Kok, R.; Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S.; Bampasidis, G.; Teanby, N. A.; Calcutt, S.

    2015-01-01

    A condensate cloud on Titan identified by its 220 cm (sup -1) far-infrared signature continues to undergo seasonal changes at both the north and south poles. In the north the cloud, which extends from 55 North to the pole, has been gradually decreasing in emission intensity since the beginning of the Cassini mission with a half-life of 3.8 years. The cloud in the south did not appear until 2012 but its intensity has increased rapidly, doubling every year. The shape of the cloud at the South Pole is very different from that in the north. Mapping in December 2013 showed that the condensate emission was confined to a ring with a maximum at 80 South. The ring was centered 4 degrees from Titan's pole. The pattern of emission from stratospheric trace gases like nitriles and complex hydrocarbons (mapped in January 2014) was also offset by 4 degrees, but had a central peak at the pole and a secondary maximum in a ring at about 70 South with a minimum at 80 South. The shape of the gas emissions distribution can be explained by abundances that are high at the atmospheric pole and diminish toward the equator, combined with correspondingly increasing temperatures. We discuss possible causes for the condensate ring. The present rapid build up of the condensate cloud at the South Pole is likely to transition to a gradual decline during 2015-16.

  18. Atmospheric Longwave Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Water Vapor at the South Pole

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Brooke A.

    2000-01-01

    The downward infrared radiance spectrum was measured with a Michelson Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) spectrometer at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Spectra were collected year-round at the South Pole in 1998. This research focuses on the atmospheric water emission lines between 250 and 800 cm-1 (40 to 12.5 μm) region. The spectral resolution is 1 cm-1. The atmosphere over the South Pole is the driest and coldest on Earth. Winter surface temperatures average approximately -60°C, while the t...

  19. Lunar South Pole Topography Derived from Clementine Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosiek, M. R.; Kirk, R.; Howington-Kraus, A.

    1999-01-01

    During the Clementine Mission both oblique and vertical multispectral images were collected. The oblique and vertical images from a single spectral band collected during the same orbit form a stereo pair that can be used to derive the topography. These stereo pairs are being used to derive the topography of an area (90 deg S to 650S latitude) surrounding the lunar south pole. Work on the lunar north pole topography will start after completion of the south pole topography. This report provides an update on the initial results for the lunar south pole topography. In 1994, the Clementine spacecraft acquired digital images of the Moon at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Onboard there were four camera systems and a laser altimeter. During the first pass, periapsis was at 30S and the highest resolution images were obtained in the southern hemisphere. Over the northern polar area, a series of oblique and vertical images were obtained with the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) camera on each orbit. During the second pass, periapsis was at 30N and the image acquisition strategy was reversed. The UV-VIS camera image size was 384 x 288 pixels with five spectral bands and one broad band. The 750-nm-band stereo pairs are the primary image source for this study. The ground sample distances (GSD) for oblique images range from 300 to 400m. The GSD for the vertical images, acquired at the end of an orbit, are slightly larger and range from 325 to 450 m. Using the formula for stereo-height accuracy, an estimate of height accuracy is 180m. This formula is IFOVMAX)/(K*B/H with IFOVMAX defined as Maximum Instantaneous Field of View; B/H is the base-to-height ratio and K is an estimate of pixel measurement accuracy on the imagery. The Clementine laser altimeter (LIDAR) data were used previously to produce a global topographic model of the Moon . The model has a vertical accuracy of about 100 m and a spatial resolution of 2.5 deg. Altimetry data were collected between 79S and 810N

  20. Sampling South Pole-Aitken Basin: The Moonrise Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Shearer, C. K.; Cohen, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    The South Pole-Aitken basin (SPA) is the largest of the giant impact basins in the inner Solar System, and its location on Earth s Moon makes it the most accessible. Exploration of SPA through direct collection and analysis of representative materials addresses issues as fundamental as the characteristics of the chemical reservoir from which the Moon originated, early differentiation and production of crust and development of global asymmetry, relationships between magmatic activity and internal thermal evolution, and effects of giant impact events on the terrestrial planets. Owing to its great size and superposition relationships with other lunar impact basins, SPA is the oldest and as such anchors the lunar chronology. Moreover, numerous large impact craters and basins are contained within it such that materials (rocks) of the SPA basin contain a record of the early impact chronology, one less likely to have been affected by the large, late nearside basins (e.g., Imbrium). Understanding the early basin chronology is key to deciphering the sequence and effects of early giant impact bombardment of the inner Solar System. That record exists on the Moon, and materials of the SPA basin will allow us to read that record. Knowledge of the early bombardment history will test - and may reshape - a key paradigm relating to early Solar System evolution. Did the planets form with the alignment of today, or was there a major reorientation of the giant planets that led to destabilization of asteroid orbits, and a cataclysmic bombardment of the inner Solar System hundreds of millions of years after accretion of the planets? Implications include understanding environments for early life-supporting habitats on Earth and Mars, and relationships to new observations of extra-solar planetary systems.

  1. Design, modeling and testing of the Askaryan Radio Array South Pole autonomous renewable power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, D.Z., E-mail: zedlam@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, 1082 Malott Hall, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582 (United States); Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskaya Highway, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Kennedy, D.M., E-mail: dmkennedy@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, 1082 Malott Hall, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582 (United States); Ratzlaff, K., E-mail: ratzlaff@ku.edu [Instrumentation Design Laboratory, University of Kansas, 6042 Malott Hall, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582 (United States); Young, R., E-mail: rwyoung@ku.edu [Instrumentation Design Laboratory, University of Kansas, 6042 Malott Hall, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We describe the design, construction and operation of the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) Autonomous Renewable Power Stations, initially installed at the South Pole in December, 2010 with the goal of providing an independently operating 100 W power source capable of year-round operation in extreme environments. In addition to particle astrophysics applications at the South Pole, such a station can easily be, and has since been, extended to operation elsewhere, as described herein.

  2. Plans for a 10-m Submillimeter-wave Telescope at the South Pole

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Antony A.; Carlstrom, John E.; Israel, Frank P.; Menten, Karl M.; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Phillips, T. G.; Sironi, Giorgio; Walker, Christopher K.

    1998-01-01

    A 10 meter diameter submillimeter-wave telescope has been proposed for the NSF Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Current evidence indicates that the South Pole is the best submillimeter-wave telescope site among all existing or proposed ground-based observatories. Proposed scientific programs place stringent requirements on the optical quality of the telescope design. In particular, reduction of the thermal background and offsets requires an off-axis, unblocked aperture, and the large field ...

  3. EVOLUTION OF THE FAR-INFRARED CLOUD AT TITAN’S SOUTH POLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Cottini, V.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; Nixon, C. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Kunde, V. G.; Carlson, R. C.; Guandique, E.; Kaelberer, M. S.; Tingley, J. S.; Albright, S. A.; Segura, M. E. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kok, R. de [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S.; Bampasidis, G. [Laboratoire d’Etudes Spatiales et d’Instrumentation en Astrophysique (LESIA), Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, 5, place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Calcutt, S., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-10

    A condensate cloud on Titan identified by its 220 cm{sup −1} far-infrared signature continues to undergo seasonal changes at both the north and south poles. In the north, the cloud, which extends from 55 N to the pole, has been gradually decreasing in emission intensity since the beginning of the Cassini mission with a half-life of 3.8 years. The cloud in the south did not appear until 2012 but its intensity has increased rapidly, doubling every year. The shape of the cloud at the south pole is very different from that in the north. Mapping in 2013 December showed that the condensate emission was confined to a ring with a maximum at 80 S. The ring was centered 4° from Titan's pole. The pattern of emission from stratospheric trace gases like nitriles and complex hydrocarbons (mapped in 2014 January) was also offset by 4°, but had a central peak at the pole and a secondary maximum in a ring at about 70 S with a minimum at 80 S. The shape of the gas emission distribution can be explained by abundances that are high at the atmospheric pole and diminish toward the equator, combined with correspondingly increasing temperatures. We discuss possible causes for the condensate ring. The present rapid build up of the condensate cloud at the south pole is likely to transition to a gradual decline from 2015 to 2016.

  4. Topographic-Compositional Relationships within the South Pole Aitken Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, P. G.; Holtzmann, J.; Blewett, D. T.; Taylor, G. J.; Hawke, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    The South Pole Aitken (SPA) Basin is an immense structure that dominates the geology of much of the farside of the Moon. Its floor is composed mostly of impact deposits, though it also has numerous relatively small regions of mare basalt. The basin floor exhibits a lower albedo and higher mafic mineral abundance than the surrounding highlands [ I ]. The origin of this mafic anomaly is a major question in lunar geology. Hypotheses for the presence of the mafic anomaly were briefly reviewed in [2] and include mare deposits mixed and obscured by basin or crater ejecta (cryptomaria), a large impact melt sheet that may have differentiated, exposed lower crustal material, and a significant component of excavated mantle. A study of mineralogy as revealed in Clementine UV-VIS imagery for limited portions of the basin found a predominantly low-Capyroxene (noritic) character [2], ruling out cryptomaria as an important contributor to the mafic enhancement. A few small cryptomaria, revealed by dark-halo impact craters and light plains units with high-FeO contents, have been found in SPA; however, it appears that extensive cryptomaria are lacking in this basin. The uniformly noritic lithology within SPA led to favor exposed lower crust or a homogenized melt sheet as the explanation for the mafic anomaly. Models of basin formation predict that a basin the size of SPA should have excavated through the entire lunar crust (assuming nonoblique impact), potentially exposing or mixing a large component of material from the mantle. Comparison of SPA floor FeO and Ti02 (derived from Clementine UV-VIS observations) and also Th (from Lunar Prospector) with model-mantle chemistries appears to be consistent with a mixture of approximately equal proportions of lower-crust and mantle material. In the present study, we examine the relationship between the basin's topography and composition in order to provide further insight on the origin of the basin floor material. Data: Clementine UV

  5. The 1500m South Pole Ice Core: Recovering a 40 Ka Environmental Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kimberly Ann; Neumann, Thomas Allen; Fudge, T. J.; Neumann, T. A.; Steig, E. J.; Cavitte, M. G. P.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2014-01-01

    Supported by the US National Science Foundation, a new 1500 m, approximately 40 ka old ice core will be recovered from South Pole during the 2014/15 and 2015/16 austral summer seasons using the new US Intermediate Depth Drill. The combination of low temperatures, relatively high accumulation rates and low impurity concentrations at South Pole will yield detailed records of ice chemistry and trace atmospheric gases. The South Pole ice core will provide a climate history record of a unique area of the East Antarctic plateau that is partly influenced by weather systems that cross the West Antarctic ice sheet. The ice at South Pole flows at approximately 10m a(exp-1) and the South Pole ice-core site is a significant distance from an ice divide. Therefore, ice recovered at depth originated progressively farther upstream of the coring site. New ground-penetrating radar collected over the drill site location shows no anthropogenic influence over the past approximately 50 years or upper 15 m. Depth-age scale modeling results show consistent and plausible annual-layer thicknesses and accumulation rate histories, indicating that no significant stratigraphic disturbances exist in the upper 1500m near the ice-core drill site.

  6. Orographic Condensation at the South Pole of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlies, Paul; Hayes, Alexander; Adamkovics, Mate

    2016-10-01

    Although many clouds have been observed on Titan over the past two decades (Griffith et al. 1998, Rodriquez et al 2009, Brown et al. 2010), only a handful of clouds have been analyzed in detail (Griffith et al 2005, Brown et al 2009, Adamkovics et al 2010). In light of new data and better radiative transfer (RT) modelling, we present here a reexamination of one of these cloud systems observed in March 2007, formerly identified as ground fog (Brown et al 2009), using the Cassini VIMS instrument. Combining our analysis with RADAR observations we attempt to understand the connection and correlation between this low altitude atmospheric phenomenon and the local topography, suggesting instead, a topographically driven (orographic) cloud formation mechanism. This analysis would present the first links between cloud formation and topography on Titan, and has valuable implications in understanding additional cloud formation mechanisms, allowing for a better understanding of Titan's atmospheric dynamics.We will also present an update on an ongoing ground based observation campaign looking for clouds on Titan. This campaign, begun back in April 2014, has been (nearly) continuously monitoring Titan for ongoing cloud activity. Although a variety of telescope and instruments have been used in an effort to best capture the onset of cloud activity expected at Titan's North Pole, no cloud outbursts have yet been observed from the ground (though frequent observations have been made with Cassini ISS/VIMS). This is interesting because it further suggests a developing dichotomy between Titan's seasons, since clouds were observable from the ground during southern summer. Thus, monitoring the onset of large scale cloud activity at Titan's North Pole will be crucial to understanding Titan's hydrologic cycle on seasonal timescales.

  7. Observation of 18.6-year modulation tide at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydelek, P. A.; Knopoff, L.; Zürn, W.

    1982-07-01

    We have observed long-period variations in the amplitudes of the diurnal and semidiurnal gravity tides at the South Pole which we attribute to the tidal effects of the 18.6-year regression of the nodes of the lunar orbit. The observations are in agreement with theoretical values of the 18.6-year amplitude modulation of these tides.

  8. Celestial Treasury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachièze-Rey, Marc; Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    2001-07-01

    Throughout history, the mysterious dark skies have inspired our imaginations in countless ways, influencing our endeavors in science and philosophy, religion, literature, and art. Filled with 380 full-color illustrations, Celestial Treasury shows the influence of astronomical theories and the richness of illustrations in Western civilization through the ages. The authors explore the evolution of our understanding of astronomy and weave together ancient and modern theories in a fascinating narrative. They incorporate a wealth of detail from Greek verse, medieval manuscripts and Victorian poetry with contemporary spacecraft photographs and computer-generated star charts. Celestial Treasury is more than a beautiful book: it answers a variety of questions that have intrigued scientists and laymen for centuries. -- How did philosophers and scientists try to explain the order that governs celestial motion? -- How did geometers and artists measure and map the skies? -- How many different answers have been proposed for the most fundamental of all questions: When and how did Earth come about? -- Who inhabits the heavens--gods, angels or extraterrestrials? No other book recounts humankind's fascination with the heavens as compellingly as Celestial Treasury. Marc Lachièze-Rey is a director of research at the Centre National pour la Récherche Scientifique and astrophysicist at the Centre d'Etudes de Saclay. He is the author of The Cosmic Background Radiation (Cambridge, 1999), and and The Quest for Unity, (Oxford, 1999 ), as well as many books in French. Jean-Pierre Luminet is a research director of the Centre National pour la Rechérche Scientifique, based at the Paris-Meudon observatory. He is the author of Black Holes, (Cambridge 1992), as well as science documentaries for television.

  9. Comparison of UV irradiance measurements at Summit, Greenland; Barrow, Alaska; and South Pole, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bernhard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available An SUV-150B spectroradiometer for measuring solar ultraviolet (UV irradiance was installed at Summit, Greenland, in August 2004. Here we compare the initial data from this new location with similar measurements from Barrow, Alaska, and South Pole. Measurements of irradiance at 345 nm performed at equivalent solar zenith angles (SZAs are almost identical at Summit and South Pole. The good agreement can be explained with the similar location of the two sites on high-altitude ice caps with high surface albedo. Clouds attenuate irradiance at 345 nm at both sites by less than 6% on average, but can reduce irradiance at Barrow by more than 75%. Clear-sky measurements at Barrow are smaller than at Summit by 14% in spring and 36% in summer, mostly due to differences in surface albedo and altitude. Comparisons with model calculations indicate that aerosols can reduce clear-sky irradiance at Summit by 4–6%; aerosol influence is largest in April. Differences in total ozone at the three sites have a large influence on the UV Index. At South Pole, the UV Index is on average 20–80% larger during the ozone hole period than between January and March. At Summit, total ozone peaks in April and UV Indices in spring are on average 10–25% smaller than in the summer. Maximum UV Indices ever observed at Summit, Barrow, and South Pole are 6.7, 5.0, and 4.0, respectively. The larger value at Summit is due to the site's lower latitude. For comparable SZAs, average UV Indices measured during October and November at South Pole are 1.9–2.4 times larger than measurements during March and April at Summit. Average UV Indices at Summit are over 50% greater than at Barrow because of the larger cloud influence at Barrow.

  10. Science, the South Pole, and the Japanese expedition of 1910-1912.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, William R

    2011-12-01

    In November 1910, Shirase Nobu (1861-1946) sailed from Tokyo Bay aboard the Kainan Maru as part of an international race for the South Pole. The Japanese had no history of polar exploration and looked to British precedence to compensate for their lack of experience. Following the British example required that they include a scientific dimension to their venture. It is clear, however, that Shirase and his men had little scientific understanding. Nevertheless, on failing to reach the Pole, science became the central aim of the expedition and the primary means to declaring their efforts a success.

  11. The south pole region of the moon as seen by Clementine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, E.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Eliason, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Clementine mission has provided the first comprehensive set of high-resolution images of the south pole region of the moon. Within 5?? of latitude of the pole, an area of an estimated 30,000 square kilometers remained in shadow during a full lunar rotation and is a promising target for future exploration for ice deposits. The Schrodinger Basin (320 kilometers in diameter), centered at 75??S, is one of the two youngest, least modified, great multiring impact basins on the moon. A large maar-type volcano localized along a graben within the Schrodinger Basin probably erupted between 1 and 2 billion years ago.

  12. North Pole, South Pole: the quest to understand the mystery of Earth's magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    The story of the quest to understand Earth’s magnetic field is one of the longest and richest in the history of science. It weaves together Greek philosophy, Chinese mysticism, the development of the compass and navigation, the physics of electromagnetism and the jig-saw like piecing together of the internal structure of the planet beneath our feet. The story begins with Magnes, an old shepherd, trudging up the mountainside after a violent thunder storm, astonished at how the iron studs in his boots stick to the rocks. It was Alexander von Humboldt who, three millennia on, pointed to lightning as the source of such magnetization. The first compass was made 2000 years ago in China - to divine the ways of feng shui - a guide to planting crops, planning streets, orienting buildings and more. It reached Europe as a navigational tool in the 12th century - no-one is quite sure how, but en route it changed from south-pointing to the north-pointing compasses of today. The earliest truly scientific experiments and writings concerned magnets and geomagnetism: Petrus Peregrinus’ Epistola of 1269, and William Gilbert’s De Magnete of1600, in which he declared Magnus magnes globus terrestris ipse est - the Earth itself is a great magnet. By then it was recognized that the compass didn’t point exactly north, and the discrepancy varied from place to place and changed over time - something of a problem for Gilbert’s idea of a geocentric axial dipole. However declination and secular variation were problems well known to Edmund Halley, who, in 1700, charted the angle of declination over the Atlantic Ocean, and in the process introduced the Halleyan line - the contour. Many of the world’s greatest scientists have turned their minds to the problem of magnetism and geomagnetism in particular - Coulomb, Gauss, Faraday, Maxwell - yet in 1905, Einstein described geomagnetism as “one of the great unsolved problems of physics”. In the mid-late nineteenth century new areas of

  13. The Spitzer-South Pole Telescope Deep Field: Survey Design and IRAC Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Ashby, M L N; Brodwin, M; Gonzalez, A H; Martinez, J; Bartlett, J G; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Crawford, T M; Dey, A; Dressler, A; Eisenhardt, P R M; Galametz, A; Jannuzi, B T; Marrone, D P; Mei, S; Muzzin, A; Pacaud, F; Pierre, M; Stern, D; Vieira, J D

    2013-01-01

    The Spitzer-South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) is a wide-area survey using Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) to cover 94 square degrees of extragalactic sky, making it the largest IRAC survey completed to date outside the Milky Way midplane. The SSDF is centered at 23:30,-55:00, in a region that combines observations spanning a broad wavelength range from numerous facilities. These include millimeter imaging from the South Pole Telescope, far-infrared observations from Herschel/SPIRE, X-ray observations from the XMM XXL survey, near-infrared observations from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey, and radio-wavelength imaging from the Australia Telescope Compact Array, in a panchromatic project designed to address major outstanding questions surrounding galaxy clusters and the baryon budget. Here we describe the Spitzer/IRAC observations of the SSDF, including the survey design, observations, processing, source extraction, and publicly available data products. In particular, we present two band-merged catalogs...

  14. Calculation of illumination conditions at the lunar south pole - parallel programming approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuera, R. Marco; Gläser, P.; Oberst, J.; De Rosa, D.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we present a parallel programming approach to evaluate illumination conditions at the lunar south pole. Due to the small inclination (1.54°) of the lunar rotational axis with respect to the ecliptic plane and the topography of the lunar south pole, which allows long illumination periods, the study of illumination conditions is of great importance. Several tests were conducted in order to check the viability of the study and to optimize the tool used to calculate such illumination. First results using a simulated case study showed a reduction of the computation time in the order of 8-12 times using parallel programming in the Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) in comparison with sequential programming in the Central Processing Unit (CPU).

  15. Plans for a 10-m Submillimeter-wave Telescope at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, A A; Israel, F P; Menten, K M; Peterson, J B; Phillips, T G; Sironi, G; Walker, C K; Stark, Antony A.; Carlstrom, John E.; Israel, Frank P.; Menten, Karl M.; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Sironi, Giorgio; Walker, Christopher K.

    1998-01-01

    A 10 meter diameter submillimeter-wave telescope has been proposed for the NSF Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Current evidence indicates that the South Pole is the best submillimeter-wave telescope site among all existing or proposed ground-based observatories. Proposed scientific programs place stringent requirements on the optical quality of the telescope design. In particular, reduction of the thermal background and offsets requires an off-axis, unblocked aperture, and the large field of view needed for survey observations requires shaped optics. This mix of design elements is well-suited for large scale (square degree) mapping of line and continuum radiation from submillimeter-wave sources at moderate spatial resolutions (4 to 60 arcsecond beam size) and high sensitivity (milliJansky flux density levels). the telescope will make arcminute angular scale, high frequency Cosmic Microwave Background measurements from the best possible ground-based site, using an aperture which is larger than is currently ...

  16. Decadal change in the troposphere and atmospheric boundary layer over the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, W.D. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    During the austral winter of 1993, the Environmental Technology Laboratory carried out a detailed field study of the atmospheric boundary layer at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station to determine the effect of transitory synoptic disturbances on the surface-energy budget. This study used newly developed 915-megahertz radar wind-profiling technology for the first time in the Antarctic in combination with conventional boundary layer instrumentation that included a short tower, sonic anemometer, microbarograph array, and doppler sodar. Recent discussions, however, of interdecadal variability in the circumpolar circulation around Antarctica and of decadal changes in summer cloudiness at the South Pole, motivated our study of the long-term variability in boundary layer characteristics, cloudiness, and tropospheric flow behavior to provide a climatological context for our single year`s observations. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Status and recent results of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, Timo

    2010-01-01

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in Antarctic ice around the South Pole. An array of four strings equipped with acoustic receivers and transmitters, permanently installed in the upper 500 m of boreholes drilled for the IceCube neutrino observatory, and a retrievable transmitter that can be used in the water filled holes before the installation of the IceCube optical strings are used to measure the ice acoustic properties. These include the sound speed and its depth dependence, the attenuation length, the noise level, and the rate and nature of transient background sources in the relevant frequency range from 10 kHz to 100 kHz. SPATS is operating successfully since January 2007 and has been able to either measure or constrain all parameters. We present the latest results of SPATS and discuss their implications for future acoustic neutrino detection activities in Antarctica.

  18. A Southern Hemisphere atmospheric history of carbon monoxide from South Pole firn air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, K. R.; Aydin, M.; Novelli, P. C.; Holmes, C. D.; Prather, M. J.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a reactive trace gas and is important to tropospheric photochemistry as a major sink of hydroxyl radicals (OH). Major sources of CO are fossil fuel combustion, linked mostly to automotive emissions, biomass burning, and oxidation of atmospheric methane. Understanding changes in carbon monoxide over the past century will improve our understanding of man's influence on the reactivity of the atmosphere. Little observational information is available about CO levels and emissions prior to the 1990s, particularly for the Southern Hemisphere. The NOAA global flask network provides the most complete instrumental record of CO, extending back to 1988. Annually averaged surface flask measurements suggest atmospheric CO levels at South Pole were relatively stable from 2004-2009 at about 51 nmol mol-1 [Novelli and Masarie, 2013]. In this study, a 20th century atmospheric history of CO is reconstructed from South Pole firn air measurements, using a 1-D firn air diffusion model. Firn air samples were collected in glass flasks from two adjacent holes drilled from the surface to 118 m at South Pole, Antarctica during the 2008/2009 field season and CO analysis was carried out by NOAA/CCG. Carbon monoxide levels increase from about 45 nmol mol-1 in the deepest firn sample at 116 m to 52 nmol mol-1 at 107 m, and remain constant at about 51-52 nmol mol-1 at shallower depths. Atmospheric histories based on the firn air reconstructions suggest that CO levels over Antarctica increased by roughly 40% (from about 36 to 50 nmol mol-1) between 1930-1990, at a rate of about 0.18 nmol mol-1 yr-1. Firn air and surface air results suggest the rate of CO increase at South Pole slowed considerably after 1990. The firn air-based atmospheric history is used to infer changes in Southern Hemisphere CO emissions over the 20th century.

  19. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  20. An investigation into the correlation of geomagnetic storms with tropospheric parameters over the South Pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Lam

    Full Text Available We test the proposal that the Sun’s magnetic activity, communicated via the solar wind, provides a link between solar variability and the Earth’s climate in the Antarctic troposphere. The strength of a geomagnetic storm is one indicator of the state of the solar wind; therefore, we use the dates of 51 moderate to strong winter geomagnetic storms from the period 1961–1990 to conduct a series of superposed epoch analyses of the winter South Pole isobaric height and temperature, at pressures of between 100–500 mbar. Using Student’s t -test to compare the mean value of the pre- and post-storm data sets, we find no evidence to support the hypothesis that there is a statistically-significant correlation between the onset of a geomagnetic storm and changes in the isobaric temperature or height of the troposphere and lower stratosphere over the South Pole during winter months. This concurs with a similar study of the variability of the troposphere and lower stratosphere over the South Pole (Lam and Rodger, 2002 which uses drops in the level of observed galactic cosmic ray intensity, known as Forbush decreases, as a proxy for solar magnetic activity instead of geomagnetic storms.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (solar wind plasma; cosmic rays – Atmospheric composition and structure (pressure, density and temperature

  1. Stratospheric trace gas and aerosol profiles at McMurdo and South Pole stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, D.J. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie); Rosen, J.M.; Kjome, N.T.; Olson, G.L.; Schmeltekopf, A.L.; Goldan, P.D.; Winkler, R.H.

    1979-10-01

    During January 1979, we conducted balloon soundings in Antarctica to measure stratospheric trace gas and aerosol profiles. For the first time, we took trace gas samples at Amundsen-Scott (South Pole) Station. Four days earlier a similar experiment had been conducted at McMurdo Station. The samples, obtained by automatically opening evacuated stainless steel spheres at several altitudes, were returned to the United States and analyzed by gas chromatography at the Aeronomy Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Boulder, CO. The excellent agreement between McMurdo and South Pole data up to 20 kilometers suggests that trace gas concentrations in the polar regions are very uniform over a time period of at least four days and that measurements at either station are probably representative of the general antarctic profile. The same conclusion may be drawn from data on the fluorocarbons. These constituents also are very inert in the troposphere, but they undergo photodissociation in the stratosphere. As a result, their concentration drops off rapidly with altitude in the stratosphere. In addition to measuring trace gases, we again measured the stratospheric sulfate aerosol profile at McMurdo Station. Finally, we conducted a number of condensation nuclei soundings from the clean air facility at South Pole Station.

  2. Coordinated ground and space measurements of an auroral surge over South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, T.J.; Detrick, D.L.; Mizera, P.F.; Gorney, D.J.; Berkey, F.T.; Eather, R.H.; Lanzerotti, L.J.

    1987-10-01

    Coincident ground-based and satellite observations are presented of a premidnight auroral surge over Amundsen-Scott South Pole station. The set of near-simultaneous measurements provides an excellent opportunity to gain a more quantitative understanding of the nature of premidnight substorm activity at high geomagnetic latitudes. The surge produced a rapid onset of cosmic radio noise absorption at the station. On the polar-orbiting DMSP F6 spacecraft, intense X ray emissions with E>2 keV energy were imaged 1/sup 0/ to 2/sup 0/ magnetically equatorward of South Pole approximately 1 min prior to the peak of the absorption event. The spectrum of precipitating electrons determined from the X ray measurements could be characterized by an e-folding energy of approx.11 keV and is found to be adequate to account for the cosmic noise absorption and maximum auroral luminosity recorded at South Pole. Photometer, all-sky camera, riometer, and magnetometer data are used to estimate the velocity of motion and spatial extent of the auroral precipitation and the ionospheric currents associated with the surge. The electron precipitation region is deduced to have a latitudinal scale size of <100 km and to move poleward with a speed of approx.1--2 km/s coincident with the movement of a westward electrojet.

  3. Coordinated ground and space measurements of auroral surge over South Pole. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, T.J.; Detrick, D.L.; Mizera, P.F.; Gorney, D.J.; Berkey, F.T.

    1988-02-01

    Coincident ground-based and satellite observations are presented of a premidnight auroral surge over Amundsen-Scott South Pole station. The set of near-simultaneous measurements provides an excellent opportunity to gain a more-quantitative understanding of the nature of premidnight substorm activity at high geomagnetic latitudes. The surge produced a rapid onset of cosmic radio noise absorption at the station. On the polar-orbiting DMSP-F6 spacecraft, intense x-ray emissions with E > 2-keV energy were imaged 1 to 2 deg magnetically equatorward of the South Pole approximately 1 min prior to the peak of the absorption event. The precipitating electron spectrum determined from the x-ray measurements could be characterized by an e-folding energy of approx. 11 keV and is found to be adequate to account for the cosmic noise absorption and maximum auroral luminosity recorded at South Pole. Photometer, all-sky camera, riometer, and magnetometer data are used to estimate the velocity of motion and spatial extent of the auroral precipitation and the ionospheric currents associated with the surge.

  4. Infrared measurements of increased CF(2)Cl(2) (CFC- 12) absorption above the South Pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, C P; Goldman, A; Murcray, F J; Murcray, F H; Murcray, D G; Levine, J S

    1988-02-01

    High-resolution ground-based solar spectra recorded at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in Dec. 1980 and Nov. 1986 have been analyzed in the region of the CF(2)Cl(2) (chlorofluorocarbon 12) nu(8) band Q branches at 1161 cm(-1). An increase in the CF(2)Cl(2) total vertical column above the South Pole of 1.24 +/- 0.15 over the 6-yr period, corresponding to an average rate of increase of 3.6 +/- 2.1%, is derived. This rate of increase is lower than indicated by in situ measurements at the South Pole over the same time period, but there is agreement when the rather error bars of the spectral measurement results are considered. Spectroscopic parameters that can successfully model CF(2)C1(2) absorption at low temperatures are needed to improve retrieval accuracies and could be applied to a number of pre-1980 atmospheric spectral data sets in the literature to obtain an improved record of early CF(2)Cl(2) concentration trends for comparison with estimates of historical release rates.

  5. Methods of celestial mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Brouwer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Methods of Celestial Mechanics provides a comprehensive background of celestial mechanics for practical applications. Celestial mechanics is the branch of astronomy that is devoted to the motions of celestial bodies. This book is composed of 17 chapters, and begins with the concept of elliptic motion and its expansion. The subsequent chapters are devoted to other aspects of celestial mechanics, including gravity, numerical integration of orbit, stellar aberration, lunar theory, and celestial coordinates. Considerable chapters explore the principles and application of various mathematical metho

  6. BICEP2/SPUD: Searching for Inflation with Degree Scale Polarimetry from the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hien Trong; Kovac, John; Adec, Peter; Aikin, Randol; Benton, Steve; Bock, Jamie; Brevik, Justus; Carlstrom, John; Dowell, Darren; Duband, Lionel; Golwala, Sunil; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Irwin, Kent; Jones, William; Kaufman, Jonathan; Keating, Brian; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lange, Andrew; Matsumura, Tomotake; Netterfield, Barth; Pryke, Clem; Ruhl, John; Sheehy, Chris; Sudiwala, Rashmi

    2008-01-01

    BICEP2/SPUD is the new powerful upgrade of the existing BICEP1 experiment, a bolometric receiver to study the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation, which has been in operation at the South Pole since January 2006. BICEP2 will provide an improvement up to 10 times mapping speed at 150 GHz compared to BICEP1, using the same BICEP telescope mount. SPUD, a series of compact, mechanically-cooled receivers deployed on the DASI mount at the Pole, will provide similar mapping speed in to BICEP2 in three bands, 100, 150, and 220 GHz. The new system will use large TES focal plane arrays to provide unprecedented sensitivity and excellent control of foreground contamination.

  7. Testing a Prototype for a New Cosmic Ray Particle Detector at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, R.; Rimsa, E.; Tharp, T.; Andeen, K.

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic ray research has grown rapidly in the past century, often using vacuum photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) to analyze the light produced by high-energy particles passing through scintillating material. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are now being recognized as a more efficient alternative to PMTs. Different types of photon events have been characterized using a SensL brand SiPM in combination with a QuarkNet Data Acquisition board. The goal of this study is to test the viability of the SiPM for a new generation surface detector at the South Pole.

  8. Mach-Zehnder Modulator Performance on the NIF South Pole Bang Time Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeman, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Chow, R.; Carpenter, A.; Bond, E.; Zayas-Rivera, Z.; Bell, P.; Celeste, J.; Clancy, T.; Miller, E. K.; Edgell, D.; Donaldson, W. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present performance data for Mach-Zehnder optical modulators fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a potential signal path upgrade for the South Pole Bang Time diagnostic. A single channel demonstration system has been deployed utilizing two modulators operating in a 90-degree In phase and Quadrature (I/Q) configuration. X-ray target emission signals are split and fed into two recording systems: a reference CRT based oscilloscope, Greenfield FTD10000, and the dual Mach-Zehnder system. Results of X-ray implosion time (bang time) determination from these two recording systems are compared and presented.

  9. Experiment to search for ultra high energy. gamma. -ray sources from the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, N.J.T.; Perrett, J.C.; Pomerantz, M.A.; Hillas, A.M.; Ogden, P.A.; Patel, M.; Reid, R.J.O.; Watson, A.A.

    1989-04-01

    We describe the construction and performance characteristics of an extensive air shower array which has been established at the geographic South Pole. The experiment has been designed to search for sources for cosmic rays with primary energies above 50 TeV with an angular resolution of about 1/sup 0/. The array has an enclosed area of 6235 m/sup 2/ and is at an altitude of 2835 m (695 g cm/sup -2/). The unique advantage of the site is the circumpolar nature of all candidate sources, including SN1987A, which lie at a constant zenith angle.

  10. IceCube Gen2. The next-generation neutrino observatory for the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santen, Jakob van [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is a cubic-kilometer Cherenkov telescope buried in the ice sheet at the South Pole that detects neutrinos of all flavors with energies from tens of GeV to several PeV. The instrument provided the first measurement of the flux of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos, opening a new window to the TeV universe. At the other end of its sensitivity range, IceCube has provided precision measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters that are competitive with dedicated accelerator-based experiments. Here we present design studies for IceCube Gen2, the next-generation neutrino observatory for the South Pole. Instrumenting a volume of more that 5 km{sup 3} with over 100 new strings, IceCube Gen2 will have substantially greater sensitivity to high-energy neutrinos than current-generation instruments. PINGU, a dense infill array, will lower the energy threshold of the inner detector region to 4 GeV, allowing a determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy. On the surface, a large air shower detector will veto high-energy atmospheric muons and neutrinos from the southern hemisphere, enhancing the reach of astrophysical neutrino searches. With its versatile instrumentation, the IceCube Gen2 facility will allow us to explore the neutrino sky with unprecedented sensitivity, providing new constraints on the sources of the highest-energy cosmic rays, and yield precision data on the mixing and mass ordering of neutrinos.

  11. Observations of a 12 H wave in the mesopause region at the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, R.L.; Senft, D.C.; Gardner, C.S. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States))

    1992-01-03

    In December 1989 a Na lidar was installed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station and was used to measure aerosol, stratospheric temperature and mesospheric Na profiles through October 1990. The mesospheric Na data are used to characterize the gravity wave field in the mesopause region, These first lidar observations of Na layer dynamics at the South Pole show strong wave activity during the Antarctic winter. Data for 25 June and 19 August 1990 UT are presented here. The total wave induced variances in atmospheric density are respectively 29 and 35(%){sup 2}. The Na layer centroid height is very low during both observation periods. On 25 June a strong 12 h oscillation is observed in the bottomside of the Na layer which extends to altitudes as low as 74 km. The vertical displacement and temperature amplitudes associated with the 12 h oscillation are respectively 1.9 km and 19 K. The characteristics of the 12 h wave are similar to the pseudotide observed at Svalbard by Walterscheid et al.

  12. Record low ozone at the south pole in the Spring of 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, D.J.; Oltmans, S.J.; Lathrop, J.A.; Harris, J.M.; Voemel, H. (NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Lab., Boulder, CO (United States))

    1994-03-15

    On October 12, 1993, a balloon-borne ozone detector recorded a total ozone value of 91[+-]5 Dobson Units (DU) at the US Amundsen-Scott Station at the south pole. This is the lowest value of total ozone ever recorded anywhere, 13% below the previous low of 105 DU at the south pole in October of 1992. A region with a thickness of 5 km, from 14 to 19 km, was totally devoid of ozone as compared to only about half this thickness for the ozone void in 1992. Sub-100 DU total ozone values were observed on several soundings during 1993 whereas the 105 DU value was observed on only one occasion in 1992. The vertical profile of ozone indicates that the main reason for the record low ozone values in 1993 was an approximately 1 km upward extension of the ozone hole caused by unusual ozone loss in the 18-23 km region. Temperatures in this region were unusually low in September and October. Thus, the extension of the ozone hole may have been the result of the prolonged presence of polar stratospheric clouds at 18-23 km combined with the continued presence of sulfate aerosol from the Pinatubo eruption and, finally, increased chlorine levels. This scenario resulted in elevated ozone loss in a region where the ozone loss process is normally not saturated. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Comparison of techniques to determine intermittency of riometer auroral absorption at South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, E. M.; Stepanova, M.; Foppiano, A. J.

    2008-05-01

    It is well known that auroral radio wave absorption, as measured by riometers, consists of periods of relative quiescence which are interrupted by short bursts of activity. Such patterns in activity are observed in systems ranging from the stock market to turbulence, i.e. they exhibit intermittency. In the case of the auroral absorption it has also been found that intermittency strongly depends on the magnetic local time, being largest in the nighttime sector. This can be interpreted as indicating that the precipitating particles responsible of the absorption exhibit intermittency, especially near the substorm eye, where the level of turbulence increases. Here, different techniques to determine intermittency of auroral absorption measured by a riometer at South Pole (-90°S) are compared. The techniques are (i) the standard Castings formulation, (ii) the Local Intermittency Measure, (iii) the superstatistic, and (iv) the non-extensive statistics. It is shown that results obtained using the superstatistic and non-extensive statistic techniques confirm previously published results for auroral absorption at South Pole using the Castings and the Local Intermittency Measure techniques. Furthermore, a preliminary comparison between techniques indicates technique differences seem to be more related to the conceptual approach of each one rather than to the numerical results given by them.

  14. Thorium Anomalies in the NW Quadrant of the South Pole-Aitken Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskin, Larry A.; McKinnon, William B.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Jolliff, Bradley L.

    2004-01-01

    The relatively high concentrations of Th near the Imbrium antipode in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin might represent Imbrium ejecta, a consequence of convergence of Th-rich material ejected by the Imbrium impact that occurred in the Th-rich Procellarum KREEP Terrane. Here, we present landing positions for 7500 fragments ejected from Imbrium obtained by three-body (Earth-Moon-fragment) numerical integration for uniformly selected azimuthal launch positions, ejection angles of 45 deg, and velocities from 0.95 to 0.99 lunar escape. This provides an estimate of the density of infalling ejecta fragments to be expected in the vicinity of the Imbrium antipode. Similar calculations for 35 and 50 deg leave large empty regions surrounding the antipode.

  15. Characteristics of immersion freezing nuclei at the south pole station in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ardon-Dryer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of aerosols as immersion freezing nuclei at the South Pole station was investigated during January and February 2009 using the FRIDGE-TAU. The analysis consisted of testing the freezing temperature of about 100–130 drops per sample containing aerosols collected at ground level and on a balloon lifted to different heights. All the drops froze between −18 °C and −27 °C. The temperature in which 50% of the drops froze occurred at −24 °C, while nuclei concentration of 1 L−1 at −22 °C was calculated. Meteorological conditions such as wind speed, ice precipitation as well as the trajectories of the air masses affected the ice nuclei concentrations. Higher concentrations were observed on days when the winds were stronger or when the air mass originated from the sea.

  16. BLAST Observations of the South Ecliptic Pole field: Number Counts and Source Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Valiante, Elisabetta; Bock, James; Braglia, Filiberto; Chapin, Edward; Devlin, Mark Joseph; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter; Hughes, David; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Scott, Kimberly; Semisch, Christopher; Stabenau, Hans; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory; Viero, Marco; Wiebe, Donald

    2010-01-01

    We present results from a survey carried out by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) on a 9 deg^2 field near the South Ecliptic Pole at 250, 350 and 500 {\\mu}m. The median 1{\\sigma} depths of the maps are 36.0, 26.4 and 18.4 mJy, respectively. We apply a statistical method to estimate submillimeter galaxy number counts and find that they are in agreement with other measurements made with the same instrument and with the more recent results from Herschel/SPIRE. Thanks to the large field observed, the new measurements give additional constraints on the bright end of the counts. We identify 132, 89 and 61 sources with S/N>4 at 250, 350, 500 {\\mu}m, respectively and provide a multi-wavelength combined catalog of 232 sources. The new BLAST maps and catalogs are available publicly at http://blastexperiment.info.

  17. Measured and computed values of clear-sky ultraviolet irradiances at the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, C.R.N.; Takashima, T.

    1985-01-01

    Baker-Blocker et al.(1) have recently presented and discussed broadband (approx. = 0.290-0.380 ..mu..) ultraviolet irradiances measured under clear skies at Amundsen-Scott station (90 /sup 0/S), South Pole, during the austral summers of 1978-79, 1979-80 and 1980-81. These measurements, made with an Eppley Model TUVR radiometer, are unique in that they have been obtained under atmospheric conditions which are very close to what would prevail in an ideal, dust- and cloud-free pure molecular (Rayleigh) atmosphere (1,2); thus, the attenuation of the incoming solar radiation may be considered as essentially being due to absorption by atmospheric ozone in the Hartley (up to approx. = 0.300 ..mu..) and Huggins (approx. = 0.300-0.360 ..mu..) bands and to molecular (Rayleigh) scattering. Against this background, we presently wish to compare these measurements with computed values of the broadband ultraviolet irradiance in simple atmospheric models.

  18. Absolute measurements of the cosmic microwave background from Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bersanelli, S.; Bonelli, G.; Sironi, G. (Universita degli Studi, Milan (Italy)); Levin, S. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)); Smoot, G.F.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, G.; Limon, M.; Vinje, W. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background play a central role in modern cosmology. The existence of the CMB as a remanent of the early Universe has constituted a pillar for the Big Bang scenario. The recent cosmic background explorer differential microwave radiometer results have provided further support to the generally accepted standard model by detecting for the first time primordial fluctuations in the CMB field at the limits expected by structure formation theories. An international program of ground-based absoluted measurements of the CMB at the centimeter and multicentimeter wavelengths was initiated in 1982. This paper reports results at the South Pole, one of a few areas of low-background environments. 12 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. The Kepler-SEP Mission: Harvesting the South Ecliptic Pole large-amplitude variables with Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Szabó, R; Kołaczkowski, Z; Moskalik, P; Ivezić, Ž; Udalski, A; Szabados, L; Kuehn, C; Smolec, R; Pigulski, A; Bedding, T; Ngeow, C C; Guzik, J A; Ostrowski, J; De Cat, P; Antoci, V; Borkovits, T; Soszyński, I; Poleski, R; Kozłowski, Sz; Pietrukowicz, P; Skowron, J; Szczygieł, D; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Szymański, M; Pietrzyński, G; Ulaczyk, K; Plachy, E; Schou, J; Evans, N R; Kopaczki, G

    2013-01-01

    As a response to the white paper call, we propose to turn Kepler to the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) and observe thousands of large amplitude variables for years with high cadence in the frame of the Kepler-SEP Mission. The degraded pointing stability will still allow observing these stars with reasonable (probably better than mmag) accuracy. Long-term continuous monitoring already proved to be extremely helpful to investigate several areas of stellar astrophysics. Space-based missions opened a new window to the dynamics of pulsation in several class of pulsating variable stars and facilitated detailed studies of eclipsing binaries. The main aim of this mission is to better understand the fascinating dynamics behind various stellar pulsational phenomena (resonances, mode coupling, chaos, mode selection) and interior physics (turbulent convection, opacities). This will also improve the applicability of these astrophysical tools for distance measurements, population and stellar evolution studies. We investigated t...

  20. Acoustic noise in deep ice and environmental conditions at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, Timo

    2008-01-01

    To study the acoustic properties of the Antarctic ice the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) was installed in the upper part of drill holes for the IceCube neutrino observatory. An important parameter for the design of a future acoustic neutrino telescope is the acoustic background noise in the ice and its spatial and temporal variations. We study the absolute noise level depth profile from SPATS data and discuss systematic uncertainties. The measured noise is very stable over one year of data taking, and we estimate the absolute noise level to be < 10 mPa in the frequency range from 10 kHz to 50 kHz at depths below 200 m. This noise level is of the same order of magnitude as observed by ocean based acoustic neutrino detection projects in good weather conditions.

  1. Intradiurnal wind variations observed in the lower thermosphere over the South Pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Portnyagin

    Full Text Available The first meteor radar measurements of meridional winds in the lower thermosphere (about 95 ± 5 km, along four azimuth directions: 0°, 90°E, 180° and 90°W; approximately 2° from the geographic South Pole were made during two observational campaigns: January 19, 1995-January 26, 1996, and November 21, 1996-January 27, 1997. Herein we report analyses of the measurement results, obtained during the first campaign, which cover the whole one-year period, with particular emphasis on the transient nature and seasonal behavior of the main parameters of the intradiurnal wind oscillations. To analyze the data, two complementary methods are used: the well-known periodogram (FFT technique and the S-transform technique. The most characteristic periods of the intradiurnal oscillations are found to be rather uniformly spread between about 7 h and 12 h. All of these oscillations are westward-propagating with zonal wave number s=1 and their usual duration is confined to several periods. During the austral winter season the oscillations with periods less than 12 h are the most intensive, while during summer season the 12-h oscillations dominate. Lamb waves and internal-gravity wave propagation, non-linear interaction of the short-period tides, excitation in situ of the short period waves may be considered as possible processes which are responsible for intradiurnal wind oscillations in the lower thermosphere over South Pole.

    Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  2. Balloon observations of ultra-low-frequency waves in the electric field above the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, B.; Benbrrook, J.R.; Bering E.A. III; Byrne, G.J.; Theall, J.R. (Univ. of Houston, TX (USA))

    1988-01-01

    The physics of ultra-low-frequency waves in the magnetosphere, near the cusp and in the polar cap, is important because this region is one where ultra-low-frequency wave energy from the magnetopause can most easily enter the magnetosphere. During the 1985-1986 South Pole balloon campaign, eight stratospheric balloon payloads were launched from Amundsen-Scott Station, South Geographic Pole, Antarctica, to record data on ultra-low-frequency waves. The payloads were instrumented with three-axis double-probe electric field detectors and X-ray scintillation counters. This paper concentrates on the third flight of this series, which was launched at 2205 universal time on 21 December 1985. Good data were received from the payload until the transmitter failed at 0342 universal time on 22 December. During most of the four hours that the balloon was afloat, an intense ultra-low-frequency wave event was in progress. The electric-field data from this period have been examined in detail and compared with magnetic field data, obtained with ground-based fluxgate and induction magnetometers to determine the characteristics of the waves. After float was reached, the electric-field data in figure 1 show large-amplitude, quasi-periodic fluctuations suggesting the presence of intense ultra-low-frequency wave activity. In conclusion, the electric-field signature observed from flight 3 appears to have been essentially an electrostatic event or possibly a short-wavelength hydromagnetic wave with a varying and interesting polarization character. The authors are continuing the analysis of the data to determine the source of the observed ultra-low-frequency waves.

  3. Continuous Lidar Monitoring of Polar Stratospheric Clouds at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D

    2009-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) play a primary role in the formation of annual ozone holes over Antarctica during the austral sunrise. Meridional temperature gradients in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere, caused by strong radiative cooling, induce a broad dynamic vortex centered near the South Pole that decouples and insulates the winter polar airmass. PSC nucleate and grow as vortex temperatures gradually fall below equilibrium saturation and frost points for ambient sulfate, nitrate, and water vapor concentrations (generally below 197 K). Cloud surfaces promote heterogeneous reactions that convert stable chlorine and bromine-based molecules into photochemically active ones. As spring nears, and the sun reappears and rises, photolysis decomposes these partitioned compounds into individual halogen atoms that react with and catalytically destroy thousands of ozone molecules before they are stochastically neutralized. Despite a generic understanding of the ozone hole paradigm, many key components of the system, such as cloud occurrence, phase, and composition; particle growth mechanisms; and denitrification of the lower stratosphere have yet to be fully resolved. Satellite-based observations have dramatically improved the ability to detect PSC and quantify seasonal polar chemical partitioning. However, coverage directly over the Antarctic plateau is limited by polar-orbiting tracks that rarely exceed 80 degrees S. In December 1999, a NASA Micropulse Lidar Network instrument (MPLNET) was first deployed to the NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory (ESRL) Atmospheric Research Observatory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station for continuous cloud and aerosol profiling. MPLNET instruments are eye-safe, capable of full-time autonomous operation, and suitably rugged and compact to withstand long-term remote deployment. With only brief interruptions during the winters of 2001 and 2002, a nearly continuous data archive exists to the present.

  4. Feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in ice: Design and performance of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS)

    CERN Document Server

    Boeser, S; Descamps, F; Fischer, J; Hallgren, A; Heller, R; Hundertmark, S; Krieger, K; Nahnhauer, R; Pohl, M; Price, P B; Sulanke, K -H; Tosi, D; Vandenbroucke, J

    2008-01-01

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been built to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of the South Pole ice in the 10 to 100 kHz frequency range so that the feasibility and specific design of an acoustic neutrino detection array at South Pole can be evaluated. SPATS consists of three vertical strings that were deployed in the upper 400 meters of the South Pole ice cap in January 2007, using the upper part of IceCube holes. The strings form a triangular array with the longest baseline 421 meters. Each of them has 7 stages with one transmitter and one sensor module. Both are equipped with piezoelectric ceramic elements in order to produce or detect sound. Analog signals are brought to the surface on electric cables where they are digitized by a PC-based data acquisition system. The data from all three strings are collected on a master-PC in a central facility, from which they are sent to the northern hemisphere via a satellite link or locally stored on tape. A technical overview of the SPATS detect...

  5. The controlled ecological life support system Antarctic analog project: Analysis of wastewater from the South Pole Station, Antarctica, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Bubenheim, David L.; Straight, Christian L.; Belisle, Warren

    1994-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support system (CELSS) Antarctic Analog Project (CAAP) is a joint National Science Foundation (NSF) and NASA project for the development, deployment and operation of CELSS technologies at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. NASA goals are operational testing of CELSS technologies and the conduct of scientific studies to facilitate technology selection and system design. The NSF goals are that the food production, water purification, and waste treatment capabilities which will be provided by CAAP will improve the quality of life for the South Pole inhabitants, reduce logistics dependence, and minimize environmental impacts associated with human presence on the polar plateau. This report presents an analysis of wastewater samples taken from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica. The purpose of the work is to develop a quantitative understanding of the characteristics of domestic sewage streams at the South Pole Station. This information will contribute to the design of a proposed plant growth/waste treatment system which is part of the CELSS Antarctic Analog Project (CAAP).

  6. The Meteorology and Chemistry of High Nitric-Acid Episodes at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, William; Davis, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Between 1998 and 2007, a series of field experiments carried out at the South Pole and with aircraft over a wider area revealed a very chemically active boundary layer overlying the east Antarctic ice sheet during the Austral summer. An early discovery was unexpectedly high concentrations of nitric acid (NO) at the South Pole. These were argued to be a result of the UV pholoysis of reactive nitrogen in surface and/or near-surface snow followed by subsequent confinement and non-linear HOx/NOx chemistry within a thin stable atmospheric boundary layer. The concentrations of NO also demonstrated daily, intraseasonal, as well as interannual variability as seen in the four field programs. This paper seeks to elucidate the interplay of large-to-small scale meteorology and chemistry at the South Pole that leads to highly variable NO concentrations and to examine boundary layer depth effects on NO in years when no direct measurements were available, in particular during the latest field program in 2006-2007. The importance of the South Pole is that it, unlike other high-latitude sites, has no diurnal cycle to disturb the evolution of the mostly stable boundary layer and its physics and chemistry. In the spring, as the solar elevation angle increases, nitrate photolysis rates increase. At the same time, the stratospheric vortex warms and with its breakup, the total column ozone increases leading to decreased photolysis rates. In addition, following the formation of the thermal tropopause in early spring, the tropospheric circulation over Antarctica changes dramatically, affecting the transport and dominant source regions for warm air and clouds arriving at the South Pole. The timing of the final warming ranged from early-November to mid-December for the four field experiment years. During the 30 days prior to the final increase in column ozone, as the thermal tropopause forms (~100 hPa), the winds at 300 hPa become bimodal, either along the eastern side of the Weddell Sea

  7. An Early Cretaceous paleomagnetic pole from Ponta Grossa dikes (Brazil): Implications for the South American Mesozoic apparent polar wander path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomeu Raposo, Maria Irene; Ernesto, Marcia

    1995-10-01

    Paleomagnetic results from the Early Cretaceous Ponta Grossa dike swarm are reported. These dikes crosscut sediments and basement rocks associated with the Ponta Grossa Arch, a tectonic feature in the eastern border of the Paleozoic-Mesozoic Paraná Basin. These dikes are vertical or subvertical and trend mainly NW and NE. Samples from 127 dikes were submitted to both alternating field and thermal demagnetizations; 121 of them yielded characteristic directions interpreted as original thermal remanent magnetizations. Both normal and reversed polarities as well as intermediate directions (6 dikes) are recorded. The paleomagnetic pole is located at 30.3°E, 82.4°S (N=115; α95=2.0° k=43.8). This pole along with the available paleomagnetic poles for the Paraná Basin volcanics (Serra Geral Formation), recalculated in this paper in the light of reported 40Ar/39Ar ages describe an apparent polar wander path segment corresponding to a clockwise rotation (~6.9°) of the South American plate. This movement is compatible with the initial phase of the South Atlantic opening with rifting progressing from south to north. However, the calculated plate velocity is higher than the predicted velocities reported so far based on oceanic floor magnetic anomalies. The new data reported in this paper allowed the calculation of a mean Early Cretaceous pole (60.3°E, 83.8°S N=7, α95=2.9°) which can be discriminated from the Middle-Late Jurassic (191.3°E, 86.2°S N=3, α95=7.8°) and Late Cretaceous (346.5°E, 84.1°S N=5, α95=4.9°) mean poles for South America, indicating a more complex movement of the continent than the simple east-west drift generally proposed.

  8. Solar irradiance at the earth's surface: long-term behavior observed at the South Pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Frederick

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This research examines a 17-year database of UV-A (320–400 nm and visible (400–600 nm solar irradiance obtained by a scanning spectroradiometer located at the South Pole. The goal is to define the variability in solar irradiance reaching the polar surface, with emphasis on the influence of cloudiness and on identifying systematic trends and possible links to the solar cycle. To eliminate changes associated with the varying solar elevation, the analysis focuses on data averaged over 30–35 day periods centered on each year's austral summer solstice. The long-term average effect of South Polar clouds is a small attenuation, with the mean measured irradiances being about 5–6% less than the clear-sky values, although at any specific time clouds may reduce or enhance the signal that reaches the sensor. The instantaneous fractional attenuation or enhancement is wavelength dependent, where the percent deviation from the clear-sky irradiance at 400–600 nm is typically 2.5 times that at 320–340 nm. When averaged over the period near each year's summer solstice, significant correlations appear between irradiances at all wavelengths and the solar cycle as measured by the 10.7 cm solar radio flux. An approximate 1.8 ± 1.0% decrease in ground-level irradiance occurs from solar maximum to solar minimum for the wavelength band 320–400 nm. The corresponding decrease for 400–600 nm is 2.4 ± 1.9%. The best-estimate declines appear too large to originate in the sun. If the correlations have a geophysical origin, they suggest a small variation in atmospheric attenuation with the solar cycle over the period of observation, with the greatest attenuation occurring at solar minimum.

  9. A measurement of secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies with two years of South Pole Telescope observations

    CERN Document Server

    Reichardt, C L; Zahn, O; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J; George, E M; Halverson, N W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hou, Z; Hrubes, J D; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Millea, M; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Williamson, R

    2011-01-01

    We present the first three-frequency South Pole Telescope (SPT) cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectra. The band powers presented here cover angular scales 2000 < ell < 9400 in frequency bands centered at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. At these frequencies and angular scales, a combination of the primary CMB anisotropy, thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects, radio galaxies, and cosmic infrared background (CIB) contributes to the signal. We combine Planck and SPT data at 220 GHz to constrain the amplitude and shape of the CIB power spectrum and find strong evidence for non-linear clustering. We explore the SZ results using a variety of cosmological models for the CMB and CIB anisotropies and find them to be robust with one exception: allowing for spatial correlations between the thermal SZ effect and CIB significantly degrades the SZ constraints. Neglecting this potential correlation, we find the thermal SZ power at 150 GHz and ell = 3000 to be 3.65 +/- 0.69 muK^2, and set an upper limit on...

  10. Velocity Shear of the Thick Disk from SPM3 Proper Motions at the South Galactic Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Girard, T M; Casetti-Dinescu, D I; Van Altena, W F; Lopez, C E; Monet, D G

    2006-01-01

    The kinematical properties of the Galactic Thick Disk are studied using absolute proper motions from the SPM3 Catalog and 2MASS near-infrared photometry for a sample of ~1200 red giants in the direction of the South Galactic Pole. The photometrically-selected sample is dominated by Thick Disk stars, as indicated by the number-density distribution that varies with distance from the Galactic plane as a single-valued exponential over the range 1

  11. Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Cluster Profiles Measured with the South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Plagge, T; Ade, P A R; Aird, K A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H -M; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; George, E M; Hall, N R; Halverson, N W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Marrone, D; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Padin, S; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Williamson, R; Zahn, O

    2009-01-01

    We present Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements of 15 massive X-ray selected galaxy clusters obtained with the South Pole Telescope. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) cluster signals are measured at 150 GHz, and concurrent 220 GHz data are used to reduce astrophysical contamination. Radial profiles are computed using a technique that takes into account the effects of the beams and filtering. In several clusters, significant SZ decrements are detected out to a substantial fraction of the virial radius. The profiles are fit to the beta model and to a generalized NFW pressure profile, and are scaled and stacked to probe their average behavior. We find model parameters that are consistent with previous studies: beta=0.86 and r_core/r_500 = 0.20 for the beta model, and (alpha, beta, gamma, c_500)=(1.0,5.5,0.5,1.0) for the generalized NFW model. Both models fit the SPT data comparably well, and both are consistent with the average SZ profile out to the virial radius. The integrated Compton-y parameter Y_SZ is computed for eac...

  12. Compositional heterogeneity of central peaks within the South Pole-Aitken Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.; Isaacson, P. J.

    2013-11-01

    high-spectral and -spatial resolution Moon Mineralogy Mapper data, we investigate compositional variations across the central peak structures of four impact craters within the South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA). Two distinct causes of spectral diversity are observed. Spectral variations across the central peaks of Bhabha, Finsen, and Lyman are dominated by soil development, including the effects of space weathering and mixing with local materials. For these craters, the central peak structure is homogeneous in composition, although small compositional differences between the craters are observed. This group of craters is located within the estimated transient cavity of SPA, and their central uplifts exhibit similar mafic abundances. Therefore, it is plausible that they have all uplifted material associated with melts of the lower crust or upper mantle produced during the SPA impact. Compositional differences observed between the peaks of these craters reflect heterogeneities in the SPA subsurface, although the origin of this heterogeneity is uncertain. In contrast to these craters, Leeuwenhoek exhibits compositional heterogeneity across its central peak structure. The peak is areally dominated by feldspathic materials, interspersed with several smaller exposures exhibiting a mafic spectral signature. Leeuwenhoek is the largest crater included in the study and is located in a region of complex stratigraphy involving both crustal (feldspathic) and SPA (mafic melt and ejecta) materials. The compositional diversity observed in Leeuwenhoek's central peak indicates that kilometer-scale heterogeneities persist to depths of more than 10 km in this region.

  13. Magnetic signature of the lunar South Pole-Aitken basin: Character, origin, and age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purucker, Michael E.; Head, James W., III; Wilson, Lionel

    2012-05-01

    A new magnetic map of the Moon, based on Lunar Prospector magnetometer observations, sheds light on the origin of the South Pole-Aitken basin (SPA), the largest and oldest of the recognized lunar basins. A set of WNW-trending linear to arcuate magnetic features, evident in both the radial and scalar observations, covers much of a 1000 km wide region centered on the NW portion of SPA. The source bodies are not at the surface because the magnetic features show no first-order correspondence to any surface topographic or structural feature. Patchy mare basalts of possible late Imbrian-age are emplaced within SPA and are inferred to have been emplaced through dikes, directly from mantle sources. We infer that the magnetic features represent dike swarms that served as feeders for these mare basalts, as evident from the location of the Thomson/Mare Ingenii, Van de Graaff, and Leeuwenhoek mare basalts on the two largest magnetic features in the region. Modeling suggests that the dike zone is between 25 and 50 km wide at the surface, and dike magnetization contrasts are in the range of 0.2 A/m. We theorize that the basaltic dikes were emplaced in the lunar crust when a long-lived dynamo was active. Based on pressure, temperature, and stress conditions prevalent in the lunar crust, dikes are expected to be a dominantly subsurface phenomenon, consistent with the observations reported here.

  14. Optical Characterization of the BICEP3 CMB Polarimeter at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Karkare, K S; Ahmed, Z; Alexander, K D; Amiri, M; Barkats, D; Benton, S J; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Boenish, H; Bowens-Rubin, R; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Buza, V; Connors, J; Filippini, J P; Fliescher, S T; Grayson, J A; Halpern, M; Harrison, S A; Hilton, G C; Hristov, V V; Hui, H; Irwin, K D; Kang, J H; Karpel, E; Kefeli, S; Kernasovskiy, S A; Kovac, J M; Kuo, C L; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Megerian, K G; Monticue, V; Namikawa, T; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Pryke, C; Reintsema, C D; Richter, S; Germaine, M T St; Schwarz, R; Sheehy, C D; Staniszewski, Z K; Steinbach, B; Teply, G P; Thompson, K L; Tolan, J E; Tucker, C; Turner, A D; Vieregg, A G; Wandui, A; Weber, A; Willmert, J; Wong, C L; Wu, W L K; Yoon, K W

    2016-01-01

    BICEP3 is a small-aperture refracting cosmic microwave background (CMB) telescope designed to make sensitive polarization maps in pursuit of a potential B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. It is the latest in the BICEP/Keck Array series of CMB experiments at the South Pole, which has provided the most stringent constraints on inflation to date. For the 2016 observing season, BICEP3 was outfitted with a full suite of 2400 optically coupled detectors operating at 95 GHz. In these proceedings we report on the far field beam performance using calibration data taken during the 2015-2016 summer deployment season in situ with a thermal chopped source. We generate high-fidelity per-detector beam maps, show the array-averaged beam profile, and characterize the differential beam response between co-located, orthogonally polarized detectors which contributes to the leading instrumental systematic in pair differencing experiments. We find that the levels of differential pointing, beamwidth, and elliptici...

  15. Analysis of Stationary, Photovoltaic-based Surface Power System Designs at the Lunar South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeh, Joshua E.

    2009-01-01

    Combinations of solar arrays and either batteries or regenerative fuel cells are analyzed for a surface power system module at the lunar south pole. The systems are required to produce 5 kW of net electrical power in sunlight and 2 kW of net electrical power during lunar night periods for a 10-year period between 2020 and 2030. Systems-level models for energy conservation, performance, degradation, and mass are used to compare to various systems. The sensitivities of important and/or uncertain variables including battery specific energy, fuel cell operating voltage, and DC-DC converter efficiency are compared to better understand the system. Switching unit efficiency, battery specific energy, and fuel cell operating voltage appear to be important system-level variables for this system. With reasonably sized solar arrays, the regenerative fuel cell system has significantly lower mass than the battery system based on the requirements and assumptions made herein. The total operational time is estimated at about 10,000 hours in battery discharge/fuel cell mode and about 4,000 and 8,000 hours for the battery charge and electrolyzer modes, respectively. The estimated number of significant depth-of-discharge cycles for either energy storage system is less than 100 for the 10-year period.

  16. Lunar Meteorites Sayh Al Uhaymir 449 and Dhofar 925, 960, and 961: Windows into South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Ryan A.; Jolliff, B. L.; Korotev, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    In 2003, three lunar meteorites were collected in close proximity to each other in the Dhofar region of Oman: Dhofar 925 (49 g), Dhofar 960 (35 g), and Dhofar 961 (22 g). In 2006, lunar meteorite Sayh al Uhaymir (SaU) 449 (16.5 g) was found about 100 km to the NE. Despite significant differences in the bulk composition of Dhofar 961 relative to Dhofar 925/960 and SaU 449 (which are identical to each other), these four meteorites are postulated to be paired based on their find locations, bulk composition, and detailed petrographic analysis. Hereafter, they will collectively be referred to as the Dhofar 961 clan. Comparison of meteorite and component bulk compositions to Lunar Prospector 5-degree gamma-ray data suggest the most likely provenance of this meteorite group is within the South Pole-Aitken Basin. As the oldest, largest, and deepest recognizable basin on the Moon, the composition of the material within the SPA basin is of particular importance to lunar science. Here we review and expand upon the geochemistry and petrography of the Dhofar 961 clan and assess the likelihood that these meteorites come from within the SPA basin based on their bulk compositions and the compositions and characteristics of the major lithologic components found within the breccia.

  17. Multichroic TES Bolometers and Galaxy Cluster Mass Scaling Relations with the South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Saliwanchik, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a high-resolution microwave-frequency telescope designed to observe the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). To date, two cameras have been installed on the SPT to conduct two surveys of the CMB, the first in intensity only (SPT-SZ) and the second in intensity and polarization (SPTpol). A third-generation polarization-sensitive camera is currently in development (SPT-3G). This thesis describes work spanning all three instruments on the SPT. I present my work in time-reversed order, to follow the canonical narrative of instrument development, deployment, and analysis. First, the development and testing of novel 3-band multichroic Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers for the SPT-3G experiment is detailed, followed by the development and deployment of the frequency multiplexed cryogenic readout electronics for the SPTpol experiment, and concluding with the analysis of data taken by the SPT-SZ instrument. I describe the development of a Bayesian likelihood based method I develop...

  18. Maps of the Magellanic Clouds from Combined South Pole Telescope and Planck Data

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, T M; Holder, G P; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H-M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; George, E M; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; Holzapfel, W L; Hou, Z; Hrubes, J D; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Luong-Van, D; Marrone, D P; McMahon, J J; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L M; Mohr, J J; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Ruhl, J E; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K T; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Williamson, R

    2016-01-01

    We present maps of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds from combined South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck data. Both instruments are designed to make measurements of the cosmic microwave background but are sensitive to any source of millimeter-wave (mm-wave) emission. The Planck satellite observes in nine mm-wave bands, while the SPT data used in this work were taken with the three-band SPT-SZ camera. The SPT-SZ bands correspond closely to three of the nine Planck bands, namely those centered at 1.4, 2.1, and 3.0 mm. The angular resolution of the Planck data in these bands ranges from 5 to 10 arcmin, while the SPT resolution in these bands ranges from 1.0 to 1.7 arcmin. The combined maps take advantage of the high resolution of the SPT data and the long-timescale stability of the space-based Planck observations to deliver high signal-to-noise and robust brightness measurements on scales from the size of the maps down to ~1 arcmin. In each of the three bands, we first calibrate and color-correct the SPT dat...

  19. Photometry of the 4686 A emission line of gamma(2) Velorum from the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Maryjane

    1990-01-01

    An automated optical telescope located at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station on Antarctica, has been used to obtain more than 78 h of photometry of the He II emission line (4686 A) of the spectroscopic binary gamma(2) Velorum. These data were obtained on seven different days during the 1987 austral winter; the longest continuous run spans 19 h. Two independent period search techniques have been used to search for periodic behavior in the strength of the He II emission line of this Wolf-Rayet star. They are: (1) power spectrum analysis and (2) a first-order sine function fit to the data using least squares. Various multiplicities of a period on the order of 1.3 h with amplitudes of a few percent are found in most of these data. According to recent theoretical models of Wolf-Rayet stars, fluctuations in the He II emission line may indicate vibrational instability in gamma(2) Vel. These pulsations may, in turn, give rise to shocks which propagate outward and which may provide the necessary conditions for periodic changes in the state of a given region of the atmosphere to occur.

  20. Atmospheric trace metals in the snow layers deposited at the South Pole from 1928 to 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutron, C.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-seven successive dated snow samples, covering a 50 y continuous time sequence between 1928 and 1977 with a time resolution of approximately one sample per year, have been collected using stringent contamination-free techniques from a 10 m deep pit in the clean sector at the geographic South Pole, Antarctica. They have been analyzed for Na, Mg, K, Ca, Fe, Al, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn and Ag in clean room conditions by flameless atomic absorption after preconcentration. For all the elements, the concentrations observed in the most recent snow layers are comparable to the ones in the 50 y old snow layers, except for Pb, for which an increase (x4) is observed after 1960 approximately. These data therefore confirm that the influence of global atmospheric pollution is probably still negligible in the remote areas of the southern hemisphere for the 12 measured elements except possibly for Pb after 1960. For this last element, however, an alternative explanation of the post-1960 increase could be that the post-1960 snow layers have been contaminated by operations at Amundsen Scott station, which has been occupied since 1957.

  1. Photometry of the 4686 A emission line of gamma(2) Velorum from the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, M. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison (USA) Florida Univ., Gainesville (USA))

    1990-10-01

    An automated optical telescope located at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station on Antarctica, has been used to obtain more than 78 h of photometry of the He II emission line (4686 A) of the spectroscopic binary gamma(2) Velorum. These data were obtained on seven different days during the 1987 austral winter; the longest continuous run spans 19 h. Two independent period search techniques have been used to search for periodic behavior in the strength of the He II emission line of this Wolf-Rayet star. They are: (1) power spectrum analysis and (2) a first-order sine function fit to the data using least squares. Various multiplicities of a period on the order of 1.3 h with amplitudes of a few percent are found in most of these data. According to recent theoretical models of Wolf-Rayet stars, fluctuations in the He II emission line may indicate vibrational instability in gamma(2) Vel. These pulsations may, in turn, give rise to shocks which propagate outward and which may provide the necessary conditions for periodic changes in the state of a given region of the atmosphere to occur. 15 refs.

  2. The Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS Extragalactic survey (SIMES) in the South Ecliptic Pole field

    CERN Document Server

    Baronchelli, I; Rodighiero, G; Franceschini, A; Capak, P L; Mei, S; Vaccari, M; Marchetti, L; Hibon, P; Sedgwick, C; Pearson, C; Serjeant, S; Menèndez-Delmestre, K; Salvato, M; Malkan, M; Teplitz, H I; Hayes, M; Colbert, J; Papovich, C; Devlin, M; Kovacs, A; Scott, K S; Surace, J; Kirkpatrick, J D; Atek, H; Urrutia, T; Scoville, N Z; Takeuchi, T T

    2016-01-01

    We present the Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS Extragalactic survey (SIMES) in the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) field. The large area covered (7.7 deg$^2$), together with one of the lowest Galactic cirrus emissions in the entire sky and a very extensive coverage by Spitzer, Herschel, Akari, and GALEX, make the SIMES field ideal for extragalactic studies. The elongated geometry of the SIMES area ($\\approx$4:1), allowing for a significant cosmic variance reduction, further improves the quality of statistical studies in this field. Here we present the reduction and photometric measurements of the Spitzer/IRAC data. The survey reaches a depth of 1.93 and 1.75 $\\mu$Jy (1$\\sigma$) at 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m, respectively. We discuss the multiwavelength IRAC--based catalog, completed with optical, mid-- and far--IR observations. We detect 341,000 sources with F$_{3.6\\mu m} \\geq 3\\sigma$. Of these, 10% have an associated 24 $\\mu$m counterpart, while 2.7% have an associated SPIRE source. We release the catalog through the NASA/IPAC Infrare...

  3. The Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS Extragalactic Survey (SIMES) in the South Ecliptic Pole Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronchelli, I.; Scarlata, C.; Rodighiero, G.; Franceschini, A.; Capak, P. L.; Mei, S.; Vaccari, M.; Marchetti, L.; Hibon, P.; Sedgwick, C.; Pearson, C.; Serjeant, S.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Salvato, M.; Malkan, M.; Teplitz, H. I.; Hayes, M.; Colbert, J.; Papovich, C.; Devlin, M.; Kovacs, A.; Scott, K. S.; Surace, J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Atek, H.; Urrutia, T.; Scoville, N. Z.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2016-03-01

    We present the Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS Extragalactic survey (SIMES) in the South Ecliptic Pole field. The large area covered (7.7 deg2), together with one of the lowest Galactic cirrus emissions in the entire sky and a very extensive coverage by Spitzer, Herschel, Akari, and GALEX, make the SIMES field ideal for extragalactic studies. The elongated geometry of the SIMES area (≈4:1), allowing for significant cosmic variance reduction, further improves the quality of statistical studies in this field. Here we present the reduction and photometric measurements of the Spitzer/IRAC data. The survey reaches depths of 1.93 and 1.75 μJy (1σ) at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, respectively. We discuss the multiwavelength IRAC-based catalog, completed with optical, mid-, and far-IR observations. We detect 341,000 sources with {F}3.6μ {{m}}≥slant 3σ . Of these, 10% have an associated 24 μm counterpart, while 2.7% have an associated SPIRE source. We release the catalog through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive. Two scientific applications of these IRAC data are presented in this paper. First, we compute integral number counts at 3.6 μm. Second, we use the [3.6]-[4.5] color index to identify galaxy clusters at z > 1.3. We select 27 clusters in the full area, a result consistent with previous studies at similar depth.

  4. Magnetic Signature of the Lunar South Pole-Aitken Basin: Character, Origin, and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purucker, Michael E.; Head, James W., III; Wilson, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    A new magnetic map of the Moon, based on Lunar Prospector (LP) magnetometer observations, sheds light on the origin of the South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA), the largest and oldest of the recognized lunar basins. A set of WNW-trending linear to arcuate magnetic features, evident in both the radial and scalar observations, covers much of a 1000 km wide region centered on the NW portion of SPA. The source bodies are not at the surface because the magnetic features show no first-order correspondence to any surface topographic or structural feature. Patchy mare basalts of possible late Imbrianage are emplaced within SPA and are inferred to have been emplaced through dikes, directly from mantle sources. We infer that the magnetic features represent dike swarms that served as feeders for these mare basalts, as evident from the location of the Thomson/ Mare Ingenii, Van de Graaff, and Leeuwenhoek mare basalts on the two largest magnetic features in the region. Modeling suggests that the dike zone is between 25 and 50 km wide at the surface, and dike magnetization contrasts are in the range of 0.2 A/m. We theorize that the basaltic dikes were emplaced in the lunar crust when a long-lived dynamo was active. Based on pressure, temperature, and stress conditions prevalent in the lunar crust, dikes are expected to be a dominantly subsurface phenomenon, consistent with the observations reported here.

  5. A record of ozone variability in South Pole Antarctic snow: Role of nitrate oxygen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Justin R.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Savarino, Joel

    2007-06-01

    The information contained in polar nitrate has been an unresolved issue for over a decade. Here we demonstrate that atmospheric nitrate's oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O-NO3) reflects stratospheric chemistry in winter and tropospheric chemistry in summer. Surface snow isotope mass balance indicates that nitrate oxygen isotopic composition is the result of a mixture of 25% stratospheric and 75% tropospheric origin. Analysis of trends in Δ17O-NO3 in a 6 m snow pit that provides a 26-year record reveals a strong 2.70-year cycle that anticorrelates (R = -0.77) with October-November-December column ozone. The potential mechanisms linking the records are either denitrification or increased boundary layer photochemical ozone production. We suggest that the latter is dominating the observed trend and find that surface ozone and Δ17O-NO3 correlate well before 1991 (R = 0.93). After 1991, however, the records show no significant relationship, indicating an altered oxidative environment consistent with current understanding of a highly oxidizing atmosphere at the South Pole. The disappearance of seasonal Δ17O-NO3 trends in the surface layer at depth remain unresolved and demand further investigation of how postdepositional processes affect nitrate's oxygen isotope composition. Overall, the findings of this study present a new paleoclimate technique to investigate Antarctic nitrate records that appear to reflect trends in stratospheric ozone depletion by recording tropospheric surface ozone variability.

  6. High-resolution Local Gravity Model of the South Pole of the Moon from GRAIL Extended Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Sander Johannes; Sabaka, Terence J.; Nicholas, Joseph B.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Rowlands, David D.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    We estimated a high-resolution local gravity field model over the south pole of the Moon using data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory's extended mission. Our solution consists of adjustments with respect to a global model expressed in spherical harmonics. The adjustments are expressed as gridded gravity anomalies with a resolution of 1/6deg by 1/6deg (equivalent to that of a degree and order 1080 model in spherical harmonics), covering a cap over the south pole with a radius of 40deg. The gravity anomalies have been estimated from a short-arc analysis using only Ka-band range-rate (KBRR) data over the area of interest. We apply a neighbor-smoothing constraint to our solution. Our local model removes striping present in the global model; it reduces the misfit to the KBRR data and improves correlations with topography to higher degrees than current global models.

  7. Ground-based instrumentation for measurements of atmospheric conduction current and electric field at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, G. J.; Benbrook, J. R.; Bering, E. A.; Few, A. A.; Morris, G. A.; Trabucco, W. J.; Paschal, E. W.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to instruments constructed to measure the atmospheric conduction current and the atmospheric electric field - two fundamental parameters of the global-electric circuit. The instruments were deployed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in January 1991 and are designed to operate continuously for up to one year without operator intervention. The atmospheric current flows into one hemisphere, through the electronics where it is measured, and out the other hemisphere. The electric field is measured by a field mill of the rotating dipole type. Sample data from the first days of operation at the South Pole indicate variations in the global circuit over time scales from minutes to hours to days.

  8. Quantification of several atmospheric gases from high resolution infrared solar spectra obtained at the South Pole in 1980 and 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Aaron; Murcray, Frank J.; Murcray, Frank H.; Murcray, David G.; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution solar absorption spectra recorded at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station were analyzed to obtain total column amounts of O3, N2O, HNO3, CO2, CH4, and CF2Cl2, and to investigate the differences in the values obtained in December 1980 with those obtained in December 1986. In addition, vertical column amounts for HCl, NO, NO2, and C2H6 were derived for December 1986. One interesting feature of these results is that the total column amounts of HCl measured for several days at the South Pole (/6.4 + or - 0.8/ x 10 to the 15th molecules/sq cm) were high compared with the HCl column amounts reported for lower latitudes.

  9. Geologic Mapping of the Lunar South Pole, Quadrangle LQ-30: Volcanic History and Stratigraphy of Schroedinger Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Petro, N. E.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we use recent images and topographic data to map the geology and geomorphology of the lunar South Pole quadrangle (LQ-30) at 1:2.5M scale [1-4] in accordance with the Lunar Geologic Mapping Program. Mapping of LQ-30 began during Mest's postdoctoral appointment and has continued under the PG&G Program, from which funding became available in February 2009. Preliminary map-ping and analyses have been done using base materials compiled by Mest, but properly mosaicked and spatially registered base materials are being compiled by the USGS and should be received by the end of June 2009. The overall objective of this research is to constrain the geologic evolution of the lunar South Pole (LQ-30: 60deg -90deg S, 0deg - +/-180deg ) with specific emphasis on evaluation of a) the regional effects of basin formation on the structure and composition of the crust and b) the spatial distribution of ejecta, in particular resulting from formation of the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin and other large basins. Key scientific objectives include: 1) Constraining the geologic history of the lunar South Pole and examining the spatial and temporal variability of geologic processes within the map area. 2) Constraining the vertical and lateral structure of the lunar regolith and crust, assessing the distribution of impact-generated materials, and determining the timing and effects of major basin-forming impacts on crustal structure and stratigraphy in the map area. And 3) assessing the distribution of resources (e.g., H, Fe, Th) and their relationships with surface materials.

  10. Infrared measurements of increased CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ (CFC-12) absorption above the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinsland, C.P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F.J.; Murcray, F.H.; Murcray, D.G.; Levine, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    High-resolution ground-based solar spectra recorded at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in Dec. 1980 and Nov. 1986 have been analyzed in the region of the CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ (chlorofluorocarbon 12) atgn/sub 8/ band Q branches at 1161 cm/sup arrow-right-left//sup 1/. An increase in the CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ total vertical column above the South Pole of 1.24 atmapprox. = 0.15 over the 6-yr period, corresponding to an average rate of increase of 3.6 atmapprox. = 2.1%, is derived. This rate of increase is lower than indicated by in situ measurements at the South Pole over the same time period, but there is agreement when the rather error bars of the spectral measurement results are considered. Spectroscopic parameters that can successfully model CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ absorption at low temperatures are needed to improve retrieval accuracies and could be applied to a number of pre-1980 atmospheric spectral data sets in the literature to obtain an improved record of early CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ concentration trends for comparison with estimates of historical release rates.

  11. MEASUREMENT OF GALAXY CLUSTER INTEGRATED COMPTONIZATION AND MASS SCALING RELATIONS WITH THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliwanchik, B. R.; Montroy, T. E. [Physics Department, Center for Education and Research in Cosmology and Astrophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bayliss, M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bocquet, S.; Desai, S. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 München (Germany); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Cho, H. M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway, Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Clocchiatti, A. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica (Chile); De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R., E-mail: benjamin.saliwanchik@case.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    We describe a method for measuring the integrated Comptonization (Y {sub SZ}) of clusters of galaxies from measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in multiple frequency bands and use this method to characterize a sample of galaxy clusters detected in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) data. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to fit a β-model source profile and integrate Y {sub SZ} within an angular aperture on the sky. In simulated observations of an SPT-like survey that include cosmic microwave background anisotropy, point sources, and atmospheric and instrumental noise at typical SPT-SZ survey levels, we show that we can accurately recover β-model parameters for inputted clusters. We measure Y {sub SZ} for simulated semi-analytic clusters and find that Y {sub SZ} is most accurately determined in an angular aperture comparable to the SPT beam size. We demonstrate the utility of this method to measure Y {sub SZ} and to constrain mass scaling relations using X-ray mass estimates for a sample of 18 galaxy clusters from the SPT-SZ survey. Measuring Y {sub SZ} within a 0.'75 radius aperture, we find an intrinsic log-normal scatter of 21% ± 11% in Y {sub SZ} at a fixed mass. Measuring Y {sub SZ} within a 0.3 Mpc projected radius (equivalent to 0.'75 at the survey median redshift z = 0.6), we find a scatter of 26% ± 9%. Prior to this study, the SPT observable found to have the lowest scatter with mass was cluster detection significance. We demonstrate, from both simulations and SPT observed clusters that Y {sub SZ} measured within an aperture comparable to the SPT beam size is equivalent, in terms of scatter with cluster mass, to SPT cluster detection significance.

  12. Measurement of Galaxy Cluster Integrated Comptonization and Mass Scaling Relations with the South Pole Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliwanchik, B. R.; et al.

    2015-01-22

    We describe a method for measuring the integrated Comptonization (Y (SZ)) of clusters of galaxies from measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in multiple frequency bands and use this method to characterize a sample of galaxy clusters detected in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) data. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to fit a β-model source profile and integrate Y (SZ) within an angular aperture on the sky. In simulated observations of an SPT-like survey that include cosmic microwave background anisotropy, point sources, and atmospheric and instrumental noise at typical SPT-SZ survey levels, we show that we can accurately recover β-model parameters for inputted clusters. We measure Y (SZ) for simulated semi-analytic clusters and find that Y (SZ) is most accurately determined in an angular aperture comparable to the SPT beam size. We demonstrate the utility of this method to measure Y (SZ) and to constrain mass scaling relations using X-ray mass estimates for a sample of 18 galaxy clusters from the SPT-SZ survey. Measuring Y (SZ) within a 0.'75 radius aperture, we find an intrinsic log-normal scatter of 21% ± 11% in Y (SZ) at a fixed mass. Measuring Y (SZ) within a 0.3 Mpc projected radius (equivalent to 0.'75 at the survey median redshift z = 0.6), we find a scatter of 26% ± 9%. Prior to this study, the SPT observable found to have the lowest scatter with mass was cluster detection significance. We demonstrate, from both simulations and SPT observed clusters that Y (SZ) measured within an aperture comparable to the SPT beam size is equivalent, in terms of scatter with cluster mass, to SPT cluster detection significance.

  13. Maps of the Magellanic Clouds from Combined South Pole Telescope and PLANCK Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, T. M.; Chown, R.; Holder, G. P.; Aird, K. A.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H.-M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; George, E. M.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Luong-Van, D.; Marrone, D. P.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Williamson, R.

    2016-12-01

    We present maps of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds from combined South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck data. The Planck satellite observes in nine bands, while the SPT data used in this work were taken with the three-band SPT-SZ camera, The SPT-SZ bands correspond closely to three of the nine Planck bands, namely those centered at 1.4, 2.1, and 3.0 mm. The angular resolution of the Planck data ranges from 5 to 10 arcmin, while the SPT resolution ranges from 1.0 to 1.7 arcmin. The combined maps take advantage of the high resolution of the SPT data and the long-timescale stability of the space-based Planck observations to deliver robust brightness measurements on scales from the size of the maps down to ∼1 arcmin. In each band, we first calibrate and color-correct the SPT data to match the Planck data, then we use noise estimates from each instrument and knowledge of each instrument’s beam to make the inverse-variance-weighted combination of the two instruments’ data as a function of angular scale. We create maps assuming a range of underlying emission spectra and at a range of final resolutions. We perform several consistency tests on the combined maps and estimate the expected noise in measurements of features in them. We compare maps from this work to those from the Herschel HERITAGE survey, finding general consistency between the data sets. All data products described in this paper are available for download from the NASA Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis server.

  14. Variability in pulmonary function following rapid altitude ascent to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, S; Anderson, P J; Miller, A D; Ceridon, M L; Beck, K C; O'Malley, K A; Johnson, J B; Johnson, B D

    2011-09-01

    The impact of acute altitude exposure on pulmonary function is variable. A large inter-individual variability in the changes in forced expiratory flows (FEFs) is reported with acute exposure to altitude, which is suggested to represent an interaction between several factors influencing bronchial tone such as changes in gas density, catecholamine stimulation, and mild interstitial edema. This study examined the association between FEF variability, acute mountain sickness (AMS) and various blood markers affecting bronchial tone (endothelin-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), catecholamines, angiotensin II) in 102 individuals rapidly transported to the South Pole (2835 m). The mean FEF between 25 and 75% (FEF(25-75)) and blood markers were recorded at sea level and after the second night at altitude. AMS was assessed using Lake Louise questionnaires. FEF(25-75) increased by an average of 12% with changes ranging from -26 to +59% from sea level to altitude. On the second day, AMS incidence was 36% and was higher in individuals with increases in FEF(25-75) (41 vs. 22%, P = 0.05). Ascent to altitude induced an increase in endothelin-1 levels, with greater levels observed in individuals with decreased FEF(25-75). Epinephrine levels increased with ascent to altitude and the response was six times larger in individuals with decreased FEF(25-75). Greater levels of endothelin-1 in individuals with decreased FEF(25-75) suggest a response consistent with pulmonary hypertension and/or mild interstitial edema, while epinephrine may be upregulated in these individuals to clear lung fluid through stimulation of β(2)-adrenergic receptors.

  15. Polar stratospheric clouds at the South Pole in 1990: Lidar observations and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, R.L.; Bowman, K.P.; Gardner, C.S. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (United States))

    1993-01-20

    In December 1989 a Rayleigh/sodium lidar (589 nm) was installed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station, and was used to measure stratospheric aerosol, temperature, and mesospheric sodium profiles through October 1990. Observations of stratospheric aerosol and temperature are presented in this paper. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were first observed in late May at about 20 km. As the lower stratosphere cooled further, PSCs were observed throughout the 12-27 km altitude region, and remained there from mid-June until late August. Observations in early September detected no PSCs above 21 km. An isolated cloud was observed in mid-October. Throughout the winter the clouds had small backscatter ratios (< 10). Observations made at two wavelengths in July show that the clouds are predominately composed of nitric acid trihydrate with associated Angstrom coefficients between 0.2 and 3.7. Comparison of the lidar data and balloon borne frost point measurements in late August indicate that the nitric acid mixing ratio was less than 1.5 ppbv. Observations over periods of several hours show downward motions in the cloud layers similar to the phase progressions of upwardly-propagating gravity waves. The vertical phase velocities of these features ([approx] 4 cm/s) are significantly faster than the expected settling velocities of the cloud particles. Both the backscatter ratio profiles and the radiosonde horizontal wind profiles show 1-4 km vertical structures. This suggests that the kilometer-scale vertical structure of the PSCs is maintained by low frequency gravity waves propagating through the cloud layers. 24 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Burnham's celestial handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Burnham, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Volume II of a comprehensive three-part guide to celestial objects outside our solar system ranges from Chamaeleon to Orion. Features coordinates, classifications, physical descriptions, hundreds of visual aids. 1977 edition.

  17. A test field for Gaia. Radial velocity catalogue of stars in the South Ecliptic Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémat, Y.; Altmann, M.; Pancino, E.; Soubiran, C.; Jofré, P.; Damerdji, Y.; Heiter, U.; Royer, F.; Seabroke, G.; Sordo, R.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Jasniewicz, G.; Martayan, C.; Thévenin, F.; Vallenari, A.; Blomme, R.; David, M.; Gosset, E.; Katz, D.; Viala, Y.; Boudreault, S.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Lobel, A.; Meisenheimer, K.; Nordlander, T.; Raskin, G.; Royer, P.; Zorec, J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Gaia is a space mission that is currently measuring the five astrometric parameters, as well as spectrophotometry of at least 1 billion stars to G = 20.7 mag with unprecedented precision. The sixth parameter in phase space (i.e., radial velocity) is also measured thanks to medium-resolution spectroscopy that is being obtained for the 150 million brightest stars. During the commissioning phase, two fields, one around each ecliptic pole, have been repeatedly observed to assess and to improve the overall satellite performances, as well as the associated reduction and analysis software. A ground-based photometric and spectroscopic survey was therefore initiated in 2007, and is still running to gather as much information as possible about the stars in these fields. This work is of particular interest to the validation of the radial velocity spectrometer outputs. Aims: The paper presents the radial velocity measurements performed for the Southern targets in the 12-17 R magnitude range on high- to mid-resolution spectra obtained with the GIRAFFE and UVES spectrographs. Methods: Comparison of the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) GIRAFFE data to spectroscopic templates observed with the HERMES (Mercator in La Palma, Spain) spectrograph enabled a first coarse characterisation of the 747 SEP targets. Radial velocities were then obtained by comparing the results of three different methods. Results: In this paper, we present an initial overview of the targets to be found in the 1 sq. deg SEP region that was observed repeatedly by Gaia ever since its commissioning. In our representative sample, we identified one galaxy, six LMC S-stars, nine candidate chromospherically active stars, and confirmed the status of 18 LMC Carbon stars. A careful study of the 3471 epoch radial velocity measurements led us to identify 145 RV constant stars with radial velocities varying by less than 1 km s-1. Seventy-eight stars show significant RV scatter, while nine stars show a composite spectrum

  18. a Search for the Cosmic Dust Increment to Aerosol Particles at the Geographic South Pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Robert Edward

    1988-12-01

    An electrostatic precipitation (ESP) particle collector was constructed and deployed to sample the South Pole, Antarctica atmosphere for submicron-size cosmic dust particles. It was in operation between December, 1983 and January, 1987 at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Clean Air Facility (CAF). The collector is most efficient for particles in the 0.3 mu m size range. An arrangement of isolation shutters and removable sampling plates allows for sample transfer, without contamination, to a remote laboratory for individual particle characterization by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS) for elemental analysis and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) for crystallographic identifications. Beside the readily identifiable contaminants, including sulfuric acid droplets that make up a significant background and sooty carbonaceous-type material, a variety of rod-shaped grains and spheres have been noted. In addition, an iron-containing mineral has been observed as fragile filamentary or needle-like crystalline aggregates. Some rather rare particles that display single element EDS signature peaks of Ti, Cr, Co, Mg, Si, and Pb and a possible Cr, Fe intermetallic or mineral particle also have been observed. While it would not be surprising for cosmic dust grains to be small in size and to have simple compositions, any concrete evidence of an extraterrestrial origin for any of these grains is lacking. Two other types of particles show a stronger possibility of cosmic origin. These are an Al, Fe particle collected during a Perseids Meteor Event and a unique particle that contains Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Fe and Ni in chondritic proportions. After completion of the particle collection program, the collector was shut down and returned to the laboratory for evaluation. An area of one of the stainless steel plates from the first chamber of the collector, the particle -charging section, was

  19. Maps of the Magellanic Clouds from Combined South Pole Telescope and Planck Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, T.M.; et al.

    2016-05-03

    We present maps of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds from combined South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck data. Both instruments are designed to make measurements of the cosmic microwave background but are sensitive to any source of millimeter-wave (mm-wave) emission. The Planck satellite observes in nine mm-wave bands, while the SPT data used in this work were taken with the three-band SPT-SZ camera. The SPT-SZ bands correspond closely to three of the nine Planck bands, namely those centered at 1.4, 2.1, and 3.0 mm. The angular resolution of the Planck data in these bands ranges from 5 to 10 arcmin, while the SPT resolution in these bands ranges from 1.0 to 1.7 arcmin. The combined maps take advantage of the high resolution of the SPT data and the long-timescale stability of the space-based Planck observations to deliver high signal-to-noise and robust brightness measurements on scales from the size of the maps down to ~1 arcmin. In each of the three bands, we first calibrate and color-correct the SPT data to match the Planck data, then we use noise estimates from each instrument and knowledge of each instrument's beam, or point-spread function, to make the inverse-variance-weighted combination of the two instruments' data as a function of angular scale. We create maps assuming a range of underlying emission spectra (for the color correction) and at a range of final resolutions. We perform several consistency tests on the combined maps and estimate the expected noise in measurements of features in the maps. We compare the maps of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) from this work to maps from the Herschel HERITAGE survey, finding general consistency between the datasets. The broad wavelength coverage provides evidence of different emission mechanisms at work in different environments in the LMC. [Abridged

  20. Cassini VIMS Spectra of the Thermal Emission from Hot Spots Along Enceladus South Pole Fissures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Cassini VIMS Team

    2016-10-01

    Most of the south pole fissure region has not been directly illuminated by sunlight since the sub-solar point moved into the northern hemisphere in 2009, thereby eliminating the background of reflected sunlight at VIMS wavelengths and making the fissure thermal emission readily measureable. Since then, VIMS has measured spectra of at least 11 hot spots along the fissures. Most of these measurements were acquired in ride-along mode with CIRS as the prime instrument. During at least 2 encounters, VIMS and CIRS acquired simultaneous or near-simultaneous spectra of the same fissure location. VIMS spectra include multiple hot spots along Damascus, Baghdad, Cairo, and a likely hot spot on Alexandria.All of the VIMS spectra examined to date are consistent with this scenario of a self-regulating fissure maximum T~200 K with brighter VIMS emissions corresponding to fissures up to ~20 m wide. Emission from the warm fissure interior walls dominate the VIMS spectra with <15% contributed by conductive heating of the adjacent terrain at VIMS wavelengths.CIRS spectra report slightly cooler T's due to CIRS increased sensitivity to lower T emission at longer wavelengths and averaging over contributions from both the hottest and cooler areas. Combined analysis of the CIRS and VIMS spectra spanning 3 to 500 micron wavelengths promises to reveal the distribution of [T, area] near the fissures that cannot be spatially resolved. This [T, area] distribution holds the key to understanding how heat is transferred to the surface within a few 100 m of the fissures.The VIMS-detected emission is concentrated in localized hot spots along the fissures and does not seem to be distributed continuously along them. CIRS spectra suggest a more continuous distribution of the emission along the fissure length. Jets locations also are distributed along the fissure length and it appears that the VIMS-detected hot spots in general correlate with jet locations, but not all of the jet locations have been

  1. Spring and Summer Changes at the South Pole as Seen by the Mars Orbiter Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, A. P.; Murray, B. C.; Byrne, S.; DeJong, E.; Danielson, G. E.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Kieffer, H. H.; Soderblom, L. A.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft has been able to follow individual features as the CO2 frost disappears and exposes the material underneath. Because the orbit of MGS is inclined at an angle of 93 degrees relative to the equator, the spacecraft gets especially good coverage of the ring at 87 degrees latitude. The following is a list of phenomena that have been seen during the spring and summer at the South Pole: (1) Circular depressions that are approximately ten meters deep and hundreds of meters in diameter. They are found only within the residual polar cap, the part that survives the summer. The high areas between the depressions are flat-topped mesas whose sides are concave circular arcs. In some places the depressions form patterns that exhibit north-south symmetry, suggesting some control by sunlight; (2) Dark layers that are exposed on the walls of the mesas. Each layer is at most a few meters thick. The dark layers might accumulate during climatic episodes of high atmospheric dust content, or they might accumulate during the annual cycling of dusty CO2; (3) Albedo differences that develop during the summer within the residual cap. These include subtle darkening of the floors of the depressions relative to the mesas and occasional major darkening of the floors, especially near the edge of the cap. The floors and mesas form a distinct stratum, suggesting they represent a distinct compositional boundary. For instance the floors may be water and the mesas may be CO2; (4) Small dark features that appear in spring on the seasonal frost outside the residual cap. Some of the features have parallel tails that are clearly shaped by the wind. Others are more symmetric, like dark snowflakes, with multiple branching arms. After the CO2 frost has disappeared the arms are seen as troughs and the centers as topographic lows; (5) Polygons whose sides are dark troughs. Those that are outside the residual cap seem to disappear when

  2. An interhemispheric comparison of GPS phase scintillation with auroral emission observed at the South Pole and from the DMSP satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Prikryl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The global positioning system (GPS phase scintillation caused by high-latitude ionospheric irregularities during an intense high-speed stream (HSS of the solar wind from April 29 to May 5, 2011, was observed using arrays of GPS ionospheric scintillation and total electron content monitors in the Arctic and Antarctica. The one-minute phase-scintillation index derived from the data sampled at 50 Hz was complemented by a proxy index (delta phase rate obtained from 1-Hz GPS data. The scintillation occurrence coincided with the aurora borealis and aurora australis observed by an all-sky imager at the South Pole, and by special sensor ultraviolet scanning imagers on board satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program. The South Pole (SP station is approximately conjugate with two Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network stations on Baffin Island, Canada, which provided the opportunity to study magnetic conjugacy of scintillation with support of riometers and magnetometers. The GPS ionospheric pierce points were mapped at their actual or conjugate locations, along with the auroral emission over the South Pole, assuming an altitude of 120 km. As the aurora brightened and/or drifted across the field of view of the all-sky imager, sequences of scintillation events were observed that indicated conjugate auroras as a locator of simultaneous or delayed bipolar scintillation events. In spite of the greater scintillation intensity in the auroral oval, where phase scintillation sometimes exceeded 1 radian during the auroral break-up and substorms, the percentage occurrence of moderate scintillation was highest in the cusp. Interhemispheric comparisons of bipolar scintillation maps show that the scintillation occurrence is significantly higher in the southern cusp and polar cap.

  3. Temperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: implications for life in a nearby subglacial lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, P Buford; Nagornov, Oleg V; Bay, Ryan; Chirkin, Dmitry; He, Yudong; Miocinovic, Predrag; Richards, Austin; Woschnagg, Kurt; Koci, Bruce; Zagorodnov, Victor

    2002-06-11

    Airborne radar has detected approximately 100 lakes under the Antarctic ice cap, the largest of which is Lake Vostok. International planning is underway to search in Lake Vostok for microbial life that may have evolved in isolation from surface life for millions of years. It is thought, however, that the lakes may be hydraulically interconnected. If so, unsterile drilling would contaminate not just one but many of them. Here we report measurements of temperature vs. depth down to 2,345 m in ice at the South Pole, within 10 km from a subglacial lake seen by airborne radar profiling. We infer a temperature at the 2,810-m deep base of the South Pole ice and at the lake of -9 degrees C, which is 7 degrees C below the pressure-induced melting temperature of freshwater ice. To produce the strong radar signal, the frozen lake must consist of a mix of sediment and ice in a flat bed, formed before permanent Antarctic glaciation. It may, like Siberian and Antarctic permafrost, be rich in microbial life. Because of its hydraulic isolation, proximity to South Pole Station infrastructure, and analog to a Martian polar cap, it is an ideal place to test a sterile drill before risking contamination of Lake Vostok. From the semiempirical expression for strain rate vs. shear stress, we estimate shear vs. depth and show that the IceCube neutrino observatory will be able to map the three-dimensional ice-flow field within a larger volume (0.5 km(3)) and at lower temperatures (-20 degrees C to -35 degrees C) than has heretofore been possible.

  4. Designing an H-rotor type Wind Turbine for Operation on Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station

    OpenAIRE

    Wahl, Mats

    2007-01-01

    This thesis focuses on designing the turbine, tower structure and generator for an H-rotor type wind turbine. The produced power will be used for heating of drilling equipment, stored in containers, on the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. A 23 kW wind turbine producing 5 kW on average has been designed. Moreover, the design has been tested to be mounted on top of the container storing the drilling equipment. Climatological data have been processed to describe the wind regime in useful terms...

  5. Quantification of HCl from High Resolution Infrared Solar Spectra Obtained at the South Pole in December 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.

    1987-01-01

    Ground-based infrared solar spectra at 0.02/ cm resolution obtained at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in December 1986 have been analysed for the atmospheric content of HCl. Nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting applied to the spectra yields a total HCl column amount of (6.4 +/- 0.8) x 10(exp 15) molec/sq cm, most being stratospheric. This amount is larger than that extrapolated from earlier results on the latitudinal distribution of atmospheric HCl.

  6. Design and Initial Performance of the Askaryan Radio Array Prototype EeV Neutrino Detector at the South Pole

    OpenAIRE

    Allison, P; Auffenberg, J.; Bard, R; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D.Z.; Boeser, S.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Connolly, A.; Davies, J; DuVernois, M.; Fox, B.; Gorham, P. W.; Grashorn, E. W.; Hanson, K.

    2011-01-01

    We report on studies of the viability and sensitivity of the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA), a new initiative to develop a Teraton-scale ultra-high energy neutrino detector in deep, radio-transparent ice near Amundsen-Scott station at the South Pole. An initial prototype ARA detector system was installed in January 2011, and has been operating continuously since then. We report on studies of the background radio noise levels, the radio clarity of the ice, and the estimated sensitivity of the plan...

  7. The Accuracy of Praziquantel Dose Poles for Mass Treatment of Schistosomiasis in School Girls in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baan, Marije; Galappaththi-Arachchige, Hashini Nilushika; Gagai, Silindile;

    2016-01-01

    by height as representing weight-has been used as a practical and cheap tool in mass treatment. In South Africa this method could be inaccurate given the prevalence of overweight and obesity. In this study in female pupils in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, we explored the accuracy of the WHO Tablet Pole...

  8. High Resolution Mapping of the Lunar South Pole-Aitken Basin Interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archinal, B. A.; Gaddis, L. R.; Hare, T. M.; Rosiek, M.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Lee, E.; Weller, L.; Kirk, R. L.; Edmundson, K.; Becker, T.; Jolliff, B. L.; Tran, T.; Robinson, M.; LROC Science Team

    2010-12-01

    We are making geodetically controlled high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) and image orthomosaics of the Constellation (Cx) Program region of interest (ROI) in the lunar South Pole-Aitken Basin interior (“SAB”) (center at 200.06° E, 60.00° S). This work is part of the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Program (LMMP), a NASA-funded effort to create useful cartographic products from past and current lunar datasets and to serve them on a web portal. The SAB is one of 50 ROIs chosen by Cx as potential sites for future robotic or human landings or analogs thereof. Source data for our products includes publically released ~50 cm/pixel Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera images and Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) spot elevation measurements and preliminary global 16 posts/° DTM. Products generated so far include: a) a preliminary stereo DTM covering ~25% of the center 20 km square area of the ROI, with post spacing (resolution) of 1.5 m and ~86x10^6 posts; b) a preliminary mosaic of 90% of the 40 km square ROI, with a resolution of 2 m, orthorectified with LOLA data or, where possible, the stereo DTM; c) preliminary DTMs generated via the use of photoclinometry (“shape from shading”), covering small areas with post spacing of 50 cm; and d) slope and roughness maps derived from a and c. All products are in the lunar mean Earth/polar axis coordinate system and the preliminary global reference frame of the current LOLA DTM. The absolute accuracy of these products is limited by the horizontal and vertical accuracy of the LOLA DTM, to which they are tied (DTMs and mosaics) or on which they are projected (mosaics). The expected vertical precision of the stereo DTM is ~20 cm. The products will soon be publically available via the LMMP portal and also via the USGS planetary GIS site, http://webgis.wr.usgs.gov/. Final versions tied to the LOLA nominal mission global DTM will be available in 2011 October. Preliminary analyses of these

  9. Design and Initial Performance of the Askaryan Radio Array Prototype EeV Neutrino Detector at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Allison, P; Bard, R; Beatty, J J; Besson, D Z; Boeser, S; Chen, C; Chen, P; Connolly, A; Davies, J; DuVernois, M; Fox, B; Gorham, P W; Grashorn, E W; Hanson, K; Haugen, J; Helbing, K; Hill, B; Hoffman, K D; Huang, M; Huang, M H A; Ishihara, A; Karle, A; Kennedy, D; Landsman, H; Laundrie, A; Liu, T -C; Macchiarulo, L; Mase, K; Meures, T; Meyhandan, R; Miki, C; Morse, R; Newcomb, M; Nichol, R J; Ratzlaff, K; Richman, M; Ritter, L; Rotter, B; Sandstrom, P; Seckel, D; Touart, J; Varner, G S; Wang, Y; Weaver, C; Wendorff, A; Yoshida, S; Young, R

    2011-01-01

    We report on studies of the viability and sensitivity of the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA), a new initiative to develop a Teraton-scale ultra-high energy neutrino detector in deep, radio-transparent ice near Amundsen-Scott station at the South Pole. An initial prototype ARA detector system was installed in January 2011, and has been operating continuously since then. We report on studies of the background radio noise levels, the radio clarity of the ice, and the estimated sensitivity of the planned ARA array given these results, based on the first five months of operation. Anthropogenic radio interference in the vicinity of the South Pole currently leads to a few-percent loss of data, but no overall effect on the background noise levels, which are dominated by the thermal noise floor of the cold polar ice, and galactic noise at lower frequencies. We have also successfully detected signals originating from a 2.5 km deep impulse generator at a distance of over 3 km from our prototype detector, confirming prior est...

  10. Burnham's celestial handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Burnham, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Volume I of this comprehensive three-part guide to the thousands of celestial objects outside our solar system ranges from Andromeda through Cetus. Objects are grouped according to constellation, and their definitions feature names, coordinates, classifications, and physical descriptions. Additional notes offer fascinating historical information. Hundreds of visual aids. 1977 edition.

  11. Burnham's celestial handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Burnham, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Volume III of this three-part comprehensive guide to the thousands of celestial objects outside our solar system concludes with listings from Pavo through Vulpecula. Objects are grouped according to constellation, and their definitions feature names, coordinates, classifications, and physical descriptions. Additional notes offer fascinating historical information. Hundreds of visual aids. 1977 edition.

  12. An Overview of Major Terrestrial, Celestial, and Temporal Coordinate Systems for Target Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    quadrant inverse tangent in (B2) is not uniquely defined at the poles (when x “ 0 and y “ 0). However, many implementations of the four-quadrant inverse ...Harmonic Coordinates .................................... 105 APPENDIX E—Principal Axes, Precession, Nutation, and the Pole Tide...on the Celestial Sphere z ` Pole of the Ecliptic ˘ x ˆ IERS Reference Meridian « Dynamical Equinox at Epoch ˙ , P z ` IERS Reference Pole

  13. The First Public Release of South Pole Telescope Data: Maps of a 95-square-degree Field from 2008 Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffer, K K; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; George, E M; Halverson, N W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Ruhl, J E; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Williamson, R

    2011-01-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has nearly completed a 2500-square-degree survey of the southern sky in three frequency bands. Here we present the first public release of SPT maps and associated data products. We present arcminute-resolution maps at 150 GHz and 220 GHz of an approximately 95-square-degree field centered at R.A. 82.7 degrees, decl. -55 degrees. The field was observed to a depth of approximately 17 micro-K arcmin at 150 GHz and 41 micro-K arcmin at 220 GHz during the 2008 austral winter season. Two variations on map filtering and map projection are presented, one tailored for producing catalogs of galaxy clusters detected through their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect signature and one tailored for producing catalogs of emissive sources. We describe the data processing pipeline, and we present instrument response functions, filter transfer functions, and map noise properties. All data products described in this paper are available for download at http://pole.uchicago.edu/public/data/maps/ra5h30dec-55 a...

  14. A Measurement of the Correlation of Galaxy Surveys with CMB Lensing Convergence Maps from the South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Bleem, L E; Holder, G P; Aird, K A; Armstrong, R; Ashby, M L N; Becker, M R; Benson, B A; Biesiadzinski, T; Brodwin, M; Busha, M T; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Doré, O; Dudley, J; Geach, J E; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N; High, F W; Holden, B P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Marrone, D P; Martinez-Manso, J; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Stanford, S A; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Stern, D; Story, K; Vallinotto, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Wechsler, R H; Williamson, R; Zahn, O

    2012-01-01

    We compare cosmic microwave background lensing convergence maps derived from South Pole Telescope (SPT) data with galaxy survey data from the Blanco Cosmology Survey, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, and a new large Spitzer/IRAC field designed to overlap with the SPT survey. Using optical and infrared catalogs covering between 17 and 68 square degrees of sky, we detect correlation between the SPT convergence maps and each of the galaxy density maps at >4 sigma, with zero cross-correlation robustly ruled out in all cases. The amplitude and shape of the cross-power spectra are in good agreement with theoretical expectations and the measured galaxy bias is consistent with previous work. The detections reported here utilize a small fraction of the full 2500 square degree SPT survey data and serve as both a proof of principle of the technique and an illustration of the potential of this emerging cosmological probe.

  15. SIMULATION OF EARTH'S POLES DYNAMICS USING ASK-ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Cherednychenko N. A.; Lutsenko Y. V.; Trunev A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Based on local semantic information models, we have examined the dependence of the dynamics of the displacement of the pole positions of celestial objects. We have also developed and differentiated an analysis of ASK-pole modeling of dynamics within sixty-year cycles of reference points and substantiated reasons for the population inversion and singular states in the dynamics of the pole

  16. Recent Global Measurements of Atmospheric COS and Historic Trends Inferred from Firn Air at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montzka, S. A.; Lind, J. A.; Dutton, G. S.; Hall, B. D.; Mondeel, D. J.; Butler, J. H.; Elkins, J. W.

    2001-12-01

    Available measurements of carbonyl sulfide provide a picture of atmospheric distributions and seasonal variations that are somewhat inconsistent with our current understanding of COS sources and sinks [see Kjellstrom, J. Atmos. Chem., 1998]. Over the past 1.5 years, we have made measurements of COS at 10 ground-based sampling stations to address some of these concerns. In addition, we have measured COS in firn air from the South Pole in an attempt to reconstruct an atmospheric history of this gas dating back to the early 1900s. The recent data show large seasonal variations at most sites in both hemispheres; summer mixing ratios at Arctic and continental US sites are 20-30% lower than observed in spring. In the northern hemisphere (NH), the timing of the seasonality lends support to strong summertime losses of COS owing to uptake by vegetation and/or soils. The only regular seasonality noted previously for COS in the NH was by total column absorption measurements at mid-latitudes that indicated slightly higher ( ~3%) mean tropospheric mixing ratios in summer. In the southern hemisphere (SH), smaller ( ~10% peak-to-peak) variations are observed at Tasmania and show a maximum during austral summer, perhaps owing to enhanced oceanic flux during that season. No seasonality is apparent at American Samoa (14 S), where larger sample-to-sample variations are observed. Our data suggest annual mean surface mixing ratios for COS that are slightly higher in the SH (by ~2%), but the NH/SH ratio varies by about +/-6% depending upon the season. Data from air trapped in the snow pack (firn) at South Pole suggest that COS mixing ratios in the early 1990's were ~20% lower than observed today. The mixing ratio increases appear to have occurred predominantly in the early part of that century.

  17. Notice of Intent to Prepare a Comprehensive Environmental Evaluation (CEE) for the Construction and Operation of a High-Energy Neutrino Telescope (Project Ice Cube) at the South Pole

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Request for comments from the NSF for a proposed project to construct and operate a high-energy neutrino telescope at the South Pole. The proposed telescope would be a second-generation instrument based on the successful evolution of a smaller neutrino telescope at the South Pole (1 page).

  18. A test field for Gaia. Radial velocity catalogue of stars in the South Ecliptic Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Frémat, Y; Pancino, E; Soubiran, C; Jofré, P; Damerdji, Y; Heiter, U; Royer, F; Seabroke, G; Sordo, R; Blanco-Cuaresma, S; Jasniewicz, G; Martayan, C; Thévenin, F; Vallenari, A; Blomme, R; David, M; Gosset, E; Katz, D; Viala, Y; Boudreault, S; Cantat-Gaudin, T; Lobel, A; Meisenheimer, K; Nordlander, T; Raskin, G; Royer, P; Zorec, J

    2016-01-01

    Gaia is a space mission currently measuring the five astrometric parameters as well as spectrophotometry of at least 1 billion stars to G = 20.7 mag with unprecedented precision. The sixth parameter in phase space (radial velocity) is also measured thanks to medium-resolution spectroscopy being obtained for the 150 million brightest stars. During the commissioning phase, two fields, one around each ecliptic pole, have been repeatedly observed to assess and to improve the overall satellite performances as well as the associated reduction and analysis software. A ground-based photometric and spectroscopic survey was therefore initiated in 2007, and is still running in order to gather as much information as possible about the stars in these fields. This work is of particular interest to the validation of the Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) outputs. The paper presents the radial velocity measurements performed for the Southern targets in the 12 - 17 R magnitude range on high- to mid-resolution spectra obtained...

  19. High Altitude Weather Balloons to Support Rayleigh and Sodium Lidar Studies of the Troposphere, Stratosphere and Mesosphere at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papen, George

    1995-01-01

    This proposal funded 100 high altitude weather balloons costing $15,500 to support the deployment of a Rayleigh/Raman/Na lidar at the South Pole. One year of measurements have been completed and it is estimated that the balloons will provide another 1-2 years of data.

  20. Frontiers in relativistic celestial mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic celestial mechanics – investigating the motion celestial bodies under the influence of general relativity – is a major tool of modern experimental gravitational physics. With a wide range of prominent authors from the field, this two-volume series consists of reviews on a multitude of advanced topics in the area of relativistic celestial mechanics – starting from more classical topics such as the regime of asymptotically-flat spacetime, light propagation and celestial ephemerides, but also including its role in cosmology and alternative theories of gravity as well as modern experiments in this area.

  1. Submillimeter spectroscopy of the Carina Nebula: Observations, operations and upgrades of the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberst, Thomas Edward

    2009-06-01

    We present the results of a ~ 250 arcmin 2 mapping of the 205 μm [NII] fine- structure line emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II HII regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at South Pole. New upgrades and modifications to the SPIFI instrument are discussed, and full details of SPIFI-AST/RO integration and calibration are provided. At the time of these observations, SPIFI had a spectral resolving power of ~ 4250, a FWHM beam size of ~ 54'', and a noise equivalent power (NEP) referred to the front end of the receiver of ~ 2.5 × 10 -15 W Hz -1/2 (~ 1.4 times the background limit). These data constitute the first ground-based detection of the 205 μm [NII] line, and only the third detection overall since those of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) in the early 1990s. We supplement the 205 μm data with new reductions of far-infrared fine- structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in 63 μm [OI], 122 m [NII], 146 μm [OI], and 158 μm [CII]; the 146 μm [OI] data include 90 raster positions which have not been previously published. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum and CO maps. The 122/205 [NII] line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158/205 [CII]/[NII] line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C + arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). The [OI] and [CII] lines are used to construct a PDR model of Carina following Kaufman et al. (1999). When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than galactic star-forming regions such as Orion, M17, or W49. This is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept

  2. CANDIDATE CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AT z > 1.3 IDENTIFIED IN THE SPITZER SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE DEEP FIELD SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettura, A.; Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-234, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Martinez-Manso, J.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Mei, S. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, Section de Meudon, Meudon Cedex (France); Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Stanford, S. A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bartlett, J. G. [APC, AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/lrfu, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2014-12-20

    We present 279 galaxy cluster candidates at z > 1.3 selected from the 94 deg{sup 2} Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) survey. We use a simple algorithm to select candidate high-redshift clusters of galaxies based on Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data combined with shallow all-sky optical data. We identify distant cluster candidates adopting an overdensity threshold that results in a high purity (80%) cluster sample based on tests in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the Boötes field. Our simple algorithm detects all three 1.4 < z ≤ 1.75 X-ray detected clusters in the Boötes field. The uniqueness of the SSDF survey resides not just in its area, one of the largest contiguous extragalactic fields observed with Spitzer, but also in its deep, multi-wavelength coverage by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), Herschel/SPIRE, and XMM-Newton. This rich data set will allow direct or stacked measurements of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect decrements or X-ray masses for many of the SSDF clusters presented here, and enable a systematic study of the most distant clusters on an unprecedented scale. We measure the angular correlation function of our sample and find that these candidates show strong clustering. Employing the COSMOS/UltraVista photometric catalog in order to infer the redshift distribution of our cluster selection, we find that these clusters have a comoving number density n{sub c}=(0.7{sub −0.6}{sup +6.3})×10{sup −7} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup −3} and a spatial clustering correlation scale length r {sub 0} = (32 ± 7) h {sup –1} Mpc. Assuming our sample is comprised of dark matter halos above a characteristic minimum mass, M {sub min}, we derive that at z = 1.5 these clusters reside in halos larger than M{sub min}=1.5{sub −0.7}{sup +0.9}×10{sup 14} h{sup −1} M{sub ⊙}. We find that the mean mass of our cluster sample is equal to M{sub mean}=1.9{sub −0.8}{sup +1.0}×10{sup 14} h{sup −1} M{sub ⊙}; thus, our sample contains the progenitors of

  3. The geometry of celestial mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Geiges, Hansjörg

    2016-01-01

    Celestial mechanics is the branch of mathematical astronomy devoted to studying the motions of celestial bodies subject to the Newtonian law of gravitation. This mathematical introductory textbook reveals that even the most basic question in celestial mechanics, the Kepler problem, leads to a cornucopia of geometric concepts: conformal and projective transformations, spherical and hyperbolic geometry, notions of curvature, and the topology of geodesic flows. For advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students, this book explores the geometric concepts underlying celestial mechanics and is an ideal companion for introductory courses. The focus on the history of geometric ideas makes it perfect supplementary reading for students in elementary geometry and topology. Numerous exercises, historical notes and an extensive bibliography provide all the contextual information required to gain a solid grounding in celestial mechanics.

  4. Solar irradiance at the Earth's surface: long-term behavior observed at the South Pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Frederick

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This research examines a 17-year database of UV-A (320–400 nm and visible (400–600 nm solar irradiance obtained by a scanning spectroradiometer located at the South Pole. The goal is to define the variability in solar irradiance reaching the polar surface, with emphasis on the influence of cloudiness and on identifying systematic trends and possible links to the solar cycle. To eliminate changes associated with the varying solar elevation, the analysis focuses on data averaged over 30–35 day periods centered on each year's austral summer solstice. The long-term average effect of South Polar clouds is a small attenuation, with the mean measured irradiances being about 5–6% less than the clear-sky values, although at any specific time clouds may reduce or enhance the signal that reaches the sensor. The instantaneous fractional attenuation or enhancement is wavelength dependent, where the percent deviation from the clear-sky irradiance at 400–600 nm is typically 2.5 times that at 320–340 nm. When averaged over the period near each year's summer solstice, significant correlations appear between irradiances at all wavelengths and the solar cycle as measured by the 10.7 cm solar radio flux. An approximate 1.8 ± 1.0% decrease in ground-level irradiance occurs from solar maximum to solar minimum for the wavelength band 320–400 nm. The corresponding decrease for 400–600 nm is 2.4 ± 1.9%. The best-estimate declines appear too large to originate in the sun. If the correlations have a geophysical origin, they suggest a small variation in atmospheric attenuation with the solar cycle over the period of observation, with the greatest attenuation occurring at solar minimum.

  5. Constraining AGN Feedback in Massive Ellipticals with South Pole Telescope Measurements of the Thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Spacek, Alexander; Cohen, Seth; Joshi, Bhavin; Mauskopf, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Energetic feedback due to active galactic nuclei (AGN) is likely to play an important role in the observed anti-hierarchical trend in the evolution of galaxies, and yet the energy injected into the circumgalactic medium by this process is largely unknown. One promising approach to constrain this feedback is through measurements of CMB spectral distortions due to the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect, whose magnitude is directly proportional to the energy input by AGN. Here we co-add South Pole Telescope SZ (SPT-SZ) survey data around a large set of massive quiescent elliptical galaxies at z >= 0.5. We use data from the Blanco Cosmology Survey and VISTA Hemisphere Survey to create a large catalog of galaxies split up into two redshift bins, with 3394 galaxies at 0.5 <= z <= 1.0 and 924 galaxies at 1.0 <= z <= 1.5, with typical stellar masses of 1.5 x 10^11 M_Sun. We then co-add the emission around these galaxies, resulting in a measured tSZ signal at 2.2 sigma significance for the lower redsh...

  6. A Measurement of Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Galaxy Clusters Using Data from the South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Baxter, E J; Dodelson, S; Aird, K A; Allen, S W; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Bocquet, S; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chiu, I; Cho, H-M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; Foley, R J; Forman, W R; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; Hennig, C; Hoekstra, H; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hou, Z; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McDonald, M; McMahon, J J; Meyer, S S; Millea, M; Mocanu, L M; Murray, S S; Padin, S; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Song, J; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Stanford, S A; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K T; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2014-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are expected to gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby generate a distinct signal in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurements of this effect can be used to constrain the masses of galaxy clusters using CMB data alone. Here we present a measurement of lensing of the CMB by galaxy clusters using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We develop a maximum likelihood approach to extract the CMB cluster lensing signal and validate the method on mock data. We quantify the effects of several potential sources of systematic error and find that they generally act to reduce the best-fit cluster mass. The net magnitude of the systematic shift to lower cluster mass is approximately the size of our statistical error bar, and we do not attempt to correct for it. We apply the maximum likelihood technique to 513 clusters selected via their SZ signatures in SPT data, and rule out the null hypothesis of no lensing at 3.0$\\sigma$. The lensing-derived mass estimate for the...

  7. Gaia Data Release 1 - The Cepheid & RR Lyrae star pipeline and its application to the south ecliptic pole region

    CERN Document Server

    Clementini, G; Leccia, S; Mowlavi, N; Lecoeur-Taibi, I; Marconi, M; Szabados, L; Eyer, L; Guy, L P; Rimoldini, L; de Fombelle, G Jevardat; Holl, B; Busso, G; Charnas, J; Cuypers, J; De Angeli, F; De Ridder, J; Debosscher, J; Evans, D W; Klagyivik, P; Musella, I; Nienartowicz, K; Ordonez, D; Regibo, S; Riello, M; Sarro, L M; Suveges, M

    2016-01-01

    We present an overview of the Specific Objects Study (SOS) pipeline developed within the Coordination Unit 7 (CU7) of the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC), the coordination unit charged with the processing and analysis of variable sources observed by Gaia, to validate and fully characterise Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars observed by the spacecraft. We describe how the SOS for Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars (SOS Cep&RRL) was specifically tailored to analyse Gaia's G-band photometric time-series with a South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) footprint, which covers an external region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). G-band time-series photometry and characterization by the SOS Cep&RRL pipeline (mean magnitude and pulsation characteristics) are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (Gaia DR1) for a total sample of 3,194 variable stars, 599 Cepheids and 2,595 RR Lyrae stars, of which 386 (43 Cepheids and 343 RR Lyrae stars) are new discoveries by Gaia. All 3,194 stars are distributed over an area extending ...

  8. Galactic Kinematics Towards the South Galactic Pole First Results from the Yale-San Juan Southern Proper-Motion Program

    CERN Document Server

    Méndez, R A; Girard, T M; Kozhurina-Platais, V; Van Altena, W F; Méndez, René A.; Platais, Imants; Girard, Terrence M.; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Altena, William F. van

    1999-01-01

    The predictions from a Galactic Structure and Kinematic model code are compared to the color counts and absolute proper-motions derived from the Southern Proper-Motion survey covering more than 700 $\\deg^2$ toward the South Galactic Pole in the range $9 < B_{\\rm J} \\le 19$. The theoretical assumptions and associated computational procedures, the geometry for the kinematic model, and the adopted parameters are presented in detail and compared to other Galactic Kinematic models of its kind. The data to which the model is compared consists of more than 30,000 randomly selected stars, and it is best fit by models with a solar peculiar motion of +5 km s$^{-1}$ in the V-component (pointing in the direction of Galactic rotation), a large LSR speed of 270 km s$^{-1}$, and a (disk) velocity ellipsoid that always points towards the Galactic center. The absolute proper-motions in the U-component indicate a solar peculiar motion of $11.0 \\pm 1.5$ km s$^{-1}$, with no need for a local expansion or contraction term. The...

  9. Constraints on Primordial Magnetic Fields from Planck combined with the South Pole Telescope CMB B-mode polarization measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Zucca, Alex; Pogosian, Levon

    2016-01-01

    A primordial magnetic field (PMF) present before recombination can leave specific signatures on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations. Of particular importance is its contribution to the B-mode polarization power spectrum. Indeed, vortical modes sourced by the PMF can dominate the B-mode power spectrum on small scales, as they survive damping up to a small fraction of the Silk length. Therefore, measurements of the B-mode polarization at high-$\\ell$ , such as the one recently performed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), have the potential to provide stringent constraints on the PMF. We use the publicly released SPT B-mode polarization spectrum, along with the temperature and polarization data from the Planck satellite, to derive constraints on the magnitude, the spectral index and the energy scale at which the PMF was generated. We find that, while Planck data constrains the magnetic amplitude to $B_{1 \\, \\text{Mpc}} < 3.3$ nG at 95\\% confidence level (CL), the SPT measurement improves the con...

  10. Detection of B-mode Polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background with Data from the South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson, D; Crites, A; Ade, P A R; Aird, K A; Austermann, J E; Beall, J A; Bender, A N; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Bock, J J; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chiang, H C; Cho, H-M; Conley, A; Crawford, T M; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; Everett, W; Gallicchio, J; Gao, J; George, E M; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N; Henning, J W; Hilton, G C; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Huang, N; Hubmayr, J; Irwin, K D; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E; Li, D; Liang, C; Luong-Van, D; Marsden, G; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L; Montroy, T E; Natoli, T; Nibarger, J P; Novosad, V; Padin, S; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Schulz, B; Smecher, G; Stark, A A; Story, K; Tucker, C; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Viero, M P; Wang, G; Yefremenko, V; Zahn, O; Zemcov, M

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background generates a curl pattern in the observed polarization. This "B-mode" signal provides a measure of the projected mass distribution over the entire observable Universe and also acts as a contaminant for the measurement of primordial gravity-wave signals. In this letter we present the first detection of gravitational lensing B modes, using first-season data from the polarization-sensitive receiver on the South Pole Telescope (SPTpol). We construct a template for the lensing B-mode signal by combining E-mode polarization measured by SPTpol with estimates of the lensing potential from a Herschel-SPIRE map of the cosmic infrared background. We compare this template to the B modes measured directly by SPTpol, finding a non-zero correlation at 7.7 sigma significance. The correlation has an amplitude and scale-dependence consistent with theoretical expectations, is robust with respect to analysis choices, and constitutes the first measurement of a powerful cosmo...

  11. SPT-3G: A Next-Generation Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiment on the South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, B A; Ahmed, Z; Allen, S W; Arnold, K; Austermann, J E; Bender, A N; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Ciocys, S T; Cliche, J F; Crawford, T M; Cukierman, A; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; Dutcher, D; Everett, W; Gilbert, A; Halverson, N W; Hanson, D; Harrington, N L; Hattori, K; Henning, J W; Hilton, G C; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Irwin, K D; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Kubik, D; Kuo, C L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Li, D; McDonald, M; Meyer, S S; Montgomery, J; Myers, M; Natoli, T; Nguyen, H; Novosad, V; Padin, S; Pan, Z; Pearson, J; Reichardt, C L; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Simard, G; Smecher, G; Sayre, J T; Shirokoff, E; Stark, A A; Story, K; Suzuki, A; Thompson, K L; Tucker, C; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Wang, G; Yefremenko, V; Yoon, K W

    2014-01-01

    We describe the design of a new polarization sensitive receiver, SPT-3G, for the 10-meter South Pole Telescope (SPT). The SPT-3G receiver will deliver a factor of ~20 improvement in mapping speed over the current receiver, SPTpol. The sensitivity of the SPT-3G receiver will enable the advance from statistical detection of B-mode polarization anisotropy power to high signal-to-noise measurements of the individual modes, i.e., maps. This will lead to precise (~0.06 eV) constraints on the sum of neutrino masses with the potential to directly address the neutrino mass hierarchy. It will allow a separation of the lensing and inflationary B-mode power spectra, improving constraints on the amplitude and shape of the primordial signal, either through SPT-3G data alone or in combination with BICEP-2/KECK, which is observing the same area of sky. The measurement of small-scale temperature anisotropy will provide new constraints on the epoch of reionization. Additional science from the SPT-3G survey will be significantl...

  12. Infrared Measurements of Several Nitrogen Species Above the South Pole in December 1980 and November - December 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1987-01-01

    In December 1980 and November-December 1986, the University of Denver atmospheric spectroscopy group recorded numerous high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra from the Amundsen-Scott south pole station. These spectra were obtained by Frank J. Murcray and Frank H. Murcray with a Michelson-type Fourier transform spectrometer and show absorption features of a number of minor and trace atmospheric gases with a minimum of atmospheric water vapor absorption. Quantifications of the total column amounts of O3, CH4, N2O, and H2O from the 1980 observations and RCI from the 1986 observations have been reported along with an atlas of the 750-960/ cm spectral region. In the present study, we report measurements of HNO3 total column amounts deduced from both data sets and NO, and NO2 total column amounts from the 1986 data set. Nitric acid may be important in the chemistry which creates the spring Antarctic ozone minimum, since it may condense in the cold winter polar stratosphere and become the dominant component of polar stratospheric clouds. The present measurements were obtained shortly after the austral spring ozone minimum and define for the first time the ambient levels of these nitrogen species immediately following the breakup of the polar vortex.

  13. CMB B-mode Polarization Measurements and constraints on Primordial Gravitational Waves from the BICEP/Keck Program at South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, John; Bicep/Keck Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The BICEP/Keck Array cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments located at the South Pole are a series of small-aperture refracting telescopes designed to probe the degree-scale B-mode signature of primordial gravitational waves. These highly-targeted experiments have produced the world's deepest maps of CMB polarization, leading to the most stringent constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio to date: r r r < 0 . 01 and below within the next several years.

  14. Real-Time Teleguidance of a Non-Surgeon Crew Medical Officer Performing Orthopedic Surgery at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station During Winter-Over

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The Amundsen-Scott South Pole Research station located at the geographic South Pole, is the most isolated, permanently inhabited human outpost on Earth. Medical care is provided to station personnel by a non-surgeon crew medical officer (CMO). During the winter-over period from February to October, the station is isolated, with no incoming or outgoing flights due to severe weather conditions. In late June, four months after the station had closed for the austral winter, a 31 year old meteorologist suffered a complete rupture of his patellar tendon while sliding done an embankment. An evacuation was deemed to be too risky to aircrews due to the extreme cold and darkness. A panel of physicians from Massachusetts General Hospital, Johns Hopkins University and the University of Texas Medical Branch were able to assess the patient remotely via telemedicine and agreed that surgery was the only means to restore mobility and prevent long term disability. The lack of a surgical facility and a trained surgical team were overcome by conversion of the clinic treatment area, and intensive preparation of medical laypersons as surgical assistants. The non-surgeon CMO and CMO assistant at South Pole, were guided through the administration of spinal anesthetic, and the two-hour operative repair by medical consultants at Massachusetts General Hospital. Real-time video of the operative field, directions from the remote consultants and audio communication were provided by videoconferencing equipment, operative cameras, and high bandwidth satellite communications. In real-time, opening incision/exposure, tendon relocation, hemostatsis, and operative closure by the CMO was closely monitored and guided and by the remote consultants. The patient s subsequent physical rehabilitation over the ensuing months of isolation was also monitored remotely via telemedicine. This was the first time in South Pole s history that remote teleguidance had been used for surgery and represents a model for

  15. An introduction to celestial mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Moulton, Forest Ray

    1984-01-01

    An unrivaled text in the field of celestial mechanics, Moulton's theoretical work on the prediction and interpretation of celestial phenomena has not been superseded. By providing a general account of all parts of celestial mechanics without an over-full treatment of any single aspect, by stating all the problems in advance, and, where the transformations are long, giving an outline of the steps which must be made, and by noting all the places where assumptions have been introduced or unjustified methods employed, Moulton has insured that his work will be valuable to all who are interested in

  16. Celestial data routing network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordetsky, Alex

    2000-11-01

    Imagine that information processing human-machine network is threatened in a particular part of the world. Suppose that an anticipated threat of physical attacks could lead to disruption of telecommunications network management infrastructure and access capabilities for small geographically distributed groups engaged in collaborative operations. Suppose that small group of astronauts are exploring the solar planet and need to quickly configure orbital information network to support their collaborative work and local communications. The critical need in both scenarios would be a set of low-cost means of small team celestial networking. To the geographically distributed mobile collaborating groups such means would allow to maintain collaborative multipoint work, set up orbital local area network, and provide orbital intranet communications. This would be accomplished by dynamically assembling the network enabling infrastructure of the small satellite based router, satellite based Codec, and set of satellite based intelligent management agents. Cooperating single function pico satellites, acting as agents and personal switching devices together would represent self-organizing intelligent orbital network of cooperating mobile management nodes. Cooperative behavior of the pico satellite based agents would be achieved by comprising a small orbital artificial neural network capable of learning and restructing the networking resources in response to the anticipated threat.

  17. Galaxy populations in the 26 most massive galaxy clusters in the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Desai, S.; Stalder, B.; Saro, A.; Dietrich, J. P.; Bayliss, M.; Bocquet, S.; Chiu, I.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Gangkofner, C.; Gupta, N.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; McDonald, M.; Reichardt, C.; Rest, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a study of the optical properties of the 26 most massive galaxy clusters within the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) 2500 deg2 survey spanning the redshift range 0.10 Frenk-White profile of concentration 2.84^{+0.40}_{-0.37} for the red sequence (RS) and 2.36^{+0.38}_{-0.35} for the total population. Stacking the data in multiple redshift bins shows slight redshift evolution in the concentration when both the total population is used, and when only RS galaxies are used (at 2.1σ and 2.8σ, respectively). The stacked LF shows a faint end slope α = -1.06^{+0.04}_{-0.03} for the total and α = -0.80^{+0.04}_{-0.03} for the RS population. The redshift evolution of m* is consistent with a passively evolving composite stellar population (CSP) model. Adopting the CSP model predictions, we explore the redshift evolution of the Schechter parameters α and φ*. We find α for the total population to be consistent with no evolution (0.3σ), and mildly significant evidence of evolution for the red galaxies (1.1-2.1σ). The data show that the density φ*/E2(z) decreases with redshift, in tension with the self-similar expectation at a 2.4σ level for the total population. The measured HON-mass relation has a lower normalization than previous low redshift studies. Finally, our data support HON redshift evolution at a 2.1σ level, with clusters at higher redshift containing fewer galaxies than their low-z counterparts.

  18. Magnetization in the South Pole-Aitken basin: Implications for the lunar dynamo and true polar wander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Michael; Hemingway, Doug; Garrick-Bethell, Ian

    2017-04-01

    A number of magnetic anomalies are present along the northern edge of the lunar South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin. A variety of hypotheses for their formation have been proposed, but an in-depth study of their properties has not been performed. Here we use two different methods to invert for their source body characteristics: one that completely searches a small parameter space of less than ten uniform-strength dipoles per anomaly, and another that uses grids of hundreds of dipoles with variable magnetization strengths. Both methods assume uniform magnetization directions at each anomaly and with one exception, produce nearly the same results. We introduce new Monte Carlo methods to quantify errors in our inversions arising from Gaussian time-dependent changes in the external field and the uncertain geometry of the source bodies. We find the errors from uncertainty in source body geometry are almost always higher. We also find a diverse set of magnetization directions around SPA, which we combine with other physical arguments to conclude that the source bodies were likely magnetized in a dynamo field. Igneous intrusions are a reasonable explanation (Purucker et al., 2012) for the directional variability, since they could be intruded over different magnetic epochs. However, the directional variability also implies either surprisingly large amounts of true polar wander or a dynamo not aligned with the lunar spin axis. We also explore the possibility that true polar wander caused by the SPA impact could allow iron-rich SPA ejecta to record a diverse set of magnetic field directions. Some of this material may have also become "sesquinary" ejecta and re-impacted across the Moon on 104-106 year timescales to capture such changes. No completely satisfactory answer emerges, except that the dipole-axis of the lunar dynamo may have been variable in direction.

  19. The Celestial Basis of Civilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, W. B.

    Scholars have long puzzled over the reasons for the ubiquity of celestial images in the residue of the world's earliest civilizations: in art, myth, religious cosmology, iconography, cosmogony, eschatological beliefs, and as portents for the conduct of royal and chiefly power. The general consensus is that these images represented a need by early societies to use the fixed celestial heavens in order to regulate ritual and agricultural cycles, and to satisfy a psychological need by people to relate themselves to their surrounding Universe. Such explanations are facile and miss an important aspect of the celestial heavens. The fixed celestial heavens served as the back-drop for a large number of often spectacular temporary naked-eye visible celestial events which animated the night and sometimes the daytime sky, and which created an 'otherworld' for virtually all cultural groups. In this paper I present a model derived from the detailed analysis of Hawaiian oral traditions and culture history in relation to historic astronomical records of temporary celestial events, and then apply this model to cultural traditions from Mesoamerica and other geographic regions in order to demonstrate that novae, supernovae, variable stars, comets, great meteor showers, aurorae, solar and lunar eclipses, and impacting Solar System debris, together played a critical role in the artistic, intellectual, and political development of early civilizations. These data not only provide important insights into the development of civilization, but also provide important details and longitudinal records of astronomical events and phenomena which are otherwise not readily available for scientific scrutiny.

  20. Gaia Data Release 1. The Cepheid and RR Lyrae star pipeline and its application to the south ecliptic pole region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementini, G.; Ripepi, V.; Leccia, S.; Mowlavi, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Marconi, M.; Szabados, L.; Eyer, L.; Guy, L. P.; Rimoldini, L.; Jevardat de Fombelle, G.; Holl, B.; Busso, G.; Charnas, J.; Cuypers, J.; De Angeli, F.; De Ridder, J.; Debosscher, J.; Evans, D. W.; Klagyivik, P.; Musella, I.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez, D.; Regibo, S.; Riello, M.; Sarro, L. M.; Süveges, M.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The European Space Agency spacecraft Gaia is expected to observe about 10 000 Galactic Cepheids and over 100 000 Milky Way RR Lyrae stars (a large fraction of which will be new discoveries), during the five-year nominal lifetime spent scanning the whole sky to a faint limit of G = 20.7 mag, sampling their light variation on average about 70 times. Aims: We present an overview of the Specific Objects Study (SOS) pipeline developed within the Coordination Unit 7 (CU7) of the Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC), the coordination unit charged with the processing and analysis of variable sources observed by Gaia, to validate and fully characterise Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars observed by the spacecraft. The algorithms developed to classify and extract information such as the pulsation period, mode of pulsation, mean magnitude, peak-to-peak amplitude of the light variation, subclassification in type, multiplicity, secondary periodicities, and light curve Fourier decomposition parameters, as well as physical parameters such as mass, metallicity, reddening, and age (for classical Cepheids) are briefly described. Methods: The full chain of the CU7 pipeline was run on the time series photometry collected by Gaia during 28 days of ecliptic pole scanning law (EPSL) and over a year of nominal scanning law (NSL), starting from the general Variability Detection, general Characterization, proceeding through the global Classification and ending with the detailed checks and typecasting of the SOS for Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars (SOS Cep&RRL). We describe in more detail how the SOS Cep&RRL pipeline was specifically tailored to analyse Gaia's G-band photometric time series with a south ecliptic pole (SEP) footprint, which covers an external region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and to produce results for confirmed RR Lyrae stars and Cepheids to be published in Gaia Data Release 1 (Gaia DR1). Results: G-band time series photometry and characterisation by the

  1. Initial deep LOFAR observations of epoch of reionization windows. I. The north celestial pole : I. The north celestial pole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yatawatta, S.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Brentjens, M. A.; Labropoulos, P.; Pandey, V. N.; Kazemi, S.; Zaroubi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Offringa, A. R.; Jelic, V.; Rubi, O. Martinez; Veligatla, V.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Brouw, W. N.; Bernardi, G.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Harker, G.; Schaye, J.; Thomas, R.; Vedantham, H.; Chapman, E.; Abdalla, F. B.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Batejat, F.; Bell, M. E.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; van de Brink, R. H.; Broderick, J. W.; Brueggen, M.; Conway, J.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Duscha, S.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McKean, J. P.; Mevius, M.; Mol, J.D.; Munk, H.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J. E.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Rottgering, H. J. A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B.; Steinmetz, M.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; ter Veen, S.; Vermeulen, R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.; Mellema, G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the LOFAR epoch of reionization (EoR) project is to detect the spectral fluctuations of the redshifted HI 21 cm signal. This signal is weaker by several orders of magnitude than the astrophysical foreground signals and hence, in order to achieve this, very long integrations, accurat

  2. South Pole-Aitken Basin: Evidence for Post-Basin Resurfacing from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W.; Fassett, C.; Kadish, S.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.

    2010-12-01

    The lunar farside South Pole-Aitken Basin is the largest and oldest documented basin on the Moon and is thus of interest from the point of view of the scale of production of impact melt at large basin-event sizes and its ring structure and potential depth of sampling at such a large diameter. We used new LOLA data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter 1) to characterize the basin interior topography, 2) to assess the nature of the nearby and relatively pristine Orientale basin and compare it to the SPA interior, and 3) to compile a new global crater database of all lunar craters ≥20 km in diameter and to assess the population of impact craters superposed on the SPA interior and exterior. We find that impact crater size-frequency distribution plots show that the exterior of the SPA basin is similar to the most heavily cratered regions of the Moon, but that the interior of the basin has a deficiency of craters in the 20-64 km diameter crater range. One interpretation of these data is that some resurfacing process (or processes) has modified the superposed crater population. Among the candidates are 1) impact crater proximity weathering/degradation by adjacent (e.g., Apollo) and nearby (e.g., Orientale) impact basin ejecta, 2) volcanic resurfacing by early non-mare volcanism, cryptomaria and/or maria, and 3) viscous relaxation removing crater topography. We consider viscous relaxation of crater topography to be the least likely due to the wavelength dependence of the process (rim-crests should be preserved and thus detected in our crater counts). Careful analysis of the impact ejecta thickness radial decay suggests that it is an important resurfacing mechanism within a basin radius from the rim crest, but is unlikely to be sufficient to explain the observed deficiency. Morphometric analysis of impact craters, modeling, and simulations of volcanic flooding suggest that the deficiency may be related to the patchy distribution of cryptomaria, suspected from mineralogic

  3. SIMULATION OF EARTH'S POLES DYNAMICS USING ASK-ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherednychenko N. A.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on local semantic information models, we have examined the dependence of the dynamics of the displacement of the pole positions of celestial objects. We have also developed and differentiated an analysis of ASK-pole modeling of dynamics within sixty-year cycles of reference points and substantiated reasons for the population inversion and singular states in the dynamics of the pole

  4. The South Pole as a site for monitoring 100 TeV cosmic gamma rays by means of an air shower array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillas, A.M. (Physics Department, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom))

    1990-01-15

    The South Pole has special advantages as a site for monitoring spasmodic or weak periodic emission of ultra high energy gamma rays from many X-ray binaries, since those sources which are within view can be seen continuously with only slow varying conditions of attenuation, and the very high altitude favors a high counting rate. It is well placed to view the large concentration of X-ray sources at southern declinations. It has proved possible to operate an air shower array efficiently in this hostile environment. Its view overlaps that from other Southern Hemisphere stations, but with higher posssible exposure.

  5. Analysis of the Use of Wind Energy to Supplement the Power Needs at McMurdo Station and Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, E. I.; Robichaud, R.; McLain, K.

    2005-05-01

    This poster summarizes the analysis of the inclusion of wind-driven power generation technology into the existing diesel power plants at two U.S. Antarctic research stations, McMurdo and Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Staff at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted the analysis. Available data were obtained on the wind resources, power plant conditions, load, and component cost. We then used NREL's Hybrid2 power system modeling software to analyze the potential and cost of using wind turbine generators at the two aforementioned facilities.

  6. Ulysses COSPIN observations of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles from the South Pole to the North Pole of the Sun during solar maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. McKibben

    Full Text Available In 2000–2001 Ulysses passed from the south to the north polar regions of the Sun in the inner heliosphere, providing a snapshot of the latitudinal structure of cosmic ray modulation and solar energetic particle populations during a period near solar maximum.  Observations from the COSPIN suite of energetic charged particle telescopes show that latitude variations in the cosmic ray intensity in the inner heliosphere are nearly non-existent near solar maximum, whereas small but clear latitude gradients were observed during the similar phase of Ulysses’ orbit near the 1994–95 solar minimum. At proton energies above ~10 MeV and extending up to >70 MeV, the intensities are often dominated by Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs accelerated near the Sun in association with intense solar flares and large Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs. At lower energies the particle intensities are almost constantly enhanced above background, most likely as a result of a mix of SEPs and particles accelerated by interplanetary shocks. Simultaneous high-latitude Ulysses and near-Earth observations show that most events that produce large flux increases near Earth also produce flux increases at Ulysses, even at the highest latitudes attained. Particle anisotropies during particle onsets at Ulysses are typically directed outwards from the Sun, suggesting either acceleration extending to high latitudes or efficient cross-field propagation somewhere inside the orbit of Ulysses. Both cosmic ray and SEP observations are consistent with highly efficient transport of energetic charged particles between the equatorial and polar regions and across the mean interplanetary magnetic fields in the inner heliosphere.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (cosmic rays – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (energetic particles; flares and mass ejections

  7. Celestial navigation in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Schlereth, Hewitt

    2000-01-01

    Celestial Navigation in a Nutshell demonstrates how to take sights by the sun, moon, stars, and planets, discussing the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The reader is taken carefully through several examples and situational illustrations, making this a most effective self-teaching guide. Common errors are reviewed and several tips on how to improve accuracy are given.

  8. Analysis of the Use of Wind Energy to Supplement the Power Needs at McMurdo Station and Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Robichaud, R.; McLain, K.

    2005-05-01

    This report summarizes an analysis of the inclusion of wind-driven power generation technology into the existing diesel power plants at two U.S. Antarctic research stations, McMurdo and Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Staff at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted the analysis. Raytheon Polar Services, which currently holds the private sector support contract for the two research stations, was a major contributor to this report. To conduct the analysis, available data were obtained on the wind resources, power plant conditions, load, and component cost. Whenever possible, we validated the information. We then used NREL's Hybrid2 power system modeling software to analyze the potential and cost of using wind turbine generators at the two aforementioned facilities. Unfortunately, the power systems and energy allocations at McMurdo and South Pole Station are being redeveloped, so it is not possible to validate future fuel use. This report is an initial assessment of the potential use of wind energy and should be followed by further, more detailed analysis if this option is to be considered further.

  9. THE FIRST PUBLIC RELEASE OF SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE DATA: MAPS OF A 95 deg{sup 2} FIELD FROM 2008 OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, K. K.; Crawford, T. M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crites, A. T.; Hoover, S.; Keisler, R. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Aird, K. A.; Hrubes, J. D. [University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Cho, H. M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Holder, G. P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); George, E. M.; Holzapfel, W. L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Halverson, N. W. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Joy, M. [Department of Space Science, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Knox, L., E-mail: kschaf2@saic.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); and others

    2011-12-10

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has nearly completed a 2500 deg{sup 2} survey of the southern sky in three frequency bands. Here, we present the first public release of SPT maps and associated data products. We present arcminute-resolution maps at 150 GHz and 220 GHz of an approximately 95 deg{sup 2} field centered at R.A. 82.{sup 0}7, decl. -55 Degree-Sign . The field was observed to a depth of approximately 17 {mu}K arcmin at 150 GHz and 41 {mu}K arcmin at 220 GHz during the 2008 austral winter season. Two variations on map filtering and map projection are presented, one tailored for producing catalogs of galaxy clusters detected through their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect signature and one tailored for producing catalogs of emissive sources. We describe the data processing pipeline, and we present instrument response functions, filter transfer functions, and map noise properties. All data products described in this paper are available for download at http://pole.uchicago.edu/public/data/maps/ra5h30dec-55 and from the NASA Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis server. This is the first step in the eventual release of data from the full 2500 deg{sup 2} SPT survey.

  10. Observation of Celestial Phenomena in Ancient China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    Because of the need for calendar-making and portent astrology, the Chinese were diligent and meticulous observers of celestial phenomena. China has maintained the longest continuous historical records of celestial phenomena in the world. Extraordinary or abnormal celestial events were particularly noted because of their astrological significance. The historical records cover various types of celestial phenomena, which include solar and lunar eclipses, sunspots, "guest stars" (novae or supernovae as we understand today), comets and meteors, and all kinds of planetary phenomena. These records provide valuable historical data for astronomical studies today.

  11. Probing star formation in the dense environments of z~1 lensing halos aligned with dusty star-forming galaxies detected with the South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Welikala, N; Guery, D; Strandet, M; Aird, K A; Aravena, M; Ashby, M L N; Bothwell, M; Beelen, A; Bleem, L E; de Breuck, C; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chapman, S C; Crawford, T M; Dole, H; Doré, O; Everett, W; Flores-Cacho, I; Gonzalez, A H; González-Nuevo, J; Greve, T R; Gullberg, B; Hezaveh, Y D; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Keisler, R; Lagache, G; Ma, J; Malkan, M; Marrone, D P; Mocanu, L M; Montier, L; Murphy, E J; Nesvadba, N P H; Omont, A; Pointecouteau, E; Puget, J L; Reichardt, C L; Rotermund, K M; Scott, D; Serra, P; Spilker, J S; Stalder, B; Stark, A A; Story, K; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Weiss, A

    2015-01-01

    We probe star formation in the environments of massive $\\sim10^{13}\\,M_{\\odot}$ dark matter halos at redshifts of $z$$\\sim$$1$. This star formation is linked to a sub-millimetre clustering signal which we detect in maps of the Planck High Frequency Instrument that are stacked at the positions of a sample of high-redshift ($z$$>$$2$) strongly-lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) 2500 deg$^2$ survey. The clustering signal has sub-millimetre colours which are consistent with the mean redshift of the foreground lensing halos ($z$$\\sim$$1$). We report a mean excess of star formation rate (SFR) compared to the field, of $(2700\\pm700)\\,M_{\\odot}\\,{yr}^{-1}$ from all galaxies contributing to this clustering signal within a radius of 3.5' from the SPT DSFGs. The magnitude of the Planck excess is in broad agreement with predictions of a current model of the cosmic infrared background. The model predicts that 80$\\%$ of the excess emission measured by Planck originates f...

  12. Constraints on the CMB Temperature Evolution using Multi-Band Measurements of the Sunyaev Zel'dovich Effect with the South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Saro, A; Mohr, J J; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Bocquet, S; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chiu, I; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Dobbs, M A; Dolag, K; Dudley, J P; Foley, R J; Gangkofner, D; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Hennig, C; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Keisler, R; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McDonald, M; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Nurgaliev, D; Padin, S; Patej, A; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruel, J; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2013-01-01

    The adiabatic evolution of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a key prediction of standard cosmology. We study deviations from the expected adiabatic evolution of the CMB temperature of the form $T(z) =T_0(1+z)^{1-\\alpha}$ using measurements of the spectrum of the Sunyaev Zel'dovich Effect with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We present a method for using the ratio of the Sunyaev Zel'dovich signal measured at 95 and 150 GHz in the SPT data to constrain the temperature of the CMB. We demonstrate that this approach provides unbiased results using mock observations of clusters from a new set of hydrodynamical simulations. We apply this method to a sample of 158 SPT-selected clusters, spanning the redshift range $0.05 < z < 1.35$, and measure $\\alpha = 0.017^{+0.030}_{-0.028}$, consistent with the standard model prediction of $\\alpha=0$. In combination with other published results, we constrain $\\alpha = 0.011 \\pm 0.016$, an improvement of $\\sim 20\\%$ over published constraints. Thi...

  13. Constraints on the CMB temperature evolution using multiband measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with the South Pole Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saro, A.; Liu, J.; Mohr, J. J.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dolag, K.; Dudley, J. P.; Foley, R. J.; Gangkofner, D.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Montroy, T. E.; Murray, S. S.; Nurgaliev, D.; Padin, S.; Patej, A.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2014-04-08

    The adiabatic evolution of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a key prediction of standard cosmology. We study deviations from the expected adiabatic evolution of the CMB temperature of the form T(z) = T0(1 + z)1 - α using measurements of the spectrum of the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We present a method for using the ratio of the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich signal measured at 95 and 150 GHz in the SPT data to constrain the temperature of the CMB. We demonstrate that this approach provides unbiased results using mock observations of clusters from a new set of hydrodynamical simulations. We apply this method to a sample of 158 SPT-selected clusters, spanning the redshift range 0.05 < z < 1.35, and measure $\\alpha = 0.017^{+0.030}_{-0.028}$, consistent with the standard model prediction of α = 0. In combination with other published results, we find α = 0.005 ± 0.012, an improvement of ~10 percent over published constraints. This measurement also provides a strong constraint on the effective equation of state in models of decaying dark energy weff = -0.994 ± 0.010.

  14. Cluster Mass Calibration at High Redshift: HST Weak Lensing Analysis of 13 Distant Galaxy Clusters from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Schrabback, T; Dietrich, J P; Hoekstra, H; Bocquet, S; Gonzalez, A H; von der Linden, A; McDonald, M; Morrison, C B; Raihan, S F; Allen, S W; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Chiu, I; Desai, S; Foley, R J; de Haan, T; High, F W; Hilbert, S; Mantz, A B; Massey, R; Mohr, J; Reichardt, C L; Saro, A; Simon, P; Stern, C; Stubbs, C W; Zenteno, A

    2016-01-01

    We present an HST/ACS weak gravitational lensing analysis of 13 massive high-redshift (z_median=0.88) galaxy clusters discovered in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey. This study is part of a larger campaign that aims to robustly calibrate mass-observable scaling relations over a wide range in redshift to enable improved cosmological constraints from the SPT cluster sample. We introduce new strategies to ensure that systematics in the lensing analysis do not degrade constraints on cluster scaling relations significantly. First, we efficiently remove cluster members from the source sample by selecting very blue galaxies in V-I colour. Our estimate of the source redshift distribution is based on CANDELS data, where we carefully mimic the source selection criteria of the cluster fields. We apply a statistical correction for systematic photometric redshift errors as derived from Hubble Ultra Deep Field data and verified through spatial cross-correlations. We account for the impact of lensing...

  15. High-Redshift Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in the South Pole Telescope Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Semler, D R; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bayliss, M; Bazin, G; Bocquet, S; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Foley, R J; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McDonald, M; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruel, J; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Song, J; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2012-01-01

    We report the first investigation of cool-core properties of galaxy clusters selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We use 13 galaxy clusters uniformly selected from 178 deg^2 observed with the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and followed-up by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. They form an approximately mass-limited sample (> 3 x 10^14 M_sun h^-1_70) spanning redshifts 0.3 0.5 cool-core clusters, including two strong cool cores. This rules out the hypothesis that there are no z > 0.5 clusters that qualify as strong cool cores at the 5.4{\\sigma} level. The fraction of strong cool-core clusters in the SPT sample in this redshift regime is between 7% and 56% (95% confidence). Although the SPT selection function is significantly different from the X-ray samples, the high-z cSB distribution for the SPT sample is statistically consistent with that of X-ray--selected samples at both low and high redshifts. The cool-core strength is inversely correlated with the offset between the brightest cluster galaxy and t...

  16. Thermal behavior of regolith at cold traps on the moon's south pole: Revealed by Chang'E-2 microwave radiometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guangfei; Li, Xiongyao; Wang, Shijie

    2016-03-01

    The long-term stability of water ice at cold traps depends on subsurface temperature and regolith thermophysical properties. Based on Chang'E-2 microwave radiometer data, we have inverted attenuation coefficient, thermal gradient and instantaneous temperature profiles at permanently shaded craters (Cabeus, Haworth and Shoemaker) on the Moon's south pole. The nonuniformity of the inverted attenuation coefficient within the craters reflects the inhomogeneous thermophysical properties of regolith. In addition, thermal gradient decreased significantly from the crater walls to the bottoms, which may be caused by scattered sunlight, internal heat flux and earthshine effect. Considering continuous supplement of water ice (with volumetric fraction 0-10%) at cold traps, it changes subsurface thermophysical properties but has little effect on thermal gradient. We also assumed that abundant ice (10%) mixed with regolith, the inversion results showed that the maximum difference of diurnal temperatures between "wet" and dry regolith were no more than 0.5 K. That is, the effect of water ice on subsurface thermal behavior can be neglected.

  17. Measurements of several atmospheric gases above the South Pole in December 1986 from high-resolution 3- to 4-micron solar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Aaron; Murcray, Frank J.; Murcray, Frank H.; Murcray, David G.; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the quantitative analysis of absorption features of a number of atmospheric gases in 0.02/cm resolution 3- to 4-micron solar spectra recorded at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. The measurements were obtained shortly after the austral spring ozone minimum and define, for the first time, the ambient levels of the species immediately following the breakup of the polar vortex. The retrieved total vertical column amounts in molecules per sq cm are: 2.4 + or - 0.4 x 10 to the 21st for H2(O-16), 4.5 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the 18th for H2(O-18), 3.9 + or - 0.4 x 10 to the 17th for HDO, 2.1 + or - 0.2 x 10 to the 19th for CH4, 5.1 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the 21st for CO2, 3.9 + or - 0.4 x 10 to the 18th for N2O, and 3.7 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the 15th for C2H6. Identification of (C-12)H3D absorption features and a search for H2CO absorption in the spectral data are also described.

  18. An elementary survey of celestial mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabov, Y

    2006-01-01

    An accessible exposition of gravitation theory and celestial mechanics, this classic, oft-cited work was written by a distinguished Soviet astronomer. It explains with exceptional clarity the methods used by physicists in studying celestial phenomena.A historical introduction explains the Ptolemaic view of planetary motion and its displacement by the studies of Copernicus, Kepler, and Newton. Succeeding chapters examine the making of celestial observations and measurements and explain such central concepts as the ecliptic, the orbital plane, the two- and three-body problems, and perturbed moti

  19. Celestial Navigation for the Novice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    What kinds of astronomical lab activities can introductory astronomy students carry out easily in daytime? The most impressive is the determination of their latitude and longitude from observations of the sun. The "shooting of a noon sight” and its "reduction to a position” is a technique still practiced by navigators in this age of GPS. Indeed, the U.S. Coast Guard exams for ocean-going licenses and include celestial navigation. These techniques continue to be used by the military and by private sailors as a backup to electronic navigation systems. We present a method to establish one's latitude and longitude to better than 30 miles from measurements of the sun's altitude that is easily within the capability non-science majors. This is a practical application of astronomy in use the world over. The streamlined method used is based on an easy-to-build protractor and string quadrant. Participants will leave with all materials to conduct this activity in their own classroom.

  20. Connecting VLBI and Gaia celestial reference frames

    CERN Document Server

    Malkin, Zinovy

    2016-01-01

    The current state of the link problem between radio and optical celestial reference frames is considered. The main objectives of the investigations in this direction during the next few years are the preparation of a comparison and the mutual orientation and rotation between the optical {\\it Gaia} Celestial Reference Frame (GCRF) and the 3rd generation radio International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF3), obtained from VLBI observations. Both systems, ideally, should be a realization of the ICRS (International Celestial Reference System) at micro-arcsecond level accuracy. Therefore, the link accuracy between the ICRF and GCRF should be obtained with similar error level, which is not a trivial task due to relatively large systematic and random errors in source positions at different frequency bands. In this paper, a brief overview of recent work on the GCRF--ICRF link is presented. Additional possibilities to improve the GCRF--ICRF link accuracy are discussed. The suggestion is made to use astrometric radio s...

  1. Celestial mechanics and astrodynamics theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Gurfil, Pini

    2016-01-01

    This volume is designed as an introductory text and reference book for graduate students, researchers and practitioners in the fields of astronomy, astrodynamics, satellite systems, space sciences and astrophysics. The purpose of the book is to emphasize the similarities between celestial mechanics and astrodynamics, and to present recent advances in these two fields so that the reader can understand the inter-relations and mutual influences. The juxtaposition of celestial mechanics and astrodynamics is a unique approach that is expected to be a refreshing attempt to discuss both the mechanics of space flight and the dynamics of celestial objects. “Celestial Mechanics and Astrodynamics: Theory and Practice” also presents the main challenges and future prospects for the two fields in an elaborate, comprehensive and rigorous manner. The book presents homogenous and fluent discussions of the key problems, rendering a portrayal of recent advances in the field together with some basic concepts and essential in...

  2. Fingerprinting Volcanic and Anthropogenic Sulfur Dioxide in the Air: A 25 Year Record of Sulfate Aerosols from the South Pole Snowpit, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, R.; Abaunza-Quintero, M.; Jackson, T. L.; McCabe, J.; Savarino, J. P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols, unlike greenhouse gases, cause cooling effect (-0.4 ± 0.2 W.m-2) by scattering incoming solar radiation and by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (IPCC 2007). Volcanic eruptions with explosivity Indices >5 inject large amounts of SO2 and particles into the stratosphere causing a significant decrease in temperature. For example a 0.7oC decrease in Earth's temperature was observed following the Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Stratospheric injection of sulfate aerosols has been suggested as a geoengineering effort to mitigate global warming caused by a significant increase in greenhouse gases. To understand the impact of volcanic events on the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer and subsequent changes in the dynamics of the upper atmosphere, a long term and high temporal resolution record of sulfate aerosol is needed. Here we present a 25 year (1978 to 2003) high resolution record of sulfate aerosols which covers largest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century namely, El-Chichón 1982 and Pinatubo 1991. Sulfate aerosol samples were obtained from a 1x1m snowpit at the South Pole, Antarctica with approximately 6 month time steps. Sulfate concentrations vary from 30 to 70 ppb depending on the season with exceptions during volcanic events which contributed a three to four folds increase in sulfate concentration Sulfate concentrations of120 ppb following El Chichón and 190 ppb after Pinatubo eruptions were observed. The oxygen isotopic anomaly varied from 0.7‰ to 3.9‰ with the highest anomaly occurring after the Pinatubo eruption. The positive Δ17O of sulfate derives from aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 and O3 oxidation and involves transfer of the isotopic anomaly from the oxidant to the product sulfate. Coupled with kinetic analysis the relative reaction rates the relative proportions of oxidation can be calculated. All other sulfate sources such as sea salt sulfates, primary sulfates from fossil fuel combustion, metal catalyzed oxidation of S

  3. Thorium abundances of basalt ponds in South Pole-Aitken basin: Insights into the composition and evolution of the far side lunar mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, J.J.; Lawrence, D.J.; Hawke, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Imbrian-aged basalt ponds, located on the floor of South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin, are used to provide constraints on the composition and evolution of the far side lunar mantle. We use forward modeling of the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer thorium data, to suggest that at least five different and distinct portions of the far side lunar mantle contain little or no thorium as of the Imbrian Period. We also use spatial correlations between local thorium enhancements and nonmare material on top of the basalt ponds to support previous assertions that lower crustal materials exposed in SPA basin have elevated thorium abundances, consistent with noritic to gabbronoritic lithologies. We suggest that the lower crust on the far side of the Moon experienced multiple intrusions of thorium-rich basaltic magmas, prior to the formation of SPA basin. The fact that many of the ponds on the lunar far side have elevated titanium abundances indicates that the far side of the Moon experienced extensive fractional crystallization that likely led to the formation of a KREEP-like component. However, because the Imbrian-aged basalts contain no signs of elevated thorium, we propose that the SPA impact event triggered the transport of a KREEP-like component from the lunar far side and concentrated it on the nearside of the Moon. Because of the correlation between basaltic ponds and basins within SPA, we suggest that Imbrian-aged basaltic volcanism on the far side of the Moon was driven by basin-induced decompressional melting. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Cluster Mass Calibration at High Redshift: HST Weak Lensing Analysis of 13 Distant Galaxy Clusters from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrabback, T.; et al.

    2016-11-11

    We present an HST/ACS weak gravitational lensing analysis of 13 massive high-redshift (z_median=0.88) galaxy clusters discovered in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey. This study is part of a larger campaign that aims to robustly calibrate mass-observable scaling relations over a wide range in redshift to enable improved cosmological constraints from the SPT cluster sample. We introduce new strategies to ensure that systematics in the lensing analysis do not degrade constraints on cluster scaling relations significantly. First, we efficiently remove cluster members from the source sample by selecting very blue galaxies in V-I colour. Our estimate of the source redshift distribution is based on CANDELS data, where we carefully mimic the source selection criteria of the cluster fields. We apply a statistical correction for systematic photometric redshift errors as derived from Hubble Ultra Deep Field data and verified through spatial cross-correlations. We account for the impact of lensing magnification on the source redshift distribution, finding that this is particularly relevant for shallower surveys. Finally, we account for biases in the mass modelling caused by miscentring and uncertainties in the mass-concentration relation using simulations. In combination with temperature estimates from Chandra we constrain the normalisation of the mass-temperature scaling relation ln(E(z) M_500c/10^14 M_sun)=A+1.5 ln(kT/7.2keV) to A=1.81^{+0.24}_{-0.14}(stat.) +/- 0.09(sys.), consistent with self-similar redshift evolution when compared to lower redshift samples. Additionally, the lensing data constrain the average concentration of the clusters to c_200c=5.6^{+3.7}_{-1.8}.

  5. Fingerprinting El Nino Southern Ocean events using oxygen triple isotopic composition of aerosol sulfate from the South Pole snow pit samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Abaunza Quintero, M. M.; Shaheen, R.; Jackson, T. L.; McCabe, J.; Savarino, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 4th assessment report [IPCC 2007], aerosols are the largest source of uncertainty in modeling the earth's radiative budget. Sulfate aerosols contributes to global cooling that may mask warming effect by greenhouse gases, therefore, high resolution record of aerosol sulfate can help to understand the impact of anthropogenic activities and natural variations on climate change. Sulfate aerosols were extracted from the ice pit samples obtained from the South Pole (1979-2002) at a high resolution temporal record of the winter and summer seasons. To insure highest measurement ability of very small samples (few nano moles) a hydrogen peroxide cleaning method was developed to remove organic impurities from aerosols which otherwise significantly affect O-triple isotopic measurement of the sulfates. Preliminary data indicated non sea salt contributions of 70-95% with a range in δ18OVSMOW = -1.86 -12% and Δ17O = 0.8-3.7% for the years 1990-2001. The positive Δ17O of sulfate derives from aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 and O3 and involves transfer of the isotopic anomaly from the oxidant to the product sulfate. All other sulfate sources (sea salt sulfates and primary sulfates from fossil fuel combustion), including gas-phase oxidation by OH in the troposphere, metal catalyzed oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI), are strictly mass dependent (Δ17O = 0%). The magnitude of the transfer of the Δ17O varies according to the relative contribution from H2O2 at pH 6 (Δ17O = 8%). Seasonal variations of these oxidants and their contribution to S(IV) oxidation will be discussed. Since our samples include the time period 1977-2002, each year divided into two parts (winter and summer season's aerosols), in addition to seasonal variation in sulfate oxidation pathways, we may also be able to assess if the oxidation cycle of sulfate changes during El Niño years.

  6. Reconstruction of extensive air showers and measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum in the range of 1 - 80 PeV at the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepser, Stefan

    2008-06-24

    IceTop is a km{sup 2} scale detector array for highly energetic cosmic radiation. It is a part of the IceCube Observatory that is presently being built at the geographic South Pole. It aims for the detection of huge particle cascades induced by PeV cosmic rays in the atmosphere. These extensive air showers are detected by cylindrical ice tanks that collect the Cherenkov light produced by penetrating particles. The main goal of IceTop is the investigation of the energy distribution and chemical composition of PeV to EeV cosmic rays. This thesis presents the first analysis of highly energetic cosmic ray data taken with IceTop. First, the light response of the IceTop tanks is parametrised as a function of energy and particle type. An expectation function for the distribution of shower signals in the detector plane is developed. The likelihood fit based on that can reconstruct the recorded shower events with resolutions of 1.5 in direction, 9m in location of the shower center, and 12% in energy. This is well competitive with other experiments. The resulting energy response of the array is studied to set up response matrices for different primary nuclei and inclinations. These allow for a deconvolution of the distribution of reconstructed energies to derive the real energy spectrum. Two unfolding algorithms are implemented and studied, and response matrices are modeled for four different composition assumptions. With each assumption, energy spectra are unfolded for three different bins in inclination, using a data sample with an exposure of 3.86.10{sup 11} m{sup 2} s sr, taken in August 2007. The range of the spectrum is 1-80 PeV. Finally, a new analysis method is developed that uses the fact that cosmic rays in the PeV range are expected to be isotropic. It is shown that this requirement can be used for a likelihood estimation that is sensitive to composition without using additional information from other detector components. The analysis shows a clear preference of

  7. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Observations Relating to Science and Landing Site Selection in South Pole-Aitken Basin for a Robotic Sample Return Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Clegg-Watkins, R. N.; Petro, N. E.; Lawrence, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Moon's South Pole-Aitken basin (SPA) is a high priority target for Solar System exploration, and sample return from SPA is a specific objective in NASA's New Frontiers program. Samples returned from SPA will improve our understanding of early lunar and Solar System events, mainly by placing firm timing constraints on SPA formation and the post-SPA late-heavy bombardment (LHB). Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images and topographic data, especially Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) scale (1-3 mpp) morphology and digital terrain model (DTM) data are critical for selecting landing sites and assessing landing hazards. Rock components in regolith at a given landing site should include (1) original SPA impact-melt rocks and breccia (to determine the age of the impact event and what materials were incorporated into the melt); (2) impact-melt rocks and breccia from large craters and basins (other than SPA) that represent the post-SPA LHB interval; (3) volcanic basalts derived from the sub-SPA mantle; and (4) older, "cryptomare" (ancient buried volcanics excavated by impact craters, to determine the volcanic history of SPA basin). All of these rock types are sought for sample return. The ancient SPA-derived impact-melt rocks and later-formed melt rocks are needed to determine chronology, and thus address questions of early Solar System dynamics, lunar history, and effects of giant impacts. Surface compositions from remote sensing are consistent with mixtures of SPA impactite and volcanic materials, and near infrared spectral data distinguish areas with variable volcanic contents vs. excavated SPA substrate. Estimating proportions of these rock types in the regolith requires knowledge of the surface deposits, evaluated via morphology, slopes, and terrain ruggedness. These data allow determination of mare-cryptomare-nonmare deposit interfaces in combination with compositional and mineralogical remote sensing to establish the types and relative proportions of materials

  8. Relativistic Celestial Mechanics of the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Kaplan, George

    2011-01-01

    This authoritative book presents the theoretical development of gravitational physics as it applies to the dynamics of celestial bodies and the analysis of precise astronomical observations. In so doing, it fills the need for a textbook that teaches modern dynamical astronomy with a strong emphasis on the relativistic aspects of the subject produced by the curved geometry of four-dimensional spacetime. The first three chapters review the fundamental principles of celestial mechanics and of special and general relativity. This background material forms the basis for understanding relativistic r

  9. Observations of the azimuthal dependence of normal mode coupling below 4 mHz at the South Pole and its nearby stations: Insights into the anisotropy beneath the Transantarctic Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao Gang

    2016-08-01

    Normal mode coupling pair 0S26-0T26 and 0S27-0T27 are significantly present at the South Pole station QSPA after the 2011/03/11 Mw9.1 Tohoku earthquake. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms responsible for the coupling pairs, I first investigate mode observations at 43 stations distributed along the polar great-circle path for the earthquake and observations at 32 Antarctic stations. I rule out the effect of Earth's rotation as well as the effect of global large-scale lateral heterogeneity, but argue instead for the effect of small-scale local azimuthal anisotropy in a depth extent about 300 km. The presence of quasi-Love waveform in 2-5 mHz at QSPA and its nearby stations confirms the predication. Secondly, I analyze normal mode observations at the South Pole location after 28 large earthquakes from 1998 to 2015. The result indicates that the presence of the mode coupling is azimuthal dependent, which is related to event azimuths in -46° to -18°. I also make a comparison between the shear-wave splitting measurements of previous studies and the mode coupling observations of this study, suggesting that their difference can be explained by a case that the anisotropy responsible for the mode coupling is not just below the South Pole location but located below region close to the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). Furthermore, more signals of local azimuthal anisotropy in normal-mode observations at QSPA and SBA, such as coupling of 0S12-0T11 and vertical polarization anomaly for 0T10, confirms the existence of deep anisotropy close to TAM, which may be caused by asthenospheric mantle flow and edge convection around cratonic keel of TAM.

  10. Connecting VLBI and Gaia celestial reference frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinovy Malkin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The current state of the link problem between radio and optical celestial reference frames is considered.The main objectives of the investigations in this direction during the next few years are the preparation of a comparisonand the mutual orientation and rotation between the optical it Gaia Celestial Reference Frame (GCRFand the 3rd generation radio International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF3, obtained from VLBI observations.Both systems, ideally, should be a realization of the ICRS (International Celestial Reference System at micro-arcsecond level accuracy.Therefore, the link accuracy between the ICRF and GCRF should be obtained with similar error level, which is not a trivial taskdue to relatively large systematic and random errors in source positions at different frequency bands.In this paper, a brief overview of recent work on the GCRF--ICRF link is presented.Additional possibilities to improve the GCRF--ICRF link accuracy are discussed.The suggestion is made to use astrometric radio sources with optical magnitude to 20$^m$ rather than to 18$^m$ as currently plannedfor the GCRF--ICRF link.In addition, the use of radio stars is also a prospective method to obtain independent and accurate orientation between the Gaia frame and the ICRF.

  11. The Accuracy of Praziquantel Dose Poles for Mass Treatment of Schistosomiasis in School Girls in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baan, Marije; Galappaththi-Arachchige, Hashini Nilushika; Gagai, Silindile;

    2016-01-01

    Background More than 260 million people live with schistosomiasis and regular mass-treatment should be implemented to prevent morbidity. Praziquantel, dosed at 40 milligrams per kilogram bodyweight, is the drug of choice. During the last decades the WHO Tablet Pole-which estimates tablet need...... Pole were used to indicate the amount of praziquantel according to height and the dose in milligrams per kilogram bodyweight was calculated. The BMI correction was performed by adding 600 milligrams (1 tablet) to the indicated dose if a person was overweight/obese. Principal Findings 3157 female...

  12. Orbital behavior around a nonuniform celestial body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosson, Z.; Hall, F.; Vogel, T.

    2016-09-01

    To effectively model the orbit around a nonuniform celestial body, detailed information needs to be determined of the perturbations. This research looked at one of the most crucial perturbations: the nonuniform gravitational field of a celestial body. Given an orbiting particle (a satellite), we utilized numerical methods to calculate its orbit in two dimensions around a discretized center mass structure. The gravitational acceleration imposed on the particle due to each mass point sums vectorally as the particle completes each infinitesimal time step of one orbit. There are noticeable effects on the orbit as the conditions of the center mass change. The development of a simulation code allows for the modelling of the orbit about an irregular body with satisfactory accuracy.

  13. Recent advances in celestial and space mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chyba, Monique

    2016-01-01

    This book presents recent advances in space and celestial mechanics, with a focus on the N-body problem and astrodynamics, and explores the development and application of computational techniques in both areas. It highlights the design of space transfers with various modes of propulsion, like solar sailing and low-thrust transfers between libration point orbits, as well as a broad range of targets and applications, like rendezvous with near Earth objects. Additionally, it includes contributions on the non-integrability properties of the collinear three- and four-body problem, and on general conditions for the existence of stable, minimum energy configurations in the full N-body problem. A valuable resource for physicists and mathematicians with research interests in celestial mechanics, astrodynamics and optimal control as applied to space transfers, as well as for professionals and companies in the industry.

  14. Celestial Fireworks from Dying Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This image of the nebula NGC 3582, which was captured by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, shows giant loops of gas bearing a striking resemblance to solar prominences. These loops are thought to have been ejected by dying stars, but new stars are also being born within this stellar nursery. These energetic youngsters emit intense ultraviolet radiation that makes the gas in the nebula glow, producing the fiery display shown here. NGC 3582 is part of a large star-forming region in the Milky Way, called RCW 57. It lies close to the central plane of the Milky Way in the southern constellation of Carina (The Keel of Jason's ship, the Argo). John Herschel first saw this complex region of glowing gas and dark dust clouds in 1834, during his stay in South Africa. Some of the stars forming in regions like NGC 3582 are much heavier than the Sun. These monster stars emit energy at prodigious rates and have very short lives that end in explosions as supernovae. The material ejected from these dramatic events creates bubbles in the surrounding gas and dust. This is the probable cause of the loops visible in this picture. This image was taken through multiple filters. From the Wide Field Imager, data taken through a red filter are shown in green and red, and data taken through a filter that isolates the red glow characteristic of hydrogen are also shown in red. Additional infrared data from the Digitized Sky Survey are shown in blue. The image was processed by ESO using the observational data identified by Joe DePasquale, from the United States [1], who participated in ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition [2]. The competition was organised by ESO in October-November 2010, for everyone who enjoys making beautiful images of the night sky using astronomical data obtained using professional telescopes. Notes [1] Joe searched through ESO's archive and identified datasets that he used to compose his

  15. Poles apart: Scott, Amundsen and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Edward J

    2011-12-01

    One hundred years ago, teams led by Roald Amundsen and Robert Scott may have been heading in the same direction but they were poles apart in the way they sought their goals. Amundsen led a five-person team of expert Nordic skiers and dog-sledders with a single goal: getting to the South Pole first. He planned and executed the effort brilliantly. Scott, in contrast, led a complex and multi-faceted Antarctic expedition with 33 explorers and scientists, many of whom were focused on ambitious and often taxing scientific research projects that had nothing whatsoever to do with reaching the Pole. Although Scott failed to reach the South Pole first and died with four men on the return trip, his expedition made significant contributions to Antarctic science. Indeed, at least some of Scott's failure to reach the Pole first and the subsequent death of his polar party on the return trip can be attributed to burden of trying to do too much and not focusing on reaching the pole.

  16. Lower pole stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanguedolce, Francesco; Breda, Alberto; Millan, Felix

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess efficacy and safety of prone- and supine percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for the treatment of lower pole kidney stones. METHODS: Data from patients affected by lower pole kidney stones and treated with PCNL between December 2005 and August 2010 were collected retrospectivel...

  17. Pacific Albacore Troll and Pole-and-line Fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The North Pacific and South Pacific Albacore Troll and Pole-and-line Fisheries project contains landings, logbooks, and size composition data from U.S.A. troll and...

  18. Initial deep LOFAR observations of epoch of reionization windows : I. The north celestial pole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yatawatta, S.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Brentjens, M. A.; Labropoulos, P.; Pandey, V. N.; Kazemi, S.; Zaroubi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Offringa, A. R.; Jelic, V.; Rubi, O. Martinez; Veligatla, V.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Brouw, W. N.; Bernardi, G.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Harker, G.; Schaye, J.; Thomas, R.; Vedantham, H.; Chapman, E.; Abdalla, F. B.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Batejat, F.; Bell, M. E.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; van de Brink, R. H.; Broderick, J. W.; Brueggen, M.; Conway, J.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Duscha, S.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McKean, J. P.; Mevius, M.; Mol, J.D.; Munk, H.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J. E.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Rottgering, H. J. A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B.; Steinmetz, M.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; ter Veen, S.; Vermeulen, R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.; Mellema, G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. The aim of the LOFAR epoch of reionization (EoR) project is to detect the spectral fluctuations of the redshifted HI 21 cm signal. This signal is weaker by several orders of magnitude than the astrophysical foreground signals and hence, in order to achieve this, very long integrations, accurat

  19. Initial deep LOFAR observations of epoch of reionization windows: I. The north celestial pole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yatawatta, S.; Bruyn, de A.G.; Brentjens, M.A.; Labropoulos, P.; Pandey, V.N.; Kazemi, S.; Zaroubi, S.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Offringa, A.R.; Jelic, V.; Martinez Rubi, O.; Veligatla, V.; Wijnholds, S.J.; Brouw, W.N.; Bernardi, G.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Harker, G.; Mellema, G.; Schaye, J.; Thomas, R.; Vedantham, H.; Chapman, E.; Abdalla, F.B.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I.M.; Batejat, F.; Bell, M.E.; Bell, M.R.; Bentum, M.J.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; Brink, van de R.H.; Broderick, J.W.; Brüggen, M.; Conway, J.; Gasperin, de F.; Geus, de E.; Duscha, S.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R.A.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M.A.; Griessmeier, J.M.; Gunst, A.W.; Hassall, T.E.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Hoeft, M.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Leeuwen, van J.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McKean, J.P.; Mevius, M.; Mol, J.D.; Munk, H.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J.E.; Norden, M.J.; Orrú, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.J.A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B.; Steinmetz, M.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Veen, ter S.; Vermeulen, R.; Weeren, van R.J.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the LOFAR Epoch of Reionization (EoR) project is to detect the spectral fluctuations of the redshifted HI 21cm signal. This signal is weaker by several orders of magnitude than the astrophysical foreground signals and hence, in order to achieve this, very long integrations, accurate calib

  20. Initial deep LOFAR observations of epoch of reionization windows. I. The north celestial pole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yatawatta, S.; et al., [Unknown; Hessels, J.W.T.; van Leeuwen, J.; Wise, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. The aim of the LOFAR epoch of reionization (EoR) project is to detect the spectral fluctuations of the redshifted HI 21 cm signal. This signal is weaker by several orders of magnitude than the astrophysical foreground signals and hence, in order to achieve this, very long integrations, accurat

  1. Initial deep LOFAR observations of epoch of reionization windows. I. The north celestial pole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yatawatta, S.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Brentjens, M. A.; Labropoulos, P.; Pandey, V. N.; Kazemi, S.; Zaroubi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Offringa, A. R.; Jelić, V.; Martinez Rubi, O.; Veligatla, V.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Brouw, W. N.; Bernardi, G.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Harker, G.; Mellema, G.; Schaye, J.; Thomas, R.; Vedantham, H.; Chapman, E.; Abdalla, F. B.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Batejat, F.; Bell, M. E.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; van de Brink, R. H.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Conway, J.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Duscha, S.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McKean, J. P.; Mevius, M.; Mol, J. D.; Munk, H.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J. E.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B.; Steinmetz, M.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; ter Veen, S.; Vermeulen, R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the LOFAR epoch of reionization (EoR) project is to detect the spectral fluctuations of the redshifted HI 21 cm signal. This signal is weaker by several orders of magnitude than the astrophysical foreground signals and hence, in order to achieve this, very long integrations, accurat

  2. North pole, South pole the quest to understand Earth's magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    Going all the way back to the Roman legend of a shepherd whose iron-studded boots stuck to the rocks, this book charts the history of the earth's magnetism, which intrigued and stumped scientists and ordinary people for centuries. Absorbing and accessible, it is a lively study of what exactly magnetic force is, what causes it, and what its place has been throughout scientific history, offering detailed insights into the inner workings of the planet and its magnetic shield.

  3. Identifying the stars on Johann Bayer's Chart of the South Polar Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridpath, I.

    2014-04-01

    The first chart of the stars in the region around the south celestial pole was published in 1603 by Johann Bayer (1572-1625) as part of his monumental star atlas called Uranometria. This south polar chart depicted 12 entirely new constellations that had been created only a few years earlier from stars observed during the first Dutch expedition to the East Indies in 1595-97. Bayer's chart plotted 121 stars in the 12 newly invented constellations. Five more stars formed a southern extension of the existing constellation Eridanus, while another twelve stars were left 'unformed', i.e. unattached to any constellation. Whereas Bayer famously applied Greek or Roman letters to the stars in the 48 Ptolemaic constellations, he left the stars in the newly invented constellations unlabelled. This paper attempts to identify the stars plotted on Bayer's chart. It also discusses the source of Bayer's data and the origin of the 12 new southern constellations.

  4. Forbush Effects on the Martian Surface and Earth's Poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, A.; Guo, J.; Heber, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Zeitlin, C.; Zheng, Y.; MacNeice, P. J.; Odstrcil, D.; Rastaetter, L.; Steigies, C. T.; Andrews, J. P.; Appel, J. K.; Beaujean, R.; Berger, L.; Boettcher, S. I.; Brinza, D. E.; Bullock, M.; Burmeister, S.; Cucinotta, F.; Dresing, N.; Drews, C.; Ehresmann, B.; Epperly, M. E.; Hassler, D.; Herbst, K.; Kim, M. H. Y.; Kohler, J.; Kühl, P.; Lohf, H.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Neal, K.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.; Smith, K. D.; Tyler, Y.; weigle, G., II

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed MSL/RAD observation of Forbush effects on the surface of Mars over a full Mars year from landing through the Mars opposition period in 2014. For the extended Mars opposition phase we compared the observed Forbush effects with those identified at Earth's south pole utilizing observations of the South Pole neutron monitor. Identification of the drivers of Forbush effects, recurrent and transient solar wind structures in the inner heliosphere, is aided by WSA-ENLIL simulations. We show that a remarkable correlations of count rates of (secondary) cosmic rays at Mars' surface and at the Earth's south pole is established for a minimum duration of 6 months around the Mars opposition, in particular when time shifted with propagation and/or corotation delays of the drivers of cosmic ray decreases in the solar wind. Moreover, the magnitude of Forbush effects on Mars is larger statistically than the equivalent near Earth's poles.

  5. Modern Celestial Mechanics: From Theory to Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, A.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Henrard, J.

    2002-10-01

    This book is intended to diffuse original research results interesting to people working in Celestial Mechanics in both theory and applications. Theoretical investigators will find several results on Hamiltonian Dynamics, Periodic Orbits, Chaos Diagnostic and Perturbations Theory. Applications cover several directions of research starting with those related to space exploration (mission design and space research) to those related to astronomy (extrasolar planets, asteroids, Near Earth asteroids). Since this book carries original results, it is unique and complements similar books and journals. Some of the subjects have great media appeal: the risk of impact of space debris on the Space Station, the possibility of fly-by missions to asteroids approaching dangerously to our planet, the study of the orbits of these objects, etc. Appealing for a large audience among scientists are the subjects related to Chaos and Order as well as those centered on the study of the dynamics of exoplanets (extrasolar planets). The appeal of the more theoretical papers lies in the fact that they make a tour on the state-of-the-art of several classical problems. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-0762-0

  6. Magnetic information calibrates celestial cues during migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg; Bäckman; Moore; Lõhmus

    2000-10-01

    Migratory birds use celestial and geomagnetic directional information to orient on their way between breeding and wintering areas. Cue-conflict experiments involving these two orientation cue systems have shown that directional information can be transferred from one system to the other by calibration. We designed experiments with four species of North American songbirds to: (1) examine whether these species calibrate orientation information from one system to the other; and (2) determine whether there are species-specific differences in calibration. Migratory orientation was recorded with two different techniques, cage tests and free-flight release tests, during autumn migration. Cage tests at dusk in the local geomagnetic field revealed species-specific differences: red-eyed vireo, Vireo olivaceus, and northern waterthrush, Seiurus noveboracensis, selected seasonally appropriate southerly directions whereas indigo bunting, Passerina cyanea, and grey catbird, Dumetella carolinensis, oriented towards the sunset direction. When tested in deflected magnetic fields, vireos and waterthrushes responded by shifting their orientation according to the deflection of the magnetic field, but buntings and catbirds failed to show any response to the treatment. In release tests, all four species showed that they had recalibrated their star compass on the basis of the magnetic field they had just experienced in the cage tests. Since release tests were done in the local geomagnetic field it seems clear that once the migratory direction is determined, most likely during the twilight period, the birds use their recalibrated star compass for orientation at departure. Copyright 2000 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  7. Celestial shadows eclipses, transits, and occultations

    CERN Document Server

    Westfall, John

    2015-01-01

    Much of what is known about the universe comes from the study of celestial shadows—eclipses, transits, and occultations.  The most dramatic are total eclipses of the Sun, which constitute one of the most dramatic and awe-inspiring events of nature.  Though once a source of consternation or dread, solar eclipses now lead thousands of amateur astronomers and eclipse-chasers to travel to remote points on the globe to savor their beauty and the adrenaline-rush of experiencing totality, and were long the only source of information about the hauntingly beautiful chromosphere and corona of the Sun.   Long before Columbus, the curved shadow of the Earth on the Moon during a lunar eclipse revealed that we inhabit a round world. The rare and wonderful transits of Venus, which occur as it passes between the Earth and the Sun, inspired eighteenth century expeditions to measure the distance from the Earth to the Sun, while the recent transits of 2004 and 2012 were the most widely observed ever--and still produced re...

  8. The stratification of regolith on celestial objects

    CERN Document Server

    Schräpler, Rainer; von Borstel, Ingo; Güttler, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    All atmosphere-less planetary bodies are covered with a dust layer, the so-called regolith, which determines the optical, mechanical and thermal properties of their surface. These properties depend on the regolith material, the size distribution of the particles it consists of, and the porosity to which these particles are packed. We performed experiments in parabolic flights to determine the gravity dependency of the packing density of regolith for solid-particle sizes of 60 $\\mu$m and 1 mm as well as for 100-250 $\\mu$m-sized agglomerates of 1.5 $\\mu$m-sized solid grains. We utilized g-levels between 0.7 m s$^{-2}$ and 18 m s$^{-2}$ and completed our measurements with experiments under normal gravity conditions. Based on previous experimental and theoretical literature and supported by our new experiments, we developed an analytical model to calculate the regolith stratification of celestial rocky and icy bodies and estimated the mechanical yields of the regolith under the weight of an astronaut and a spacec...

  9. Relativistic Celestial Mechanics of the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Efroimsky, Michael; Kaplan, George

    2011-09-01

    The general theory of relativity was developed by Einstein a century ago. Since then, it has become the standard theory of gravity, especially important to the fields of fundamental astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, and experimental gravitational physics. Today, the application of general relativity is also essential for many practical purposes involving astrometry, navigation, geodesy, and time synchronization. Numerous experiments have successfully tested general relativity to a remarkable level of precision. Exploring relativistic gravity in the solar system now involves a variety of high-accuracy techniques, for example, very long baseline radio interferometry, pulsar timing, spacecraft Doppler tracking, planetary radio ranging, lunar laser ranging, the global positioning system (GPS), torsion balances and atomic clocks. Over the last few decades, various groups within the International Astronomical Union have been active in exploring the application of the general theory of relativity to the modeling and interpretation of high-accuracy astronomical observations in the solar system and beyond. A Working Group on Relativity in Celestial Mechanics and Astrometry was formed in 1994 to define and implement a relativistic theory of reference frames and time scales. This task was successfully completed with the adoption of a series of resolutions on astronomical reference systems, time scales, and Earth rotation models by the 24th General Assembly of the IAU, held in Manchester, UK, in 2000. However, these resolutions only form a framework for the practical application of relativity theory, and there have been continuing questions on the details of the proper application of relativity theory to many common astronomical problems. To ensure that these questions are properly addressed, the 26th General Assembly of the IAU, held in Prague in August 2006, established the IAU Commission 52, "Relativity in Fundamental Astronomy". The general scientific goals of the new

  10. Industrial Scale Production of Celestial Body Simulants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The technical objectives of this program are to develop a cost-effective process to deliver Celestial body simulants for the foreseeable future. Specifically, the...

  11. A Review of Celestial Burying Ground in Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUQIAN

    2005-01-01

    Celestial burying ground ,also called “Mandala”,is where life leaves and comes.A huge piece of stone hidden in high mountains is surrounded by burning plants that give up smoke going up into the air.

  12. Reorientation of the early lunar pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Futoshi; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki

    2014-06-01

    Palaeomagnetic measurements suggest that an active core dynamo operated on the Moon from 4.2 to 3.56 billion years ago. Since the Apollo era, many magnetic anomalies have been observed on the Moon. The magnetization of the lunar crust in some of these regions could preserve the signature of an early dipolar magnetic field generated by a core dynamo. Thus, the magnetic anomalies may yield information about the position of the palaeomagnetic pole during the time that the dynamo operated. Here we present a comprehensive survey of magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface using magnetometer data obtained by the Lunar Prospector and Kaguya lunar orbiters. We extract magnetization vectors from 24 magnetic anomalies using an iterative inversion method and derive the palaeomagnetic poles. We find that the north poles, as well as the antipodal south poles, cluster in two distinct locations: one near the present rotation axis and the other at mid-latitude. The clustering is consistent with a dipole-dominated magnetic field generated in the lunar core by a dynamo that was reversing, much like that of Earth. Furthermore, the two pole clusters imply that the Moon experienced a polar wander event during its ancient history due to the reorientation of the Moon with respect to its spin axis by 45°-60°.

  13. Frontiers in Relativistic Celestial Mechanics, Vol. 2, Applications and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2014-08-01

    Relativistic celestial mechanics - investigating the motion celestial bodies under the influence of general relativity - is a major tool of modern experimental gravitational physics. With a wide range of prominent authors from the field, this two-volume series consists of reviews on a multitude of advanced topics in the area of relativistic celestial mechanics - starting from more classical topics such as the regime of asymptotically-flat spacetime, light propagation and celestial ephemerides, but also including its role in cosmology and alternative theories of gravity as well as modern experiments in this area. This second volume of a two-volume series covers applications of the theory as well as experimental verifications. From tools to determine light travel times in curved space-time to laser ranging between earth and moon and between satellites, and impacts on the definition of time scales and clock comparison techniques, a variety of effects is discussed. On the occasion of his 80-th birthday, these two volumes honor V. A. Brumberg - one of the pioneers in modern relativistic celestial mechanics. Contributions include: J. Simon, A. Fienga: Victor Brumberg and the French school of analytical celestial mechanics T. Fukushima: Elliptic functions and elliptic integrals for celestial mechanics and dynamical astronomy P. Teyssandier: New tools for determining the light travel time in static, spherically symmetric spacetimes beyond the order G2 J. Müller, L. Biskupek, F. Hofmann and E. Mai: Lunar laser ranging and relativity N. Wex: Testing relativistic celestial mechanics with radio pulsars I. Ciufolini et al.: Dragging of inertial frames, fundamental physics, and satellite laser ranging G. Petit, P. Wolf, P. Delva: Atomic time, clocks, and clock comparisons in relativistic spacetime: a review

  14. ASTEP South: a first photometric analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Crouzet, N; Mékarnia, D; Szulágyi, J; Abe, L; Agabi, A; Fanteï-Caujolle, Y; Gonçalves, I; Barbieri, M; Schmider, F -X; Rivet, J -P; Bondoux, E; Challita, Z; Pouzenc, C; Fressin, F; Valbousquet, F; Blazit, A; Bonhomme, S; Daban, J -B; Gouvret, C; Bayliss, D; Zhou, G

    2012-01-01

    The ASTEP project aims at detecting and characterizing transiting planets from Dome C, Antarctica, and qualifying this site for photometry in the visible. The first phase of the project, ASTEP South, is a fixed 10 cm diameter instrument pointing continuously towards the celestial South pole. Observations were made almost continuously during 4 winters, from 2008 to 2011. The point-to-point RMS of 1-day photometric lightcurves can be explained by a combination of expected statistical noises, dominated by the photon noise up to magnitude 14. This RMS is large, from 2.5 mmag at R=8 to 6% at R=14, because of the small size of ASTEP South and the short exposure time (30 s). Statistical noises should be considerably reduced using the large amount of collected data. A 9.9-day period eclipsing binary is detected, with a magnitude R=9.85. The 2-season lightcurve folded in phase and binned into 1000 points has a RMS of 1.09 mmag, for an expected photon noise of 0.29 mmag. The use of the 4 seasons of data with a better d...

  15. Physical state and temporal evolution of icy surfaces in the Mars South Pole by retrieving their bidirectional reflectance from CRISM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douté, Sylvain Michel; Pilorget, Cedric; Fernando, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    On Mars H2O and CO2 ices can be found as seasonal or perennial deposits notably in the polar regions. At the moment little is known about their bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) despite the significance of such information for characterizing the composition, physical state and energy balance of the icy surfaces from the bolometric albedo. The BRF is potentially accessible thanks to the near-simultaneous multi-angle, hyperspectral observations of the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) implying 11 viewing angles in visible and infrared ranges. However, its extraction from the CRISM measurements is especially challenging. Indeed, the atmospheric aerosols (mineral dust, sometimes H2O ice) have a strong contribution in the CRISM measurements that must be corrected. At high latitudes, their contribution is accentuated because the sun is low above the horizon. Besides, the BRF of ices is expected to be highly anisotropic especially under grazing illumination creating difficulties with the traditional Lambertian surface assumption commonly used for atmospheric correction. In previous research we put forward the Multi-angle Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations (MARS-ReCO), an algorithm that characterizes and corrects the aerosol scattering effects. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the BRF of surface materials are retrieved conjointly and coherently as a function of wavelength. In this work, we apply MARS-ReCO on time series of CRISM sequences over different regions of interest in the outskirts of the south permanent polar cap. The time series span from mid-spring to late summer during which the CO2 ice sublimates revealing H2O frost and defrosted terrains. No ground truth is available for the investigated regions but cross-validation with other datasets such as observations by OMEGA (mapping spectrometer on MEX) can be applied. Thanks to the atmospheric correction, we are able to identify various classes of

  16. Daytime Celestial Navigation for the Novice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Philip M.; Night, Christopher

    2010-03-01

    What kinds of astronomical lab activities can high school and college astronomy students carry out easily in daytime? The most impressive is the determination of latitude and longitude from observations of the Sun. The ``shooting of a noon sight'' and its ``reduction to a position'' grew to become a daily practice at the start of the 19th century1 following the perfection of the marine chronometer by John Harrison and its mass production.2 This technique is still practiced by navigators in this age of GPS. Indeed, the U.S. Coast Guard exams for ocean-going licenses include celestial navigation.3 These techniques continue to be used by the military and by private sailors as a backup to all-too-fallible and jammable electronic navigation systems. A sextant, a nautical almanac,4 special sight reduction tables,5 and involved calculations are needed to determine position to the nearest mile using the Sun, Moon, stars, or planets. Yet, finding latitude and longitude to better than 30 miles from measurements of the Sun's altitude is easily within the capability of those taking astronomy or physics for the first time by applying certain basic principles. Moreover, it shows a practical application of astronomy in use the world over. The streamlined method described here takes advantage of the similar level of accuracy of its three components: 1.Observations using a homemade quadrant6 (instead of a sextant), 2. Student-made graphs of the altitude of the Sun over a day7 (replacing lengthy calculation using sight reduction tables), and 3. An averaged 20-year analemma used to find the Sun's navigational coordinates8,9 (rather than the 300+ page Nautical Almanac updated yearly).

  17. Frontiers in Relativistic Celestial Mechanics, Vol. 1. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2014-10-01

    Relativistic celestial mechanics - investigating the motion celestial bodies under the influence of general relativity - is a major tool of modern experimental gravitational physics. With a wide range of prominent authors from the field, this two-volume series consists of reviews on a multitude of advanced topics in the area of relativistic celestial mechanics - starting from more classical topics such as the regime of asymptotically-flat spacetime, light propagation and celestial ephemerides, but also including its role in cosmology and alternative theories of gravity as well as modern experiments in this area. This first volume of a two-volume series is concerned with theoretical foundations such as post-Newtonian solutions to the two-body problem, light propagation through time-dependent gravitational fields, as well as cosmological effects on the movement of bodies in the solar systems. On the occasion of his 80-th birthday, these two volumes honor V. A. Brumberg - one of the pioneers in modern relativistic celestial mechanics. Contributions include: M. Soffel: On the DSX-framework T. Damour: The general relativistic two body problem G. Schaefer: Hamiltonian dynamics of spinning compact binaries through high post-Newtonian approximations A. Petrov and S. Kopeikin: Post-Newtonian approximations in cosmology T. Futamase: On the backreaction problem in cosmology Y. Xie and S. Kopeikin: Covariant theory of the post-Newtonian equations of motion of extended bodies S. Kopeikin and P. Korobkov: General relativistic theory of light propagation in multipolar gravitational fields

  18. Rad Pole Cam Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckendorn, F. M.; Odell, D. M. C; Harpring, L. J.; Peterson, K. D.

    2005-10-05

    The RadPoleCam was developed to provide Department Of Energy (DOE) first responders the capability to assess the radiological and visual condition of remote or inaccessible locations. Real time gamma isotopic identification is provided to the first responder in the form of audio feedback (i.e. spoken through head phones) from a gamma detector mounted on a collapsible pole that can extend from 1 to 9 meters (6 to 29 feet). Simultaneously, selectable direct and side looking visual images are provided from the 5cm (2in) diameter, waterproof probe tip. The lightweight, self contained, ruggedized, system will provide a rapidly deployable field system for visual and radiological search and assessment of confined spaces and extended reach locations.

  19. Constraining gluon poles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Anikin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we revise the QED gauge invariance for the hadron tensor of Drell–Yan type processes with the transversely polarized hadron. We perform our analysis within the Feynman gauge for gluons and make a comparison with the results obtained within the light-cone gauge. We demonstrate that QED gauge invariance leads, first, to the need of a non-standard diagram and, second, to the absence of gluon poles in the correlators 〈ψ¯γ⊥A+ψ〉 related traditionally to dT(x,x/dx. As a result, these terms disappear from the final QED gauge invariant hadron tensor. We also verify the absence of such poles by analyzing the corresponding light-cone Dirac algebra.

  20. Dynamical Configurations of Celestial Systems Comprised of Multiple Irregular Bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yu; Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript considers the main features of the nonlinear dynamics of multiple irregular celestial body systems. The gravitational potential, static electric potential, and magnetic potential are considered. Based on the three established potentials, we show that three conservative values exist for this system, including a Jacobi integral. The equilibrium conditions for the system are derived and their stability analyzed. The equilibrium conditions of a celestial system comprised of n irregular bodies are reduced to 12n minus 9 equations. The dynamical results are applied to simulate the motion of multiple-asteroid systems. The simulation is useful for the study of the stability of multiple irregular celestial body systems and for the design of spacecraft orbits to triple asteroid systems discovered in the solar system. The dynamical configurations of the five triple-asteroid systems 45 Eugenia, 87 Sylvia, 93 Minerva, 216 Kleopatra, and 136617 1994CC, and the six-body system 134340 Pluto are calculated and...

  1. Economic Analysis of the South Pole Traverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-29

    scrutiny of and approval by other member countries covered by the Antarctic Treaty . Section 6.3.2 of the CEE presented estimates of cargo weights...Lockheed Martin - Antarctic Support Contract 7400 S. Tucson Way Centennial, CO 80112 Final Report Approved for public release; distribution is...unlimited. Prepared for National Science Foundation, Division of Polar Programs, Antarctic Infrastructure and Logistics Arlington, VA 22230 Under

  2. Drilling deep in South Pole Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, Timo

    2014-01-01

    To detect the tiny flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei or from interactions of highest energy cosmic rays with the microwave background photons needs target masses of the order of several hundred cubic kilometers. Clear Antarctic ice has been discussed as a favorable material for hybrid detection of optical, radio and acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions. To apply these technologies at the adequate scale hundreds of holes have to be drilled in the ice down to depths of about 2500 m to deploy the corresponding sensors. To do this on a reasonable time scale is impossible with presently available tools. Remote drilling and deployment schemes have to be developed to make such a detector design reality. After a short discussion of the status of modern hot water drilling we present here a design of an autonomous melting probe, tested 50 years ago to reach a depth of about 1000 m in Greenland ice. A scenario how to build such a probe today with modern technologies...

  3. The South Pole-Aitken basin thorium anomaly and its enrichment characteristics and mechanisms%南极-艾肯盆地Th异常的富集特征和机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦中虎; 刘少峰; 奚晓旭; 韦蔚; 吴志远; 李力

    2012-01-01

    The result of remote sensing to the lunar surface shows that the distribution of thorium exists in global imbalance, forming two thorium anomaly regions in Imbrium-Procellarum and South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin respectively. It is gencrally believed that thorium in Imbrium-Procellarum is derived from the KREEP layer underlying crust by Imbrium impact, but there are various explanations for the origin of thorium in SPA. Through the analysis of the geomorphology of SPA, basin structure, the distribution of craters, volcanism, geochemical characteristics, and the discussion of thorium enrichment mechanisms, this paper argues that it is more likely that in SPA basin elevated thorium abundances stem from thorium-rich lower crustal materials exposed by the SPA impact event and there is an intimate relation between curve pattern of thorium enrichment and basin structure with a probable impact of Apollo basin formation.%遥感探测表明月表Th元素分布存在全球不均衡性,形成分别以雨海-风暴洋和南极-艾肯(SPA)盆地为中心的Th异常区.研究认为雨海-风暴洋的Th主要来源于对其下覆KREEP物质的开掘,但对SPA盆地的Th来源有各种不同的认识.本文通过对SPA盆地的地形、盆地构造、撞击坑分布、火山作用和地球化学特征的分析,以及对Th富集机理的探讨,认为SPA盆地内Th更可能来源于撞击作用对富Th下月壳物质的开掘;Th的弧形富集特征与盆地构造有很大相关性,并可能受到Apollo盆地形成的影响.

  4. Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect mass-observable relations using South Pole Telescope observations of an X-ray selected sample of low-mass galaxy clusters and groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Mohr, J.; Saro, A.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Gangkofner, D.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.;  uhada, R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-02-25

    We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from ~6 deg2 of the XMM–Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (≥1042 erg s-1) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y_500 mass relations. The former is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8σ with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8σ significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y_500 signal that is (17 ± 9)per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter

  5. Project Vesta: A Laboratory Exercise on the Measurement of Celestial Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, David E.

    1974-01-01

    Described is an activity that was developed to measure celestial coordinates. Pictures were taken of the asteroid Vesta, coordinates for reference stars determined, and then celestial coordinates of Vesta were determined with assistance of a computer. (RH)

  6. Wood pole overhead lines

    CERN Document Server

    Wareing, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This new book concentrates on the mechanical aspects of distribution wood pole lines, including live line working, environmental influences, climate change and international standards. Other topics include statutory requirements, safety, profiling, traditional and probabilistic design, weather loads, bare and covered conductors, different types of overhead systems, conductor choice, construction and maintenance. A section has also been devoted to the topic of lightning, which is one of the major sources of faults on overhead lines. The book focuses on the effects of this problem and the strate

  7. Periodically poled silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  8. Universal tectonic dichotomy of small celestial bodies expressed in their common convexo-concave shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    The wave planetology [1, 2, 3 & others] declares in its first theorem that all celestial bodies are dichotomous. This is a result of a warping action of the fundamental wave (wave 1 long 2πR where R is a body radius) that appears in any body due to its movement in non-round (elliptical, parabolic) keplerian orbits with periodically changing accelerations. Having a standing character and four crossing directions in rotating bodies (but all bodies rotate!) these waves inevitably press in one hemisphere and bulge out the opposite one tending to impose on a body convexo-concave shape. This shape is leveled out in larger bodies due to enhanced gravity but is clearly observed in smaller ones with diminished gravity. Still, in the larger bodies as, for an example, in Earth the tectonic dichotomy is expressed as an opposition of the subsided western Pacific hemisphere and the uplifted eastern continental hemisphere. At Mars even sharper dichotomy is in the north-south direction. Small bodies (normally less than 400-500 km across) notwithstanding their type (asteroids, comets, satellites), size and composition (stones, metals, ices) are flattened and bended by the fundamental wave. That is why all asteroids in the main asteroid belt have an oblong shape what was established rather long ago but never was properly explained. Now a number of small satellites is observed by Cassini spacecraft in the saturnian system that makes together with jovian and martian small satellites a representative group for comparisons. In the figures below are shown asteroids, satellites and a comet arranged in a row of increasing sizes. They all are flattened except the largest in the row Enceladus (505 km) and bended tending to acquire a convexo-concave shape. Asteroids: Itokawa (0.5 km long), Eros (33 km, PIA03111). Satellites: Calypso (22 km, PIA07633), Atlas (32 km, PIA08233), Prometheus (102 km, PIA08192), Hyperion (350 km, PIA06645), Enceladus (505 km, PIA08258, comet-like behaviour). Comet

  9. LSPECS: A Proposed Robotic Astronomy Mission to the Lunar South Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    This paper outlines a possible mission to emplace a robotic infrared/submillimeter wave interferometer array near the lunar south pole. This region has now been investigated by the Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions, and by Earth-based radar, and its topography and thermal environment are fairly well-known. The area would be exceptionally suitable for infrared/submillimeter astronomy because of the continually low temperatures, approaching that of liquid nitrogen (77K) in some places. The presence of ice has been inferred independently from Clementine and Lunar Prospector, providing another incentive for a south polar mission. A submillimeter spaceborne interferometer mission, Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of the Cosmic Structure (SPECS) has been proposed by John Mather and others, covering the 40 - 500 micron region with 3 formation flying telescopes. The present paper proposes a lunar adaptation of the SPECS concept, LSPECS. This adaptation would involve landing 4 telescopes on the area north of Shackleton crater at zero degrees longitude. This is in nearly year round darkness but is continually radar visible from Earth. The landed payload of LSPECS would include a telerobotic rover, 4 three meter submm telescopes, a solar power array to be emplaced on the continually sunlit north rim of Shackleton crater, and an S-band antenna for data relay to Earth. Operation without the use of expendable cryogenics for cooling might be possible, trading long exposure time for instrument temperatures above that of liquid helium. The LSPECS would permit long-term study of an extremely wide range of cosmic and solar system phenomena in the southern celestial hemisphere. For complete sky coverage, a similar installation near the north pole would be required. The LSPECS site would also be suitable other types of observation, such as optical interferometry or centimeter wavelength radio astronomy. The lunar south pole is also of great interest because of its extensive

  10. Schroedinger Equation and the Quantization of Celestial Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present article, we argue that it is possible to generalize Schroedinger equation to describe quantization of celestial systems. While this hypothesis has been described by some authors, including Nottale, here we argue that such a macroquantization was formed by topological superfluid vortice. We also provide derivation of Schroedinger equation from Gross-Pitaevskii-Ginzburg equation, which supports this superfluid dynamics interpretation.

  11. A Celestial Assisted INS Initialization Method for Lunar Explorers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Fang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The second and third phases of the Chinese Lunar Exploration Program (CLEP are planning to achieve Moon landing, surface exploration and automated sample return. In these missions, the inertial navigation system (INS and celestial navigation system (CNS are two indispensable autonomous navigation systems which can compensate for limitations in the ground based navigation system. The accurate initialization of the INS and the precise calibration of the CNS are needed in order to achieve high navigation accuracy. Neither the INS nor the CNS can solve the above problems using the ground controllers or by themselves on the lunar surface. However, since they are complementary to each other, these problems can be solved by combining them together. A new celestial assisted INS initialization method is presented, in which the initial position and attitude of the explorer as well as the inertial sensors’ biases are estimated by aiding the INS with celestial measurements. Furthermore, the systematic error of the CNS is also corrected by the help of INS measurements. Simulations show that the maximum error in position is 300 m and in attitude 40″, which demonstrates this method is a promising and attractive scheme for explorers on the lunar surface.

  12. South African Student Constructed Indlebe Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGruder, Charles H.; MacPherson, Stuart; Janse Van Vuuren, Gary Peter

    2017-01-01

    The Indlebe Radio Telescope (IRT) is a small transit telescope with a 5 m diameter parabolic reflector working at 21 cm. It was completely constructed by South African (SA) students from the Durban University of Technology (DUT), where it is located. First light occurred on 28 July 2008, when the galactic center, Sagittarius A, was detected. As a contribution to the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, staff members in the Department of Electronic Engineering at DUT in 2006 decided to have their students create a fully functional radio telescope by 2009. The specific project aims are to provide a visible project that could generate interest in science and technology in high school students and to provide a real world system for research in radio astronomy in general and an optimization of low noise radio frequency receiver systems in particular. These aims must be understood in terms of the SA’s government interests in radio astronomy. SA is a partner in the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) project, has constructed the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT) and MeerKat, which is the largest and most sensitive radio telescope in the southern hemisphere. SA and its partners in Africa are investing in the construction of the African Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (AVN), an array of radio telescopes throughout Africa as an extension of the existing global Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (VLBI). These projects will allow SA to make significant contributions to astronomy and enable astronomy to contribute to the scientific education and development goals of the country. The IRT sees on a daily basis the transit of Sag A. The transit time is influenced by precession, nutation, polar motion, aberration, celestial pole offset, proper motion, length of the terrestrial day and variable ionospheric refraction. Of these eight factors six are either predictable or measureable. To date neither celestial pole offset nor variable ionospheric refraction are predicable

  13. Foraminíferos bentónicos aglutinados de los Depósitos turbidíticos. Área Nápoles, Sur de San Marcos de Tarrazú, Costa Rica Agglutinated foraminifera from turbiditic deposits, Nápoles Area, South of San Marcos, Tarrazú, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lolita Campos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En el sector de Nápoles, San Marcos de Tarrazú, situado dentro de una ancha faja estructural aún no completamente definida en el límite entre las cuencas sedimentarias de Valle Central y Térraba, la muestra LOR-10 brindó una asociación faunística de exclusivamente foraminíferos bentónicos. Como no fueron encontrados foraminíferos planctónicos no se pudieron realizar determinaciones bioestratigráficas. Del total de individuos identificados, estos corresponden a 3 subórdenes, 9 superfamilias y 33 especies. Con respecto al índice de diversidad de Shannon (H, para interpretaciones paleoecológicas el resultado fue de H=1.4, indicando condiciones de ciénagas y ambientes marginales marinos. Los foraminíferos bentónicos identificados hasta nivel de especie en la muestra, poseen rangos de existencia muy amplio señalando una zona que se extiende del Triásico al Reciente. Desde el punto de vista paleoecológico en relación con la salinidad, fueron determinados los siguientes porcentajes 53.3% de rotaliinos, 41.9% de texturaliinos y 2.2% de miliólidos, valores que son indicadores de ambientes de laguna salobre, estuario y plataforma, esta mezcla de fauna de ambientes distintos sugiere que se trata de un depósito alóctono retrabajado. La identificación de Portatrochammina sp. (4.3% que aparece entre los 500 y 2000 m, pero es abundante aproximadamente entre los 600 y 700 m y de Cibicides lobatulus (3.2% indicadora de la zona batial media superior (500-1500 m, confirman la interpretación del ambiente del depósito como un abanico submarino de talud del ámbito batial medio. Así mismo la preeminencia de los foraminíferos aglutinados sugiere un importante aporte de detrito hacia la cuenca. Por último, las cuencas estratificadas, frías, profundas, con altas tasas de sedimentación favorecen la preservación de las asociaciones de foraminíferos aglutinados sobre los carbonatadosIn the area of Napoles, South of San Marcos, Tarraz

  14. The IAA Cosmic Study 'Protecting the Environment of Celestial Bodies'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, Petra; Hofmann, Mahulena; Williamson, Mark

    The study group tasked with producing this International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) `Cosmic Study' on Protecting the Environment of Celestial Bodies was formed under the aus-pices of IAA Commission V (Space Policy, Law Economy). The members of the international, multidisciplinary team assembled to undertake the Study accept, as a premise, the Planetary Protection Policy guidelines developed by COSPAR, which differentiate the degree of protec-tion according to the type of space activity and the celestial body under investigation (such that fly-by missions have less stringent requirements than lander missions, while Mars is `better protected' than the Moon). However, this Study goes deliberately beyond the interpretation of `Planetary Protection' as a set of methods for protecting the planets from biological con-tamination and extends consideration to the geophysical, industrial and cultural realms. The Study concludes that, from the perspective of current and future activities in outer space, present measures aimed at protecting the space environment are insufficient. Deficiencies in-clude a lack of suitable in-situ methods of chemical and biological detection and the absence of a systematic record of radioactive contaminants. Other issues identified by the Study include an insufficient legal framework, a shortage of effective economic tools and a lack of political will to address these concerns. It is expected that new detection methods under development, and the resultant increase in microbiological knowledge of the planetary surfaces, will lead to changes in the COSPAR planetary protection guidelines and bioburden limits. It is important, however, that any new approaches should not hamper future exploration and exploitation of celestial bodies more than absolutely necessary. The Study addresses the need to find a balance between protection and freedom of action. From a legal perspective, the Study concludes that a general consensus on protection of the

  15. Surmanuhtlusele pole kohta / Marianne Mikko

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mikko, Marianne, 1961-

    2008-01-01

    Surmanuhtlusest kui inimõiguste rängimast rikkumisest. Lisatud: surmanuhtlus arvudes. Ilmunud ka Hiiu Leht 14. okt. 2008, lk. 2 ; Põhjarannik 16. okt. 2008, lk. 4 ; Pärnu Postimees 11. okt. 2008, lk. 19 ; Hiiu Leht : Nädalalõpp 14. nov. 2008, lk. 6, pealkiri kujul: surmanuhtlusele pole Euroopas kohta ; Meie Maa : Nädalalõpp 14. nov. 2008, lk. 6, pealkiri kujul: surmanuhtlusele pole Euroopas kohta

  16. 5th Austrian Hungarian workshop on celestial mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süli, Áron

    2011-06-01

    The 5th Hungarian-Austrian Workshop on Celestial Mechanics took place from 9th until the 10th of April 2010 in Vienna, Austria. The workshop was held in the Institute for Astronomy of Vienna University. From the Eötvös University and from the host institute experts and PhD students gathered together to discuss the challenges and new results of the actual problems of celestial mechanics. The workshop was held in the meeting room at the Sternwarte of the Vienna University located in a magnificent park in the heart of Vienna. Following the themes of the four previous events the focus for this workshop ranged from the Trojan problem, dynamics in binary star systems and exoplanetray systems. We were pleased to acknowledge the support of the host university. The talks were characterized by a large spectrum, which is typical of the workshops on celestial mechanics. Several talks discussed different aspects of the trojan problem, such as the three Trojan Problem, dynamics of trojan-like planets in binary stars, the frequencies of their motion around the triangular lagrangian points, etc. Several speakers focused on the formation of planetary systems and on the field of exoplanetary systems, like exoplanetary systems in higher order mean motion resonances, formation of planets in binary systems, stability of exomoons etc. Some of the presentation used sophisticated mathematical tools in order to understand mean motion resonances, the Sitnikov problem applying the KAM and the Nekhoroshev theorem. The theme of a number of talks was the motion of Solar System bodies: dynamics of the newly discovered moons of Pluto and of near-Earth asteroids. General problems were also addressed, among others chaos in Hamiltonian systems, adaptive Lie-integration method and iterative solution approximation to the generalised Sitnikov problem.

  17. TRIP: General computer algebra system for celestial mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, J.; Gastineau, M.

    2012-10-01

    TRIP is an interactive computer algebra system that is devoted to perturbation series computations, and specially adapted to celestial mechanics. Its development started in 1988, as an upgrade of the special purpose FORTRAN routines elaborated by J. Laskar for the demonstration of the chaotic behavior of the Solar System. TRIP is a mature and efficient tool for handling multivariate generalized power series, and embeds two kernels, a symbolic and a numerical kernel. This numerical kernel communicates with Gnuplot or Grace to plot the graphics and allows one to plot the numerical evaluation of symbolic objects.

  18. Kepler-16 Circumbinary System Validates Quantum Celestial Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the application of quantum celestial mechanics (QCM to the Kepler-16 cir- cumbinary system which has a single planet orbiting binary stars with the important system parameters known to within one percent. Other gravitationally bound systems such as the Solar System of planets and the Jovian satellite systems have large uncertain- ties in their total angular momentum. Therefore, Kepler-16 allows us for the first time to determine whether the QCM predicted angular momentum per mass quantization is valid.

  19. Elliptical Chandler pole motions of the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yury; Ferrandiz, Jose

    2010-05-01

    In the work the values of the period and eccentricity of Chandler motion of poles of axes of rotation of the Earth and Mars have been determined. The research has been carried out on the basis of developed earlier by authors an intermediate rotary Chandler-Euler motion of the weakly deformable celestial bodies (Barkin, Ferrandiz and Getino, 1996; Barkin, 1998). An influence of a liquid core on Chandler motion of a pole in the given work has not considered. The periods of the specified pole motions make 447.1 d for the Earth and 218.1 d for Mars. In comparison with Euler motions of poles because of elastic properties of planets the Chandler periods are increased accordingly on 142.8 d (about 46.9 %) for the Earth and on 26.2 d (on 13.7 %) for Mars. Values of eccentricities of specified Chandler motions of pole e = √b2 --a2- b (here a both b are smaller and big semi-axes of Chandler ellipse) make 0.09884 for the Earth and 0.3688 for Mars (accordingly, on 21.1 % and 6.2 % more than the appropriate values of eccentricities for models of planets as rigid non-spherical bodies). Axes of an ellipse a also b correspond to the principal equatorial axes of inertia of a planet Ox and Oyfor which the moments of inertia have the smallest valueA and middle value B. The pole of the principal axis of inertia Ox for the Earth is displaced to the west on the angle 14°9285, and the pole of the principal axis of inertia Ox for Mars is displaced to the west on the angle 105°0178 (in the appropriate basic geographical systems of coordinates of the given planets). For ellipticties of Chandler trajectories ɛ = (b- a)-b the values 0.004897 (for the Earth) and 0.07048 (for Mars) have been obtained. The specified values surpass by Euler values of appropriate ellipticties on 46.8 % (in case of the Earth) and on 13.3 % (in the case of Mars). Love number k2describing the elastic properties of planets, were accepted equal 0.30 for the Earth and 0.153 for Mars. Estimations of Chandler periods

  20. A Proposed Robotic Astronomy Mission to the Lunar South Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    This paper outlines a possible mission to emplace a robotic infrared / submillimeter wave interferometer array near the lunar south pole. This region has now been investigated by the Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions, and by Earth-based radar, and its topography and thermal environment are fairly well-known. The area would be exceptionally suitable for infrared / submillimeter astronomy because of the continually low temperatures, approaching that of liquid nitrogen (77K) in some places. A submillimeter spaceborne interferometer mission, Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of the Cosmic Structure (SPECS) has been proposed by John Mather and others, covering the 40 - 500 micron region with 3 formation flying telescopes. The present paper proposes a lunar adaptation of the SPECS concept, LSPECS. This adaptation would involve landing 4 telescopes on the area north of Shackleton crater at zero degrees longitude. This is in nearly year round darkness but is continually radar visible from Earth. The landed payload of LSPECS would include a telerobotic rover, 4 three meter submm telescopes, a solar power array to be emplaced on the continually sunlit north rim of Shackleton crater, and an S-band antenna for data relay to Earth. Passive cooling without the use of expendable cryogenics. might be possible, trading long exposure time for instrument temperatures above that of liquid helium. The LSPECS would permit long-term study of an extremely wide range of cosmic and solar system phenomena in the southern celestial hemisphere. For complete sky coverage, a similar installation near the north pole would be required. The LSPECS site would also be suitable other types of observation, such as optical interferometry or centimeter wavelength radio astronomy. The lunar south pole is also of great interest because of its extensive ice deposits, which may represent cometary infall with pre-biotic compounds.

  1. The science of the lunar poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, P. G.

    2011-12-01

    imaging of interiors of polar shadowed craters has been accomplished by many instruments from the ultraviolet to the radar. Imaging radars on Chandrayaan-1 and LRO have identified anomalous craters that may contain rich water ice deposits. Neutron spectrometers on Lunar Prospector and LRO directly detected hydrogen enhancements at both poles. Spectacularly, the LCROSS impact experiment detected a wide range of volatile elements and species at Cabeus crater in the lunar south polar region. While these measurements have catapulted polar science forward, much remains to be understood about the polar system, both from analysis of the current data, and new missions planned and in development. The general state of the lunar atmosphere is planned to be addressed by the UV and neutral mass spectrometers carried by the planned NASA LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere And Dust Environment Explorer) spacecraft creating an important baseline. But more data is necessary, from an in situ direct assay of polar volatiles to measurements of species and fluxes into and out of the cold traps over lengthy timescales.

  2. The Power of Stars How Celestial Observations Have Shaped Civilization

    CERN Document Server

    Penprase, Bryan E

    2011-01-01

    What are some of the connections that bind us to the stars? How have these connections been established? And how have people all around the world and throughout time reacted to the night sky, the sun and moon, in their poetry, mythology, rituals, and temples? This book explores the influence of the sky on both ancient and modern civilization, by providing a clear overview of the many ways in which humans have used the stars as an ordering principle in their cultures, and which today still inspire us intellectually, emotionally, and spiritually. The book explores constellation lore from around the world, celestial alignments of monuments and temples, both from ancient and modern civilizations, and the role the sky has played in the cultures of the Greek, Egyptian, Babylonian, Native American, Chinese, Mayan, Aztec, and Inca. Models of the universe from each of these cultures are described clearly, and each culture’s explanation of the stars, planets, and other celestial objects are described. The roots of as...

  3. Poles in the Dutch Cape Colony 1652-1814

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalski Mariusz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of Poles to the colonisation and development of the Dutch Cape Colony is not commonly known. Yet, Poles have been appearing in this colony since its very inception (1652. During the entire period considered here the presence of Poles was the result of the strong economic ties between Poland and the Netherlands. At the end of this period there was an increase in their share, in connection with the presence of numerous alien military units on the territory of the Colony, because of Poles having served in these units. Numerous newcomers from Poland settled in South Africa for good, established families, and their progeny made up part of the local society. The evidence of this phenomenon is provided by the present-day Afrikaner families of, for instance, Drotsky, Kitshoff, Kolesky, Latsky, Masuriek, Troskie, Zowitsky, and others. A quite superficial estimation implies that the settlers coming from Poland could make up a bit over 1% of the ancestors of the present-day Afrikaners. Poles would also participate in the pioneering undertakings within the far-off fringes of the Colony, including the robbery-and-trade expedition of 1702.

  4. On the consistency of the current conventional EOP series and the celestial and terrestrial reference frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Santiago; Heinkelmann, Robert; Ferrándiz, José M.; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2017-02-01

    Precise transformation between the celestial reference frames (CRF) and terrestrial reference frames (TRF) is needed for many purposes in Earth and space sciences. According to the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) recommendations, the accuracy of positions and stability of reference frames should reach 1 mm and 0.1 mm year^{-1}, and thus, the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) should be estimated with similar accuracy. Different realizations of TRFs, based on the combination of solutions from four different space geodetic techniques, and CRFs, based on a single technique only (VLBI, Very Long Baseline Interferometry), might cause a slow degradation of the consistency among EOP, CRFs, and TRFs (e.g., because of differences in geometry, orientation and scale) and a misalignment of the current conventional EOP series, IERS 08 C04. We empirically assess the consistency among the conventional reference frames and EOP by analyzing the record of VLBI sessions since 1990 with varied settings to reflect the impact of changing frames or other processing strategies on the EOP estimates. Our tests show that the EOP estimates are insensitive to CRF changes, but sensitive to TRF variations and unmodeled geophysical signals at the GGOS level. The differences between the conventional IERS 08 C04 and other EOP series computed with distinct TRF settings exhibit biases and even non-negligible trends in the cases where no differential rotations should appear, e.g., a drift of about 20 μ as year^{-1 }in y_{pol } when the VLBI-only frame VTRF2008 is used. Likewise, different strategies on station position modeling originate scatters larger than 150 μ as in the terrestrial pole coordinates.

  5. On the consistency of the current conventional EOP series and the celestial and terrestrial reference frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Santiago; Heinkelmann, Robert; Ferrándiz, José M.; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2016-08-01

    Precise transformation between the celestial reference frames (CRF) and terrestrial reference frames (TRF) is needed for many purposes in Earth and space sciences. According to the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) recommendations, the accuracy of positions and stability of reference frames should reach 1 mm and 0.1 mm year^{-1} , and thus, the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) should be estimated with similar accuracy. Different realizations of TRFs, based on the combination of solutions from four different space geodetic techniques, and CRFs, based on a single technique only (VLBI, Very Long Baseline Interferometry), might cause a slow degradation of the consistency among EOP, CRFs, and TRFs (e.g., because of differences in geometry, orientation and scale) and a misalignment of the current conventional EOP series, IERS 08 C04. We empirically assess the consistency among the conventional reference frames and EOP by analyzing the record of VLBI sessions since 1990 with varied settings to reflect the impact of changing frames or other processing strategies on the EOP estimates. Our tests show that the EOP estimates are insensitive to CRF changes, but sensitive to TRF variations and unmodeled geophysical signals at the GGOS level. The differences between the conventional IERS 08 C04 and other EOP series computed with distinct TRF settings exhibit biases and even non-negligible trends in the cases where no differential rotations should appear, e.g., a drift of about 20 μ as year^{-1 } in y_{pol } when the VLBI-only frame VTRF2008 is used. Likewise, different strategies on station position modeling originate scatters larger than 150 μ as in the terrestrial pole coordinates.

  6. Calligraphic Poling for WGM Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohageg, Makan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    By engineering the geometry of a nonlinear optical crystal, the effective efficiency of all nonlinear optical oscillations can be increased dramatically. Specifically, sphere and disk shaped crystal resonators have been used to demonstrate nonlinear optical oscillations at sub-milliwatt input power when cs light propagates in a Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) of such a resonant cavity. in terms of both device production and experimentation in quantum optics, some nonlinear optical effects with naturally high efficiency can occult the desired nonlinear scattering process. the structure to the crystal resonator. In this paper, I will discuss a new method for generating poling structures in ferroelectric crystal resonators called calligraphic poling. The details of the poling apparatus, experimental results and speculation on future applications will be discussed.

  7. Calligraphic Poling of Ferroelectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohageg, Makan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Adrey; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Calligraphic poling is a technique for generating an arbitrary, possibly complex pattern of localized reversal in the direction of permanent polarization in a wafer of LiNbO3 or other ferroelectric material. The technique is so named because it involves a writing process in which a sharp electrode tip is moved across a surface of the wafer to expose the wafer to a polarizing electric field in the desired pattern. The technique is implemented by use of an apparatus, denoted a calligraphic poling machine (CPM), that includes the electrode and other components as described in more detail below.

  8. On the abundance of deuterium in celestial objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Rickard; Kero, Johan; Liszka, Ludwik

    2016-04-01

    The deuterium hydrogen ratio (D/H) is the subject of conflicting ideas about the origin of water on the Earth. The present D/H ratio in the Earth oceans (≈1.5x10-4) is substantially lower than most, if not all potential cosmic sources. Furthermore, other celestial bodies, including interstellar space, display a fairly wide range of D/H ratios superseding the terrestrial one. Escape processes may in part explain higher D/H ratios on Mars and Venus, but cannot explain the Earth's low ratio compared to that of the potential sources (e.g. comets and meteors), unless a deuterium "removal" process can be inferred that reduces the D/H ratio. Alternatively, the D/H ratio in the Earth's ocean represents a time capsule of a yet to be identified cosmic source. It is here hypothesized that the former is the cause, a "removal" of deuterium in matter (carbohydrates, water etc.) having high (pristine) D/H ratios. By "removal" is here meant an isotope transmutation, i.e. deuterium is transmuted to hydrogen plus a thermal neutron, a process requiring >2.25 MeV (≈3.6·10-13 J). However, once released a thermal neutron will eventually fuse with another heavier element by thermal neutron capture, a process that may lead to energy in excess of the spallation energy. The energy gain differs for different isotopes, but if exceeding unity it will induce more heat/power than the input power, maintaining power production over time. A gain less than unity will still result in deuterium removal, but also isotope transmutation, and/or element transmutation via β± decay. This report gives a theoretical background for the plasma forcing that can lead to thermal neutron spallation, a process that changes/decrease the D/H ratio in celestial objects. The applicability of the theory will be tested on celestial objects subjected to strong dynamic, and electromagnetic forcing, by the Sun or during the entry of high-speed objects into the Earth's atmosphere.

  9. Celestial Navigation Fix Based on Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsou Ming-Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A technique for solving celestial fix problems is proposed in this study. This method is based on Particle Swarm Optimization from the field of swarm intelligence, utilizing its superior optimization and searching abilities to obtain the most probable astronomical vessel position. In addition to being applicable to two-body fix, multi-body fix, and high-altitude observation problems, it is also less reliant on the initial dead reckoning position. Moreover, by introducing spatial data processing and display functions in a Geographical Information System, calculation results and chart work used in Circle of Position graphical positioning can both be integrated. As a result, in addition to avoiding tedious and complicated computational and graphical procedures, this work has more flexibility and is more robust when compared to other analytical approaches.

  10. The ancient Armenian calendars' connection with the celestial bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broutian, G. H.

    2015-07-01

    The two oldest Armenian calendars - the Haykian and Protohaykian calendars were connected with observations of celestial bodies. Particularly since 2341 B.C. the heliacal rising of the first star of Orion was used to determine the day of the main holiday - Nawasard. Before that the observations of the same star were used in Protohaykian calendar to determine both the beginning and the end of the year. The year was determined as the duration of visibility of the star Betelgeuse. The year started with the heliacal rising of this star and ended with its heliacal setting. The remaining duration was considered to be out of the year. There are also evidences in Armenian medieval literary sources concerning the observations of heliacal rising and setting of Pleiades. An attempt was made to substantiate that the large symbol carved on the rock platform of the small hill in Metzamor also concerns to the Pleiades and shows the direction of heliacal rising of Pleiades.

  11. Incontri celesti, vita del padre Clavio in cinque atti

    CERN Document Server

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2011-01-01

    The year 2012 will be the fourth centennial year of the Jesuit Christopher Clavius (1535-1612), known as the Euclid of XVI century and the collaborator of the Pope Gregory XIII for the calendar reformation. In the occasion of the year of astronomy I wrote a short theatre pi\\`ece "Celestial encounters" dedicated to the life of Ft. Clavius. He observed two total eclipses from centreline in 1560 in Coimbra and in 1567 in Rome, a fact which is remarkable even for contemporary astronomers. The story is developed around those trips: scientific and religious motivations are put in evidence with historical and fantasy, but realistic, facts. An interregional project between Switzerland and Italy, dedicated to the development of high resolution CMOS camera for astronomy and medical sciences has been entitled to Clavius and will produce high resolution measurements of solar diameter.

  12. An approach to Mel'nikov theory in celestial mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Cicogna, G

    1999-01-01

    Using a completely analytic procedure - based on a suitable extension of a classical method - we discuss an approach to the Poincaré-Mel'nikov theory, which can be conveniently applied also to the case of non-hyperbolic critical points, and even if the critical point is located at the infinity. In this paper, we concentrate our attention on the latter case, and precisely on problems described by Kepler-like potentials in one or two degrees of freedom, in the presence of general time-dependent perturbations. We show that the appearance of chaos (possibly including Arnol'd diffusion) can be proved quite easily and in a direct way, without resorting to singular coordinate transformations, such as the McGehee or blowing-up transformations. Natural examples are provided by the classical Gyldén problem, originally proposed in celestial mechanics, but also of interest in different fields, and by the general 3-body problem in classical mechanics.

  13. Glass Waveguides for Periodic Poling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage-Pedersen, Jacob; Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Kristensen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Planar silica-based waveguide devices have been developed for second-harmonic generation by poling with periodic electrodes. We show that detrimental charge transport can occur along interfaces, but with proper choice of fabrication, high-quality devices are obtained....

  14. Kool pole vabrik / Peeter Kreitzberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kreitzberg, Peeter, 1948-2011

    2003-01-01

    Riigikogu liige Peeter Kreitzberg nimetab Res Publica kavandatavat koolireformi kirvereformiks, mis ei lähtu hariduse põhiprobleemidest. Autor pooldab haridusvõimaluste regionaalset võrdsust ning leiab, et hariduses pole vaja võistlust mõttetult õhutada

  15. Celestial Navigation in the USA, Fiji, and Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Jarita C.

    2015-05-01

    Today there are many coastal communities that are home to navigators who use stars for position finding at night; I was, however, unaware of this fact when I began researching celestial navigation practices in 1997. My project focused on three communities: the Moce Islanders of Fiji, the Kerkennah Islanders in Tunisia, and the U.S. Navy officers and students at the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland. My goal was to answer the question of why people continue to navigate by the stars, but also to understand the role of technology in their navigation practices. Using anthropology techniques of ethnography including participant observation, formal and informal interviews, audio and videotaping, I gathered data over five years at the three communities. I began by learning the details of how they use the stars for navigation. Next, I learned about who did the navigation and where they learned to navigate. I gathered opinions on various navigation aids and instruments, and opinions about the future of using the stars for navigation. I listened to the stories that they told about navigating. In the United States I worked in English, in Fiji, in Fijian and English, and in Tunisia, French and English. For the formal interviews I worked with translators. The navigators use stars for navigating today but the future of their techniques is not certain. Though practiced today, these celestial navigation traditions have undergone and continue to undergo changes. New navigational technologies are part of the stimulation for change, thus 'a meeting of different worlds' is symbolized by peoples encounters with these technologies.

  16. Exploración o deporte: comparación entre los modelos britanico y noruego en la carrera por alcanzar el polo sur = Exploration or sport: comparision between british and norwegian models in the race to reach the south pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Gálvez González

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se analiza la carrera entre Roald Amundsen y Robert F. Scott por alcanzar el Polo Sur entre 1911 y 1912, tomando como base un planteamiento deportivo de organizar la exploración. La expedición de Amundsen fue considerada como moderna, por aplicar los avances existentes para llegar el primero a los 90º Sur. La expedición de Scott sin embargo se organizó según las tradiciones militares británicas. Al final, la victoria del noruego demostró una elección más adecuada de la los factores técnicos, tácticos, biológicos y psicológicos.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------This paper examines the race between Roald Amundsen and Robert F. Scott to reach the South Pole between 1911 and 1912, based on a Sports approach to organize the exploration. Amundsen's expedition was considered as modern to implement existing developments to be the first to get to 90 degrees south. Scott's expedition was organized, however, according to British military traditions. In the end, the Norwegian won, demonstrating a more suitable choice of the technical, tactical, biological and psychological factors.

  17. Territorial Balancing of Poles of Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA POPESCU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is part of the study "Specific problems of the development of the settlement network in south-eastern Romania. Regions of development 3 (South, 4 (South-West and 8 (Bucharest-Ilfov" elaborated during 2004 – 2006, within the AMTRANS programme funded by the Ministry of Education and Research, coordinated by INCD – URBANPROIECT in partnership with the Institute of Geography of the Romanian Academy and the Qualification in Statistics National Centre. The general objective of the project was sustainable and balanced spatial development of the settlement network and promotion of new relationships between urban and rural. Concretely, the study has produced a model of a polycentric and balanced settlement network according to the European principles. The case study testing and validating this model took place in southern Romania, territory exhibiting acutely the entire range of problems related to the state of the settlement network: profoundly large rural areas, accentuated dynamics of declaring new cities without sufficient evidence, excessive polarization exercised by Bucharest, etc. The paper presents the intervention directions needed to balance in the territory urban poles within the studied area, focusing on the establishment of orientation policies to consolidate the role of each settlement based on the hierarchical level of importance: European, national, regional, and local. The paper also identifies possible functional urban areas: the metropolitan area of Bucharest, areas of potential strategic integration, areas of cooperation between the small and medium-sized cities and the rural regions. Within each of these areas, the paper proposes to establish new relationships between urban and rural based on partnership, involving cooperation and coordination in achieving common goals.The study considers that the poles of development are the key element of proposed model, and their identification, formation, and balanced distribution

  18. Mechanical behaviour of cross-country ski racing poles during double poling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, Thomas; Karlöf, Lars

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of cross-country ski poles during double poling on a treadmill using three-dimensional kinematics. The results were compared with standard laboratory tests of the pole manufacturers. A total of 18 skiers were analysed at two speeds (85% and 95% of the maximal speed) at grades of 1.5% and 7%. Variables describing cycle characteristics, bending stiffness, bending behaviour, and trajectories of the pole markers were analysed. Triangular-shaped poles demonstrated the greatest stiffness and lowest variability in maximal bending. Softer poles demonstrated greater variability in bending behaviour and lost ground contact at high skiing speeds, which for some skiers resulted in failure to complete high-speed tests. Considerable variations in pole behaviour for similar poles between skiers were observed, which might be attributed to differences in technique, indicating that mechanical properties of the poles did not exclusively determine pole behaviour in the dynamic situation. The greatest magnitude of pole bending was in the middle part of the pole, which differed from the standard static pole analysis of the manufacturer. Increases in grade demonstrated the greatest effect on pole bending. Distinct differences from the pole manufacturers' laboratory measures were apparent, suggesting that basic pole testing might be adapted.

  19. Numeric calculation of celestial bodies with spreadsheet analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The motion of the planets and moons in our solar system can easily be calculated for any time by the Kepler laws of planetary motion. The Kepler laws are a special case of the gravitational law of Newton, especially if you consider more than two celestial bodies. Therefore it is more basic to calculate the motion by using the gravitational law. But the problem is, that by gravitational law it is not possible to calculate the state of motion with only one step of calculation. The motion has to be numerical calculated for many time intervalls. For this reason, spreadsheet analysis is helpful for students. Skills in programmes like Excel, Calc or Gnumeric are important in professional life and can easily be learnt by students. These programmes can help to calculate the complex motions with many intervalls. The more intervalls are used, the more exact are the calculated orbits. The sutdents will first get a quick course in Excel. After that they calculate with instructions the 2-D-coordinates of the orbits of Moon and Mars. Step by step the students are coding the formulae for calculating physical parameters like coordinates, force, acceleration and velocity. The project is limited to 4 weeks or 8 lessons. So the calcualtion will only include the calculation of one body around the central mass like Earth or Sun. The three-body problem can only be shortly discussed at the end of the project.

  20. Celestial delights the best astronomical events through 2020

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Celestial Delights is the essential 'TV Guide' for the sky. Through extensive graphics integrated with an eight-year-long calendar of sky events, it provides a look at "don't miss" sky events, mostly for naked-eye and binocular observing. It is organized by ease of observation – lunar phases and the brighter planets come first, with solar eclipses, the aurora, and comets coming later. This third edition also includes a hefty dose of sky lore, astronomical history, and clear overviews of current science. It provides a handy reference to upcoming naked-eye events, with information broken out in clear and simple diagrams and tables that are cross-referenced against a detailed almanac for each year covered. This book puts a variety of information all in one place, presents it in a friendly way that does not require prior in-depth astronomical knowledge, and provides the context and historical background for understanding events that astronomy software or web sites lack.

  1. The periodic dynamics of the irregular heterogeneous celestial bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Lei; Yang, Mo; Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Junfeng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a methodology to study the periodic dynamics of irregular heterogeneous celestial bodies. Heterogeneous bodies are not scarce in space. It has been found that bodies, such as 4 Vesta, 624 Hektor, 87 Sylvia, 16 Psyche and 25143 Itokawa, may all have varied internal structures. They can be divided into large-scale and small-scale cases. The varied internal structures of large-scale bodies always result from gradient pressure inside, which leads to compactness differences of the inner material. However, the heterogeneity of a small-scale body is always reflected by the different densities of different areas, which may originate from collision formation from multiple objects. We propose a modeling procedure for the heterogeneous bodies derived from the conventional polyhedral method and then compare its dynamical characteristics with those of the homogeneous case. It is found that zero-velocity curves, positions of equilibrium points, types of bifurcations in the continuation of the orbital family and the stabilities of periodic orbits near the heterogeneous body are different from those in the homogeneous case. The suborbicular orbits near the equatorial plane are potential parking orbits for a future mission, so we discuss the switching of the orbital stability of the family because it has fundamental significance to orbit maintenance and operations around actual asteroids.

  2. Advanced Spacecraft Navigation and Timing Using Celestial Gamma-Ray Sources Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed novel program will use measurements of the high-energy photon output from gamma-ray celestial sources to design a new, unique navigation system. This...

  3. Combining sky and earth: desert ants (Melophorus bagoti) show weighted integration of celestial and terrestrial cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legge, Eric L G; Wystrach, Antoine; Spetch, Marcia L; Cheng, Ken

    2014-12-01

    Insects typically use celestial sources of directional information for path integration, and terrestrial panoramic information for view-based navigation. Here we set celestial and terrestrial sources of directional information in conflict for homing desert ants (Melophorus bagoti). In the first experiment, ants learned to navigate out of a round experimental arena with a distinctive artificial panorama. On crucial tests, we rotated the arena to create a conflict between the artificial panorama and celestial information. In a second experiment, ants at a feeder in their natural visually-cluttered habitat were displaced prior to their homing journey so that the dictates of path integration (feeder to nest direction) based on a celestial compass conflicted with the dictates of view-based navigation (release point to nest direction) based on the natural terrestrial panorama. In both experiments, ants generally headed in a direction intermediate to the dictates of celestial and terrestrial information. In the second experiment, the ants put more weight on the terrestrial cues when they provided better directional information. We conclude that desert ants weight and integrate the dictates of celestial and terrestrial information in determining their initial heading, even when the two directional cues are highly discrepant.

  4. The North Ecliptic Pole Supercluster

    OpenAIRE

    Mullis, C. R.; Henry, J. P.; Gioia, I. M.; Boehringer, H.; Briel, U. G.; Voges, W.; Huchra, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    We have used the ROSAT All-Sky Survey to detect a known supercluster at z=0.087 in the North Ecliptic Pole region. The X-ray data greatly improve our understanding of this supercluster's characteristics, approximately doubling our knowledge of the structure's spatial extent and tripling the cluster/group membership compared to the optical discovery data. The supercluster is a rich structure consisting of at least 21 galaxy clusters and groups, 12 AGN, 61 IRAS galaxies, and various other objec...

  5. The North Ecliptic Pole Supercluster

    CERN Document Server

    Mullis, C R; Gioia, I M; Böhringer, H; Briel, U G; Voges, W; Huchra, J P

    2001-01-01

    We have used the ROSAT All-Sky Survey to detect a known supercluster at z=0.087 in the North Ecliptic Pole region. The X-ray data greatly improve our understanding of this supercluster's characteristics, approximately doubling our knowledge of the structure's spatial extent and tripling the cluster/group membership compared to the optical discovery data. The supercluster is a rich structure consisting of at least 21 galaxy clusters and groups, 12 AGN, 61 IRAS galaxies, and various other objects. A majority of these components were discovered with the X-ray data, but the supercluster is also robustly detected in optical, IR, and UV wavebands. Extending 129 x 102 x 67 (1/h50 Mpc)^3, the North Ecliptic Pole Supercluster has a flattened shape oriented nearly edge-on to our line-of-sight. Owing to the softness of the ROSAT X-ray passband and the deep exposure over a large solid angle, we have detected for the first time a significant population of X-ray emitting galaxy groups in a supercluster. These results demon...

  6. Lunar Pole Illumination and Communications Statistics Computed from GSSR Elevation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System RADAR (GSSR) group at JPL produced a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the lunar south pole using data obtained in 2006. This model has 40-meter horizontal resolution and about 5-meter relative vertical accuracy. This paper uses that Digital Elevation Model to compute average solar illumination and Earth visibility near the lunar south pole. This data quantifies solar power and Earth communications resources at proposed lunar base locations. The elevation data were converted into local terrain horizon masks, then converted into selenographic latitude and longitude coordinates. The horizon masks were compared to latitude, longitude regions bounding the maximum Sun and Earth motions relative to the moon. Proposed lunar south pole base sites were examined in detail, with the best site showing multi-year averages of solar power availability of 92% and Direct-To-Earth (DTE) communication availability of about 50%. Results are compared with a theoretical model, and with actual sun and Earth visibility averaged over the years 2009 to 2028. Results for the lunar North pole were computed using the GSSR DEM of the lunar North pole produced in 1997. The paper also explores using a heliostat to reduce the photovoltaic power system mass and complexity.

  7. The possibility existence of volatile compounds in the area of NSR S5 spot of local suppression of epithermal neutron flux in the South Pole region of the Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feoktistova, Ekaterina

    2016-07-01

    6 statistically significant areas in which it was recorded a lower value of the flow of epithermal neutrons was found in the polar regions of the moon according to LEND: 5 areas are located in the south polar region (the area NSR S1 - 5 [1]) and one (area NSR N1[1]) to the north. One of these areas - the area NSR S5 - is located in the landing sector Luna - Globe mission [2], the launch of which is planned by Russian Space Agency in 2018. In this paper, we investigated the temperature regime, illumination conditions and the possibility of the existence of deposits of volatile compounds in this area. To study we selected a number of substances was detected in the LCROSS impact site in the crater Cabeus, particularly compounds such as H2O, CO2, SO2, CH3OH, NH3, C2H4, H2S, CH4 · 5.75H2O and CO · 5.75H2O [3]. We divided the area of NSR S5 spot into a grid with a number of elements. Step in longitude grid was 0.15 degrees, a step in latitude 0.05 degrees. The total number of the elements of the area of the crater is 36000. The height, slope and orientation of each element were calculated based on a LOLA DEM [4] using an algorithm described in [5]. Our results show that the compounds of deposits such as H2O, CO2, SO2, CH3OH, NH3, C2H4, H2S, CH4 · 5.75H2O and CO · 5.75H2O may exist in NSR S5. Thus, the local suppression the epithermal neutron flux in this region may be due to the presence of hydrogen-containing compounds deposits. [1] Mitrofanov et al. (2012) JGR 117, E003956 [2] Ivanov et al. (2014) Solar System Res. 48, 391 - 402 [3] Colaprete et al. (2010) Science 330, 463-468 [4] http://wwwpds.wustl.edu/ [5] Zevenbergen, L.W., Thorne (1987) Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 12(1), 47-56.

  8. Lunar Pole Illumination and Communications Maps Computed from GSSR Elevation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Scott

    2009-01-01

    A Digital Elevation Model of the lunar south pole was produced using Goldstone Solar System RADAR (GSSR) data obtained in 2006.12 This model has 40-meter horizontal resolution and about 5-meter relative vertical accuracy. This Digital Elevation Model was used to compute average solar illumination and Earth visibility with 100 kilometers of the lunar south pole. The elevation data were converted into local terrain horizon masks, then converted into lunar-centric latitude and longitude coordinates. The horizon masks were compared to latitude, longitude regions bounding the maximum Sun and Earth motions relative to the moon. Estimates of Earth visibility were computed by integrating the area of the region bounding the Earth's motion that was below the horizon mask. Solar illumination and other metrics were computed similarly. Proposed lunar south pole base sites were examined in detail, with the best site showing yearly solar power availability of 92 percent and Direct-To-Earth (DTE) communication availability of about 50 percent. Similar analysis of the lunar south pole used an older GSSR Digital Elevation Model with 600-meter horizontal resolution. The paper also explores using a heliostat to reduce the photovoltaic power system mass and complexity.

  9. The Inner Meaning of Outer Space: Human Nature and the Celestial Realm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy L. Hubbard

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Kant argued that humans possess a priori knowledge of space; although his argument focused on a physics of bodies, it also has implications for a psychology of beings. Many human cultures organize stars in the night sky into constellations (i.e., impose structure; attribute properties, behaviors, and abilities to objects in the celestial realm (i.e., impose meaning; and use perceived regularity in the celestial realms in development of calendars, long-range navigation, agriculture, and astrology (i.e., seek predictability and control. The physical inaccessibility of the celestial realm allows a potent source of metaphor, and also allows projection of myths regarding origin and ascension, places of power, and dwelling places of gods, immortals, and other souls. Developments in astronomy and cosmology infl uenced views of human nature and the place of humanity in the universe, and these changes parallel declines in egocentrism with human development. Views regarding alleged beings (e.g., angels, extraterrestrials from the celestial realm (and to how communicate with such beings are anthropocentric and ignore evolutionary factors in physical and cognitive development. It is suggested that in considering views and uses of the celestial realm, we learn not just about the universe, but also about ourselves. *

  10. Miks pole Eestis edukat keskklassi? / Heimar Lenk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lenk, Heimar, 1946-

    2005-01-01

    Riigikogu liikme sõnul pole Eesti häda mitte rikaste rikkuses, vaid selles, et meil pole välja kujunenud keskklassi. Eestis puudub keskklass seetõttu, et rahvas on majanduslikult liialt kihistunud, tugevalt paremale kaldu poliitika on soodustanud vaid kitsa kildkonna rikastumist

  11. Macro Fiber Piezocomposite Actuator Poling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlink, Rudy J.; Bryant, Robert G.; Manos, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The performance and advantages of Piezocomposite Actuators are to provide a low cost, in-situ actuator/sensor that is flexible, low profile and high strain per volt performance in the same plane of poled voltage. This paper extends reported data for the performance of these Macrofiber Composite (MFC) Actuators to include 4 progressively narrower Intedigitized electrode configurations with several line widths and spacing ratios. Data is reported for max free strain, average strain per applied volt, poling (alignment of the electric dipoles of the PZT ceramic) voltage vs. strain and capacitance, time to poling voltage 95% saturation. The output strain per volt progressively increases as electrode spacing decreases, with saturation occurring at lower poling voltages. The narrowest spacing ratio becomes prone to voltage breakdown or short circuits limiting the spacing width with current fabrication methods. The capacitance generally increases with increasing poling voltage level but has high sensitivity to factors such as temperature, moisture and time from poling which limit its usefulness as a simple indicator. The total time of applied poling voltage to saturate or fully line up the dipoles in the piezoceramic was generally on the order of 5-20 seconds. Less sensitivity to poling due to the applied rate of voltage increase over a 25 to 500 volt/second rate range was observed.

  12. Characterization of thermally poled germanosilicate thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, A.; Digonnet, M.J.F.; Kino, G.S.; Ay, F.; Aydinli, A.

    2004-01-01

    We report measurements of the nonlinearity profile of thermally poled low-loss germanosilicate films deposited on fused-silica substrates by PECVD, of interest as potential electro-optic devices. The profiles of films grown and poled under various conditions all exhibit a sharp peak similar to0.5 mu

  13. New pole placement algorithm - Polynomial matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafai, B.; Keel, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    A simple and direct pole-placement algorithm is introduced for dynamical systems having a block companion matrix A. The algorithm utilizes well-established properties of matrix polynomials. Pole placement is achieved by appropriately assigning coefficient matrices of the corresponding matrix polynomial. This involves only matrix additions and multiplications without requiring matrix inversion. A numerical example is given for the purpose of illustration.

  14. Baryon transition form factors at the pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiator, L.; Döring, M.; Workman, R. L.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Omerović, R.; Stahov, J.; Švarc, A.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic resonance properties are uniquely defined at the pole and do not depend on the separation of the resonance from background or the decay channel. Photon-nucleon branching ratios are nowadays often quoted at the pole, and we generalize the considerations to the case of virtual photons. We derive and compare relations for nucleon to baryon transition form factors both for the Breit-Wigner and the pole positions. Using the MAID2007 and SAID SM08 partial wave analyses of pion electroproduction data, we compare the GM, GE, and GC form factors for the Δ (1232 ) resonance excitation at the Breit-Wigner resonance and pole positions up to Q2=5 GeV2 . We also explore the E /M and S /M ratios as functions of Q2. For pole and residue extraction, we apply the Laurent + Pietarinen method.

  15. Baryon transition form factors at the pole

    CERN Document Server

    Tiator, L; Workman, R L; Hadžimehmedović, M; Osmanović, H; Omerović, R; Stahov, J; Švarc, A

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic resonance properties are uniquely defined at the pole and do not depend on the separation of the resonance from background or the decay channel. Photon-nucleon branching ratios are nowadays often quoted at the pole, and we generalize the considerations to the case of virtual photons. We derive and compare relations for nucleon to baryon transition form factors both for the Breit-Wigner and the pole positions. Using the MAID2007 and SAID SM08 partial wave analyses of pion electroproduction data, we compare the $G_M$, $G_E$, and $G_C$ form factors for the $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance excitation at the Breit-Wigner resonance and pole positions up to $Q^2=5$ GeV$^2$. We also explore the $E/M$ and $S/M$ ratios as functions of $Q^2$. For pole and residue extraction, we apply the Laurent + Pietarinen method.

  16. Planar glass devices for efficient periodic poling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage-Pedersen, Jacob; Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Kristensen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that frequency-converting devices of high quality can be realised with glass poling. The devices, made with silica-on-silicon technology, are poled with periodic, embedded electrodes, and used for second-harmonic generation. We obtain precise control of the quasi phase-matching wav......We demonstrate that frequency-converting devices of high quality can be realised with glass poling. The devices, made with silica-on-silicon technology, are poled with periodic, embedded electrodes, and used for second-harmonic generation. We obtain precise control of the quasi phase......-matching wavelength and bandwidth, and a normalised conversion efficiency of 1.4×10-3 %/W/cm2 which, to our knowledge, is the highest obtained so far with periodic glass poling....

  17. Baryon transition form factors at the pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiator, L.; Döring, M.; Workman, R. L.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Omerović, R.; Stahov, J.; Švarc, A.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic resonance properties are uniquely defined at the pole and do not depend on the separation of the resonance from background or the decay channel. Photon-nucleon branching ratios are nowadays often quoted at the pole, and we generalize the considerations to the case of virtual photons. We derive and compare relations for nucleon to baryon transition form factors both for the Breit-Wigner and the pole positions. Using the MAID2007 and SAID SM08 partial wave analyses of pion electroproduction data, we compare the $G_M$, $G_E$, and $G_C$ form factors for the $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance excitation at the Breit-Wigner resonance and pole positions up to $Q^2=5$ GeV$^2$. We also explore the $E/M$ and $S/M$ ratios as functions of $Q^2$. For pole and residue extraction, we apply the Laurent + Pietarinen method.

  18. Pole placement with constant gain output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, B.; Lindorff, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Given a linear time invariant multivariable system with m inputs and p outputs, it was shown that p closed loop poles of the system can be preassigned arbitrarily using constant gain output feedback provided (A circumflex, B circumflex) is controllable. These data show that if (A circumflex, B circumflex, C circumflex) is controllable and observable, and Rank B circumflex = m, Rank C circumflex = p, then max (m,p) poles of the system can be assigned arbitarily using constant gain output feedback. Further, it is shown that in some cases more than max (m,p) poles can be arbitrarily assigned. A least square design technique is outlined to approximate the desired pole locations when it is not possible to place all the poles.

  19. Characterization of thermally poled germanosilicate thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, A.; Digonnet, M. J. F.; Kino, G. S.; Ay, F.; Aydinli, A.

    2004-10-01

    We report measurements of the nonlinearity profile of thermally poled low-loss germanosilicate films deposited on fused-silica substrates by PECVD, of interest as potential electro-optic devices. The profiles of films grown and poled under various conditions all exhibit a sharp peak ~0.5 μm beneath the anode surface, followed by a weaker pedestal of approximately constant amplitude down to a depth of 13-16 μm, without the sign reversal typical of poled undoped fused silica. These features suggest that during poling, the films significantly slow down the injection of positive ions into the structure. After local optimization, we demonstrate a record peak nonlinear coefficient of ~1.6 pm/V, approximately twice as strong as the highest reliable value reported in thermally poled fused silica glass, a significant improvement that was qualitatively expected from the presence of Ge.

  20. Holography with a Landau pole

    CERN Document Server

    Faedo, Anton F; Pantelidou, Christiana; Tarrio, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Holography for UV-incomplete gauge theories is important but poorly understood. A paradigmatic example is $d=4$, $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills coupled to $N_f$ quark flavors, which possesses a Landau pole at a UV scale $\\Lambda_{LP}$. The dual gravity solution exhibits a UV singularity at a finite proper distance along the holographic direction. Despite this, holographic renormalization can be fully implemented via analytic continuation to an AdS solution. The presence of a UV cut-off manifests itself in several interesting ways. At energies $E \\ll \\Lambda_{LP}$ no pathologies appear, as expected from effective field theory. In contrast, at scales $E \\lesssim \\Lambda_{LP}$ the gravitational potential becomes repulsive, and at temperatures $T \\lesssim \\Lambda_{LP}$ the specific heat becomes negative. Although we focus on $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills with flavor, our qualitative results apply to a much more general class of theories, since they only depend on the fact that the metric near the UV singular...

  1. The ICRF-3: Status, Plans, and Multi-wavelength Progress on the next generation Celestial Reference Frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    ICRF-3 seeks to improve upon the highly successful ICRF-2. Our goals are to improve the precision, spatial and frequency coverage relative to the ICRF-2 by 2018. This date is driven by the desire to create radio frames that are ready for comparison with the Gaia optical frame.Several specific actions are underway. A collaboration to improve at S/X-band precision of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Calibrator Survey's ~2200 sources, which are typically 5 times less precise than the rest of the ICRF-2, is bearing fruit and is projected to yield a factor of 3 improvement in precision. S/X-band southern hemisphere precision improvements are underway with observations using southern antennas such as the AuScope, Warkworth, and HartRAO, South Africa.We also seek to improve radio frequency coverage with X/Ka-band and K-band work. An X/Ka frame of 660 sources now has full sky coverage from the addition of a 2nd southern station in Argentina which is strengthening the southern hemisphere in general. The X/Ka-band frame's precision is now comparable to the ICRF-2 for the 530 sources in common. A K-band collaboration has formed with similar coverage and southern precision goals. By the time of this meeting, we expect K-band to complete full sky coverage with south polar cap observations and to improve spatial density north of -30 deg declination with VLBA observations.On the analysis front, special attention is being given to combination techniques both of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) frames and of multiple data types. Consistency of the Celestial Reference Frame (CRF) with the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) and Earth Oreintation Parameters (EOP) is another area of concern. Comparison of celestial frame solutions from various groups is underway in order to identify and correct systematic errors. We will discuss evidence emerging for 100 µas zonal errors in the ICRF2 in the declination range from 0 to -30 deg.Finally, work is underway to identify and

  2. Feynman rules of higher-order poles in CHY construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rijun; Feng, Bo; Luo, Ming-xing; Zhu, Chuan-Jie

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we generalize the integration rules for scattering equations to situations where higher-order poles are present. We describe the strategy to deduce the Feynman rules of higher-order poles from known analytic results of simple CHY-integrands, and propose the Feynman rules for single double pole and triple pole as well as duplex-double pole and triplex-double pole structures. We demonstrate the validation and strength of these rules by ample non-trivial examples.

  3. Cultural Astronomy in Africa South of the Sahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    This chapter examines two foci of cultural astronomy found in Africa south of the Sahara: creation myths and celestial art. The examples highlighted are from the Akan, the Bahima, the Boshongo, the Fon, the Igbo, the Mambila, the Yoruba, and the Zulu people.

  4. Are the orbital poles of binary stars in the solar neighbourhood anisotropically distributed?

    CERN Document Server

    Agati, J-L; Jorissen, A; Soulié, E; Udry, S; Verhas, P; Dommanget, J

    2014-01-01

    We test whether or not the orbital poles of the systems in the solar neighbourhood are isotropically distributed on the celestial sphere. The problem is plagued by the ambiguity on the position of the ascending node. Of the 95 systems closer than 18 pc from the Sun with an orbit in the 6th Catalogue of Orbits of Visual Binaries, the pole ambiguity could be resolved for 51 systems using radial velocity collected in the literature and CORAVEL database or acquired with the HERMES-Mercator spectrograph. For several systems, we can correct the erroneous nodes in the 6th Catalogue of Orbits and obtain new combined spectroscopic-astrometric orbits for seven systems [WDS 01083+5455Aa,Ab; 01418+4237AB; 02278+0426AB (SB2); 09006+4147AB (SB2); 16413+3136AB; 17121+4540AB; 18070+3034AB]. We used of spherical statistics to test for possible anisotropy. After ordering the binary systems by increasing distance from the Sun, we computed the false-alarm probability for subsamples of increasing sizes, from N = 1 up to the full ...

  5. Extreme Environments: The Ghetto and the South Pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Chester M.

    Extreme environments, such as polar regions or space crafts, provide an analogue for speculations concerning the needs of, educational provisions for, and environmental impacts on ghetto youth in kindergarten through the third grade. This discussion first centers on the common qualities of an extreme environment (whether exotic or mundane): forced…

  6. The new South Pole air shower experiment - SPASE-2

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, J E; Gaisser, T K; Gill, J R; Hart, S P; Hinton, J A; Lloyd-Evans, J; Martello, D; Miller, T C; Ogden, P A; Patel, M; Rochester, K; Spiczak, G M; Stanev, T; Watson, A A

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new coincidence experiment designed to improve understanding of the composition of the primary cosmic-ray beam around the knee of the spectrum. The experiment consists of an air shower array on the surface (SPASE-2), which works in coincidence with an array of air-Cherenkov detectors (VULCAN), and the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) deep in the ice. The experiment must cover the energy range from approx 10 sup 1 sup 4 to approx 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 eV to overlap with direct measurements at lower energy and encompass the regions of the knee and beyond in the cosmic ray spectrum.

  7. Forecasting scenarios of collision catastrophes produced by celestial body falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, V.; Kochetova, O.; Chernetenko, Y.; Zheleznov, N.; Deryugin, V.; Zaitsev, A.

    2014-07-01

    The subject under discussion arose in the course of developing a computer program, which gives the possibility for numerical and graphical modeling of the scenarios of catastrophes caused by collisions of cosmic bodies with the Earth. It is expected that this program can be used for computer-assisted training of the personnel of units of the Ministry for Emergency Situations in the case of a situation caused by the fall of a celestial body on the Earth. Also, it is anticipated that the program can be used in real situations when a dangerous body is discovered on an orbit leading to an imminent collision with the Earth. From the scientific point of view, both variants of use require solving of analogous tasks. In what follows, we discuss both variants. 1. The computation of the circumstances for a fall on the Earth (or approach within short distance) of a real body begins with the determination of its orbit from the observations available using the least-squares method. The mean square error of the representation of the observations on the base of the initial values of the coordinates and the velocities is computed, as well as their covariance matrix. Then, the trajectory of the body's motion is followed by numerical integration starting from the osculating epoch to the collision with the Earth or to its flyby. The computer program takes into account the various cases: at the initial moment, the body can move away from or approach the Earth, it can be outside the sphere of action or inside it. At the moment, when the body enters the sphere of action, the coordinates of the center of the dispersion ellipse on the target plane are computed as well as the dimensions of its axes. Using these data, the probability of collision with the Earth is calculated. Then, the point of penetration of the body into the Earth's atmosphere at a given height above the level of the Earth geoid is determined. In case the body is passing by the Earth, the minimum distance of the body from

  8. Endistel ajateenijatel pole karistust karta / Holger Roonemaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Roonemaa, Holger

    2007-01-01

    Kevadtormi õppusel kaitseväe korda rikkunud Kuperjanovi pataljoni endistel ajateenijatel pole karistust karta, sest karistust saab määrata vaid teenistusaja jooksul. Lisa: Kuperjanovis oli vähe korda

  9. A Comparative Analysis of the New Five-Pole and Three-Pole Active Magnet Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Vakili

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more attention has been given to the active AMBs thanks to their low maintenance cost, suitability for clean environments, and high speed. One of the popular types of AMBs is the three-pole type with integrated and separate cores. Some deficiencies of this type of bearing are its high oscillation, low stability and low efficiency. This paper seeks to analyse the three-pole AMBs and describe their deficiencies and introduce and analyse a new five-pole AMB. The model thus proposed has lower oscillation as well as more stability and efficiency. The five-pole AMB has been simulated by a controller in the presence of disturbance. The results of simulation demonstrate lower vibration and oscillation in the five-pole AMB in comparison with the three-pole model.

  10. Illustrating the phaenomena celestial cartography in antiquity and the Middle Ages

    CERN Document Server

    Dekker, Elly

    2013-01-01

    In this volume all extant celestial maps and globes made before 1500 are described and analysed. It also discusses the astronomical sources involved in making these artefacts in antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Islamic world and the European Renaissance before 1500.

  11. The Gravitational Effects of a Celestial Body with Magnetic Charge and Moment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The gravitational effects (precession of charge-less particles and deflection of light) in the gravitational field of a celestial body with magnetic charge and moment (CM)are investigated. We found that the magnetic charge always weakens the pure Schwarzschild effects, while the magnetic dipole moment deforms the effects in a more complicated way.

  12. A moving-barber-pole illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Chubb, Charles; Sperling, George

    2014-05-01

    In the barber-pole illusion (BPI), a diagonally moving grating is perceived as moving vertically because of the shape of the vertically oriented window through which it is viewed-a strong shape-motion interaction. We introduce a novel stimulus-the moving barber pole-in which a diagonal, drifting sinusoidal carrier is windowed by a raised, vertical, drifting sinusoidal modulator that moves independently of the carrier. In foveal vision, the moving-barber-pole stimulus can be perceived as several active barber poles drifting horizontally but also as other complex dynamic patterns. In peripheral vision, pure vertical motion (the moving-barber-pole illusion [MBPI]) is perceived for a wide range of conditions. In foveal vision, the MBPI is observed, but only when the higher-order modulator motion is masked. Theories to explain the BPI make indiscriminable predictions in a standard barber-pole display. But, in moving-barber-pole stimuli, the motion directions of features (e.g., end stops) of the first-order carrier and of the higher-order modulator are all different from the MBPI. High temporal frequency stimuli viewed peripherally greatly reduce the effectiveness of higher-order motion mechanisms and, ideally, isolate a single mechanism responsible for the MBPI. A three-stage motion-path integration mechanism that (a) computes local motion energies, (b) integrates them for a limited time period along various spatial paths, and (c) selects the path with the greatest motion energy, quantitatively accounts for these high-frequency data. The MBPI model also accounts for the perceived motion-direction in peripherally viewed moving-barber-pole stimuli that do and do not exhibit the MBPI over the entire range of modulator (0-10 Hz) and carrier (2.5-10 Hz) temporal frequencies tested.

  13. Assessment of structural integrity of wooden poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craighead, Ian A.; Thackery, Steve; Redstall, Martin; Thomas, Matthew R.

    2000-05-01

    Despite recent advances in the development of new materials, wood continues to be used globally for the support of overhead cable networks used by telecommunications and electrical utility companies. As a natural material, wood is subject to decay and will eventually fail, causing disruption to services and danger to public and company personnel. Internal decay, due to basidomycetes fungi or attack by termites, can progress rapidly and is often difficult to detect by casual inspection. The traditional method of testing poles for decay involves hitting them with a hammer and listening to the sound that results. However, evidence suggests that a large number of poles are replaced unnecessarily and a significant number of poles continue to fail unexpectedly in service. Therefore, a more accurate method of assessing the structural integrity of wooden poles is required. Over the last 25 years there have been a number of attempts at improving decay detection. Techniques such as ultrasound, drilling X rays etc. have been developed but have generally failed to improve upon the practicality and accuracy of the traditional testing method. The paper describes the use of signal processing techniques to analyze the acoustic response of the pole and thereby determine the presence of decay. Development of a prototype meter is described and the results of initial tests on several hundred poles are presented.

  14. 2D Stabilised analytic signal method in DC pole-pole potential data interpretation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paras R Pujari; Rambhatla G Sastry

    2003-03-01

    Using analytic signal method, interpretation of pole-pole secondary electric potentials due to 2D conductive/resistive prisms is presented. The estimated parameters are the location, lateral extent or width and depth to top surface of the prism. Forward modelling is attempted by 2D-Finite Difference method. The proposed stabilised analytic signal algorithm (RES2AS) uses Tikhonov's regularization scheme and FFT routines. The algorithm is tested on three theoretical examples and field data from the campus of Roorkee University. The stability of RES2AS is also tested on synthetic error prone secondary pole-pole potential data.

  15. Clouds Over the North Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 29 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. Like yesterday's image, the linear 'ripples' are water-ice clouds. As spring is deepening at the North Pole these clouds are becoming more prevalent. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.9, Longitude 135.5 East (224.5 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are

  16. Industry in growth poles of Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Iacoboaea

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A competitive industry can reduce costs and prices, can create new products, thus contributing significantly to productivity growth throughout the economy. The industry is also the main source of innovation necessary for society to meet the challenges faced. Growth poles have the ability to spread economic development in adjacent areas and contributes significantly to the territorial development of the country. This article aims to analyze the current state of industry growth poles of Romania, in terms of number of employees, distribution of sub-industries and density of firms in industry. It also highlights business structures and industry clusters located in the growth poles, as solutions for boosting economic growth and creation of added value. Analysis performed leads to the conclusion that all growth poles are engines of economical development in the industry for the regios of origin. We distinguish growth poles Timişoara and Cluj-Napoca whose economic advantage is given by the favorable position close to the markets of the European Union.

  17. A method to determine asteroid poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deangelis, G.

    1993-01-01

    The determination of spin axis and shape is well known to be of fundamental importance for studies about the rotational and physical properties of asteroids. In particular, knowledge that the pole coordinate distribution is random or not could indicate the probable non-Maxwellian distribution of asteroid spin axes, while the distribution in terms of size and shape could place important constraints on the theories about the collisional history of some individual asteroids, of asteroid families, and of the asteroid population as a whole. Many kinds of methods have been developed to determine pole coordinates. An EA method is presented, from which it is possible to obtain the solution with no trial poles, but with a simultaneous least square fit on both the E and A part. Results for rotational and shape parameters were obtained for 18 asteroids: the values of the obtained parameters are generally in close agreement with those of others.

  18. Heavenly Networks. Celestial Maps and Globes in Circulation between Artisans, Mathematicians, and Noblemen in Renaissance Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the iconography on a set of star charts by Albrecht Dürer (1515), and celestial globes by Caspar Vopel (1536) and Christoph Schissler (1575). The iconography on these instruments is conditioned by strong traditions which include not only the imagery on globes and planispheres (star charts), but also ancient literature about the constellations. Where this iconography departs from those traditions, the change had to do with humanism in the sixteenth century. This "humanistic" dimension is interwoven with other concerns that involve both "social" and "technical" motivations. The interplay of these three dimensions illustrates how the iconography on celestial charts and globes expresses some features of the shared knowledge and shared culture between artisans, mathematicians, and nobles in Renaissance Europe.

  19. UBVRI Photometric Standard Stars Around the Celestial Equator: Updates and Additions

    CERN Document Server

    Landolt, Arlo U

    2009-01-01

    New broadband UBVRI photoelectric observations on the Johnson-Kron-Cousins photometric system have been made of 202 stars around the sky, and centered at the celestial equator. These stars constitute both an update of and additions to a previously published list of equatorial photometric standard stars. The list is capable of providing, for both celestial hemispheres, an internally consistent homogeneous broadband standard photometric system around the sky. When these new measurements are included with those previously published by Landolt (1992), the entire list of standard stars in this paper encompasses the magnitude range 8.90 < V < 16.30, and the color index range -0.35 < (B - V) < +2.30.

  20. IN-FLIGHT ALIGNMENT OF INERTIAL NAVIGATION SYSTEM BY CELESTIAL OBSERVATION TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALlJamshaid; FANGJian-cheng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an in-flight alignment technique for a strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) and employs a star pattern recognition procedure for identifying stars sensed by a CCD electrooptical star sensor.Collinearity equations are used to estimate sensor frame star coordinates and the conventional least square differential correction method is used to estimate the unknown orientation angles. A comparison of this attitude with the attitude estimated by the SINS provides axis misalignment angles. Simulations using a Kalman filter are carried out for an SINS and the system employs a local level navigation frame. The space stabilized SINS is discussed in conjunction with the celestial aiding. Based on the observation of the Kalman filter, the estimating and compensating gyro errors, as well as the position and velocity errors caused by the SINS misalignments are calibrated by celestial attitute information.

  1. Pole solutions for flame front propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Kupervasser, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with solving mathematically the unsteady flame propagation equations. New original mathematical methods for solving complex non-linear equations and investigating their properties are presented. Pole solutions for flame front propagation are developed. Premixed flames and filtration combustion have remarkable properties: the complex nonlinear integro-differential equations for these problems have exact analytical solutions described by the motion of poles in a complex plane. Instead of complex equations, a finite set of ordinary differential equations is applied. These solutions help to investigate analytically and numerically properties of the flame front propagation equations.

  2. POLES OF ZETA FUNCTIONS OF COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A vanishing theorem is proved for -adic cohomology with compact support on an affine (singular) complete intersection. As an application, it is shown that for an affine complete intersection defined over a finite field of q elements, the reciprocal "poles" of the zeta function are always divisible by q as algebraic integers. A p-adic proof is also given, which leads to further q-divisibility of the poles or equivalently an improvement of the polar part of the AxKatz theorem for an affine complete intersection. Similar results hold for a projective complete intersection.

  3. Log amplifier with pole-zero compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookshier, William

    1987-01-01

    A logarithmic amplifier circuit provides pole-zero compensation for improved stability and response time over 6-8 decades of input signal frequency. The amplifier circuit includes a first operational amplifier with a first feedback loop which includes a second, inverting operational amplifier in a second feedback loop. The compensated output signal is provided by the second operational amplifier with the log elements, i.e., resistors, and the compensating capacitors in each of the feedback loops having equal values so that each break point or pole is offset by a compensating break point or zero.

  4. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Pursimo, T. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope Apartado 474E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Jauncey, David L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Maslennikov, K. [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo, Pulkovskoye Shosse, 65/1, 196140, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Boldycheva, A., E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  5. On the design of pole modules for inverse systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, B. F.; Sain, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    When a linear dynamical system admits more than one inverse, it is known that the pole module of any inverse must contain, either as a submodule or as a factor module, a module of fixed poles isomorphic to the zero module of the original system. Design of the pole module for such an inverse system is resolved by introducing a variable pole module for the inverse, by determining necessary and sufficient conditions for a desired module to be a variable pole module, and by studying the manner in which the fixed and variable modules assemble into the pole module of the inverse. If the fixed and variable pole spectra are disjoint, the pole module of the inverse system is a direct sum of the fixed- and variable-pole modules; if not, procedures for addressing the Jordan structure are presented.

  6. A new method of single celestial-body sun positioning based on theory of mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei; Xu Xiaofeng; Wu Yuanzhe

    2016-01-01

    Considering defects of current single celestial-body positioning methods such as discon-tinuity and long period, a new sun positioning algorithm is herein put forward. Instead of tradi-tional astronomical spherical trigonometry and celestial coordinate system, the proposed new positioning algorithm is built by theory of mechanisms. Based on previously derived solar vector equations (from a C1R2P2 series mechanism), a further global positioning method is developed by inverse kinematics. The longitude and latitude coordinates expressed by Greenwich mean time (GMT) and solar vector in local coordinate system are formulated. Meanwhile, elimination method of multiple solutions, errors of longitude and latitude calculation are given. In addition, this algo-rithm has been integrated successfully into a mobile phone application to visualize sun positioning process. Results of theoretical verification and smart phone’s test demonstrate the validity of pre-sented coordinate’s expressions. Precision is shown as equivalent to current works and is acceptable to civil aviation requirement. This new method solves long-period problem in sun sight running fix-ing and improves applicability of sun positioning. Its methodology can inspire development of new sun positioning device. It would be more applicable to be combined with inertial navigation systems for overcoming discontinuity of celestial navigation systems and accumulative errors of inertial nav-igation systems.

  7. Kosovo : kannatlikkusele lootmine pole plaan / Chris Patten

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Patten, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Autor leiab, et arvestades Kosovo elanike ülekaalukat soovi olla vaba Serbiast, riigist, mis üritas nad kõrvaldada, ning alternatiivi täielikku puudumist Belgradi poolt, pole rahvusvahelisel kogukonnal muud võimalust kui anda Kosovole iseseisvus

  8. NATO pole suutnud Gaddafit murda / Evelyn Kaldoja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldoja, Evelyn, 1980-

    2011-01-01

    Liibüa diktaatori Muammar Gaddafi režiim pole langenud, Lääneriigid jätkavad sõjalisi operatsioone tsiviilelanike kaitseks. Kolm võimalikku lahendust Liibüa kriisile, BBC diplomaatiakorrespondendi Jonathan Marcuse hinnang

  9. Numerical pole assignment by eigenvalue Jacobian inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevaston, George E.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical procedure for solving the linear pole placement problem is developed which operates by the inversion of an analytically determined eigenvalue Jacobian matrix. Attention is given to convergence characteristics and pathological situations. It is not concluded that the algorithm developed is suitable for computer-aided control system design with particular reference to the scan platform pointing control system for the Galileo spacecraft.

  10. Recent advances in poled optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pruneri, V.; Margulis, W.; Myrén, N.;

    2005-01-01

    A second-order nonlinearity can be induced in optical fibres through poling. We describe accomplishments of the EU project GLAMOROUS in making low-cost high performance electrooptic and nonlinear optical fibre- and waveguide-based components. In particular a comparison with more traditional...

  11. Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert R.; Meyers, Valerie E.

    2015-01-01

    Crew members can be directly exposed to celestial dust in several ways. After crew members perform extravehicular activities (EVAs), they may introduce into the habitat dust that will have collected on spacesuits and boots. Cleaning of the suits between EVAs and changing of the Environmental Control Life Support System filters are other operations that could result in direct exposure to celestial dusts. In addition, if the spacesuits used in exploration missions abrade the skin, as current EVA suits have, then contact with these wounds would provide a source of exposure. Further, if celestial dusts gain access to a suit's interior, as was the case during the Apollo missions, the dust could serve as an additional source of abrasions or enhance suit-induced injuries. When a crew leaves the surface of a celestial body and returns to microgravity, the dust that is introduced into the return vehicle will "float," thus increasing the opportunity for ocular and respiratory injury. Because the features of the respirable fraction of lunar dusts indicate they could be toxic to humans, NASA conducted several studies utilizing lunar dust simulants and authentic lunar dust to determine the unique properties of lunar dust that affect physiology, assess the dermal and ocular irritancy of the dust, and establish a permissible exposure limit for episodic exposure to airborne lunar dust during missions that would involve no more than 6 months stay on the lunar surface. Studies, with authentic lunar soils from both highland (Apollo 16) and mare (Apollo17) regions demonstrated that the lunar soil is highly abrasive to a high fidelity model of human skin. Studies of lunar dust returned during the Apollo 14 mission from an area of the moon in which the soils were comprised of mineral constituents from both major geological regions (highlands and mares regions) demonstrated only minimal ocular irritancy, and pulmonary toxicity that was less than the highly toxic terrestrial crystalline

  12. Positive and Negative Thermal Poling of Germanosilicate Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, D.; Wu, W.; Arentoft, Jesper;

    1999-01-01

    In situ measurements of thermal poling of germanosilicate fibers under positive and negative poling voltages show different dynamics of a linear electro-optic effect induced into fibers. The mechanism for the induced electro-optic effect is addressed......In situ measurements of thermal poling of germanosilicate fibers under positive and negative poling voltages show different dynamics of a linear electro-optic effect induced into fibers. The mechanism for the induced electro-optic effect is addressed...

  13. 30 CFR 57.6701 - Tamping and loading pole requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tamping and loading pole requirements. 57.6701 Section 57.6701 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... poles shall be of wood or other nonconductive, nonsparking material. Couplings for poles shall...

  14. Determination of pole orientations and shapes of asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Per; Barucci, M. Antonietta; Drummond, Jack D.; Lumme, Kari; Ostro, Steven J.

    1989-01-01

    The principles of asteroid light-curve inversion are discussed together with basic principles involved in approaches for deriving asteroid pole and shape parameters from photometry data. The merits of various pole determination techniques are described and compared. Results obtained so far on the pole orientations and shapes of asteroids are presented.

  15. 30 CFR 56.12048 - Communication conductors on power poles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Communication conductors on power poles. 56... Electricity § 56.12048 Communication conductors on power poles. Telegraph, telephone, or signal wires shall not be installed on the same crossarm with power conductors. When carried on poles...

  16. Pole Placement with Fields of Positive Characteristic

    CERN Document Server

    Gorla, Elisa

    2009-01-01

    The pole placement problem belongs to the classical problems of linear systems theory. It is often assumed that the ground field is the real numbers R or the complex numbers C. The major result over the complex numbers derived in 1981 by Brockett and Byrnes states that arbitrary static pole placement is possible for a generic set of m-inputs, p-outputs and McMillan degree n system as soon as mp>=n. Moreover the number of solutions in the situation mp=n is an intersection number first computed by Hermann Schubert in the 19th century. In this paper we show that the same result with slightly different proofs holds over any algebraically closed field.

  17. Pole Inflation - Shift Symmetry and Universal Corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Broy, Benedict J; Roest, Diederik; Westphal, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    An appealing explanation for the Planck data is provided by inflationary models with a non-canonical kinetic term: a Laurent expansion of the kinetic function translates into a potential with a nearly shift-symmetric plateau in canonical fields. The shift symmetry can be broken at large field values by including higher-order poles. We show that the resulting corrections to the inflationary dynamics and predictions are universal at lowest order, and can induce power loss at large angular scales. At lowest order there are no corrections from a pole of one order higher; this is referred to as extended no-scale in string theory and we explain why this is a general phenomenon. Finally, we outline which other corrections may arise as string loop corrections.

  18. Efficient iterative adaptive pole placement algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊民; 李靖; 杨磊

    2004-01-01

    An iterative adaptive pole placement algorithm is presented. The stability and the convergence of the algorithm are respectively established. Since one-step iterative formulation in computing controller's parameters is used, the on-line computation cost is greatly reduced with respected to the traditional algorithm. The algorithm with the feed-forward can follow arbitrarily bounded output. The algorithm is also extended to multivariate case. Simulation examples show the efficiency and robustness of the algorithm.

  19. Pole Assignment for Second-Order Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHU, E. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper contains some results for pole assignment problems for the second-order system M ẍ(t)+D ẋ(t)+K x (t)=B u (t) . Specifically, Algorithm 0 constructs feedback matrices F1 and F2 such that the closed-loop quadratic pencil Pc( λ)= λ2M+ λ ( D+ BF2)+( K+ BF1) has a desired set of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors are well-conditioned. The method is a modification of the SVD-based method proposed by Juang and Maghami [1, 2] which is a second-order adaptation of the well-known robust eigenvalue assignment method by Kautsky et al. [3] for first-order systems. Robustness is achieved by minimising some not-so-well-known condition numbers of the eigenvalues of the closed-loop second-order pencil. We next consider the partial pole assignment problem. In 1997, Datta, Elhay and Ram proposed three biorthogonality relations for eigenvectors of symmetric definite quadratic pencils [4]. One of these relations was used to derive an explicit solution to the partial pole assignment problem by state feedback for the related single-input symmetric definite second-order control system. The solution shed new light on the stabilisation and control of large flexible space structures, for which only one small subset of the spectrum needs to be reassigned while retaining the complementary part of the spectrum. In this paper, the method has been generalised for multi-input and non-symmetric quadratic pencils. Finally, we discuss briefly the output feedback pole assignment problem.

  20. Micro-arcsecond Celestial Reference Frames: definition and realization - Impact of the recent IAU Resolutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicole Capitaine

    2012-01-01

    The adoption of the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS),based on Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of extragalactic radiosources by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) since 1998 January 1,opened a new era for astronomy.The ICRS and the corresponding frame,the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF),replaced the Fundamental Catalog (FK5) based on positions and proper motions of bright stars,with the Hipparcos catalog being adopted as the primary realization of the ICRS in optical wavelengths.According to its definition,the ICRS is such that the barycentric directions of distant extragalactic objects show no global rotation with respect to these objects; this provides a quasi-inertial reference for measuring the positions and angular motions of the celestial objects.Other resolutions on reference systems were passed by the IAU in 2000 and 2006 and endorsed by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) in 2003 and 2007,respectively.These especially concern the definition and realization of the astronomical reference systems in the framework of general relativity and transformations between them.First,the IAU 2000 resolutions refined the concepts and definition of the astronomical reference systems and parameters for Earth's rotation,and adopted the IAU 2000 precession-nutation.Then,the IAU 2006 resolutions adopted a new precession model that is consistent with dynamical theories; they also addressed definition,terminology or orientation issues relative to reference systems and time scales that needed to be specified after the adoption of the IAU 2000 resolutions.An additional IUGG 2007 resolution defined the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) so that it strictly complies with the IAU recommendations.Finally,the IAU 2009 resolutions adopted a new system of astronomical constants and an improved realization of the ICRF.These fundamental changes have led to significant improvements in the fields

  1. Method of separation of celestial gamma-ray bursts from solar flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, K.W.; White, R.S. (Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, UC Riverside, California 92521 (United States)); Klebesadel, R.W.; Laros, J.G. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1991-09-01

    We recently discovered 217 new'' celestial gamma-ray burst candidates from the new'' burst search of the PVO real time data base.[sup 1] The burst search covered the time period from September 1978 to July 1988. Sixty were confirmed by at lest on other spacecraft, e.g., ISEE-3, V-11, V-12, etc. None triggered the PVO high time resolution memory. In this paper we describe a new algorithm based ont eh relationship between time width [ital T][sub [ital w

  2. The ICRF-3: Status, plans, and progress on the next generation International Celestial Reference Frame

    CERN Document Server

    Malkin, Z; Arias, F; Boboltz, D; Boehm, J; Bolotin, S; Bourda, G; Charlot, P; De Witt, A; Fey, A; Gaume, R; Heinkelmann, R; Lambert, S; Ma, C; Nothnagel, A; Seitz, M; Gordon, D; Skurikhina, E; Souchay, J; Titov, O

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this presentation is to report the latest progress in creation of the next generation of VLBI-based International Celestial Reference Frame, ICRF3. Two main directions of ICRF3 development are improvement of the S/X-band frame and extension of the ICRF to higher frequencies. Another important task of this work is the preparation for comparison of ICRF3 with the new generation optical frame GCRF expected by the end of the decade as a result of the Gaia mission.

  3. Celestial harvest 300-plus showpieces of the heavens for telescope viewing and contemplation

    CERN Document Server

    Mullaney, James

    2012-01-01

    This book describes over 300 celestial wonders that can be viewed with common binoculars and low-power ""backyard"" telescopes incorporating refractors and reflectors.In addition to such showpieces as the Andromeda Galaxy, the largest and brightest of all galaxies after the Milky Way, and the Blue Snowball, one of the autumn sky's outstanding planetary nebulas, over 20 other special objects are listed and characterized, many of which are visible to the unaided eye on a dark, clear night.The sun, moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and other members of the earth's solar system are also describ

  4. Pole-placement with constant gain output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, B.; Lindorff, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Davison (1970) has demonstrated that it is possible to assign max (m, p) poles of a linear time-invariant controllable and observable multivariable system arbitrarily close to desired locations by using constant gain output feedback. A new proof of Davison's theorem on pole placement is developed, and a system design procedure is described which offers some advantages over Davison's method. It is shown that in some cases more than max (m, p) poles can be assigned arbitrarily, and a least square design procedure is proposed to approximate the desired pole locations when it is not possible to place all the poles.

  5. Growth Poles - an Alternative to Reducing Regional Disparities. Case Study-Iaşi Growth Pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLETA MONICA MUSTĂȚEA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current development of the European Union is based on the cohesion policy which focuses on the attenuation of regional disparities. For this purpose, the idea of growth poles emerged in Romania, and its role became more than familiar: the determination of an internal socio-economic cohesion. Polycentrism becomes a concept of territorial planning increasingly promoted. Development of growth poles aims to reduce the attraction force of large centres and to balance the location of activities generating functions across a territory. This was the idea that led to the formation of Iaşi Metropolitan Area, territorial unit that is intended to be the main regional centre of the North-East Region, thus polarizing the surrounding areas. Iaşi Growth Pole objectives are represented by economic competitiveness, the development of regional connectivity and the promotion of regional cooperation. One of the major assets of the growth pole in achieving these goals is the cross-border position near the eastern border of the European Union. This paper examines to what extent Iași Growth Pole can rise to the required standards, while the peripheral position seems to be rather a disadvantage and the uncertain functionality of the metropolitan area shows that the main problem remains the reduced economic competitiveness.

  6. Purification of fluorescently labeled Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spindle Pole Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Trisha N.

    2016-01-01

    Centrosomes are components of the mitotic spindle responsible for organizing microtubules and establishing a bipolar spindle for accurate chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the centrosome is called the spindle pole body, a highly organized tri-laminar structure embedded in the nuclear envelope. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of fluorescently labeled spindle pole bodes from S. cerevisiae. Spindle pole bodies are purified from yeast using a TAP-tag purification followed by velocity sedimentation. This highly reproducible TAP-tag purification method improves upon previous techniques and expands the scope of in vitro characterization of yeast spindle pole bodies. The genetic flexibility of this technique allows for the study of spindle pole body mutants as well as the study of spindle pole bodies during different stages of the cell cycle. The ease and reproducibility of the technique makes it possible to study spindle pole bodies using a variety of biochemical, biophysical, and microscopic techniques. PMID:27193850

  7. Searching for Terrain Softening near Mercury's North Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobian, P. S.; Vilas, F.; Lederer, S. M.; Barlow, N. G.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999, following the initial discovery of radar bright craters near both poles of Mercury measured the depth-todiameter (d/D) ratios of 170 impact craters in Mariner 10 images covering four different regions on Mercury s surface. Rapid softening of crater structure, indicated by lower d/D ratios, could indicate the possibility of subsurface water ice in Mercury's terrain originating from an internal source in the planet. Their study included 3 specific radar bright craters suggested to contain ice. They concluded that no terrain softening was apparent, and a rapidly emplaced exogenic water source was the most likely source for the proposed ice in these craters. Recent radar observations of the Mercurian North pole have pinpointed many additional radar bright areas with a resolution 10x better than previous radar measurements, and which correlate with craters imaged by Mariner 10. These craters are correlated with regions that are permanently shaded from direct sunlight, and are consistent with observations of clean water ice. We have expanded the initial study by Barlow et al. to include d/D measurements of 12 craters newly identified as radar bright at latitudes poleward of +80o. The radar reflectivity resemblances to Mars south polar cap and echoes from three icy Galilean satellites suggest that these craters too may have polar ice on Mercury. The effect of subsurface H20 on impact craters is a decrease in its d/D ratio, and softening of crater rims over a period of time. The study of Barlow et al., focused on determining the d/D ratios of 170 impact craters in the Borealis (north polar), Tolstoj (equatorial), Kuiper (equatorial), and Bach (south polar) quadrangles. This work focuses on the newly discovered radar bright craters, investigating their d/D ratios as an expansion of the earlier work..We compare our results to the statistical results from Barlow et al. here. With the upcoming Messenger spacecraft mission to Mercury, this is an especially timely study

  8. On one-way Doppler measurements of space craft and celestial objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochim, E. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The orbital velocity of a spacecraft and other celestial objects is monitored by observing the Doppler frequency shift of the signals received at the ground station. This is possible one-way in case the transmitted frequency is stable enough. In most spacecraft a calibrated transponder allows two-way Doppler frequency registrations. In general, the factor 2 is expected as the quotient between two- and one-way frequencies. However, this is no longer the case when the motion of the observed object deviates from the orbit as predicted. Frequency differences appear. Porsche (1999) has published a formula to describe these differences based on the assumption of a double projection of the true velocity vector. In the present paper a more sophisticated analysis of the influence of state errors on the track-ing results is deduced. This theory has been tested by the Doppler measurements during flybys of the comet space probe GIOTTO penetrating through the comae of the comets P/Halley and P/Grigg-Skjellerup. One-way Doppler measurements of the low Earth satellites CHAMP and TERRASAR-X show a tendency for the applicability of this approach. Finally, some conse-quences for the observation of other celestial objects are discussed.

  9. Optimization design about gimbal structure of high-precision autonomous celestial navigation tracking mirror system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Xiao-xu; Han, Jun-feng; Wei, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Mei-lin; Yue, Peng

    2016-01-01

    High precision tracking platform of celestial navigation with control mirror servo structure form, to solve the disadvantages of big volume and rotational inertia, slow response speed, and so on. It improved the stability and tracking accuracy of platform. Due to optical sensor and mirror are installed on the middle-gimbal, stiffness and resonant frequency requirement for high. Based on the application of finite element modality analysis theory, doing Research on dynamic characteristics of the middle-gimbal, and ANSYS was used for the finite element dynamic emulator analysis. According to the result of the computer to find out the weak links of the structure, and Put forward improvement suggestions and reanalysis. The lowest resonant frequency of optimization middle-gimbal avoid the bandwidth of the platform servo mechanism, and much higher than the disturbance frequency of carrier aircraft, and reduces mechanical resonance of the framework. Reaching provides a theoretical basis for the whole machine structure optimization design of high-precision of autonomous Celestial navigation tracking mirror system.

  10. A Ka-band Celestial Reference Frame with Applications to Deep Space Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. E.; García-Miró, C.; Horiuchi, S.; Sotuela, I.

    2011-10-01

    The Ka-band radio spectrum is now being used for a wide variety of applications. This paper highlights the use of Ka-band as a frequency for precise deep space navigation based on a set of reference beacons provided by extragalactic quasars which emit broadband noise at Ka-band. This quasar-based celestial reference frame is constructed using X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) from fifty-five 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network antennas in California, Australia, and Spain. We report on observations which have detected 464 sources covering the full 24 hours of Right Ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the international standard S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of ~200 micro-arcsec (μas) in α cos δ and ~300 μas in δ. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 μas level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of instrumental phase calibration, tropospheric refraction mis-modeling, and limited southern geometry. The motivation for extending the celestial reference frame to frequencies above 8 GHz is to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability and to support spacecraft navigation for Ka-band based NASA missions.

  11. A Ka-Band Celestial Reference Frame with Applications to Deep Space Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. Eric; Garcia-Miro, Cristina; Horiuchi, Shinji; Sotuela, Ioana

    2011-01-01

    The Ka-band radio spectrum is now being used for a wide variety of applications. This paper highlights the use of Ka-band as a frequency for precise deep space navigation based on a set of reference beacons provided by extragalactic quasars which emit broadband noise at Ka-band. This quasar-based celestial reference frame is constructed using X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) from fifty-five 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network antennas in California, Australia, and Spain. We report on observations which have detected 464 sources covering the full 24 hours of Right Ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the international standard S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of approximately 200 micro-arcsec in alpha cos(delta) and approximately 300 micro-arcsec in delta. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 micro-arcsec level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of instrumental phase calibration, tropospheric refraction mis-modeling, and limited southern geometry. The motivation for extending the celestial reference frame to frequencies above 8 GHz is to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability and to support spacecraft navigation for Ka-band based NASA missions.

  12. Are the orbital poles of binary stars in the solar neighbourhood anisotropically distributed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agati, J.-L.; Bonneau, D.; Jorissen, A.; Soulié, E.; Udry, S.; Verhas, P.; Dommanget, J.

    2015-02-01

    We test whether or not the orbital poles of the systems in the solar neighbourhood are isotropically distributed on the celestial sphere. The problem is plagued by the ambiguity on the position of the ascending node. Of the 95 systems closer than 18 pc from the Sun with an orbit in the 6th Catalogue of Orbits of Visual Binaries, the pole ambiguity could be resolved for 51 systems using radial velocity collected in the literature and CORAVEL database or acquired with the HERMES/Mercator spectrograph. For several systems, we can correct the erroneous nodes in the 6th Catalogue of Orbits and obtain new combined spectroscopic/astrometric orbits for seven systems [WDS 01083+5455Aa,Ab; 01418+4237AB; 02278+0426AB (SB2); 09006+4147AB (SB2); 16413+3136AB; 17121+4540AB; 18070+3034AB]. We used of spherical statistics to test for possible anisotropy. After ordering the binary systems by increasing distance from the Sun, we computed the false-alarm probability for subsamples of increasing sizes, from N = 1 up to the full sample of 51 systems. Rayleigh-Watson and Beran tests deliver a false-alarm probability of 0.5% for the 20 systems closer than 8.1 pc. To evaluate the robustness of this conclusion, we used a jackknife approach, for which we repeated this procedure after removing one system at a time from the full sample. The false-alarm probability was then found to vary between 1.5% and 0.1%, depending on which system is removed. The reality of the deviation from isotropy can thus not be assessed with certainty at this stage, because only so few systems are available, despite our efforts to increase the sample. However, when considering the full sample of 51 systems, the concentration of poles toward the Galactic position l = 46.0°, b = 37°, as observed in the 8.1 pc sphere, totally vanishes (the Rayleigh-Watson false-alarm probability then rises to 18%). Tables 1-3 and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org† Deceased October 1, 2014.

  13. Modified π π amplitude with σ pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydžovský, P.; Kamiński, R.; Nazari, V.

    2014-12-01

    A set of well-known once subtracted dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition is used to modify unitary multichannel S (π π , K K ¯, and η η ) and P (π π , ρ 2 π , and ρ σ ) wave amplitudes mostly below 1 GeV. Before the modifications, these amplitudes significantly did not satisfy the crossing symmetry condition and did not describe the π π threshold region. Moreover, the pole of the S wave amplitude related with the f0(500 ) meson (former f0(600 ) or σ ) had much smaller imaginary part and bigger real one in comparison with those in the newest Particle Data Group Tables. Here, these amplitudes are supplemented by near threshold expansion polynomials and refitted to the experimental data in the effective two pion mass from the threshold to 1.8 GeV and to the dispersion relations up to 1.1 GeV. In result the self consistent, i.e., unitary and fulfilling the crossing symmetry condition, S and P wave amplitudes are formed and the σ pole becomes much narrower and lighter. To eliminate doubts about the uniqueness of the so obtained sigma pole position short and purely mathematical proof of the uniqueness of the results is also presented. This analysis is addressed to a wide group of physicists and aims at providing a very effective and easy method of modification of, many presently used, π π amplitudes with a heavy and broad σ meson without changing of their original mathematical structure.

  14. Tent-Poles of the Bestseller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thessa; Vistisen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes a framework for understanding and analysing how the passive audience of a media event turns into active stakeholders. The starting point is the cross-media content quadrant (Jensen and Vistisen, 2012), which shows how the producer’s control is distributed on social media pla...... platforms, while storytelling evolves around a tent-pole, for example, a bestseller or blockbuster. To further explain how the audience engages, a three-step rhetoric model largely based on Bitzer (1998) and Tolkien (1971) is developed and explained....

  15. Perturbing rational harmonic functions by poles

    CERN Document Server

    Sète, Olivier; Liesen, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    We study how adding certain poles to rational harmonic functions of the form $R(z)-\\bar{z}$, with $R(z)$ rational and of degree $d\\geq 2$, affects the number of zeros of the resulting functions. Our results are motivated by and generalize a construction of Rhie derived in the context of gravitational microlensing (ArXiv e-print 2003). Of particular interest is the construction and the behavior of rational functions $R(z)$ that are {\\em extremal} in the sense that $R(z)-\\bar{z}$ has the maximal possible number of $5(d-1)$ zeros.

  16. Gauge invariance, causality and gluonic poles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikin, I.V., E-mail: anikin@theor.jinr.r [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Teryaev, O.V., E-mail: teryaev@theor.jinr.r [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-05

    We explore the electromagnetic gauge invariance of the hadron tensor of the Drell-Yan process with one transversely polarized hadron. The special role is played by the contour gauge for gluon fields. The prescription for the gluonic pole in the twist 3 correlator is related to causality property and compared with the prescriptions for exclusive hard processes. As a result we get the extra contributions, which naively do not have an imaginary phase. The single spin asymmetry for the Drell-Yan process is accordingly enhanced by the factor of two.

  17. The Pole Orientation, Pole Precession, and Moment of Inertia Factor of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, R. A.; French, R. G.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M.; Colwell, J. E.; Marouf, E.; Rappaport, N.; McGhee, C.; Sepersky, T.; Lonergan, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses our determination of the Saturn's pole orientation and precession using a combination of Earthbased and spacecraft based observational data. From our model of the polar motion and the observed precession rate we obtain a value for Saturn's polar moment of inertia

  18. a New Ediacaran Pole from Easternmost Baltica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, J. G.; Levashova, N. M.; Kuznetsov, N. B.; Sergeeva, N. D.; Golovanova, I. V.; Danukalov, K. N.; Bazhenov, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Ediacaran paleogeography is notoriously messy due to equally confusing paleomagnetic data from both Laurentia and Baltica. Ediacaran (~Vendian) rocks have been studied from several localities from Baltica, but the so far published poles can be used to place the Baltic craton at nearly any latitude and orientation [Meert et al., 2007]. At the same time, it is challenging to understand the paleogeography of the Ediacaran world given all the biologic, climatic and tectonic changes during the time interval from 635-542 Ma. We present preliminary paleomagnetic and geochronological data from (late?) Ediacaran sediments from the deformed (low metamorphic grade) peri-Uralian margin of Baltica. We successfully isolated a dual-polarity high-temperature component from eleven sites; the primary origin of this remanence is strongly supported by a positive reversal test (class B). The corresponding paleomagnetic pole is in close agreement with the coeval results from the Winter Coast of northern Baltica [Popov et al., 2002; 2005; Iglesia Llanos et al., 2005], despite a ~1600 km separation between two study areas. These data jointly indicate a very low (<10 degrees N or S) paleolatitude for eastern Baltica in Ediacaran time. Paleogeographic implications of these new data will be discussed in the context of Ediacaran-Cambrian tectonic models. This study is supported by RFBR grant 11-05-00037 and NSF grant EAR11-19038.

  19. Effects of pole compliance and step frequency on the biomechanics and economy of pole carrying during human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Eric R; Lieberman, Graham M; McCarty, Logan S; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates whether a flexible pole can be used as an energy-saving method for humans carrying loads. We model the carrier and pole system as a driven damped harmonic oscillator and predict that the energy expended by the carrier is affected by the compliance of the pole and the ratio between the pole's natural frequency and the carrier's step frequency. We tested the model by measuring oxygen consumption in 16 previously untrained male participants walking on a treadmill at four step frequencies using two loaded poles: one made of bamboo and one of steel. We found that when the bamboo pole was carried at a step frequency 20% greater than its natural frequency, the motions of the centers of mass of the load and carrier were approximately equal in amplitude and opposite in phase, which we predicted would save energy for the carrier. Carrying the steel pole, however, resulted in the carrier and loads oscillating in phase and with roughly equal amplitude. Although participants were less economical using poles than predicted costs using conventional fixed-load techniques (such as backpacks), the bamboo pole was on average 5.0% less costly than the steel pole. When allowed to select their cadence, participants also preferred to carry the bamboo pole at step frequencies of ∼2.0 Hz. This frequency, which is significantly higher than the preferred unloaded step frequency, is most economical. These experiments suggest that pole carriers can intuitively adjust their gaits, or choose poles with appropriate compliance, to increase energetic savings.

  20. Evolução conceitual de professores sobre o movimento diário da esfera celeste Conceptual evolution of teachers about the daily motion of the celestial sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sergio Bretones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este é um estudo sobre a elaboração do conceito de movimento diário da esfera celeste por um grupo de professores de Ciências e Geografia de 5ª a 8ª séries, participantes de um curso de Astronomia. Os resultados baseiam-se, sobretudo, na análise de suas respostas às perguntas das avaliações e em registros de aulas do curso. Discutem-se: a relação entre as respostas dos participantes, seus relatos sobre suas observações, e o desenvolvimento de conteúdos referentes ao movimento de constelações. Apresentam-se as elaborações de sequências da evolução conceitual do grupo e sua relação com a prática e a teoria trabalhadas no curso. Tais elaborações revelam os princípios relacionados à observação do céu: relação da altura do polo celeste com a latitude geográfica, obliquidade, continuidade do movimento, circularidade, tridimensionalidade e ciclicidade. O estudo sugere que esses princípios, usados como guias heurísticos, seriam úteis para o ensino da observação do céu.This work presents a study about the concept formation of the daily motion of the celestial sphere by a group of middle school teachers participants of an Astronomy course. The results are based on the analyses of the answers of these teachers for the questions made in the check tests and the records from the classes of the course. It is studied the relation between the answers, the accounts of the sky observations by the participants and the development of the contents about the daily motion of the celestial sphere. The elaborations of sequences of the verified conceptual evolution by the group and its relation with the theory develop in the course are presented. After a closer look at the elaborations of the participants, some principles were revealed: the elevation of the celestial pole to geographic latitude, obliquity, continuity of motion, circularity, tri-dimensionality and cyclicity. The study suggests that these principles shoud be used

  1. Nonlinear effect induced in thermally poled glass waveguides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yi-tao

    2006-01-01

    Thermally poled germanium-doped channel waveguides are presented. Multilayer waveguides containing a silicon oxynitride layer were used as charge trapper in this investigation on the effect of the internal field inside the waveguide. Compared to waveguides without the trapping layer, experimental results showed that the induced linear electro-optic (EO) coefficient increases about 20% after poling, suggesting strongly that the internal field is relatively enhanced, and showed it is a promising means for improving nonlinearity by poling in waveguides.

  2. Least Square Approximation by Linear Combinations of Multi(Poles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    ID-R134 069 LEAST SQUARE APPROXIMATION BY LINEAR COMBINATIONS OF i/i MULTI(POLES). 1U OHIO STATE UNIV COLUMBUS DEPT OF GEODETIC SCIENCE AND SURVEY...TR-83-0 117 LEAST SQUARE APPROXIMATION BY LINEAR COMBINATIONS OF (MULTI)POLES WILLI FREEDEN DEPARTMENT OF GEODETIC SCIENCE AND SURVEYING THE OHIO...Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED LEAST SQUARE APPROXIMATION BY LINEAR Scientific Report No. 3 COMBINATIONS OF (MULTI)POLES 6. PERFORMING ORG

  3. Charge quantisation without magnetic poles: a topological approach to electromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Solha, Romero

    2014-01-01

    The present work provides a theoretical explanation for the quantisation of electric charges, an open problem since Millikan's oil drop experiment in 1909. This explanation is based solely on Maxwell's theory, it recasts Electromagnetic theory under the language of complex line bundles; therefore, neither magnetic poles nor quantum mechanics are invoked. The existence of magnetic poles was essentially the only theoretical explanation for charge quantisation (e.g. Dirac's magnetic pole), and t...

  4. Effects of poling process on KNN-modified piezoceramic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Rubio, F.; Romero, J. J.; Ochoa Guerrero, Diego A.; García García, José Eduardo; Pérez Pérez, Rafael; Fernández, José Francisco

    2010-01-01

    The influence of the orthorhombic to tetragonal phase transition near room temperature in the poling process of KNN-modified piezoceramics was studied. Poling temperatures of 25° and 120°C were used. The percentage of 90° domains reorientation induced by poling was evaluated trough X-ray diffraction analysis. The improvement of the piezoelectric properties when the poling temperature was 25°C could not be explained by the reorientation of 90° domains alone. Raman spectroscopy evidenced that t...

  5. Generalized Pole Inflation: Hilltop, Natural, and Chaotic Inflationary Attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Terada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    A new paradigm for inflationary model building appeared recently, in which inflationary observables are determined by the structure of a pole in the inflaton kinetic term rather than the shape of the inflaton potential. We comprehensively study this framework with an arbitrary order of the pole taking into account possible additional poles in the kinetic term or in the potential. Depending on the setup, the canonical potential becomes the form of hilltop or plateau models, variants of natural inflation, or monomial or polynomial chaotic inflation. We demonstrate attractor behavior of these models and compute corrections from the additional poles to the inflationary observables.

  6. Is the aether entrained by the motion of celestial bodies? What do the experiments tell us?

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Even though the concept has evolved and if the designation as aether is improperly regarded as outdated, nobody today considers that the vacuum is empty. However, the nature and the properties of the substratum, which permeates the entire universe, remain for the most part unspecified. For example, divergent opinions are put forward by physicists about a possible dragging of the aether by the translational motion of celestial bodies due to gravitation. We show in this text that such a hypothesis is inconsistent with well established experimental data which, on the contrary, lend support to non-entrained aether theory based on Lorentz contraction. A revaluation of the aether drift to which the Earth is subjected is carried out.

  7. A STUDY ON LOWER SECONDARY SCHOOL PUPILS’ PERCEPTIONS OF CERTAIN ASTRONOMICAL PHENOMENA AND CELESTIAL BODIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIRGINIA SASU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to reveal certain misconceptions of astronomical phenomena and of celestial bodies that lower secondary school pupils have and which might represent an obstacle in the process of acquiring knowledge of astronomy, geography, and physics. We applied a questionnaire to a group of 26 pupils in the 6th grade at Colegiul Naţional Pedagogic „Gh. Lazăr” (“Gh. Lazăr National Pedagogical College in Cluj-Napoca, in the school year 2010 – 2011. The questionnaire consisted of six independent topics: the alternation of day and night, the seasons, the Moon, the solar system, the constellations and the speed of light. Pupils’ answers to these questions emphasize the importance of the study of astronomy as a school subject in order to facilitate building up appropriate mind constructs of the highest degree of objectivity about the world, about the environment we live in.

  8. Signature of the celestial spheres discovering order in the solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Warm, Harmut

    2010-01-01

    "A milestone in modern research on the the harmony of the spheres." - Novalis magazine "This book reignites the debate on the harmony of the spheres." - Das Goetheanum Is the solar system ordered, or is it simply the result of random and chaotic accidents? This book takes us on a powerful and compelling journey of discovery, revealing the celestial spheres' astonishingly complex patterns. The movements of the planets are found to correspond accurately with simple geometric figures and musical intervals, pointing to an exciting new perspective on the ancient idea of a "harmony of the spheres". Hartmut Warm's detailed presentation incorporates the distances, velocities and periods of conjunction of the planets, as well as the rotations of the Sun, Moon and Venus. Numerous graphics - including colour plates - illustrate the extraordinary beauty of the geometrical forms that result when the movements of several planets are viewed in relation to one another. In addition, the author describes and analyses the conce...

  9. SAS-2 observations of celestial diffuse gamma radiation above 30 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The small astronomy satellite, SAS-2, used a 32-deck magnetic core digitized spark chamber to study gamma rays with energies above 30 MeV. Data for four regions of the sky away from the galactic plane were analyzed. These regions show a finite, diffuse flux of gamma rays with a steep energy spectrum, and the flux is uniform over all the regions. Represented by a power law, the differential energy spectrum shows an index of 2.5 + or - 0.4. The steep SAS-2 spectrum and the lower energy data are reasonably consistent with a neutral pion gamma-ray spectrum which was red-shifted (such as that proposed by some cosmological theories). It is concluded that the diffuse celestial gamma ray spectrum observed presents the possibility of cosmological studies and possible evidence for a residual cosmic ray density, and supports the galactic superclusters of matter and antimatter remaining from baryon-symmetric big bang.

  10. Electromechanical properties of a disc-type salient-pole brushless DC motor with different pole numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukaniszyn, M.; Jagiela, M.; Wrobel, R.

    2003-04-16

    A brushless, permanent magnet, three-phase disc-type salient-pole DC motor with co-axial flux in the stator is considered. Electromechanical properties of a basic eight-pole motor are compared with those for a 16-pole one of the same volume, in order to contrast the two potential candidates for variable-speed, low-cost drives. As a basis of the comparative analysis, 3D FEM magnetic field modelling and circuit analysis considering an electronic commutator are employed. Increasing the number of poles results in unfavourable raising in the switching frequency. The eight-pole motor construction has been shown in simulations to have higher efficiency and lower power losses than its 16-pole counterpart. (Author)

  11. International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF): mantenimiento y extensión

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.; Arias, E. F.; Eubanks, T.; Fey, A. L.; Gontier, A.-M.; Jacobs, C. S.; Sovers, O. J.; Archinal, B. A.; Charlot, P.

    A partir de enero de 1998 el sistema de referencia celeste convencional está representado por el International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) y materializado a través de las coordenadas VLBI del conjunto de radiofuentes extragalácticas que conforman el International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). La primera realización del ICRF, fue elaborada en 1995 por un grupo de expertos designado por la IAU, la que encomendó al International Earth Rotation Service el mantenimiento del ICRS, del ICRF y del vínculo con marcos de referencia en otras frecuencias. Una primera extensión del ICRF se realizó entre abril y junio de 1999, con el objetivo primario de proveer posiciones de radiofuentes extragalácticas observadas a partir de julio de 1995 y de mejorar las posiciones de las fuentes ``candidatas" con la inclusión de observaciones adicionales. Objetivos secundarios fueron monitorear a las radiofuentes para verificar que siguen siendo adecuadas para realizar al ICRF y mejorar las técnicas de análisis de datos. Como resultado del nuevo análisis se obtuvo una solución a partir de la cual se construyó la primera extensión del ICRF, denominada ICRF - Ext.1. Ella representa al ICRS, sus fuentes de definición se mantienen con las mismas posiciones y errores que en la primera realización del ICRF; las demás radiofuentes tienen coordenadas mejor determinadas que en ICRF; el marco de referencia se densificó con el agregado de 59 nuevas radiofuentes.

  12. Pole assignment in descriptor periodic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; Hung-Yuan; LIN; Wen-Wei; XU; Shufang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a pole assignment problem is considered for the descriptor linear discrete-time periodic systems, which is using the periodic proportional-derivative feedback to modify a given system such that the closed loop system has a specified selfconjugate set of eigenvalues. It is shown that the complete reachability of an open loop periodic system is equivalent to the possibility of assigning an arbitrary set of the eigenvalues to the system by choosing the suitable periodic proportional-derivative feedback.A computational approach is also proposed to solve the problem, which uses the reliable numerical techniques based on the orthogonal transformations. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  13. Spherical harmonics, invariant theory and Maxwell's poles

    CERN Document Server

    Dowker, J S

    2008-01-01

    I discuss the relation between harmonic polynomials and invariant theory and show that homogeneous, harmonic polynomials correspond to ternary forms that are apolar to a base conic (the absolute). The calculation of Schlesinger that replaces such a form by a polarised binary form is reviewed. It is suggested that Sylvester's theorem on the uniqueness of Maxwell's pole expression for harmonics is renamed the Clebsch-Sylvester theorem. The relation between certain constructs in invariant theory and angular momentum theory is enlarged upon and I resurrect the Joos--Weinberg matrices. Hilbert's projection operators are considered and their generalisations by Story and Elliott are related to similar, more recent constructions in group theory and quantum mechanics, the ternary case being equivalent to SU(3).

  14. Tracking the Solar Cycle through IBEX Observations of Energetic Neutral Atom Flux Variations at the Heliospheric Poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Bzowski, M.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Janzen, P. H.; Karna, N.; Kubiak, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Sokół, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    With seven years of Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observations, from 2009 to 2015, we can now trace the time evolution of heliospheric energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) through over half a solar cycle. At the north and south ecliptic poles, the spacecraft attitude allows for continuous coverage of the ENA flux; thus, signal from these regions has much higher statistical accuracy and time resolution than anywhere else in the sky. By comparing the solar wind dynamic pressure measured at 1 au with the heliosheath plasma pressure derived from the observed ENA fluxes, we show that the heliosheath pressure measured at the poles correlates well with the solar cycle. The analysis requires time-shifting the ENA measurements to account for the travel time out and back from the heliosheath, which allows us to estimate the scale size of the heliosphere in the polar directions. We arrive at an estimated distance to the center of the ENA source region in the north of 220 au and in the south a distance of 190 au. We also find a good correlation between the solar cycle and the ENA energy spectra at the poles. In particular, the ENA flux for the highest IBEX energy channel (4.3 keV) is quite closely correlated with the areas of the polar coronal holes, in both the north and south, consistent with the notion that polar ENAs at this energy originate from pickup ions of the very high speed wind (˜700 km s-1) that emanates from polar coronal holes.

  15. Lower pole calculi larger than one centimeter: Retrograde intrarenal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas J Gross

    2008-01-01

    The technical developments in laser technology as well as significant improvement in flexible renoscopes have made RIRS for larger lower pole stones possible. The low complication rate gives RIRS for lower pole stones superiority over the invasive percutaneous approach, which is associated with significant morbidity, even in experienced hands.

  16. Secondary electron emission yield on poled silica based thick films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braga, D.; Poumellec, B.; Cannas, V.;

    2004-01-01

    Studies on the distribution of the electric field produced by a thermal poling process in a layer of Ge-doped silica on silicon substrate, by using secondary electron emission yield (SEEY) measurements () are presented. Comparing 0 between poled and unpoled areas, the SEEY at the origin of electron...

  17. Kolm aastat hiljem : ühisrinnet pole / Erkki Bahovski

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Bahovski, Erkki, 1970-

    2004-01-01

    Autori hinnangul pole kolm aastat tagasi suurriikide juhtide poolt avaldatud soov koostööks rahvusvahelise terrorismi vastu võitlemisel tänaseks teostunud. Samuti pole suudetud kõrvale tõrjuda riikide omavahelisi huvisid ning ajaloolisi tüliküsimusi

  18. Kremli insaider : Putinil pole peaministri kohta vaja / Jaanus Piirsalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Piirsalu, Jaanus, 1973-

    2007-01-01

    Moskvas arvatakse, et kui president Vladimir Putin on otsustanud saada peaministriks, pole enam eriti oluline järgmise riigipea isik. Kõige suuremaks peetakse Viktor Zubkovi shansse riigipea kohale. Politoloog Gleb Pavlovski hinnangul pole peaministriks saamine Putinile praegu üldse ahvatlev. Lisa: Kas Zhirinovski pääseb uude riigiduumasse?

  19. pbx is required for pole and eye regeneration in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chieh G; Wang, Irving E; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Planarian regeneration involves regionalized gene expression that specifies the body plan. After amputation, planarians are capable of regenerating new anterior and posterior poles, as well as tissues polarized along the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and medial-lateral axes. Wnt and several Hox genes are expressed at the posterior pole, whereas Wnt inhibitory genes, Fgf inhibitory genes, and prep, which encodes a TALE-family homeodomain protein, are expressed at the anterior pole. We found that Smed-pbx (pbx for short), which encodes a second planarian TALE-family homeodomain transcription factor, is required for restored expression of these genes at anterior and posterior poles during regeneration. Moreover, pbx(RNAi) animals gradually lose pole gene expression during homeostasis. By contrast, pbx was not required for initial anterior-posterior polarized responses to wounds, indicating that pbx is required after wound responses for development and maintenance of poles during regeneration and homeostatic tissue turnover. Independently of the requirement for pbx in pole regeneration, pbx is required for eye precursor formation and, consequently, eye regeneration and eye replacement in homeostasis. Together, these data indicate that pbx promotes pole formation of body axes and formation of regenerative progenitors for eyes.

  20. 30 CFR 57.12048 - Communication conductors on power poles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Communication conductors on power poles. 57... MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12048 Communication conductors on power poles. Telegraph, telephone, or signal wires shall not be installed on the same crossarm with power conductors. When...

  1. 49 CFR 229.81 - Emergency pole; shoe insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency pole; shoe insulation. 229.81 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Electrical System § 229.81 Emergency pole; shoe insulation. (a) Each locomotive equipped with a pantograph...

  2. Pole Dancing Auto-ethnography – Practice, Pedagogy, Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Patricia Cadwallader

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research paper, the author addresses the following four questions: 1 What are the implications of bringing pole dancing into concert dance, not as a caricature or theatrical version of what is performed in strip clubs, but as its own, free-standing art form? 2 In what ways will years of ballet and modern dance training influence the type of dancing that emerges from dancers when poles and other apparatuses are introduced? 3 How can the author create an original pole dancing style and pedagogical methods for teaching it? 4 Who participates in pole fitness classes and how does the demographic change based on location? What about when pole fitness classes are offered in an academic setting? The author shares first-hand experiences of investigating pole dancing in fitness classes, attending performances, engaging in a rehearsal process with highly trained dancers, and teaching pole dancing to movers with a wide range of abilities. The author addresses how research plans changed as she encountered limitations of budget and time constraints. The author also elaborates on the creative process that she engaged in with her thesis cast, collaborators, and supporting designers in the making of Super-beneath, a theatrical dance work that uses five, free-standing poles. She outline the vignettes, overall structure, and narrative of the work. The author then discusses where this research fits into the larger field of pole dancing, and the even larger field of dance. In the final sections of this paper, the author describes her pedagogical practices relating to pole classes, what “practice as research” means to her, and how she would like to continue on this research trajectory in the future.

  3. Changes in performance and poling kinetics during cross-country sprint skiing competition using the double-poling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Jussi; Laaksonen, Marko S; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Nummela, Ari; Linnamo, Vesa

    2013-11-01

    In this study, changes in skiing performance and poling kinetics during a simulated cross-country sprint skiing competition were investigated. Twelve elite male cross-country skiers performed simulated sprint competition (4 x 1,150 m heat with 20 min recovery between the heats) using the double-poling technique. Vertical and horizontal pole forces and cycle characteristics were measured using a force plate system (20-m long) during the starting spurt, racing speed, and finishing spurt of each heat. Moreover, heat and 20-m phase velocities were determined. Vertical and horizontal pole impulses as well as mean cycle length were calculated. The velocities of heats decreased by 2.7 +/- 1.7% (p = 0.003) over the simulated competition. The 20-m spurting velocity decreased by 16 +/- 5% (p < 0.002) and poling time increased by 18 +/- 9% (p < 0.003) in spurt phases within heats. Vertical and horizontal poling impulses did not change significantly during the simulation; however, the mean forces decreased (p < 0.039) (vertical by 24 +/- 11% and horizontal by 20 +/- 10%) within heats but not between the heats. Decreased heat velocities over the simulated sprint and spurting velocities within heats indicated fatigue among the skiers. Fatigue was also manifested by decreased pole force production and increased poling time.

  4. Long-term Dynamical Behavior of Highly Perturbed Natural and Artificial Celestial Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Aaron J.

    This thesis explores the dynamical evolution of celestial bodies, both natural and artificial, which are strongly perturbed by solar radiation pressure---a non-gravitational force that has played an increasingly important role in celestial mechanics since the early 1900s. The particular focus is on the high area-to-mass ratio (HAMR) space debris discovered in near geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) through optical observations in 2004, and on micron-sized circumplanetary dust particles in the outer Saturnian system. The formalism developed can also be applied to---and, indeed, was unquestionably influenced by---the orbital motion of spacecraft about small bodies (asteroids and comets). The chief difficulties which arise in getting an accurate understanding of the motion of such bodies in highly perturbed dynamical environments come, in part, from the nonlinearity of the dynamical system, but more so from the inadequacy of the classical approaches and methods. While modern formulations based on numerical integrations can give "precise" solutions for specific initial conditions, these afford little insight into the nature of the problem or the essential dependence of the perturbed motion on the system parameters. The predominant perturbations acting on HAMR objects and circumplanetary dust grains are solar radiation pressure, planetary oblateness, and third-body gravitational interactions induced by the Sun and nearby natural satellites. We developed first-order averaged models, based on the Milankovitch formulation of perturbation theory, which govern the long-term evolution of orbits subject to these perturbing forces. The unexpectedly rich results obtained by the use of this vector formalism are due to certain important circumstances in celestial and quantum mechanics which gave rise to its origin and development. An attempt has been made to trace these historical developments and to put them into the perspective of the present. The averaged equations of motion hold

  5. Glacier melt on the Third Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, T.

    2015-12-01

    With an average elevation above 4,000 metres, the Third Pole (TP) is a unique region with many high mountains centered on the Tibetan Plateau stretching over 5 million square kilometers. Major environmental changes are taking place on the TP characterized by complex interactions of atmospheric, cryospheric, hydrological, geological and environmental processes. These processes are critical for the well-being of the three billion people inhabiting the plateau and the surrounding regions. Glacier melt is one of the most significant environmental changes observed on the TP. Over the past decade, most of the glaciers on the TP have undergone considerable melt. The Third Pole Environment (TPE) has focused on the causes of the glacier melt by conducting large-scale ground in-situ observation and monitoring, analyzing satellite images and remote sensing data, and applying numerical modeling to environmental research on the TP. The studies of long-term record of water stable isotopes in precipitation and ice core throughout the TP have revealed different features with regions, thus proposing significant influence of atmospheric circulations on spatial precipitation pattern over the TP. Validation of the result by isotope-equipped general circulation models confirms the spatial distribution of different atmospheric circulation dominances on the TP, with northern part dominated by the westerlies, southern part by the summer monsoon, and central part featuring the influences of both circulation systems. Such unique circulation patterns also bear directly on the status of glaciers and lakes over the TP and its surroundings. The studies therefore found the largest glacier melt in the monsoon-dominated southern part, moderate melt in the central part of transition, and the least melt, or even slight advance in the westerlies-dominated northern TP. It is clear that some mountains on the TP are undergoing rapid melt and the consequence of without ice and snow will be very soon. The

  6. Status of GRAIL Gravity Field Determination Using the Celestial Mechanics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Daniel; Beutler, Gerhard; Jäggi, Adrian; Bock, Heike; Mervart, Leos; Meyer, Ulrich; Bertone, Stefano

    To determine the gravity field of the Moon, the NASA mission GRAIL (Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory) inherits its concept from the Earth orbiting GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) mission. The use of ultra-precise inter-satellite Ka-band ranging observations enables data acquisition even when the spacecraft are not tracked from the Earth. The data allows for a highly accurate estimation of the lunar gravity field with unprecedented resolution on both sides of the Moon, which is crucial to improve the understanding of its internal structure and thermal evolution. In this presentation we discuss GRAIL-based lunar gravity fields generated with the Celestial Mechanics Approach. Ka-band range-rate (KBRR) observations and position data (GNI1B products) are used to solve for the lunar gravity field parameters in a generalized orbit determination problem. Apart from normalized spherical harmonic coefficients up to degrees n≤ 200, also arc- and satellite-specific parameters, like initial state vectors and pseudo-stochastic pulses, are set up as common parameters for all measurement types. The latter shall compensate for imperfect models of non-gravitational accelerations, e.g., caused by solar radiation pressure. In addition, especially for the data of the primary mission phase, it is essential to estimate time bias parameters for the KBRR observations. We compare our results from the nominal mission phase with the official Level 2 gravity field models first released in October 2013. Our results demonstrate that the lunar gravity field can be recovered with a high quality by adapting the Celestial Mechanics Approach, even when using pre-GRAIL or pre-SELENE gravity field models as a priori fields and when replacing sophisticated models of non-gravitational accelerations by appropriately spaced and constrained pseudo-stochastic pulses. Yet, the usage of preprocessed position data as pseudo observations is not fully satisfying and is potentially

  7. Research on the Distribution and Content of Water Ice in Lunar Pole Regions Using Clementine UVVI S Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiguo Meng; Shengbo Chen; Peng Lu; Zijun Wang; Yi Lian; Chao Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Interest in the Moon started to increase at the beginning of the 21st century,and henceforth,more and more attention has been paid to the content and distribution of water ice in the lunar polar regions.The existence of water or ice in the regolith can apparently change its dielectric features.Therefore,in this article,the Dobson model is adopted and improved according to the Moon's environmental features,to construct the relationship between the volumetric water ice content and the dielectric constant.Thereafter,a lunar regolith dielectric distribution map is generated based on the improved Dobson model and the Clementine UVVIS data.The map indicates that the imaginary part of the dielectric constants in the lunar mare is much higher than that in the highlands.However,the maximum dielectric constants occur at the north- and south-pole regions,whose values are apparently bigger than those in the middle and low latitudes.Then,an abnormal map of the dielectric constant is gained if the threshold is put as 0.053 7,which is the highest value in the middle and low latitudes.The statistical results indicate that the number of abnormal pixels is 110 596,and the average is about 0.057 9.Assuming that the mean dielectric constant in the lunar mare is the normal dielectric constant at the south and north poles and ε1=11.58+i0.057 9 is the abnormal one,the volumetric water ice content can be evaluated using the advanced Dobson model.The results show that the average volumetric water ice content is about 1.64%,and the total area is about 25 294 km2,where 10 956 km2 belongs to the north pole and the rest is in the south pole.

  8. Periodic, Quasi-Periodic and Chaotic Motions in Celestial Mechanics: Theory and Applications Selected papers from the Fourth Meeting on Celestial Mechanics, CELMEC IV San Martino al Cimino (Italy), 11–16 September 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Celletti, A

    2006-01-01

    The book provides the most recent advances of Celestial Mechanics, as provided by high-level scientists working in this field. It covers theoretical investigations as well as applications to concrete problems. Outstanding review papers are included in the book and they introduce the reader to leading subjects, like the variational approaches to find periodic orbits, the stability theory of the N-body problem, the spin-orbit resonances and chaotic dynamics, the space debris polluting the circumterrestrial space.

  9. GUIDELESS SPATIAL COORDINATE MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGY BASED ON CODING POLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Min; QIU Zongming; QU Jiamin; LIU Hongzhao

    2008-01-01

    A new method of guideless spatial coordinate measurement technology based on coding pole and vision measurement is proposed. Unequal spacing of bar code is adopted to pole, so that the code combination of pole image in measuring field is unique. Holographic characteristics of numeric coding pole are adopted to obtain pole pose and pole probe position by any section of bar code on the pole. Spatial coordinates of measuring points can be obtained by coordinate transform. The contradiction between high resolution and large visual field of image sensor is resolved, thereby providing a new concept for surface shape measurement of large objects with high precision. The measurement principles of the system are expounded and mathematic model is established. The measurement equation is evaluated by simulation experiments and the measurement precision is analyzed. Theoretical analysis and simulation experiments prove that this system is characterized by simple structure and wide measurement range. Therefore it can be used in the 3-dimentional coordinate measurement of large objects.

  10. Conference on Hamiltonian Systems and Celestial Mechanics 2014 & Workshop on Virus Dynamics and Evolution : Extended Abstracts Spring 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Cors, Josep; Llibre, Jaume; Korobeinikov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The two parts of the present volume contain extended conference abstracts corresponding to selected talks given by participants at the "Conference on Hamiltonian Systems and Celestial Mechanics 2014" (HAMSYS2014) (15 abstracts) and at the "Workshop on Virus Dynamics and Evolution" (12 abstracts), both held at the Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (CRM) in Barcelona from June 2nd to 6th, 2014, and from June 23th to 27th, 2014, respectively. Most of them are brief articles, containing preliminary presentations of new results not yet published in regular research journals. The articles are the result of a direct collaboration between active researchers in the area after working in a dynamic and productive atmosphere. The first part is about Central Configurations, Periodic Orbits and Hamiltonian Systems with applications to Celestial Mechanics – a very modern and active field of research. The second part is dedicated to mathematical methods applied to viral dynamics and evolution. Mathematical modelling of biologi...

  11. Non-linear VLBI station motions and their impact on the celestial reference frame and Earth orientation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krásná, Hana; Malkin, Zinovy; Böhm, Johannes

    The increasing accuracy and growing time span of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations allow the determination of seasonal signals in station positions which still remain unmodelled in conventional analysis approaches. In this study we focus on the impact of the neglected seasonal signals in the station displacement on the celestial reference frame and Earth orientation parameters. We estimate empirical harmonic models for selected stations within a global solution of all suitable VLBI sessions and create mean annual models by stacking yearly time series of station positions which are then entered a priori in the analysis of VLBI observations. Our results reveal that there is no systematic propagation of the seasonal signal into the orientation of celestial reference frame but position changes occur for radio sources observed non-evenly over the year. On the other hand, the omitted seasonal harmonic signal in horizontal station coordinates propagates directly into the Earth rotation parameters causing differences of several tens of microarcseconds.

  12. Edward Burne-Jones’ The Days of Creation: A Celestial Utopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana De Girolami Cheney

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Edward Burne-Jones’ cycle of The Days of Creation of 1870-66(Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University Museums, Cambridge, MA was highly praised and elegantly described by Oscar Wilde: “The picture is divided into six compartments, each representing a day in the Creation of the World, under the symbol of an angel holding a crystal globe, within which is shown the work of a day.” This essay examines how Burne-Jones visualized an unusual celestial creation where angels holding magical spheres unveil the divine manifestation for the creation of a terrestrial realm. His The Days of Creation is an aesthetic culmination of the artistic power of invention, imitation and creation of beauty. Burne-Jones borrows the divine concept of world creation to formulate his own artist creation. Selecting God’s week of creation, he empowers a daily angel to manifest the beauty and power of divine creation. Ultimately, Burne-Jones creates a cosmic utopia, a mythical heavenly and natural realm, where angels design a world of beauty to be emulated not only by the artist, but also by most of all by the viewer.

  13. Dual-EKF-Based Real-Time Celestial Navigation for Lunar Rover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A key requirement of lunar rover autonomous navigation is to acquire state information accurately in real-time during its motion and set up a gradual parameter-based nonlinear kinematics model for the rover. In this paper, we propose a dual-extended-Kalman-filter- (dual-EKF- based real-time celestial navigation (RCN method. The proposed method considers the rover position and velocity on the lunar surface as the system parameters and establishes a constant velocity (CV model. In addition, the attitude quaternion is considered as the system state, and the quaternion differential equation is established as the state equation, which incorporates the output of angular rate gyroscope. Therefore, the measurement equation can be established with sun direction vector from the sun sensor and speed observation from the speedometer. The gyro continuous output ensures the algorithm real-time operation. Finally, we use the dual-EKF method to solve the system equations. Simulation results show that the proposed method can acquire the rover position and heading information in real time and greatly improve the navigation accuracy. Our method overcomes the disadvantage of the cumulative error in inertial navigation.

  14. The effects of frequency-dependent quasar evolution on the celestial reference frame

    CERN Document Server

    Shabala, Stanislav; McCallum, Jamie; Titov, Oleg; Blanchard, Jay; Lovell, Jim; Watson, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    We examine the relationship between source position stability and astrophysical properties of radio-loud quasars making up the International Celestial Reference Frame. We construct light curves for 95 most frequently observed ICRF2 quasars at both the geodetic VLBI observing bands. Because the appearance of new quasar components corresponds to an increase in quasar flux density, these light curves allow us to probe source structure on sub-100 microarcsecond scales, much smaller than conventional VLBI imaging. Flux density monitoring also allows us to trace the evolution of quasar structure. We test how source position stability depends on three astrophysical parameters: (1) Flux density variability at X-band; (2) Time lag between S and X-band light curves; (3) Spectral index rms, defined as the variability in the ratio between S and X-band flux densities. We find that small (<0.15 years) time lags between S and X-band light curves and low (<0.10) spectral index variability are excellent indicators of po...

  15. Asymptotic theory of the motion of celestial bodies in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulov, V. P.

    2004-04-01

    At a large entry velocity of celestial bodies into the atmosphere, a mass-loss parameter β= σVe2/2 ( σ is the ablation coefficient) is very large. So, for some versions of the 1908 Tunguska event parameters, one has β=5-25. In the case of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragments entry into Jupiter, the parameter β is 75-100. Some stations of European Fireball Network have observed at May, June 1997 two bolides, for which β was estimated as 150 and 40. Therefore, the limiting theory for meteoroid motion in the atmosphere is developed. The solution of meteoric physics equations depends on two (single body) or three parameters (splitting body), and β is among them as argument of some special functions. The asymptotic limit of the solution at β≫1 looks like changing meteoroid mass from entry value to zero at constant velocity. This limit for a single body was compared with observations in May, June 1997 in Czech Republic, and good agreement was achieved. Ultimate models with fragmentation are necessary to understand some real features of large-scale events. So, results of this work show that for large bodies such as Tunguska space body and comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragments, we should discuss a motion of gaseous volume after finishing ablation at almost entry velocity. Probably, the big forest fall in 1908 in Siberia and plumes in 1994 on Jupiter are results of such gas jets.

  16. Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Planets and Celestial Calibration Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Weiland, J L; Hill, R S; Wollack, E; Hinshaw, G; Greason, M R; Jarosik, N; Page, L; Bennett, C L; Dunkley, J; Gold, B; Halpern, M; Kogut, A; Komatsu, E; Larson, D; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Nolta, M R; Smith, K M; Spergel, D N; Tucker, G S; Wright, E L

    2010-01-01

    We present WMAP seven-year observations of bright sources which are often used as calibrators at microwave frequencies. Ten objects are studied in five frequency bands (23 - 94 GHz): the outer planets (Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune) and five fixed celestial sources (Cas A, Tau A, Cyg A, 3C274 and 3C58). The seven-year analysis of Jupiter provides temperatures which are within 1-sigma of the previously published WMAP five-year values, with slightly tighter constraints on variability with orbital phase, and limits (but no detections) on linear polarization. Scaling factors are provided which, when multiplied by the Wright Mars thermal model predictions at 350 micron, reproduce WMAP seasonally averaged observations of Mars within ~2%. An empirical model is described which fits brightness variations of Saturn due to geometrical effects and can be used to predict the WMAP observations to within 3%. Seven-year mean temperatures for Uranus and Neptune are also tabulated. Uncertainties in Uranus temperatu...

  17. Non-parametric PSF estimation from celestial transit solar images using blind deconvolution

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Adriana; Jacques, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Context: Characterization of instrumental effects in astronomical imaging is important in order to extract accurate physical information from the observations. Optics are never perfect and the non-ideal path through the telescope is usually represented by the convolution of an ideal image with a Point Spread Function (PSF). Other sources of noise (read-out, Photon) also contaminate the image acquisition process. The problem of estimating both the PSF filter and a denoised image is called blind deconvolution and is ill-posed. Aims: We propose a blind deconvolution scheme that relies on image regularization. Contrarily to most methods presented in the literature, it does not assume a parametric model of the PSF and can thus be applied to any telescope. Methods: Our scheme uses a wavelet analysis image prior model and weak assumptions on the PSF filter's response. We use the observations from a celestial body transit where such object can be assumed to be a black disk. Such constraints limits the interchangeabil...

  18. Kepler-47 Circumbinary Planets obey Quantization of Angular Momentum per Unit Mass predicted by Quantum Celestial Mechanics (QCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kepler-47 circumbinary system has three known planets orbiting its binary star barycenter and therefore can provide a precision test of the Quantum Celestial Mechan- ics (QCM prediction of the quantization of angular momentum per unit mass in all gravitationally bound systems. Two of the planets are in the Habitable Zone (HZ, so system stability can be a primary concern. QCM may be a major contributor to the stability of this system.

  19. Absolute multi-pole encoder with a simple structure based on an improved gray code to enhance the resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong; HAO Shuang-hui; HAO Ming-hui

    2009-01-01

    We developed a novel absolute multi-pole encoder structure to improve the resolution of the multi-pole encoder, realize absolute output and reduce the manufacturing cost of the encoder. The structure includes two ring alnicos defined as index track and sub-division track, respectively. The index track is magnetized based on the improved gray code, with linear halls placed around the track evenly. The outputs of linear halls show the region the rotor belongs to. The sub-division track is magnetized to N-S-N-S (north-south-north-south), and the number of N-S pole pairs is determined by the index track. Three linear hall sensors with an air-gap of 2 mm are used to translate the magnetic filed to voltage signals. The relative offset in a single N-S is obtained through look-up. The magnetic encoder is calibrated using a higher-resolution incremental optical encoder. The pulse output from the optical encoder and hall signals from the magnetic encoder are sampled at the same time and transmitted to a computer, and the relation between them is calculated, and stored in the FLASH of MCU (micro controller unit) for look-up. In the working state, the absolute angle is derived by looking-up with hall signals. The structure is simple and the manufacturing cost is very low and suitable for mass production.

  20. Pole-to-pole biogeography of surface and deep marine bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiglione, Jean-François; Galand, Pierre E; Pommier, Thomas; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Maas, Elizabeth W; Bakker, Kevin; Bertilson, Stefan; Kirchmanj, David L; Lovejoy, Connie; Yager, Patricia L; Murray, Alison E

    2012-10-23

    The Antarctic and Arctic regions offer a unique opportunity to test factors shaping biogeography of marine microbial communities because these regions are geographically far apart, yet share similar selection pressures. Here, we report a comprehensive comparison of bacterioplankton diversity between polar oceans, using standardized methods for pyrosequencing the V6 region of the small subunit ribosomal (SSU) rRNA gene. Bacterial communities from lower latitude oceans were included, providing a global perspective. A clear difference between Southern and Arctic Ocean surface communities was evident, with 78% of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) unique to the Southern Ocean and 70% unique to the Arctic Ocean. Although polar ocean bacterial communities were more similar to each other than to lower latitude pelagic communities, analyses of depths, seasons, and coastal vs. open waters, the Southern and Arctic Ocean bacterioplankton communities consistently clustered separately from each other. Coastal surface Southern and Arctic Ocean communities were more dissimilar from their respective open ocean communities. In contrast, deep ocean communities differed less between poles and lower latitude deep waters and displayed different diversity patterns compared with the surface. In addition, estimated diversity (Chao1) for surface and deep communities did not correlate significantly with latitude or temperature. Our results suggest differences in environmental conditions at the poles and different selection mechanisms controlling surface and deep ocean community structure and diversity. Surface bacterioplankton may be subjected to more short-term, variable conditions, whereas deep communities appear to be structured by longer water-mass residence time and connectivity through ocean circulation.

  1. China Becomes Growth Pole of Global Milk Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ It was recently learnt from China Association of Milk Industry, the developing trend of the global milk industry indicates that,China has become the growth pole of the future development of the global milk industry.

  2. Asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Miseon; Chang, Jaerak; Chang, Sunghoe; Lee, Kyung S; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2014-02-21

    CPAP is an essential component for centriole formation. Here, we report that CPAP is also critical for symmetric spindle pole formation during mitosis. We observed that pericentriolar material between the mitotic spindle poles were asymmetrically distributed in CPAP-depleted cells even with intact numbers of centrioles. The length of procentrioles was slightly reduced by CPAP depletion, but the length of mother centrioles was not affected. Surprisingly, the young mother centrioles of the CPAP-depleted cells are not fully matured, as evidenced by the absence of distal and subdistal appendage proteins. We propose that the selective absence of centriolar appendages at the young mother centrioles may be responsible for asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted cells. Our results suggest that the neural stem cells with CPAP mutations might form asymmetric spindle poles, which results in premature initiation of differentiation.

  3. TOUGHENING OF FERROELECTRICS BY THE OUT-OF-PLANE POLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨卫; 方菲

    2003-01-01

    Subjected to the prior out-of-plane poling, the ferroelectrics can be toughened considerably. The present paper describes the variation of the stress intensity factor (SIF) by 90° switching in ferroelectrics. The analysis is carried out for the combined mechanical and electrical loading, with simple relations obtained for the case of the purely electrical loading. The out-of-plane poling is found to raise the SIF for the crack initiation, but appreciably reduces the SIF for the crack growth in a steady state. More stable fracture resistance curves can be achieved by the out-of-plane poling. This prediction is supported quantitatively by the testing data of SENB specimens of PZT-5 samples, when the toughening effects of polings in three orthogonal directions are compared.

  4. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated...... whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family....... Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare...

  5. The Achievements of the GLAMOROUS Project on Poling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margulis, Walter; Myrén, N.; Fage-Pedersen, Jacob;

    2005-01-01

    The GLAMOROUS project had as objective to demonstrate the feasibility of fibre and waveguide components with a second order nonlinearity induced by poling. The accomplishments of this nine-partners European Research Project are described....

  6. A Totem Pole Represents Native Culture at Seattle Pacific University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, Kenneth

    1980-01-01

    The article describes a totem pole carved by a Tlingit artist using traditional symbols to illustrate the history and mission of Seattle Pacific University. The article also reports the 1979 dedication ceremony. (SB)

  7. Decentralized-feedback pole placement of linear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Martin, C. F.; Gilliam, D.; Byrnes, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    A projectile product spaces model is used to analyze decentralized systems. The degree of the pole placement map is computed. The conditions under which the degree is odd are also given. Twin lift systems are studied. It is proved that the poles of a twin lift system can be assigned to any values by local static and local dynamic feedback laws if and only if the system is jointly controllable.

  8. On Design of Automatic Choosing Control by Pole Placement

    OpenAIRE

    高田, 等; 提, 祐樹; 八野, 知博; TAKATA, Hitoshi; Sage, Yuki; HACHINO, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with design of an augmented automatic choosing control (AACC) for nonlinear systems. The AACC is synthesized by smoothly uniting a set of sectionwise linear controls, in which pole placement approach is used. An observer theory is applied to it in a case that the state vector includes some unmeasurable variables directly. Control and observer's gains are obtained by the pole placement method.

  9. International Youth Conference on the Poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, A. K.; Kuhn, T. S.; Baeseman, J.; Garmulewicz, A.; Raymond, M.; Salmon, R.

    2006-12-01

    The International Polar Year (IPY) is an international effort, involving more than 50 countries, to focus research in both the sciences and social sciences on the world's Polar Regions. In order to secure youth involvement in the IPY, the Youth Steering Committee (YSC) has been formed, aiming specifically to network young polar researchers from all backgrounds enabling collaboration and to involve this group in outreach focused towards other young people. A conference targeted directly at an audience of early career researchers and international youth will be central to fulfilling these aims. The YSC has therefore developed the concept of the International Youth Conference on the Poles (IYCP). Proposed for 2008, this conference will bring together youth from a diverse set of backgrounds and nationalities to discuss the issues affecting the Polar Regions, their effects on a global scale and ways of addressing these issues. The conference will also serve to highlight ongoing IPY research, especially research being undertaken by young researchers, and provide a perennial framework for youth involvement in polar research and policies. The IYCP will run for three days in May 2008, attracting an international youth audience, as well as representatives from polar organizations, teachers, politicians, policy makers, the general public and media. The IYCP will be divided into three sections. Youth Roundtable Discussions will bring youth together to discuss issues affecting the Polar Regions and potential solutions to these. A Young Researchers Conference will provide the opportunity for young researchers working in the Polar Regions to present their work to an interdisciplinary audience. The Polar Fair will provide an interactive environment for youth to learn about the Polar Regions. The IYCP will be of great importance to the IPY because it will serve as the principle venue during the Polar Year where youth from many different disciplines, backgrounds and countries will

  10. The lizard celestial compass detects linearly polarized light in the blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, Giulia; Parretta, Antonio; Petrucci, Ferruccio; Buttini, Paola; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Foà, Augusto

    2012-09-15

    The present study first examined whether ruin lizards, Podarcis sicula, are able to orientate using plane-polarized light produced by an LCD screen. Ruin lizards were trained and tested indoors, inside a hexagonal Morris water maze positioned under an LCD screen producing white polarized light with a single E-vector, which provided an axial cue. White polarized light did not include wavelengths in the UV. Lizards orientated correctly either when tested with E-vector parallel to the training axis or after 90 deg rotation of the E-vector direction, thus validating the apparatus. Further experiments examined whether there is a preferential region of the light spectrum to perceive the E-vector direction of polarized light. For this purpose, lizards reaching learning criteria under white polarized light were subdivided into four experimental groups. Each group was tested for orientation under a different spectrum of plane-polarized light (red, green, cyan and blue) with equalized photon flux density. Lizards tested under blue polarized light orientated correctly, whereas lizards tested under red polarized light were completely disoriented. Green polarized light was barely discernible by lizards, and thus insufficient for a correct functioning of their compass. When exposed to cyan polarized light, lizard orientation performances were optimal, indistinguishable from lizards detecting blue polarized light. Overall, the present results demonstrate that perception of linear polarization in the blue is necessary - and sufficient - for a proper functioning of the sky polarization compass of ruin lizards. This may be adaptively important, as detection of polarized light in the blue improves functioning of the polarization compass under cloudy skies, i.e. when the alternative celestial compass based on detection of the sun disk is rendered useless because the sun is obscured by clouds.

  11. Non-parametric PSF estimation from celestial transit solar images using blind deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Adriana; Delouille, Véronique; Jacques, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Context: Characterization of instrumental effects in astronomical imaging is important in order to extract accurate physical information from the observations. The measured image in a real optical instrument is usually represented by the convolution of an ideal image with a Point Spread Function (PSF). Additionally, the image acquisition process is also contaminated by other sources of noise (read-out, photon-counting). The problem of estimating both the PSF and a denoised image is called blind deconvolution and is ill-posed. Aims: We propose a blind deconvolution scheme that relies on image regularization. Contrarily to most methods presented in the literature, our method does not assume a parametric model of the PSF and can thus be applied to any telescope. Methods: Our scheme uses a wavelet analysis prior model on the image and weak assumptions on the PSF. We use observations from a celestial transit, where the occulting body can be assumed to be a black disk. These constraints allow us to retain meaningful solutions for the filter and the image, eliminating trivial, translated, and interchanged solutions. Under an additive Gaussian noise assumption, they also enforce noise canceling and avoid reconstruction artifacts by promoting the whiteness of the residual between the blurred observations and the cleaned data. Results: Our method is applied to synthetic and experimental data. The PSF is estimated for the SECCHI/EUVI instrument using the 2007 Lunar transit, and for SDO/AIA using the 2012 Venus transit. Results show that the proposed non-parametric blind deconvolution method is able to estimate the core of the PSF with a similar quality to parametric methods proposed in the literature. We also show that, if these parametric estimations are incorporated in the acquisition model, the resulting PSF outperforms both the parametric and non-parametric methods.

  12. On the Analysis of Multistep-Out-of-Grid Method for Celestial Mechanics Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olifer, L.; Choliy, V.

    2016-09-01

    Occasionally, there is a necessity in high-accurate prediction of celestial body trajectory. The most common way to do that is to solve Kepler's equation analytically or to use Runge-Kutta or Adams integrators to solve equation of motion numerically. For low-orbit satellites, there is a critical need in accounting geopotential and another forces which influence motion. As the result, the right side of equation of motion becomes much bigger, and classical integrators will not be quite effective. On the other hand, there is a multistep-out-of-grid (MOG) method which combines Runge-Kutta and Adams methods. The MOG method is based on using m on-grid values of the solution and n × m off-grid derivative estimations. Such method could provide stable integrators of maximum possible order, O (hm+mn+n-1). The main subject of this research was to implement and analyze the MOG method for solving satellite equation of motion with taking into account Earth geopotential model (ex. EGM2008 (Pavlis at al., 2008)) and with possibility to add other perturbations such as atmospheric drag or solar radiation pressure. Simulations were made for satellites on low orbit and with various eccentricities (from 0.1 to 0.9). Results of the MOG integrator were compared with results of Runge-Kutta and Adams integrators. It was shown that the MOG method has better accuracy than classical ones of the same order and less right-hand value estimations when is working on high orders. That gives it some advantage over "classical" methods.

  13. Variation of the Pole Length in Pole-Oriented Bonded Rings due to the Location and Number of Injection Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina H. Kurth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer bonded magnets are compounds consisting of a polymer matrix with embedded hard magnetic filler particles. These materials are mainly used in applications in actor or sensor technology. One example is the application as multipolar encoder wheel in magnetic sensors. Depending on the application different requirements have to be fulfilled, such as a high pole length accuracy and repeatability. This investigation deals with the production of multipolar rings in the injection molding process for sensor applications and influences of the design of the gating system on the pole length accuracy. It is shown that the number of injection points and developing weld lines, as well as the positioning of the injection points, has a major influence on the magnetization characteristics of the molded rings. In general, a positioning of injection points and weld lines in the pole pitch and higher number of injection points lead to rings with a high reproduction accuracy of the pole length of the mold.

  14. The shape of Mercury's south-polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M. E.; Kahan, D. S.; Barnouin, O. S.; Ernst, C. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Hauck, S. A.; Lemoine, F. G.; Neumann, G. A.; Peale, S. J.; Margot, J.; Mazarico, E.; McNutt, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    We present measurements of the radius of Mercury over the planet's southern hemisphere within 30° of the south pole. These measurements, derived from occultations of MESSENGER's radio frequency (RF) transmissions, are the first such measurements southward of 30°S, a region beyond the reach of the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA). The occultation start and end times, recovered with 0.3-s accuracy or better by fitting edge-diffraction patterns to the RF power history, are used to estimate Mercury's radius at the tangent point of the RF path. The occultation-analysis techniques were calibrated by comparing hundreds of occultation-derived radii to MLA measurements in Mercury's northern hemisphere, indicating a measurement accuracy of 0.4 km (one standard deviation). The southern-hemisphere data provide initial estimates of the flattening of the south-pole region and the north-south offset between Mercury's center of figure (COF) and center of mass (COM). A high degree of flattening would complement the north-polar depression and may indicate a rotationally driven equatorial bulge as the source for the degree-2 shape of Mercury. Alternatively, the lack of south-pole flattening would suggest that the north-pole depression may be a remnant of impacts or mantle convective flow. The presence or lack of a north-south COM-COF offset contributes to our understanding of the processes that shape Mercury's rotational and interior dynamics.

  15. Temperature retrieval at the southern pole of the Venusian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate-Lopez, Itziar; Garcia-Munoz, A.; Hueso, R.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2013-10-01

    Venus’ thermal radiation spectrum is punctuated by CO2 bands of various strengths probing into different atmospheric depths. It is thus possible to invert measured spectra of thermal radiation to infer atmospheric temperature profiles. VIRTIS-M observations of Venus in the 3-5 µm range allow us to study the night time thermal structure of the planet’s upper troposphere and lower mesosphere from 50 to 105 km [1, 2]. Building a forward radiative transfer model that solves the radiative transfer equation for the atmosphere on a line-by-line basis, we confirmed that aerosol scattering must be taken into account and we studied the impact of factors such as cloud opacity, and the size, composition and vertical distribution of aerosols [3]. The cloud top altitude and aerosol scale height have a notable impact on the spectrum. However, their weighting function matrices have similar structures contributing to the degeneracy of the temperature retrieval algorithm [2]. Our retrieval code is focused on the strong 4.3µm CO2 band, which enables the determination of the thermal profile above the cloud top, and based on the algorithm proposed by Grassi et al. (2008) in their equation (2). We present temperature maps for the south pole of Venus, where a highly variable vortex is observed. We aim to combine these maps with our previously measured velocity fields from the same VIRTIS-M infrared images [4], in order to infer the potential vorticity distribution for different vortex configurations and to improve the understanding of its unpredictable character and its role in the general atmospheric circulation. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN projects AYA2009-10701 and AYA2012-36666 with FEDER funds, by Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-765-13 and by Universidad País Vasco UPV/EHU through program UFI11/55. IGL and AGM gratefully acknowledge ESA/RSSD for hospitality and access to ‘The Grid’ computing resources. References [1] Roos-Serote, M., et al

  16. The practice of pole dance as a leisure activity in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andorra Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the how pole dance is practiced as a form of leisure activity in Denmark. The methodical approach is qualitative and inspired by ethnography. I have conducted a field study where I have observed and participated in the pole dance culture in Copenhagen from May...... to October 2014. Furthermore, I have conducted five interviews with pole studio owners and 14 shorter interviews with pole dancers. The study showed that the pole dance culture is complex; there is more than one way to practice pole dance both in terms of movements, attire, and attitude. This article...... addresses the difference between a focus on dance and a focus on tricks in pole dancing as well as it examines the different opinions pole studio owners have concerning ‘sexiness’ in pole dance and how this affects the way pole dance is practiced....

  17. A novel star identification technique robust to high presence of false objects: The Multi-Poles Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiattarella, Vincenzo; Spiller, Dario; Curti, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    This work proposes a novel technique for the star pattern recognition for the Lost in Space, named Multi-Poles Algorithm. This technique is especially designed to ensure a reliable identification of stars when there is a large number of false objects in the image, such as Single Event Upsets, hot pixels or other celestial bodies. The algorithm identifies the stars using three phases: the acceptance phase, the verification phase and the confirmation phase. The acceptance phase uses a polar technique to yield a set of accepted stars. The verification phase performs a cross-check between two sets of accepted stars providing a new set of verified stars. Finally, the confirmation phase introduces an additional check to discard or to keep a verified star. As a result, this procedure guarantees a high robustness to false objects in the acquired images. A reliable simulator is developed to test the algorithm to obtain accurate numerical results. The star tracker is simulated as a 1024 × 1024 Active Pixel Sensor with a 20° Field of View. The sensor noises are added using suitable distribution models. The stars are simulated using the Hipparcos catalog with corrected magnitudes accordingly to the instrumental response of the sensor. The Single Event Upsets are modeled based on typical shapes detected from some missions. The tests are conducted through a Monte Carlo analysis covering the entire celestial sphere. The numerical results are obtained for both a fixed and a variable attitude configuration. In the first case, the angular velocity is zero and the simulations give a success rate of 100% considering a number of false objects up to six times the number of the cataloged stars in the image. The success rate decreases at 66% when the number of false objects is increased to fifteen times the number of cataloged stars. For moderate angular velocities, preliminary results are given for constant rate and direction. By increasing the angular rate, the performances of the

  18. Deep Extragalactic Surveys around the Ecliptic Poles with AKARI (ASTRO-F)

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuhara, H; Matsuura, S; Nakagawa, T; Kawada, M; Oyama, Y; Pearson, C P; Oyabu, S; Takagi, T; Serjeant, S; White, G J; Hanami, H; Watarai, H; Takeuchi, T T; Kodama, T; Arimoto, N; Okamura, S; Lee, H M; Pak, S; Im, M S; Lee, M G; Kim, W; Jeong, W S; Imai, K; Fujishiro, N; Shirahata, M; Suzuki, T; Ihara, C; Sakon, I; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Matsuura, Shuji; Nakagawa, Takao; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Oyama, Youichi; Pearson, Chris P.; Oyabu, Shinki; Takagi, Toshinobu; Serjeant, Stephen; White, Glenn J.; Hanami, Hitoshi; Watarai, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Kodama, Tadayuki; Arimoto, Nobuo; Okamura, Sadanori; Lee, Hyung Mok; Pak, Soojong; Im, Myung Shin; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Kim, Woojung; Jeong, Woong Seob; Imai, Koji; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Shirahata, Mai; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Ihara, Chiaki; Sakon, Itsuki

    2006-01-01

    AKARI (formerly ASTRO-F) is an infrared space telescope designed for an all-sky survey at 10-180 (mu)m, and deep pointed surveys of selected areas at 2-180 (mu)m. The deep pointed surveys with AKARI will significantly advance our understanding of galaxy evolution, the structure formation of the Universe, the nature of the buried AGNs, and the cosmic infrared background. Here we describe the important characteristics of the AKARI mission: the orbit, and the attitude control system, and investigate the optimum survey area based on the updated pre-flight sensitivities of AKARI, taking into account the cirrus confusion noise as well as the surface density of bright stars. The North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) is concluded to be the best area for 2-26 (mu)m deep surveys, while the low-cirrus noise regions around the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) are worth considering for 50-180 (mu)m pointed surveys to high sensitivities limited by the galaxy confusion noise. Current observational plans of these pointed surveys are described ...

  19. THE ESTIMATION OF ORDERING DEGREE OF CORONA-POLED NONLINEAR OPTICAL POLYMER FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Cheng; DONG Haiou; WANG Jiafu

    1992-01-01

    The investigation of electrochromic effect of corona-poled nonlinear optical polymer films is an effective method for the estimation of poling level and the selection of poling conditions. The poling electric field Ep and orientational order parameter φ, which are the important parameters to predict d33 of poled tilms, can be calculated by a simple operation from the number of red shift of charge transfer absorption band. The calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. Assessment of Pole Erosion in a Magnetically Shielded Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Ortega, Alejandro L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster called H6 have been performed to quantify the erosion rate at the inner pole. The assessments have been made in two versions of the thruster, namely the unshielded (H6US) and magnetically shielded (H6MS) configurations. The simulations have been performed with the 2-D axisymmetric code Hall2De which employs a new multi-fluid ion algorithm to capture the presence of low-energy ions in the vicinity of the poles. It is found that the maximum computed erosion rate at the inner pole of the H6MS exceeds the measured rate of back-sputtered deposits by 4.5 times. This explains only part of the surface roughening that was observed after a 150-h wear test, which covered most of the pole area exposed to the plasma. For the majority of the pole surface the computed erosion rates are found to be below the back-sputter rate and comparable to those in the H6US which exhibited little to no sputtering in previous tests. Possible explanations for the discrepancy are discussed.

  1. Avoidance of a Landau pole by flat contributions in QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaczynski, Lutz, E-mail: lutz.klaczynski@gmx.de [Department of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kreimer, Dirk, E-mail: kreimer@mathematik.hu-berlin.de [Alexander von Humboldt Chair in Mathematical Physics, Humboldt University, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    We consider massless Quantum Electrodynamics in the momentum scheme and carry forward an approach based on Dyson–Schwinger equations to approximate both the β-function and the renormalized photon self-energy (Yeats, 2011). Starting from the Callan–Symanzik equation, we derive a renormalization group (RG) recursion identity which implies a non-linear ODE for the anomalous dimension and extract a sufficient but not necessary criterion for the existence of a Landau pole. This criterion implies a necessary condition for QED to have no such pole. Solving the differential equation exactly for a toy model case, we integrate the corresponding RG equation for the running coupling and find that even though the β-function entails a Landau pole it exhibits a flat contribution capable of decreasing its growth, in other cases possibly to the extent that such a pole is avoided altogether. Finally, by applying the recursion identity, we compute the photon propagator and investigate the effect of flat contributions on both spacelike and timelike photons. -- Highlights: •We present an approach to approximate both the β-function and the photon self-energy. •We find a sufficient criterion for the self-energy to entail the existence of a Landau pole. •We study non-perturbative ‘flat’ contributions that emerge within the context of our approach. •We discuss a toy model and how it is affected by flat contributions.

  2. A nondestructive characterization system of periodically poled crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaixi; Zhou, Huang; Chen, Liyuan; Zou, Xiaolin; Miao, Long; Feng, Xinkai; Li, Guangwei; Liang, Wanguo

    2015-08-01

    Periodically poled crystals are widely used as SHG, DFG, SFG, OPO and THz generation, and there is a broad application prospect in some areas such as the laser display, optical fiber communication, atmospheric exploration and military confrontation. At present, to get the parameters of periodically poled crystals, like duty ratio, the main method is chemical etching of the samples. In this paper, we present a nondestructive characterization system of periodically poled crystals. When we apply a proper high voltage on both sides of the periodically poled crystal, the refractive index difference of positive and negative domain will be increased and we can observe a clear domain pattern by the a microscope so as to obtain general information. Then a single frequency laser is prepared to radiate on +z surface of the periodically poled crystal, we can get some orders of diffraction according to diffraction optics principle. Finally, we can measure the parameters such as period, duty ratio by use of numerical analysis. The testing sample size of this system can be up to 60mm, The accuracy of the testing period can be 0.1μm, and the measurement range of duty ratio is 20%-50%.

  3. Two-pole structure of the D0* (2400)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, Miguel; Fernandez-Soler, Pedro; Guo, Feng-Kun; Nieves, Juan

    2017-04-01

    The so far only known charmed non-strange scalar meson is dubbed as D0* (2400) in the Review of Particle Physics. We show, within the framework of unitarized chiral perturbation theory, that there are in fact two (I = 1 / 2 ,JP =0+) poles in the region of the D0* (2400) in the coupled-channel Dπ, Dη and Ds K bar scattering amplitudes. With all the parameters previously fixed, we predict the energy levels for the coupled-channel system in a finite volume, and find that they agree remarkably well with recent lattice QCD calculations. This successful description of the lattice data is regarded as a strong evidence for the two-pole structure of the D0* (2400). With the physical quark masses, the poles are located at (2105-8+6 - i102-12+10) MeV and (2451-26+36 - i134-8+7) MeV, with the largest couplings to the Dπ and Ds K bar channels, respectively. Since the higher pole is close to the Ds K bar threshold, we expect it to show up as a threshold enhancement in the Ds K bar invariant mass distribution. This could be checked by high-statistic data in future experiments. We also show that the lower pole belongs to the same SU(3) multiplet as the Ds0 * (2317) state. Predictions for partners in the bottom sector are also given.

  4. Development of a multi-pole magnetorheological brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, Yaojung; Nguyen, Quang-Anh

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a new approach in the design and optimization of a novel multi-pole magnetorheological (MR) brake that employs magnetic flux more effectively on the surface of the rotor. MR brakes with conventional single ring-type electromagnetic poles have reached the limits of torque enhancement. One major reason is the limitation of the magnetic field strength within the active area of the MR fluid due to the geometric constraints of the coil. The multi-pole MR brake design features multiple electromagnetic poles surrounded by several coils. As a result, the active chaining areas for the MR fluid are greatly increased, and significant brake torque improvement is achieved. The coil structure, as a part of the stator, becomes flexible and customizable in terms of space usage for the winding and bobbin design. In addition, this brake offers extra options in its dimensions for torque enhancement because either the radial or the axial dimensions of the rotor can be increased. Magnetic circuit analysis was conducted to analyze the effects of the design parameters on the field torque. After that, simulations were done to find the optimal design under all major geometric constraints with a given power supply. The results show that the multi-pole MR brake provides a considerable braking torque increase while maintaining a compact and solid design. This is confirmation of its feasibility in actual braking applications.

  5. ULYSSES comes full circle, before revisiting the Sun's poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    slanted orbit took Ulysses to solar latitudes greater than 70 degrees for a total of 234 days -- first in the southern hemisphere and then in the north. Also of great interest was the rapid passage from the south to the north, via the Sun's equatorial region, during which Ulysses covered 160 degrees in solar latitude in less than a year. Nine onboard experiments have gathered data continuously since launch, for international teams totalling 150 scientists. Some instruments detect the outward-blowing solar wind and its magnetic field, which create the heliosphere. Others record cosmic rays coming in from the Galaxy, which are strongly influenced by the solar wind. Ulysses picks up natural radio signals emitted by the Sun, the planets and the heliosphere itself. Innovative techniques identify alien atoms and dust particles infiltrating the heliosphere from interstellar space. Ulysses is also a key member of a network of interplanetary spacecraft making observations of enigmatic bursts of gamma rays originating in the far reaches of the Universe. New facts about the fast solar wind were among Ulysses' most fundamental discoveries. The typical solar wind emerging from the Sun's equatorial zone is variable but relatively slow, at 350-400 kilometres per second. The fast wind blows at a steady 750 kilometres per second. It comes from cool regions of the solar atmosphere called coronal holes which (when the Sun is quiet) are close to the poles and fairly small. Yet Ulysses found the fast wind fanning out to fill two-thirds of the volume of the heliosphere. The boundary between the two windstreams is unexpectedly sharp. The magnetic field of the Sun turns out to be strangely uniform at all latitudes in the heliosphere. Close to the visible surface of the Sun, the magnetic field is strongest over the poles, but this intensification disappears at Ulysses' distance. Apparently magnetic pressure in the solar wind averages out the differences in field strength. On the other hand

  6. Mechanisms of Earth activity forsed by external celestial bodies:energy budjet and nature of cyclicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    In given report we discuss tidal and non-tidal mechanisms of forced tectonic (endogenous) activity of the Earth caused by gravitational attraction of the Moon, Sun and the planets. On the base of the classical solution of the problem of elasticity for model of the Earth with concentric mass distribution the evaluations of the tidal energy and power of Earth lunar-solar deformations, including their joint effect, were obtained. Important role of the joint energetic effect of rotational deformation of the Earth with lunar and solar tides was illustrated. Gravitational interaction of the Moon and Sun with non-spherical, non-homogeneous shells of the Earth generates big additional mechanical forces and moments of the interaction of the neighboring shells (rigid core, liquid core, mantle, lithosphere and separate plates). Acting of these forces and moments in the different time scales on the corresponding sells generates cyclic perturbations of the tensional state of the shells, their deformations, small relative translational displacements and small relative rotational oscillations of the shells. In geological period of time it leads to a fundamental tectonic reconstruction of the Earth. These additional forces and moments of the cyclic celestial-mechanical nature produce cyclic deformations of the all layers of the body and organize and control practically all natural processes. The additional force between mantle and core is cyclic and characterized by the wide basis of frequencies typical for orbital motions (of the Sun, Moon and planets), for rotational motion of the Earth, Moon and Sun and for many from observed natural processes. The problem about small relative translatory-rotary motion of the two shells separated by the thin viscous-elastic layer is studied. The differential equations of motion were obtained and have been studied in particular cases (plane motion of system; case of two axisymmetrical interacting shells and oth.) by approximate methods of small

  7. Gaia, Helios, Selene and Ouranos: the three principal celestial bodies and the sky in the ancient Greek cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodossiou, Efstratios; Manimanis, Vassilios N.; Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Mantarakis, Petros

    In this article we consider the role of the three principal celestial bodies, the Earth (Gaia), the Sun (Helios) and the Moon (Selene), as well as the Sky (Ouranos) in the ancient Greek cosmogony. This is done by the analysis of antique Greek texts like Orphic Hymns and the literary remains of the writers and philosophers like Aeschylus, (Pseudo) Apollodorus, Apollonius Rhodius, Aristotle, Euripides, Hesiod, Homer, Hyginus, Nonnus, Pausanias, Pindar and Sophocles, as well as by the analysis of texts of Roman writers like Cicero, Ovid and Pliny.

  8. Quantum and Post-Newtonian Effects in the Anomalistic Period and the Mean Motion of Celestial Bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Haranas, Ioannis; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis; Kotsireas, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    We study the motion of a secondary celestial body under the influence of the corrected gravitational force of a primary. We study the effect of quantum and relativistic corrections to the gravitational potential of a primary body acting on the orbiting body. More specifically, two equations are derived to approximate the perigee/perihelion/periastron time rate of change and its total variation over one revolution (i.e., the difference between the anomalistic period and the Keplerian period) under the influence of the quantum as well as post- Newtonian accelerations. Numerical results have been obtained for the artificial Earth satellite Molnya, Mercury, and, finally, the for the HW Vir c, planetary companion.

  9. Method and System for Gamma-Ray Localization Induced Spacecraft Navigation Using Celestial Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Suneel I. (Inventor); Hisamoto, Chuck (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system for spacecraft navigation using distant celestial gamma-ray bursts which offer detectable, bright, high-energy events that provide well-defined characteristics conducive to accurate time-alignment among spatially separated spacecraft. Utilizing assemblages of photons from distant gamma-ray bursts, relative range between two spacecraft can be accurately computed along the direction to each burst's source based upon the difference in arrival time of the burst emission at each spacecraft's location. Correlation methods used to time-align the high-energy burst profiles are provided. The spacecraft navigation may be carried out autonomously or in a central control mode of operation.

  10. Global plate tectonics and the secular motion of the pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, T.

    1977-01-01

    Astronomical data compiled during the last 70 years by the international organizations providing the coordinates of the instantaneous pole clearly shows a persistent drift of the mean pole. The differential contributions to the earth's second-order tensor of inertia were obtained and applied, resulting in no significant displacement of the earth's principal axis. In view of the above, the effect that theoretical geophysical models for absolute plate velocities may have on an apparent displacement of the mean pole as a consequence of station drifting was analyzed. The investigation also reports new values for the crustal tensor of inertia (assuming an ellipsoidal earth) and the orientation of its axis of figure, reopening the old speculation of a possible sliding of the whole crustover the upper mantle, including the supporting geophysical and astronomic evidence.

  11. PLANNING THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR TIMISOARA GROWTH POLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălina-Livia POPA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to show that planning the quality of life at local level through economic development can be a new approach for policy makers and community in improving quality of life. In this purpose, the Quality Function Deployment (QFD model will be use to planning the quality of life and to identify the main directions of economic development to support improving the quality of life at the level of Timisoara Growth Pole from Romania. The dimensions of quality of life are analyzed starting from the point of view of inhabitants. The results include a new approach in which the dimensions of quality of life are the key element that orients economic development in order to improve the quality of life of human being. The case study results refer to the main elements of quality of life at Timisoara Growth Pole and the relevant directions of economic development to improve the quality of life for Timisoara Growth Pole.

  12. Ising Spectroscopy II: Particles and poles at T>Tc

    CERN Document Server

    Zamolodchikov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    I discuss particle content of the Ising field theory (the scaling limit of the Ising model in a magnetic field), in particular the evolution of its mass spectrum under the change of the scaling parameter. I consider both real and pure imaginary magnetic field. Here I address the high-temperature regime, where the spectrum of stable particles is relatively simple (there are from one to three particles, depending on the parameter). My goal is to understand analytic continuations of the masses to the domain of the parameter where they no longer exist as the stable particles. I use the natural tool -- the $2\\to 2$ elastic scattering amplitude, with its poles associated with the stable particles, virtual and resonance states in a standard manner. Concentrating attention on the "real" poles (those corresponding to stable and virtual states) I propose a scenario on how the pattern of the poles evolves from the integrable point $T=T_c,\\ H\

  13. A HIGH PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUE FOR POLE BALANCING PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadır KARASULU

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available High performance computing techniques can be used effectively for solution of the complex scientific problems. Pole balancing problem is a basic benchmark tool of robotic field, which is an important field of Artificial Intelligence research areas. In this study, a solution is developed for pole balancing problem using Artificial Neural Network (ANN and high performance computation technique. Algorithm, that basis of the Reinforcement Learning method which is used to find the force of pole's balance, is transfered to parallel environment. In Implementation, C is preferred as programming language and Message Passing Interface (MPI is used for parallel computation technique. Self–Organizing Map (SOM ANN model's neurons (artificial neural nodes and their weights are distributed to six processors of a server computer which equipped with each quad core processor (total 24 processors. In this way, performance values are obtained for different number of artificial neural nodes. Success of method based on results is discussed.

  14. Quasinormal modes and Regge poles of the canonical acoustic hole

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Sam R; Crispino, Luis C B

    2014-01-01

    We compute the quasinormal mode frequencies and Regge poles of the canonical acoustic hole (a black hole analogue), using three methods. First, we show how damped oscillations arise by evolving generic perturbations in the time domain using a simple finite-difference scheme. We use our results to estimate the fundamental QN frequencies of the low multipolar modes $l=1, 2, \\ldots$. Next, we apply an asymptotic method to obtain an expansion for the frequency in inverse powers of $l+1/2$ for low overtones. We test the expansion by comparing against our time-domain results, and (existing) WKB results. The expansion method is then extended to locate the Regge poles. Finally, to check the expansion of Regge poles we compute the spectrum numerically by direct integration in the frequency domain. We give a geometric interpretation of our results and comment on experimental verification.

  15. 27.3-day and Average 13.6-day Periodic Oscillations in the Earth's Rotation Rate and Atmospheric Pressure Fields Due to Celestial Gravitation Forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guoqing; ZONG Haifeng; ZHANG Qingyun

    2011-01-01

    Variation in length of day of the Earth (LOD equivalent to the Earth's rotation rate) versus change in atmospheric geopotential height fields and astronomical parameters were analyzed for the years 1962-2006.This revealed that there is a 27.3-day and an average 13.6-day periodic oscillation in LOD and atmospheric pressure fields following lunar revolution around the Earth. Accompanying the alternating change in celestial gravitation forcing on the Earth and its atmosphere, the Earth's LOD changes from minimum to maximum,then to minimum. and the atmospheric geopotential height fields in the tropics oscillate from low to high,then to low. The 27.3-day and average 13.6-day periodic atmospheric oscillation in the tropics is proposed to be a type of strong atmospheric tide, excited by celestial gravitation forcing. A formula for a Tidal Index was derived to estimate the strength of the celestial gravitation forcing, and a high degree of correlation was found between the Tidal Index determined by astronomical parameters, LOD, and atmospheric geopotential height. The reason for the atmospheric tide is periodic departure of the lunar orbit from the celestial equator during lunar revolution around the Earth. The alternating asymmetric change in celestial gravitation forcing on the Earth and its atmosphere produces a "modulation" to the change in the Earth's LOD and atmospheric pressure fields.

  16. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) Maps of the Permanently Shaded Regions (PSR) at the Lunar Poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Paul; Retherford, Kurt; Gladstone, Randall; Stern, Alan; Egan, Anthony; Miles, Paul; Parker, Joel; Kaufmann, David; Horvath, David; Greathouse, Thomas; Versteeg, Maartem; Steffl, Andrew; Mukherjee, Joey; Davis, Michael; Slater, David; Bayless, Amanda; Feldmann, Paul; Hurley, Dana; Pryor, Wayne; Hendrix, Amanda

    2013-04-01

    The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) instrument on-board LRO is a UV spectrograph covering the spectral range of 57-196 nm. We present Lyman-alpha and far-UV albedo maps of the north and south poles. These maps indicate that the coldest, permanently shadowed regions (PSR) in deep polar craters have significantly lower Lyman-alpha albedo than the surrounding regions, which is best explained by a high surface porosity there - possibly related to the accumulation of volatile frosts.

  17. Electromagnetic Radial Forces in a Hybrid Eight-Stator-Pole, Six-Rotor-Pole Bearingless Switched-Reluctance Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Siebert, Mark W.; Ho, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis and experimental measurement of the electromagnet force loads on the hybrid rotor in a novel bearingless switched-reluctance motor (BSRM) have been performed. A BSRM has the combined characteristics of a switched-reluctance motor and a magnetic bearing. The BSRM has an eight-pole stator and a six-pole hybrid rotor, which is composed of circular and scalloped lamination segments. The hybrid rotor is levitated using only one set of stator poles. A second set of stator poles imparts torque to the scalloped portion of the rotor, which is driven in a traditional switched reluctance manner by a processor. Analysis was done for nonrotating rotor poles that were oriented to achieve maximum and minimum radial force loads on the rotor. The objective is to assess whether simple one-dimensional magnetic circuit analysis is sufficient for preliminary evaluation of this machine, which may exhibit strong three-dimensional electromagnetic field behavior. Two magnetic circuit geometries, approximating the complex topology of the magnetic fields in and around the hybrid rotor, were employed in formulating the electromagnetic radial force equations. Reasonable agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions was obtained with typical magnetic bearing derating factors applied to the predictions.

  18. Bacterial scaffold directs pole-specific centromere segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacin, Jerod L; Gahlmann, Andreas; Bowman, Grant R; Perez, Adam M; von Diezmann, Alexander R S; Eckart, Michael R; Moerner, W E; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-05-13

    Bacteria use partitioning systems based on the ParA ATPase to actively mobilize and spatially organize molecular cargoes throughout the cytoplasm. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses a ParA-based partitioning system to segregate newly replicated chromosomal centromeres to opposite cell poles. Here we demonstrate that the Caulobacter PopZ scaffold creates an organizing center at the cell pole that actively regulates polar centromere transport by the ParA partition system. As segregation proceeds, the ParB-bound centromere complex is moved by progressively disassembling ParA from a nucleoid-bound structure. Using superresolution microscopy, we show that released ParA is recruited directly to binding sites within a 3D ultrastructure composed of PopZ at the cell pole, whereas the ParB-centromere complex remains at the periphery of the PopZ structure. PopZ recruitment of ParA stimulates ParA to assemble on the nucleoid near the PopZ-proximal cell pole. We identify mutations in PopZ that allow scaffold assembly but specifically abrogate interactions with ParA and demonstrate that PopZ/ParA interactions are required for proper chromosome segregation in vivo. We propose that during segregation PopZ sequesters free ParA and induces target-proximal regeneration of ParA DNA binding activity to enforce processive and pole-directed centromere segregation, preventing segregation reversals. PopZ therefore functions as a polar hub complex at the cell pole to directly regulate the directionality and destination of transfer of the mitotic segregation machine.

  19. Model for Formation of Dunes at the North Martian Pole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; CHEN Chu-Xin

    2010-01-01

    @@ The Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera(MOC)took images of a series of strange horseshoe-shaped dunes at the North Martian pole in 2004.These dunes would be formed due to the strong Martian winds whose pattern is different from that on the Earth.We study the cause of the formation of these dunes and make a model for them.In this model,wind speed near the north Martian pole can be evaluated based on the shape of the dunes.We also estimate the surpassing speed of dunes of different sizes.

  20. Nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the distal pole of the scaphoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavuk Garg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Post traumatic osteonecrosis of distal pole of scaphoid is very rare. We present a case of 34 years old male, drill operator by occupation with nontraumatic osteonecrosis of distal pole of the scaphoid. The patient was managed conservatively and was kept under regular follow-up every three months. The patient was also asked to change his profession. Two years later, the patient had no pain and had mild restriction of wrist movements (less than 15 degrees in either direction. The radiographs revealed normal density of the scaphoid suggesting revascularization.

  1. Multichannel Anomaly of the Resonance Pole Parameters Resolved

    CERN Document Server

    Ceci, S; Svarc, A; Watson, S; Zauner, B; Ceci, Sasa; Stahov, Jugoslav; Svarc, Alfred; Watson, Shon; Zauner, Branimir

    2006-01-01

    Inspired by anomalies which the standard scattering matrix pole-extraction procedures have produced in a mathematically well defined coupled-channel model, we have developed a new method based solely on the assumption of partial-wave analyticity. The new method is simple and applicable not only to theoretical predictions but to the empirical partial-wave data as well. Since the standard pole-extraction procedures turn out to be the lowest-order term of the proposed method the anomalies are understood and resolved.

  2. Multichannel Anomaly of the Resonance Pole Parameters Resolved

    OpenAIRE

    Ceci, Sasa; Stahov, Jugoslav; Svarc, Alfred; Watson, Shon; Zauner, Branimir

    2006-01-01

    Inspired by anomalies which the standard scattering matrix pole-extraction procedures have produced in a mathematically well defined coupled-channel model, we have developed a new method based solely on the assumption of partial-wave analyticity. The new method is simple and applicable not only to theoretical predictions but to the empirical partial-wave data as well. Since the standard pole-extraction procedures turn out to be the lowest-order term of the proposed method the anomalies are un...

  3. Regional pole assignment for uncertain delta-operator systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Man LIU; Yuanwei JING; Siying ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    The pole assignment in a specified disk by state feedback for uncertain delta-operator systems is studied.By making use of algebra Riccati equations,a sufficient and necessary condition of pole assignment for a kind of parameter uncertain delta-operator system in a specified disk by state feedback is presented.And the design method of state feedback controller is also developed.The proposed method can unify some previous related results of continuous and discrete time systems into the delta framework.The efficiency of the design method is illustrated by a numerical example.

  4. Role of pion pole in hard exlusive meson leptoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Goloskokov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    We consider the pion pole contribution and transversity effects determined by the $H_T$ and $\\bar E_T$ Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) which are essential in hard pseudoscalar and vector meson leptoproduction. We investigate spin effects in the $\\omega$ and $\\rho^0$ reactions. It is shown that the pion pole contribution is very important in the $\\omega$ production. Such effects in the $\\rho^0$ channel are much smaller. Our results on spin asymmetries and spin density matrix elements in these reactions were found to be in good agreement with HERMES data.

  5. Poles Living in Ireland and their Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka NOLKA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The economic growth of Ireland resulted in a significant number of Poles migrating to Ireland following the EU enlargement in 2004. The article explores the quality of life of Poles living in Ireland. Using data from a preliminary survey conducted in 2006, several dimensions of living conditions are analysed, including interpersonal relations, material security, health and healthcare. The study shows that evaluations of almost all aspects of quality of life improved, apart from components such as healthcare and the ability to acquire help from social organisations. Also interpersonal relations, contrary to the initial assumption, were enhanced by migration to Ireland.

  6. Express method of construction of accurate inverse pole figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, Yu; Isaenkova, M.; Fesenko, V.

    2016-04-01

    With regard to metallic materials with the FCC and BCC crystal lattice a new method for constructing the X-ray texture inverse pole figures (IPF) by using tilt curves of spinning sample, characterized by high accuracy and rapidity (express), was proposed. In contrast to the currently widespread method to construct IPF using orientation distribution function (ODF), synthesized in several partial direct pole figures, the proposed method is based on a simple geometrical interpretation of a measurement procedure, requires a minimal operating time of the X-ray diffractometer.

  7. From 'third pole' to north pole: a Himalayan origin for the arctic fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Li, Qiang; Takeuchi, Gary T; Xie, Guangpu

    2014-07-22

    The 'third pole' of the world is a fitting metaphor for the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau, in allusion to its vast frozen terrain, rivalling the Arctic and Antarctic, at high altitude but low latitude. Living Tibetan and arctic mammals share adaptations to freezing temperatures such as long and thick winter fur in arctic muskox and Tibetan yak, and for carnivorans, a more predatory niche. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first evolutionary link between an Early Pliocene (3.60-5.08 Myr ago) fox, Vulpes qiuzhudingi new species, from the Himalaya (Zanda Basin) and Kunlun Mountain (Kunlun Pass Basin) and the modern arctic fox Vulpes lagopus in the polar region. A highly hypercarnivorous dentition of the new fox bears a striking resemblance to that of V. lagopus and substantially predates the previous oldest records of the arctic fox by 3-4 Myr. The low latitude, high-altitude Tibetan Plateau is separated from the nearest modern arctic fox geographical range by at least 2000 km. The apparent connection between an ancestral high-elevation species and its modern polar descendant is consistent with our 'Out-of-Tibet' hypothesis postulating that high-altitude Tibet was a training ground for cold-environment adaptations well before the start of the Ice Age.

  8. An analytical model for the celestial distribution of polarized light, accounting for polarization singularities, wavelength and atmospheric turbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Gao, Jun; Fan, Zhiguo; Roberts, Nicholas W.

    2016-06-01

    We present a computationally inexpensive analytical model for simulating celestial polarization patterns in variable conditions. We combine both the singularity theory of Berry et al (2004 New J. Phys. 6 162) and the intensity model of Perez et al (1993 Sol. Energy 50 235-245) such that our single model describes three key sets of data: (1) the overhead distribution of the degree of polarization as well as the existence of neutral points in the sky; (2) the change in sky polarization as a function of the turbidity of the atmosphere; and (3) sky polarization patterns as a function of wavelength, calculated in this work from the ultra-violet to the near infra-red. To verify the performance of our model we generate accurate reference data using a numerical radiative transfer model and statistical comparisons between these two methods demonstrate no significant difference in almost all situations. The development of our analytical model provides a novel method for efficiently calculating the overhead skylight polarization pattern. This provides a new tool of particular relevance for our understanding of animals that use the celestial polarization pattern as a source of visual information.

  9. Actual Problems in Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy, International Conference Cluj/Napoca, Romania, May 25-27, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Érdi, B.; Szenkovits, F.

    2007-05-01

    In 25--27 May 2006 an International Conference on Actual Problems in Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy was organized at Cluj-Napoca. The Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science of the Babeş-Bolyai University, the host of this conference, organized this scientific meeting in collaboration with the Loránd Eötvös University (Budapest, Hungary), Sapientia University (Miercuria Ciuc, Romania), Astronomical Institute of the Romanian Academy (Bucharest, Romania) and Institute for Space Science (Bucharest, Romania). The main topics covered by the meeting were: - Solar-System dynamics, stability, resonances, chaos; - Dynamics of populations in the Solar System: NEAs, MBAs, Centaurs, KBOs, TNOs: observations, orbits, theoretical models; - Galactic and extragalactic dynamics; - Problems, models, methods and techniques in contemporary celestial mechanics and dynamical astronomy. The conference was structured into seven sessions of oral presentations, a poster session and a round table discussion. Each of the seven main sessions began with an invited lecture. These lectures reviewed the following fields: the Sitnikov problem (R. Dvorak, Austria); the age of the asteroid families (Z. Knezevic, Serbia and Montenegro); stability of exoplanetary systems (B. Érdi, Hungary); Saari's conjecture (Diacu, Canada); integrability from direct and inverse standpoints (G. Bozis, Greece); stability of exact solutions in restricted many-body problems (E. Grebenicov, Russia); actual Romanian research in post-Newtonian dynamics (V. Mioc, Romania). Beside the invited lectures, the 21 oral presentations covered the most various domains of celestial mechanics and dynamical astronomy. Chaotic behaviour was a premier topic. It was approached and studied by analytical, geometrical and numerical methods in many astronomical problems: the restricted three-body problem (with examples in the Solar System), the Gylden's model and its generalizations, capture domain, resonances, etc

  10. Evolution of Titan's stratospheric properties near the poles since the northern spring equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustenis, Athena; Jennings, Donald; Achterberg, Richard; Lavvas, Panayiotis; Nixon, Conor; Flasar, F. Michael; Bampasidis, Georgios; Teanby, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Since 2010, we observe the appearance at Titan's south pole of several trace species for the first time, such as HC3N and C6H6, observed only at high northern latitudes before equinox. Since 2012 this situation has rapidly evolved with a strong enhancement of gases and condensates in the South pole. We will present an analysis of spectra acquired by Cassini/CIRS at high resolution from 2012 in nadir mode. We investigate here latitudes poleward of 50°S and 50°N from 2010 (after the Southern Autumnal Equinox) until 2014 (Coustenis et al. 2015). For some of the most abundant and longest-lived hydrocarbons (C2H2, C2H6 and C3H8) and CO2, the evolution in the past 4 years at a given latitude is not very significant within error bars especially until mid-2013. In more recent dates, these molecules show a trend for increase in the south. This trend is dramatically more pronounced for the other trace species, especially in 2013-2014, and at 70°S relative to 50°S. These two regions then demonstrate that they are subject to different dynamical processes in and out of the polar vortex region. For most species, we find higher abundances at 50°N compared to 50°S, with the exception of C3H8, CO2, C6H6 and HC3N, which arrive at similar mixing ratios after mid-2013 (Coustenis et al. 2015). While the 70°N data show generally no change with a trend rather to a small decrease for most species within 2014, the 70°S results indicate a strong enhancement in trace stratospheric gases after 2012. The 663 cm-1 HC3N and the C6H6 674 cm-1 emission bands appeared in late 2011/early 2012 in the south polar regions and have since then exhibited a dramatic increase in their abundances. At 70°S HC3N, HCN and C6H6 have increased by 3 orders of magnitude over the past 3-4 years while other molecules, including C2H4, C3H4 and C4H2, have increased less sharply (by 1-2 orders of magnitude). This is a strong indication of the rapid and sudden buildup of the gaseous inventory in the southern

  11. Introduction on background medium theory about celestial body motion orbit and foundation of fractional-dimension calculus about self-similar fractal measure calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, by discussing the basic hypotheses about the continuous orbit and discrete orbit in two research directions of the background medium theory for celestial body motion, the concrete equation forms and their summary of the theoretic frame of celestial body motion are introduced. Future more, by discussing the general form of Binet's equation of celestial body motion orbit and it's solution of the advance of the perihelion of planets, the relations and differences between the continuous orbit theory and Newton's gravitation theory and Einstein's general relativity are given. And by discussing the fractional-dimension expanded equation for the celestial body motion orbits, the concrete equations and the prophesy data of discrete orbit or stable orbits of celestial bodies which included the planets in the Solar system, satellites in the Uranian system, satellites in the Earth system and satellites obtaining the Moon obtaining from discrete orbit theory are given too. Especially, as the preliminary exploration and inference to the gravitation curve of celestial bodies in broadly range, the concept for the ideal black hole with trend to infinite in mass density difficult to be formed by gravitation only is explored. By discussing the position hypothesis of fractional-dimension derivative about general function and the formula form the hypothesis of fractional-dimension derivative about power function, the concrete equation formulas of fractional-dimension derivative, differential and integral are described distinctly further, and the difference between the fractional-dimension derivative and the fractional-order derivative are given too. Subsequently, the concrete forms of measure calculation equations of self-similar fractal obtaining by based on the definition of form in fractional-dimension calculus about general fractal measure are discussed again, and the differences with Hausdorff measure method or the covering method at present are given. By applying

  12. Pole-Based Approximation of the Fermi-Dirac Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin LIN; Jianfeng LU; Lexing YING; Weinan E

    2009-01-01

    Two approaches for the efficient rational approximation of the Fermi-Dirac function are discussed: one uses the contour integral representation and conformal map-ping, and the other is based on a version of the multipole representation of the Fermi-Dirac function that uses only simple poles. Both representations have logarithmic computational complexity. They are of great interest for electronic structure calculations.

  13. ENPA endine juht seisukohti muutnud pole / Hendrik Vosman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vosman, Hendrik

    2008-01-01

    Eelmisel aastal Eestit vähemuste diskrimineerimises süüdistanud Euroopa Nõukogu Parlamentaarse Assamblee endine esimees Rene van der Linden pole oma seisukohta muutnud ning usub endiselt, et tema jutt inimõiguste rikkumiste kohta Eestis peab paika. Vt. samas: Van der Linden

  14. Poling process optimization of piezo nano composite PZT/polimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridlo, M. Rosyid; Lestari, Titik; Mardiyanto, Oemry, Achiar

    2013-09-01

    The objective of poling process is to make the electric dipole directions to be parallel in the inside perovskite crystal of piezo materials. In simply way, poling was carried out by giving the two sides of a piezo material by highly electrical potential. More parallel of electrical dipoles, it is more strength the piezo characteristics. The optimization involved control of temperature, time depth and the electrical voltage. The samples was prepared by solgel method with precursor tetrabutyl titanat Ti(OC4H9)4, zirconium nitrat Zr(NO3)4ṡ5H2O, Pb(CH3COO)2ṡ3H2O and solution ethylene glycol. Molar ratio Pb:Zr:Ti = 1,1:0,52:0,48 with concidering lossed Pb. Result of solgel process is nano powder PZT. The formed nano powder PZT was then mixed with polimer PVDF and pressed 10 MPa at 150 °C with the size 15 mm in diameter. After poling, piezoelectric constant d33 was measured. The highest d33 = 45 pC/N was found at poling parameters V = 5 kV/ mm, T = 120 °C dan time depth = 1 hours.

  15. Catapult effect in pole vaulting: is muscle coordination determinant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frère, Julien; Göpfert, Beat; Hug, François; Slawinski, Jean; Tourny-Chollet, Claire

    2012-02-01

    This study focused on the phase between the time of straightened pole and the maximum height (HP) of vaulter and aimed at determining the catapult effect in pole vaulting on HP. Seven experienced vaulters performed 5-10 vaults recorded by two video cameras, while the surface electromyography (sEMG) activity of 10 upper limbs muscles was recorded. HP was compared with an estimated maximum height (HP(est)) allowing the computation of a push-off index. Muscle synergies were extracted from the sEMG activity profiles using a non-negative matrix factorization algorithm. No significant difference (p>0.47) was found between HP(est) (4.64±0.21m) and HP (4.69±0.23m). Despite a high inter-individual variability in sEMG profiles, two muscle synergies were extracted for all the subjects which accounted for 96.1±2.9% of the total variance. While, the synergy activation coefficients were very similar across subjects, a higher variability was found in the muscle synergy vectors. Consequently, whatever the push-off index among the pole vaulters, the athletes used different muscle groupings (i.e., muscle synergy vectors) which were activated in a similar fashion (i.e., synergy activation coefficients). Overall, these results suggested that muscle coordination adopted between the time of straightened pole and the maximum height does not have a major influence on HP.

  16. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  17. Families of Poles in the Netherlands (FPN) survey. Wave 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karpinska, K.; Dykstra, P.A.; Fokkema, T.

    2016-01-01

    The release of formal restrictions on the free movement of Central and Eastern Europeans that started with the end of the Cold War and the eastward enlargement of the European Union in the 2000s have led to new migration flows in Europe. In the Netherlands, in absolute terms, Poles are the largest g

  18. Liz Taylor : minu van Gogh pole natsidele kuulunud

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Elizabeth Taylor palus kohtult otsust, et talle kuuluvat 15 miljonit dollarit maksvat Vincent van Goghi maali "Vaade Saint-Remy varjupaigale" pole natsid Margarete Mauthneri juudiperekonna käest vägivaldselt ära võtnud. E. Taylori isa ostis maali 1963. a. Londonis oksjonilt

  19. Poled-glass devices: Influence of surfaces and interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage-Pedersen, Jacob; Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Kristensen, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Devices in periodically poled glass must have a large periodic variation of the built-in field. We show that the periodic variation can be severely degraded by charge dynamics taking place at the external (glass–air) interface or at internal (glass–glass) interfaces if the interfaces have imperfe...

  20. Charge quantisation without magnetic poles: A topological approach to electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solha, Romero

    2016-01-01

    The present work provides a theoretical explanation for the quantisation of electric charges, an open problem since Millikan's oil drop experiment in 1909. This explanation is based solely on Maxwell's theory, it recasts Electromagnetic theory under the language of complex line bundles; therefore, neither magnetic poles nor quantum mechanics are invoked.

  1. Finite element analysis of boron diffusion in wooden Poles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Hoffmeyer, Preben; Bechgaard, Carl;

    2004-01-01

    The problem of describing the migration of dissolved boron in wood is treated with special reference to the commonly used remedial treatment of wooden poles. The governing equations are derived and discussed together with some of the material parameters required. The equations are solved by the f...... by the finite element method and, finally, results showing the effect of different treatment strategies are presented....

  2. Finite Element Analysis of Boron Diffusion in Wooden Poles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Hoffmeyer, Preben; Bechgaard, Carl;

    2004-01-01

    The problem of describing the migration of dissolved boron in wood is treated with special reference to the commonly used remedial treatment of wooden poles. The governing equations are derived and discussed together with some of the material parameters required. The equations are solved by the f...... by the finite element method and, finally, results showing the effect of different treatment strategies are presented....

  3. Finite Element Analysis of Boron Diffusion in Wooden Poles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Hoffmeyer, P.; Bechgaard, C.;

    2003-01-01

    The problem of describing the migration of dissolved boron in wood is treated with special reference to the commonly used remedial treatment of wooden poles. The governing equations are derived and discussed together with some of the material parameters required. The equations are solved by the f...... by the finite element method and, finally, results showing the effect of different treatment strategies are presented....

  4. South-South, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovutor Owhoeli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 213 faecal samples were collected from four abattoirs and households to determine the prevalence of helminthes infections in exotic and indigenous goats in Port Harcourt, South-South, Nigeria. The study revealed that out of 153 exotic goats (Red Sokoto Capra hircus, 112 were infected with various species of gastrointestinal helminths; out of 60 indigenous goats (West African dwarf Capra hircus, 49 were also infected with various types of gastrointestinal helminths. The formol-ether concentration method was used to analyse the specimens. The study revealed that an overall prevalence of (75.5% was recorded, out of which 57 (76.0%, 55 (70.5%, and 49 (81.6% were recorded for exotic goat in the months of May–September, 2010, exotic goat in the months October 2010–February, 2011 and for indigenous goats, respectively. The overall prevalence amongst the infected animals was not statistically significant (P>0.05. Species of helminthes revealed from the study were, Haemonchus, Strongyloides, Chabertia, Trichuris, Ostertagia, Bunostomum, Trichostrongyloida, Ascaris, Tenia, Avitelina, Fasciola, Eurytrema, Gastrothylax, Schistosoma, and Dicrocoelium.

  5. Inferior patellar pole fragmentation in children: just a normal variant?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H.; Vogelius, Esben S.; Orth, Robert C.; Guillerman, R.P.; Jadhav, Siddharth P. [Texas Children' s Hospital, E.B. Singleton Pediatric Radiology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Fragmentary ossification of the inferior patella is often dismissed as a normal variant in children younger than 10 years of age. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fragmentary inferior patellar pole ossification is a normal variant or is associated with symptoms or signs of pathology using MRI and clinical exam findings as reference. A retrospective review was performed on 150 patients ages 5-10 years who underwent 164 knee radiography and MRI exams (45.1% male, mean age: 7.8 years). The presence or absence of inferior patellar pole fragmentation on radiography was correlated with the presence or absence of edema-like signal on MR images. Clinical notes were reviewed for the presence of symptoms or signs referable to the inferior patellar pole. These data were compared with a 1:1 age- and sex-matched control group without inferior pole fragmentation. Statistical analysis was performed using two-tailed t-tests. Forty of 164 (24.4%) knee radiographs showed fragmentary ossification of the inferior patella. Of these 40 knees, 62.5% (25/40) had edema-like signal of the inferior patellar bone marrow compared with 7.5% (3/40) of controls (P = 0.035). Patients with fragmentary ossification at the inferior patella had a significantly higher incidence of documented focal inferior patellar pain compared with controls (20% vs. 2.5%, P = 0.015). Inferior patellar pole fragmentation in children 5 to 10 years of age may be associated with localized symptoms and bone marrow edema-like signal and should not be routinely dismissed as a normal variant of ossification. (orig.)

  6. The Interactive Climate and Vegetation Along the Pole-Equator Belts Simulated by a Global Coupled Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between climate and vegetation along four Pole-Equator-Pole (PEP) belts were explored using a global two-way coupled model, AVIM-GOALS, which links the ecophysiological processes at the land surface with the general circulation model (GCM). The PEP belts are important in linking the climate change with the variation of sea and land, including terrestrial ecosystems. Previous PEP belts studies have mainly focused on the paleoclimate variation and its reconstruction. This study analyzes and discusses the interaction between modern climate and vegetation represented by leaf area index (LAI) and net primary production (NPP). The results show that the simulated LAI variation, corresponding to the observed LAI variation, agrees with the peak-valley variation of precipitation in these belts. The annual mean NPP simulated by the coupled model is also consistent with PIK NPP data in its overall variation trend along the four belts, which is a good example to promote global ecological studies by coupling the climate and vegetation models. A large discrepancy between the simulated and estimated LAI emerges to the south of 15°N along PEP 3 and to the south of 18°S in PEP 1S, and the discrepancy for the simulated NPP and PIK data in the two regions is relatively smaller in contrast to the LAI difference. Precipitation is a key factor affecting vegetation variation, and the overall trend of LAI and NPP corresponds more obviously to precipitation variation than temperature change along most parts of these PEP belts.

  7. Amplitude-phase calculations of Regge poles obtained from coupled radial Dirac equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thylwe, K-E [KTH-Mechanics, Royal lnstitute of Technology, S-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); McCabe, P, E-mail: ket@mech.kth.se [CCDC, 12 Union Road, CB2 1EZ, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-08

    A recently developed amplitude-phase method for spinor-wave solutions is applied to the calculations of Regge pole positions and residues of Dirac particles. At a given energy the Dirac spin causes two sets of Regge poles that tend to coalesce in the non-relativistic limit. For the particular case of equal Lorentz-type vector and scalar potentials there is only one pole string, located very close to the non-relativistic pole string.

  8. The Discovery of the Regular Movements of Celestial Bodies and the Development of Monotheism in the Ancient Near East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, G. B.

    2011-06-01

    For Ancient Mesopotamians, astronomical phenomena were signs signifying the gods' judgment on human behaviour. Mesopotamian scholars studied celestial phenomena for understanding the gods' will, and strongly developed astrology. From the 8th to the 6th century BC Assyrian and Babylonian astronomers achieved the ability to predict solar and lunar eclipses, and the planets' movements through mathematical calculations. Predictability of astral phenomena solicited the awareness that they are all regular, and that the universe is governed by an eternal, immutable order fixed at its very beginning. This finally favoured the idea that the cosmic order depended on the will of one god only, displacing polytheism in favour of monotheism; and astrology lost its religious importance as a mean to know the divine will.

  9. Zero initial partial derivatives of satellite orbits with respect to force parameters violate the physics of motion of celestial bodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Satellite orbits have been routinely used to produce models of the Earth’s gravity field. In connection with such productions, the partial derivatives of a satellite orbit with respect to the force parameters to be determined, namely, the unknown harmonic coefficients of the gravitational model, have been first computed by setting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero. In this note, we first design some simple mathematical examples to show that setting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero is generally erroneous mathematically. We then prove that it is prohibited physically. In other words, set-ting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero violates the physics of motion of celestial bodies.

  10. Zero initial partial derivatives of satellite orbits with respect to force parameters violate the physics of motion of celestial bodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU PeiLiang

    2009-01-01

    Satellite orbits have been routinely used to produce models of the Earth's gravity field. In connection with such productions, the partial derivatives of a satellite orbit with respect to the force parameters to be determined, namely, the unknown harmonic coefficients of the gravitational model, have been first computed by setting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero. In this note, we first design some simple mathematical examples to show that setting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero is generally erroneous mathematically. We then prove that it is prohibited physically. In other words, set-ting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero violates the physics of motion of celestial bodies.

  11. The limit passage of space curvature in problems of celestial mechanics with the generalized Kepler and Hooke potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozmishcheva, Tatiana

    2016-09-01

    The connection between the problems of celestial mechanics: the Kepler problem, the two-center problem and the two body problem in spaces of constant curvature with the generalized Kepler and Hooke potentials is investigated. The limit passage in the two-center and two body problems in the Lobachevsky space and on a sphere is carried out as λto0 (λ is the curvature of the corresponding space) for the two potentials. The potentials and metrics in spaces under study are written in the gnomonic coordinates. It is shown that as the curvature radius tends to infinity, the generalized gravitational and elastic potentials transform to the Kepler and Hooke forms in the Euclidean space.

  12. Paleomagnetic study of Siluro-Devonian volcanic rocks from the central Lachlan Orogen: Implications for the apparent pole wander path of Gondwana

    Science.gov (United States)

    VéRard, Christian; Tait, Jennifer; Glen, Richard

    2005-06-01

    The apparent pole wander (APW) path for Gondwana is still not clearly established, in particular, for Silurian-Devonian times. A controversial debate places authors who argue for an "X path," running directly through Africa on a reconstruction of Gondwana against those who advocate a large loop passing by southern South America, the "Y path." Most of the paleomagnetic data used to draw this loop come from the Lachlan Orogen (Australia). A paleomagnetic study was carried out in the well-dated Ambone and Ural volcanics in the central subprovince of Lachlan Orogen, New South Wales. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility measurements confirms detailed mapping of the region and shows that these massive dacitic sills and/or lava flows are flat lying. Among the different localities studied, only one yields interpretable paleomagnetic results. Two components of magnetization can be identified: a midtemperature direction yielding a corresponding pole in Australian coordinates λ = 67.9°S/ϕ = 084.4°E (B = 5; n = 21; dp = 17.5°/dm = 23.1°) and a high-temperature direction with a corresponding VGP λ = 24.4°S/ϕ = 060.6°E (B = 5; n = 25; dp = 1.4°/dm = 2.5°). The first is interpreted as corresponding to an Early Carboniferous pole position and can be regarded as an overprint probably related to the Early Carboniferous Kanimblan orogenic event. The second does not correspond to any expected Silurian-Devonian or younger pole position. This magnetization is thought to be primary in origin; however, secular variation has apparently not been averaged out in the single lava flow sampled. Therefore the earliest Devonian paleopole position probably lies in a 30° cone around the obtained VGP, and this position can only match the X-type APW path for Gondwana. It is in particular very different from coeval poles obtained in the eastern subprovince of the Lachlan Orogen, and it is mostly used as key poles supporting the Silurian-Devonian loop for the APW path of Gondwana

  13. Center of Mass of Two or More Celestial Bodies as a Basis of Comets and «Black Holes» Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Eugeny F. Orlov

    2012-01-01

    The article considers the questions, arising during rendezvous of two celestial bodies with equal mass, one of which is the Earth and the consequences of such rendezvous to modern civilization, suggests the idea of centers of galaxies mass with anomalously large values of the gravitational fields, which allows to divide them into two types – material filled and hollow.

  14. Center of Mass of Two or More Celestial Bodies as a Basis of Comets and «Black Holes» Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeny F. Orlov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the questions, arising during rendezvous of two celestial bodies with equal mass, one of which is the Earth and the consequences of such rendezvous to modern civilization, suggests the idea of centers of galaxies mass with anomalously large values of the gravitational fields, which allows to divide them into two types – material filled and hollow.

  15. Effect of Materials and Manufacturing on the Bending Stiffness of Vaulting Poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. L.; Kukureka, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in the world record height achieved in pole vaulting can be related to the improved ability of the athletes, in terms of their fitness and technique, and to the change in materials used to construct the pole. For example in 1960 there was a change in vaulting pole construction from bamboo to glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP)…

  16. Double Trouble: A Rare Case of Bilateral Upper Pole Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Peters

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old girl presented with bilateral back pain caused by bilateral upper pole ureteropelvic junction obstructions; an extremely rare phenomenon. Bilateral robotically assisted upper pole pyeloplasties were preformed at the same setting with an excellent clinical response. Although rare, upper pole ureteropelvic junction obstruction is a defined entity that urologists should be aware of.

  17. Is it possible to reduce the knee joint compression force during level walking with hiking poles?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S B; Henriksen, M; Aaboe, J;

    2010-01-01

    Walking with hiking poles has become a popular way of exercising. Walking with poles is advocated as a physical activity that significantly reduces the loading of the hip, knee and ankle joints. We have previously observed that pole walking does not lead to a reduction of the load on the knee joi...

  18. Claw-pole Synchronous Generator for Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVEL Valentina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a claw-poles generator for compressed air energy storage systems. It is presented the structure of such a system used for compensating of the intermittency of a small wind energy system. For equipping of this system it is chosen the permanent magnet claw pole synchronous generator obtained by using ring NdFeB permanentmagnets instead of excitation coil. In such a way the complexity of the scheme is reduced and the generator become maintenance free. The new magnetic flux density in the air-gap is calculated by magneticreluctance method and by FEM method and the results are compared with measured values in the old and new generator.

  19. Neuromorphic Continuous-Time State Space Pole Placement Adaptive Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢钊; 孙明伟

    2003-01-01

    A neuromorphic continuous-time state space pole assignment adaptive controller is proposed, which is particularly appropriate for controlling a large-scale time-variant state-space model due to the parallely distributed nature of neurocomputing. In our approach, Hopfield neural network is exploited to identify the parameters of a continuous-time state-space model, and a dedicated recurrent neural network is designed to compute pole placement feedback control law in real time. Thus the identification and the control computation are incorporated in the closed-loop, adaptive, real-time control system. The merit of this approach is that the neural networks converge to their solutions very quickly and simultaneously.

  20. Posttraumatic osteonecrosis and nonunion of distal pole of scaphoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kapoor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic osteonecrosis of distal pole of scaphoid is an extremely rare with only two reported cases so far. We present a case of a 30-year-old male with a 2-year-old posttraumatic osteonecrosis and nonunion of distal pole of scaphoid left wrist. He presented with complaints of pain and restriction of movements. There was no evidence of radiocarpal arthritis. He was managed with open reduction and internal fixation with k-wires, supplemented by a pronator quadratus based muscle pedicle bone graft. The fracture union was achieved at 6 months. After 2 years, he had almost complete range of wrist motion and had returned to his preinjury level of functional activity. His MRI (magnetic resonance imaging scans showed evidence of revascularization suggesting successful incorporation of bone graft.

  1. Voronoi poles-based saliency feature detection from point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Wei, Ning; Dong, Fangmin; Yang, Yuanqin

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we represent a novel algorithm for point cloud feature detection. Firstly, the algorithm estimates the local feature for each sample point by computing the ratio of the distance from the inner voronoi pole and the outer voronoi pole to the surface. Then the surface global saliency feature is detected by adding the results of the difference of Gaussian for local feature under different scales. Compared with the state of the art methods, our algorithm has higher computing efficiency and more accurate feature detection for sharp edge. The detected saliency features are applied as the weights for surface mesh simplification. The numerical results for mesh simplification show that our method keeps the more details of key features than the traditional methods.

  2. On the ultimate uncertainty of the top quark pole mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beneke, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Marquard, P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Nason, P. [INFN, Sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Steinhauser, M. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik

    2016-05-15

    We combine the known asymptotic behaviour of the QCD perturbation series expansion, which relates the pole mass of a heavy quark to the MS mass, with the exact series coefficients up to the four-loop order to determine the ultimate uncertainty of the top-quark pole mass due to the renormalon divergence. We perform extensive tests of our procedure by varying the number of colours and flavours, as well as the scale of the strong coupling and the MS mass, and conclude that this uncertainty is around 70 MeV. We further estimate the additional contribution to the mass relation from the five-loop correction and beyond to be 250 MeV.

  3. Pole assignment for stochastic systems with unknown coefficients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈翰馥[1; 曹希仁[2

    2000-01-01

    This paper solves the exact pole assignment problem for the single-input stochastic systems with unknown coefficients under the controllability assumption which is necessary and sufficient for the arbitrary pole assignment for systems with known coefficients. The system noise is required to be mutually independent with zero mean and bounded second moment. Two approaches to solving the problem are proposed: One is the iterative learning approach which can be applied when the state at a fixed time can be repeatedly observed with different feedback gains; the other is the adaptive control approach which works when the trajectories satisfy a nondegeneracy condition. Both methods are essentially based on stochastic approximation, and the feedback gains are recursively given without invoking the certainty-equivalency-principle.

  4. Regionalization of surface heat fluxes and evapotranspiration over heterogeneous landscape of the Third Pole region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yaoming

    2016-04-01

    Like Antarctica and the Arctic, the Third Pole region is drawing increased attention among the international academic community. It is centered on the Tibetan Plateau, stretching from the Pamir Plateau and Hindu-Kush on the west to the Hengduan Mountains on the east, and from the Kunlun and Qilian Mts on the north to the Himalayas on the south. Covering over 5,000,000 km2 in total and with an average elevation surpassing 4000 m. The exchange of energy and evapotranspiration (ET) between land surface and atmosphere over the Third Pole region play an important role in the Asian monsoon system, which in turn is a major component of both the energy and water cycles of the global climate system. The parameterization methods based on satellite data and Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) observations have been proposed and tested for deriving regional distribution of surface reflectance, surface temperature, net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux, latent heat flux and ET over heterogeneous landscape. As cases study, the methods were applied to the whole Tibetan Plateau area and Nepal area. To validate the proposed methods, the ground-measured surface reflectance, surface temperature, net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux in the Third Pole Environment Programme (TPE) Research Platform (TPEP) TPEP are compared to the derived values. The results show that the derived surface variables, land surface heat fluxes and ET over the study area are in good accordance with the land surface status. These parameters show a wide range due to the strong contrast of surface features. And the estimated land surface variables and land surface heat fluxes are in good agreement with ground measurements, and all the absolute percent difference is less than 10% in the validation sites. It is therefore concluded that the proposed methods are successful for the retrieval of land surface variables and land surface heat fluxes over heterogeneous

  5. Improvement of Electrochemical Machining Accuracy by Using Dual Pole Tool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) is one of the best al ternatives for producing complex shapes in advanced materials used in aircraft a nd aerospace industries. However, the reduction of the stray material removal co ntinues to be major challenges for industries in addressing accuracy improvement . This study presents a method of improving machining accuracy in ECM by using a dual pole tool with a metallic bush outside the insulated coating of a cathode tool. The bush is connected with anode and so the el...

  6. Edgar Savisaar : BRS pole piisavalt investeerinud / Raigo Neudorf

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Neudorf, Raigo

    2006-01-01

    Majandus- ja kommunikatsiooniminister on rahul, et riigi ja BRS-iga saavutati kokkulepe ettevõtte aktsiate tagasiostuks, kuid leiab, et BRS pole täitnud võetud investeerimiskohustusi ning seega peab järgnevatel aastatel suunama ettevõtte kaasajastamisse miljardeid kroone. Vt. samas: Jüri Käo: investeeringute kogumaht ületas nõutu; Savisaar: Jüri Käo ajab pada; Pingelised läbirääkimised BRS-iga

  7. Detachments of the retinal pigment epithelium at the posterior pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, K G; Levitzky, M J; Carr, R E

    1976-08-01

    Multiple vitelliform cysts of the retina, a disorder of unknown cause in which there are multiple detachments of the retinal pigment epithelium at the posterior pole, occurred in five patients. In four patients all lesions were located outside the parafoveal area while one patient showed bilateral foveal elevations associated with more eccentric detachments. Several patients showed slow resolution of some of the detachments with mild disturbances of the pigment epithelium.

  8. Tööpuudus 29%, palavikku pole / Rachel Donadio

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Donadio, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Lõuna-Hispaanias asuvas Cádizis on töötus 29%, ometi pole eurotsooni kõrgeim tööpuuduse määr tekitanud linnas sügavat sotsiaalset rahutust ega massilisi proteste, sest üsna kõrge elukvaliteedi tagavad töötutele kompleksne turvavõrk, mis koosneb varimajandusest, perekonna toetusest ja valitsuse toetusest

  9. Sequential pole dominance model and decay of new mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Chaichian, Masud

    1976-01-01

    The sequential pole dominance model recently proposed by Freund and Nambu (1975) allows predictions to be made about the decay processes which violate the Zweig-Iizuka rule. Detailed comparison of the model with recent experimental data on the decay modes of psi (3095) and psi '(3684) reveals some quantitative disagreement. A possible decay mechanism which can account for this discrepancy is discussed. (7 refs).

  10. Effect of poling time and grid voltage on phase transition and piezoelectricity of poly(vinyledene fluoride) thin films using corona poling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeva, Suresha K.; Berring, John; Walus, Konrad; Stoeber, Boris

    2013-07-01

    Corona poling was used to create piezoelectric polyvinylidene flouride (PVDF) thin films and the effects of poling time and grid voltage on the electric and physical properties of the samples was studied. Using x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and direct measurement of piezoelectricity, the phase transition behaviour and piezoelectric constant of stretched and poled PVDF film was investigated. Results indicate that the poling time and grid voltage have no substantial influence on the phase transition behaviour of PVDF. However, they were found to have a significant effect on the piezoelectric charge constant of PVDF.

  11. Manliness and Exploration: The Discovery of the North Pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Americans crowded newsstands in early 1910 to read Robert Peary's firsthand account of his expedition to the North Pole. As they read "The Discovery of the North Pole," serialized exclusively in Hampton's Magazine, few knew that this harrowing, hypermasculine tale was really crafted by New York poet Elsa Barker. Barker's authorship of the North Pole story put her at the center of a large community of explorers, writers, patrons, and fans who were taken with Arctic exploration as much for its national symbolism as for its thrilling tales. The fact that Barker was a woman made her ascent into elite expeditionary circles remarkable. Yet this essay argues that it was also representative: women shaped the ideas and practices of manly exploration at home as well as in the field. Peary's dependence upon women writers, patrons, and audiences came at a time when explorers were breaking away from their traditional base of support: male scientific networks that had promoted their expeditions since the 1850s. Despite the "go-it-alone" ideals of their expedition accounts, explorers adopted masculine roles shaped by the world around them: by the growing influence of women writers, readers, and lecture-goers and, simultaneously, by the declining influence of traditional scientific peers and patrons. Barker and Peary's story, then, reveals a new fault line that opened up between scientists and explorers in the late nineteenth century over the issue of manliness, a fault line still largely uncharted in historical scholarship.

  12. Traditions connected with the pole shift model of the Pleistocene

    CERN Document Server

    Woelfli, Willy

    2010-01-01

    As is well known, during the Last Glacial Maximum, about 20'000 years ago, the ice was asymmetrically distributed around the present North Pole. It reached the region of New York, while east Siberia remained ice free. Mammoths lived in arctic regions of east Siberia, where now their food cannot grow. Therefore the globe must have been turned in such a way that the North Pole was in Greenland. The required rapid geographic pole shift at the end of the ice ages has been shown to be physically possible, on condition that an astronomical object of planetary size in an extremely eccentric orbit existed. In this postulated situation it was red hot and a disk shaped gas cloud reduced the solar radiation on Earth in a time dependent way. A frequent objection to this hypothesis is that the phenomena should be reported in old traditions. This paper quotes such traditions from passages of Platon, Herodotus, Ovid, papyrus Ipuwer, Gilgamesh, the Bible, American Indians and other civilizations. Far from being exhaustive th...

  13. Automatic Pole and Q-Value Extraction for RF Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Potratz, H.-W. Glock, U. van Rienen, F. Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    The experimental characterization of RF structures like accelerating cavities often demands for measuring resonant frequencies of Eigenmodes and corresponding (loaded) Q-values over a wide spectral range. A common procedure to determine the Q-values is the -3dB method, which works well for isolated poles, but may not be applicable directly in case of multiple poles residing in close proximity (e.g. for adjacent transverse modes differing by polarization). Although alternative methods may be used in such cases, this often comes at the expense of inherent systematic errors. We have developed an automation algorithm, which not only speeds up the measurement time significantly, but is also able to extract Eigenfrequencies and Q-values both for well isolated and overlapping poles. At the same time the measurement accuracy may be improved as a major benefit. To utilize this procedure merely complex scattering parameters have to be recorded for the spectral range of interest. In this paper we present the proposed algorithm applied to experimental data recorded for superconducting higher-order-mode damped multi-cell cavities as an application of high importance.

  14. THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF THE BRASOV GROWTH POLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida CATANA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The demographic dynamics analysed in the context of the relationship between economic development and social inclusion presents an image of the sustainable development of a community as well as the manner how the financial resources have been used. With an allocation of 74.3 million euro in the programming period 2007-2013, the Brasov Growth Pole has pursued the contribution to the achievement of sustainable development since 2005 by the participation in the Agenda 21. The implementation of projects with European financing in areas such as transport, social and educational infrastructure or tourism have generated changes/demographic movements, which this paper proposes to present. The evolution of the stable population, its dynamics at the level of each locality that is part of the Brasov growth pole as well as the dynamics of the number of employees or the development of the unemployment rate are presented by the cluster analysis. The effects of the European financing obtained from Regional Operational Programme 2007-2013 are thus reflected in the sustainable development of the Brasov growth pole from the point of view of the dynamics of the population

  15. Universal structure of subleading infrared poles in gauge theory amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, Lance J; Sterman, George

    2008-01-01

    We study the origin of subleading soft and collinear poles of form factors and amplitudes in dimensionally-regulated massless gauge theories. In the case of form factors of fundamental fields, these poles originate from a single function of the coupling, denoted G(alpha_s), depending on both the spin and gauge quantum numbers of the field. We relate G(alpha_s) to gauge-theory matrix elements involving the gluon field strength. We then show that G(alpha_s) is the sum of three terms: a universal eikonal anomalous dimension, a universal non-eikonal contribution, given by the coefficient B_delta (alpha_s) of delta(1 - z) in the collinear evolution kernel, and a process-dependent short-distance coefficient function, which does not contribute to infrared poles. Using general results on the factorization of soft and collinear singularities in fixed-angle massless gauge theory amplitudes, we conclude that all such singularities are captured by the eikonal approximation, supplemented only by the knowledge of B_delta (...

  16. Wind Stress Forcing of the North Sea "Pole Tide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    OConnor, William P.; Chao, Benjamin Fong; Zheng, Dawei; Au, Andrew Y.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted numerical simulations of the wind-forcing of the sea level variations in the North Sea using a barotropic ocean model with realistic geography, bathymetry, and boundary conditions, to examine the forcing of the 14-month "pole tide" which is known to be strong along the Denmark- Netherlands coast. The simulation input is the monthly-mean surface wind stress field from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis for the 40-year period 1958-1997. The output sea level response was then compared with 10 coastal tide gauge records from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). Besides the strong seasonal variations, several prominent quasi-periodicities exist at around 7 years, 3 years, 14 months, 9 months, and 6.5 months. Correlation and spectral analyses show remarkable agreement between the model output and the observations, particularly in the 14-month, or Chandler period band. The latter indicates that the enhanced pole tide found in the North Sea along the Denmark-Netherlands coast is actually the coastal setup response to wind stress forcing with a periodicity of 14 months. We find no need to invoke a geophysical explanation involving resonance-enhancement of pole tide in the North Sea to explain the observations.

  17. PINGU: A Vision for Neutrino and Particle Physics at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade (PINGU) is a proposed low-energy in-fill extension to the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. With detection technology modeled closely on the successful IceCube example, PINGU will provide a 6Mton effective mass for neutrino detection with an energy threshold of a few GeV. With an unprecedented sample of over 60,000 atmospheric neutrinos per year in this energy range, PINGU will make highly competitive measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters in an energy range over an order of magnitude higher than long-baseline neutrino beam experiments. PINGU will measure the mixing parameters $\\theta_{\\rm 23}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{\\rm 32}$, including the octant of $\\theta_{\\rm 23}$ for a wide range of values, and determine the neutrino mass ordering at $3\\sigma$ median significance within 4 years of operation. PINGU's high precision measurement of the rate of ${\

  18. Measurement of South Pole ice transparency with the IceCube LED calibration system

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2013-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, approximately 1 km^3 in size, is now complete with 86 strings deployed in the Antarctic ice. IceCube detects the Cherenkov radiation emitted by charged particles passing through or created in the ice. To realize the full potential of the detector, the properties of light propagation in the ice in and around the detector must be well understood. This report presents a new method of fitting the model of light propagation in the ice to a data set of in-situ light source events collected with IceCube. The resulting set of derived parameters, namely the measured values of scattering and absorption coefficients vs. depth, is presented and a comparison of IceCube data with simulations based on the new model is shown.

  19. Mesoscale optical turbulence simulations above Dome C, Dome A and South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Lascaux, Franck; Hagelin, Susanna; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.17709.x

    2010-01-01

    In two recent papers the mesoscale model Meso-NH, joint with the Astro-Meso-NH package, has been validated at Dome C, Antarctica, for the characterization of the optical turbulence. It has been shown that the meteorological parameters (temperature and wind speed, from which the optical turbulence depends on) as well as the Cn2 profiles above Dome C were correctly statistically reproduced. The three most important derived parameters that characterize the optical turbulence above the internal antarctic plateau: the surface layer thickness, the seeing in the free-atmosphere and in the total atmosphere showed to be in a very good agreement with observations. Validation of Cn2 has been performed using all the measurements of the optical turbulence vertical distribution obtained in winter so far. In this paper, in order to investigate the ability of the model to discriminate between different turbulence conditions for site testing, we extend the study to two other potential astronomical sites in Antarctica: Dome A ...

  20. Low frequency observations of linearly polarized structures in the interstellar medium near the south Galactic pole

    CERN Document Server

    Lenc, Emil; Sun, X H; Sadler, E M; Willis, A G; Barry, N; Beardsley, A P; Bell, M E; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Callingham, J R; Cappallo, R J; Carroll, P; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Deshpande, A A; Dillon, J S; Dwarkanath, K S; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; For, B -Q; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hancock, P; Hazelton, B J; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Jacobs, D C; Kapinska, A D; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kim, H -S; Kratzenberg, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Morgan, J; Murphy, T; Neben, A R; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Paul, S; Pindor, B; Pober, J C; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Sethi, S K; Srivani, K S; Staveley-Smith, L; Subrahmanyan, R; Sullivan, I S; Tegmark, M; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S J; Trott, C; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Wyithe, J S B; Zheng, Q

    2016-01-01

    We present deep polarimetric observations at 154 MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), covering 625 deg^2 centered on RA=0 h, Dec=-27 deg. The sensitivity available in our deep observations allows an in-band, frequency-dependent analysis of polarized structure for the first time at long wavelengths. Our analysis suggests that the polarized structures are dominated by intrinsic emission but may also have a foreground Faraday screen component. At these wavelengths, the compactness of the MWA baseline distribution provides excellent snapshot sensitivity to large-scale structure. The observations are sensitive to diffuse polarized emission at ~54' resolution with a sensitivity of 5.9 mJy beam^-1 and compact polarized sources at ~2.4' resolution with a sensitivity of 2.3 mJy beam^-1 for a subset (400 deg^2) of this field. The sensitivity allows the effect of ionospheric Faraday rotation to be spatially and temporally measured directly from the diffuse polarized background. Our observations reveal large-sca...

  1. Study of electromagnetic backgrounds in the 25-300 MHz frequency band at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Auffenberg, Jan; Gaisser, Tom; Helbing, Klaus; Karg, Timo; Karle, Albrecht; Kravchenko, Ilya

    2010-01-01

    Extensive air showers are detectable by radio signals with a radio surface detector. A promising theory of the dominant emission process is the coherent synchrotron radiation emitted by e+ e- shower particles in the Earth's magnetic field (geosynchrotron effect). A radio air shower detector can extend IceTop, the air shower detector on top of IceCube. This could increase the sensitivity of IceTop to higher shower energies and for inclined showers significantly. Muons from air showers are a major part of the background of the neutrino telescope IceCube. Thus a surface radio air shower detector could act as a veto detector for this muonic background. Initial radio background measurements with a single antenna in 2007 revealed a continuous electromagnetic background promising a low energy threshold of radio air shower detection. However, short pulsed radio interferences can mimic real signals and have to be identified in the frequency range of interest. These properties of the electromagnetic background was bein...

  2. Galaxy Populations in the 26 most massive Galaxy Clusters in the South Pole Telescope SZE Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zenteno, A; Desai, S; Stalder, B; Saro, A; Dietrich, J P; Bayliss, M; Bocquet, S; Chiu, I; Gonzalez, A H; Gangkofner, C; Gupta, N; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; McDonald, M; Reichardt, C; Rest, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the optical properties of the 26 most massive galaxy clusters selected within the SPT-SZ 2500 deg$^2$ survey. This Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect selected sample spans a redshift range of 0.10 < z < 1.13. We measure the galaxy radial profile, the luminosity function (LF), and the halo occupation number (HON) using optical data with a typical depth of $m^*$ + 2. The stacked radial profiles are consistent with a NFW profile with a concentration of $2.84^{+0.40}_{-0.37}$ for the red sequence (RS) and $2.36^{+0.38}_{-0.35}$ for the total population. Stacking the data in multiple redshift bins shows a hint of redshift evolution in the concentration when both the total population is used, and when only RS galaxies are used (at 2.1$\\sigma$ and 2.8$\\sigma$, respectively). The stacked LF shows a faint end slope $\\alpha = -1.06^{+0.04}_{-0.03}$ for the total and $\\alpha = -0.80^{+0.04}_{-0.03}$ for the RS population. The redshift evolution of $m^*$ is found to be consistent with a passively evolv...

  3. 1-D air-snowpack modeling of atmospheric nitrous acid at South Pole during ANTCI 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liao

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A 1-D air-snowpack model of HONO has been developed and constrained by observed chemistry and meteorology data. The 1-D model includes molecular diffusion and mechanical dispersion, windpumping in snow, gas phase to quasi-liquid layer phase HONO transfer and quasi-liquid layer nitrate and interstitial air HONO photolysis. Photolysis of nitrate is important as a dominant HONO source inside the snowpack, however, the observed HONO emission from the snowpack was triggered mainly by the equilibrium between quasi liquid layer nitrite and firn air HONO deep down the snow surface (i.e. 30 cm below snow surface. The high concentration of HONO in the firn air is subsequently transported above the snowpack by diffusion and windpumping. The model uncertainties come mainly from lack of measurements and the interpretation of the QLL properties based on the bulk snow measurements. One critical factor is the ionic strength of QLL nitrite, which is estimated here by the bulk snow pH, nitrite concentration, and QLL to bulk snow volume ratio.

  4. 1-D Air-snowpack modeling of atmospheric nitrous acid at South Pole during ANTCI 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Liao

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A 1-D air-snowpack model of HONO has been developed and constrained by observed chemistry and meteorology data. The 1-D model includes molecular diffusion and mechanical dispersion, windpumping in snow, gas phase to quasi-liquid layer phase HONO transfer and quasi-liquid layer nitrate and interstitial air HONO photolysis. Photolysis of nitrate is important as a dominant HONO source inside the snowpack, however, the observed HONO emission from the snowpack was triggered mainly by the equilibrium between quasi liquid layer nitrite and firn air HONO deep down the snow surface (i.e. 30 cm below snow surface. The high concentration of HONO in the firn air is subsequently transported above the snowpack by diffusion and windpumping. The model uncertainties come mainly from lack of measurements and the interpretation of the QLL properties based on the bulk snow measurements. One critical factor is the ionic strength of QLL nitrite, which is estimated here by the bulk snow pH, nitrite concentration, and QLL to bulk snow volume ratio.

  5. LRO-LAMP Detection of Geologically Young Craters in Lunar South Pole Permanently Shaded Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, K. E.; Greathouse, T. K.; Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Jordan, A. P.; Lemelin, M.; Koeber, S. D.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Patterson, G. W.; Robinson, M.; Lucey, P. G.; Hendrix, A. R.; Hurley, D.; Stickle, A. M.; Pryor, W.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method for detecting fresh craters on the Moon using the LRO-LAMP and provide comparison with other LRO datasets. We also present a new method for setting an upper limit for the age of young craters detected with this method.

  6. Requirements for a New Detector at the South Pole Receiving an Accelerator Neutrino Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    There are recent considerations to increase the photomultiplier density in the IceCube detector array beyond that of DeepCore, which will lead to a lower detection threshold and a huge fiducial mass for the neutrino detection. This initiative is known as "Phased IceCube Next Generation Upgrade" (PINGU). We discuss the possibility to send a neutrino beam from one of the major accelerator laboratories in the Northern hemisphere to such a detector. Such an experiment would be unique in the sense that it would be the only neutrino beam where the baseline crosses the Earth's core. We study the detector requirements for a beta beam, a neutrino factory beam, and a superbeam, where we consider both the cases of small theta_13 and large theta_13, as suggested by the recent T2K hint. We illustrate that a flavor-clean beta beam best suits the requirements of such a detector, in particular, that PINGU may replace a magic baseline detector for small values of theta_13 -- even in the absence of any energy resolution capabi...

  7. From DeepCore to PINGU. Measuring atmospheric neutrino oscillations at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Very large volume neutrino telescopes (VLVNTs) observe atmospheric neutrinos over a wide energy range (GeV to TeV), after they travel distances as large as the Earth's diameter. DeepCore, the low energy extension of IceCube, has started making meaningful measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters θ23 and | Δm232| by analyzing the atmospheric flux at energies above 10 GeV. PINGU, a proposed project to lower DeepCore's energy threshold, aims to use the same flux to further increase the precision with which these parameters are known, and eventually determine the sign of Δm232. The latest results from DeepCore, and the planned transition to PINGU, are discussed here.

  8. From DeepCore to PINGU: Measuring atmospheric neutrino oscillations at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    Very large volume neutrino telescopes (VLVNTs) observe atmospheric neutrinos over a wide energy range (GeV to TeV), after they travel distances as large as the Earth's diameter. DeepCore, the low energy extension of IceCube, has started making meaningful measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters $\\theta_{23}$ and $|\\Delta m^2_{32}|$ by analyzing the atmospheric flux at energies above 10 GeV. PINGU, a proposed project to lower DeepCore's energy threshold, aims to use the same flux to further increase the precision with which these parameters are known, and eventually determine the sign of $\\Delta m^2_{32}$. The latest results from DeepCore, and the planned transition to PINGU, are discussed here.

  9. AST\\/RO A Small Submillimeter Telescope at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, A A

    2001-01-01

    Understanding of star formation in the Universe is advancing through submillimeter-wave observations of the Milky Way and other galaxies. Technological constraints on such observations require a mixture of telescope sizes and observational techniques. For some purposes, small submillimeter-wave telescopes are more sensitive than large ones. The Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) is a small, wide-field instrument located at an excellent observatory site. By observing the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds at arcminute resolution, it provides a context for interpreting observations of distant galaxies made by large interferometric telescopes. AST/RO also provides hands-on training in submillimeter technology and allows testing of novel detector systems.

  10. Pole-Like Object Extraction from Mobile LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Han; Tan, Feitong; Wang, Ruisheng

    2016-06-01

    Object detection and recognition from LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) data has been a research topic in the fields of photogrammetry and computer vision. Unlike point clouds collected in well-controlled indoor environments, point clouds in urban environments are more complex due to complexity of the real world. For example, trees sometimes close to signs or buildings, which will cause occlusions in the point clouds. Current object detection or reconstruction algorithms will have problems when recognizing objects with severe occlusions caused by trees etc. In this paper, a robust vegetation removal method and a DBSCAN based pole-like object detection method are proposed. Based on observation that major difference between vegetation and other rigid objects is their penetrability with respect to LiDAR, we introduce a local roughness measure to differentiate rigid objects from non-rigid ones (vegetation in this paper). First, a local sphere with a small radius is generated for each input point. Three principal components of the local sphere are then calculated, and a plane is determined. The roughness is obtained through calculating the standard deviation of distances from all inside points to the plane by a weighted summation of the normalized distances. The further the point to the plane, the smaller the weight is. Finally, a graph cuts based method is introduced to classify the input point sets into two groups. The data term is defined by the normalized roughness of the current point, and the smoothness term is defined by the normalized distance between the point and its nearest neighbour point. In terms of pole-like object detection, first, a uniformed 2D grid is generated through projecting all the points to the XY-plane. The seed points of the pole-like objects are obtained by determining the x and y coordinates by the centres of the highest density cells of the grid and the z coordinate by the mean height of the point sets of each object. Finally, a DBSCAN

  11. South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixen, Peter; Tarp, Finn

    1996-01-01

    This paper explores the macroeconomic situation and medium-term perspectives of the South African economy. Three fully quantified and internally consistent scenarios are presented. The projections demonstrate that there is room for increased public spending in real terms to help address South Afr...... macro-economic balance and avoid unsustainable public sector deficits....

  12. Fibreglass as an alternative to wood poles : Transmission and distribution poles and crossarms : use of fiber reinforced composite materials for overhead electric utility lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, J.R. [Shakespeare Composites and Electronics, Newberry, SC (United States)

    2002-07-01

    For over thirty years, Shakespeare Composites and Electronics has manufactured fiberglass composite lighting and utility poles, as well as being the number one maker of composite crossarms. Composite poles have a few advantages, such as being lightweight, they do no rust, are woodpecker and termite resistant, use no harmful chemicals, and have long life. A chart displaying the comparative pole weights is presented. The key design factors of fiberglass composite utility poles are: pole diameter, fiberglass type and wind angle, layers (thickness) of fiberglass, resin type and formulation, resin mix consistency, cure cycle and maximum curing temperature, and others. Two charts were also displayed presenting 40 feet class 4 pole bending strengths and 40 feet class 2 pole bending strengths. The author indicated that composite poles have a better strength consistency than wood, while being as consistent as steel and prestressed concrete. The design is based on an overload factor of safety of 2.5 for numerous installations. Some of the analytical methods used include mechanical testing, finite element modeling, and thermal analysis. The author describes in detail the concerns associated with attachments. Coating consists of a system of ultra violet blockers in the resin followed by an added resin rich polyester veil outer surface. In addition, there is a proprietary coating process with additional ultra violet blockers. Quality control is effected at the plant. The weathering system lasts 80 years. figs.

  13. Energy harvesting using AC machines with high effective pole count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Richard Theodore

    In this thesis, ways to improve the power conversion of rotating generators at low rotor speeds in energy harvesting applications were investigated. One method is to increase the pole count, which increases the generator back-emf without also increasing the I2R losses, thereby increasing both torque density and conversion efficiency. One machine topology that has a high effective pole count is a hybrid "stepper" machine. However, the large self inductance of these machines decreases their power factor and hence the maximum power that can be delivered to a load. This effect can be cancelled by the addition of capacitors in series with the stepper windings. A circuit was designed and implemented to automatically vary the series capacitance over the entire speed range investigated. The addition of the series capacitors improved the power output of the stepper machine by up to 700%. At low rotor speeds, with the addition of series capacitance, the power output of the hybrid "stepper" was more than 200% that of a similarly sized PMDC brushed motor. Finally, in this thesis a hybrid lumped parameter / finite element model was used to investigate the impact of number, shape and size of the rotor and stator teeth on machine performance. A typical off-the-shelf hybrid stepper machine has significant cogging torque by design. This cogging torque is a major problem in most small energy harvesting applications. In this thesis it was shown that the cogging and ripple torque can be dramatically reduced. These findings confirm that high-pole-count topologies, and specifically the hybrid stepper configuration, are an attractive choice for energy harvesting applications.

  14. Laparoscopic upper pole heminephroureterectomy in children: Seven-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimally invasive surgery is the current approach to perform heminephroureterectomy (HN in children. This can be obtained through a transperitoneal (TP or a retroperitoneal approach. Here, we report our experience using a TP approach. Materials and Methods: From 2005 to 2014, 22 TP laparoscopic upper poles HN were performed at our institution. There were nine girls and 13 boys aged between 20 months and 6 years (mean age 3.9. Eight patients were diagnosed prenatally, 17 patients presented with urinary tract infection (UTI and three with vomiting and failure to thrive. The indication for HN was reflux nephropathy and UTI in non-functioning upper pole in 19 patients and cystic dysplasia in 1 patient. The surgical technique involved the following steps: Cystoscopic recognition; positioning of 3-4 trocar (right HN; identification of the kidney (detachment of the colon; isolation and low ligation of the dilated ureter; decrossing from renal vessels; section of the parenchyma by LigaSure; haemostasis with clips and LigaSure; drain. Results: The mean operative time was 154 min (range: 81-220 min. All patients were discharged from the 2 nd to 4 th day. Neither major complication nor conversion was recorded. 1 patient presented leakage of urine for 7 days from the drainage which resolved spontaneously. At ultrasound follow-up, 5 patients showed a secondary perirenal cyst, 2-5 cm diameter that resolved spontaneously. Conclusion: The results indicate that laparoscopic upper pole heminephrectomy is the treatment of choice in cases of non-functioning dilated lower segments of duplicated kidneys. The use of laparoscopic approach offers a good working space, a good visual control of the vessels and allows a very low isolation of the ureteral stump which counterbalance the peritoneal violation.

  15. Bacterial diversity in snow on North Pole ice floes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauptmann, Aviaja Zenia Edna Lyberth; Stibal, Marek; Bælum, Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    The microbial abundance and diversity in snow on ice floes at three sites near the North Pole was assessed using quantitative PCR and 454 pyrosequencing. Abundance of 16S rRNA genes in the samples ranged between 43 and 248 gene copies per millilitre of melted snow. A total of 291,331 sequences were...... obtained through 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, resulting in 984 OTUs at 97 % identity. Two sites were dominated by Cyanobacteria (72 and 61 %, respectively), including chloroplasts. The third site differed by consisting of 95 % Proteobacteria. Principal component analysis showed that the three...

  16. Ülikoolid pole mängukannid / Sirje Tohver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tohver, Sirje

    2001-01-01

    TPÜ korraldas 16. märtsil̀ 2001 ümarlaua "Ülikoolid pole mängukannid", kus oli arutusel riikliku koolitustellimuse vähenemine avalik-õiguslikele ülikoolidele. Osalesid TPÜ filoloogiateaduskonna dekaan dots. H. Mattisen, kultuuriteaduskonna dekaan prof. A. Avarand, akadeemiline prorektor dots. L. Jõgi, teadus- ja arendusprorektor prof. P. Normak, haridusminister T. Lukas, TPÜ rektor prof. M. Arvisto ja EKA rektor prof. A. Keskküla, TTÜ rektor prof. A. Keevallik, EMA õppeprorektor A. Pung

  17. Are Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies Viewed Pole-on?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    0.2’’ respectively. Figure 1 displays the position of each slit over a Barbosa et al. (2009) GMOS IFU image of the [S III] flux (which originates...C. Winge, H. Schmitt: Gemini/ GMOS IFU gas velocity ’tomography’ of the narrow line region of nearby active galaxies, MNRAS, 396 (2009) 2. [2] D...1995) 81. 4 P o S ( N L S 1 ) 0 5 0 Are NLS1s Pole-on? Travis C. Fischer 5 Figure 1: NGC 4051 GMOS IFU image showing integrated [SIII] flux

  18. Bacterial diversity in snow on North Pole ice floes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauptmann, Aviaja Zenia Edna Lyberth; Stibal, Marek; Bælum, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The microbial abundance and diversity in snow on ice floes at three sites near the North Pole was assessed using quantitative PCR and 454 pyrosequencing. Abundance of 16S rRNA genes in the samples ranged between 43 and 248 gene copies per millilitre of melted snow. A total of 291,331 sequences were...... sites clustered together when compared to the underlying environments of sea ice and ocean water. The Shannon indices ranged from 2.226 to 3.758, and the Chao1 indices showed species richness between 293 and 353 for the three samples. The relatively low abundances and diversity found in the samples...

  19. Plasmon Pole Approximations within a GW Sternheimer implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Vincent; Cote, Michel

    We use an implementation of the GW approximation that exploits a Sternheimer equation and a Lanczos procedure to circumvent the resource intensive sum over all bands and inversion of the dielectric matrix. I will present further improvement of the method that uses Plasmon Pole approximations to evaluate the integral over all frequencies analytically. A comparison study between the von Linden-Horsh and Engel-Farid approaches for energy levels of various molecules along with benchmarking of the computational ressources needed by the method will be discussed.

  20. Detection and Classification of Pole-Like Objects from Mobile Mapping Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukano, K.; Masuda, H.

    2015-08-01

    Laser scanners on a vehicle-based mobile mapping system can capture 3D point-clouds of roads and roadside objects. Since roadside objects have to be maintained periodically, their 3D models are useful for planning maintenance tasks. In our previous work, we proposed a method for detecting cylindrical poles and planar plates in a point-cloud. However, it is often required to further classify pole-like objects into utility poles, streetlights, traffic signals and signs, which are managed by different organizations. In addition, our previous method may fail to extract low pole-like objects, which are often observed in urban residential areas. In this paper, we propose new methods for extracting and classifying pole-like objects. In our method, we robustly extract a wide variety of poles by converting point-clouds into wireframe models and calculating cross-sections between wireframe models and horizontal cutting planes. For classifying pole-like objects, we subdivide a pole-like object into five subsets by extracting poles and planes, and calculate feature values of each subset. Then we apply a supervised machine learning method using feature variables of subsets. In our experiments, our method could achieve excellent results for detection and classification of pole-like objects.