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Sample records for cedar cryptomeria japonica

  1. Naturally occurrence of Sr and Ca in the stem of a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) using PIXE

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    Katayama, Y.; Aoki, T.; Ko, S.; Yoshida, K. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Distribution profiles of Sr and Ca occurring naturally in the stem of a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) were determined using PIXE. The average concentration of Sr was around 7.5 ppm and the average Ca concentration was about 540 ppm. (author)

  2. Estimation of Carbon Balance in Young and Mature Stands of Japanese Cedar (Cryptomeria Japonica) Plantation

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    Lee, M.; Sode, N.; Koizumi, H.

    2006-12-01

    Two-thirds of Japan is covered by forests, and Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) plantations occupy approximately 45% of the plantation areas or 20% of total forested area in Japan. Since the 1950s, cedar plantation has been encouraged and managed for timber production. Therefore, it is important to study quantitatively and synthetically the balance of carbon in cedar plantation ecosystems according to forest development. The ecological process-based approach provides a detailed assessment of belowground compartment as one of the major compartment of carbon balance. Carbon net balance (NEP: net ecosystem production) in ecosystems by this approach is determined by the balance between net primary production (NPP) of vegetation and heterotrophic respiration (HR) of soil (NEP= NPP-HR). HR is the difference between total soil respiration (SR) and root respiration (RR) (HR= SR-RR). To estimate the NPP, we used to biometric method by allometric relationships and litter traps. To estimate the SR, we used a chamber system with automatic open and closing for measuring continuous CO2 efflux from soil surface based on an open-flow method (AOCC) and a portable system for measuring leaf photosynthesis attached to a soil chamber (LI-6400). Our object is to examine balance of carbon in ca. 7 y old (young) and 45 y old (mature) stands of Japanese cedar. Our goal of this study is to investigate carbon cycling on a regional scale using ecological process, remote sensing, and climate observation and modeling analysis as part of the 21st COE program {Satellite Ecology}. This presents the initial results obtained by a process-based measurement since 2004. The study region refers to a cool temperate zone, Asia monsoon climate (36° 08'N, 137° 22'E). In the mature stand, Japanese cedar plantation located in about 10km east of Takayama city, central Japan. The ecological-process research plot was established on the middle of a slope (30m×50m) in November 2004. The slope

  3. Growth and transpiration of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and Hinoki cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) seedlings in response to soil water content.

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    Nagakura, Junko; Shigenaga, Hidetoshi; Akama, Akio; Takahashi, Masamichi

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the effects of soil water content on growth and transpiration of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) and Hinoki cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa (Siebold et Zucc.) Endl.), potted seedlings were grown in well-watered soil (wet treatment) or in drying soil (dry treatment) for 12 weeks. Seedlings in the wet treatment were watered once every 2 or 3 days, whereas seedlings in the dry treatment were watered when soil water content (Theta; m3 m(-3)) reached 0.30, equivalent to a soil matric potential of -0.06 MPa. From Weeks 7 to 12 after the onset of the treatments, seedling transpiration was measured by weighing the potted seedlings. After the last watering, changes in transpiration rate during soil drying were monitored intensely. The dry treatment restricted aboveground growth but increased biomass allocation to the roots in both species, resulting in no significant treatment difference in whole-plant biomass production. The species showed similar responses in relative growth rate (RGR), net assimilation rate (NAR) and shoot mass ratio (SMR) to the dry treatment. Although NAR did not change significantly in either C. japonica or C. obtusa as the soil dried, the two species responded differently to the dry treatment in terms of mean transpiration rate (E) and water-use efficiency (WUE), which are parameters that relate to NAR. In the dry treatment, both E and WUE of C. japonica were stable, whereas in C. obtusa, E decreased and WUE increased (E and WUE counterbalanced to maintain a constant NAR). Transpiration rates were lower in C. obtusa seedlings than in C. japonica seedlings, even in well-watered conditions. During soil drying, the transpiration rate decreased after Theta reached about 0.38 (-0.003 MPa) in C. obtusa and 0.32 (-0.028 MPa) in C. japonica. We conclude that C. obtusa has more water-saving characteristics than C. japonica, particularly when water supply is limited.

  4. IgE reactivity and cross-reactivity to Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) pollen allergens in dogs with atopic dermatitis.

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    Sakaguchi, M; Masuda, K; Yasueda, H; Saito, S; DeBoer, D J; Tsujimoto, H

    2001-11-01

    The natural occurrence of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollinosis has been reported in dogs with atopic dermatitis. However, the reactivity to Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) pollen allergens in these dogs has not been reported. The present study was designed to investigate the reactivity to Japanese cypress pollen allergens in dogs sensitized to Japanese cedar pollen allergens. In 19 dogs with specific IgE to C. japonica pollen allergen, we measured the specific IgE to C. obtusa pollen allergen and examined the reactivity to the allergen by intradermal test. Of the 19 dogs, 18 had specific IgE to crude and purified major allergens (Cha o 1) of C. obtusa pollen. Most of the dogs showed a positive reaction to C. obtusa pollen allergens in the intradermal test. Allergenic cross-reactivity between Cha o 1 and Cry j 1 (a major allergen in C. japonica pollen) was observed by the ELISA inhibition method. Dogs sensitized to Japanese cedar pollen allergens demonstrate reactivity to Japanese cypress pollen allergens.

  5. Essential Oil of Japanese Cedar (Cryptomeria japonica Wood Increases Salivary Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Levels after Monotonous Work

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    Eri Matsubara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Employee problems arising from mental illnesses have steadily increased and become a serious social problem in recent years. Wood is a widely available plant material, and knowledge of the psychophysiological effects of inhalation of woody volatile compounds has grown considerably. In this study, we established an experimental method to evaluate the effects of Japanese cedar wood essential oil on subjects performing monotonous work. Two experiment conditions, one with and another without diffusion of the essential oil were prepared. Salivary stress markers were determined during and after a calculation task followed by distribution of questionnaires to achieve subjective odor assessment. We found that inhalation of air containing the volatile compounds of Japanese cedar wood essential oil increased the secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-s. Slight differences in the subjective assessment of the odor of the experiment rooms were observed. The results of the present study indicate that the volatile compounds of Japanese cedar wood essential oil affect the endocrine regulatory mechanism to facilitate stress responses. Thus, we suggest that this essential oil can improve employees’ mental health.

  6. Novolak PF resins prepared from phenol liquefied Cryptomeria japonica and used in manufacturing moldings.

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    Lee, Wen-Jau; Chen, Yi-Chun

    2008-10-01

    The wood of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) was liquefied in phenol with H2SO4 and HCl as catalysts. The liquefied wood was reacted with formalin to prepare the novolak PF resin. The results showed that the reaction of liquefied Japanese cedar with formalin was an exothermic reaction, and formed a solid-like resin without extra heating. Two novolak PF resins were prepared from the liquefied wood which were identified as SF and CF that using the liquefied wood with H2SO4 and HCl as catalyst respectively. The novolak PF powder displayed thermo-melting characteristic. The resins of SF and CF had weight average molecular weight of 3638 and 3941 respectively and melting temperature of 149.4 degrees C and 127.5 degrees C respectively. Both of the novolak resins could be used to make moldings with good performance by mixing the novolak resin with wood powder, hardener and zinc stearate at the weight ratio of 60:30:10:1 and hot-pressed under 200 degrees C for 10min.

  7. Isolation and functional analysis of the CjNdly gene, a homolog in Cryptomeria japonica of FLORICAULA/LEAFY genes.

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    Shiokawa, Takahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Futamura, Norihiro; Osanai, Kosuke; Murasugi, Daisuke; Shinohara, Kenji; Kawai, Shinya; Morohoshi, Noriyuki; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Kajita, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of CjNdly, a homolog in Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) of the FLORICAULA/LEAFY (FLO/LFY) genes. We determined the entire nucleotide sequence of CjNdly, including short 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions. The deduced amino acid sequence was similar to those of the products of the FLO/LFY genes from other species. The nucleotide sequence showed the closest homology to that of the NEEDLY gene in Pinus radiata D. Don. Although no proline-rich region has been reported previously in homologous gene products from gymnosperms, we found such a region at the amino-terminal end of the deduced amino acid sequence encoded by CjNdly. We detected the expression of CjNdly in both reproductive and vegetative tissues and organs of C. japonica. Heterologous expression of CjNdly in transgenic tobacco plants induced precocious flowering of regenerating shoots on agar-solidified medium and flowers with an abnormal phenotype, namely, petal-like stamens. Our findings suggest that the CjNdly gene may have important roles in flower development in Japanese cedar, resembling those of its angiosperm homologs.

  8. Stem volume Models and Validation for Cryptomeria japonica in Jeju Island, Korea

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    Seo, YeonOk; Jung, Sung Cheol; Lumbres, Roscinto Ian; Jeon, Chul Hyun; Kim, Chan Soo

    2016-04-01

    This study was carried out to fit different volume equations for Cryptomeria japonica trees in Jeju Experimental Forests, Jeju Island, Korea. A total of 120 Cryptomeria japonica trees were measured and were randomly split into two dataset One is for initial model development (80% of the dataset) and the other is for model validation (20% of the dataset). The two dataset were then combined for the final model development. Coefficient of determination (R2), root mean square error (RMSE), mean difference (MD), absolute mean difference (AMD) were used as evaluation statistics to evaluate the performance of the different models. Results showed that volume models with two independent variables (DBH and total height) had a better performance as compared to models with only one (DBH). The result of model evaluation and validation showed that model 6 (V=aDbHc) was considered best based on the rank analysis among the candidate models. It is hope that the result of this study could help forests managers to easily predict the total volume of Cryptomeria japonica which is important in Carbon stock assessment of the different Cryptomeria japonica forests in Jeju Island, Korea.

  9. Common antigenicity between Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) pollen, I. H-2 complex affects cross responsiveness to Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 at the T- and B-cell level in mice.

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    Kingetsu, I; Ohno, N; Hayashi, N; Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Saito, S

    2000-04-01

    Common antigenicity among two purified Japanese cedar pollen allergens (Cry j 1 and Cry j 2) and one Japanese cypress pollen allergen (Cha o 1) was explored at the T-cell and B-cell level in mice of different H-2 haplotypes. Cry j 2 did not show any common antigenicity with Cry j 1 or Cha o 1. B10.S (H-2S) mice immunized with Cry j 1 or Cha o 1 generated T cells and antibodies reactive to both antigens, indicating the common antigenicity of these antigens. C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice were non-responders to Cry j 1. BALB/c (H-2d) mice immunized with Cry j 1 or Cha o 1 and C57BL/6 mice immunized with Cha o 1 generated T cells that were only reactive with the respective immunogen, but produced antibody reactive to both Cry j 1 and Cha o 1, indicating that Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 share their B-cell epitope but not their T-cell epitope. This finding may provide a clue for the clarification of the T-cell and B-cell epitopes of Cry j 1 and Cha o 1, even though the data are influenced by H-2 complex restriction in mice. Considering that H-2 complex restriction affects cross responsiveness to Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 at the T- and B-cell level in mice, we assessed the possible situation in humans exposed sequentially to Japanese cedar pollen and Japanese cypress pollen.

  10. Common antigenicity between Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) pollen, II. Determination of the cross-reacting T-cell epitope of cry j 1 and cha o 1 in mice.

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    Ohno, N; Ide, T; Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Saito, S

    2000-04-01

    We have previously detected common antigenicity between Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 in B10.S mice. B10.S mice immunized with Cry j 1- or Cha o 1-generated T cells and antibodies reactive to both allergens. In the present study, we investigated the cross-reacting and Cry j 1-specific T-cell epitopes in B10.S mice. Lymph node cells from B10. S mice immunized with Cry j 1 recognized Cry j 1 p111-130, p211-230, and p310-330 as well as Cha o 1 p209-228. The existence of the cross-reacting T-cell epitope in Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 was confirmed by the response of newly established p211-230-specific and Cha o 1 p209-228-specific T-cell lines. The minimum peptide sequence (p213-224) of the cross-reacting T-cell epitope was identical in Cry j 1 and Cha o 1. These findings clearly demonstrate that common antigenicity at the T-cell level between Japanese cedar and cypress pollen allergens was caused by the existence of an identitical-cell epitope in Cry j 1 and Cha o 1.

  11. DENDROECOLOGY OF A 25 YEARS OLD Cryptomeria japonica (L. F. DON. STAND IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL

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    Mário Dobner Júnior

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509814579Cryptomeria japonica is indigenous to the temperate region of Japan, where it is known as ‘sugi’. In Brazil, the plantation of this species is recommended for the highlands and cold regions in the southern, where it is well adapted to the edaphoclimatic conditions. The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between meteorological variables and growth of a 25 years old Cryptomeria japonica stand. Cross-sectional discs from 30 different trees were collected, within all diametric classes. After dried and sanded, annual rings were measured and correlated with meteorological data by dendrochronological analysis tools. The growth series showed an intercorrelation of 0.668. The radial growth of the species was positively influenced by the minimum temperature of September and by the medium temperature of May. There was no correlation between growth and precipitation, although peaks of growth were observed in years with high precipitation.  

  12. Antigenic analysis of Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa using anti-Cry j 1 monoclonal antibodies.

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    Suzuki, M; Ito, M; Ito, H; Baba, S; Takagi, I; Yasueda, H; Ohta, N

    1996-01-01

    In Japan, pollen of Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa are a yearly source of distress for many people suffering seasonally from allergic rhinitis. To study common epitopes shared by the two species, two monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) were raised against Cry j 1, which is the most predominant allergen in C. japonica. One of the moAbs was found to be reactive even to the major allergen of C. obtusa, demonstrating that the moAb (J1B01) can detect an epitope shared by both species J1B01 strongly inhibited the binding of the major allergens of C. japonica and C. obtusa to IgE of patients who are sensitive to C. japonica and C. obtusa. This finding signifies the importance of the epitope recognized by J1B01.

  13. Larvicidal efficacy of Cryptomeria japonica leaf essential oils against Anopheles gambiae.

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    Mdoe, France P; Cheng, Sen-Sung; Lyaruu, Lucile; Nkwengulila, Gamba; Chang, Shang-Tzen; Kweka, Eliningaya J

    2014-09-04

    Alternative insecticidal compounds with mortality effect against mosquito life cycle stages are currently needed. The compounds should be biodegradable and nontoxic to non-targeted insects. Plant based larvicides provide effective control of vector populations. This study explored Cryptomeria japonica leaf essential oil larvicidal potency against Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto. Essential oils (12.5 to 200 μg/mL) extracted from C. japonica leaves were evaluated against An. gambiae s.s. larvae in both the laboratory and semi field in 6 replicates for each dose. Larval mortality readings were taken at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post treatment. C. japonica leaf essential oil yield was 17.06 ± 0.56 mL/kg and 1.60 ± 0.33% (w/w). GC-FID and GC-MS analyses revealed 22 constituents. Essential oil was more effective against An. gambiae s.s. larvae in the laboratory than in semi field trials. Mortality increased with increasing dosages (12.5 to 200 μg/mL) in the laboratory (31.75 to 100%) and semi field trials (17.75 to 99.5%), respectively. The LC50 value ranged from 5.55 to 63.92 μg/mL in the laboratory, and 8.22 to 134.84 μg/mL in semi field conditions, LC90 value ranged from 41.34 to 205.93 μg/mL in the laboratory and 50.92 to 213.11 μg/mL in semi field conditions. This study has demonstrated the potential of C. japonica leaf essential oil to cause mortality effects to An. gambiae s. s. larval populations, however, further studies need to be conducted under field conditions and also with individual active compounds of C. japonica essential oil.

  14. Demographic Genetic Structure of Cryptomeria japonica var.sinensis in Tianmushan Nature Reserve,China

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    Yan Chen; Shu-Zhen Yang; Ming-Shui Zhao; Bi-Ye Ni; Liang Liu; Xiao-Yong Chen

    2008-01-01

    Genetic changes over space and time provide insights into the relative roles of evolutionary factors in shaping genetic patterns within plant populations.However,compared with spatial genetic structure,few studies have been conducted on genetic changes over time.In this study,we used six polymorphic microsatellite loci to assess genetic variation of six size-classes of the population of Liushan,Cryptomeria japonica var.sinensis,in the Tianmushan National Nature Reserve,whose origin was debatable.The mean number of alleles per locus and expected heterozygosity were 4.583 and 0.5999 respectively,lower than other conifers with the same life history characteristics.FST was 0.002 4- 0.003,and the pairwise test revealed no significant differentiation in any pair of size classes.Significant heterozygosity excesses were detected in five size classes except the oldest one,indicating bottleneck event(s).The above results support the hypothesis that Tianmushan population was introduced and followed by natural regeneration.

  15. Essential oil from Cryptomeria japonica induces apoptosis in human oral epidermoid carcinoma cells via mitochondrial stress and activation of caspases.

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    Cha, Jeong-Dan; Kim, Ji-Young

    2012-03-30

    Cryptomeria japonica D. Don (C. japonica) has been used in traditional medicines from Asia for a variety of indications, including liver ailments, and an antitussive, and for its antiulcer activities. We examined the cell viability and apoptosis of KB cells treated with C. japonica essential oil at several concentrations for 12 h by MTT assay, Hoechst-33258 dye staining, DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry (cell cycle), and Western blotting for mitochondria stress, activation of caspases, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. The essential oil induced the apoptosis of KB cells in a dose-dependent manner, which was verified by DNA fragmentation, appearance of apoptotic bodies, and the sub-G1 ratio. The essential oil also induced rapid and transient caspase-3 activity and cleavage of PARP of the KB cells. Treating the cells with the oil also caused changes in the mitochondrial level of the Bcl-2 family proteins such as Bcl-2 and Bax, thereby inducing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. The essential oil of C. japonica may have potential as a cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic agent.

  16. Evaluation of cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers for Chamaecyparis obtusa based on expressed sequence tag information from Cryptomeria japonica.

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    Matsumoto, A; Tsumura, Y

    2004-12-01

    We have developed and evaluated sequence-tagged site (STS) primers based on expressed sequence-tag information derived from sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) for use in hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa), a species that belongs to a different family (although it appears to be fairly closely related to sugi). Of the 417 C. japonica STS primer pairs we screened, 120 (approximately 30%) were transferable and provided specific PCR amplification products from 16 C. obtusa plus trees. We used haploid megagametophytes to investigate the homology of 80 STS fragments between C. obtusa and C. japonica and to identify orthologous loci. Nearly 90% of the fragments showed high (>70%) degrees of similarity between the species, and 35 STSs indicated homology to entries with the same putative function in a public DNA database. Of the 120 STS fragments amplified, 72 showed restriction fragment length polymorphisms; in addition, the CC2430 primers detected amplicon length polymorphism. We assessed the inheritance pattern of 27 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers, using 20 individuals from the segregation population. All the markers analyzed were consistent with the marker inheritance patterns obtained from the screening panel, and no markers (except CC2716) showed significant (Pobtusa. Most of the markers should also provide reliable anchor loci for comparative mapping studies of the C. obtusa and C. japonica genomes.

  17. Essential Oil from Cryptomeria japonica Induces Apoptosis in Human Oral Epidermoid Carcinoma Cells via Mitochondrial Stress and Activation of Caspases

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    Ji-Young Kim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cryptomeria japonica D. Don (C. japonica has been used in traditional medicines from Asia for a variety of indications, including liver ailments, and an antitussive, and for its antiulcer activities. We examined the cell viability and apoptosis of KB cells treated with C. japonica essential oil at several concentrations for 12 h by MTT assay, Hoechst-33258 dye staining, DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry (cell cycle, and Western blotting for mitochondria stress, activation of caspases, and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase. The essential oil induced the apoptosis of KB cells in a dose-dependent manner, which was verified by DNA fragmentation, appearance of apoptotic bodies, and the sub-G1 ratio. The essential oil also induced rapid and transient caspase-3 activity and cleavage of PARP of the KB cells. Treating the cells with the oil also caused changes in the mitochondrial level of the Bcl-2 family proteins such as Bcl-2 and Bax, thereby inducing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. The essential oil of C. japonica may have potential as a cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic agent.

  18. Changes in the localization and levels of starch and lipids in cambium and phloem during cambial reactivation by artificial heating of main stems of Cryptomeria japonica trees

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    Begum, Shahanara; Nakaba, Satoshi; Oribe, Yuichiro; Kubo, Takafumi; Funada, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Cambial reactivation in trees occurs from late winter to early spring when photosynthesis is minimal or almost non-existent. Reserve materials might be important for wood formation in trees. The localization and approximate levels of starch and lipids (as droplets) and number of starch granules in cambium and phloem were examined from cambial dormancy to the start of xylem differentiation in locally heated stems of Cryptomeria japonica trees in winter. Methods Electric heating tape was wrapped on one side of the stem of Cryptomeria japonica trees at breast height in winter. The localization and approximate levels of starch and lipids (as droplets) and number of starch granules were determined by image analysis of optical digital images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Key Results Localized heating induced earlier cambial reactivation and xylem differentiation in stems of Cryptomeria japonica, as compared with non-heated stems. There were clear changes in the respective localizations and levels of starch and lipids (as droplets) determined in terms of relative areas on images, from cambial dormancy to the start of xylem differentiation in heated stems. In heated stems, the levels and number of starch granules fell from cambial reactivation to the start of xylem differentiation. There was a significant decrease in the relative area occupied by lipid droplets in the cambium from cambial reactivation to the start of xylem differentiation in heated stems. Conclusions The results showed clearly that the levels and number of storage starch granules in cambium and phloem cells and levels of lipids (as droplets) in the cambium decreased from cambial reactivation to the start of xylem differentiation in heated stems during the winter. The observations suggest that starch and lipid droplets might be needed as sources of energy for the initiation of cambial cell division and the differentiation of xylem in Cryptomeria japonica. PMID:21037242

  19. Essential oil characterization of two Azorean Cryptomeria japonica populations and their biological evaluations.

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    Moiteiro, Cristina; Esteves, Teresa; Ramalho, Luís; Rojas, Rosario; Alvarez, Sandra; Zacchino, Susana; Bragança, Helena

    2013-12-01

    Essential oils from foliage, bark and heartwood of Cryptomeriajaponica D. Don from Azores Archipelago (Portugal) were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. Two populations, of black and reddish heartwood color, were studied. The main compounds found in the foliage of both populations were alpha-pinene (9.6-29.5%), (+)-phyllocladene (3.5-26.5%), ent-kaur-16-ene (0.2-20.6%), sabinene (0.5-19.9%) and limonene (1.4-11.5%), with a large variation in individual compounds from each population. Heartwood oils were characterized by a high content of cubebol (2.8-39.9%) and epi-cubebol (4.1-26.9%) isomers, which were absent in the foliage. Elemol and eudesmol isomers were found in the foliage and heartwood oils, while (+)-phyllocladene was absent in heartwood. Black and reddish bark oils were composed of the diterpenes dehydroferruginol (1.9-5.1%) and ferruginol (2.6-11.5%), along with the sesquiterpenes delta-cadinene (10.4-15.9%), alpha-muurolene (3.3-5.4%), epi-zonarene (4.0-5.0%), cubenol (9.3-14.0%), tau-muurolol (4.8-10.7%), beta-eudesmol (3.0-9.9%), gamma-eudesmol (1.9-7.0%) and hedycariol (1.4-6.2%). Azorean C. japonica oils exhibited significant chemical differences compared with native plants from Asia. The essential oils showed moderate antimicrobial activity against the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans and human pathogenic bacteria (especially against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis). The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils may be attributed to compounds such as ent-kaur-16-ene, (+)-phyllocladene, ferruginol and elemol, which are present in different proportions within the complex oil mixture. These results suggest a potential use for C. japonica oils obtained from wood industry leftovers.

  20. Effect of epicuticular wax crystals on the localization of artificially deposited sub-micron carbon-based aerosols on needles of Cryptomeria japonica.

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    Nakaba, Satoshi; Yamane, Kenichi; Fukahori, Mie; Nugroho, Widyanto Dwi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Kuroda, Katsushi; Sano, Yuzou; Wuled Lenggoro, I; Izuta, Takeshi; Funada, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism of adsorption of particles suspended in the gas-phase (aerosol) to the outer surfaces of leaves provides useful information for understanding the mechanisms of the effect of aerosol particles on the growth and physiological functions of trees. In the present study, we examined the localization of artificially deposited sub-micron-sized carbon-based particles on the surfaces of needles of Cryptomeria japonica, a typical Japanese coniferous tree species, by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The clusters (aggregates) of carbon-based particles were deposited on the needle surface regions where epicuticular wax crystals were sparsely distributed. By contrast, no clusters of the particles were found on the needle surface regions with dense distribution of epicuticular wax crystals. Number of clusters of carbon-based particles per unit area showed statistically significant differences between regions with sparse epicuticular wax crystals and those with dense epicuticular wax crystals. These results suggest that epicuticular wax crystals affect distribution of carbon-based particles on needles. Therefore, densely distributed epicuticular wax crystals might prevent the deposition of sub-micron-sized carbon-based particles on the surfaces of needles of Cryptomeria japonica to retain the function of stomata.

  1. Efeito do volume de tubetes e tipos de substratos na qualidade de mudas de cryptomeria japonica (l.f. d. don.

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    Constâncio Bernardo dos Santos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptomeria japonica (L. F. D. Don. is a species of great potential for planting in elevated and cold regions of Brazil. It is remarkable for its fast growth, good adaptation to the climate and soil of Southern Brazil, and it also shows a good response to silvicultural technologies. In addition, it is notable for the quality and diversity of its raw material usage for the industries of pulp and paper, plywood, construction of houses, furniture, boats, ships, etc. The experimental plan was bifactorial in the entirely randomized design with 8 treatments, 5 repetitions with 40 seedlings per treatment. The results indicated that for the production of seedlings of this species, the substrate soil + vermiculite showed the best development of the seedlings in 120 cm3 containers.

  2. Complete nucleotide sequence of the Cryptomeria japonica D. Don. chloroplast genome and comparative chloroplast genomics: diversified genomic structure of coniferous species

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    Hirao, Tomonori; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kurita, Manabu; Kondo, Teiji; Takata, Katsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Background The recent determination of complete chloroplast (cp) genomic sequences of various plant species has enabled numerous comparative analyses as well as advances in plant and genome evolutionary studies. In angiosperms, the complete cp genome sequences of about 70 species have been determined, whereas those of only three gymnosperm species, Cycas taitungensis, Pinus thunbergii, and Pinus koraiensis have been established. The lack of information regarding the gene content and genomic structure of gymnosperm cp genomes may severely hamper further progress of plant and cp genome evolutionary studies. To address this need, we report here the complete nucleotide sequence of the cp genome of Cryptomeria japonica, the first in the Cupressaceae sensu lato of gymnosperms, and provide a comparative analysis of their gene content and genomic structure that illustrates the unique genomic features of gymnosperms. Results The C. japonica cp genome is 131,810 bp in length, with 112 single copy genes and two duplicated (trnI-CAU, trnQ-UUG) genes that give a total of 116 genes. Compared to other land plant cp genomes, the C. japonica cp has lost one of the relevant large inverted repeats (IRs) found in angiosperms, fern, liverwort, and gymnosperms, such as Cycas and Gingko, and additionally has completely lost its trnR-CCG, partially lost its trnT-GGU, and shows diversification of accD. The genomic structure of the C. japonica cp genome also differs significantly from those of other plant species. For example, we estimate that a minimum of 15 inversions would be required to transform the gene organization of the Pinus thunbergii cp genome into that of C. japonica. In the C. japonica cp genome, direct repeat and inverted repeat sequences are observed at the inversion and translocation endpoints, and these sequences may be associated with the genomic rearrangements. Conclusion The observed differences in genomic structure between C. japonica and other land plants, including

  3. Effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate particles on growth and gas exchange rates of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Otani, Yoko; Li, Peiran; Nagao, Hiroshi; Lenggoro, I. Wuled; Ishida, Atsushi; Yazaki, Kenichi; Noguchi, Kyotaro; Nakaba, Satoshi; Yamane, Kenichi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Sano, Yuzou; Funada, Ryo; Izuta, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    To clarify the effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate (AS) particles on growth and physiological functions of forest tree species, seedlings of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica were exposed to submicron-size AS particles during two growing seasons from 3 June 2011 to 8 October 2012. The mean sulfate concentration in PM2.5 increased during the exposure inside the chamber in 2011 and 2012 by 2.73 and 4.32 μg SO42- m-3, respectively. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were detected on the whole-plant dry mass of the seedlings. These results indicate that the exposure to submicrometer AS particles at the ambient level for two growing seasons did not significantly affect the growth of the seedlings. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were found on the net photosynthetic rate in the leaves or needles of F. crenata, C. sieboldii and L. kaempferi seedlings. Also, in the previous-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, exposure to AS particles significantly reduced the net photosynthetic rate, which may be caused by the reduction in the concentration of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). On the contrary, in current-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, net photosynthetic rate significantly increased with exposure to AS particles, which may be the result of increases in stomatal conductance and concentrations of Rubisco and chlorophyll. Furthermore, exposure to AS particles correlated with an increase in concentrations of NH4+, free amino acid and total soluble protein, suggesting that AS particles may be deliquesced, absorbed into the leaves and metabolized into amino acid and protein. These results suggest that net photosynthesis in the needles of C. japonica is relatively sensitive to submicron-size AS particles as compared with the other three tree species.

  4. Comparison of chemical compositions and antimicrobial activities of essential oils from three conifer trees; Pinus densiflora, Cryptomeria japonica, and Chamaecyparis obtusa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Hee; Lee, Sang Hee; Hong, Soon-Kwang

    2009-04-01

    The chemical compositions, and antibacterial and antifungal effects of essential oils extracted from three coniferous species, Pinus densiflora, Cryptomeria japonica, and Chamaecyparis obtusa, were investigated. Gas chromatography mass analysis of the essential oils revealed that the major components and the percentage of each essential oil were 16.66% beta-phellandrene and 14.85% alpha-pinene in P. densiflora; 31.45% kaur-16-ene and 11.06% sabinene in C. japonica; and 18.75% bicyclo [2, 2, 1] heptan-2-ol and 17.41% 2-carene in Ch. obtusa. The antimicrobial assay by agar disc diffusion method showed that 2.2 microg of Ch. obtusa oil inhibited most effectively the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 33312 and Klebsiella oxytoca ATCC 10031, whereas the C. japonica oil gave weak antimicrobial activity. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for bacterial strains were in the range of 5.45-21.8 mg/ml depending on essential oils, but most Gram-negative bacteria were resistant even at 21.8 mg oil/ml. P. densiflora oil showed the most effective antifungal activity and the MIC values for Cryptococcus neoformans B42419 and Candida glabrata YFCC 062CCM 11658 were as low as 0.545 and 2.18 mg/ml, respectively. Cryp. neoformans B42419 was the most sensitive to all essential oils in the range of 0.545-2.18 mg/ml. Our data clearly showed that the essential oils from the three conifers had effective antimicrobial activity, especially against fungi.

  5. Expression and immunoreactivity of Cryptomeria japonica pollen allergen, CJP-6%日本柳杉花粉变应原CJP-6的重组表达和免疫反应性鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋建国; 刘瑞玲; 付永锋; 程训佳

    2012-01-01

    目的 获得日本柳杉花粉主要变应原CJP-6的编码基因,构建其原核表达载体进行表达,并对重组CJP-6(rCJP-6)进行免疫活性鉴定.方法 从日本柳杉花粉中提取总RNA,采用RT-PCR的方法扩增CJP-6编码基因,将其克隆入pET-19b表达载体.转入大肠杆菌BL21 Star (DE3) pLysS,经IPTG诱导表达,以Ni2+亲和层析柱对重组变应原进行纯化,采用Dot blot和ELISA方法检测重组变应原rCJP-6与对日本柳杉花粉、尘螨和蒿草花粉过敏患者的血清中的IgE反应活性.结果 重组变应原与日本柳杉花粉过敏患者血清中的IgE具有较高的结合活性,rCJP-6与尘螨、蒿草花粉过敏患者血清中的IgE也具有很高的反应性,而且反应性与日本柳杉花粉过敏的患者血清相似.结论 制备并获得了具有IgE结合活性的重组日本柳杉花粉变应原CJP-6,日本柳杉花粉变应原是中国过敏反应性疾病患者潜在的变应原,为国内过敏反应性疾病的临床诊断和免疫治疗及进一步的实验研究奠定了基础.%Objective:To construct a recombinant prokaryotic expression vector to express Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japoni-ca) pollen allergen, CJP-6, and to identify IgE-binding capacity of the recombinant allergen. Methods:The total RNA was extracted from C. Japonica pollen, and then the CJP-6 gene fragments were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into vector pET-19b. The recombinant plasmids were transformed to E. Coli BL21 Star (DE3) pLysS. After induced by IPTG, the recombinant protein was purified through Ni2+ affinity chromatography. The IgE binding activity of rCJP-6 is assessed using sera from patients allergic to C. Japonica pollen, mite and Artemisia pollen by Dot blot and ELISA. Results:The recombinant allergen was expressed in E. Coli and purified through Ni2+ affinity chromatography successfully. The rCJP-6 has high affinity with IgE existing in sera of patients allergic to C. Japonica pollen, mite and Artemisia pollen

  6. The formation of pollen in male flowers and yearly atmospheric pollen counts of Cryptomeria japonica in the following year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Taira

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of yearly atmospheric pollen counts is a very important component in the prevention of allergenic symptoms. We investigated the relationship between atomspheric pollen counts and the formation of male flowers of Cryptomeriajaponica D. Don (C. japonica. An atmospheric pollen survey of C. japonica was conducted from 1983 to 1996 using a Durham’s sampler. A regression analysis was performed between the total pollen count and July temperature in previous years. The atmospheric pollen counts of C. japonica had a high positive correlation with the mean temperature in July of the previous year. However, the predicted using average mean July temperature records of the previous year were insufficient, especially in years following high pollen count. In experimental conditions, using 60 C. japonica trees in pots, the formation of male flowers was shown to increase with a rise in incubation temperature. In a forest of C. japonica, our results showed that the length and weight of new needle growth from old needles, which produced many flowers in the previous year, were shorter and lighter, respectively. These aerobiological and plant physiological studies provide evidence that a smaller number of pollen counts are a common result in a year following one in which many male flowers are produced, even if the mean July temperature of that year was high.

  7. Effect of aluminum on the growth and nutrient uptake in cryptomeria japonica D.Don and Chamaecyparis obtusa Sieb. et Zucc.; Sugi oyobi hinoki no ikusei to yobun kyushu ni oyobosu aluminium no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Y.; Matsumura, H.; Kobayashi, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-09-10

    Two-year-old seedlings of Sugi (Japanese cedar: Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) and Hinoki (Japanese cypress: Chamaecyparis obtusa Sieb. et Zucc.) were grown for 4 months in 1/5 Hoagland`s No.2 nutrient culture solution containing aluminum chloride in the concentration range of 0.5 to 20 mM within the pH range of 3.5 to 4.0. Aluminium supplied at or below 1 mM of Al had no effect on the mortality of these species. However, the increase Al concentration higher than 2 mM increased the mortality. While they showed significant growth reduction at or higher Al concentration of 5 mM, there were no difference in growth response to Al between the two species in this experiment. While Al contents in leaf and root significantly increased with increasing Al concentration in the solution, contents of Ca, Mg and P in leaf decreased. Roof p content in Sugi increased with the increase of Al concentration in the solution, while no such change was observed in Hinoki root. This result suggests that Al might make phosphate immobile or inviolable form in Sugi root and this might lead to the reduced translocation of P into the leaf. In contrast, Al did not interfere with the uptake of phosphate in the root, however, it might interrupt phosphate transport into leaf from root system in Hinoki. The Al concentration such as 5 mM in the root sphere induced growth reductions in Sugi and Hinoki, with no significant difference in the response between the two species. This concentration was much higher than those reported in the field crops, vegetables and/or herbs. Thus, if soil acidification will be induced by acidic deposition in future, these herbaceous plants will be influenced faster than the conifer trees. This also means that ground vegetation change will be observed earlier than the conifer decline by the soil acidification stress. 23 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Determination of Seed Soundness in Conifers Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa Using Narrow-Multiband Spectral Imaging in the Short-Wavelength Infrared Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Osamu; Hara, Masashi; Tobita, Hiroyuki; Yazaki, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Uemura, Akira; Utsugi, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of planted forests of Cryptomeria japonica (sugi) and Chamaecyparis obtuse (hinoki) is the pressing importance to the forest administration in Japan. Low seed germination rate of these species, however, has hampered low-cost production of their seedlings for reforestation. The primary cause of the low germinability has been attributed to highly frequent formation of anatomically unsound seeds, which are indistinguishable from sound germinable seeds by visible observation and other common criteria such as size and weight. To establish a method for sound seed selection in these species, hyperspectral imaging technique was used to identify a wavelength range where reflectance spectra differ clearly between sound and unsound seeds. In sound seeds of both species, reflectance in a narrow waveband centered at 1,730 nm, corresponding to a lipid absorption band in the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) range, was greatly depressed relative to that in adjacent wavebands on either side. Such depression was absent or less prominent in unsound seeds. Based on these observations, a reflectance index SQI, abbreviated for seed quality index, was formulated using reflectance at three narrow SWIR wavebands so that it represents the extent of the depression. SQI calculated from seed area-averaged reflectance spectra and spatial distribution patterns of pixelwise SQI within each seed area were both proven as reliable criteria for sound seed selection. Enrichment of sound seeds was accompanied by an increase in germination rate of the seed lot. Thus, the methods described are readily applicable toward low-cost seedling production in combination with single seed sowing technology.

  9. Determination of Seed Soundness in Conifers Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa Using Narrow-Multiband Spectral Imaging in the Short-Wavelength Infrared Range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Matsuda

    Full Text Available Regeneration of planted forests of Cryptomeria japonica (sugi and Chamaecyparis obtuse (hinoki is the pressing importance to the forest administration in Japan. Low seed germination rate of these species, however, has hampered low-cost production of their seedlings for reforestation. The primary cause of the low germinability has been attributed to highly frequent formation of anatomically unsound seeds, which are indistinguishable from sound germinable seeds by visible observation and other common criteria such as size and weight. To establish a method for sound seed selection in these species, hyperspectral imaging technique was used to identify a wavelength range where reflectance spectra differ clearly between sound and unsound seeds. In sound seeds of both species, reflectance in a narrow waveband centered at 1,730 nm, corresponding to a lipid absorption band in the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR range, was greatly depressed relative to that in adjacent wavebands on either side. Such depression was absent or less prominent in unsound seeds. Based on these observations, a reflectance index SQI, abbreviated for seed quality index, was formulated using reflectance at three narrow SWIR wavebands so that it represents the extent of the depression. SQI calculated from seed area-averaged reflectance spectra and spatial distribution patterns of pixelwise SQI within each seed area were both proven as reliable criteria for sound seed selection. Enrichment of sound seeds was accompanied by an increase in germination rate of the seed lot. Thus, the methods described are readily applicable toward low-cost seedling production in combination with single seed sowing technology.

  10. Determination of Seed Soundness in Conifers Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa Using Narrow-Multiband Spectral Imaging in the Short-Wavelength Infrared Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Osamu; Hara, Masashi; Tobita, Hiroyuki; Yazaki, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Uemura, Akira; Utsugi, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of planted forests of Cryptomeria japonica (sugi) and Chamaecyparis obtuse (hinoki) is the pressing importance to the forest administration in Japan. Low seed germination rate of these species, however, has hampered low-cost production of their seedlings for reforestation. The primary cause of the low germinability has been attributed to highly frequent formation of anatomically unsound seeds, which are indistinguishable from sound germinable seeds by visible observation and other common criteria such as size and weight. To establish a method for sound seed selection in these species, hyperspectral imaging technique was used to identify a wavelength range where reflectance spectra differ clearly between sound and unsound seeds. In sound seeds of both species, reflectance in a narrow waveband centered at 1,730 nm, corresponding to a lipid absorption band in the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) range, was greatly depressed relative to that in adjacent wavebands on either side. Such depression was absent or less prominent in unsound seeds. Based on these observations, a reflectance index SQI, abbreviated for seed quality index, was formulated using reflectance at three narrow SWIR wavebands so that it represents the extent of the depression. SQI calculated from seed area-averaged reflectance spectra and spatial distribution patterns of pixelwise SQI within each seed area were both proven as reliable criteria for sound seed selection. Enrichment of sound seeds was accompanied by an increase in germination rate of the seed lot. Thus, the methods described are readily applicable toward low-cost seedling production in combination with single seed sowing technology. PMID:26083366

  11. Changes in soil chemistry and root growth of Cryptomeria japonica, chamaecyparis obtusa, and chamaecyparis pisifera exposed simulated acid rain; Jinko sanseiu bakuro ni tomonau dojo rikagakusei no henka to sugi, hinoki, sawara no seiiku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Y.; Matsumura, H.; Kobayashi, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-10

    Plants of Cryptomeria japonica, Chamaecyparis obtusa, and Chamaecypris pisifera grown in andosol were exposed to simulated acid rain (SAR) for 23 months, to examine the relationship between change in soil chemistry and root growth. Soil pH exposed to SAR of pH 4.0 did not show any significant differences from that of soil exposed to pH 5.6. Exposed to SAR of pH 2.0 lowered soil pH to 4.0. The pH of fertilized soil was lower than that of non-fertilized one. Total precipitation and cultivated plant species did not significantly affect the soil pH. Exposure to 5,450 mm of pH 2.0 for Cryptomeria japonica significantly decreased concentrations of exchangeable Ca and Mg, while increased concentration of water-soluble Al, with decreasing pH of soils. Thus, molar ratio of (K+Ca+Mg)/Al was reduced, remarkably. This ratio reached to the equilibrium after one year. Soil acidification stress with high Al concentration did not appear to cause significant growth reduction in conifers even under non-fertilized conditions. 13 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Effect of solution pH on the growth of Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa grown in nutrient solution culture; Sugi to hinoki no seiiku ni oyobosu baiyoeki pH no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Y.; Matsumura, H.; Kobayashi, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-10

    When wet deposition including acid rain, mist and fog, and dry deposition including gaseous and particulate SOx and NOx are added to soil, the soil acidification occurs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the soil acidification stress, which may contribute to the conifer decline. Two-year-old seedlings of Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa were cultivated to examine the effect of root sphere acidity on the plant growth in the nutrient solution culture. Acidity of one fifth Hoagland`s nutrient culture solution was adjusted to the pH in five levels, i.e., 3.5 to 4.0, 4.0 to 4.5, 4.5 to 5.0, 5.0 to 5.5, and 5.5 to 6.0. Cultivation period was for 15 weeks. The growth performance of both Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa was best under the lowest pH level of 3.5 to 4.0. Both species, however, decreased plant dry weight at high pH level. Total cation contents in the leaves and roots of both species cultivated at pH 3.5 to 4.0 were highest. These results suggested that both species have a characteristic adaptability to such a low pH condition. 13 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Effect of air pollution on annual ring width of Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc. and Cryptomeria Japonica D. Don, in Kitakyushu city. Kitakyushu shi deno Sugi, Akamatsu no nenrinhaba ni oyobosu taiki osen no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Y.; Yamashita, T.; Kido, K. (The Kitakyushu Municipal Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Kitakyushu (Japan))

    1993-05-10

    There is a little of examples to have numerically evaluated an influence of the air pollution in the field for the long period. By using the conifer species growing in the Kitakyushu city and its periphery, in this report, a relation between the annual ring width and the air pollution has been investigated. Two tree species of Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc. and Cryptomeria japonica D.Don were selected as the tree species. The individuals, with a breast height diameter of about 50cm, more than 10 pieces for each were selected, and then the annual ring specimens for about 50 years upto 1990 were obtained by using the increment borer. The annual ring width was normalized by converting to the annual ring indices. It was found that there is a significant relation between the annual ring indices obtained from the trees in the city and the air pollution, and that the annual ring growth in the 1990's has recovered to a same degree of the growth in the 1940's. As a result of comparing the multiple regression in 3 cases using the air pollution statistics, meteorological statistics and both of them, in addition, it was found that, while both of the air pollution and climatic factors influence on the growth of annual ring, the influence of air pollution is greater than the climate at the stand in the city. 23 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Invasion of moso bamboo into a Japanese cedar plantation affects the chemical composition and humification of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsueh-Ching; Tian, Guanglong; Chiu, Chih-Yu

    2016-08-01

    Bamboo, which has dense culms and root rhizome systems, can alter soil properties when it invades adjacent forests. Therefore, this study investigated whether bamboo invasions can cause changes in soil organic matter (SOM) composition and soil humification. We combined solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy and chemical analysis to examine the SOM in a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and adjacent bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) plantation. Bamboo reduced soil organic C (SOC) content, compared to the cedar plantation. The value of ∆logK (ratio of absorbance of humic acids at 400 and 600 nm) was cedar > transition zone > bamboo soils. Our results indicated that bamboo increased SOM humification, which could be due to the fast decomposition of bamboo litter with the high labile C. Furthermore, intensive management in the bamboo plantation could enhance the humification as well. Overall, litter type can control an ecosystem’s SOC nature, as reflected by the finding that higher labile C in bamboo litter contributed the higher ratios of labile C to SOC and lower ratios of recalcitrant C to SOC in bamboo soils compared with cedar soils. The invasion of bamboo into the Japanese cedar plantation accelerated the degradation of SOM.

  15. Estimation of lead sources in a Japanese cedar ecosystem using stable isotope analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Yuko [Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Matsunosato 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8687 (Japan)]. E-mail: yuko106@ffpri.affrc.go.jp; Noguchi, Kyotaro [Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Matsunosato 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8687 (Japan); Takahashi, Masamichi [Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Matsunosato 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8687 (Japan); Okamoto, Toru [Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Matsunosato 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8687 (Japan); Yoshinaga, Shuichiro [Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Matsunosato 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8687 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    Anthropogenic Pb affects the environment worldwide. To understand its effect on forest ecosystem, Pb isotope ratios were determined in precipitation, various components of vegetation, the forest floor, soil and parent material in a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) forest stand. The average {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratio in bulk precipitation was 1.14 {+-} 0.01 (mean {+-} SD), whereas that in the subsoil (20-130 cm) was 1.18 {+-} 0.01. Intermediate ratios ranging from 1.15 to 1.16 were observed in the vegetation, the forest floor, and the surface soil (0-10 cm). Using the {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios, the contribution of anthropogenic sources to Pb accumulated in the forest were estimated by the simple binary mixing model. Sixty-two percent of the Pb in the forest floor, 71% in the vegetation, and 55% in the surface soil (0-10 cm) originated from anthropogenic sources, but only 16% in the sub-surface soil (10-20 cm) was anthropogenic. These results suggest that internal Pb cycling occurs mainly between surface soil and vegetation in a Japanese cedar ecosystem, and that anthropogenic Pb strongly influences Pb cycling. Although the Japanese cedar ecosystem has a shallow forest floor, very little atmospherically derived Pb migrated downward over 10 cm in depth.

  16. Determining Accuracy of Thermal Dissipation Methods-based Sap Flux in Japanese Cedar Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Man-Ping; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Laplace, Sophie; Lin, Song-Jin; Kume, Tomonori

    2017-04-01

    Thermal dissipation method, one kind of sap flux measurement method that can estimate individual tree transpiration, have been widely used because of its low cost and uncomplicated operation. Although thermal dissipation method is widespread, the accuracy of this method is doubted recently because some tree species materials in previous studies were not suitable for its empirical formula from Granier due to difference of wood characteristics. In Taiwan, Cryptomeria japonica (Japanese cedar) is one of the dominant species in mountainous area, quantifying the transpiration of Japanese cedar trees is indispensable to understand water cycling there. However, no one have tested the accuracy of thermal dissipation methods-based sap flux for Japanese cedar trees in Taiwan. Thus, in this study we conducted calibration experiment using twelve Japanese cedar stem segments from six trees to investigate the accuracy of thermal dissipation methods-based sap flux in Japanese cedar trees in Taiwan. By pumping water from segment bottom to top and inserting probes into segments to collect data simultaneously, we compared sap flux densities calculated from real water uptakes (Fd_actual) and empirical formula (Fd_Granier). Exact sapwood area and sapwood depth of each sample were obtained from dying segment with safranin stain solution. Our results showed that Fd_Granier underestimated 39 % of Fd_actual across sap flux densities ranging from 10 to 150 (cm3m-2s-1); while applying sapwood depth corrected formula from Clearwater, Fd_Granier became accurately that only underestimated 0.01 % of Fd_actual. However, when sap flux densities ranging from 10 to 50 (cm3m-2s-1)which is similar with the field data of Japanese cedar trees in a mountainous area of Taiwan, Fd_Granier underestimated 51 % of Fd_actual, and underestimated 26 % with applying Clearwater sapwood depth corrected formula. These results suggested sapwood depth significantly impacted on the accuracy of thermal dissipation

  17. Recombinant Fusion Allergens, Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 from Japanese Cedar Pollen, Conjugated with Polyethylene Glycol Potentiate the Attenuation of Cry j 1-Specific IgE Production in Cry j 1-Sensitized Mice and Japanese Cedar Pollen Allergen-Sensitized Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Takashi; Fujinami, Koji; Ishikawa, Ryosuke; Tateno, Minoru; Tahara, Yoshio; Okumura, Yasushi; Ohta, Hisashi; Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollinosis is the most prevalent seasonal rhinitis in Japan. A standardized Japanese cedar pollen extract (CPE) containing 1.5-4.2 μg of Cry j 1 is currently the highest-concentration extract available for allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) against this pollinosis. Therefore, we developed a PEGylated fusion protein as a more effective SIT vaccine against Japanese cedar pollinosis. The fusion protein of major allergens for Japanese cedar pollen, Cry j 1 and Cry j 2, was expressed in Escherichia coli and conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The purified PEGylated Cry j 1/2 fusion protein (PEG-fusion) was subcutaneously injected four times into Cry j 1- sensitized mice and CPE-sensitized monkeys. The mice were then subcutaneously challenged with Cry j 1 and serum levels of Cry j 1-specific immunoglobulin, and the proliferation and cytokine production of splenocytes were analyzed. The monkeys were intranasally challenged with CPE and analyzed for Cry j 1-specific immunoglobulin levels in plasma. Cry j 1-specific IgE was significantly attenuated in the PEG-fusion-treated group after Cry j 1-challenge and Cry j 1-specific IgG was significantly increased following PEG-fusion treatment in mice and monkeys. Proliferation and Th2-type cytokine production in splenocytes stimulated with Cry j 1 were also reduced in PEG-fusion-treated mice. IL10 and IL2 production were reduced, but not significantly, while IFN-x03B3; was significantly increased in the PEG-fusion-treated group. A high-dose injection of PEG-fusion appears to be a valid candidate for a safer and more effective vaccine than the conventional SIT extract for Japanese cedar pollinosis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Uptake and translocation of radiocesium in cedar leaves following the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikiori, Tatsuhiro [Center for Regional Environment Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Watanabe, Mirai, E-mail: watanabe.mirai@nies.go.jp [Center for Regional Environment Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Koshikawa, Masami K.; Takamatsu, Takejiro; Ishii, Yumiko; Ito, Shoko [Center for Regional Environment Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Takenaka, Akio [Center for Environmental Biology and Ecosystem Studies, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Watanabe, Keiji [Center for Regional Environment Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Center for Environmental Science in Saitama, 914 Kamitanadare, Kazo, Saitama 347-0115 (Japan); Hayashi, Seiji [Center for Regional Environment Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Cryptomeria japonica trees in the area surrounding Fukushima, Japan, intercepted {sup 137}Cs present in atmospheric deposits soon after the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011. To study the uptake and translocation of {sup 137}Cs in C. japonica leaves, we analyzed activity concentrations of {sup 137}Cs and the concentration ratios of {sup 137}Cs to {sup 133}Cs ({sup 137}Cs/{sup 133}Cs) in old and new leaves of C. japonica collected from a forest on Mount Tsukuba between 9 and 15 months after the accident. Both isotopes were also analyzed in throughfall, bulk precipitation and soil extracts. Water of atmospheric and soil origin were used as proxies for deciphering the absorption from leaf surfaces and root systems, respectively. Results indicate that 20–40% of foliar {sup 137}Cs existed inside the leaf, while 60–80% adhered to the leaf surface. The {sup 137}Cs/{sup 133}Cs ratios inside leaves that had sprouted before the accident were considerably higher than that of the soil extract and lower than that of throughfall and bulk precipitation. Additionally, more than 80% of {sup 137}Cs in throughfall and bulk precipitation was present in the dissolved form, which is available for foliar uptake, indicating that a portion of the {sup 137}Cs inside old leaves was presumably absorbed from the leaf surface. New leaves that sprouted after the accident had similar {sup 137}Cs/{sup 133}Cs ratios to that of the old leaves, suggesting that internal {sup 137}Cs was translocated from old to new leaves. For 17 species of woody plants other than C. japonica, new leaves that sprouted after the accident also contained {sup 137}Cs, and their {sup 137}Cs/{sup 133}Cs ratios were equal to or higher than that of the soil extract. These results suggested that foliar uptake and further translocation of {sup 137}Cs is an important vector of contamination in various tree species during or just after radioactive fallout. - Highlights: • {sup 137}Cs was absorbed into cedar leaves

  19. Impregnation of preservative and fire retardants into Japanese cedar lumber by passive impregnation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Nazrul Islam

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper azole type B (CAz-B preservative and polyphosphatic carbamate (PPC fire retardants were impregnated in succession into green (97% MC and kiln-dried (18% MC Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica (L.f. D.Don lumber by the passive impregnation method to prolong the period of lumber use by increasing its resistance to fire and biological degradation. Lumber was dried with a kiln or by air-drying. Total chemical retention, penetration, leaching, decay resistance (JIS K 1571, and fire retardancy (ISO 834-1 standard, 20 minutes tests were performed according to the mentioned standards. Preservative retention was higher in the green lumber (4.97 kg/m3 compared with the kiln-dried (4.88 kg/m3 lumber. However, fire retardant retention was similar for both lumber types (107 and 111 kg/m3. Leaching was higher in kiln-dried lumber (21.8% compared to air-dried lumber (14.4%, although there were no significant differences in the decay resistance test between these two lumber types. The fire performance of both lumber types was similar in the fire resistance test. Therefore, the passive impregnation method can be used effectively for impregnation of both preservatives and fire retardants into wood.

  20. Cedar leaf oil poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedar leaf oil is made from some types of cedar trees. Cedar leaf oil poisoning occurs when someone swallows this substance. ... The substance in cedar leaf oil that can be harmful is thujone (a hydrocarbon).

  1. CEDAR 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriwether, John W., Jr.; Killeen, Timothy

    The third workshop session of the National Science Foundation's Coupling Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) initiative took place at the National Bureau of Standards and National Center for Atmospheric Research institutions in Boulder, Colo., June 6-10, and was attended by 155 participants, including about 40 graduate students.The CEDAR initiative represents the fruit of many years of efforts by the aeronomy community and NSF to modernize the techniques used to understand the many processes of the upper atmosphere both theoretically and experimentally. Since the beginning of this initiative (under the old name of Ground-Based Optical Aeronomy) with a summer meeting in Logan, Utah, in 1983, there has been a workshop meeting every summer. The 1988 CEDAR meeting, in particular, reflected the growing maturity of the CEDAR initiative. The meeting was well attended, and, in general, we found fewer participants drawn to the meeting just by curiosity and more who came because they expected the workshop activities would be time well spent.

  2. Characterization of sulfur deposition over the period of industrialization in Japan using sulfur isotope ratio in Japanese cedar tree rings taken from stumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takuya; Tayasu, Ichiro; Takenaka, Chisato

    2015-07-01

    We characterized the sulfur deposition history over the period of industrialization in Japan based on the sulfur isotope ratio (δ(34)S) in tree rings of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) stumps. We analyzed and compared δ(34)S values in the rings from two types of disk samples from 170-year-old stumps that had been cut 5 years earlier (older forest stand) and from 40-year-old living trees (younger forest stand) in order to confirm the validity of using stump disks for δ(34)S analysis. No differences in δ(34)S values by age were found between the sample types, indicating that stump disks can be used for δ(34)S analysis. The δ(34)S profile in tree rings was significantly correlated with anthropogenic SO2 emissions in Japan (r = -0.76, p tree rings serve as a record of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. In addition, the values did not change largely from pre-industrialization to the 1940s (+4.2 to +6.1‰). The values before the 1940s are expected to reflect the background sulfur conditions in Japan and, thus, disks containing rings formed before the 1940s contain information about the natural environmental sulfur, which is useful for biogeochemical studies.

  3. Concentrated protein body product derived from rice endosperm as an oral tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy--a new mucosal vaccine formulation against Japanese cedar pollen allergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhya Wakasa

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation.

  4. Effect of Ca/Al molar ratio on the growth of Cryptomeria japonica, Chamaecyparis obtusa and Chamaecyparis pisifera grown in nutrient solution culture and their critical point; Suiko saibai jokenka ni okeru sugi, hinoki, sawara no seiiku ni oyobosu Ca/Al no eikyo to critical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Y. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Umezawa, T.; Murakoshi, M. [Bio-Environment Research, Co. Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1998-11-10

    A solution culture is experimented for the investigation of the effect of Ca/Al on the growth of Sugi (cryptomeria), Hinoki (cypress), and Sakura (cherry tree), and of CP (critical point for the emergence of the effect of Al). The solution culture is performed in water under specified conditions, the harvest is assortedly collected after 14 weeks, and is measured for dried weight. Sugi and Hinoki wither and die at an Al concentration of 5mM, but not at an Al concentration of 1mM or less. The concentration of Ca fails to exert any significant influence. At the Al concentration of 5mM, the trees are inhibited from growing in height or trunk diameter, but not affected by Ca concentration. The dried weight shares the same trend. The dried weight begins to decrease when the mol concentration ratio of Ca/Al or (K+Ca+Mg)/Al lowers to four or less. It may be concluded that conifers are inhibited from growing when the Al concentration is 2mM or higher, Ca/Al is one or lower, or (K+Ca+Mg)/Al is five or lower. If the point where growth is inhibited by 20% or 50% is chosen as the reference point, the CP of (K+Ca+Mg)/Al will be 1 or 0.5, respectively. This means that a different reference point yields a different value. There is an experimental outcome stating that growth is not affected even when this value is 0.4 in the case of soil exposed to artificial acid rain. 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Changes in plant-soil feedback regulate ecosystem nitrogen retention during stand development of Japanese cedar plantation after clear-cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, K.; Tateno, R.; Katsuyama, M.; Tokuchi, N.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have documented the impacts of forest clear-cutting on nitrogen (N) cycling and retention, and most of them reported a large loss of N (mainly NO3--N) after cutting. However, the recovery process of N dynamics after clear-cutting and subsequent afforestation has been unclear. It is well known that internal N cycling creates ecosystem feedback between plant productivity (i.e. N uptake rate and nitrogen use efficiency) and soil N availability (i.e. soil N transformation rate and microorganism activities). Therefore, we focused on the relationship between hydrological N loss and internal N cycling during development of monoculture Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) plantation stands. In our study site, stand age of planted trees is even within a watershed, but is various among watersheds. The use of these watersheds as chronosequence can help to isolate the effects of stand development processes after clear-cutting. We aimed to elucidate the factors regulating ecosystem N retention during forest development after clear-cutting. Our study site is located in Nara Prefecture, central Japan, which received 2,900 mm precipitation in annual means and 13 - 14 kg N ha-1 year-1 as mean bulk N deposition (2004-2007). Stream NO3- concentration, annual N export, litterfall, plant N uptake, soil N availability and transformation rates, carbon (C) and N content in forest-floor, mineral soil, and soil microbial biomass were examined in 1-, 6-, 17-, 32-, 43,- and 90-year-old-stand watersheds. After clear-cutting, early growth of Japanese cedar seedlings can be supported by higher soil N availability, resulting from enhanced decomposition processes by canopy opening. Thereafter in the 32-year-old stand, we found that the crucial increase in newly supplied litterfall on the forest floor can enhance N immobilization by C-limited soil microbes and decrease soil N availability, which can trigger a decline in net primary production and the increase in nitrogen use

  6. Azimuthal and radial variations in sap flux density and effects on stand-scale transpiration estimates in a Japanese cedar forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Yoshinori; Tsuruta, Kenji; Ogura, Akira; Noto, Fumikazu; Komatsu, Hikaru; Otsuki, Kyoichi; Maruyama, Toshisuke

    2013-05-01

    Understanding radial and azimuthal variation, and tree-to-tree variation, in sap flux density (Fd) as sources of uncertainty is important for estimating transpiration using sap flow techniques. In a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don.) forest, Fd was measured at several depths and aspects for 18 trees, using heat dissipation (Granier-type) sensors. We observed considerable azimuthal variation in Fd. The coefficient of variation (CV) calculated from Fd at a depth of 0-20 mm (Fd1) and Fd at a depth of 20-40 mm (Fd2) ranged from 6.7 to 37.6% (mean = 28.3%) and from 19.6 to 62.5% (mean = 34.6%) for the -azimuthal directions. Fd at the north aspect averaged for nine trees, for which azimuthal measurements were made, was -obviously smaller than Fd at the other three aspects (i.e., west, south and east) averaged for the nine trees. Fd1 averaged for the nine trees was significantly larger than Fd2 averaged for the nine trees. The error for stand-scale transpiration (E) estimates caused by ignoring the azimuthal variation was larger than that caused by ignoring the radial variation. The error caused by ignoring tree-to-tree variation was larger than that caused by ignoring both radial and azimuthal variations. Thus, tree-to-tree variation in Fd would be more important than both radial and azimuthal variations in Fd for E estimation. However, Fd for each tree should not be measured at a consistent aspect but should be measured at various aspects to make accurate E estimates and to avoid a risk of error caused by the relationship of Fd to aspect.

  7. The first CEDAR counter

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The first differential Cerenkov counter with chromatic corrections (called CEDAR) successfully tested at the PS in July 75. These counters were used in the SPS hadronic beams for particle identification. Some of the eight photomultipliers can be seen: they receive the light reflected back through the annular diaphragm. René Maleyran stands on the left.

  8. Biomass carbon accumulation in aging Japanese cedar plantations in Xitou, central Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsin; Hung, Chih-Yu; Chen, Chiou-Peng; Pei, Chuang-Wun

    2013-12-01

    Japanese cedar (Chrytomeria japonica D. Don) is an important plantation species in Taiwan and represents 10% of total plantation area. It was first introduced in 1910 and widely planted in the northern and central mountainous areas of Taiwan. However, a change in forest management from exotic species to native species in 1980 had resulted in few new Japanese cedar plantations being established. Most Japanese cedar plantations are now between 30 and 50 years old and reaching their rotation period. It is of interest to know whether these plantations could be viable for future carbon sequestration through the accumulations of stand carbon stocks. Twelve even-aged Japanese cedar stands along a stand age gradient from 37 to 93 years were selected in Xitou of central Taiwan. The study aims were to investigate the basic stand characteristics and biomass carbon stock in current Japanese cedar stands, and determine the relationships among stand characteristics, tree biomass carbon, and stand age. Our results indicate that existing Japanese cedar plantations are still developing and their live tree biomass carbon continues to accumulate. At stands with a stand age of 90 years, tree density, canopy height, mean diameter at breast height, basal area, and live tree biomass carbon stocks reach to nearly 430 tree ha(-1), 27 m, 48 cm, 82 m(2) ha(-1) and 300 Mg C ha(-1), respectively. Therefore, with no harvesting, current Japanese cedar plantations provide a carbon sink by storing carbon in tree biomass.

  9. Inferring the chemical form of {sup 137}Cs deposited by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident by measuring {sup 137}Cs incorporated into needle leaves and male cones of Japanese cedar trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanasashi, Tsutomu, E-mail: kanasashi.tsutomu@g.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Takenaka, Chisato [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Sugiura, Yuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 765-1 Funaishikawa, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    We hypothesized that the water-soluble (ionic) and water-insoluble (stable) radiocesium from the initial fallout of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident was distributed in various proportions in the surrounding areas and that this distribution was reflected in the trees that suffered deposition from the initial fallout. This study attempted to evaluate local variations in the chemical form of {sup 137}Cs derived from the initial fallout of the FDNPP accident and whether its chemical form affected the radiocesium concentration in the tissues currently growing in trees, even after the initial fallout ceased. For these estimations, the ratio between the {sup 137}Cs concentration in Cryptomeria japonica needle leaves in the tree crown, which existed before the FDNPP accident and subsequently directly exposed to the initial fallout ({sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accident} {sub N}), and the amount of {sup 137}Cs in the initial fallout itself ({sup 137}Cs{sub fallout}) was determined ({sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accident} {sub N}/{sup 137}Cs{sub fallout}) at 66 sites. In addition, the {sup 137}Cs ratios between the male cones produced in 2012 ({sup 137}Cs{sub male} {sub cone}) and needle leaves that had elongated in the spring of 2011 ({sup 137}Cs{sub 2011N}) was determined at 82 sites ({sup 137}Cs{sub male} {sub cone}/{sup 137} Cs{sub 2011N}). Most of the sites with lower {sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accident} {sub N}/{sup 137}Cs{sub fallout} ratios were distributed in eastern Fukushima, relatively close to the Pacific Ocean coastline. Lower {sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accidentN}/{sup 137}Cs{sub fallout} and higher {sup 137}Cs{sub malecone}/{sup 137}Cs{sub 2011N} were found to be associated with higher proportions of {sup 137}Cs in ionic forms. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis, and likely reflect regional variations in the chemical form of the deposited radiocesium. - Highlights: • Study of spatial variation of ionic and stable {sup 137}Cs in the initial

  10. Present situation of cedar pollinosis in Japan and its immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Yamamoto, Heizaburo; Yonekura, Syuji; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki

    2009-06-01

    Recent observations have suggested significant worldwide increase in the prevalence of allergic rhinitis and cedar pollinosis. In Japan, Japanese cedar (Cryptometria japonica) and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) pollens are considered to be the major unique allergens and their extent of dispersal is quite large, travelling more than 100km and thus causing serious pollinosis. Cedar pollinosis is a typical type 1 allergic disease by an adaptive immune response that occurs through the induction of allergen-specific effector T cells from naïve T cells. We examined the number of Japanese cedar pollen specific memory Th cells in the peripheral blood of the patients and found that the cedar pollen specific IL-4-producing Th2 memory cells increased during the pollen season and decreased during the off-season. However, more than 60% of the cedar-specific memory Th2 cells survived up to 8 months after the pollen season. Natural killer T(NKT) cells represent a unique lymphocyte subpopulation and their activity is not restricted to MHC antigens. NKT cells play an important role in innate immunity, however, the participation in development of allergic rhinitis could not be clarified.

  11. Present Situation of Cedar Pollinosis in Japan and its Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Okamoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations have suggested significant worldwide increase in the prevalence of allergic rhinitis and cedar pollinosis. In Japan, Japanese cedar (Cryptometria japonica and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa pollens are considered to be the major unique allergens and their extent of dispersal is quite large, travelling more than 100 km and thus causing serious pollinosis. Cedar pollinosis is a typical type 1 allergic disease by an adaptive immune response that occurs through the induction of allergen-specific effector T cells from naive T cells. We examined the number of Japanese cedar pollen specific memory Th cells in the peripheral blood of the patients and found that the cedar pollen specific IL-4-producing Th2 memory cells increased during the pollen season and decreased during the off-season. However, more than 60% of the cedar-specific memory Th2 cells survived up to 8 months after the pollen season. Natural killer T(NKT cells represent a unique lymphocyte subpopulation and their activity is not restricted to MHC antigens. NKT cells play an important role in innate immunity, however, the participation in development of allergic rhinitis could not be clarified.

  12. Elemental dynamics of a Japanese watershed with sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) and hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) plantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohrui, K. [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture; Mitchell, M.J. [State Univ. of New York, Syracuse, NY (United States). Coll. of Environmental Science and Forestry

    1996-12-01

    The various factors affecting elemental losses in drainage waters of a forest ecosystem were studied. Pools and fluxes of elements K, Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, N, and S in a small forested watershed of sugi and hinoki plantations in Japan, were quantified. Roles of the components of the biogeochemical cycle in contributing to elemental loss or retention were evaluated. The high concentration of foliar biomass and elemental contents in sugi and hinoki stands were found to contribute to increases of K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} and retention of H{sup +} (increase of pH) as water passed through the canopy. The weathering and N-mineralization and nitrification rates of soils were also quantified. 78 refs., 8 tabs., 1 fig.

  13. Uptake and translocation of radiocesium in cedar leaves following the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikiori, Tatsuhiro; Watanabe, Mirai; Koshikawa, Masami K; Takamatsu, Takejiro; Ishii, Yumiko; Ito, Shoko; Takenaka, Akio; Watanabe, Keiji; Hayashi, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Cryptomeria japonica trees in the area surrounding Fukushima, Japan, intercepted (137)Cs present in atmospheric deposits soon after the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011. To study the uptake and translocation of (137)Cs in C. japonica leaves, we analyzed activity concentrations of (137)Cs and the concentration ratios of (137)Cs to (133)Cs ((137)Cs/(133)Cs) in old and new leaves of C. japonica collected from a forest on Mount Tsukuba between 9 and 15 months after the accident. Both isotopes were also analyzed in throughfall, bulk precipitation and soil extracts. Water of atmospheric and soil origin were used as proxies for deciphering the absorption from leaf surfaces and root systems, respectively. Results indicate that 20-40% of foliar (137)Cs existed inside the leaf, while 60-80% adhered to the leaf surface. The (137)Cs/(133)Cs ratios inside leaves that had sprouted before the accident were considerably higher than that of the soil extract and lower than that of throughfall and bulk precipitation. Additionally, more than 80% of (137)Cs in throughfall and bulk precipitation was present in the dissolved form, which is available for foliar uptake, indicating that a portion of the (137)Cs inside old leaves was presumably absorbed from the leaf surface. New leaves that sprouted after the accident had similar (137)Cs/(133)Cs ratios to that of the old leaves, suggesting that internal (137)Cs was translocated from old to new leaves. For 17 species of woody plants other than C. japonica, new leaves that sprouted after the accident also contained (137)Cs, and their (137)Cs/(133)Cs ratios were equal to or higher than that of the soil extract. These results suggested that foliar uptake and further translocation of (137)Cs is an important vector of contamination in various tree species during or just after radioactive fallout.

  14. Erstnachweis von Taiwania, Cryptomeria und Liquidambar aus dem Bitterfelder und Baltischen Bernstein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jähnichen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Aus dem untermiozänen Bernstein von Bitterfeld (Sachsen-Anhalt werden erstmalig ein strukturzeigender Zweig von Taiwania schaeferi, ein isoliertes Nadel-Fragment von Cryptomeria sp. sowie ein Fruchtstand von Liquidambar europaea beschrieben. Außerdem muß “Widdringtonites oblongifolius” (Goeppert & Menge Caspary & Klebs 1906/07 pro parte aus dem obereozänen Baltischen Bernstein nach morphologisch-anatomischen Merkmalskomplexen ebenfalls zu Taiwania schaeferi gestellt werden. “Enormicutis eoconferta” — aff. Cryptomeria spec. (Schneider 1986 aus der obereozänen Braunkohle von Nordwestsachsen muß nach morphologisch-anatomischen Details zu Athrotaxis couttsiae (Heer Gardner revidiert werden. First record of Taiwania, Cryptomeria and Liquidambar from Bitterfeld and Baltic amber A structure-bearing twig of Taiwania schaeferi, an isolated needle-fragment of Cryptomeria spec. as also an aggregate fruit of Liquidambar europaea are firstly described from the Lower Miocene amber of Bitterfeld (Saxony-Anhalt. Moreover “Widdringtonites oblongifolius” (Goeppert & Menge Caspary & Klebs 1906/07 p.p. from the Upper Eocene Baltic amber after morphological-anatomical features must be also assigned to Taiwania schaeferi. “Enormicutis eoconferta” — aff. Cryptomeria sp. (Schneider 1986 from the Upper Eocene brown-coal of North Western Saxony after morphological-anatomical details must be revised to Athrotaxis couttsiae (Heer Gardner. doi:10.1002/mmng.19980010112

  15. Comparative Analysis of the Chloroplast Genomic Information of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb. Hook with Sibling Species from the Genera Cryptomeria D. Don, Taiwania Hayata, and Calocedrus Kurz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb. Hook is an important coniferous tree species for timber production, which accounts for ~40% of log supply from plantations in southern China. Chloroplast genetic engineering is an exciting field to engineer several valuable tree traits. In this study, we revisited the published complete Chinese fir (NC_021437 and four other coniferous species chloroplast genome sequence in Taxodiaceae. Comparison of their chloroplast genomes revealed three unique inversions found in the downstream of the gene clusters and evolutionary divergence were found, although overall the chloroplast genomic structure of the Cupressaceae linage was conserved. We also investigated the phylogenetic position of Chinese fir among conifers by examining gene functions, selection forces, substitution rates, and the full chloroplast genome sequence. Consistent with previous molecular systematics analysis, the results provided a well-supported phylogeny framework for the Cupressaceae that strongly confirms the “basal” position of Cunninghamia lanceolata. The structure of the Cunninghamia lanceolata chloroplast genome showed a partial lack of one IR copy, rearrangements clearly occurred and slight evolutionary divergence appeared among the cp genome of C. lanceolata, Taiwania cryptomerioides, Taiwania flousiana, Calocedrus formosana and Cryptomeria japonica. The information from sequence divergence and length variation of genes could be further considered for bioengineering research.

  16. Comparative Analysis of the Chloroplast Genomic Information of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook with Sibling Species from the Genera Cryptomeria D. Don, Taiwania Hayata, and Calocedrus Kurz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weiwei; Chen, Jinhui; Hao, Zhaodong; Shi, Jisen

    2016-07-07

    Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook) is an important coniferous tree species for timber production, which accounts for ~40% of log supply from plantations in southern China. Chloroplast genetic engineering is an exciting field to engineer several valuable tree traits. In this study, we revisited the published complete Chinese fir (NC_021437) and four other coniferous species chloroplast genome sequence in Taxodiaceae. Comparison of their chloroplast genomes revealed three unique inversions found in the downstream of the gene clusters and evolutionary divergence were found, although overall the chloroplast genomic structure of the Cupressaceae linage was conserved. We also investigated the phylogenetic position of Chinese fir among conifers by examining gene functions, selection forces, substitution rates, and the full chloroplast genome sequence. Consistent with previous molecular systematics analysis, the results provided a well-supported phylogeny framework for the Cupressaceae that strongly confirms the "basal" position of Cunninghamia lanceolata. The structure of the Cunninghamia lanceolata chloroplast genome showed a partial lack of one IR copy, rearrangements clearly occurred and slight evolutionary divergence appeared among the cp genome of C. lanceolata, Taiwania cryptomerioides, Taiwania flousiana, Calocedrus formosana and Cryptomeria japonica. The information from sequence divergence and length variation of genes could be further considered for bioengineering research.

  17. Spectroscopic analysis of carbonization behavior of wood, cellulose and lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishimaru, Kengo; Hata, Toshimitsu; Bronsveld, Paul; Meier, Dietrich; Imamura, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The surface and bulk chemistry of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria Japonica), cotton cellulose and lignin samples carbonized at 500-1,000 degrees C was investigated by elemental analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman spectrometry.

  18. Characterization of sp(2)- and sp(3)-bonded carbon in wood charcoal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishimaru, Kengo; Hata, Toshimitsu; Bronsveld, Paul; Nishizawa, Takashi; Imamura, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) preheated at 700 degrees C was subsequently heated to 1800 degrees C and characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The degree of disorder of carbon crystallites and the amount of amorphous phase decreased considerably

  19. Treatment of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica D.) sapwood with aqueous solution of acetic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUBao-wang; DUGuang-hua; MATSUITakanao; MATSUSHITAYoh-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Sugi sapwood samples were processed with aqueous solution of acetic acid in order to find the response of the weight of sugi sapwood and the treatment of aqueous solution of acetic acid. The result showed that loss of weight for the treated sugisapwood was about equal to yield of extracts from sugi sapwood, and increased with the increment of the concentration of aqueous solution of acetic acid. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra changes of the treated sugi wood and extracts from sugi sapwood were analyzed by FT-IR spectroscopic technique. Increasing tendency of absorption intensities of the stretching vibration at 3 400 cm-1 of hydroxyl group (OH) and C=C in lignin stretching vibration at 1510 cm-1 of benzene ring inlignin were observed from FT-IR of the treated sugi sapwood. From FT-IR spectra of extracts from sugi sapwood by aqueoussolution of acetic acid, the dissolution of lignin was observed during the treatment with 30% acetic acid solution aqueous.

  20. Selected Water-Quality Data from the Cedar River and Cedar Rapids Well Fields, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1999-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littin, Gregory R.; Schnoebelen, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    The Cedar River alluvial aquifer is the primary source of municipal water in the Cedar Rapids, Iowa area. Municipal wells are completed in the alluvial aquifer at approximately 40 to 80 feet deep. The City of Cedar Rapids and the U.S. Geological Survey have been conducting a cooperative study of the groundwater-flow system and water quality near the well fields since 1992. Previous cooperative studies between the City of Cedar Rapids and the U.S. Geological Survey have documented hydrologic and water-quality data, geochemistry, and groundwater models. Water-quality samples were collected for studies involving well field monitoring, trends, source-water protection, groundwater geochemistry, evaluation of surface and ground-water interaction, assessment of pesticides in groundwater and surface water, and to evaluate water quality near a wetland area in the Seminole well field. Typical water-quality analyses included major ions (boron, bromide, calcium, chloride, fluoride, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, silica, sodium, and sulfate), nutrients (ammonia as nitrogen, nitrite as nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, and orthophosphate as phosphorus), dissolved organic carbon, and selected pesticides including two degradates of the herbicide atrazine. In addition, two synoptic samplings included analyses of additional pesticide degradates in water samples. Physical field parameters (alkalinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance and water temperature) were recorded with each water sample collected. This report presents the results of water quality data-collection activities from January 1999 through December 2005. Methods of data collection, quality-assurance samples, water-quality analyses, and statistical summaries are presented. Data include the results of water-quality analyses from quarterly and synoptic sampling from monitoring wells, municipal wells, and the Cedar River.

  1. Digital Preservation and the Cedars Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kelly

    1998-01-01

    Defines and discusses strategies for digital preservation. Describes the United Kingdom's CURL (Consortium of University Research Libraries) exemplars in digital archives project "Cedars" led by the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, and Leeds to address strategic, methodological, and practical issues, and to provide guidance in best…

  2. 33 CFR 110.83a - Cedar Point, Sandusky, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cedar Point, Sandusky, Ohio. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.83a Cedar Point, Sandusky, Ohio. The water area enclosed by the break wall beginning at latitude 41°28′13″ N., longitude 82°40′39″ W.;...

  3. A tale of two cedars – International symposium on western redcedar and yellow-cedar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constance Harrington

    2010-01-01

    From May 24-28, 2010, an international symposium on western redcedar (Thuja plicata) and yellowcedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis [syn., Chamaecyparis nootkatensis]) was held at the University of Victoria on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. The symposium was entitled “A Tale of Two Cedars” and...

  4. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Japanese Cedar Pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiro Okubo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of pollinosis caused by cedar pollen has increased by 10% these ten years of 26.5% in the investigation of 2008 in Japan. The pharmacotherapy is a main treatment tool for pollinosis, and the surgical treatment is not acknowledged to the treatment of pollinosis internationally. Moreover, allergen immunotherapy enters a special treatment method, and is an important therapeutic procedure. The allergen immunotherapy is unique for having possibility of curing allergen specific allergic diseases. However the side effect of allergen subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT, such as anaphylaxis is kept at a distance in a medical situation in Japan. Then, a sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT that was safer than it, developed in Europe for pollinosis induced by grass or ragweed, but not in Japan. As a result, the effect of SLIT was proven in the cedar pollinosis in Japan as high level evidence. A whole body immunity induction is thought in the appearance of the effect, and, in addition, it is necessary to be going to be cleared the accurate mechanism of the effect in the future. Moreover, the development of a special SLIT and the import of an overseas product are needed in Japan.

  5. Examination of edge effects in a Cryptomeria fortunei plantation in Zhougong Mountain, western Sichuan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyi Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate edge effects on community structure, species composition and diversity in an artificial forest, research was conducted on Zhougong Mountain, a forest park in western Sichuan, and a large fragmented plantation of Cryptomeria fortunei was selected as the sample plot. The average DBH (diameter at breast height, average height, average density, richness index (D and Shannon-Wiener index (H were used to evaluate edge effects. Based on a field survey, 5 transects (width = 10 m were established from the edge to interior forest (gradient 1 to gradient 5, and 4 small plots (10 m × 10 m were chosen in each transect using a random sampling method. Results showed that 111 species, belonging to 96 genera and 54 families were recorded in 20 small plots with a total area of 2,000 m2. The following results were also found in this investigation: (1 The number of species decreased away from the edge to forest interior. (2 In terms of community structure, a decrease of average DBH was found in the tree layer with the increase of edge gradients. Average density followed the opposite pattern and no significant differences were found in average height. In the shrub layer, average density decreased with the increase of edge gradients and no significant differences were found in average height. Average density and height both decreased from the edge to interior forest in the herb layer. (3 Based on the analysis of species diversity, richness index (D and Shannon-Wiener index (H of the plantation, decreased values were generally found with an increase of edge gradients, and were much more obvious in the shrub and herb layer. Moreover, the number of common species and Sørensen’s similarity coefficient between edge gradients in the forest interior and edge 1 both showed a decreasing trend from the edge to interior forest. (4 Based on a comprehensive analysis, a clear change of community was found between edge 2 and edge 3, indicating that edge effects

  6. Final wilderness proposal : Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a letter from the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife announcing the completion of the wilderness study concerning the Cedar Island National...

  7. Inventory of Atlantic White Cedar Remnant Stands in North Carolina.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This inventory was commissioned by the U.S. Air Force to identify the location and condition of extant remnant Atlantic white cedar groves and stands in North...

  8. Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Cedar Island NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  9. Utilities at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (utilpnt)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents various types of utilities, including water- and power-related utilities, at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. The utilities were...

  10. Isotopes - Recolonization of the Cedar River, WA by Pacific salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of this study is to quantify population, community, and ecosystem level changes as a result of salmon recolonization of the Cedar River, WA above...

  11. Parking Areas at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (prkareas)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This polygon dataset locates the parking areas within Cedar Breaks National Monument. The parking areas were digitized from the 2002 Color aerial photographs and the...

  12. Footprints of Buildings at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (footprints)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/INFO coverage consisting of 10 polygons representing the buildings' footprints at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. The footprints were collected...

  13. Springs at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (allsprgs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 151 points representing spring locations in and surrounding Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. This data originates...

  14. Transportation Signs at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (trspsign)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains the starting point for the collection of transportation signs at Cedar Breaks National Monument. There are over 400 signs (transportation and...

  15. Designated Overlook Areas at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (ovrareas)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains three polygons that represent areas of designated overlooks at Cedar Breaks National Monument. Note: Point Supreme needs an FMSS number - it...

  16. Service Areas at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (srvcarea)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains service areas at Cedar Breaks National Monument. The service areas were collected by a Trimble GeoXT GPS unit and post processed for...

  17. Lower Suwannee & Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuges: Comprehensive Conservation Plans

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Cedar Keys NWR and Lower Suwannee NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  18. Diet - Recolonization of the Cedar River, WA by Pacific salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of this study is to quantify population, community, and ecosystem level changes as a result of salmon recolonization of the Cedar River, WA above...

  19. Letter to President [Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a letter from the Assistant Secretary of the Interior to the President regarding the establishment of the Cedar Island Wilderness area. The letter...

  20. Cedar River Chinook genotypes - Estimate relative reproductive success of hatchery and wild fall Chinook salmon in the Cedar River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We are using genetic pedigree information to estimate the reproductive success of hatchery and wild fall-run Chinook salmon spawning in the Cedar River, Washington....

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-11-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-11-0000 dbj|BAF31946.1| putative ammonium transporter AMT2 [Cryptomeria japon...ica] dbj|BAF31947.1| putative ammonium transporter AMT2 [Cryptomeria japonica] dbj|BAF31948.1| putative ...ammonium transporter AMT2 [Cryptomeria japonica] dbj|BAF31949.1| putative ammonium transporter AMT2 [Cryptomeria japon...ica] dbj|BAF31950.1| putative ammonium transporter AMT2 [Cryptomeria japon...ica] dbj|BAF31951.1| putative ammonium transporter AMT2 [Cryptomeria japonica] dbj|BAF31952.1| putative a

  2. Components in Wood-vinegar of Sugi ( Cryptomeria Japonica D. Don) Sapwood%柳杉木材边材木醋液中的成分研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏立纲; 鲁保旺; 马英冲; 李中原

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-seven components in wood-vinegar obtained from the carbonization of sugi sapwood were determined by capillary gas chromatography(GC).The results showed that main components in sugi wood-vinegar were methanol,ketones, carboxylic cids,furans,phenols and guaiacols.The methods of solvent extraction and silica gel column chromatography were used to further investigate the unknown components in the wood-vinegar.The chiral levoglucosan(LGA,1,6-anhydroβ-D-glucose) as an unknown component was isolated form sugi wood-vinegar, which was not able to be detected by the capillaryGC. 60.5 g LGA can be separated from 150 mL sugi wood-vinegar.The pathway of the formation of major components in sugiwood-vinegar was also analyzed and discussed.%用毛细管气相色谱法对日本柳杉木材边材炭化得到的木醋液中的37种成分进行定性和定量分析.结果表明,醇类、酮类、羧酸类、呋喃类、苯酚类及愈创苯酚类是其主要成分.用溶剂萃取-硅胶柱层析法进一步分离处理木醋液,纯化出炭化过程中产生的手性脱水内醚糖-左旋葡聚糖(LGA,1,6-脱水-β-D-葡萄糖),但其不能被毛细管气相色谱法检测出.从150 mL木醋液中可分离纯化出60.5 mg LGA.另外,对木醋液中主要成分的生成路线也进行了分析和讨论.

  3. Clinical aspects of Japanese cedar pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Okuda

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCPsis is a major national health problem in Japan. The present review provides an update on information on JCPsis based on clinical data from our research group, through the support of the Department of Health and Welfare (Japanese Government, during the period from 1988 to 1997, because this disease is infrequently documented internationally despite a large number of publications from Japan. The information on JCPsis presented here may be of use in the management of various kinds of pollinosis prevalent in other countries. The prevalence rates of JCPsis vary from district to district and also depend on the age of the subjects, the method of analysis and the year of examination in population. Yet, on an average, the incidence of JCPsis is presumed to be 10-20% in adults and 5-10% in children. The risk factors for sensitization and the onset of symptoms seem to be dependent on the amount of air-borne pollen, the age of school children, hereditary disposition, including human leukocyte antigen type and the high levels of specific IgE in childhood. Because pollen counts also vary depending on many factors, such as the type of pollen samplers used, yearly variations, the number of pollen count stations, the atmospheric temperature and solar radiation in the previous year of the season, accurate predictions of daily and seasonal pollen counts are rather difficult. Commercial crude extracts and purified allergenic substances Cry j I and II correlate well with the skin test and the radioallergosorbent test. Japanese cedar pollen has an allergenic component that is cross-reactive with Japanese cypress. In many patients, the onset of symptoms occurs on the day when the air-borne pollen count is 10/cm2 (the Durham method and, if severe symptoms occur due to intense exposure to pollen, the symptoms will last for a long time despite variations in the pollen count (priming effect. Eye glasses, face masks and keeping windows and

  4. Inventory of Atlantic White-Cedar Remnant Stands in North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report addresses Atlantic white cedar swamp restoration in North Carolina refuges. The ecology, use, and historical distribution of Atlantic white-cedar (AWC)...

  5. 75 FR 68780 - Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... Doc No: 2010-28232] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. RC11-1-000] Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing November 2, 2010. Take notice that on October 27, 2010, Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC (Cedar Creek) filed an appeal with the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  6. Consumer willingness to pay a price premium for standing-dead Alaska yellow-cedar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan

    2004-01-01

    Alaska yellow-cedar has declined in Southeast Alaska over the past 100 years, resulting in half a million acres of dead or dying trees. The natural decay resistance of Alaska yellow-cedar means that many of these trees are still merchantable. However, the topography of Southeast Alaska is such that selectively harvesting Alaska yellow-cedar may often require helicopter...

  7. The management toward an uneven-aged mixed forest in a row-thinned Cryptomeria plantation%柳杉人工林行列疏伐异龄混交林经营研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱志明; 苏声欣; 钟智昕; 唐盛林; 林谦佑

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a Cryptomeria ( Cryptomeria japonica ) plantation which was row-thinned with different thinning regimes at age 24 and under-planted with 4 species:Taiwan yellow false-cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa var. formosana) , Taiwan red false-cypress ( Chamaecyparis formosensis) , Luanta-fir ( Cunninghamia konishii ) and Taiwania ( Taiwania cryptomerioides ) in the thinned areas. After 21 years, the survival rates of under-planting trees revealed significant differences in different planting species ( ranging from 59% in Taiwania to 31% in Luanta-fir) , but not so in different thinning treatments. The DBH and height growths of the under-planting trees also showed significant inter-specific differences, however the effect of different thinning treatments was not significant. The DBH and height growth of Cryptomeria in the reserve strips were significantly higher than that in the control area. However, the volume in the control area was still larger than that in the thinned areas. We also observed a decrease of thinning effect on the periodic annual increments of diameter 13 years after thinning. The volume growth in the thinned areas obviously exceeded that in the control area 7 years after thinning. Besides, due to the serious wind damages occurring in the retained Cryptomeria trees 6 years after thinning, we recommend adopting broader retaining strips ( >20 m) in thinning operations to prevent wind damages. In the investigation of ground-layer vegetation, 97 plant species were recorded, with the Shannon index of diversity reaching 1.78 and the Simpson index of diversity reaching 0.66 . The species richness was averagely lower in the retaining strips and control area than in the thinned areas, suggesting that different thinning treatments would create different environmental conditions in the understory and thus affect the composition and diversity of ground-layer vegetation. In the investigation of natural regeneration trees, 66 species and 2

  8. An integrated approach to salt cedar control and rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt cedar (Tamarix spp.), a small tree native to Central Asia has invaded more than 4.7 million acres in the western United States. Planted in the early 1800s as an ornamental and later for windbreaks and soil stabilization, it escaped cultivation, infesting riparian and adjacent communities. Thre...

  9. The White Cedar of the Dismal Swamp 1923

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a report that discusses the various uses, yields and properties of the White Cedar in the Great Dismal Swamp area in the early 1920s. It also discusses the...

  10. 78 FR 58470 - Television Broadcasting Services; Cedar Rapids, Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Cedar Rapids, Iowa AGENCY: Federal Communications... review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television....

  11. Characterization of Micronutrient Deficiency in Australian Red Cedar (Toona ciliata M. Roem var. australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno da Silva Moretti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Red Cedar presents a great exploitation potential in Brazil, but works about the nutrient requirements and deficiency characterization in that species are still scarce. The objectives of this work were evaluating the effects of the omission of micronutrients and characterizing the nutrient deficiency symptoms in Australian Red Cedar saplings. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse for a 90-day period. Australian Red Cedar cuttings were cultivated in pots with a nutrient solution under the missing element technique. The omission of the micronutrients B, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn affect negatively the height, diameter, and dry matter yield of the Australian Red Cedar plants. The micronutrient which affected the relative growth of the plants the most was B. Australian Red Cedar plants deficient in micronutrients present several visual symptoms characteristic of the metabolism disorders. The perception of the deficiencies through the visual diagnosis can be useful in the nutrient management of the culture of the Australian Red Cedar.

  12. TREATMENTS TO MINIMIZE EXTRACTIVES STAIN IN WESTERN RED CEDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Stirling,

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Under certain conditions involving uneven exposure to weather, stains related to the extractives can reduce the aesthetic appeal of western red cedar in exterior applications such as fence boards, siding, and sidewall shingles. Selected chemical treatments were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the formation of extractives stain. DDACarbonate, alkyl amine oxide, and combinations thereof delayed extractives stain formation in an accelerated field test, with higher loadings having greater effect.

  13. Anthranilic acid derivatives from Inula japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Jiang Qin; Hui Zi Jin; Jian Jun Fu; Xiao Jia Hu; Yan Zhu; Yun Heng Shen; Shi Kai Yan; Wei Dong Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Three new anthranilic acid derivatives, N-heneicosanoylanthranilic acid (1b), N-tricosanoylanthranilic acid (1d), N-tetra-cosanoylanthranilic acid (1e), and two known N-arachidylanthranilic acid (1a) and N-docosanoylanthranilic acid (1c) were isolatedfrom the aerial parts of Inula japonica Thunb. Their structures were established by spectroscopic and chemical methods.2008 Hui Zi Jin. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  14. The ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) fauna of the cedar glades and xeric limestone prairies of the Central Basin of Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ants may be the most thoroughly documented group of insects inhabiting the cedar glades of the Central Basin of Tennessee with two studies conducted in the late 1930s reporting ants found in cedar glades of the region. To compare the ant fauna of modern cedar glades with the lists produced in earlie...

  15. Hanford Reach - Control of Salt Cedar Plants in an Isolated Zone

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Target Invasive Species: salt cedar (Tamarix sp.; a Class “B” noxious weed in WA, “B” designated weed in OR) minimum of 32 acres within ~760 acres. Salt cedar...

  16. Isolation and Structure Elucidation of the Terpene "[beta]"-Thujone from Cedar Leaf Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Larry G.

    2011-01-01

    Western red cedar leaf affords an essential oil characterized by high thujone content. Students in an advanced organic chemistry lab course isolate a single thujone diastereoisomer from commercially available cedar leaf oil. Treatment of crude oil, containing roughly 70% thujone, predominately as [alpha]-thujone (6.5:1), with ethanolic sodium…

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF WIDE COMPATIBILITY VARIETIES IN SOME TROPICAL JAPONICA RICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hairmansis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The F1 hybrid sterility in indica/japonica crosses is the major barrier in developing hybrid rice varieties between these two diverse germplasm. The sterility problem in japonica/indica hybrids can be overcome by using wide compatibility genes. The objective of this study was to identify wide compatibility varieties (WCVs in some tropical japonica rice. Twenty five tropical japonica varieties as male parents were crossed with indica (IR64 and japonica (Akitakomachi testers as female parents. The crosses were planted following a randomized complete block design with three replications. Varieties having average spikelet fertility of more than 70% with both the indica and japonica testers were rated as WCVs. Result from this study showed that six tropical japonica varieties were classified as WCVs, i.e., Cabacu, Grogol, Kencana Bali, Klemas, Lampung Lawer, and Napa. Hybrid sterility is caused by partial sterility of male and female gametes. The WCVs from the present study can be used in hybrid rice breeding program to solve hybrid sterility in indica/japonica hybrids.

  18. Lonicerae Japonicae Flos and Lonicerae Flos: A Systematic Pharmacology Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lonicerae japonicae flos, a widely used traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, has been used for several thousand years in China. Chinese Pharmacopeia once included Lonicerae japonicae flos of Caprifoliaceae family and plants of the same species named Lonicerae flos in general in the same group. Chinese Pharmacopeia (2005 Edition lists Lonicerae japonicae flos and Lonicerae flos under different categories, although they have the similar history of efficacy. In this study, we research ancient books of TCM, 4 main databases of Chinese academic journals, and MEDLINE/PubMed to verify the origins and effects of Lonicerae japonicae flos and Lonicerae flos in traditional medicine and systematically summarized the research data in light of modern pharmacology and toxicology. Our results show that Lonicerae japonicae flos and Lonicerae flos are similar pharmacologically, but they also differ significantly in certain aspects. A comprehensive systematic review and a standard comparative pharmacological study of Lonicerae japonicae flos and Lonicerae flos as well as other species of Lonicerae flos support their clinical safety and application. Our study provides evidence supporting separate listing of Lonicerae japonicae flos and Lonicerae flos in Chinese Pharmacopeia as well as references for revision of relevant pharmacopeial records dealing with traditional efficacy of Lonicerae japonicae flos and Lonicerae flos.

  19. Genome Polymorphisms Between Indica and Japonica Revealed by RFLP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Song-wen; LIU Xia; XU Cai-guo; SHI Li-li; ZHANG Xin; DING De-liang; WANG Yong

    2007-01-01

    Revealing the genome polymorphisms between indica and japonica subspecies; RFLP markers, which are located across 12 chromosomes of rice, were used to analyze indica-japonica differentiation in different rice varieties. At the same time, genome sequence variations of screened loci were analyzed by bioinformatics method. Twenty-eight RFLP probes, which can classify indica-japonica rice, were confirmed. Subspecies genome polymorphisms of screened loci were found by analyzing the publication of the genome sequences data of rice. The study indicated that these screened markers can be used for classifying indica-japonica subspecies. With the publication of the genome sequences of rice, marker polymorphisms between indica and japonica subspecies can be revealed by genome differentiation.

  20. Validation of yield component traits identified by GWA mapping in a rice tropical japonica x tropical japonica RIL mapping population

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Rice Diversity Panel 1 (RDP1) was developed for genome-wide association (GWA) mapping to explore the five diverse rice (Oryza sativa) subpopulations (indica, aus, aromatic, temperate japonica and tropical japonica). RDP1 was evaluated for over 30 agronomic and morphological traits, most of whic...

  1. Provenances and fertilizer on early growth cedar seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Carlos Navroski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the initial development of different provenances and the influence of base fertilizer and coverage on growth of Cedrela fissilis seedlings. Provenances of seeds were collected in Lapa, PR, Fernandes Pinheiro, PR and Itaara, RS. After germination, the seedlings were transplanted to plastic bags of 500 cm³, filled with commercial substrate. Total height (h, stem diameter (sd, and ratio h/sd seedlings were measured after 150 days of transplanting. Seedlings of Fernandes Pinheiro received basic fertilization after transplantation (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 g dm-3  Osmocote® and cover (3 and 6 g L-1, respectively, of Peter’s® and urea. The provenance and doses of controlled-release fertilizer influenced early development of Cedrela fissilis seedlings. Itaara provenance showed better seedlings growth. Cedar seedlings showed good growth when incorporated into the substrate 5 g dm-3 Osmocote® and, in addition, applied in topdressing 3 g L-1 of Peter’s®. Urea topdressing is rarely recommended for cedar seedlings.

  2. Fundamental study on production of 'hyper wood pellet' - (4) characterization of torrefied products obtained using various methods of heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Takahiro; Sano, Tetsuya; Ohara, Seiji [Forestry and Forest Products Research Inst., Tsukuba (Japan)], e-mail: tyoshid@ffpri.affrc.go.jp; Nomura, Takashi; Watada, Hiroki [Fukui Prefectural Green Center, Sakai, Fukui (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Improved wood pellets (hyper wood pellets) were produced from the torrefaction of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and oak (Konara, Quercus serrata). Five types of ovens were used under dry and wet conditions for the torrefaction of wood chips and the subsequent pellet samples. As a result, calorific values were improved in both Japanese cedar and oak species, and a 30% higher HHV was obtained in Japanese cedar by heat treatment at 240 deg C using an inert gas torrefaction oven. We also investigated the characteristics of torrefied products obtained using four other types of heat treatment under reduced pressure, with superheated steam, and using conventional charcoal ovens in view of larger-scale production. By using a flow-type oven with superheated steam, hyper wood pellets having a calorific value of 21.4MJ/kg were produced by heat treatment at 240 deg C. Elemental analyses showed that dehydration mainly occurred during the torrefaction conducted in this study.

  3. Increasing Drought Sensitivity and Decline of Atlas Cedar (Cedrus atlantica in the Moroccan Middle Atlas Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Julio Camarero

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the interactions between climate change and forest structure on tree growth are needed for decision making in forest conservation and management. In this paper, we investigated the relative contribution of tree features and stand structure on Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica radial growth in forests that have experienced heavy grazing and logging in the past. Dendrochronological methods were applied to quantify patterns in basal-area increment and drought sensitivity of Atlas cedar in the Middle Atlas, northern Morocco. We estimated the tree-to-tree competition intensity and quantified the structure in Atlas cedar stands with contrasting tree density, age, and decline symptoms. The relative contribution of tree age and size and stand structure to Atlas cedar growth decline was estimated by variance partitioning using partial-redundancy analyses. Recurrent drought events and temperature increases have been identified from local climate records since the 1970s. We detected consistent growth declines and increased drought sensitivity in Atlas cedar across all sites since the early 1980s. Specifically, we determined that previous growth rates and tree age were the strongest tree features, while Quercus rotundifolia basal area was the strongest stand structure measure related to Atlas cedar decline. As a result, we suggest that Atlas cedar forests that have experienced severe drought in combination with grazing and logging may be in the process of shifting dominance toward more drought-tolerant species such as Q. rotundifolia.

  4. Tamarisk (Salt Cedar) Infestations in Northwestern Nevada Mapped Using Landsat TM Imagery and GIS Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, D.; Geraci, C.; Kolkowitz, S.

    2004-12-01

    Tamarisk, also known as salt cedar (Tamarix sp.) is a prevalent invasive species that has infested many riparian areas in the southwestern United States. Mature salt cedar plants are resistant to high stress environments and fare well in drought conditions, mainly due to their extensive root systems that derive much of their sustenance from the water table rather than surface water and precipitation. The salt cedar root systems have altered hydrological patterns by tapping into underlying aquifers. This has decreased water available for recreational use, regional ecology and plant diversity. Many states have implemented salt cedar monitoring programs at the local level, but the problem of large-scale mapping of this invasive species has continued to be a challenge to land management agencies. Furthermore, inaccessible and unexplored areas continue to be absent in the mapping process. In August 2004, using field data consisting of large areas as training sets for classification of Landsat TM imagery, the DEVELOP student research team at NASA Ames Research Center generated a preliminary map of areas that that were susceptible to salt cedar growth for a region in northwestern Nevada. In addition to the remote sensing-based classification of satellite imagery, the team used the variables of elevation and estimated distance to the water table in conjunction with collected field data and knowledge of salt cedar growth habits to further refine the map. The team has further extended the mapping of key environmental factors of water availability for salt cedar, soil types and species distribution in regions infested by salt cedar. The investigation was carried out by 1) improving an existing GIS layer for water access using a suitable interpolation method, 2) including a GIS layer for soils associated with salt cedar growth and 3) completing field work to evaluate species distribution and regions of presence or absence of salt cedar. The outcome of this project served to

  5. Radiocarbon concentration in modern tree rings from Fukushima, Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T.; Cresswell, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica), collected from Iwaki, Fukushima in 2014, was analyzed for the long-lived radionuclide 14C. Values of δ14C varied from 211.7‰ in 1984 to 16.9‰ in 2013. The temporal δ14C variation can be described as an exponential decline, indistinguishable from.......e. fossil carbon) source. This change coincides with local traffic increases since two nearby expressways were opened in the 1990's. In addition, the small but visible 14C pulse observed in the 2011 tree-ring might be caused by release from the damaged reactors during the Fukushima nuclear accident....

  6. Response surface methodology based optimization for degradation of align in Laminaria japonica feedstuff via fermentation by Bacillus in Apostichopus japonicas farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xitao Wang

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: This study provides an alternative and economical way to reduce the algin content in L. japonica through degradation by WB1, making it a promising potential source of feed for cultured L. japonica.

  7. Carbonization of Bamboo and Japanese Cedar under Soft Hydrothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosogi, Kana; Yamamoto, Toshifumi; Inamaru, Hiroshi; Mori, Yuki; Li, Zhixia; Yamasaki, Nakamichi; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2010-11-01

    Carbons formed from biomass have many potential applications including as absorbents for environmental contaminants, catalysts, and constituents of various medicines. Bamboo and Japanese cedar leaves were used as the starting materials for carbonization at temperatures up to 200° C using dry steam below the saturated vapor pressure which has the ability to dehydrate hydrocarbons. These carbonization processes were studied using a continuous pipe line autoclave under non-equilibrium conditions. The effect of various reaction conditions on carbonization were examined by thermal analysis, extraction components, and surface observation. The bamboo carbonization product exhibited the ability to highly adsorb chlorinated organic compounds such as chloroform in aqueous solution compared with a commercial activated carbon.

  8. Recovery of palladium using chemically modified cedar wood powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Durga; Hirota, Koichi

    2009-10-15

    Japanese cedar wood powder (CWP) was chemically modified to a tertiary-amine-type adsorbent and studied for the selective recovery of Pd(II) from various industrial waters. Batch adsorption tests performed from 0.1 M to 5 M HCl and HNO3 systems reveal stable performance with better results in HNO3 medium. The maximum loading capacity for Pd(II) was studied in HCl as well as in HNO3. A continuous-flow experiment taking a real industrial solution revealed the feasibility of using modified CWP for the selective uptake and preconcentration of traces of palladium contained in acidic effluents. In addition, stable adsorption performance even on long exposure to gamma-irradiation and selective recovery of palladium from simulated high-level liquid waste (HLW) are important outcomes of the study.

  9. Environmental Action Memorandum : [Ottawa and Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuges Fishery Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Action memorandum for the Ottawa and Cedar Point NWRs Fishery Management Plan states that the Plan is found not to have significant environmental...

  10. Endangered Species Consultation Request : Opening to Sports & Commercial Fishing Ottawa and Cedar Point NWR’s

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Endangered Species Consultation Request states that the Ottawa and Cedar Point NWRs Fishery Management Plan will not affect bald eagles on the Refuge.

  11. Experimental streams - Recolonization of the Cedar River, WA by Pacific salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of this study is to quantify population, community, and ecosystem level changes as a result of salmon recolonization of the Cedar River, WA above...

  12. Proposing New Wilderness Areas: Okefenokee, Pelican Islands, Island Bay, Cedar Keys, Passage Key, and Wichita Mountains

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — President Transmittal on the proposal of wilderness additions that include Okefenokee, Pelican Islands, Island Bay, Cedar Keys, Passage Key, and Wichita Mountains.

  13. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 6) to Cedar Keys NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Cedar...

  14. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 6) to Cedar Island NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Cedar...

  15. Overhead Utility Lines at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (cebr_powerln)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains 49 arcs and 50 nodes representing power lines at Cedar Breaks National Monument. The power lines supply electricity and telephone services to...

  16. Picnic Tables within the Designated Picnic Area at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (pcnctbl)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains the individual picnic areas (as points where the picnic tables are generally located) within the only designated picnic area at Cedar Breaks...

  17. Embracing the River: Smart Growth Strategies for Assisting in Cedar Rapids' Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report from an EPA-FEMA technical assistance project with Cedar Rapids, IA, offers ideas to encourage infill development, make development more resilient to floods, and improve stormwater management.

  18. Growth, movement and survival - Recolonization of the Cedar River, WA by Pacific salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of this study is to quantify population, community, and ecosystem level changes as a result of salmon recolonization of the Cedar River, WA above...

  19. Fish abundance, composition, distribution - Recolonization of the Cedar River, WA by Pacific salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of this study is to quantify population, community, and ecosystem level changes as a result of salmon recolonization of the Cedar River, WA above...

  20. Cedar Breaks National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plot, Observation Points and Accuracy Assessment Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file contains 282 point locations of field plot and observation data used by, and collected for, the vegetation mapping project for Cedar Breaks National...

  1. Fishing Plan : Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge : Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Fishing Plan for Ottawa and Cedar Point NWRs. The Plan provides an introduction and history of the refuges, information about program relation to refuge...

  2. Atlantic White Cedar Swamp Restoration : Monitoring Ecosystem Services and Self-Maintenance

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes an Atlantic white cedar swamp restoration project. This project will study the restoration of the once prevalent ecosystem. Three ecosystem...

  3. Cedar Studio: an IDE supporting adaptive model-driven user interfaces for enterprise applications

    OpenAIRE

    Akiki, Pierre; Bandara, Arosha; Yu, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Support tools are necessary for the adoption of model-driven engineering of adaptive user interfaces (UI). Enterprise applications in particular, require a tool that could be used by developers as well as I.T. personnel during all the development and post-development phases. An IDE that supports adaptive model-driven enterprise UIs could further promote the adoption of this approach. This paper describes Cedar Studio, our IDE for building adaptive model-driven UIs based on the CEDAR reference...

  4. Immunosuppressive activities of fucoidan from Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quanbin; Li, Zhien; Zhou, Gefei; Niu, Xizhen; Zhang, Hong

    2003-12-01

    Effects of fucoidan from Laminaria japonica on 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction and the serum levels of IgG, IgM, complement C3 and C4 were investigated in the present study. Results showed that oral administration of fucoidan at dose of 150 and 300 mg/(kg· d) for 9 days before the hapten challenge significantly inhibited 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene induced delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction; and also inhibited the humoral immunity. Serum C3 and C4 levels were markedly reduced by fucoidan at dose of 150 and 300 mg/kg; and serum IgG and IgM levels were reduced by fucoidan at dose of 300mg/kg. The inhibitory effects of fucoidan on delayed-type hypersensitivity suggested that it may be potential medication for chronic inflammatory diseases in the future.

  5. A transformation model for Laminaria Japonica (Phaeophyta, Laminariales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Song; Jiang, Peng; Li, Xin-Ping; Wang, Xi-Hua; Zeng, Cheng-Kui

    1998-03-01

    A genetic transformation model for the seaweed Laminaria japonica mainly includes the following aspects: 1. The method to introduce foreign genes into the kelp, L. japonica Biolistic bombardment has been proved to be an effective method to bombard foreign DNA through cell walls into intact cells of both sporophytes and gametophytes. The expression of cat and lacZ was detected in regenerated sporophytes, which suggests that this method could induce random integration of foreign genes. Promoters to drive gene expression

  6. Herpetofauna of the cedar glades and associated habitats of the Inner Central Basin of middle Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiller, M.L.; Graham, Reynolds R.; Glorioso, B.M.; Spiess, J.; Miller, B.T.

    2011-01-01

    The cedar glades and barrens of the Inner Central Basin (ICB) of middle Tennessee support a unique and diverse flora and fauna and represent some of the state's most valued natural areas. We conducted herpetofaunal inventories of the cedar glades, associated barrens, cedar-hardwood forest, and adjacent aquatic habitats of the Stones River drainage of Middle Tennessee, focusing our sampling effort primarily at seven state- or federally owned properties in Rutherford and Wilson counties. These properties included Stones River National Battlefield (SRNB), Flat Rock State Natural Area (FRSNA), Vesta Cedar Glade State Natural Area (VSNA), Fall Creek Recreation Area (FCRA) on J. Percy Priest Wildlife Management Area, Cedars of Lebanon State Forest (CLSF), Cedars of Lebanon State Forest Natural Area (CLSNA), and Cedars of Lebanon State Park (CLSP). We used a variety of inventory techniques in terrestrial, aquatic, and subterranean habitats to survey these properties periodically from 1989 to 2010. We documented 49 species (22 amphibian and 27 reptile) accounting for 75.4% of the 65 herpetofaunal species thought to occur in the ICB, including records for Cemophora coccinea, Aneides aeneus, Gyrinophilus palleucus, Ambystoma barbouri, and Pseudotriton montanus. We found differences in alpha and beta diversity between sites, with the CLSF complex containing a high of 41 herpetofaunal species and FRSNA containing a low of 23 species. Beta diversity comparisons indicated similarity in amphibian species composition between FRSNA and CLSF and between SRNB and CLSF (9 shared species), and in reptile species composition between VSNA and the CLSF complex (16 shared species). We compare the results of our inventory with two previous studies conducted in the area and discuss the relative abundance, conservation, and threats to the herpetofaunal community of these habitats.

  7. Review and Prospect on Japonica Hybrid Rice Research in Anhui Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cheng-quan; WANG Shou-hai; WANG De-zheng; LUO Yan-chang; ZHANG Pei-jiang; WU Shuang; DU Shi-yun; XU Chuan-wan

    2005-01-01

    The breeding history and commercial exploitation of japonica hybrid rice in Anhui Province, China over the last threedecades were reviewed. Besides, the bottleneck problems restricting the development of japonica hybrid rice in China weresummarized, and corresponding technological countermeasures were proposed.

  8. Inferring the chemical form of 137Cs deposited by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident by measuring (137)Cs incorporated into needle leaves and male cones of Japanese cedar trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanasashi, Tsutomu; Takenaka, Chisato; Sugiura, Yuki

    2016-05-15

    We hypothesized that the water-soluble (ionic) and water-insoluble (stable) radiocesium from the initial fallout of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident was distributed in various proportions in the surrounding areas and that this distribution was reflected in the trees that suffered deposition from the initial fallout. This study attempted to evaluate local variations in the chemical form of (137)Cs derived from the initial fallout of the FDNPP accident and whether its chemical form affected the radiocesium concentration in the tissues currently growing in trees, even after the initial fallout ceased. For these estimations, the ratio between the (137)Cs concentration in Cryptomeria japonica needle leaves in the tree crown, which existed before the FDNPP accident and subsequently directly exposed to the initial fallout ((137)Cs pre-accident N), and the amount of (137)Cs in the initial fallout itself ((137)Cs fallout) was determined ((137)Cs pre-accident N/(137)Cs fallout) at 66 sites. In addition, the (137)Cs ratios between the male cones produced in 2012 ((137)Cs male cone) and needle leaves that had elongated in the spring of 2011 ((137)Cs 2011N) was determined at 82 sites ((137)Cs male cone/(137) Cs 2011N). Most of the sites with lower (137)Cs pre-accident N /(137)Cs fallout ratios were distributed in eastern Fukushima, relatively close to the Pacific Ocean coastline. Lower (137)Cs pre-accident N/(137)Cs fallout and higher (137)Cs malecone/(137)Cs 2011N were found to be associated with higher proportions of (137)Cs in ionic forms. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis, and likely reflect regional variations in the chemical form of the deposited radiocesium.

  9. Traditional Applications and Phytochemical Investigations of Lonicera japonica Thunb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandigawad Annapurna M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lonicera japonica (Honeysuckle Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae is one of the oldest medicinal plants in known history. Sometimes referred to woodbine was once used widely to treat urinary complaints, asthma etc. Lonicera japonica is an ingredient of herbal tea and has been known thousands of years for its cooling and detoxification effects. According to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, honeysuckle is taken orally for digestive disorders, enteritis, dysentery, urinary disorders, headache, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, malignant tumors etc. The objective of the present study is to identify the phytochemical constituents of Lonicera japonica in order to understand the nature of the principle components responsible for its medicinal property. Gas chromatography/Mass spectroscopy (GC/MS system was employed to provide a rapid method to make characterization of the bioactive compounds present in the hydroethanolic extract from Lonicera japonica Flowers. Ethanolic extract of flower oil of Lonicera japonica evidenced the presence of multiple components in the extract. The structures of thirty seven compounds found in the hydroethanolic flower oil were suggested mainly by MS data, reference compounds and available mass spectra data in the literature. Flavanoids, alkaloids, phenolic acids, terpenes and steroids were found as the main constituents.

  10. Radiocaesium partitioning in Japanese cedar forests following the “early” phase of Fukushima fallout redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppin, Frederic; Hurtevent, Pierre; Loffredo, Nicolas; Simonucci, Caroline; Julien, Anthony; Gonze, Marc-Andre; Nanba, Kenji; Onda, Yuichi; Thiry, Yves

    2016-11-01

    Our study focused on radiocaesium (137Cs) partitioning in forests, three vegetation periods after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. 137Cs distribution in forest components (organic and mineral soil layers as well as tree compartments: stem, bark, needles, branches and roots) was measured for two Japanese cedar stand ages (17 and 33 years old). The results showed that around 85% of the initial deposit was found in the forest floor and topsoil. For the youngest stand almost 70% of the deposit is present in the forest floor, whereas for the oldest stand 50% is present in the 0–3 cm mineral soil layer. For trees, old and perennial organs (including dead and living needles and branches, litter fall and outer bark) directly exposed to the fallout remained the most contaminated. The crown concentrated 61–69% of the total tree contamination. Surprisingly the dead organs concentrated 25 ± 9% (young cedars) to 36 ± 20% (mature cedar) of the trees’ residual activity, highlighting the importance of that specific compartment in the early post-accident phase for Japanese cedar forests. Although the stem (including bark) represents the highest biomass pool, it only concentrates 3.3% and 4.6% of the initial 137Cs deposit for mature and young cedars, respectively.

  11. 76 FR 78641 - Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC, Milford Wind Corridor Phase I, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC, Milford Wind Corridor Phase I, LLC; Notice of...'s (Commission) June 16, 2011 Order.\\1\\ \\1\\ Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC and Milford Wind Corridor...

  12. Relationship of Parental Indica-Japonica Indexes with Yield and Grain Quality Traits of Japonica Hybrid Rice in Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-rong; QIU Fu-lin; HUA Ze-tian; DAI Gui-jin

    2010-01-01

    Taking the main parents (10 male sterile lines and 10 restorer lines) and their 100 combinations of japonica hybrid rice in northern China as materials, the relationships of parental indica-japonica indexes determined by the methods of the Cheng's index as well as simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with yield and grain quality traits of hybrid rice were studied. For the parents, the Cheng's index (Chi) ranged from 13.5 to 19.3 and the indica index in SSR markers (ADi) were from 0.12 to 0.38. The classification of parents by Chi was not completely consistent with that by ADi. The Chi of male parent was more closely related to hybrid traits than that of female parent, as contrasted to ADi. At the same time, the difference between parents (PD) in Chi was more closely related to hybrid traits than that in ADi. The indica-japonica indexes of parents and their difference between parents appeared quadratic relationship to hybrid traits with the critical extremum. The directions of the correlation of indica-japonica indexes of parents and their differences with hybrid yield traits were on the opposition to those with hybrid grain quality traits. Therefore, the female parent should match the male parent moderately in indica-japonica index to obtain the optimum of hybrid traits, high yield as well as good quality.

  13. 冷冻处理对日本柳杉边材炭化的影响%Effect of Pretreatment with Freezhing on Carbonization of Sugi ( Cryptomeria japonica ) Sapwood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁保旺; 杜冠华; 松井隆尚; 松下洋一; 菅本和宽

    2005-01-01

    将冷冻处理前后的日本柳杉边材在400℃下进行炭化,得到了木醋液、木焦油和木炭.与没有处理相比,虽然处理过边材的木焦油的收率几乎不变,木醋液的收率显示增加倾向,但是木炭的收率有减少迹象.用毛细管气相色谱法对得到的木醋液中的11种成分进行了定量分析.与无处理相比较后,发现处理过边材木醋液中的甲醇、脂肪酸及糠醛(呋喃甲醛)的收量有了变化,但是5-羟甲基糠醛、麦芽酚、苯酚、邻苯二酚及愈创苯酚的收量几乎没有变化.%Sugi sapwoods at different moisture content after and before freezing treatment were carbonized at 400 ℃ to afford wood-vinegar, wood-tar and charcoal. Yield of wood-vinegar prepared from the treated wood tended to increase, and yield of charcoal indicated opposite tendency, but yield of wood-tar was almost constant. 11 components in wood-vinegar obtained from the Sugi sapwoods after and before treatment were determined by capillary gas chromatography (capillary GC). The change in amounts of methanol, carboxylic acids and 2 - furaldehyde in wood-vinegar from the treated sapwood was observed, but amounts of 5 - hydroxymethyl - 2 - furaldehyde, maltol, phenols, pyrocatechol, and guaiacols were almost constant.

  14. Expression of indica rice resistant sources to Brown planthopper(BPH) in indica-japonica hybrids and their utillzation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGTibin; XUSuoshun; GUFulin

    1992-01-01

    We studied the genetic mode in transferring BPH-resistance genes from indica varieties to japonica varieties January 1988 to December 1989 in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province. Indica varieties selected on a basis of BPH-resistance genes, i.e., Yankeng 2 (japonica), 02428 (japonica), 40316 (indica-japonica progeny),

  15. The extraction of pigments from fresh Laminaria japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Liqun; LI Pengcheng; FAN Shoujin

    2008-01-01

    The pigments in Laminaria japonica was extracted with six organic solvents and analyzed in spectroscopy analysis.The extractions conditions were screened by an orthogonal test and the quantity of extracted pigments was determined spectroscopically.The results show that:(1) among the six organic solvents,acetone was the most effective one for the extraction; (2) the optimum extraction conditions were as follows:the ratio of S/M (solvent volume/ material weight) was 30ml/g; fresh seaweed was extracted 2 times in 2h; (3) the average total content of pigments was 1.85mg/g (calculated with dry L.japonica).

  16. Cedar virus: a novel Henipavirus isolated from Australian bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn A Marsh

    Full Text Available The genus Henipavirus in the family Paramyxoviridae contains two viruses, Hendra virus (HeV and Nipah virus (NiV for which pteropid bats act as the main natural reservoir. Each virus also causes serious and commonly lethal infection of people as well as various species of domestic animals, however little is known about the associated mechanisms of pathogenesis. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new paramyxovirus from pteropid bats, Cedar virus (CedPV, which shares significant features with the known henipaviruses. The genome size (18,162 nt and organization of CedPV is very similar to that of HeV and NiV; its nucleocapsid protein displays antigenic cross-reactivity with henipaviruses; and it uses the same receptor molecule (ephrin-B2 for entry during infection. Preliminary challenge studies with CedPV in ferrets and guinea pigs, both susceptible to infection and disease with known henipaviruses, confirmed virus replication and production of neutralizing antibodies although clinical disease was not observed. In this context, it is interesting to note that the major genetic difference between CedPV and HeV or NiV lies within the coding strategy of the P gene, which is known to play an important role in evading the host innate immune system. Unlike HeV, NiV, and almost all known paramyxoviruses, the CedPV P gene lacks both RNA editing and also the coding capacity for the highly conserved V protein. Preliminary study indicated that CedPV infection of human cells induces a more robust IFN-β response than HeV.

  17. Cedar Pollen Aggravates Atopic Dermatitis in Childhood Monozygotic Twin Patients with Allergic Rhino Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yukako Murakami; Saki Matsui; Akiko Kijima; Shun Kitaba; Hiroyuki Murota; Ichiro Katayama

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of 7-year-old monozygotic twin patients with atopic dermatitis. The HLA haplotypes were HLA A2, A11, B27, B61, DR1, and DR4. Both serum IgE levels and cedar pollen radioallergosorbent test (RAST) scores were high in the twins (elder/younger sister: IgE: 5170/3980 IU/ml and Japansese cedar pollen: >100/64.0) in contrast to low mite and food RAST scores (Dermatophagoides Pterygonium; 0.59/0.4 and egg white 9.24/4.6). The patients showed positive immediate (20 min in both sister...

  18. New Diarylheptanoid from the Barks of Alnus japonica Steudel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A new diarylheptanoid glycoside, 1,7-bis-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5-hydroxyheptane-3-O-β-D-xylopyranoside (1), together with nine known diarylheptanoids (2-10) were isolated from the fresh bark of Alnus japonica which is a species of the genus Alnus species, growing throughout Korea.

  19. Laminaria japonica Extract, an Inhibitor of Clavibater michiganense Subsp. Sepedonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Cai

    Full Text Available Bacterial ring rot of potato is one of the most serious potato plant and tuber diseases. Laminaria japonica extract was investigated for its antimicrobial activity against Clavibater michiganense subsp. sepedonicum (Spieckermann & Kotthoff Davis et al., the causative agent of bacterial ring rot of potato. The results showed that the optimum extraction conditions of antimicrobial substances from L. japonica were an extraction temperature of 80°C, an extraction time of 12 h, and a solid to liquid ratio of 1∶25. Active compounds of L. japonica were isolated by solvent partition, thin layer chromatography (TLC and column chromatography. All nineteen fractionations had antimicrobial activities against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum, while Fractionation three (Fr.3 had the highest (P<0.05 antimicrobial activity. Chemical composition analysis identified a total of 26 components in Fr.3. The main constituents of Fr.3 were alkanes (80.97%, esters (5.24%, acids (4.87% and alcohols (2.21%. Antimicrobial activity of Fr.3 against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum could be attributed to its ability to damage the cell wall and cell membrane, induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, increase cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, inhibit the glycolytic pathway (EMP and tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, inhibit protein and nucleic acid synthesis, and disrupt the normal cycle of DNA replication. These findings indicate that L. japonica extracts have potential for inhibiting C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum.

  20. Comparative proteomic analysis of indica and japonica rice varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Yang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Indica and japonica are two main subspecies of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L. that differ clearly in morphological and agronomic traits, in physiological and biochemical characteristics and in their genomic structure. However, the proteins and genes responsible for these differences remain poorly characterized. In this study, proteomic tools, including two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, were used to globally identify proteins that differed between two sequenced rice varieties (93-11 and Nipponbare. In all, 47 proteins that differed significantly between 93-11 and Nipponbare were identified using mass spectrometry and database searches. Interestingly, seven proteins were expressed only in Nipponbare and one protein was expressed specifically in 93-11; these differences were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and proteomic analysis of other indica and japonica rice varieties. This is the first report to successfully demonstrate differences in the protein composition of indica and japonica rice varieties and to identify candidate proteins and genes for future investigation of their roles in the differentiation of indica and japonica rice.

  1. [Study on Commercial Specification of Lonicerae Japonicae Flos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zou, Lin; Liu, Wei; Bian, Li-hua; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Yong-qing; Dan, Staerk

    2015-04-01

    To provide the basis data for the institute of commercial specification standard of Lonicerae Japonicae Flos. 39 samples of Lonicerae Japonicae Flos commercial of different grades in market were collected, and vernier caliper and electronic balance were used to measure the numbers of flower bud and blooming rate per 0. 5 g, contamination content, browning degree, milden and rot, length, upside diameter, middle diameter and bottom diameter of Lonicerae Japonicae Flos. The content of neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid, rutin, galuteolin,3,5-icaffeoylquinic acid and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid were detected by HPLC. Correlation analysis, principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used by SPSS to analyze all index data,and the correlation of appearance characteristics and intrinsic active constituents was discussed. The numbers of flower bud and blooming rate per 0. 5 g, contamination content and browning degree were principal component indexes. The length of flower bud showed a significant correlation with galuteolin content, and the browning degree and upside diameter showed a significant correlation with chlorogenic acid content. Lonicerae Japonicae Flos commercial should be divided into four specification grades by sieved indexes.

  2. Heavy Metal Biosorption Sites Studies of Laminaria japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Aihong; WANG Xian; DENG Yongzhi; CHEN Lidan

    2005-01-01

    The role played by the functional groups of Laminaria japonica treated by methanol and formaldehyde in biosorption of the heavy metals was investigated.Infrared spectroscopy analysis and biosorption experiments show that both carboxyl and amino groups join in the sorption; chemical treatment decreased the biosorption efficiency of the heavy metals.

  3. Two new diterpenoids from Rabdosia japonica var.glaucocalyx

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Bao Xiang; Yi Xin Xu; Yang Shen; Li Jin; Hou Peng Wang; Hai Sheng Chen

    2008-01-01

    Two new diterpenoids,named glaucocalyxin F and glaucocalyxin X,respectively,were isolated from the whole plant of Rabdosia japonica (Burro.f.) Hara vat.glaucocalyx (Maxim.) Hara.Their structures was established on the basis of spectral analysis.

  4. A new ent-kaurane diterpenoid from Isodon japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    One new ent-kaurane diterpenoid,named maoyecrystal L was isolated from the EtOAc extract of the dried leaves of lsodon japonica.Its structure was established by various spectroscopic means and confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis.

  5. Two New ent-Kaurane Diterpenoids from Isodon japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two new ent-kauranoids, named maoyecrystals A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the EtOAc extract of the dried leaves of Isodon japonica (Burman f.) Hara collected in Tongbai mountains, Henan Province. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectral data, especially by 2D NMR.

  6. Anti-inflammatory terpenes from flowers of Inula japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sheng-An; Zhu, Hong; Qin, Nan; Zhou, Jing-Ya; Lee, Eunkyung; Kong, De-Xin; Jin, Mei-Hua; Duan, Hong-Quan

    2014-05-01

    Five new terpenes (1-5) and ten known compounds (6-15) were isolated from Inula japonica, and their structures were identified by spectroscopic analysis. Compounds 3 and 14 showed positive inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production. Furthermore, compound 14 suppressed both leukotriene C4 synthesis and degranulation in c-kit ligand-induced bone marrow-derived mast cells.

  7. Effect of Preservative Treatment on Fungal Colonization of Teak, Redwood, and Western Red Cedar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera Orozco, Yohanna; Freitag, F.; Morrell, Jeffrey J.

    Fungal flora present in preservative treated samples or non-treated samples from sapwood and heartwood of teak, western red cedar, redwood, and southern yellow pine was assessed after 6 to 18 months of exposure near Hilo, Hawaii. The objectives were to compare fungal composition and diversity...

  8. Bioprospection of Eastern Red Cedar from Nine Physiographic Regions in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniperus virginiana (Family Cupressaceae), commonly called as Eastern Red Cedar, is a widely distributed species in the United States and parts of Canada. It produces two important chemical products, the anticancer compound podophyllotoxin and essential oil. The objective of this study was to evalu...

  9. Methods for screening Port-Orford-cedar for resistance to Phytophthora lateralis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett M. Hansen; Paul Reeser; Wendy Sutton; Richard A. Sniezko

    2012-01-01

    Port-Orford-cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A. Murray) Parl.) (POC) is an economically and ecologically valuable tree in the forests of southwest Oregon and northern California and in the horticultural trade worldwide. Phytophthora lateralis, the aggressive, invasive cause of POC root disease, was introduced to the native...

  10. 75 FR 13668 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cedar Rapids, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ..., Cedar Rapids, IA (74 FR 67141) Docket No. FAA-2009-0916. Interested parties were invited to participate... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...

  11. Cedar Pollen Aggravates Atopic Dermatitis in Childhood Monozygotic Twin Patients with Allergic Rhino Conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukako Murakami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 7-year-old monozygotic twin patients with atopic dermatitis. The HLA haplotypes were HLA A2, A11, B27, B61, DR1, and DR4. Both serum IgE levels and cedar pollen radioallergosorbent test (RAST scores were high in the twins (elder/younger sister: IgE: 5170/3980 IU/ml and Japansese cedar pollen: >100/64.0 in contrast to low mite and food RAST scores (Dermatophagoides Pterygonium; 0.59/0.4 and egg white 9.24/4.6. The patients showed positive immediate (20 min in both sisters and delayed (24 hours in elder sister, 24, 48, 72 hours in younger sister reactions to a scratch test with Japanese cedar pollen. Skin lesions on the face were aggravated and extended to the trunk and extremities during the Japanese cedar pollen season and gradually subsided in summer. Oral provocation with egg white or cow milk showed no exacerbations, and topical corticosteroid did not improve the eczema. In contrast, successful protection from severe scratching behaviors was achieved by use of topical anti-allergic eye drops and wearing nightgowns made by the mother.

  12. Phytochemical Analysis of an Extract prepared from Eastern Red Cedar Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) is one of the few conifer species native to the Midwest plains, and is one of the few tree species whose range and plant numbers have actually increased in the past century. Because of its encroachment onto open lands, it is now considered an invasive spe...

  13. New canker disease of Incense-cedar in Oregon caused by Phaeobotryon cupressi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incense-cedar (Calocedrus decurrens) is a native tree occurring in Oregon and California. Since the early 2000’s, a new canker disease has been observed with increasing frequency on ornamental and windbreak trees planted in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Symptoms appear as dead, flagging, small-di...

  14. Distribution of Different Species of the Bacteroides fragilis Group in Individuals with Japanese Cedar Pollinosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odamaki, Toshitaka; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Kondo, Shizuki; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Togashi, Hideo; Enomoto, Tadao; Benno, Yoshimi

    2008-01-01

    We investigated associations of species of the Bacteroides fragilis group with Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCPsis). Cell numbers of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides intestinalis were significantly higher in JCPsis subjects than in non-JCPsis subjects before the pollen season. They correlated positively with both symptom scores and JCPsis-specific immunoglobulin E levels. PMID:18791010

  15. Valencene oxidase CYP706M1 from Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cankar, K.; Houwelingen, van A.M.M.L.; Goedbloed, M.A.; Renirie, R.; Jong, de R.M.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Bosch, H.J.; Sonke, Th.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    (+)-Nootkatone is a natural sesquiterpene ketone used in grapefruit and citrus flavour compositions. It occurs in small amounts in grapefruit and is a major component of Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) heartwood essential oil. Upon co-expression of candidate cytochrome P450 enzymes from

  16. Composition of the heartwood essential oil of incense cedar (Calocedrus decurrens Torr.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeba Veluthoor; Rick G. Kelsey; M.P. Gonzalez-Hernandez; Nicholas Panella; Marc Dolan; Joe. Karchesy

    2011-01-01

    Incense cedar (Calocedrus decurrens) is a tree native to Oregon and California, perhaps best known for its aromatic wood and use in the manufacturing of pencils. The wood is also highly valued for its decorative appearance and durability in lumber, related sawmill products, and fence posts. Chemical investigations of heartwood extracts have shown...

  17. 78 FR 35787 - Safety Zones; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay, Cedar Point, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie... restrict vessel traffic during the swim portion of the Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay, OH.... Basis and Purpose Each year, the Revolution 3 Triathlon occurs at Cedar Point near Sandusky, OH....

  18. Valencene oxidase CYP706M1 from Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cankar, K.; Houwelingen, van A.M.M.L.; Goedbloed, M.A.; Renirie, R.; Jong, de R.M.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Bosch, H.J.; Sonke, Th.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    (+)-Nootkatone is a natural sesquiterpene ketone used in grapefruit and citrus flavour compositions. It occurs in small amounts in grapefruit and is a major component of Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) heartwood essential oil. Upon co-expression of candidate cytochrome P450 enzymes from Ala

  19. Carbon, cesium and iodine isotopes in Japanese cedar leaves from Iwaki, Fukushima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T.; Cresswell, Alan J.;

    2016-01-01

    Japanese cedar leaves from Iwaki, Fukushima were analyzed for carbon, cesium and iodine isotopic compositions before and after the 2011 nuclear accident. The Δ14C values reflect ambient atmospheric 14C concentrations during the year the leaves were sampled/defoliated, and also previous year...

  20. An increase in pectin methyl esterase activity accompanies dormancy breakage and germination of yellow cedar seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, C; Kermode, A R

    2000-09-01

    Pectin methyl esterase (PME) (EC 3.1.1.11) catalyzes the hydrolysis of methylester groups of cell wall pectins. We investigated the role of this enzyme in dormancy termination and germination of yellow cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis [D. Don] Spach) seeds. PME activity was not detected in dormant seeds of yellow cedar but was induced and gradually increased during moist chilling; high activity coincided with dormancy breakage and germination. PME activity was positively correlated to the degree of dormancy breakage of yellow cedar seeds. The enzyme produced in different seed parts and in seeds at different times during moist chilling, germination, and early post-germinative growth consisted of two isoforms, both basic with isoelectric points of 8.7 and 8.9 and the same molecular mass of 62 kD. The pH optimum for the enzyme was between 7.4 and 8.4. In intact yellow cedar seeds, activities of the two basic isoforms of PME that were induced in embryos and in megagametophytes following dormancy breakage were significantly suppressed by abscisic acid. Gibberellic acid had a stimulatory effect on the activities of these isoforms in embryos and megagametophytes of intact seeds at the germinative stage. We hypothesize that PME plays a role in weakening of the megagametophyte, allowing radicle emergence and the completion of germination.

  1. Comparison of freshwater mussel communities from 1988 to 2015 in the Cedar Creek Watershed, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Out of the 300 genera of freshwater mussels (Unionidae) represented in North America, most species have shown declines in abundance and distribution largely due to human-mediated factors. This study compares current community composition, abundance and richness of mussels in Cedar Creek, Indiana wit...

  2. Features of the rheological properties of dough with sunflower and cedar flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gaysina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Promising directions of development of assortment of flour confectionery products are currently creating new combinations, more extraordinary and interesting, the reduction in calories, increase the nutritional value, development of formulations of functional products. As enriching additives in the manufacture of pastry products can be used flour sunflower flour and cedar. Sunflower meal – one of the possible sources of increase of food value. The only raw material component of this product are sunflower seeds that have passed the purification from impurities and shell of the particles, with the subsequent removal of oil from them and grinding. In this torment, to the maximum extent maintained all the valuable biological active substances and vitamins. Sunflower flour is a complex product: it is good recommendation system of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, including fiber, vitamins, phospholipids and mineral substances. Cedar flour is characterized by high protein content (up to 48 % is well balanced in amino acids resultant composition contains b vitamins, food fibers, micro - and macroelements, necessary for life of the human body. Cedar flour has a good functional and technological properties In this paper we study the effect of cedar flour and sunflower meal on the rheological characteristics of dough. Effect of formulation components on the rheological properties of the test is evaluated in terms of water absorption of the flour, the duration of doughing, degree of its dilution and stability when mixing. It was found that the addition of 17% sunflower meal increases the viscosity of the dough and has a strengthening effect on the structure of the dough. Adding cedar flour in the amount of 20% caused the decrease in viscosity and getting more flexible dough.

  3. Groundwater-Mining-Induced Subsidence and Earth Fissures in Cedar Valley, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, T. R.; Inkenbrandt, P.; Lund, W. R.; Lowe, M.; Bowman, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater pumping in excess of recharge (groundwater mining) has lowered the potentiometric surface in Cedar Valley, southwestern Utah, by as much as 114 feet since 1939. Lowering the potentiometric surface (head decline) has caused permanent compaction of fine-grained sediments of the Cedar Valley aquifer. Recently acquired interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery shows that land subsidence is occurring over an ~100 square-mile area, including two pronounced subsidence bowls in the northeastern (Enoch graben) and southwestern (Quichapa Lake area) parts of the valley. A lack of accurate historical benchmark elevation data over much of the valley prevents detailed long-term quantification of subsidence. In response to the land subsidence, earth fissures have formed along the margins of the Enoch graben and north and west of Quichapa Lake. Our initial inventory of Cedar Valley fissures, which relied on aerial-photography analysis, identified 3.9 miles of fissures in 2009. With newly acquired light detection and ranging (LiDAR) coverage in 2011, we more than doubled the total length of mapped fissures to 8.3 miles. Fissures on the west side of the Enoch graben exhibit ongoing vertical surface displacement with rates as high as 1.7 inches/year. The largest Enoch-graben-west fissure has displaced street surfaces, curb and gutter, and sidewalks, and has reversed the flow direction of a sewer line in a partially developed subdivision. Several Cedar Valley fissures are closely associated with, and in some places coincident with, mapped Quaternary faults. While the majority of Cedar Valley fissures are mapped in agricultural areas, continued groundwater mining and resultant subsidence will likely cause existing fissures to lengthen and new fissures to form that may eventually impact other developed areas of the valley.

  4. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the adhesion time of Penicillium spores to cedar wood surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soumya, Elabed [Laboratoire de Biotechnologie Microbienne, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques de Fès-Saïs (Morocco); Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Centre Universitaire Régional d' Interface-Fès (Morocco); Saad, Ibnsouda Koraichi, E-mail: ibnsouda@hotmail.com [Laboratoire de Biotechnologie Microbienne, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques de Fès-Saïs (Morocco); Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Centre Universitaire Régional d' Interface-Fès (Morocco); Abdellah, Houari [Laboratoire de Biotechnologie Microbienne, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques de Fès-Saïs (Morocco); Hassan, Latrache [Laboratoire de Valorisation et de Sécurité des Produits Agroalimentaires, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques de Beni Mellal (Morocco)

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the adhesion of 4 Penicillium strains (Penicillium granulatum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium commune and Penicillium chrysogenum) on cedar wood was examined qualitatively and quantitatively by using the extended DLVO (XDLVO) approach and the environmental scanning electronic microscopy (ESEM) technique. A comparison between the XDLVO theories and the ESEM technique was also investigated. The adhesion tests revealed that P. chrysogenum was not able to adhere on the cedar wood substrata, as predicted by the XDLVO approach. We have also found by ESEM that the three Penicillium strains (P. granulatum, P. crustosum, P. commune) adhered on wood, as not predicted theoretically. Moreover, the time of adhesion (3 h and 24 h) was used not only to compare the capacity of adhesion according to contact time but also to explain the discrepancies between the XDLVO approach prediction and the adhesion experiments. A positive relationship between the XDLVO approach and adhesion experiments has been observed after 3 h of adhesion. In contrast, a contradiction between the XDLVO predictions and the adhesion test results has been noted after 24 h of adhesion of Penicillium strains to the wood surface. Highlights: ► Calculation of free energy of adhesion to cedar wood of Penicillium by XDLVO approach ► Adhesion is not favorable for all Penicillium spores–cedar wood combinations. ► Adhesion tests demonstrated the ability of Penicillium spores to adhere to cedar wood. ► XDLVO approach correlated well with the results obtained after 3 h of adhesion. ► Discrepancy between XDLVO predictions and experimental observations at 24 h of adhesion.

  5. Studies on Schistosomiasis japonica and Saponins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edito Garcia

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available The molluscicidal activity of the bark of Entada phaseoloides and extracts from tubers of its related specie, Entada parvifolia against Oncomelania quadrasi, the snail intermediate host of Shistosoma japonicum in the Philippines were determined.The commercial gogo bark applied to waters with O. quadrasi, in the proportion of 2 gms/liter will kill 100% of snails within 24 hours. At this concentration miracidia and cercariae of S. japonicum in the same waters will die within one hour, thus, making the water safe or noninfective for some time. At the dose 100 gms/sqm of water-covered terrestial snail habitats, provided previously cleared of vegetations, at least 90% of O. quadrasi will die within 24 hours. These measures can be practical on a self-help basis by inhabitants of schistosomiasis endemic areas where gogo plant grows or where its bark is marketed.At dilution of 1:5,000 saponin extracted from tubers of E. parvifolia killed at least 90% of snails after 24 hours exposure while ethanol (crude saponin and other extracts require at least 1:2,000 concentration to kill at least 90% of O. quadrasi. At these concentrations and the expenses and time involved in the preparation of these extracts, they are not economical or practical for large scale use of molluscicides.It is suggested that methods of extraction and purification which require little time of preparation and a cheaper but of higher recovery rate of molluscicidal principles be developed.Surveys of barrios in three towns of Leyte, endemic for Schistosomiasis japonica using the circum oval-precipitin test (COPT and stool examination in the same subjects were undertaken. Findings show that the use of blood COPT method is advantageous over that of the stool examination in schistosomiasis surveys as its prescribed procedure is simple, specific and more sensitive. Moreover, the prevalence rate it determined was higher than that obtained by the stool examination in all three towns studied with

  6. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 6) to Cedar Keys NWR : Revised report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Cedar...

  7. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, and West Sister Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1983 calendar year. The report...

  8. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 1973 Annual Narrative Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge, West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge, Navarre Unit,...

  9. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 1987 Annual Water Management Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Management Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan. Ottawa NWR, Cedar...

  10. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 1988 Annual Water Management Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Management Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan. Ottawa NWR, Cedar...

  11. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 2009 Water Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Book has been developed monitor water levels at all units in the Refuge Complex. Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby...

  12. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 2012 Water Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Book has been developed monitor water levels at all units in the Refuge Complex. Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby...

  13. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 2010 Water Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Book has been developed monitor water levels at all units in the Refuge Complex. Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby...

  14. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 2011 Water Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Book has been developed monitor water levels at all units in the Refuge Complex. Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby...

  15. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 2014 Water Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Book has been developed monitor water levels at all units in the Refuge Complex. Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby...

  16. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 2013 Water Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Book has been developed monitor water levels at all units in the Refuge Complex. Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby...

  17. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 2005 Water Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Book has been developed monitor water levels at all units in the Refuge Complex. Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby...

  18. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 2008 Water Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Book has been developed monitor water levels at all units in the Refuge Complex. Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby...

  19. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 2007 Water Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Book has been developed monitor water levels at all units in the Refuge Complex. Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby...

  20. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 2015 Water Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Book has been developed monitor water levels at all units in the Refuge Complex. Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, the...

  1. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, West Sister Island NWR, Navarre Marsh, and Darby Marsh outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979...

  2. Road and Street Centerlines, Cedar Roads, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as 'Cedar Roads'. The extent of these data...

  3. Effect of polystimulin growth regulators and scion clones on graft success and subsequent growth in Atlantic cedar (Cedrus atlantica Manetti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirdar, Erol; Ertekin, Murat

    2007-04-01

    Atlantic cedar (Cedrus atlantica Manetti) was grown, grafting onto the rootstocks of 2 years old Lebanon cedar (Cedrus libani L.). The mixture of polystimulin (PS) growth regulators was used to determine the effects on graft success and subsequent growth during three growing seasons. Scion clones had no effect on grafts success. PS increased the graft success by 20% in comparison to controls. PS-treated grafts burst their buds 18-20 days earlier than control grafts and increased shoot elongation. The PS-treated grafts had 4-5 cm longer shoots than controls at the end of three growing seasons. Thus, this research indicates the significance of PS-application on graft success and subsequent shoot growth on Atlantic cedar. It suggested that use of PS-treated grafts was more profitable than controls. Polystimulins which were used in small doses contributed significantly to the metabolism of Atlantic cedar seedlings after grafting.

  4. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 2006 Water Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Book has been developed monitor water levels at all units in the Refuge Complex. Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby...

  5. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, and West Sister Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1985 calendar year. The report...

  6. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, and West Sister Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report...

  7. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, and West Sister Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1986 calendar year. The report...

  8. Department of the Interior : Draft Environmental Statement : DES 74-19 : Proposed Mattamuskeet - Swanquarter - Cedar Island - Pea Island Wilderness Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a draft of an analysis of the environmental impact wilderness designation would pose for the Mattamuskeet - Swanquarter - Cedar Island - Pea Island...

  9. Road and Street Centerlines, Cedar Area roads, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as 'Cedar Area roads'. The extent of these...

  10. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 1992 Annual Water Management Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Management Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan. Ottawa NWR, Cedar...

  11. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa, Cedar Point, and West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year....

  12. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, and West Sister Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report...

  13. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, West Sister Island NWR, Navarre Marsh, and Darby Marsh outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1980...

  14. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, and West Sister Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1981 calendar year. The report...

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dugesia japonica (Platyhelminthes; order Tricladida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Masato; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru

    2012-10-01

    We used two sequencing methods, namely long polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and primer walking, to determine the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Dugesia japonica and most of the mtDNA sequence of Dugesia ryukyuensis. The genome of D. japonica contained 36 genes including 12 of the 13 protein-coding genes characteristic of metazoan mitochondrial genomes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. The genome of D. ryukyuensis contained 33 genes, including 12 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 19 transfer RNA genes. The gene order of the mitochondrial genome from the Dugesia species showed no clear homology with either the Neodermata or other free-living Rhabditophora. This indicates that the platyhelminths exhibit great variability in mitochondrial gene order. This is the first complete sequence analysis of the mitochondrial genome of a free-living member of Rhabditophora, which will facilitate further studies on the population genetics and genomic evolution of the Platyhelminthes.

  16. Flavonoids and fatty acids of Camellia japonica leaves extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthia M. Azuma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The ethanol extract from the leaves of Camellia japonica L., Theaceae, showed antiradical potential in the DPPH test using TLC plates (SiO2. Aiming the isolation of active compounds, this extract was partitioned between BuOH:H2O (1:1 and the two obtained phases were also evaluated to detection of antiradical activity. The active BuOH phase was fractionated in Sephadex LH-20 and silica (normal or reverse phase to afford three aglycone flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol and apigenin, which have been described in the C. japonica at first time, two glycosilated flavonoids (rutin and quercetrin, and a mixture of saturated fatty acids. The structures of isolated compounds were defined by NMR and GC/MS analyses.

  17. Genetic Structure and Indica/Japonica Component Changes in Major Inbred Rice Varieties in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ping; YUAN Xiao-ping; XU Qun; WANG Cai-hong; YU Han-yong; WANG Yi-ping; TANG Sheng-xiang

    2013-01-01

    We used 39 SSR markers to analyze the genetic structure of 304 major Chinese inbred rice varieties,and to compare changes in the indica or japonica components in these varieties that have been widely cultivated from the 1950s to the 1990s in China.The genetic structure analysis showed that these rice varieties were distinctly divided into two populations,indica and japonica.The sub-structure of indica varieties was more complex than that of japonica ones.Among the various lines,late-season indica and early season japonica varieties had simpler genetic backgrounds.The seasonal ecotypes were not quite consistent with the subtypes of genetic structure.Twelve SSR loci with specific differentiation between indica and japonica were used to calculate the indica/japonica components.The differences in indica/japonica components among the five decades were not significant,except for late-season indica varieties in the 1990s,which had a significantly higher japonica component.These results will help to understand the genetic structure of the major Chinese inbred rice varieties and will be useful for indica-japonica hybrid breeding in China.

  18. Genetic Differentiations among the Populations of Salvia japonica (Lamiaceae and Its Related Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUDARMONO

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and genetic variations within Salvia japonica (Lamiaceae and its related species in Japan were analyzed for clarifying their taxonomic significance. The genetic variations were explored through chloroplast and nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences and allozyme polymorphisms. Since chromosome numbers characterized the genus of Salvia, we also examined whether the karyotypes were different. We examined 58 populations of S. japonica and 14 populations of others species of Salvia. Among the populations of S. japonica represented four forms (f. japonica, f. longipes, f. lanuginosa and f. albiflora. The size of chromosomes were various among Salvia spp. Based on the allozyme as well as the DNA sequence, the populations of S. japonica separated from the others Salvia species. The populations of S. japonica exhibited four combinations of the morphological characters. However, these combinations did not correlate to the four forms of S. japonica. In addition, the morphological variations did not correlate to the allozyme and DNA sequences. It is suggested that the four morphological variations as well as the four form of S. japonica should not considered to be a taxonomic unit; accordingly, S. japonica were considered to be still at the early stage of speciation process.

  19. Antimicrobial Air Filters Using Natural Euscaphis japonica Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi Byoung Hwang

    Full Text Available Controlling bioaerosols has become more important with increasing participation in indoor activities. Treatments using natural-product nanomaterials are a promising technique because of their relatively low toxicity compared to inorganic nanomaterials such as silver nanoparticles or carbon nanotubes. In this study, antimicrobial filters were fabricated from natural Euscaphis japonica nanoparticles, which were produced by nebulizing E. japonica extract. The coated filters were assessed in terms of pressure drop, antimicrobial activity, filtration efficiency, major chemical components, and cytotoxicity. Pressure drop and antimicrobial activity increased as a function of nanoparticle deposition time (590, 855, and 1150 µg/cm2(filter at 3-, 6-, and 9-min depositions, respectively. In filter tests, the antimicrobial efficacy was greater against Staphylococcus epidermidis than Micrococcus luteus; ~61, ~73, and ~82% of M. luteus cells were inactivated on filters that had been coated for 3, 6, and 9 min, respectively, while the corresponding values were ~78, ~88, and ~94% with S. epidermidis. Although statistically significant differences in filtration performance were not observed between samples as a function of deposition time, the average filtration efficacy was slightly higher for S. epidermidis aerosols (~97% than for M. luteus aerosols (~95%. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MS analyses confirmed that the major chemical compounds in the E. japonica extract were 1(ß-O-galloyl pedunculagin, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, and kaempferol-3-O-glucoside. In vitro cytotoxicity and disk diffusion tests showed that E. japonica nanoparticles were less toxic and exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity toward some bacterial strains than a reference soluble nickel compound, which is classified as a human carcinogen. This study provides valuable information for the development of a

  20. Antimicrobial and antipathogenic activity of Fallopia japonica leaves alcoholic extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana-Cristina Marinaş

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study consists in the investigation of the antimicrobial and antiphatogenic activity of ethanol extracts obtain from F. japonica leaves. Total phenolic content was determined by Folin-Ciocalteu method, while their phenolic composition was specified by HPLC. In vitro antimicrobial activity of various concentrations ranging from 6.25 to 200 μL/mL of alcoholic (ethanol 70% extract of F. japonica were analyzed on different clinical and reference bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii and fungal strains belonging to Candida spp. using agar disk diffusion method and broth dilution method. The anti-pathogenic properties were studied by determining the adhesion capacity of microbial strains to inert substrate. The soluble virulence factors were quantified using specific media with different biochemical substrats for revealing haemolysins, lecithinase, gelatinase, lipase, DN-ase, amylase and iron chelating agents. The antibiogram adapted technique assesseded the synergic effects of F. japonica leaves extracts with the clinical used antibiotics for different bacterial strains. The studied extract showed the best antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa (6.25 μL/mL due to phenolic compound identified (epicatechin, rutin and quercetin. In the Gram-positive strains’ case were observed phenotypic changes in the DNA-ase and lechitinase enzymes expression. In the antibioresistance pattern profiling it was observed that F. japonica leaves improved the Kanamycin activity for S. aureus, Colistin for P. aeruginosa and Meropenem for A. baumanii. In this respect, could be assumed that this extract could be used complementarily with antibiotherapy, by inhibiting the specific virulence factors.

  1. Karyotypic analysis of Skimmia japonica (Rutaceae) and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tomoko; Naiki, Akiyo; Nagamasu, Hidetoshi

    2007-01-01

    A karyotypic analysis of three species of Skimmia (Rutaceae) in East Asia was performed that examined 88 individuals from 53 localities. Chromosome numbers of S. japonica, S. reevesiana and S. arisanensis were 2n=30, 31, 32 (=30+0-2B), 2n=60 and 2n=60, respectively. The chromosome number of S. arisanensis was reported for the first time. All species had a large chromosome pair or quartet (the first pair or quartet) with a median-submedian centromere in the karyotype. In S. japonica the arm ratio of this first pair was considerably variable and showed a geographical pattern. In the northern half of the distribution range, Sakhalin, Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku and part of Kyushu, the arm ratio was 1-1.2, while in the southern half, part of Kyushu, Ryukyu and Taiwan, the arm ratio was very variable and ranged from 1.2 to 2.4. In S. japonica the first pair was sometimes rather heteromorphic; however, the heteromorphism was not related to sex of the plant.

  2. Valencene oxidase CYP706M1 from Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankar, Katarina; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Goedbloed, Miriam; Renirie, Rokus; de Jong, René M; Bouwmeester, Harro; Bosch, Dirk; Sonke, Theo; Beekwilder, Jules

    2014-03-18

    (+)-Nootkatone is a natural sesquiterpene ketone used in grapefruit and citrus flavour compositions. It occurs in small amounts in grapefruit and is a major component of Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) heartwood essential oil. Upon co-expression of candidate cytochrome P450 enzymes from Alaska cedar in yeast with a valencene synthase, a C. nootkatensis valencene oxidase (CnVO) was identified to produce trans-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone. Formation of (+)-nootkatone was detected at 144±10μg/L yeast culture. CnVO belongs to a new subfamily of the CYP706 family of cytochrome P450 oxidases. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The expression of a mountain cedar allergen comparing plant-viral apoplastic and yeast expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehnke, Marcie H; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M; Kearney, Christopher M

    2008-07-01

    Jun a 3, a major allergenic protein in mountain cedar pollen, causes seasonal allergic rhinitis in hypersensitive individuals. Recombinant Jun a 3 was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana interstitial fluid (300 microg/g leaf material) and Pichia pastoris (100 microg/ml media). Polyclonal anti-Jun a 3 and IgE antibodies from the sera of allergic patients both reacted with the recombinant protein. Of the two systems, recombinant protein from the plant apoplast contained fewer contaminating proteins. This method allows for a more convenient and inexpensive expression of the recombinant allergen, which will allow for further structural studies and may prove useful in diagnostic and/or immunotherapeutic strategies for cedar allergy.

  4. Produce of seedlings of cedar in function of types of container and fertilization sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Henrique de Castro Pias

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of cedar seedlings according to the size of containers and nutrient sources. It was tested three types of containers (Root trainers, plastic bag and plastic vase, three sources of fertilization (Conventional, Kimcoat® and Osmocote® in seven evaluations. The cedar seedlings in root trainers, fertilized with source Osmocote® presented the greatest increments in height and stem diameter when compared to another sources of fertilization. The plastic bag and plastic vase containers promoted similar seedlings height growth. However the seedlings grown in plastic vase presented greatest growth in stem diameter when compared with the ones in plastic bag.

  5. Relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomichi Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP is an important illness caused by the inhalation of airborne allergenic cedar pollens, which are dispersed in the early spring throughout the Japanese islands. However, associations between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of allergic symptoms are largely unknown, due to a lack of understanding regarding personal pollen exposures in relation to indoor and outdoor concentrations. This study aims to examine the relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts. We conducted a 4-year monitoring campaign to quantify indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne cedar pollen counts, where the personal passive settling sampler that has been previously validated against a volumetric sampler was used to count airborne pollen grains. A total of 256 sets of indoor, outdoor, and personal samples (768 samples were collected from 9 subjects. Medians of the seasonally-integrated indoor-to-outdoor, personal-to-outdoor, and personal-to-indoor ratios of airborne pollen counts measured for 9 subjects were 0.08, 0.10, and 1.19, respectively. A greater correlation was observed between the personal and indoor counts (r = 0.89 than between the personal and outdoor counts (r = 0.71, suggesting a potential inaccuracy in the use of outdoor counts as a basis for estimating personal exposures. The personal pollen counts differed substantially among the human subjects (49% geometric coefficient of variation, in part due to the variability in the indoor counts that have been found as major determinants of the personal pollen counts. The findings of this study highlight the need for pollen monitoring in proximity to human subjects to better understand the relationships between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of pollen allergy.

  6. Changes in the soil bacterial communities in a cedar plantation invaded by moso bamboo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Te; Tang, Sen-Lin; Pai, Chuang-Wen; Whitman, William B; Coleman, David C; Chiu, Chih-Yu

    2014-02-01

    Moso bamboo is fast-growing and negatively allelopathic to neighboring plants. However, there is little information on the effects of its establishment and expansion to adjacent forest soil communities. To better understand the impacts of bamboo invasion on soil communities, the phylogenetic structure and diversity of the soil bacterial communities in moso bamboo forest, adjacent Japanese cedar plantation, and bamboo-invaded transition zone were examined using a combination of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and bar-coded pyrosequencing techniques. Based on the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs), Shannon diversity index, Chao1 estimator, and rarefaction analysis of both techniques, the bamboo soil bacterial community was the most diverse, followed by the transition zone, with the cedar plantation possessing the lowest diversity. The results from both techniques revealed that the Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria predominated in the three communities, though the relative abundance was different. The 250 most abundant OTUs represented about 70% of the total sequences found by pyrosequencing. Most of these OTUs were found in all three soil communities, demonstrating the overall similarity among the bacterial communities. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis showed further that the bamboo and transition soil communities were more similar with each other than the cedar soils. These results suggest that bamboo invasion to the adjacent cedar plantation gradually increased the bacterial diversity and changed the soil community. In addition, while the 10 most abundant OTUs were distributed worldwide, related sequences were not abundant in soils from outside the forest studied here. This result may be an indication of the uniqueness of this region.

  7. Osteology of the Basal Hadrosauroid Eolambia caroljonesa (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda) from the Cedar Mountain Formation of Utah

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Andrew T.; John Bird; Kirkland, James I.; Peter Dodson

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eolambia caroljonesa is known from copious remains from the lower Cenomanian Mussentuchit Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation in eastern Utah; however, the taxon has been only briefly described. Thus, we present herein a complete osteological description of Eolambia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The description of Eolambia presented here is based upon the holotype partial skeleton (CEUM 9758), paratype partial skull (CEUM 5212), and abundant disarticulated elements from two ...

  8. The expression of a mountain cedar allergen comparing plant-viral apoplastic and yeast expression systems

    OpenAIRE

    Moehnke, Marcie H.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M.; Kearney, Christopher M

    2008-01-01

    Jun a 3, a major allergenic protein in mountain cedar pollen, causes seasonal allergic rhinitis in hypersensitive individuals. Recombinant Jun a 3 was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana interstitial fluid (300 μg/g leaf material) and Pichia pastoris (100 μg/ml media). Polyclonal anti-Jun a 3 and IgE antibodies from the sera of allergic patients both reacted with the recombinant protein. Of the two systems, recombinant protein from the plant apoplast contained fewer contaminating proteins. Thi...

  9. [Characteristics of canopy structure of super high yielding japonica hybrid rice community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinhong; Zhang, Guoping; Guo, Hengde; Mao, Guojuan

    2003-06-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of canopy structure, such as the numbers of seedling, panicle and grain, the distribution of dry matters in different canopy layers and different organs, and the distributions of LAI and of solar radiation in different canopy layers of super high yielding community of japonica hybrid rice were studied, in comparison with normal japonica rice. The results showed that the total the dry matter weight and the dry matter weight of layers below 40 cm, 40-60 cm, 60-80 cm and above 80 cm of japonica hybrid rice canopy were 32.29%, 29.12%, 13.95%, 16.45% and 100.17% higher those that of normal japonica rice, respectively. The ratios of dry leaf (photosynthetic organ) and of dry panicle (sink organ) weight to total dry weight were 24.8% and 12.8%, respectively, which were greater than those of normal japonica rice, while the ratios of dry sheath and stem (storage organs) weight were 33.6% and 28.9%, respectively, which were lower than those of normal japonica rice. The allotment of LAI in different layers of japonica hybrid rice canopy was reasonable, and the LAI of above 40 cm layer at full heading stage reached 5.44. The solar radiation was well-distributed inside japonica hybrid rice canopy, for example, the solar radiation in layers below 60 cm were 13.1%-37.0% higher, but 5.9%-12.2% lower above 60 cm than that of normal japonica rice. The extinction coefficients of solar radiation in layers below 20 cm, 20-40 cm, 40-60 cm and 60-80 cm of japonica hybrid rice canopy were 35.1%, 13.5%, 29.1% and 17.2% lower than that of normal japonica rice, respectively.

  10. Evaluating the Invasion of Red Cedar (Juniperus viriginiana) Downstream of Gavins Point Dam, Missouri National Recreational River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S.; Knox, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Gavins Point Dam, the final dam on the main-stem Missouri River, alters downstream river form and function. Throughout a 59-mile downstream reach, the dam reduces overbank flooding and lowers the water surface by 1-3 meters. Under the dam-created hydro-geomorphic conditions, native cottonwood trees are unable to regenerate. The limited regeneration of native riparian cottonwoods, the lowered water surface, and the reduced overbank flooding creates a terrace environment within the riparian habitat. Consequently, red cedars, a native upland tree, are invading this new terrace-like riparian environment. To this end, we apply Bayesian statistical models to investigate patterns of red cedar riparian invasion and assess ecosystem function patterns along this flow-regulated reach. We set up plots within cottonwood stands along a 59-km reach downstream of Gavins Point Dam. Within each plot, we collected soil samples, litter samples, stem densities of trees, and collected cores of the largest cottonwood and largest red cedar in each plot. To assess influences of red cedar on soil indicators of ecosystem function and general patterns of ecosystem function within the study area, we measured organic carbon, nitrogen, pH, electrical conductivity, and hydrophobicity. To determine drivers and patterns of invasion and ecosystem function we conducted Bayesian linear regressions and means comparison tests. Red cedars existed along the floodplain prior to regulation. However, according to our tree age data and stem density data red cedars existed at a lower population than today. We found that 2 out of 565 red cedars established before the dam was completed. Also, we found no significant difference in soil properties between soils with established red cedar and soils with established cottonwood. By studying soil texture data, and interpreting fluvial geomorphic surfaces in the field and via aerial photography, we found soil texture generally reflects the type of fluvial surface

  11. Growth and mineral nutrition in seedlings of australian cedar (Toona ciliata subjected to nutrient deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno da Silva Moretti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate nutritional requirements and the effect of nutrient deprivation on the development of seedlings of Australian cedar (Toona ciliata M. Roem var. australis, a greenhouse experiment was conducted. The substrate used was a dystroferric red latosol with low nutrient availability, using 15 treatments and applying the missing element technique. The experiment included two complete treatments (one provided N, P, K, S, B, Cu, Zn with limestone while another provided N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, B, Cu and Zn without limestone, besides deprivation of each nutrient (-N, -P, -K, -Ca, -Mg, -S, -B, -Cu and -Zn, one treatment with combined deprivation of B, Cu and Zn, one treatment applying limestone only, one treatment applying N, P, K, S, B, Cu and Zn, without limestone, and one absolute control treatment (natural soil. The following characteristics were evaluated: height, diameter, shoot dry matter and root dry matter, and nutrient content in the shoot dry matter after 150 days. Australian cedar plants have high nutritional requirements, and nutrients P, N, S, Ca, K, Mg and Cu, in that order, were found to be limiting factors to plant development. B and Zn deprivation did not affect plant development. Limestone application was essential for the development of Australian cedar plants. Initial deficiency symptoms were found to be the result of S, limestone and N deprivation.

  12. EffectsofDifferentEcologicalConditionsonGrainQualityandRVAProfileCharaCteriSticSofJaponicaRiceVarietiesfrOmYunnanPlateauofChinaandKorea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenhua ZHU; Pingrong YUAN; Guozhen ZHAO; Zhenxi SU; Xinhua LIAO; Seajun YANG; Luyuan DAI

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to investigate the variation characteristics of Yunnan and Korean japonica rice quality under different environmental conditions in Yunnan Plateau. [Method] Ten Yunnan japonica rice varieties and six Korean japoni- ca rice varieties were selected to investigate the effects of ecological conditions on grain quality characteristics and starch RVA profile characteristic values of Yunnan and Korean japonica rice. [Result] The coefficient of variation of Yunnan and Korean japonica rice reached the maximum in setback viscosity (SBV). The coefficients of variation of brown rice length (BRL), chalkiness rate (CR), amylose content (AC), protein content (PC), alkali digestion value (ADV), final viscosity (FLV), setback vis- cosity (SBV) and peak time (PET) of Yunnan japonica rice varieties were significant- ly higher than those of Korean japonica rice, while other grain quality characteristics were contrary. With the increasing altitudes, BRL, brown rice width (BRW), length- width ratio (L/W), whiteness (WH), AC, ADV, FLV and consistence viscosity (CTV) of Yunnan japonica rice and BRL, BRW, WH, PC, peak viscosity (PKV), hot viscosi- ty (HTV) and breakdown viscosity (BDV) of Korean japonica rice were significantly reduced , while CR, PC, HTV and PeT of Yunnan japonica rice and L/W, AC, ADV and CTV of Korean japonica rice significantly increased, but CR of Korean japonica rice showed no significantly variation. PKV, BDV and pasting temperature (PAT) of Yunnan japonica rice and PaT of Korean japonica rice showed an upward trend af- ter an initial drop with the increasing altitudes, while SBV of Yunnan japonica rice and FLV and PeT of Korean japonica rice were contrary. [Conclusion] This study provided theoretical basis for breeding of japonica rice in Yunnan Plateau.

  13. 50 CFR 226.215 - Critical habitat for the North Pacific Right Whale (Eubalaena japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Right Whale (Eubalaena japonica). 226.215 Section 226.215 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE... DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.215 Critical habitat for the North Pacific Right Whale (Eubalaena japonica). (a) Primary Constituent Elements. The primary constituent elements of the North Pacific right...

  14. Screening on the Pharmacodynemic Active Parts of Protecting Liver of Peristrope japonica (thunb.)Bremek

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨希雄; 皮慧芳; 张国欣; 庞雪冰; 吴继洲

    2004-01-01

    The pharmacodynamic active parts of protecting liver of Peristrope japonica (thunb.)Bremek were identified. Rat acute liver injury model was induced by D-galactosamine (D-GlaN).The active parts were identified on the whole extraction and 4 fractions. The results showed that the pharmacodynamic active parts of Peristrope japonica were the n-BuOH fraction.

  15. Indoor and outdoor concentrations of Japanese cedar pollens and total suspended particulates: A case study at a kindergarten in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Naomichi [Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Tokai University, Bohseidai, Isehara-shi, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Ichiban-cho 8, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Nishikawa, Junko; Sakamoto, Miho; Shimizu, Tomomi; Matsuki, Hideaki [Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Tokai University, Bohseidai, Isehara-shi, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP) caused by allergenic cedar and cypress pollens is one of major economic and health issues in Japan. The present study reported here aimed to provide basic data to understand the status of early life exposures to airborne cedar and cypress pollens in school settings. In particular, the study investigated relationships between indoor and outdoor concentrations of airborne cedar and cypress pollens and total suspended particulates (TSP) in a kindergarten in Japan. Overall, outdoor concentrations of the airborne pollens and TSP were higher than the indoor concentrations, i.e., indoor to outdoor (I/O) ratios of 0.043-0.055 and 0.545 for the airborne pollens and TSP, respectively. The smaller I/O ratios for the pollens were expected because the larger pollen grains (20-30 {mu}m in diameter) were less likely penetrated to indoor environment than for smaller airborne particulates. The present study also found increased TSP concentrations during the pollen season was likely attributed to increased airborne pollen concentrations. By understanding the status of indoor and outdoor concentrations of airborne cedar and cypress pollens in school settings, early life exposures to these allergenic pollens should be effectively minimized to prevent subsequent progression to JCP symptoms. (author)

  16. Early results from genetic trials on the growth of Spanish cedar and itssusceptibility to the shoot borer moth in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheila E. Ward; Kevyn E. Wightman; Bartolo. Rodriguez Santiago

    2008-01-01

    Cedrela odorata (Spanish cedar) is a neotropical broadleaf tree species that is in high demand for furniture and interior fittings. In 1998, seed collections were made from Spanish cedar in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, for genetic conservation and tree improvement projects. Progeny from these collections were established in genetic trials at Bacalar, Noh Bec, and Zoh...

  17. Study on sound absorption characteristics of Cryptomeria fortunei Hooibrenk ex Otto et Dietr%柳杉木材吸声性能的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王东; 彭立民; 傅峰; 王军锋; 朱广勇

    2014-01-01

    The sound absorption performance of solid wood is closely linked with its microcosmic structure. The research of sound absorption performance of solid wood has important practical significance. The relations between Cryptomeria fortunei’s sound-absorbing properties and texture, thickness, heartwood and sapwood, and moisture content were investigated by using impedance tube method. The results show that the sound absorption performance on the cross-section in the texture direction was the best, the sound absorption coefficient of sapwood was slightly higher than that of heartwood’s;As the thickness of the tested wood increased the sound absorption coefficient also raised correspondingly within the 1500~2500 Hz;and the sound absorption coefficient moved toward the low-frequency direction. the sound absorption coefficient with high frequency reduced, and the wood’s sound-absorbing properties that its moisture content was under fiber saturation point, was higher than that its moisture content was above fiber saturation point.%实木的吸声性能与其微观构造有着紧密的联系,研究实木的吸声性能有着重要的现实意义。本实验利用阻抗管,研究了柳杉木材吸声性能与其纹理方向、厚度、心边材、木材含水率之间的关系。结果表明在纹理方向上横切面的吸声性能最好,边材略高于心材。在1500~2500 Hz内,随木材厚度的增加吸声系数不断增加,并且随厚度的增加吸收峰会向低频方向移动,随厚度增加高频的吸声系数会降低,纤维饱和点以下木材吸声性能明显高于纤维饱和点以上的。

  18. Soil ecology of a rock outcrop ecosystem: Abiotic stresses, soil respiration, and microbial community profiles in limestone cedar glades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Advised by Dzantor, E. Kudjo

    2015-01-01

    Limestone cedar glades are a type of rock outcrop ecosystem characterized by shallow soil and extreme hydrologic conditions—seasonally ranging from xeric to saturated—that support a number of plant species of conservation concern. Although a rich botanical literature exists on cedar glades, soil biochemical processes and the ecology of soil microbial communities in limestone cedar glades have largely been ignored. This investigation documents the abiotic stress regime of this ecosystem (shallow soil, extreme hydrologic fluctuations and seasonally high soil surface temperatures) as well as soil physical and chemical characteristics, and relates both types of information to ecological structures and functions including vegetation, soil respiration, and soil microbial community metabolic profiles and diversity. Methods used in this investigation include field observations and measurements of soil physical and chemical properties and processes, laboratory analyses, and microbiological assays of soil samples.

  19. Schistosomiasis japonica: modelling as a tool to explore transmission patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun-Fang; Lv, Shan; Wang, Qing-Yun; Qian, Men-Bao; Liu, Qin; Bergquist, Robert; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-01-01

    Modelling is an important tool for the exploration of Schistosoma japonicum transmission patterns. It provides a general theoretical framework for decision-makers and lends itself specifically to assessing the progress of the national control programme by following the outcome of surveys. The challenge of keeping up with the many changes of social, ecological and environmental factors involved in control activities is greatly facilitated by modelling that can also indicate which activities are critical and which are less important. This review examines the application of modelling tools in the epidemiological study of schistosomiasis japonica during the last 20 years and explores the application of enhanced models for surveillance and response. Updated and timely information for decision-makers in the national elimination programme is provided but, in spite of the new modelling techniques introduced, many questions remain. Issues on application of modelling are discussed with the view to improve the current situation with respect to schistosomiasis japonica. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Golden Indica and Japonica rice lines amenable to deregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, Tran Thi Cuc; Al-Babili, Salim; Schaub, Patrick; Potrykus, Ingo; Beyer, Peter

    2003-09-01

    As an important step toward free access and, thus, impact of GoldenRice, a freedom-to-operate situation has been achieved for developing countries for the technology involved. Specifically, to carry the invention beyond its initial "proof-of-concept" status in a Japonica rice (Oryza sativa) cultivar, we report here on two transformed elite Indica varieties (IR64 and MTL250) plus one Japonica variety Taipei 309. Indica varieties are predominantly consumed in the areas with vitamin A deficiency. To conform with regulatory constraints, we changed the vector backbone, investigated the absence of beyond-border transfer, and relied on Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation to obtain defined integration patterns. To avoid an antibiotic selection system, we now rely exclusively on phosphomannose isomerase as the selectable marker. Single integrations were given a preference to minimize potential epigenetic effects in subsequent generations. These novel lines, now in the T(3) generation, are highly valuable because they are expected to more readily receive approval for follow-up studies such as nutritional and risk assessments and for breeding approaches leading to locally adapted variety development.

  1. Concentrating phenolic acids from Lonicera japonica by nanofiltration technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cunyu; Ma, Yun; Li, Hongyang; Peng, Guoping

    2017-03-01

    Response surface analysis methodology was used to optimize the concentrate process of phenolic acids from Lonicera japonica by nanofiltration technique. On the basis of the influences of pressure, temperature and circulating volume, the retention rate of neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid and 4-dicaffeoylquinic acid were selected as index, molecular weight cut-off of nanofiltration membrane, concentration and pH were selected as influencing factors during concentrate process. The experiment mathematical model was arranged according to Box-Behnken central composite experiment design. The optimal concentrate conditions were as following: nanofiltration molecular weight cut-off, 150 Da; solutes concentration, 18.34 µg/mL; pH, 4.26. The predicted value of retention rate was 97.99% under the optimum conditions, and the experimental value was 98.03±0.24%, which was in accordance with the predicted value. These results demonstrate that the combination of Box-Behnken design and response surface analysis can well optimize the concentrate process of Lonicera japonica water-extraction by nanofiltration, and the results provide the basis for nanofiltration concentrate for heat-sensitive traditional Chinese medicine.

  2. Bacteria Endosymbiont, Wolbachia, Promotes Parasitism of Parasitoid Wasp Asobara japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furihata, Shunsuke; Hirata, Makiko; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Hayakawa, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia is the most widespread endosymbiotic bacterium that manipulates reproduction of its arthropod hosts to enhance its own spread throughout host populations. Infection with Wolbachia causes complete parthenogenetic reproduction in many Hymenoptera, producing only female offspring. The mechanism of such reproductive manipulation by Wolbachia has been extensively studied. However, the effects of Wolbachia symbiosis on behavioral traits of the hosts are scarcely investigated. The parasitoid wasp Asobara japonica is an ideal insect to investigate this because symbiotic and aposymbiotic strains are available: Wolbachia-infected Tokyo (TK) and noninfected Iriomote (IR) strains originally collected on the main island and southwest islands of Japan, respectively. We compared the oviposition behaviors of the two strains and found that TK strain females parasitized Drosophila melanogaster larvae more actively than the IR strain, especially during the first two days after eclosion. Removing Wolbachia from the TK strain wasps by treatment with tetracycline or rifampicin decreased their parasitism activity to the level of the IR strain. Morphological and behavioral analyses of both strain wasps showed that Wolbachia endosymbionts do not affect development of the host female reproductive tract and eggs, but do enhance host-searching ability of female wasps. These results suggest the possibility that Wolbachia endosymbionts may promote their diffusion and persistence in the host A. japonica population not only at least partly by parthenogenesis but also by enhancement of oviposition frequency of the host females.

  3. Complete plastid genome of Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl and comparative analysis in Rosaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liqun; Guan, Qijie; Amin, Awais; Zhu, Wei; Li, Mengzhu; Li, Ximin; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Jingkui

    2016-01-01

    Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl (loquat) is an evergreen Rosaceae fruit tree widely distributed in subtropical regions. Its leaves are considered as traditional Chinese medicine and are of high medical value especially for cough and emesis. Thus, we sequenced the complete plastid genome of E. japonica to better utilize this important species. The complete plastid genome of E. japonica is 159,137 bp in length, which contains a typical quadripartite structure with a pair of inverted repeats (IR, 26,326 bp) separated by large (LSC, 89,202 bp) and small (SSC, 19,283 bp) single-copy regions. The E. japonica plastid genome encodes 112 unique genes which consist of 78 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Gene structure and content of E. japonica plastid genome are quite conserved and show similarity among Rosaceous species. Five large indels are unique to E. japonica in comparison with Pyrus pyrifolia and Prunus persica, which could be utilized as molecular markers. A total of 72 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected and most of them are mononucleotide repeats composed of A or T, indicating a strong A or T bias for base composition. The Ka and Ks ratios of most genes are lower than 1, which suggests that most genes are under purifying selection. The phylogenetic analysis described the evolutionary relationship within Rosaceae and fully supported a close relationship between E. japonica and P. pyrifolia.

  4. Transcriptome sequencing and De Novo analysis of Youngia japonica using the illumina platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulan Peng

    Full Text Available Youngia japonica, a weed species distributed worldwide, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. It is an ideal plant for studying the evolution of Asteraceae plants because of its short life history and abundant source. However, little is known about its evolution and genetic diversity. In this study, de novo transcriptome sequencing was conducted for the first time for the comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity of Y. japonica. The Y. japonica transcriptome was sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. We produced 21,847,909 high-quality reads for Y. japonica and assembled them into contigs. A total of 51,850 unigenes were identified, among which 46,087 were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database and 41,752 were annotated in the Swiss-Prot database. We mapped 9,125 unigenes onto 163 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database. In addition, 3,648 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were detected. Our data provide the most comprehensive transcriptome resource currently available for Y. japonica. C4 photosynthesis unigenes were found in the biological process of Y. japonica. There were 5596 unigenes related to defense response and 1344 ungienes related to signal transduction mechanisms (10.95%. These data provide insights into the genetic diversity of Y. japonica. Numerous SSRs contributed to the development of novel markers. These data may serve as a new valuable resource for genomic studies on Youngia and, more generally, Cichoraceae.

  5. Advances and Prospects in Breeding Japonica Rice for Super High Yield in the Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wen-fu; XU Zheng-jin; ZHANG Wen-zhong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, advances and prospects in breeding japonica rice for super high yield in the northern China were analyzed comprehensively in terms of breeding theories, techniques and practices. The author holds that developing and spreading super rice is an important way to enhance the overall yielding ability of japonica rice and attaining immense expansion of rice production. After theories and technical guidelines for super rice breeding were formulated, which involved the creation of new plant morphology and strong hybrid vigor through crossing indica with japonica subspecies, the optimization of combination of desirable traits via multiple crossing or backcrossing, the assemblage of favorable genes and the integration of ideal plant morphology with the utilization of vigor-major breakthroughs have been made in conventional breeding of japonica super rice. A batch of new super rice varieties marked by superior rice quality and high disease resistance, such as Shennong 265, Shennong 606, and Jijing 88, etc., have been developed and released. In comparison with the advancement in conventional breeding of super rice, progress in hybrid japonica super rice breeding is slower because of climatic and ecological constraint in northern China. Therefore, solving the contradictions between vigor and growth duration, between yield and rice quality, and boosting vastly seed production are still serious challenges for breeders of hybrid japonica rice. Physiological and genetic problems in japonica super rice breeding are also discussed in this paper.

  6. ESTs analyses of Lampetra japonica liver and comparation transcriptome with the jawed vertebrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A cDNA library was constructed from the liver of Lampetra japonica. 10077 ESTs were obtained by random selecting clones for sequencing. The results demonstrated that 8515 ESTs were assembled into 648 consensus sequences, represented 2210 unique transcripts, 47.06% of which were predicted as full length cDNAs. In addition, 1562 ESTs were singlets. Using the BLAST to align the assembled ESTs, we found that 93.9% (2053) transcripts shared similarity to sequences published in GenBank databases. The functional annotations to assembled ESTs showed that the genes, involved in immunology, blood coagulation and metabolism of jawed vertebrates, were highly expressed in the liver of L. japonica. Furthermore, 8 potential novel genes were identified. Further comparing liver transcriptome of L. japonica with Fundulus heteroclitus, Mus musculus, Bos Taurus, and Homo sapiens revealed that the genes of Chitinase and Polysaccharides metabolism were more highly expressed in L. japonica than the others, which implied that they may play an important role in immunity of L. japonica. In addition, using the TargetScan, we marked microRNA target within 3′ UTR of L. japonica liver transcriptome. The data indicated that some microRNA targets were homology with the targets embeded in human cancer genes. The result seems to provide a useful clue to the treatment of human cancer. Therefore, the present work will be an important resource for investigating the functional genomics and proteomics of L. japonica as well as evolution of vertebrates.

  7. ESTs analyses of Lampetra japonica liver and comparation transcriptome with the jawed vertebrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A cDNA library was constructed from the liver of Lampetra japonica. 10077 ESTs were obtained by random selecting clones for sequencing. The results demonstrated that 8515 ESTs were assembled into 648 consensus sequences, represented 2210 unique transcripts, 47.06% of which were predicted as full length cDNAs. In addition, 1562 ESTs were singlets. Using the BLAST to align the assembled ESTs, we found that 93.9% (2053) transcripts shared similarity to sequences published in GenBank databases. The functional annotations to assembled ESTs showed that the genes, involved in immu-nology, blood coagulation and metabolism of jawed vertebrates, were highly expressed in the liver of L. japonica. Furthermore, 8 potential novel genes were identified. Further comparing liver transcriptome of L. japonica with Fundulus heteroclitus, Mus musculus, Bos Taurus, and Homo sapiens revealed that the genes of Chitinase and Polysaccharides metabolism were more highly expressed in L. japonica than the others, which implied that they may play an important role in immunity of L. japonica. In addi-tion, using the TargetScan, we marked microRNA target within 3′ UTR of L. japonica liver transcriptome. The data indicated that some microRNA targets were homology with the targets embeded in human cancer genes. The result seems to provide a useful clue to the treatment of human cancer. Therefore, the present work will be an important resource for investigating the functional genomics and pro-teomics of L. japonica as well as evolution of vertebrates.

  8. Variations of metabolites and proteome in Lonicera japonica Thunb. buds and flowers under UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Zheng, Wen; Hu, Xingjiang; Xu, Xiaobao; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Jingkui

    2017-04-01

    Lonicera japonica Thunb., also known as Jin Yin Hua and Japanese honeysuckle, is used as a herbal medicine in Asian countries. Its flowers have been used in folk medicine in the clinic and in making food or healthy beverages for over 1500years in China. To investigate the molecular processes involved in L. japonica development from buds to flowers exposed to UV radiation, a comparative proteomics analysis was performed. Fifty-four proteins were identified as differentially expressed, including 42 that had increased expression and 12 that had decreased expression. The levels of the proteins related to glycolysis, TCA/organic acid transformation, major carbohydrate metabolism, oxidative pentose phosphate, stress, secondary metabolism, hormone, and mitochondrial electron transport were increased during flower opening process after exposure to UV radiation. Six metabolites in L. japonica buds and flowers were identified and relatively quantified using LC-MS/MS. The antioxidant activity was performed using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay, which revealed that L. japonica buds had more activity than the UV irradiated flowers. This suggests that UV-B radiation induces production of endogenous ethylene in L. japonica buds, thus facilitating blossoming of the buds and activating the antioxidant system. Additionally, the higher metabolite contents and antioxidant properties of L. japonica buds indicate that the L. japonica bud stage may be a more optimal time to harvest than the flower stage when using for medicinal properties.

  9. Different gene expression patterns between leaves and flowers in Lonicera japonica revealed by transcriptome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libin eZhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The perennial and evergreen twining vine, Lonicera japonica is an important herbal medicine with great economic value. However, gene expression information for flowers and leaves of L. japonica remains elusive, which greatly impedes functional genomics research on this species. In this study, transcriptome profiles from leaves and flowers of L. japonica were examined using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 239.41 million clean reads were used for de novo assembly with Trinity software, which generated 150,523 unigenes with N50 containing 947 bp. All the unigenes were annotated using Nr, SwissProt, COGs (Clusters of Orthologous Groups, GO (Gene Ontology and KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. A total of 35,327 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, P≤0.05 between leaves and flowers were detected. Among them, a total of 6,602 DEGs were assigned with important biological processes including Metabolic process, Response to stimulus, Cellular process and etc. KEGG analysis showed that three possible enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of chlorogenic acid were up-regulated in flowers. Furthermore, the TF-based regulation network in L. japonica identified three differentially expressed transcription factors between leaves and flowers, suggesting distinct regulatory roles in L. japonica. Taken together, this study has provided a global picture of differential gene expression patterns between leaves and flowers in L japonica, providing a useful genomic resource that can also be used for functional genomics research on L. japonica in the future.

  10. Biodeterioration of products made from australian cedar (Toona ciliata M. Roem. var. australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Amarante Almeida

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the natural resistance of composite and solid wood panels from Toona ciliata to fungal attack through accelerated laboratory testing, to characterize the anatomical components of the wood according to IAWA, to quantify the soluble and insoluble lignin contents by acid hydrolysis and to determine the colorimetric parameters before and after fungal attack by using the CIE-L*a*b*(1976 system. Solid wood was classified as moderately and highly resistant to white-rot fungus (Trametes versicolor and to brown-rot fungus (Gloeophyllum trabeum. OSB panels were found to be resistant and moderately resistant to white-rot fungus and highly resistant to brown-rot fungus. Variation in species and particle type did not have a positive effect on the treatments. As regards the wood, both fungi were inhibited by the presence of phenolic resin. Particleboard panels were classified as moderately resistant to white-rot fungus. Treatments T2 (cedar and T4 (cedar-eucalyptus were resistant while treatment T3 (cedar-pine was not resistant to attack by brown-rot fungus. The urea-formaldehyde resin failed to inhibit attack in the same way the phenolic resin did. Anatomically, the species was found to have medium texture, straight vessel lines, pleasant smell after incision and poor luster on the radial surface. Its anatomical structure favored colonization by the threadlike filaments of the fungi. All treatments caused wood darkening after attack by the G. trabeum fungus, with total variation in color. It was observed that with weight loss an increase followed in insoluble lignin contents, in all treatments, indicating that this chemical property is a determining factor in wood resistance to the attack of the fungi being evaluated.

  11. Vitellogenin gene characterization and expression of Asian paddle crabs ( Charybdis japonica) following endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kiyun; Kwak, Tae-Soo; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2014-06-01

    Vitellogenin (VTG), the yolk-precursor lipoprotein, has been widely recognized as a biomarker for the detection of estrogenic activity in water-borne chemical pollutants. The Asian paddle crab, Charybdis japonica, is a potential bio-indicator for monitoring marine environments. The aim of this study was to identify the possibility of using C. japonica VTG as biomarkers of stress caused by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). We characterized a partial sequence of the VTG cDNA in the C. japonica crab and evaluated the crab's mRNA expression profiles following exposure to different concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-nonylphenol (NP) for 24 or 96 h. The sequence homology of C. japonica VTG is over 93% in nucleotide and over 98% in amino acid with the corresponding gene of other crabs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the C. japonica VTG is an ortholog of other species of lobster and shrimp. Tissue distribution analysis of the C. japonica VTG mRNA revealed that the expression of VTG mRNA was highest in the ovary of females and hepatopancreas. The expression of the C. japonica VTG gene in various BPA or NP concentrations during shorter and longer times was assessed. The expression of VTG transcripts was significantly increased in the C. japonica crab exposed to BPA and NP at different concentrations for 24 h. The mRNA expression of the VTG gene was significantly induced in concentration- and time-dependent manners after BPA or NP exposures for 96 h. These results indicate that crab C. japonica VTG could be used as a potential biomarker of EDCs in marine environment monitoring.

  12. Physics and roller coasters-The Blue Streak at Cedar Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers, Robert R.

    1991-06-01

    The use of a roller coaster for external classroom studies of kinematics, forces, dynamics, and energy conservation is discussed. Experimental accelerometer measurements of the vertical forces acting on riders of the Blue Streak at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio are presented. Theoretically, the track profile is used to calculate/predict the vertical forces acting on a rider at the hilltops, valley bottoms, and several other points of interest along the track. Finally the experimental results and theoretical predictions are compared in the context of a rider's experiences.

  13. Characterization of Japanese cedar bio-oil produced using a bench-scale auger pyrolyzer

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A bench-scale auger reactor was designed for use as a laboratory-scale fast pyrolyzer for producing bio-oil from Japanese cedar. An analytical pyrolysis method was performed simultaneously to determine the distribution of pyrolysis products. The pyrolysis temperature was found to have the greatest influence on the bio-oil characteristics; bio-oil yields increased as the pyrolysis temperature increased from 450 to 550 °C. The concentration of levoglucosan in the bio-oil, however, decreased sig...

  14. Threat to Cedar, Cedrela odorata, Plantations in Vietnam by the Weevil, Aclees sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Thu, Pham Quang; Quang, Dao Ngoc; Dell, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The recent decline and death of young cedar, Cedrela odorata L. (Sapindales: Meliaceae), plantations in Vietnam is caused by Aclees sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a wood-boring brown weevil. A field study was undertaken in three-year-old plantations in two districts in Thanh Hoa province in August 2008. Trees were heavily impacted by the weevil, Aclees; the infestation level (P) ranged from 80 to 100% and the average damage index (R) ranged from 1.8 to 2.8. Observations over one year enable...

  15. Cedar Grove: An Interdisciplinary Investigation of a Late Caddo Farmstead in the Red River Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-31

    the Matagorda Bay colony. Fernando del Bosque (Steck 1932). Neither of these In the meantime, in July 1685 the Spanish had learned expeditions...i-5. a. Class D rim designs found on pottery from Cedar Grove; b. Class D body designs CERAMICS 117I Pl amno iF m".no’ El Camino 3 EDorado Eliot I...the variety. It has a single row of diagonally incised lines of rim designs of the El Camino pattern on deep plain on a short rim (our Albertus 2

  16. [Investigation on formation mechanism of secologanic acid sulfonates in sulfur-fumigated buds of Lonicera japonica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ai-Li; Gao, Hui-Min; Chen, Liang-Mian; Zhang, Qi-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Min

    2014-05-01

    To investigate formation mechanism of secologanic acid sulfonates in sulfur-fumigated buds of Lonicera japonica, secologanic acid was enriched and purified from the sun-dried buds of L. japonica by various column chromatography on macroporus resin HPD-100, silica gel and ODS. The stimulation experiments of sulfur-fumigation process were carried out using secologanic acid reacted with SO2 in the aqueous solution. The reaction mechanism could be involved in the esterification or addition reaction. The present investigation provides substantial evidences for interpreting formation pathway of secologanic acid sulfonates in sulfur-fumigated buds of L. japonica.

  17. Characterization of Japanese cedar bio-oil produced using a bench-scale auger pyrolyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Ryohei; Akazawa, Minami; Kojima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A bench-scale auger reactor was designed for use as a laboratory-scale fast pyrolyzer for producing bio-oil from Japanese cedar. An analytical pyrolysis method was performed simultaneously to determine the distribution of pyrolysis products. The pyrolysis temperature was found to have the greatest influence on the bio-oil characteristics; bio-oil yields increased as the pyrolysis temperature increased from 450 to 550 °C. The concentration of levoglucosan in the bio-oil, however, decreased significantly with increasing pyrolysis temperature, while it increased following analytical pyrolysis. The same results were obtained for 4-vinylguaiacol and E-isoeugenol, which were the major secondary products produced in the present study. Compared to the yields of these major products obtained via analytical pyrolysis, the yields from the auger reactor were very low, indicating that the auger reactor process had a longer vapor residence time than the analytical pyrolysis process, resulting in the acceleration of secondary reactions of the pyrolysates. The pH values and densities of the bio-oils produced in the auger reactor were similar to those reported by researchers using woody biomass, despite their lower viscosities. From these results, it was concluded that the pyrolysis temperature and residence time of the pyrolysates played a significant role in determining the characteristics of the cedar bio-oil.

  18. Recombinant pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases from western red cedar (Thuja plicata) catalyze opposite enantiospecific conversions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Gang, D R; Davin, L B; Lewis, N G

    1999-01-01

    Although the heartwood of woody plants represents the main source of fiber and solid wood products, essentially nothing is known about how the biological processes leading to its formation are initiated and regulated. Accordingly, a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-guided cloning strategy was employed to obtain genes encoding pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases from western red cedar (Thuja plicata) as a means to initiate the study of its heartwood formation. (+)-Pinoresinol-(+)-lariciresinol reductase from Forsythia intermedia was used as a template for primer construction for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplifications, which, when followed by homologous hybridization cloning, resulted in the isolation of two distinct classes of putative pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase cDNA clones from western red cedar. A representative of each class was expressed as a fusion protein with beta-galactosidase and assayed for enzymatic activity. Using both deuterated and radiolabeled (+/-)-pinoresinols as substrates, it was established that each class of cDNA encoded a pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase of different (opposite) enantiospecificity. Significantly, the protein from one class converted (+)-pinoresinol into (-)-secoisolariciresinol, whereas the other utilized the opposite (-)-enantiomer to give the corresponding (+)-form. This differential substrate specificity raises important questions about the role of each of these individual reductases in heartwood formation, such as whether they are expressed in different cells/tissues or at different stages during heartwood development.

  19. Flood-inundation maps for Grand River, Red Cedar River, and Sycamore Creek near Lansing, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew; Ostheimer, Chad J.

    2015-08-26

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a total of 19.7 miles of the Grand River, the Red Cedar River, and Sycamore Creek were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Lansing, Michigan, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, show estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at three USGS streamgages: Grand River at Lansing, MI (04113000), Red Cedar River at East Lansing, MI (04112500), and Sycamore Creek at Holt Road near Holt, MI (04112850). Near-real-time stages at these streamgages can be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at all of these sites.

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the adhesion time of Penicillium spores to cedar wood surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumya, Elabed; Ibnsouda, Saad Koraichi; Abdellah, Houari; Hassan, Latrache

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the adhesion of 4 Penicillium strains (Penicillium granulatum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium commune and Penicillium chrysogenum) on cedar wood was examined qualitatively and quantitatively by using the extended DLVO (XDLVO) approach and the environmental scanning electronic microscopy (ESEM) technique. A comparison between the XDLVO theories and the ESEM technique was also investigated. The adhesion tests revealed that P. chrysogenum was not able to adhere on the cedar wood substrata, as predicted by the XDLVO approach. We have also found by ESEM that the three Penicillium strains (P. granulatum, P. crustosum, P. commune) adhered on wood, as not predicted theoretically. Moreover, the time of adhesion (3 h and 24 h) was used not only to compare the capacity of adhesion according to contact time but also to explain the discrepancies between the XDLVO approach prediction and the adhesion experiments. A positive relationship between the XDLVO approach and adhesion experiments has been observed after 3h of adhesion. In contrast, a contradiction between the XDLVO predictions and the adhesion test results has been noted after 24h of adhesion of Penicillium strains to the wood surface.

  1. Biologically Important Eremophilane Sesquiterpenes from Alaska Cedar Heartwood Essential Oil and Their Semi-Synthetic Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe J. Karchesy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Alaska cedar heartwood is known to contain compounds which contribute to the remarkable durability of this species. While previous research has identified several compounds, a complete description of this oil has not been undertaken. In this research a profile of the oil is given in which the major components are identified by GC, isolation and spectroscopic techniques. The major components of the steam distilled essential oil were identified as nootkatin, nootkatone, valencene, nootaktene, carvacrol, methyl carvacrol, nootkatol (2, and eremophil-1(10,11-dien-13-ol (3. The last two compounds were isolated for the first time from Alaska cedar in this research. The absolute stereochemistry at C-2 of nootkatol was shown to have the (S configuration using the Mosher ester method. Assignment of stereochemistry for valencene-13-ol (3 was established by synthesis from valencene (6. Finally, two related sesquiterpenoids were synthesized from nootkatone and valencene. These sesquiterpenoids were nootkatone-1,10-11,12-diepoxide (5 and valencene-13-aldehyde (4, respectively.

  2. Characterization and Antioxidant Properties of the Condensed Tannins from Alaska Cedar Inner Bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Rosales-Castro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure and antioxidant activity of condensed tannins isolated from Alaska Cedar inner bark have been investigated. Oligomers of flavan-3-ol were purified by column chromatography (Sephadex LH-20 and analyzed by 13CNMR and MALDI-TOF MS spectrometries. Their antioxidant activities were measured using 1,1’-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS free radicals scavenging, ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP, and β-carotene-linoleic acid model system (β-CLAMS assays. Results showed that the condensed tannins consents of both homogeneous and heterogeneous oligomers of procyanidins (catechin/epicatechin and prodelphinidins (gallocatechin/ epigallocatechin flavan-3-ol units; and oligomers from trimmers to heptamers with dominant interflavan linkages B-type as it is most common in proanthocyanidins. Condensed tannins showed significant ntioxidant activity as the median inhibition capacity IC 50 is comparable to the catechin control response. Alaska Cedar inner bark oligomers show high antioxidant capacity, evaluated by both methods based on electron transfer mechanisms and hydrogen atom transfer reactions. This bark may be considered as a new source of natural antioxidants for nutraceutical ingredients.

  3. Western red cedar dust exposure and lung function: a dose-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noertjojo, H K; Dimich-Ward, H; Peelen, S; Dittrick, M; Kennedy, S M; Chan-Yeung, M

    1996-10-01

    The relationship between levels of cumulative red cedar dust exposure and decline in lung function was explored in an 11-yr follow-up study of 243 sawmill workers who participated in at least two occasions. We also studied 140 office workers in a similar manner as control subjects. Workers with asthma were excluded from the analysis. During the period of the study, 916 personal and 216 area samples of dust were collected from the sawmill. Cumulative wood dust exposure was calculated for each sawmill worker according to the duration and exposure in each job, based on the geometric mean of all dust measurements for that job. Average daily dust exposure was calculated by dividing the total cumulative exposure by the number of days of work. Workers were divided into low-, medium-, and high-exposure groups with mean daily level of exposure of 0.4 mg/m3, respectively. Sawmill workers had significantly greater declines in FEV1 and FVC compared with office workers adjusted for age, smoking, and initial lung function. A dose-response relationship was observed between the level of exposure and the annual decline in FVC. We conclude that exposure to Western red cedar dust is associated with a greater decline in lung function which may lead to development of chronic airflow limitation.

  4. Development of microsatellite markers for the clonal shrub Orixa japonica (Rutaceae) using 454 sequencing1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Ichiro; Setsuko, Suzuki; Sugai, Kyoko; Yanagisawa, Nao

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for a dioecious shrub, Orixa japonica (Rutaceae). Because O. japonica vigorously propagates by vegetative growth, microsatellite markers can be used to identify clonal relationships among its ramets. Methods and Results: Sixteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were identified by 454 next-generation sequencing. The number of alleles and expected heterozygosity for each locus among four populations ranged from two to 10 and from 0.140 to 0.875, respectively. Five of the 16 loci showed a low null allele frequency. Because Orixa is a monotypic genus, cross-amplification in a consubfamilial species, Skimmia japonica, was tested, and only one locus showed polymorphism. Conclusions: These microsatellite markers developed for O. japonica contribute to clone identification for studies examining the clonal structure and true sex ratio in the wild. Moreover, five markers that have a low null allele frequency can also be used for estimating mating systems or performing parentage analysis. PMID:27785383

  5. Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx Flavonoids Fraction Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chu, Chun-Jun; Xu, Nai-Yu; Li, Xian-Lun; Xia, Long; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Zhi-Tao; Zhao, Zhong-Zhen; Chen, Dao-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx (Maxim.) Hara, belonging to the Labiatae family, is widely used as an anti-inflammatory and antitumor drug for the treatment of different inflammations and cancers. Aim of the Study...

  6. RESEARCH OF SOPHORA JAPONICA L. FLOWER BUDS VOLATILE COMPOUNDS WITH GAS-CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS- SPECTROMETRY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cholak I.S.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work represents the results of the research ofessential oil contained in Sophora japonica L. flowerbuds volatile compounds collected during the nextstages of their development: green flower buds, formedflower buds and the beginning of flower buds opening.Essential oil assay content in Sophora japonica L.flower buds was determined with hydrodistillationmethod. Content of essential oil in the raw material isless than 0,1%. Qualitative composition and assaycontent of Sophora japonica L. flower buds essential oilconstituents were determined with chromato-massspectrometry method. In consequence of the research 80constituents were identified in Sophora japonica L.flower buds out of which 61 substances are during thegreen flower buds and beginning of flower budsopening stages, 66 substances are during formed flowerbuds stage. Substances are represented by aliphatic andcyclic terpenoids, their alcohols and ketones. Mostvolatile substances were extracted on the stage offormed buds.

  7. Chlorophycean parasite on a marine fish, Sillago japonica (Japanese sillago).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Kazuhiko; Akai, Noriko; Liao, Lawrence M; Ikeda, Shota; Yoshimatsu, Sadaaki

    2013-12-01

    A green spotted Japanese sillago (Sillago japonica) was caught by a fisherman and brought to the laboratory for pathological inspection. The green spots were abundant on the lateral line and more extensively so within the mouth cavity. In both sites, green spots were embedded within the fish flesh and formed 2-3mm dome-shaped colonies. SEM revealed these colonies to harbor numerous unknown cells with small, surface warts (ornamentations). Molecular analysis showed the cells were Desmodesmus (D. komarekii), a common freshwater coccoid green alga found in ponds and rivers worldwide. It is uncertain how the host fish came to be infected with the alga which was not merely attached externally but embedded within the flesh and inside the mouth cavity. This is the first case of parasitic form of coccoid green algae in marine fish and provides new insights into the variable nature of green algae.

  8. Tyrosinase Inhibitory Chemical Constituents from Cleyera japonica Thunberg Branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Eun Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bioassay-guided investigation of the branches of Cleyera japonica led to the isolation of four phenolic constituents: 3,3’-di-O-methylellagic acid (1, 3,3’-di-O-methylellagic acid 4’-O-β-D-xylofuranoside (2, 3,5,7-trihydroxychromone 3-O-α-L-arabinofuranoside (3 and aviculin (4. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral studies, as well as by comparison with literature data. Tyrosinase inhibition activities were carried out for the isolated compounds using arbutin as a positive control. Among them, compound 2 was identified as a potent tyrosinase inhibitor. It inhibited mushroom tyrosinase with an IC50 value of 0.078 mM, which is about three times more active than arbutin (IC50 =0.25 mM. All of the compounds 1-4 were isolated for the first time from this plant.

  9. Preliminary studies on rice quality of japonica-indica hybrid rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIZhenyu; ZHANGYunkang; WUJianli

    1997-01-01

    It has been proved that high yield combinations can be obtained via hybridization between indica and japonica rice. However, people have worried about the quality of this kind of rice for a long time. Our researches were mainly based on the mating pattern of “japonica male sterile line/indica restorer line” to generate and select elite japonicalinous crosses. Ricequality is shown in table 1 and 2.

  10. Oral Administration of Heat-Killed Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2809 Reduces Cedar Pollen Antigen-Induced Peritoneal Eosinophilia in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Sashihara

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions: We demonstrated that the oral administration of heat-killed L. gasseri OLL2809 suppresses eosinophilia via the modulation of Th1/Th2 balance. These observations suggested that heat-killed L. gasseri OLL2809 might potentially ameliorate the increased number of eosinophils in patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis.

  11. 77 FR 3840 - Iowa Interstate Railroad, Ltd.-Lease Exemption-Line of Cedar Rapids and Iowa City Railway Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... Surface Transportation Board Iowa Interstate Railroad, Ltd.--Lease Exemption--Line of Cedar Rapids and Iowa City Railway Company AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of Exemption. SUMMARY.... 10902 for Iowa Interstate Railroad, Ltd. (IAIS), a Class II rail carrier, to lease and operate 8.4 miles...

  12. CBM in 3-D: coalbed methane multicomponent 3-D reservoir characterisation study, Cedar Hill Field, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, T.; Shuck, E.; Benson, R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    1995-10-01

    The article explains how 3-D multicomponent seismic surveys could substantially improve the production and development of fractured coalbed methane reservoirs. The technique has been used by Northern Geophysical for the detection of geological faults and zones of enhanced fracture permeability proximal to the fault in the western side of the Cedar Hill field in San Juan Basin, NM, USA. 3 figs.

  13. 乌桕·枫杨和柳杉乙醇提取液的灭螺活性比较%Comparison of Molluscicide Activity of Ethanol Extracts of Sapium sebiferum, Pterocarya stenoptera and Cryptomeria fortunei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗坤水; 李闪全; 徐林初; 余能富; 邹峥嵘

    2011-01-01

    [目的]比较乌桕、枫杨和柳杉己醇提取液的灭螺活性.[方法]采用室内浸杀钉螺试验,测定了鸟桕、枫杨和柳杉乙醇提取液的灭螺活性.[结果]乌桕、枫杨和柳杉乙醇浸提液均具有一定的灭螺效果,其中乌桕和柳杉灭螺效果较好且相差不大,而枫杨相对较差;采用乙醇能较好地提取植物的有效灭螺成分,其灭螺效果比植物的水浸液要好.[结论]为生态柳螺植物材料的筛选提供了理论依据.%[ Objective ] The aim was to compare molluscicide activity of ethanol extracts of Sapium sebiferum, Pterocarya stenoptera and Cryptomeria fortunei. [ Method ] The molluscicide activity of ethanol extracts of Sapium sebiferum, Pterocarya stenoptera and Cryptomeria fortunei were determined with indoor killing experiment. [ Result] Sapium sebiferum, Pterocarya stenoptera and Cryptomeriafortunei exhibited activity against Oncanelania hupensis. Among them, the molluscicide activity of Sapium sebiferum and Cryptomeriafortunei was similar, but the activity of Pterocarya stenoptera was relatively poor. The effective components of plants were extracted more completely, so the molluscicide activity of ethanol-extracts was stronger than water-extracts. [ Conclusion] The study will provide theoretical basis for screening molluscicide plants.

  14. Effect of domestication on the genetic diversity and structure of Saccharina japonica populations in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xiuliang; Yao, Jianting; Li, Qiuying; Liu, Fuli; Yotsukura, Norishige; Krupnova, Tatiana N.; Duan, Delin

    2017-01-01

    Saccharina japonica is a commercially and ecologically important seaweed and is an excellent system for understanding the effects of domestication on marine crops. In this study, we used 19 selected simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to investigate the influence of domestication on the genetic diversity and structure of S. japonica populations. Wild kelp populations exhibited higher genetic diversity than cultivated populations based on total NA, HE, HO, NP and AR. Discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC), a neighbour-joining (NJ) tree and STRUCTURE analyses indicated that S. japonica populations could be divided into two groups (a cultivated/introduced group and a wild indigenous group) with significant genetic differentiation (P < 0.0001). Divergent selection, continuous inbreeding and inter-specific hybridization have caused the divergence of these two genetically separate gene pools. The significant genetic differentiation between northern and southern cultivated populations appears to be due to inter-specific hybridization and wild germplasm introduction during the domestication process. In addition, the cultivation of S. japonica has not resulted in any serious genetic disturbance of wild introduced S. japonica populations. An understanding of the genetic diversity and genetic structure of domesticated S. japonica will be necessary for further genetic improvement and effective use of germplasm. PMID:28176848

  15. Independent domestication of Asian rice followed by gene flow from japonica to indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-chia; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Itoh, Takeshi

    2012-05-01

    Results from studies on the domestication process of Asian rice Oryza sativa have been controversial because of its complicated evolutionary history. Previous studies have yielded two alternative hypotheses about the origin(s) of the two major groups of O. sativa: japonica and indica. One study proposes a single common wild ancestor, whereas the other suggests that there were multiple domestication events of different types of wild rice. Here, we provide clear evidence of the independent domestication of japonica and indica obtained via high-throughput sequencing and a large-scale comparative analysis of two wild rice accessions (W1943 and W0106) and two cultivars (a japonica cultivar called "Nipponbare" and an indica cultivar called "Guangluai-4"). The different domestication processes of the two cultivar groups appear to have led to distinct patterns of molecular evolution in protein-coding regions. The intensity of purifying selection was relaxed only in the japonica group, possibly because of a bottleneck effect. Moreover, a genome-wide comparison between Nipponbare, Guangluai-4, and another indica cultivar (93-11) suggests multiple hybridization events between japonica and indica, both before and after the divergence of the indica cultivars. We found that a large amount of genomic DNA, including domestication-related genes, was transferred from japonica to indica, which might have been important in the development of modern rice. Our study provides an overview of the dynamic process of Asian rice domestication, including independent domestication events and subsequent gene flow.

  16. Responsive Surface Methodology Optimizes Extraction Conditions of Industrial by-products, Camellia japonica Seed Cake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Kyeom; Lim, Ho-Jeong; Kim, Mi-So; Choi, Soo Jung; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Cho Rong; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background: The central nervous system is easily damaged by oxidative stress due to high oxygen consumption and poor defensive capacity. Hence, multiple studies have demonstrated that inhibiting oxidative stress-induced damage, through an antioxidant-rich diet, might be a reasonable approach to prevent neurodegenerative disease. Objective: In the present study, response surface methodology was utilized to optimize the extraction for neuro-protective constituents of Camellia japonica byproducts. Materials and Methods: Rat pheochromocytoma cells were used to evaluate protective potential of Camellia japonica byproducts. Results: Optimum conditions were 33.84 min, 75.24%, and 75.82°C for time, ethanol concentration and temperature. Further, we demonstrated that major organic acid contents were significantly impacted by the extraction conditions, which may explain varying magnitude of protective potential between fractions. Conclusions: Given the paucity of information in regards to defatted C. japonica seed cake and their health promoting potential, our results herein provide interesting preliminary data for utilization of this byproduct from oil processing in both academic and industrial applications. SUMMARY Neuro-protective potential of C. japonica seed cake on cell viability was affected by extraction conditionsExtraction conditions effectively influenced on active constituents of C. japonica seed cakeBiological activity of C. japonica seed cake was optimized by the responsive surface methodology. Abbreviations used: GC-MS: Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer, MTT: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, PC12 cells: Pheochromocytoma, RSM: Response surface methodology. PMID:27601847

  17. Youngia japonica (Asteraceae, Lactuceae), una novedad para la Flora adventicia de Argentina Youngia japonica (Asteraceae, Lactuceae), a novelty for the adventitious Flora of Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Se menciona por primera vez para Argentina la presencia de Youngia japonica, una maleza nativa del Sudeste de Asia. Fue observada como ruderal e invasora de jardines en las provincias de Tucumán y Entre Ríos. Se estima que la llegada de la especie al país es reciente. Se presenta una descripción e ilustraciones de la planta.The presence of Youngia japonica, a weed native of Southeastern Asia, is reported for the first time in Argentina. It was observed as ruderal and invading gardens in Tucum...

  18. Fine root dynamics in moso bamboo and Japanese cedar forest by scanner method in central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Wei; Lin, Po-Hsuan; Kume, Tomonori

    2017-04-01

    is to characterize the temporal and spatial variation of fine root dynamics in moso bamboo forests in central Taiwan by using scanner method with 6 acrylic boxes. Other the other hand, this study compared the result with those of adjacent Japanese cedar forests with 8 acrylic boxes. Consequently, we found the fine root production rate and decomposition rate of the bamboo forest are higher than cedar forest. Also, the timing of first observation of new roots was earlier in bamboo forest than cedar forest. This study also examined differences of temporal patterns among measurement locations based on long-term data after box installation.

  19. 14C levels in the vicinity of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant prior to the 2011 accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T.; Cresswell, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) from Okuma, ∼1 km southwest of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, was cored and each annual ring was analysed for 14C. The 14C specific activity values varied from 330.4 Bq kg−1 C in the tree ring formed in 1971 to 231.2 Bq kg−1 C...... discharges from the reactors during their normal operations. In addition, the specific activities are positively correlated with the annual electricity generation values. The excess 14C specific activities were ... and consequently no significant radiological impact of atmospheric 14C discharges from the FDNPP during the entire period of normal operations. Additionally, no 14C pulse in activity can be observed in the year 2011 ring. This might be caused by a limited 14C release from the damaged reactors during the accident...

  20. Radiocarbon Releases from the 2011 Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T.; Cresswell, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiocarbon activities were measured in annual tree rings for the years 2009 to 2015 from Japanese cedar trees (Cryptomeria japonica) collected at six sites ranging from 2.5-38 km northwest and north of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The 14C specific activity varied from 280.4 Bq kg-1...... C in 2010 to 226.0 Bq kg-1 C in 2015. The elevated 14C activities in the 2009 and 2010 rings confirmed 14C discharges during routine reactor operations, whereas those activities that were indistinguishable from background in 2012-2015 coincided with the permanent shutdown of the reactors after...... the excess 14C activities is negligible compared to the dose from natural/nuclear weapons sources....

  1. Cleaning procedures for removal of external deposits from plant samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salkl, H.; Maeda, O.

    1982-08-01

    Foliar samples of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica), Japanese white oak (Quercus myrsinaefolia), and Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) were washed with running tap water, a 2% detergent solution, or 0.2 M HCl. The concentration of 16 elements were determined by inductively coupled argon plasma spectrometry to compare the effects of the three cleaning procedures on removal of external deposits. Among the three washing procedures, the most effective was the acid washing, which removed significant proportions of the total Al, Cr, Fe, Pb, Ti, and other elements from crude foliar samples without causing any measurable loss of K. It was ascertained by scanning electron microscopy that this treatment effectively removed particulate fallout on leaf surfaces without doing any visual damage to the plant material.

  2. Forecasting Monthly Prices of Japanese Logs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Michinaka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Forecasts of prices can help industries in their risk management. This is especially true for Japanese logs, which experience sharp fluctuations in price. In this research, the authors used an exponential smoothing method (ETS and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA models to forecast the monthly prices of domestic logs of three of the most important species in Japan: sugi (Japanese cedar, Cryptomeria japonica D. Don, hinoki (Japanese cypress, Chamaecyparis obtusa (Sieb. et Zucc. Endl., and karamatsu (Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi (Lamb. Carr.. For the 12-month forecasting periods, forecasting intervals of 80% and 95% were given. By measuring the accuracy of forecasts of 12- and 6-month forecasting periods, it was found that ARIMA gave better results than did the ETS in the majority of cases. However, the combined method of averaging ETS and ARIMA forecasts gave the best results for hinoki in several cases.

  3. [Comparative study on the assay for IgE antibodies specific for Chamaecyparis obtusa pollen between AlaSTAT and CAP-RAST].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, O; Imai, T; Saneyoshi, K; Endo, T; Nagakura, H; Ono, M; Moriyama, H

    1996-06-01

    Titers of IgE antibody specific for the pollen of Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa) were determined by AlaSTAT and CAP-RAST in 221 patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis. IgE antibody to C. obtusa tested positive by CAP-RAST at a higher rate (80.5%) than by AlaSTAT (52.6%). The results obtained from the two assays were compared with those from intradermal skin test. CAP-RAST had a higher sensitivity than that of AlaSTAT. Because the two methods showed no differences in the determination of IgE antibody specific for Cryptomeria japonica, the above differences between AlaSTAT and CAP-RAST are surmised to be ascribable to the differences of C. obtusa antigen used in the both assays.

  4. An Electrostatic-Barrier-Forming Window that Captures Airborne Pollen Grains to Prevent Pollinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takikawa, Yoshihiro; Matsuda, Yoshinori; Nonomura, Teruo; Kakutani, Koji; Kusakari, Shin-Ichi; Toyoda, Hideyoshi

    2017-01-01

    An electrostatic-barrier-forming window (EBW) was devised to capture airborne pollen, which can cause allergic pollinosis. The EBW consisted of three layers of insulated conductor wires (ICWs) and two voltage generators that supplied negative charges to the two outer ICW layers and a positive charge to the middle ICW layer. The ICWs generated an attractive force that captured pollen of the Japanese cedar, Cryptomeria japonica, from air blown through the EBW. The attractive force was directly proportional to the applied voltage. At ≥3.5 kV, the EBW exerted sufficient force to capture all pollen carried at an air flow of 3 m/s, and pollen-free air passed through the EBW. The findings demonstrated that the electrostatic barrier that formed inside the EBW was very effective at capturing airborne pollen; thus, it could allow a home to remain pollen-free and healthy despite continuous pollen exposure.

  5. Dinosaur tracks from the Cedar Mountain Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Arches National Park, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, M.G.; White, D.; Kirkland, J.; Santucci, V.

    2004-01-01

    The seventh and largest known dinosaur tracksite from the Cedar Mountain Formation is reported from two important stratigraphic levels in the Ruby Ranch Member within the boundaries of Arches National Park. Previous reports of sites with a few isolated tracks are of limited utility in indicating the fauna represented by track makers. The Arches site reveals evidence of several theropod morphotypes, including a possible match for the coelurosaur Nedcolbertia and an apparently didactyl Utahraptor-like dromeosaurid. Sauropod tracks indicate a wide-gauge morphotype (cf. Brontopodus). Ornithischian tracks suggest the presence of an iguandontid-like ornithopod and a large ankylosaur. Dinosaur track diversity is high in comparison with other early Cretaceous vertebrate ichnofaunas, and it correlates well with faunal lists derived from skeletal remains, thus providing a convincing census of the known fauna. ?? Taylor and Francis Inc.

  6. Precipitation reconstruction using ring-width chronology of Himalayan cedar from western Himalaya: Preliminary results

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram R Yadav; Won-Kyu Park

    2000-09-01

    Himalayan cedar (Cedrus deodara (D. Don) G. Don) due to its long age and wide ecological amplitude in the Himalayan region has strong dendroclimatic potential. A well replicated ring-width chronology of it, derived from the ensemble of tree-ring samples of two adjacent homogeneous sites, has been used to reconstruct precipitation for the non-monsoon months (previous year October to concurrent May) back to AD 1171. This provides the first record of hydrological conditions for the western Himalayan region, India during the whole of the `Little Ice Age' and latter part of the `Medieval Warm Period'. The reconstruction revealed the wettest and the driest non-monsoon months during the fourteenth and the thirteenth centuries, respectively. The seventeenth century consistently recorded dry non-monsoon months in the western Himalayan region. Surplus precipitation, especially more pronounced since the 1950s, is recorded in the current century.

  7. Osteology of the basal hadrosauroid Eolambia caroljonesa (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda from the Cedar Mountain Formation of Utah.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T McDonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eolambia caroljonesa is known from copious remains from the lower Cenomanian Mussentuchit Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation in eastern Utah; however, the taxon has been only briefly described. Thus, we present herein a complete osteological description of Eolambia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The description of Eolambia presented here is based upon the holotype partial skeleton (CEUM 9758, paratype partial skull (CEUM 5212, and abundant disarticulated elements from two bonebeds that contain juvenile individuals. These remains allow the skeletal anatomy of Eolambia to be documented almost fully and a revised diagnosis to be proposed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The description provided here facilitates comparisons between Eolambia and other iguanodontians and allows Eolambia to be coded for additional characters in phylogenetic analyses. The close affinity between Eolambia and Probactrosaurus gobiensis from the Early Cretaceous of China supports previous hypotheses of faunal interchange between Asia and North America in the early Late Cretaceous.

  8. Evaluate Habitat Use and Population Dynamics of Lampreys in Cedar Creek, 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Jennifer; Pirtle, Jody; Barndt, Scott A.

    2002-03-31

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River Basin have declined to a remnant of their pre-1940s populations and the status of the western brook lamprey (L. richardsoni) is unknown. Identifying the biological and ecological factors limiting lamprey populations is critical to their recovery, but little research has been conducted on these species within the Columbia River Basin. This ongoing, multi-year study examines lamprey populations in Cedar Creek, Washington, a third-order tributary to the Lewis River. This annual report describes the activities and results of the second year of this project. Adult (n = 24), metamorphosed (n = 247), transforming (n = 4), and ammocoete (n = 387) stages from both species were examined in 2001. Lamprey were captured using adult fish ladders, lamprey pots, rotary screw traps, and lamprey electrofishers. Twenty-nine spawning ground surveys were conducted. Nine strategic point-specific habitat surveys were performed to assess habitat requirements of juvenile lamprey.

  9. A Study of Factors involved in possible regeneration of Atlantic White Cedar in a recently burned area in the Great Dismal Swamp

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Historically white cedar has managed to regenerate without benefit of controlled burns and it seems that .most wild fires occur during the dry season. It was...

  10. [Narrative report for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge, West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge, Navarre Tract: Calendar year 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa, Cedar Point, and West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year....

  11. [Narrative report for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge, West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge, Navarre Tract: Calendar year 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa, Cedar Point, and West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year....

  12. [Narrative report for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge, West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge, Navarre Tract: Calendar year 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa, Cedar Point, and West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year....

  13. [Narrative report for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge, West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge, Navarre Tract: Calendar year 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa, Cedar Point, and West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year....

  14. Laminaria japonica combined with probiotics improves intestinal microbiota: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seok-Jae; Kim, Jinsung; Han, Gajin; Kim, Seul-Ki; Kim, Hong-Geol; Yeo, Inkwon; Ryu, Bongha; Park, Jae-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Laminaria japonica--a widely used ingredient in seaweed kimchi--and lactic acid bacteria (LAB)--a main component of traditional fermented Korean food--may alter human intestinal microbiota composition and have a positive effect on various digestive problems. However, few clinical trials have investigated the potential benefits of L. japonica when combined with LAB for human intestinal microbiota. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the effects of L. japonica and representative LAB on the human intestine. Forty participants with no known digestive diseases were randomly assigned to one of the two combination groups: (1) L. japonica with LAB and (2) L. japonica with placebo LAB. The study agents were administered for 4 weeks with a 2-week follow-up period. The primary outcome measure was the number of each of the seven LAB species in the human intestine, and the secondary outcome measures included the Korean version of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale, the World Health Organization Quality of Life, and bowel functions. The primary outcome was evaluated before and after administration of the study agents (0 and 4 weeks), and the secondary outcomes were evaluated at 0, 4, and 6 weeks. Four of the seven LAB species were found to be significantly increased in the L. japonica with the LAB group and five species were significantly different from those of the placebo group. The secondary outcome measures did not change significantly. In conclusion, L. japonica with LAB facilitated the proliferation of beneficial human intestinal microbiota. ( ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01651741).

  15. Effect of alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the growth of Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG You; TANG Xue-xi; YANG Zhen; YU Zhi-ming

    2006-01-01

    We collected the diseased blades of Laminaria japonica from Yantai Sea Farm from October to December 2002, and the alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the diseased blade was isolated and purified, and was identified as Alteromonas espejiana. This bacterium was applied as the causative pathogen to infect the blades of L. japonica under laboratory conditions. The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of the bacterium on the growth of L. japonica, and to find the possibly effective mechanism. Results showed that: (1)The blades of L.japonica exhibited symptoms of lesion,bleaching and deterioration when infected by the bacterium,and their growth and photosynthesis were dramatically suppressed. At the same time, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation enhanced obviously, and the relative membrane permeability increased significantly. The contents of malonaldehyde (MDA) and free fatty acid in the microsomol membrane greatly elevated, but the phospholipid content decreased. Result suggested an obvious peroxidation and deesterrification in the blades of L. japonica when infected by the bacterium. (2) The simultaneous assay on the antioxidant enzyme activities demonstrated that superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) increased greatly when infected by the bacterium, but glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) did not exhibit active responses to the bacterium throughout the experiment. (3) The histomorphological observations gave a distinctive evidence of the severity of the lesions as well as the relative abundance in the bacterial population on the blades after infection. The bacterium firstly invaded into the endodermis of L. japonica and gathered around there, and then resulted in the membrane damage, cells corruption and ultimately, the death of L.japonica.

  16. Quantitative remote sensing of ammonium minerals, Cedar Mountains, Esmeralda County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, William M.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1995-01-01

    Mineral-bound ammonium (NH4+) was discovered by the U.S. Geological Survey in the southern Cedar Mountains of Esmeralda County, Nevada in 1989. At 10 km in length, this site is 100 times larger than any previously known occurrence in volcanic rocks. The ammonium occurs in two hydrothermally altered, crystal-rich rhyolitic tuff units of Oligocene age, and is both structurally and stratigraphically controlled. This research uses Advanced Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data to quantitatively map the mineral-bound ammonium (buddingtonite) concentration in the altered volcanic rocks. Naturally occurring mineral-bound ammonium is fairly rare; however, it has been found to occur in gold-bearing hydrothermal deposits. Because of this association, it is thought that ammonium may be a useful too in exploration for gold and other metal deposits. Mineral-bound ammonium is produced when an ammonium ion (NH4+) replaces the alkali cation site (usually K+) in the crystal structure of silicate minerals such as feldspars, micas and clays. Buddingtonite is an ammonium feldspar. The ammonium originates in buried organic plant matter and is transported to the host rock by hydrothermal fluids. Ammonium alteration does not produce visible changes in the rock, and it is barely detectable with standard x-ray diffraction methods. It is clearly identified, however, by absorption features in short wave-infrared (SWIR) wavelengths (2.0 - 2.5 micrometers). The ammonium absorption features are believed to be caused by N-H vibrational modes and are analogous to hydroxyl (O-H) vibrational modes, only shifted slightly in wavelength. Buddingtonite absorption features in the near- and SWIR lie at 1.56, 2.02 and 2.12 micrometers. The feature at 2.12 micrometer is the strongest of the three and is the only one used in this study. The southern Cedar Mountains are sparsely vegetated and are an ideal site for a remote sensing study.

  17. The basis for fibrinogen Cedar Rapids ({gamma}R275C) fibrin network structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiOrio, J.P. [Baxter Healthcare Corp., Round Lake, IL (United States); Mosesson, M.W.; Siebenlist, K.R. [Univ. Wisconsin Medical School-Milwaukee Clinic Campus, WI (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Fibrinogen `Cedar Rapids` is a heterozygous dysfibrinogenemia characterized by delayed and abnormal fibrin polymerization. The specific molecular defect ({gamma}R275C) is relatively common, but in only one case, fibrinogen Tokyo II, has the ultrastructural basis for defective clot formation been determined. This report reflects similar structural studies on Cedar Rapids fibrinogen and fibrin. Crosslinked fibrinogen molecules and fibrils, were prepared at 1 mg/ml in the presence of factor XIIIa (100 u/ml). When {gamma} chains had become {approximately}10 to 20% crosslinked to {gamma} dimers, samples were diluted with Hepes buffered saline, pH 7, to a fibrinogen concentrated of 5 to 10 {mu}g/ml. Three {mu}l was then injected into 3 {mu}l buffer on a carbon-coated EM grid, the specimen allowed to attach for one minute, fluid-exchanged several times with 150 mM NH{sub 4} acetate solution, frozen in liquid nitrogen, freeze-dried, and imaged at the Brookhaven STEM facility using a 40 kv probe focused at 0.25 nm. Fibrin for scanning EM (SEM) was formed directly on carbon-formvar coated gold grids. Clots that had formed overnight were fixed with 2.5% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M Hepes, pH 7 buffer containing 0.2% tannic acid, washed with buffer, dehydrated, CO{sub 2} critical point dried, coated with 7.5 nm platinum, and imaged in a JOEL Field Emission SEM operated at 5 kV.

  18. Evidence for inhibition of bacterial luminescence by allelochemicals from Fibrocapsa japonica (Raphidophyceae), and the role of light and microalgal growth rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssel, Marion; de Boer, M. Karin; Tyl, Monika R.; Gieskes, Winfried W. C.

    2008-01-01

    The marine microalga Fibrocapsa japonica Toriumi and Takano (Raphidophyceae) produces haemolysins, neurotoxins and reactive oxygen species (ROS). To quantify potential effects of such bioactive compounds on surrounding organisms the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri was exposed to F. japonica culture

  19. Evidence for inhibition of bacterial luminescence by allelochemicals from Fibrocapsa japonica (Raphidophyceae), and the role of light and microalgal growth rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssel, Marion; de Boer, M. Karin; Tyl, Monika R.; Gieskes, Winfried W. C.

    The marine microalga Fibrocapsa japonica Toriumi and Takano (Raphidophyceae) produces haemolysins, neurotoxins and reactive oxygen species (ROS). To quantify potential effects of such bioactive compounds on surrounding organisms the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri was exposed to F. japonica culture

  20. Enzyme expression in indica and japonica rice cultivars under saline stress=Expressão de enzimas em cultivares de arroz indica e japonica sob estresse salino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rodrigues Mendes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The southern State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS is the main rice producer in Brazil with a 60% participation of the national production and 86% participation of the region. Rice culture irrigation system is done by flooding, which leads to soil salinization, a major environmental constraint to production since it alters the plants’ metabolism exposed to this type of stress. The indica cultivar, widely used in RS, has a higher sensitivity to salinity when compared to that of the japonica cultivar in other physiological aspects. Current research analyzes enzymes expression involved in salt-subjected indica and japonica rice cultivars’ respiration. Oryza sativa L. spp. japonica S.Kato (BRS Bojuru, IAS 12-9 Formosa and Goyakuman and Oryza sativa L. spp. indica S. Kato (BRS Taim-7, BRS Atalanta and BRS Querencia were the cultivars employed. Seedlings were transferred to 15 L basins containing 50% Hoagland nutrient solution increased by 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mM NaCl, and collected at 14, 28 and 42 days after transfer (DAT. Plant tissues were macerated and placed in eppendorf tubes with Scandálios extractor solution. Electrophoresis was performed in 7% of the polyacrylamide gels in vertical vats. Bands were revealed for the following enzymes systems: esterase, alcohol dehydrogenase, phosphoglucoisomerase, malate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme and alpha amylase. The enzymes expression was greater in subspecies japonica, with more intense bands in proportion to salinity increase. Results show that enzyme systems are involved in the salinity defense mechanisms in O. sativa spp. japonica cultivar.O Estado do Rio Grande do Sul (RS destaca-se como principal produtor de arroz, participando com 60% da produção nacional e 86% da regional. O sistema de irrigação da cultura é por inundação, que induz o solo à salinização, um dos maiores limitadores ambientais à produção, alterando o metabolismo da plantas expostas a este tipo de estresse. As cultivares

  1. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy characterization of the adhesion of conidia from Penicillium expansum to cedar wood substrata at different pH values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Abed, Soumya; Ibnsouda, Saad Koraichi; Latrache, Hassan; Meftah, Hasna; Tahri, Nezha Joutey; Hamadi, Fatima

    2012-04-01

    Initial microbial adhesion to surfaces is a complicated process that is affected by a number of factors. An important property of a solution that may influence adhesion is pH. The surface properties of the cedar wood were characterized by the sessile drop technique. Moreover, the interfacial free energy of surface adhesion to the cedar wood was determined under pH values (2, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11). The results showed that cedar wood examined at different pH levels could be considered hydrophobic ranged from Giwi = -13.1 mJ/m(2) to Giwi = -75 mJ/m(2). We noted that the electron-donor character of cedar wood was important at both basic and limit acidic conditions (pH 11 and pH 3) and it decreased at intermediate pH (pH 5). The cedar wood substratum presents a weak electron acceptor under various pH's. In addition, the adhesion of conidia from Penicilllium expansum to the cedar wood surfaces at different pH values (2, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11) was investigated using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy and image analysis was assessed with the Mathlab(®) program. The data analysis showed that the conidia from P. expansum were strongly influenced by the pH. The maximum adhesion occurs in the pH 11 and pH 3 and decreased to 24% at pH 5.

  2. Differentiation of Indica-Japonica rice revealed by insertion/deletion (InDel) fragments obtained from the comparative genomic study of DNA sequences between 93-11 (Indica) and Nipponbare (Japonica)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xingxing; LIU Jing; QIU Yinqiu; ZHAO Wei; SONG Zhiping; LU Baorong

    2007-01-01

    DNA polymorphisms from nucleotide insertion/deletions (InDels) in genomic sequences are the basis for developing InDel molecular markers.To validate the InDel primer pairs on the basis of the comparative genomic study on DNA sequences between an Indica rice 93-11 and a Japonica rice Nipponbare for identifying Indica and Japonica rice varieties and studying wild Oryza species,we studied 49 Indica,43 Japonica,and 24 wild rice accessions collected from ten Asian countries using 45 InDel primer pairs.Results indicated that of the 45 InDel primer pairs,41 can accurately identify Indica and Japonica rice varieties with a reliability of over 80%.The scatter plotting data of the principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that:(i) the InDel primer pairs can easily distinguish Indica from Japonica rice varieties,in addition to revealing their genetic differentiation;(ii) the AA-genome wild rice species showed a relatively close genetic relationship with the Indica rice varieties;and (iii)the non-AA genome wild rice species did not show evident differentiation into the Indica and Japonica types.It is concluded from the study that most of the InDel primer pairs obtained from DNA sequences of 93-11 and Nipponbare can be used for identifying lndica and Japonica rice varieties,and for studying genetic relationships of wild rice species,particularly in terms of the Indica-Japonica differentiation.

  3. Local and traditional uses, phytochemistry, and pharmacology of Sophora japonica L.: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xirui; Bai, Yajun; Zhao, Zefeng; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Fang, Jiacheng; Huang, Linhong; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Yajun; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2016-07-01

    Sophora japonica (Fabaceae), also known as Huai (Chinese: ), is a medium-sized deciduous tree commonly found in China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and other countries. The use of this plant has been recorded in classical medicinal treatises of ancient China, and it is currently recorded in both the Chinese Pharmacopoeia and European Pharmacopoeia. The flower buds and fruits of S. japonica, also known as Flos Sophorae Immaturus and Fructus Sophorae in China, are most commonly used in Asia (especially in China) to treat hemorrhoids, hematochezia, hematuria, hematemesis, hemorrhinia, uterine or intestinal hemorrhage, arteriosclerosis, headache, hypertension, dysentery, dizziness, and pyoderma. To discuss feasible trends for further research on S. japonica, this review highlights the botany, ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, biological activities, and toxicology of S. japonica based on studies published in the last six decades. Information on the S. japonica was collected from major scientific databases (SciFinder, PubMed, Elsevier, SpringerLink, Web of Science, Google Scholar, Medline Plus, China Knowledge Resource Integrated (CNKI), and "Da Yi Yi Xue Sou Suo (http://www.dayi100.com/login.jsp)" for publications between 1957 and 2015 on S. japonica. Information was also obtained from local classic herbal literature, government reports, conference papers, as well as PhD and MSc dissertations. Approximately 153 chemical compounds, including flavonoids, isoflavonoids, triterpenes, alkaloids, polysaccharides, amino acids, and other compounds, have been isolated from the leaves, branches, flowers, buds, pericarps, and/or fruits of S. japonica. Among these compounds, several flavonoids and isoflavonoids comprise the active constituents of S. japonica, which exhibit a wide range of biological activities in vitro and in vivo such as anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, anti-osteoporotic, antioxidant, radical scavenging, antihyperglycemic, antiobesity, antitumor, and

  4. Artificial selection for a green revolution gene during japonica rice domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Kenji; Yamasaki, Masanori; Takuno, Shohei; Miura, Kotaro; Katagiri, Satoshi; Ito, Tomoko; Doi, Kazuyuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Ebana, Kaworu; Matsumoto, Takashi; Innan, Hideki; Kitano, Hidemi; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2011-07-01

    The semidwarf phenotype has been extensively selected during modern crop breeding as an agronomically important trait. Introduction of the semidwarf gene, semi-dwarf1 (sd1), which encodes a gibberellin biosynthesis enzyme, made significant contributions to the "green revolution" in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Here we report that SD1 was involved not only in modern breeding including the green revolution, but also in early steps of rice domestication. We identified two SNPs in O. sativa subspecies (ssp.) japonica SD1 as functional nucleotide polymorphisms (FNPs) responsible for shorter culm length and low gibberellin biosynthetic activity. Genetic diversity analysis among O. sativa ssp. japonica and indica, along with their wild ancestor O. rufipogon Griff, revealed that these FNPs clearly differentiate the japonica landrace and O. rufipogon. We also found a dramatic reduction in nucleotide diversity around SD1 only in the japonica landrace, not in the indica landrace or O. rufipogon. These findings indicate that SD1 has been subjected to artificial selection in rice evolution and that the FNPs participated in japonica domestication, suggesting that ancient humans already used the green revolution gene.

  5. Genetic Diversity of Japonica Rice (Oryza sativa L. Based on Markers Corresponding to Starch Synthesizing Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puji Lestari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes related to starch synthesis and the metabolism contribute to a variety of physicochemical properties that determine the eating/cooking qualities of rice. Our previous study suggested that a set of molecular markers was able to estimate the eating quality of japonica rice. The present study reports the genetic diversity of 22 japonica rice varieties based on markers corresponding to starch synthesizing genes. The mean of the polymorphic information content (PIC: 0.135 value and the diversity index (0.171 indicated a low genetic diversity in these varieties. The phylogenetic tree clearly demonstrated three main clusters: 1 cluster I contained seven varieties with similar physicochemical properties; 2 cluster II only showed a Japanese variety, Koshihikari, and 3 cluster III included the most Korean varieties (14 varieties. This phylogenetic analysis did not completely represent the physicochemical properties differentiation of the japonica varieties, although it did reveal an initial clue to the close relationship between Korean rice and the Japanese and Chinese varieties. Notably, these markers were also able to identify a premium japonica rice. The molecular markers and information concerning the genetic relationship would be useful in improving the japonica rice along with its starch quality of in breeding program.

  6. 辽宁杂交粳稻育种有关问题探讨%On the Problems in Japonica Hybrid Rice Breeding in Liaoning On the Problems in Japonica Hybrid Rice Breeding in Liaoning On the Problems in Japonica Hybrid Rice Breeding in Liaoning On the Problems in Japonica Hybrid Rice Breeding in Liaoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华泽田; 王彦荣; 王岩; 蔡伟; 代贵金; 郝宪彬

    2001-01-01

    针对目前北方杂交粳稻发展中存在的问题,笔者结合自己多年的育种实践,提出了杂交粳稻育种的研究方向和技术路线。%In view of the existing problems in the development of japonica hybrid rice in Northern China, the authors proposed the research orientation and technical approaches for japonica hybrid rice breeding on the basis of the breeding practices of many years. a) Correctly understand and utilize heterosis in rice. By way of raising yield potential of both parents and making use of the additive effects of genes to increase the standard heterosis of F1 hybrids; To improve grain quality of F1 hybrids, the breeding of quality parents should be intensified because of the negative heterosis in some grain quality characters. b) Ideal plant type should be paid more attention to in japonica hybrid rice breeding. The plant types of both parents should be favourable not only to a full play of F1 heterosis but also to hybrid seed production. c) Explore new germplasms such as japonica male sterile lines with dominant semi-dwarf genes and transgenic herbicide-resistant japonica restorer and enhance the use of them.

  7. Genetic diversity and elite gene introgression reveal the japonica rice breeding in northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dan; WANG Jia-yu; WANG Xiao-xue; YANG Xian-li; SUN Jian; CHEN Wen-fu

    2015-01-01

    Abundant genetic diversity and rational population structure of germplasm beneift crop breeding greatly. To investigate genetic variation among geographical y diverse set of japonica germplasm, we analyzed 233 japonica rice cultivars col-lected from Liaoning, Jilin and Heilongjiang provinces of China, which were released from 1970 to 2011 by using 62 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and 8 functional gene tags related to yield. A total of 195 al eles (Na) were detected with an average of 3.61 per locus, indicating a low level of genetic diversity level among al individuals. The genetic diversity of the cultivars from Jilin Province was the highest among the three geographic distribution zones. Moreover, the genetic diversity was increased slightly with the released period of cultivars from 1970 to 2011. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that genetic differentiation was more diverse within the populations than that among the populations. The neighbor-joining (NJ) tree indicated that cultivar clusters based on geographic distribution represented three independent groups, among which the cluster of cultivars from Heilongjiang is distinctly different to the cluster of cultivars from Liaoning. For the examined functional genes, two or three al elic variations for each were detected, except for IPA1 and GW2, and most of elite genes had been introgressed in modern japonica rice varieties. These results provide a valuable evaluation for genetic backgrounds of current japonica rice and wil be used directly for japonica rice breeding in future.

  8. De Novo Assembly and Characterization of Sophora japonica Transcriptome Using RNA-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liucun Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sophora japonica Linn (Chinese Scholar Tree is a shrub species belonging to the subfamily Faboideae of the pea family Fabaceae. In this study, RNA sequencing of S. japonica transcriptome was performed to produce large expression datasets for functional genomic analysis. Approximate 86.1 million high-quality clean reads were generated and assembled de novo into 143010 unique transcripts and 57614 unigenes. The average length of unigenes was 901 bps with an N50 of 545 bps. Four public databases, including the NCBI nonredundant protein (NR, Swiss-Prot, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG, and the Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG, were used to annotate unigenes through NCBI BLAST procedure. A total of 27541 of 57614 unigenes (47.8% were annotated for gene descriptions, conserved protein domains, or gene ontology. Moreover, an interaction network of unigenes in S. japonica was predicted based on known protein-protein interactions of putative orthologs of well-studied plant genomes. The transcriptome data of S. japonica reported here represents first genome-scale investigation of gene expressions in Faboideae plants. We expect that our study will provide a useful resource for further studies on gene expression, genomics, functional genomics, and protein-protein interaction in S. japonica.

  9. Calcium pretreatment increases thermotolerance of Laminaria japonica sporophytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Wang; Qingyun Yu; Xuexi Tang; Lili Wang

    2009-01-01

    Calcium is a secondary messenger in plant signaling,and its concentration changes spatially and temporally during the course of heat stress.In the present study,potassium antimonate was used to visualize calcium localization in blades of a marine macroalga,the juvenile Laminariajaponica sporophytes under heat stress (25 ℃).Result showed that loosely bound calcium was mainly distributed on the cell wall under normal conditions (10 ℃),and flowed into the cytoplasm when exposed to heat.The simutaneous assay on the antioxidant system changes was performed.Oxidative damage,as measured by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) malondialdehyde (MDA) content,increased significantly during heat stress,and calcium pretreatment alleviated oxidative damage.The assay on the activities of six antioxidant enzymes demonstrated that their enzymatic activities were inhibited when exposed to heat stress,but Ca2+ pretreatment effectively attenuated the inhibition.Results in the present study inferred that calcium homeostasis plays an essential role in L.japonica sporophyte when exposed to heat,and calcium pretreatment could improve its thermo-tolerance.

  10. Thermography evaluation of japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Freire de Souza Jr

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine variations in the body surface temperature (TS of quails by infrared thermography. The study was conducted at the Laboratory of Biometeorology and Animal Welfare, campus Mossoró/RN, Brazil. Ten adult quails were used, males and females, in a controlled environment. The air temperature (TA was divided into three classes (CT: CT 1 (TA < 18 °C; CT 2 (18  TA < 22 °C CT 3 (TA  22 °C. The cloacal temperature (TC was measured. The TS was measured in three regions (legs, face and feathered region. The analysis of variance for TS revealed a significant effect of the body region, CT and interaction between body region and CT. The region of the face presented TS (33.68 °C higher than the area covered by feathers (24.73 °C and the region of the legs (24.68 °C. The region of legs was the one that suffered the greatest variation in TS. Thus, it is concluded that Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica have a difference in the body surface temperature according to the body region.

  11. Thermography evaluation of japanese quais (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Freire de Souza Jr

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine variations in the body surface temperature (TS of quails by infrared thermography. The study was conducted at the Laboratory of Biometeorology and Animal Welfare, campus Mossoró/RN, Brazil. Ten adult quails were used, males and females, in a controlled environment. The air temperature (TA was divided into three classes (CT: CT 1 (TA = 22 °C. The cloacal temperature (TC was measured. The TS was measured in three regions (legs, face and feathered region. The analysis of variance for TS revealed a significant effect of the body region, CT and interaction between body region and CT. The region of the face presented TS (33.68 °C higher than the area covered by feathers (24.73 °C and the region of the legs (24.68 °C. The region of legs was the one that suffered the greatest variation in TS. Thus, it is concluded that Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica have a difference in the body surface temperature according to the body region.

  12. Isolation of Fucoxanthin from the Rhizoid of Laminaria japonica Aresch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Jun WANG; Guang-Ce WANG; Ming ZHANG; C. K. TSENG

    2005-01-01

    Fucoxanthin was extracted from the intact rhizoid of Laminariajaponica Aresch with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and then recovered from the DMSO extract by partitioning into ethyl acetate and subse-quent evaporation. Some isolation conditions such as solvent volume and extraction time were screened.The quantity and quality of the extracted fucoxanthin were determined by spectral analysis (absorptionspectra and fluorescence emission spectra). The results indicated that: (1) the average total content offucoxanthin was 122.1 μg in 1 g of fresh L. japonica rhizoid; (2) in comparison with the widely used organicsolvent, acetone, DMSO was much more effective for the extraction of fucoxanthin; (3) both DMSO volumeand extraction time influenced extraction efficiency such as the recovery rate and purity of fucoxanthin (1 gpurity 0.63); (4) when (NH4)2SO4 concentration was in the range of 0.5-1.0 mol/L, the pigments rapidly andentirely moved from DMSO into the ethyl acetate phase; (5) the ethyl acetate and DMSO were recycledusing a rotary evaporator.

  13. The study of antioxidant activities of fucoidan from Laminaria japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xue; Xue Changhu; Cai Yuepiao; Wang Dongfeng; Fang Yu

    2005-01-01

    Two large molecular weight fucoidan fractions F-A and F-B were obtained by water extraction and anion-exchange chromatography and then L-A and L-B with low molecular weight and uronic acid content were prepared by radical process degradation of F-A and F-B. The antioxidant activities of the fucoidan fractions on two oxygen free radicals and Cu2+-induced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation were studied. The results show that all the fucoidan fractions had excellent scavenging capacities on superoxide radical and hypochlorous acid, except the highly sulfated fraction L-B. In LDL oxidation system, low molecular weight fractions L-A and L-B exhibited great inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation induced by Cu2+, however F-A and F-B had little inhibitory effects in this system due to their large molecular weights. The present results suggest that fucoidan from Laminaria japonica is an excellent natural antioxidant and has great potential for preventing the free radical-mediated diseases.

  14. Protective Effect of Laminaria japonica with Probiotics on Murine Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Jae Ko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronically relapsing inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. Most IBD treatments are unsatisfactory; therefore, various dietary supplements have emerged as promising interventions. Laminaria japonica (LJ is an edible seaweed used to regulate digestive symptoms. Probiotics have been reported to improve digestive problems and their simultaneous administration with seaweeds has been shown to produce synergistic therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of LJ combination with probiotics on dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model in mice. Aqueous LJ extracts (LJE at doses from 100 to 300 mg/kg and probiotics at a dose of 300 mg/kg were orally administered for 7 days. Body weight, colon length, histological score, macroscopic damage, and the levels of cytokines IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (P40, IL-12 (P70, IL-17, and TNF-α were assessed. LJE alone caused a significant improvement of colitis signs such as colon length, histological score, and IL-1β and IL-6 production. LJE and probiotics demonstrated a synergistic effect by the histological score and levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 (P40 but not IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-12 (P70. In conclusion, LJE was effective in inducing protection against colitis in mice and acted synergistically with probiotics.

  15. Using processed feeds for laying quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AE Murakami

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to determine the productive performance and egg quality of Japanese quails fed different types of processed rations (mash, extruded, or pelleted. One hundred and forty-four 18-w-old quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica were housed in galvanized wire cages and fed a 21.50% CP and 2850 kcal ME/kg basal feed supplied in mash, extruded, or pelleted form. Experimental data were analyzed by ANOVA as a complete randomized design, with three treatments (ration forms and six replicates of eight quails each. When necessary, means were compared by Tukey's test at 5% significance. Quails fed pelleted feed presented higher egg production, feed intake, and egg mass weight as compared to mash- and extruded-diet-fed birds. Under the conditions of the present experiment, it was possible to conclude that the feed physical form did not affect egg quality, except for pelleted diets, which promoted good production performance and high egg mass. However, the use of feed pelleting should be economically analyzed considering the final cost of egg production.

  16. Novel analgesic peptides from the tree frog of Hyla japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuqin; Li, Zhengtao; Liu, Han; He, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Yun; Jin, Jieqiong; Che, Jing; Li, Cheng; Chen, Wenlin; Lai, Ren; Liu, Jingze

    2014-04-01

    Two novel analgesic peptides (Analgesin-HJ, FWPVI-NH2 and Analgesin-HJ(I5T), FWPVT-NH2) were identified from the skin of the tree frog, Hyla japonica. There are 171 amino acid residues in the precursor encoding analgesin-HJs. The precursor contains 10 copies of mature peptide, which include 9 copies of analgesin-HJ and one copy of analgesin-HJ(I5T). Results from analgesic experiments using mice models including abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid, formalin-induced paw licking, and thermal pain test indicated that this two peptides exerted comparable analgesic activities with morphine. In addition, they had ability to inhibit inflammatory factor secretion induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Considering their easy production, storage, transfer and potential analgesic activity, analgesin-HJs might be exciting leading compounds or templates for the development of novel analgesic agent. In addition, this study might facilitate to understand skin defensive mechanism of amphibians. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Antioxidant lignans and chromone glycosides from Eurya japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Kuo, Li-Ming; Zhang, Li-Jie; Huang, Hung-Tse; Lin, Zhi-Hu; Liaw, Chia-Ching; Cheng, Hui-Ling; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Kuo, Yao-Haur; Ho, Hsiu-O

    2013-04-26

    Four new 8,8',7,2'-lignans, (+)-ovafolinin B-9'-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), (-)-ovafolinin B-9'-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (2), (+)-ovafolinin E-9'-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (3), and (-)-ovafolinin E-9'-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (4), two neolignans, eusiderin N (5) and (7S,8R)-3,5,5'-trimethoxy-4',7-epoxy-8,3'-neolignan-9,9'-diol-4-O-β-d-xylopyranoside (6), and two new chromone glycosides, 5,7-dihydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (7) and 5,7-dihydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one-3-O-β-d-xylopyranoside (8), together with 25 known compounds, were isolated from the stems of Eurya japonica. Structural elucidation of compounds 1-8 was established by spectroscopic methods, especially 2D NMR techniques, electronic circular dichroism data, and comparison with reported data. The isolates were evaluated for antioxidant and anti-NO production activities. Compounds 1, 2, 12-20, and 29 (ED50 23.40 μM for 1) demonstrated potent antioxidant activity compared to the positive control α-tocopherol (ED50 27.21 μM). On the other hand, compounds 1, 2, 7-9, 12-20, and 32 showed only weak anti-NO production activity when compared to the positive control quercetin.

  18. Spatial orientation in Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruploh, Tim; Kazek, Agnieszka; Bischof, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Finding a given location can be based on a variety of strategies, for example on the estimation of spatial relations between landmarks, called spatial orientation. In galliform birds, spatial orientation has been demonstrated convincingly in very young domestic chicks. We wanted to know whether adult Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica) without food deprivation are also able to use spatial orientation. The quails had to learn the relation of a food location with four conspicuous landmarks which were placed in the corners of a square shaped arena. They were trained to find mealworms in three adjacent food cups in a circle of 20 such cups. The rewarded feeders were located during training between the same two landmarks each of which showed a distinct pattern. When the birds had learned the task, all landmarks were displaced clockwise by 90 degrees. When tested in the new situation, all birds redirected their choices with respect to the landmark shift. In subsequent tests, however, the previously correct position was also chosen. According to our results, quails are using conspicuous landmarks as a first choice for orientation. The orientation towards the previously rewarded location, however, indicates that the neuronal representation of space which is used by the birds also includes more fine grain, less conspicuous cues, which are probably also taken into account in uncertain situations. We also presume that the rare orientation towards never rewarded feeders may be due to a foraging strategy instead of being mistakes.

  19. Nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites in loquat fruits (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, José Julián; Roca, María; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2014-10-29

    Nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs) and nonfluorescent dioxobilane chlorophyll catabolites (NDCCs) are the terminal compounds of the chlorophyll degradation pathway that may display beneficial properties to human health related to their antioxidant properties, which were recently shown. A profile of NCCs/NDCC of the loquat fruit Eriobotrya japonica Lindl. is described. From the 13 known different NCC structures described to date, three have been identified in loquats. Two new structures not defined so far were characterized in loquat fruits: Ej-NCC2, which corresponds to the methyl ester at C13(2) of Bn-NCC1 and in very low amount Ej-NDCC1, the only NDCC found in loquats. Keto-enol tautomerism at the C13(1) position in NCCs is described for the first time as a regular process in chlorophyll catabolism, probably through a nonspecific mechanism since almost all the chlorophyll catabolites structures detected in fruits of loquat present keto and enol tautomers. The results obtained have been possible through a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization ion trap and quadropole time-of-flight mass spectrometry fitted with a powerful postprocessing software.

  20. Terpenoids from rhizomes of Alpinia japonica inhibiting nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang-Ming; Luo, Jian-Guang; Yang, Ming-Hua; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-03-01

    A new sesquiterpenoid, 1, and three new diterpenoids, 3-5, along with five known compounds, 2 and 6-9, were isolated from rhizomes of Alpinia japonica. The structures of the new compounds were determined as (1R,4R,6S,7S,9S)-4α-hydroxy-1,9-peroxybisabola-2,10-diene (1), methyl (12E)-16-oxolabda-8(17),12-dien-15-oate (3), (12R)-15-ethoxy-12-hydroxylabda-8(17),13(14)-dien-16,15-olide (4), and methyl (11E)-14,15,16-trinorlabda-8(17),11-dien-13-oate (5) by means of spectroscopic data. The absolute configurations at C(4) in 1 and C(12) in 4 were deduced from the circular dichroism (CD) data of the in situ-formed [Rh2 (CF3 COO)4 ] complexes. Inhibitory effects of the isolates on NO production in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 macrophages were evaluated, and 2-4, 6, and 7 were found to exhibit inhibitory activities with IC50 values between 14.6 and 34.3 μM.

  1. Spatial orientation in Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Ruploh

    Full Text Available Finding a given location can be based on a variety of strategies, for example on the estimation of spatial relations between landmarks, called spatial orientation. In galliform birds, spatial orientation has been demonstrated convincingly in very young domestic chicks. We wanted to know whether adult Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica without food deprivation are also able to use spatial orientation. The quails had to learn the relation of a food location with four conspicuous landmarks which were placed in the corners of a square shaped arena. They were trained to find mealworms in three adjacent food cups in a circle of 20 such cups. The rewarded feeders were located during training between the same two landmarks each of which showed a distinct pattern. When the birds had learned the task, all landmarks were displaced clockwise by 90 degrees. When tested in the new situation, all birds redirected their choices with respect to the landmark shift. In subsequent tests, however, the previously correct position was also chosen. According to our results, quails are using conspicuous landmarks as a first choice for orientation. The orientation towards the previously rewarded location, however, indicates that the neuronal representation of space which is used by the birds also includes more fine grain, less conspicuous cues, which are probably also taken into account in uncertain situations. We also presume that the rare orientation towards never rewarded feeders may be due to a foraging strategy instead of being mistakes.

  2. The gastrointestinal tract microbiota of the Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Ngare; Hughes, Robert J; Aspden, William J; Chapman, James; Moore, Robert J; Stanley, Dragana

    2016-05-01

    Microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) plays an essential role in the health and well-being of the host. With the exception of chickens, this area has been poorly studied within birds. The avian GIT harbours unique microbial communities. Birds require rapid energy bursts to enable energy-intensive flying. The passage time of feed through the avian GIT is only 2-3.5 h, and thus requires the presence of microbiota that is extremely efficient in energy extraction. This investigation has used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to explore the GIT microbiota of the flighted bird, the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). We are reporting, for the first time, the diversity of bacterial phylotypes inhabiting all major sections of the quail GIT including mouth, esophagus, crop, proventriculus, gizzard, duodenum, ileum, cecum, large intestine and feces. Nine phyla of bacteria were found in the quail GIT; however, their distribution varied significantly between GIT sections. Cecal microbiota was the most highly differentiated from all the other communities and showed highest richness at an OTU level but lowest richness at all other taxonomic levels being comprised of only 15 of total 57 families in the quail GIT. Differences were observed in the presence and absence of specific phylotypes between sexes in most sections.

  3. Sexual Dichromatism of the Damselfly Calopteryx japonica Caused by a Melanin-Chitin Multilayer in the Male Wing Veins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Leertouwer, Hein L.; Hariyama, Takahiko; De Raedt, Hans A.; Wilts, Bodo D.

    2012-01-01

    Mature male Calopteryx japonica damselflies have dark-blue wings, due to darkly coloured wing membranes and blue reflecting veins. The membranes contain a high melanin concentration and the veins have a multilayer of melanin and chitin. Female and immature C. japonica damselflies have brown wings. W

  4. Sexual Dichromatism of the Damselfly Calopteryx japonica Caused by a Melanin-Chitin Multilayer in the Male Wing Veins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Leertouwer, Hein L.; Hariyama, Takahiko; De Raedt, Hans A.; Wilts, Bodo D.

    2012-01-01

    Mature male Calopteryx japonica damselflies have dark-blue wings, due to darkly coloured wing membranes and blue reflecting veins. The membranes contain a high melanin concentration and the veins have a multilayer of melanin and chitin. Female and immature C. japonica damselflies have brown wings.

  5. A tale of two seagrasses: Comparing the science and management of Zostera marina and Zostera japonica in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    On the Pacific coast of North America, at least two congeners of Zostera occur: native Zostera marina, and introduced, Z. japonica. Z. japonica is considered “invasive” and therefore, ecologically and economically harmful by some, while others consider it benign or perhaps benef...

  6. Variation of radiocesium concentrations in cedar pollen in the Okutama area since the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, H; Inoue, K; Sakano, Y; Hamada, M; Shimizu, H; Fukushi, M

    2015-11-01

    Due to releases of radionuclides in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, radiocesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) has been incorporated into large varieties of plant species and soil types. There is a possibility that radiocesium taken into plants is being diffused by pollen. Radiocesium concentrations in cedar pollen have been measured in Ome City, located in the Okutama area of metropolitan Tokyo, for the past 3 y. In this research, the variation of radiocesium concentrations was analysed by comparing data from 2011 to 2014. Air dose rates at 1 m above the ground surface in Ome City from 2011 to 2014 showed no significant difference. Concentration of (137)Cs contained in the cedar pollen in 2012 was about half that in 2011. Between 2012 and 2014, the concentration decreased by approximately one-fifth, which was similar to the result of a press release distributed by the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries.

  7. Dry deposition of sulfur to forests in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Akira; Sato, Kazuo; Fujita, Shin-ichi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Dry deposition is an important input process of acidifying compounds to forest ecosystem. However, dry deposition to forest was largely unstudied in Japan, despite the fact that about 70% of the land is covered with forest. To assess the contribution of dry deposition to the total (wet + dry) input of sulfur to forest, we estimated dry deposition velocities and fluxes of sulfur to three different forest stands (cedar [Cryptomeria japonica], pine [Pinus densiflora], and oak [Quercus serrata]) located at Mt. Akagi in Gumma Prefecture, Japan. Micro meteorology above canopies, atmospheric concentrations, and throughfall fluxes were measured from October 1994 to September 1995. Deposition velocities of sulfur dioxide and particulate sulfate were determined by using the inferential method, based on the result of meteorological measurements. Dry deposition fluxes were calculated from the estimated deposition velocities and the result of concentration measurements. Dry deposition fluxes of sulfate for cedar, pine, and oak were estimated at 164 eq/ha/y, 143 eq/ha/y, and 131 eq/ha/y, respectively. The relative contribution of dry deposition ranged from 20% to 22% of the total sulfur deposition. However, these results might be underestimated because estimated fluxes were about 30% lower than observed net throughfall fluxes ([throughfall + stemflow] - precipitation) in cedar and pine forest stands.

  8. Height-diameter model for black locust, Anatolian black pine and Taurus cedar tree species in Lakes Region

    OpenAIRE

    ÇATAL, Yılmaz

    2012-01-01

    The height of a tree is important for assessing tree volume and site index. Diameter of breast height-tree height releation equations are often used to predict the mean tree height for trees in case only diameter at breast height is measured. This study aim describes between the tree heights with diameter of breast height relationships for artificially grown black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.), Anatolian black pine (Pinus nigra Arnold. subsp. pallasiana (Lamb.) Holmboe) and Taurus cedar (C...

  9. Yellow-cedar in vitro clonal production and evaluation of propagules for reforestation. FRDA research memo No. 211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Technical note describing a project that was part of an ongoing effort to develop micropropagation techniques on an operation scale and to investigate their possible use in producing genetically improved stock for planting. The project developed a commercially viable process that uses organogenic micropropagation to produce yellow-cedar stock for operational reforestation; evaluated the techniques for developing genetically improved clones; and established demonstration plots of mircopropagules.

  10. Stable carbon isotope fractionation in pollen of Atlas cedar: first steps towards a new palaeoecological proxy for Northwest Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Benjamin; Fletcher, William; Ryan, Peter; Grant, Helen; Ilmen, Rachid

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of stable carbon isotopes can provide information on climate and the environmental conditions at different growth stages of the plant, both past and present. Carbon isotope discrimination in plant tissue is already well understood, and can be used as a drought stress indicator for semi-arid regions. Stable carbon isotope ratios measured directly on pollen provides the potential for the development of long-term environmental proxies (spanning thousands of years), as pollen is well preserved in the environment. Atlas Cedar (Cedrus atlantica Endl. Manetti ex Carrière), is an ideal test case to develop a pollen stable carbon isotope proxy. The tree grows across a wide altitudinal and climatic range and is extremely sensitive to moisture availability. The pollen is abundant, and easily identifiable to the species level in pollen analysis because different cedar species are geographically confined to different regions of the world. In 2015 we sampled 76 individual cedar trees across latitudinal, altitudinal and environmental gradients, highly focused on the Middle Atlas region of Morocco, with 25 additional samples from botanical gardens across Europe and the US to extend these gradients. Here, we report new stable carbon isotope data from pollen, leaf and stem wood from these samples with a view to assessing and quantifying species-specific fractionation effects associated with pollen production. The isotopic response of individual trees at local and wider geographical scales to altitude and climatic conditions is presented. This research forms part of an ongoing PhD project working to develop and calibrate a modern carbon isotope proxy in Atlas cedar pollen, which can ultimately be applied to fossil sequences and complement existing multi-proxy records (e.g. pollen analysis in lake sediments, tree-rings).

  11. Archeological Survey and Testing at Pomme de Terre and Stockton Lakes, Cedar, Dade, Hickory, and Polk Counties, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    were rare in prior to Anglo-American settlement because red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) is extremely susceptible to fire dam- age . Other frequently...common fish remains from Rodgers Shelter are catfish (Ictaluridae) and suckers ( Catostomidae ) (Parmalee et al. 1976:157). Gravels of the stream bottoms and...terrace, but this occupation was not investigated ade- quately for interpretation (Kay 1982c:736). Radiocarbon ages pertaining to this period are 3530 1

  12. Geomorphic Framework to assess changes to aquatic habitat due to flow regulation and channel and floodplain alteration, Cedar River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Little, Rand

    2010-01-01

    Flow regulation, bank armoring, and floodplain alteration since the early 20th century have contributed to significant changes in the hydrologic regime and geomorphic processes of the Cedar River in Washington State. The Cedar River originates in the Cascade Range, provides drinking water to the Seattle metropolitan area, and supports several populations of anadromous salmonids. Flow regulation currently has limited influence on the magnitude, duration, and timing of high-flow events, which affect the incubation of salmonids as well as the production and maintenance of their habitat. Unlike structural changes to the channel and floodplain, flow regulation may be modified in the short-term to improve the viability of salmon populations. An understanding of the effects of flow regulation on those populations must be discerned over a range of scales from individual floods that affect the size of individual year classes to decadal high flow regime that influences the amount and quality of channel and off-channel habitat available for spawning and rearing. We present estimates of reach-scale sediment budgets and changes to channel morphology derived from historical orthoimagery, specific gage analyses at four long-term streamflow-gaging stations to quantify trends in aggradation, and hydrologic statistics of the magnitude and duration of peak streamflows. These data suggest a gradient of channel types from unconfined, sediment-rich segments to confined, sediment-poor segments that are likely to have distinct responses to high flows. Particle-size distribution data and longitudinal water surface and streambed profiles for the 56 km downstream of Chester Morse Lake measured in 2010 show the spatial extent of preferred salmonid habitat along the Cedar River. These historical and current data constitute a geomorphic framework to help assess different river management scenarios for salmonid habitat and population viability. PDF version of a presentation on changes to aquatic

  13. Cellulose extraction from Zoysia japonica pretreated by alumina-doped MgO in AMIMCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Le; Ju, Meiting; Li, Weizun; Jiang, Yang

    2014-11-26

    In this study, alumina-doped MgO was produced as a solid alkali for lignocellulose pretreatment. Pretreatment with alumina-doped MgO disrupted the lignocellulose structure and significantly reduced the lignin content of the Z. japonica. After pretreatment, Z. japonica showed significant solubility in 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AMIMCl). The similar high solubility of pretreated Z. japonica samples by original alumina-doped MgO and used alumina-doped MgO also proved that alumina-doped MgO had strong stability, which can be recycled and used repeatedly. The regenerated cellulose was similar to microcrystalline cellulose according to FTIR and NMR analyses. Compared to microcrystalline cellulose, only the crystallinity of the regenerated cellulose decreased.

  14. Microsatellite markers for Nuphar japonica (Nymphaeaceae), an aquatic plant in the agricultural ecosystem of Japan1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Sonoko; Shiga, Takashi; Isagi, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Nuphar species (Nymphaeaceae) are representative aquatic plants in irrigation ponds in Japanese agricultural ecosystems. We developed 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers for N. japonica and confirmed their utility for its close relatives N. oguraensis var. akiensis and N. ×saijoensis, which originated from natural hybridization between N. japonica and N. oguraensis. Methods and Results: Genetic variation was characterized in 15 polymorphic loci in three populations of N. japonica. The average number of alleles per locus was 3.47 (range = 2−9; n = 32), and the average expected heterozygosity per locus was 0.84 (range = 0.5–1.0); 11 loci were amplified in N. oguraensis var. akiensis and 15 in N. ×saijoensis. Conclusions: The polymorphic microsatellite markers developed in this study will be useful for investigating the levels of genetic diversity within remnant populations of Nuphar taxa and could provide a valuable tool for conservation genetics of these taxa. PMID:28101435

  15. Genetic structure of Camellia japonica L. in an old-growth evergreen forest, Tsushima, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, S; Tomaru, N; Yoshimaru, H; Manabe, T; Yamamoto, S

    2000-06-01

    The spatial genetic structure of Camellia japonica was investigated, using microsatellite markers, in a 4-ha permanent plot within an old-growth forest. Spatial distribution of individuals was also assessed to obtain an insight into spatial relationships between individuals and alleles. Morisita's index of dispersion showed that 518 C. japonica individuals in the plot were clumped, and Moran's I spatial autocorrelation coefficient revealed weak genetic structure, indicating a low level of allele clustering. Average I correlograms showed that there was stronger genetic structure over short-distance classes. The clumped distribution of individuals and the positive autocorrelation over short-distance classes may result from the limited seed dispersal and microsite heterogeneity of the stand, while the genetic structure may be weakened by overlapping seed shadow and extensive pollen flow, mediated by animal vectors, and the high outcrossing rate found in C. japonica.

  16. Spectrum of allergens for Japanese cedar pollinosis and impact of component-resolved diagnosis on allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Takashi; Kawamoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    The high prevalence of Japanese cedar pollinosis in Japan is associated with a negative impact on the quality of life of patients, as well as significant loss of productivity among the workforce in early spring, thus representing a serious social problem. Furthermore, the prevalence is increasing, and has risen by more than 10% in this decade. Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 were identified as the major allergens in Japanese cedar pollen (JCP), and in 2004, the existence of other major and minor allergens were revealed by a combination of two-dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblotting analysis. Allergenome analysis identified a chitinase, a lipid transfer protein, a serine protease, and an aspartic protease as novel IgE-reactive allergens in patients with JCP allergy. Thaumatin-like protein (Cry j 3) was shown to be homologous to Jun a 3, a major allergen from mountain cedar pollen. Isoflavone reductase-like protein was also characterized in a study of a JCP cDNA library. The characterization of component allergens is required to clarify the sensitizer or cross-reactive elicitor allergens for component-resolved diagnosis (CRD). Increasing evidence from numerous clinical trials indicates that CRD can be used to design effective allergen-specific immunotherapy. In this review, we summarize the eight characterized JCP allergens and discuss the impact of CRD and characterization of novel allergens on allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  17. Development of Japonica Male Sterile Lines Integrating Cytoplasmic Male Sterility and Photosensitive Genic Male Sterility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shou-hai; DU Shi-yun; WANG De-zheng; LI Cheng-quan

    2005-01-01

    It has been previously established that the BT type of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is induced by high temperatures,while photosensitive genic male sterility (PGMS) seed sets by low temperatures induce. In the current study, we have bred photosensitive cytoplasmic male sterility (PCMS) lines (2308SA and 2310SA) by crossing the CMS line with the PGMS japonica line with maintainer genes. The sterility of PCMS japonica was consequently controlled by two groups of male sterile genes resulting from the integration of PGMS and CMS genes. The results on plant fertility, at different sowing times, were as follows: (a) Under conditions of natural long-day photoperiod and at temperatures above 35℃, the PGMS gene regulated PCMS japonica sterility - the higher the temperature, the lower the pollen fertility. However, bagged seed sets of PCMS japonica, not exposed to high temperatures, induced the CMS seed set. (b) Exposure to long-day photoperiod and temperature conditions between 35℃ and the critical sterility inducing temperature of PGMS resulted in both PGMS and CMS gene controlled sterility of PCMS japonica, which exhibited stable characteristics. (c) When exposed to critical sterility inducing temperatures or short-day photoperiod and daily high temperatures below 32℃, the BT type of the CMS gene regulated PCMS sterility. Under these conditions, the PGMS gene rendered male sterility insusceptible to occasional cool summer days when this PCMS line, adopted for hybrid seed production, develops into panicle differentiation stage.The present study also investigated the fertility restoration, seed production and combining ability of PCMS japonica so as to optimize its use.

  18. Estrogenic activity of a naringinase-treated extract of Sophora japonica cultivated in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Halawany, Ali M; Chung, Mi Hwa; Abdallah, Hossam M; Nishihara, Tsutomu; Hattori, Masao

    2010-02-01

    The naringinase-treated methanol extract of Sophora japonica L. (Fabaceae) seeds showed potent estrogen agonist activity. Through bioassay-guided isolation of the main active constituents from the naringinase-treated methanol extract of S. japonica, the aglycones genistein and kaempferol were found to be the main phytoestrogens in the naringinase-treated extract. In addition, kaempferol was nearly equipotent to genistein as an estrogen agonist. Concerning the compounds isolated from the untreated methanol extract, sophoricoside showed weak estrogenic activity on ERbeta only.

  19. Preliminary study on the genes related to the fertility of indica/japonica hybrid rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Studying the sterility of indica/japonica hybrid was a prerequisite for the utilization of heterosis in high yield rice breeding. In 1986, Ikehashi et al found that wide compatibility varieties, which possessed S5-n allele, couldovercome the sterility of indica/japonica hybrids, and thesterilitv was mainly caused by allelic interaction at S-5 lo-cus. Further studies indicated that the sterility could notbe completely overcome just by S5-n. There were must beother loci responsible for the sterility of indica/ japonicahybrids.

  20. Catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica over nanoporous catalysts using Py-GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Jong-Ki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica was carried out over a hierarchical meso-MFI zeolite (Meso-MFI and nanoporous Al-MCM-48 using pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. The effect of the catalyst type on the product distribution and chemical composition of the bio-oil was examined using Py-GC/MS. The Meso-MFI exhibited a higher activity in deoxygenation and aromatization during the catalytic pyrolysis of L. japonica. Meanwhile, the catalytic activity of Al-MCM-48 was lower than that of Meso-MFI due to its weak acidity.

  1. Fullerene fine particles adhere to pollen grains and affect their autofluorescence and germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoyagi H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hideki Aoyagi, Charles U UgwuLife Science and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, JapanAbstract: Adhesion of commercially produced fullerene fine particles to Cryptomeria japonica, Chamaecyparis obtusa and Camellia japonica pollen grains was investigated. The autofluorescence of pollen grains was affected by the adhesion of fullerene fine particles to the pollen grains. The degree of adhesion of fullerene fine particles to the pollen grains varied depending on the type of fullerene. Furthermore, germination of Camellia japonica pollen grains was inhibited by the adhesion of fullerene fine particles.Keywords: Cryptomeria japonica, Chamaecyparis obtusa, Camellia japonica, autofluorescence, pollen grains, fullerene fine particle

  2. Isolation of antiosteoporotic compounds from seeds of Sophora japonica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam M Abdallah

    Full Text Available Chemical investigation of Sophora japonica seeds resulted in the isolation of seven metabolites identified as: genistin (1, sophoricoside (2, sophorabioside (3, sophoraflavonoloside (4, genistein 7,4'-di-O-β-D-glucopyransoide (5, kaempferol 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1 → 6β-D-glucopyranosyl(1 → 2β-D-glucopyranoside (6 and rutin (7. Compounds 1, 2 and 5 showed significant estrogenic proliferative effect in MCF-7 cell in sub-cytotoxic concentration range. Compounds 1 and 2 showed minimal cell membrane damaging effect using LDH leakage assay. Accordingly, compound 2 (sophoricoside, (SPH was selected for further in-vivo studies as a potential anti-osteoporosis agent. The anti-osteoporotic effect of SPH was assessed in ovarectomized (OVX rats after oral administration (15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg for 45 days compared to estradiol (10 µg/kg as a positive control. Only in a dose of 30 mg/kg, SPH regained the original mechanical bone hardness compared to normal non-osteoporotic group. However, SPH (15 mg/kg significantly increased the level of alkaline phosphatase (ALP to normal level. Treatment with SPH (30 mg/kg increased the level of ALP to be higher than normal group. SPH (15 mg/kg did not significantly increase the serum level of osteocalcin (OC compared to OVX group. On the other hand, treatment with SPH (30 mg/kg significantly increased the level of OC to 78% higher than normal non-ovarectomized animals group. In addition, SPH (15 mg/kg decreased the bone resorption marker, acid phosphatase (ACP to normal level and SPH (30 mg/kg further diminished the level of serum ACP. Histopathologically, sophoricoside ameliorated the ovarectomy induced osteoporosis in a dose dependent manner. The drug showed thicker bony trabeculae, more osteoid, and more osteoblastic rimming compared to OVX group.

  3. Locomotor activity rhythm in the Japanese eel Anguilla japonica elvers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Under artificial LD cycles (6, 12, 18 L), the elvers of Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica, showed a 24 h cycle of locomotor activity rhythm being most active at light transitions: the eels' activity rose to a primary peak after lights-off, followed by a quiescent period during which they buried into the shelters or lying motionlessly on sand for most of the time, and then reached a secondary peak before lights-on. Elvers could resynchronize their activity rhythm with a new photo cycle within 4 d. Moreover, their activity level at dark phase significantly increased as the light period was prolonged: higher activity levels during shorter dark period. However, the elvers did not display clearly the existence of a circadian rhythm under constant light or dark conditions. The timing of daily activity rhythm evidenced in the Japanese eels may occur through the action of the LD cycles with a weak participation of an endogenous circadian system. In all the LD cycles, over 99% of the activity occurred in the dark phase, indicating that the eels were always nocturnally active no matter what time of day it might be. Under 12 L conditions, the eels' activity level and the time outside sand were significantly elevated both at light and dark phases as temperature increased from 10~15 to 20~25 ℃. The activity rhythm pattern (i.e., two peaks occurring around light transitions) did not apparently change among temperatures. However, in contrast with the primary activity peaks immediately after lights-off at 20 and 25 ℃, the timing of the primary peaks at 10 and 15 ℃ showed a latency of a few hours following lights-off, indicating the inhibiting effect of low temperature on the eels' activity.

  4. Influences of floral composition and environment on plant biomarkers across a Cretaceous landscape (Big Cedar Ridge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, R. T.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Wing, S. L.; McInerney, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous fossil site at Big Cedar Ridge (BCR; late Campanian, 72.7 Ma), located in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA, contains a flora preserved in situ in a volcanic ash tuff over an organic-rich paleosol. The BCR flora is irregularly but extensively exposed along a ~4 km north-south transect and records a lowland flora that grew on a coastal delta on the western shore of the Cretaceous Interior Seaway (Meeteetse Formation). The transect spans a diverse landscape and a range of environmental gradients from very carbon-rich, swampy soils in the southern portion to less carbon-rich in the north; the landscape is also intersected by multiple inactive channel cuts that were filling with sediment and organic matter at the time of ash deposition. Recently Wing and others (2012, Ecological Monographs) described the composition of the local plant community at high resolution across the entire landscape, including identification and quantification of cover and richness for >122 taxonomic morphotypes, for each of 100 sites along the transect. Big Cedar Ridge captures an important time in the ecological development of plant communities: the site preserves ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms in 'fern thicket' floral assemblages, which are rare today, as well as disturbed habitats with abundant herbaceous 'dicot' angiosperms. During the Late Cretaceous angiosperms were globally increasing in abundance, displacing other plant groups as vegetational dominants. This setting allows for a novel analysis of plant biomarkers in the context of floral diversity, abundance, and landscape heterogeneity. We quantified leaf waxes (n-alkyl lipids), plant-derived terpenoids, bacterial hopanes, carbon isotope values (including bulk and compound-specific), and percent total organic carbon of the underlying paleosol for 36 sites along the transect in order to assess the influence of floral composition and soil environment on biomarker distributions and preservation. We compare lipid

  5. 不同坡位柳杉人工林夏季土壤动物群落特征%Soil fauna community structure in Cryptomeria fortunei artificial stands at different slope elevations in summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖玖金; 林宏贵; 周鑫; 尤花; 李云; 张健

    2016-01-01

    为研究柳杉Cryptomeria fortunei人工林不同坡位土壤动物群落结构特征,采用手捡法和干湿漏斗法在四川盆周西缘山地3个不同坡位(海拔分别为1088 m,987 m和830 m)的柳杉人工林设置样地(分别为样地Ⅰ,样地Ⅱ和样地Ⅲ)进行土壤动物群落调查。结果显示:试验所采集到的土壤动物平均密度为3.46×104只·m-2,隶属于5门13纲94类,其中,土壤动物密度和类群数均以样地Ⅲ最高,分别为6.53×104只·m-2和66类,以样地Ⅰ最低,分别为1.35×104只·m-2和38类,土壤动物密度和类群数呈现出随坡位高度增加而减少的趋势;从垂直分布来看,各土层土壤动物密度均随着坡位的上升而减少,各样地有大于43%的土壤动物个体分布在0~5 cm土层(凋落物层除外),有大于72%的土壤动物类群分布在凋落物层;除Simpson优势度指数(C)外,土壤动物多样性指数均以样地Ⅲ最高,同时,各样地间土壤动物群落Sorenson相似性系数较Morisita-Horn相似性系数波动更大,表明坡位对柳杉人工林下土壤动物群落各类群的相对数量影响较类群数的影响大。图3表5参20%Soil fauna, an important comp onent of soil ecosystems, plays an important role in decomposition of biological remains, affects soil properties, and enhances material recycling and energy conversion in the soil. Understanding the impacts of slope elevation on soil fauna is essential to achieve sustainable Cryptomeria for-tunei artificial stand management and biodiversity conservation; therefore, an investigation on soil fauna was carried out in Cryptomeria fortunei plantations. Three sample plots were set at three slope elevations (Plot Ⅰ-1 088 m, Plot Ⅱ-987 m, and Plot Ⅲ-830 m). Macrofauna samples (n=3) were picked up by hand in each sampled slope with the area of 50 cm × 50 cm (0.25 m2). After recording the types of soil fauna, the samples were put into

  6. PCR-RFLP and AP-PCR of rbcL and ITS of rDNA Show That × Taxodiomeria peizhongii (Taxodium x Cryptomeria) Is not an Intergeneric Hybrid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    ×Taxodiomeria peizhongiiZ. J. Ye, J. J. Zhang et S. H. Pan was regarded as a new intergeneric hybrid between Taxodium mucronatum Tenore (as the female donor) and Cryptomeria fortunei Hooibrenk ex Otto et Dietr (as the male donor). To confirm the authenticity of the intergeneric hybrid, we analyzed the rbcL gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 26S-18S ribosomal RNA gene of the three species using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR), and obtained the following results: i) Taxodiomeria peizhongii had the same RFLP maps of the rbcL gene and the ITS as Taxodium mucronatum, but was different from C. fortunei; ii) a 311-bp PCR amplification product was obtained in C. fortunei by AP-PCR of ITS, but was not found in Taxodiomeria peizhongii. Our results have demonstrated that C. fortunei did not provide any genome for Taxodiomeria peizhongii, implying that T. peizhongii is not an intergeneric hybrid between the two species.

  7. Growth response of Lebanon cedar (Cedrus libani) plantations to thinning intensity in Western Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carus, Serdar; Catal, Yilmaz

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents the growth response of 25 yr old Lebanon cedar (Cedrus libani A. Rich.) plantation to thinnings of different intensities in Isparta in western Turkey. The thinning intensity was measured by using the residual basal area (%) as parameter. In spring of 2005, three treatments were tested; light, moderate and heavy thinning with respectively 10, 25 and 35% of basal area removed. The statistical design of the experiment was a randomized incomplete block with two blocks and three treatments. Variables such as diameter at breast height (diameter) and height were measured. Growth rate ratios of diameter in moderately thinned and heavily thinned stands were 1.02 and 1.03, respectively. Basal area growth rates in moderately thinned and heavily thinned plots were 0.93 and 1.05, respectively. The largest values for the mean tree were observed with the heaviest thinning treatment. Absolute diameter increment was positively correlated with initial diameter in all plots. Relative diameter growth was negatively correlated with initial diameter. Growth rate interpretations were supported by analysis of variance using Duncan's test of range multiple. The results obtained show significant differences between treatments for tree height growth, for the two inventories carried out (2005, 2008). However diameter basal area and volume were no found between treatments for tree.

  8. Seasonal Variation in the NDVI–Species Richness Relationship in a Prairie Grassland Experiment (Cedar Creek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Species richness generally promotes ecosystem productivity, although the shape of the relationship varies and remains the subject of debate. One reason for this uncertainty lies in the multitude of methodological approaches to sampling biodiversity and productivity, some of which can be subjective. Remote sensing offers new, objective ways of assessing productivity and biodiversity. In this study, we tested the species richness–productivity relationship using a common remote sensing index, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, as a measure of productivity in experimental prairie grassland plots (Cedar Creek. Our study spanned a growing season (May to October, 2014 to evaluate dynamic changes in the NDVI–species richness relationship through time and in relation to environmental variables and phenology. We show that NDVI, which is strongly associated with vegetation percent cover and biomass, is related to biodiversity for this prairie site, but it is also strongly influenced by other factors, including canopy growth stage, short-term water stress and shifting flowering patterns. Remarkably, the NDVI-biodiversity correlation peaked at mid-season, a period of warm, dry conditions and anthesis, when NDVI reached a local minimum. These findings confirm a positive, but dynamic, productivity–diversity relationship and highlight the benefit of optical remote sensing as an objective and non-invasive tool for assessing diversity–productivity relationships.

  9. Resistance of pine, australian red cedar woods and their derivate products to Cryptotermes brevis attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Xisto Ribeiro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the resistance of Australian red cedar (Toona ciliata and pine (Pinus sp. woods and particleboards made from these species to dry-wood termite Cryptotermes brevis attack, as much as to quantify the mortality of the insects. 30 termite pseudo-workers were put in each 9,5 cm-diameter Petri dishes containing the samples (1,5 x 1,5 x 0,5 cm and cotton sheets positioned on the perforated covers, daily moisturized with 5 ml of water. The dishes were maintained in BOD (Biological Oxygen Demand at 24±5 ºC and 24 h of escotophase. A control sample without any feed source was included in the bioassay. The deterioration index (ID and mortality of the insects were evaluated after 60 days. Termites from the control sample presented higher termite mortality than the other treatments, which did not differ among each other. Toona ciliata wood was more resistant than Pinus sp. wood to Cryptotermes brevis attack. The average deterioration indexes were 1.74% and 6.62% respectively for those woods. The average deterioration index of the panels made with 100% Toona ciliata (ID=1.58% was similar to the deterioration index of particleboards made with this specie mixed with Pinus sp. (ID=1.87%.

  10. Impact of famous CEDAR, GEM and ISTP geomagnetic Storms on HF Radio Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoveshchensky, D.; Sergeeva, M.

    The mighty geomagnetic storms due to the extraordinary Sun s activity cause as a rule some impacts in these areas radiation effects on human and satellites commercial airlines outages electric power and other geomagnetic effects navigation and communication GPS effects ionospheric disturbances HF communication effects Therefore our scientific understanding of this activity is very important Joint efforts for example within the framework of the CAWSES enable progress in our ability to i identify critical inputs to specify the geospace environment at a level needed to minimize impacts on technology human society and life and ii support the development of robust models that predict conditions in geospace based on understanding of the Sun-Earth system and all of its interacting components In this study influence of 14 geomagnetic storms from a list of CEDAR GEM and ISTP storms within 1997-99 on radio propagation conditions have been investigated These conditions were estimated through variations of the MOF and LOF the maximum and lowest operation frequencies on each path from three high-latitude HF radio paths of North-west Russia before during and after a storm It was shown that the storm impact on the ionosphere and radio propagation for each storm has an individual character Nevertheless the common character of the certain manifestations during storm-time was revealed For example the frequency range MOF - LOF is getting wider several hours before a storm then it is sharply narrow during a storm-time and further it is expanded again several

  11. Threat to cedar, Cedrela odorata, plantations in Vietnam by the weevil, Aclees sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Pham Quang; Quang, Dao Ngoc; Dell, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The recent decline and death of young cedar, Cedrela odorata L. (Sapindales: Meliaceae), plantations in Vietnam is caused by Aclees sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a wood-boring brown weevil. A field study was undertaken in three-year-old plantations in two districts in Thanh Hoa province in August 2008. Trees were heavily impacted by the weevil, Aclees; the infestation level (P) ranged from 80 to 100% and the average damage index (R) ranged from 1.8 to 2.8. Observations over one year enabled the life history to be determined. Eggs were laid (February to March, September to November) inside the bark from the base of the trunk up to 60 cm in height. Larvae formed extensive feeding tunnels in the inner bark and sap wood. Pupation occurred in feeding tunnels or pupal chambers in the sapwood. Adults emerged twice a year, February to March and August to October. It is concluded that Aclees is a threat to C. odorata plantations in tropical regions of the world, and quarantine measures should be implemented to reduce the risk of spread.

  12. Soil microbial community profiles and functional diversity in limestone cedar glades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Dzantor, E. Kudjo; Momen, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Rock outcrop ecosystems, such as limestone cedar glades (LCGs), are known for their rare and endemic plant species adapted to high levels of abiotic stress. Soils in LCGs are thin (functional diversity were characterized in LCGs using community level physiological profiling (CLPP) and plate-dilution frequency assays (PDFA). Most-probable number (MPN) estimates and microbial substrate-utilization diversity (H) were positively related to soil thickness, soil organic matter (OM), soil water content, and vegetation density, and were diminished in alkaline soil relative to circumneutral soil. Soil nitrate showed no relationship to SMCs, suggesting lack of N-limitation. Canonical correlation analysis indicated strong correlations between microbial CLPP patterns and several physical and chemical properties of soil, primarily temperature at the ground surface and at 4-cm depth, and secondarily soil-water content, enabling differentiation by season. Thus, it was demonstrated that several well-described abiotic determinants of plant community structure in this ecosystem are also reflected in SMC profiles.

  13. [Willingness to pay for Japanese cedar pollinosis: comparison between pollination and non-pollination seasons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakutani, Chieko; Ogino, Satoshi; Irifune, Morihiro; Kikumori, Hiroshi; Seo, Ritsu; Takeda, Mariko; Tamaki, Akiko; Baba, Kenji; Dake, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Hiroki; Enomoto, Tadao

    2004-06-01

    Allergic rhinitis is not fatal illness, but its high prevalence and several symptoms result in substantial medical cost. There is increasing interest in the use of economic evaluations in healthcare; therefore, we investigated patients' willingness to pay (WTP) for prevention and cure from Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP), and compared WTP values assessed in non-pollination season (June 1998) and pollination season (February-March 2003). Japanese economic woes got worse in 2003 than in 1998. Patients were randomly selected from ENT clinical sites in Osaka, 175 and 645 patients completed WTP questionnaire in 1998 and 2003, respectively. WTP value was lower in 2003 than in 1998, which related to part-time employees and housewives' reducing WTP. Declining WTP value did not associated with the differences in patient characteristics between 1998 and 2003 including age, duration of disease, nasal symptom severity and comorbid condition. These results show that we have to take employment status into account in economic evaluations. Decline in WTP for JCP in 2003 was strongly affected by Japanese sluggish economy, and the WTP seemed to be stable value in individual patients.

  14. Exploiting genes and functional diversity of chlorogenic acid and luteolin biosyntheses in Lonicera japonica and their substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Zhouyong; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Xumin; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-25

    Chlorogenic acids (CGAs) and luteolin are active compounds in Lonicera japonica, a plant of high medicinal value in traditional Chinese medicine. This study provides a comprehensive overview of gene families involved in chlorogenic acid and luteolin biosynthesis in L. japonica, as well as its substitutes Lonicera hypoglauca and Lonicera macranthoides. The gene sequence feature and gene expression patterns in various tissues and buds of the species were characterized. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 14 chlorogenic acid and luteolin biosynthesis-related genes were identified from the L. japonica transcriptome assembly. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that the function of individual gene could be differentiation and induce active compound diversity. Their orthologous genes were also recognized in L. hypoglauca and L. macranthoides genomic datasets, except for LHCHS1 and LMC4H2. The expression patterns of these genes are different in the tissues of L. japonica, L. hypoglauca and L. macranthoides. Results also showed that CGAs were controlled in the first step of biosynthesis, whereas both steps controlled luteolin in the bud of L. japonica. The expression of LJFNS2 exhibited positive correlation with luteolin levels in L. japonica. This study provides significant information for understanding the functional diversity of gene families involved in chlorogenic acid and the luteolin biosynthesis, active compound diversity of L. japonica and its substitutes, and the different usages of the three species.

  15. Tyrosinase Inhibitory Effect and Antioxidative Activities of Fermented and Ethanol Extracts of Rhodiola rosea and Lonicera japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shuen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first study to investigate the biological activities of fermented extracts of Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae and Lonicera japonica Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae. Alcaligenes piechaudii CC-ESB2 fermented and ethanol extracts of Rhodiola rosea and Lonicera japonica were prepared and the antioxidative activities of different concentrations of samples were evaluated using in vitro antioxidative assays. Tyrosinase inhibition was determined by using the dopachrome method with L-DOPA as substrate. The results demonstrated that inhibitory effects (ED50 values on mushroom tyrosinase of fermented Rhodiola rosea, fermented Lonicera japonica, ethanol extract of Lonicera japonica, and ethanol extract of Rhodiola rosea were 0.78, 4.07, 6.93, and >10 mg/ml, respectively. The DPPH scavenging effects of fermented Rhodiola rosea (ED50 = 0.073 mg/ml and fermented Lonicera japonica (ED50 = 0.207 mg/ml were stronger than effects of their respective ethanol extracts. Furthermore, the scavenging effect increases with the presence of high content of total phenol. However, the superoxide scavenging effects of fermented Rhodiola rosea was less than effects of fermented Lonicera japonica. The results indicated that fermentation of Rhodiola rosea and Lonicera japonica can be considered as an effective biochemical process for application in food, drug, and cosmetics.

  16. Growth Response of Northern White-Cedar (Thuja occidentalis to Natural Disturbances and Partial Cuts in Mixedwood Stands of Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Ruel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Northern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis is a species of high commercial and ecological value, the abundance of which has been declining since the middle of the 19th century. Very little information regarding its silviculture in mixedwood stands is currently available, even though a significant portion of wood resources comes from these stands. The present study is a retrospective analysis of white-cedar growth in partially harvested mixedwood stands of western Quebec, Canada. Eight stands distributed across two regions were analyzed. Dendrochronological approaches examined long-term diameter growth for sample white-cedar trees and stems of associated species. These approaches were used to reconstruct stand characteristics at the time of harvesting, together with local harvesting intensity. The study demonstrated white-cedar’s capacity to maintain good growth for long periods of time and at large tree sizes. Accession to the upper canopy positions occurs through repeated episodes of suppression/release, most of which seem to be associated with spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana outbreaks. White-cedar response to partial harvesting varies with tree size, residual basal area and species composition. Growth response was generally stronger for small trees, even though large trees still maintained the best diameter growth. Growth of white-cedar was negatively affected by an increase in softwood proportion in basal area. Growth responses to harvesting could be sustained for a period of 20 years.

  17. Microsatellite variation between Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) and European eel (Anguilla anguilla)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Allelic variation in a total of 7 microsatellites was examined between elvers of freshwater eels (Anguilla japonica and Anguilla anguilla). The number of alleles at these loci ranged from 8 to 26. A single test of each locus revealed significant deficits of heterozygotes (P<0.01). Significant departure from expectations of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was found for all loci within four subpopulations of A. japonica, which opposes the panmixia hypothesis of Schmidt. Also exact tests of population differentiation based on allelic frequency distribution disagree the hypothesis of random distribution of individuals among populations. Population structure among four populations of A. japonica was revealed with FST value of 0.009 8 (P=0.000 48; 10 000iteration). Pairwise matrixes of FST and RST showed a significant difference between two distantly related species-A. japonica and A. anguilla. Divergent time of the two species calculated by Goldstein method is over 2million years. The results may challenge the Schmidt's theory about the distribution of freshwater eels.

  18. Analysis on Genetic Relationship of Oxya chinensis and Oxya japonica from Xuzhou and Pingshan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-zhen; ZHANG Min; GUO Ya-ping; MA En-bo

    2006-01-01

    Genetic relationship among Oxya chinensis populations and Oxya japonica populations collected from Xuzhou City,Jiangsu Province and Pingshan County, Hebei Province, China were analyzed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. A total of 125 DNA bands ranging from 200 to 2 200 bp were amplified by 10 random primers in DNA samples from 43 grasshopper individuals. One hundred and twenty-three (99%) of these bands were polymorphic. Shannon's index showed that the genetic, diversity within O. chinensis (0.3432) was higher than that of O. japonica (0.2781). Nei's genetic distance between O. chinensis population and O. japonica population from the same area was less than that between populations from two different areas. The dendrogram based on Nei's genetic distance of RAPD markers was constructed using the unweighted pair group method with the arithmetic average (UPGMA) and Neighbor-Joining (NJ) methods. Cluster analysis indicated that all the individuals were grouped into two main clusters. O. chinensis populations from Xuzhou and Pingshan formed one cluster, and O. japonica populations from the two regions belonged to another cluster. The results demonstrated that RAPD can detect polymorphisms to distinguish minor difference among individuals within species, and among closely related species.

  19. Antibacterial Activity of Phytochemicals Isolated from Atractylodes japonica against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ho Hang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has been emerging worldwide as one of the most important problems in communities and hospitals. Therefore, new agents are needed to treat acute oral infections from MRSA. In this study, antibacterial compounds from the roots of Atractylodes japonica (A. japonica were isolated and characterized. The compounds were isolated from the root extracts using HPLC-piloted activity-guided fractionations. Four A. japonica compounds were isolated and identified as atractylenolide III (1, atractylenolide I (2, diacetylatractylodiol [(6E,12E-tetradeca-6,12-diene-8,10-diyne-1,3-diol diacetate, TDEYA, 3. and (6E,12E-tetradecadiene-8,10-diyne-1,3-diol (TDEA, 4, which was obtained by hydrolysis of TDEYA. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs was determined in the setting of clinical MRSA isolates. Compound 4 showed anti-MRSA activity with a MIC value of 4-32 μg/mL. The overall results provide promising baseline information for the potential use of the extract of A. japonica as well as some of the isolated compounds in the treatment of bacterial infections.

  20. Feeding and growth of Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) chicks with unpredictable food access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, P; Visser, GH; Daan, S

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the effect of unpredictable feeding times on feeding activity and body mass gain in fast growing Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) from 7 to 31 d of age. Quail chicks were subjected to a long day length (18L:6D) with ad libitum food during (1) 17.5 h of the light period, starting

  1. Developmental Analysis of Genetic Behavior of Brown Rice Width in indica-japonica Hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-ming; SHI Chun-hai; YE Shen-hai; QI Yong-bin

    2006-01-01

    The developmental genetic behaviors of brown rice width (BRW) have been studied in indica-japonica hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.), in which seven indica male sterile lines and five japonica restorer lines were applied, by using the developmental genetic models and corresponding statistical approaches for quantitative traits of triploid in cereal crops. The BRW of indica-japonica hybrid rice was co-determined by gene expression of triploid endosperm, cytoplasm, diploid maternal plant and their genotype ×environmental interaction effects. Unconditional analysis showed that the endosperm additive and maternal additive effects were predominant for the development of BRW from early- to late-stage of the grain development, but the endosperm dominant effect together with maternal effect and cytoplasmic effect became the major factor determing the BRW at the ripening stage. Moreover,conditional analysis found that there were new onset and offset of gene expression at different developmental stages of BRW in indica-japonica hybrid rice. Maternal and cytoplasm general heritabilities and their interaction heritabilities were more important compared to other components of heritability for BRW at all the five developmental stages.

  2. The storage characters related to indica/japonica diferentiation of rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The decline of rice quality and germination ability in the process of storage was a big problem to food production and nanagement. Gas and temperature control was used to decrease storage losing, but selecting germplasm with good storage characters was rare. In practice, it was found that storage characters of indica were better than that of japonica.

  3. [Study on standard of safe application of thiamethoxam on GAP of Lonicera japonica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-nan; Li, Yong; Dong, Jie; Zhang, Jin-liang; Wang, Pin-shu; Ding, Wan-long

    2015-09-01

    The paper is aimed to establish a method of residue analysis for thiamethoxam and to study its degradation dynamic and final residue and its standard of safe application of thiamethoxam on Lonicera japonica. Samples extracted with methanol by ultrasonication were purified with dichloromethane by liquid-liquid extraction and SPE column and analysed by HPLC-UV. The results showed that average rate was 84.91%-94.44% and RSD 1.74%-4.96% with addition of thiamethoxam in respectively diverse concentration, which meets inspection requirement of pesticide residue. Two kinds of dosages of thiamethoxam were treated- varying from recommended dosage (90 g x hm(-2)) to high dosage (135 g x hm(-2)), Results of two years test showed that thiamethoxam was degraded more than 90% seven days after application and the half - life period of thiamethoxam was 1.54-1.66 d. The digestion rate of thiamethoxam was fast in the L. japonica. The recommended MRL of thiamethoxam in the L. japonica is 0.1 mg x kg(-1), the dosage of 25% thiamethoxam WDG from 90-135 g x hm(-2) is sprayed less than three times a year on L. japonica and 14 days is proposed for the safety interval of the last pesticide application's and harvest's date.

  4. Chemical characterisation of three haemolytic compounds from the microalgal species Fibrocapsa japonica (Raphidophyceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, M.; Koulman, A; van Rijssel, M; Lutzen, A.; de Boer, M.K.; Tyl, M.R.; Liebezeit, G.

    2004-01-01

    The molecular Structures of the three main haemolytic compounds (Fj1, Fj2 and Fj3) isolated from the ichthyotoxic microalgal species Fibrocapsa japonica have been investigated by NMR, LC-ESI-MS, ESI-MS-MS, IR, GC-MS and GC-HRMS methods. They are polyunsaturated fatty acids which we identified as:

  5. A phytotoxic active substance in the decomposing litter of the fern Gleichenia japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Saito, Yoshihumi; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2015-03-15

    The fern Gleichenia japonica often dominates plant communities by forming large monospecific stands throughout the temperate to tropical Asia. The objective of this study was the investigation of allelopathic property and substances of the decomposing litter of the fern to evaluate the possible involvement of its allelopathy in the domination. An aqueous methanol extract of G. japonica litter inhibited the growth of garden cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli), and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum). This result suggests that G. japonica litter contains growth inhibitory substances. The extract was purified by chromatography while monitoring the inhibitory activity, and a growth inhibitory substance was isolated. The chemical structure of the substance was determined by spectral data to be a novel compound, 13-O-β-fucopyranosyl-3β-hydroxymanool. This compound inhibited root and shoot growth of garden cress and barnyard grass at concentrations ranging from 89.7 to 271 μM for 50% inhibition. In addition, the compound had potent growth inhibitory activity with the soil taken from near the colony. The concentration of the compound in soil under a pure colony of G. japonica was 790 μM, suggesting that the compound may contribute to the establishment of monocultural stands by this fern.

  6. Preliminary analysis of population genetic diversity of cultivated Laminaria japonica sporophyte via AFLP technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Heng; Sui, Zhenghong; Bao, Zhenmin

    2010-03-01

    The amplified fragment length polymorphic DNA (AFLP) technique was adopted to estimate the population genetic polymorphism among 30 sporophytes of Laminaria japonica collected from a cultivating farm in Rongcheng, China. Three methods were used for genomic DNA extraction from Laminaria japonica sporophyte and only the products obtained using the improved genomic DNA extraction kit method proved qualified for AFLP analysis. The parameters of the method were optimized. Samples of forty milligrams and the cell lysis time of 120 min were suggested to replace the parameters recommended by the manufacturer. Thirty individuals of Laminaria japonica from the same cultivating site were investigated using one pair of selective primers. A total of 21 loci were obtained and 17 of them were polymorphic. The mean percent age of polymorphic loci of this population was 80.95%. The Nei’s gene diversity (H) within this population was 0.3028 and the average Shannon’s Information index (I) was 0.4498. A genetic distance matrix among different individuals was constructed as well. Through this study, an applicable AFLP genetic analysis working system for Laminaria japonica sporophyte was established. The results of this research also revealed a high level of genetic diversity within the studied population.

  7. Chemical characterisation of three haemolytic compounds from the microalgal species Fibrocapsa japonica (Raphidophyceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, M.; Koulman, A; van Rijssel, M; Lutzen, A.; de Boer, M.K.; Tyl, M.R.; Liebezeit, G.

    2004-01-01

    The molecular Structures of the three main haemolytic compounds (Fj1, Fj2 and Fj3) isolated from the ichthyotoxic microalgal species Fibrocapsa japonica have been investigated by NMR, LC-ESI-MS, ESI-MS-MS, IR, GC-MS and GC-HRMS methods. They are polyunsaturated fatty acids which we identified as: 6,

  8. Effects of cadmium hyperaccumulation on the concentrations of four trace elements in Lonicera japonica Thunb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhouli; He, Xingyuan; Chen, Wei

    2011-06-01

    Hyperaccumulators are important in the phytoremediation of cadmium (Cd)-contaminated soil. In this study, Cd accumulation and the interactions between Cd and four other trace elements (Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn) in Lonicera japonica Thunb. were investigated. As a result of exposure to soil containing 50 mg kg(-1) Cd, stem and shoot Cd concentrations reached 344.49 ± 0.71 and 286.12 ± 9.38 μg g(-1) DW respectively, without showing symptoms of visible damage to the plants. This suggests that L. japonica has a strong tolerance to Cd. It is proposed that trace metal elements are involved in the Cd-detoxification mechanisms shown by hyperaccumulators. There is a synergistic interaction in accumulation and translocation between Cd and Fe and a significantly negative correlation between Cd and Cu or Zn concentrations in L. japonica plant tissues. The imbalanced trace element concentrations influences detoxification processes to Cd, therefore, L. japonica could be considered as a new Cd-hyperaccumulator model to investigate the metal tolerance strategies of plants.

  9. Effects of Silicon at Different Concentrations on Morphology and Photosynthetic Physiological Mechanism of Japonica Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang CHEN; Liping CAI; Bin ZHOU; Yan SHI; Meng RAO

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to explore effects of silicon at different concentrations on morphology and photosynthetic physiological mechanism of japonica rice. [Method] Seedlings of japonica rice were treated with silicon at different concentrations (0, 30, 80, 130 and 180 mg/L of sodium silicate); silicon contents were measured with Molybdenum blue spectrophotometric method in root, stem and leaf; plant height, root length and number in different treatment groups were measured with tools; chlorophyll a and b, and a/b in leaf and stem of rice in different groups were measured. [Result] Silicon contents in vegetative organs were as follows: stem〉leaf〉 root; when silicon was 80 mg/L, japonica ecotype was shortest; when silicon was 30 mg/L, root length of the rice was shortest and root number was least; when silicon was 30 mg/L, contents of chlorophyll a and b were highest and chlorophyll a/b achieved the peak when silicon was 80 mg/L. [Conclusion] Silicon at proper concen- tration would improve lodging-resistance and efficiency of photosynthesis, further enhancing yield of japonica rice.

  10. Subspecies characteristics in filial generation of cross between indica and japonica rice under different environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hai; LIU Hongguang; YANG Li; ZHU Chunjie; WANG Jiayu; YANG Qianhua; XU Zhengjin; ZHENG Jiakui

    2007-01-01

    The recombinant inbred lines (RILs) population derived from the cross between "Zhongyouzao8" (hsien or indica) and "Fengjin" (keng or japonica) was grown in Liaoning and Sichuan Provinces to compare the subspecies characteristics under different environments.The results showed that the distribution of Cheng's index was japonicalinous.The population was more japonicalinous in Sichuan than that in Liaoning as a whole.Further analysis indicated that indiea and indica-cline in Sichuan were more indicalinous than those in Liaoning,japonica and japonica-cline in Sichuan were more japonicalinous than those in Liaoning.The effects of environment on six characteristics of Cheng's index were different because of different characters,as well as on the correlations between the six characters,the Cheng's index and the vascular bundle traits.For example,the length of the first and second rachis and leaf pubescence were more japoniealinous in Sichuan than in Liaoning,while the length/width ratio of spikelets and glume color at heading time were more indicalinous in Sichuan than in Liaoning.The vascular bundle characteristics of RILs in different environments changed remarkably.The number of large vascular bundles in panicle neck was less in Sichuan than in Liaoning,while the number of small vascular bundles in panicle neck and second top stem was greater in Sichuan than in Liaoning.The ratio of large to small vascular bundles in panicle neck decreased and the ratio of large vascular bundles between the second top stem and panicle neck increased in Sichuan.Though total trend was the vascular bundle ratio of large to small in indica was greater than that in japonica and the ratio of large vascular bundles in indica was less than that in japonica,it is not appropriate that the vascular bundle ratio of large to small and the ratio of large vascular bundles are regarded as the parameters for subspecies classification in rice.The vascular bundles characteristics from typical indica or

  11. Structure and heterologous expression of the gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein from Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, H; Takada, K; Nakamura, S; Horikoshi, K

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein (CSG) of Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1 was cloned and sequenced. The structural gene consisted from an open reading frame of 2,586 bp. A potential promoter sequence was found about 150 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the Ha. japonica CSG revealed that the mature CSG consisted of 828 amino acids. Five potential N-glycosylation sites were found in the mature sequence. The cloned CSG gene of Ha. japonica was expressed in closely-related halophilic archaea.

  12. Antioxidant responses of Propylaea japonica (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) exposed to high temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shize; Fu, Wenyan; Li, Ning; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2015-02-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors, and is responsible for a variety of physiological stress responses in organisms. Induced thermal stress is associated with elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation leading to oxidative damage. The ladybeetle, Propylaea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is considered a successful natural enemy because of its tolerance to high temperatures in arid and semi-arid areas in China. In this study, we investigated the effect of high temperatures (35, 37, 39, 41 and 43 °C) on the survival and activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidases (POD), glutathione-S-transferases (GST), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in P. japonica adults. The results indicated that P. japonica adults could not survive at 43 °C. CAT, GST and TAC were significantly increased when compared to the control (25 °C), and this played an important role in the process of antioxidant response to thermal stress. SOD and POD activity, as well as MDA, did not differ significantly at 35 and 37 °C compared to the control; however, there were increased levels of SOD, POD and MDA when the temperature was above 37 °C. These results suggest that thermal stress leads to oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes play important roles in reducing oxidative damage in P. japonica adults. This study represents the first comprehensive report on the antioxidant defense system in predaceous coccinellids (the third trophic level). The findings provide useful information for predicting population dynamics and understanding the potential for P. japonica as a natural enemy to control pest insects under varied environmental conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization and analysis of a de novo transcriptome from the pygmy grasshopper Tetrix japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongying; Liu, Fei; Lu, Huimeng; Huang, Yuan

    2016-06-11

    The pygmy grasshopper Tetrix japonica is a common insect distributed throughout the world, and it has the potential for use in studies of body colour polymorphism, genomics and the biology of Tetrigoidea (Insecta: Orthoptera). However, limited biological information is available for this insect. Here, we conducted a de novo transcriptome study of adult and larval T. japonica to provide a better understanding of its gene expression and develop genomic resources for future work. We sequenced and explored the characteristics of the de novo transcriptome of T. japonica using Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. A total of 107 608 206 paired-end clean reads were assembled into 61 141 unigenes using the trinity software; the mean unigene size was 771 bp, and the N50 length was 1238 bp. A total of 29 225 unigenes were functionally annotated to the NCBI nonredundant protein sequences (Nr), NCBI nonredundant nucleotide sequences (Nt), a manually annotated and reviewed protein sequence database (Swiss-Prot), Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. A large number of putative genes that are potentially involved in pigment pathways, juvenile hormone (JH) metabolism and signalling pathways were identified in the T. japonica transcriptome. Additionally, 165 769 and 156 796 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms occurred in the adult and larvae transcriptomes, respectively, and a total of 3162 simple sequence repeats were detected in this assembly. This comprehensive transcriptomic data for T. japonica will provide a usable resource for gene predictions, signalling pathway investigations and molecular marker development for this species and other pygmy grasshoppers.

  14. Clinical Decision Making and Outcome in Routine Care for People with Severe Mental Illness (CEDAR: Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemes Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A considerable amount of research has been conducted on clinical decision making (CDM in short-term physical conditions. However, there is a lack of knowledge on CDM and its outcome in long-term illnesses, especially in care for people with severe mental illness. Methods/Design The study entitled "Clinical decision making and outcome in routine care for people with severe mental illness" (CEDAR is carried out in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Switzerland and UK. First, CEDAR establishes a methodology to assess CDM in people with severe mental illness. Specific instruments are developed (and psychometric properties established to measure CDM style, key elements of CDM in routine care, as well as CDM involvement and satisfaction from patient and therapist perspectives. Second, these instruments are being put to use in a multi-national prospective observational study (bimonthly assessments during a one-year observation period; N = 560. This study investigates the immediate, short- and long-term effect of CDM on crucial dimensions of clinical outcome (symptom level, quality of life, needs by taking into account significant variables moderating the relationship between CDM and outcome. Discussion The results of this study will make possible to delineate quality indicators of CDM, as well as to specify prime areas for further improvement. Ingredients of best practice in CDM in the routine care for people with severe mental illness will be extracted and recommendations formulated. With its explicit focus on the patient role in CDM, CEDAR will also contribute to strengthening the service user perspective. This project will substantially add to improving the practice of CDM in mental health care across Europe. Trial register ISRCTN75841675.

  15. Rainfall Runoff Modelling for Cedar Creek using HEC-HMS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, P.; Kalra, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall-runoff modelling studies are carried out for the purpose of basin and river management. Different models have been effectively used to examine relationships between rainfall and runoff. Cedar Creek Watershed Basin, the largest tributary of St. Josephs River, located in northeastern Indiana, was selected as a study area. The HEC-HMS model developed by US Army Corps of Engineers was used for the hydrological modelling. The national elevation and national hydrography data was obtained from United States Geological Survey National Map Viewer and the SSURGO soil data was obtained from United States Department of Agriculture. The watershed received hypothetical uniform rainfall for a duration of 13 hours. The Soil Conservation Service Curve Number and Unit Hydrograph methods were used for simulating surface runoff. The simulation provided hydrological details about the quantity and variability of runoff in the watershed. The runoff for different curve numbers was computed for the same basin and rainfall, and it was found that outflow peaked at an earlier time with a higher value for higher curve numbers than for smaller curve numbers. It was also noticed that the impact on outflow values nearly doubled with an increase of curve number of 10 for each subbasin in the watershed. The results from the current analysis may aid water managers in effectively managing the water resources within the basin. 1 Graduate Student, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603 2 Development Review Division, Clark County Public Works, 500 S. Grand Central Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89155, USA

  16. Developing dynamic field theory architectures for embodied cognitive systems with cedar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lomp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Embodied artificial cognitive systems such as autonomous robots or intelligent observers connect cognitive processes to sensory and effector systems in real time. Prime candidates for such embodied intelligence are neurally inspired architectures. While components such as forward neural networks are well established, designing pervasively autonomous neural architectures remains a challenge. This includes the problem of tuning the parameters of such architectures so that they deliver specified functionality under variable environmental conditions and retain these functions as the architectures are expanded. The scaling and autonomy problems are solved, in part, by dynamic field theory (DFT, a theoretical framework for the neural grounding of sensorimotor and cognitive processes. In this paper, we address how to efficiently build DFT architectures that control embodied agents and how to tune their parameters so that the desired cognitive functions emerge while such agents are situated in real environments. In DFT architectures, dynamic neural fields or nodes are assigned dynamic regimes, that is, attractor states and their instabilities, from which cognitive function emerges. Tuning thus amounts to determining values of the dynamic parameters for which the components of a DFT architecture are in the specified dynamic regime under the appropriate environmental conditions. The process of tuning is facilitated by the software framework cedar, which provides a graphical interface to build and execute DFT architectures. It enables to change dynamic parameters online and visualize the activation states of any component while the agent is receiving sensory inputs in real-time. Using a simple example, we take the reader through the workflow of conceiving of DFT architectures, implementing them on embodied agents, tuning their parameters, and assessing performance while the system is coupled to real sensory inputs.

  17. Space weather effects on radio propagation: study of the CEDAR, GEM and ISTP storm events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Blagoveshchensky

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of 14 geomagnetic storms from a list of CEDAR, GEM and ISTP storms, that occurred during 1997–1999, on radio propagation conditions has been investigated. The propagation conditions were estimated through variations of the MOF and LOF (the maximum and lowest operation frequencies on three high-latitude HF radio paths in north-west Russia. Geophysical data of Dst, Bz, AE as well as some riometer data from Sodankyla observatory, Finland, were used for the analysis. It was shown that the storm impact on the ionosphere and radio propagation for each storm has an individual character. Nevertheless, there are common patterns in variation of the propagation parameters for all storms. Thus, the frequency range Δ=MOF−LOF increases several hours before a storm, then it narrows sharply during the storm, and expands again several hours after the end of the storm. This regular behaviour should be useful for the HF radio propagation predictions and frequency management at high latitudes. On the trans-auroral radio path, the time interval when the signal is lost through a storm (tdes depends on the local time. For the day-time storms an average value tdes is 6 h, but for night storms tdes is only 2 h. The ionization increase in the F2 layer before storm onset is 3.5 h during the day-time and 2.4 h at night. Mechanisms to explain the observed variations are discussed including some novel possibilities involving energy input through the cusp.

  18. Mapping estuarine distributions of the non-indigenous Japanese Eelgrass Zostera japonica using Color Infrared Aerial Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation describes a technique for mapping distributions of the nonindigenous Japanese eelgrass Zostera japonica in estuarine ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest. The relatively broad distribution of this intertidal plant, often on very soft substrate, makes classical g...

  19. Effects of Temperature, Salinity and Seed Age on Induction of Zostera japonica Germination in North America, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagrasses can colonize unstructured mudflats either through clonal growth or seed germination and survival. Zostera japonica is an introduced seagrass in North America that has rapidly colonized mudflats along the Pacific Coast, leading to active management of the species. Gro...

  20. Mapping estuarine distributions of the non-indigenous Japanese Eelgrass Zostera japonica using Color Infrared Aerial Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation describes a technique for mapping distributions of the nonindigenous Japanese eelgrass Zostera japonica in estuarine ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest. The relatively broad distribution of this intertidal plant, often on very soft substrate, makes classical g...

  1. Effects of Temperature, Salinity and Seed Age on Induction of Zostera japonica Germination in North America, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagrasses can colonize unstructured mudflats either through clonal growth or seed germination and survival. Zostera japonica is an introduced seagrass in North America that has rapidly colonized mudflats along the Pacific Coast, leading to active management of the species. Gro...

  2. ASSESSMENT OF ANTIOXIDANT, CYTOTOXIC AND ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITIES OF DIFFERENT FRACTIONS OF CRUDE EXTRACT OF STEPHANIA JAPONICA STEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishwajit Bokshi , S.M. Abdur Rahman*, S. K. Sadhu , Ashif Muhammad and Hemayet Hossain

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The different fractions of crude methanolic extract of stem of Stephania japonica (Thunb. Miers was evaluated for antioxidant, cytotoxic and antibacterial activities. The various fractions of S. japonica Stem i.e. Ethyl Acetate (EAJS, CHCl3 (CFJS, CCl4 (CTJS and Petroleum ether (PEJS were subjected to free radical scavenging activity. In this investigation, CFJS showed the most significant free radical scavenging activity with IC50 value of 119.0µg/ml for S. japonica stem. Cytotoxic activity was investigated by brine shrimp (Artemia salina lethality assay. The LC50 value of sample CTJS (Carbon Tetrachloride fraction of S. japonica Stem, was 3.0µg/ml is highly most significant. Antibacterial activity was tested by disk diffusion method. The Carbon Tetrachloride soluble fraction showed good antibacterial activity against different species of bacteria at different doses. The Ethyl Acetate soluble fraction shows good activity only against E. coli at different doses.

  3. Carbon and nitrogen storage and their allocation pattern in Cryptomeria fortunei plantations in southeastern Guangxi of South China%桂东南柳杉人工林碳氮储量及其分配格局

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫德祥; 吴庆标; 林宁; 卓宇

    2012-01-01

    以广西六万林场31年生3种密度柳杉(Cryptomeria fortunei)人工林为对象,对其碳、氮储量以及碳、氮分配格局进行研究.结果表明:低、中、高3种密度的柳杉人工林生态系统碳储量分别为355.72、417.21和378.71 t·hm-2,氮储量分别为17.91、22.13和19.99t·hm-2,均表现为中密度>高密度>低密度;低、中、高密度植被层碳储量分别为127.71、101.98和100.12 t·hm-2,分别为土壤层碳储量的56.01%、32.35%、35.94%,表现为低密度>中密度>高密度;植被层氮储量分别为1048.85、674.26和705.69 kg· hm-2,为土壤层氮储量的6.22%、3.14%、3.66%,则表现为低密度>高密度>中密度.充分说明桂东南柳杉人工林生态系的碳、氮储量受林分密度的影响,且碳、氮储量主要分布在土壤层.%Taking the 31 -year-old Cryptomeria fortunei plantations with low, medium and high stand densities in the Liuwan Forest Farm in southeastern subtropical region of Guangxi as test objects, this paper studied their carbon and nitrogen storage and allocation pattern. The total ecosystem carbon storage in the plantations with low, medium and high densities was 355. 72, 417. 21 and 378.71 t ? Hm~2, and the total ecosystem nitrogen storage was 17. 91, 22. 13 and 19. 99 t ? Hm"2 , respectively, both with the order of medium density > high density > low density. The carbon storage in the vegetation layer of the plantations was 127. 71, 101. 98 and 100. 12 t ? Hm~2, accounting for 56.01% , 32. 35% and 35. 94% of the soil carbon storage in 0-100 cm layer, respectively, and showing the order of low density > medium density > high density'. The nitrogen storage in the vegetation layer of the plantations was 1048. 85 , 674. 26 and 705. 69 kg ? Hm" , and occupied 6. 22% , 3. 14% and 3. 66% of the soil nitrogen storage in 0-100 cm layer, respectively, following the order of low density > high density > medium density. Our study indicated that the carbon

  4. Allelopathy is involved in the formation of pure colonies of the fern Gleichenia japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Saito, Yoshihumi; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2013-04-15

    The fern Gleichenia japonica is one of the most widely distributed fern and occurs throughout East to South Asia. The species often dominates plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination has not yet been described. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that allelochemicals are involved in the formation of G. japonica colonies. An aqueous methanol extract of G. japonica inhibited the growth of seedlings of garden cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and timothy (Phleum pratense). Increasing extract concentration increased the inhibition. These results suggest that G. japonica contain allelopathic substances. The extract was then purified by several chromatographies with monitoring the inhibitory activity and two growth inhibitory substances causing the allelopathic effect were isolated. The chemical structures of the two substances were determined by spectral data to be a novel compound 3-O-β-allopyranosyl-13-O-β-fucopyranosyl-3β-hydroxymanool (1) and 18-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-13-epitorreferol (2). These compounds inhibited the shoot and root growth of garden cress, lettuce, alfalfa (Medicago sativa), timothy, ryegrass and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli) at concentrations greater than 0.1-1.0mM. The concentrations required for 50% growth inhibition of root and shoot growth of these test plants ranged from 0.72 to 3.49mM and 0.79 to 3.51mM for compounds 1 and 2, respectively. Concentration of compounds 1 and 2 in soil under the pure colony of G. japonica was 4.9 and 5.7mM, respectively, indicating concentrations over those required for 50% growth inhibition are potentially available under monocultural stands of these ferns. Therefore, these compounds may contribute to the allelopathic effects caused by presence of G. japonica and may thus contribute to the establishment of monocultural stands by this

  5. Thermal analysis about Cryptomeria Fortunei wood treated by the compounds of MUF-Boron%MUF复配硼系化合物处理柳杉木材的热分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴宇博; 刘君良; 邢珍

    2012-01-01

    通过热重(TG)和差热分析(DTA),考察经不同浓度的MUF及其与硼酸、硼砂复配的改性液处理后柳杉木材的热分解过程,结果表明:MUF对木材具有一定的催化成炭作用,复配硼酸、硼砂后其催化成炭作用得到进一步的加强;MUF促进了木材燃烧时的氧化分解,但复配硼酸、硼砂后,氧化分解反应得到明显抑制,放热量降低,剩炭率提高。%The thermal decomposition of Cryptomeria Fortunei wood treated by melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF) resin and the mixture of MUF/boric acid/borax (MBB) with different concentrations were studied by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Results showed that MUF had certain catalytic effect on carbon forming, and the effect was further enhanced after adding boric acid and borax into MUF. The oxidative decomposition of wood in combustion was accelerated due to the treatment of MUF, but obviously restrained after the treatment of MBB. The heat release quantity of wood in combustion was reduced and the char yield ratio of wood after combustion was increased by the treatments of MUF and MBB.

  6. 乌桕、枫杨和柳杉乙醇提取液灭螺活性比较%Comparison of Molluscicide Activity of Ethanol Extract of Sapium sebiferum, Pterocarya stenoptera and Cryptomeria fortunei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗坤水; 李闪金; 徐林初; 余能富; 邹峥嵘

    2011-01-01

    [目的]比较乌桕、枫杨和柳杉乙醇提取液灭螺活性.[方法]采用室内浸杀钉螺试验,测定了乌桕、枫杨和柳杉乙醇提取液灭螺活性.[结果]乌桕、枫杨和柳杉均具有一定的灭螺效果,其中乌桕和柳杉灭螺效果相差不大,而枫杨的灭螺效果较差;采用乙醇能较好地提取植物的有效灭螺成分,比植物的水浸液灭螺效果要好.[结论]为生态抑螺植物材料的筛选提供了理论依据.%[Objective] The aim was to compare the molluscicide activity of ethanol extract of Sapium sebiferum, Pterocarya stenoptera and Cryptomeria fortunei. [ Method.] The molluscicide activity of ethanol extract of S. sebiferum, P. stenoptera and C. fortunei was determined through poison test of Oncomelania hupensis in laboratory. [ Result] S. sebiferum, P. stenoptera and C. fortunei had certain molluscicide effect, and S. sebiferum and C. fortunei had better effect with little difference than P. stenoptera; ethanol could extract the effective molluscicide component from plant more completely, and its molluscicide effect was better than that of plant infusion. [ Conclusion] Our study could provide theory reference for the plant selection of controlling O. hupensis ecologically.

  7. SSR Marker Analysis on indica-japonica Differentiation of Natural Population of Oryza rufipogon in Yuanjiang, Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ya-li; YANG Xiao-xi; ZHAO Feng-ping; XU Ming-hui

    2006-01-01

    By using 19 pairs of primers that could identify two subspecies (indica and japonica) of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), the indica-japonica differentiation of 56 individuals from the natural population of common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) in Yuanjiang was analyzed by SSR (microsatellite DNAs, or simple sequence repeat). Of the 19 pairs of primers, 17 pairs (89.47%) could amplify only one kind of band type among ail of the individuals, but primers RM251 and RM18 could amplify polymorphic band types. The bands amplified by 16 pairs of primers (84.21%) were identical to the indica-japonica diagnostic bands of relevant locus in cultivated rice, including 11 japonica-like loci and 4 indica-like loci. The bands amplified by the other three pairs of primers (RM18, RM202,RM205) were different from indica or japonica diagnostic bands of cultivated rice. The results showed that according to 19 loci analyzed, 84.21% of SSR loci in genomic DNA of common wild rice in Yuanjiang displayed indica-japonica differentiation and 13.79% of the loci still kept primitive, and most of the detected loci were homogenetic in the natural population.

  8. Consumption of Bt Maize Pollen Containing Cry1Ie Does Not Negatively Affect Propylea japonica (Thunberg (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Propylea japonica (Thunberg (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae are prevalent predators and pollen feeders in East Asian maize fields. They are therefore indirectly (via prey and directly (via pollen exposed to Cry proteins within Bt-transgenic maize fields. The effects of Cry1Ie-producing transgenic maize pollen on the fitness of P. japonica was assessed using two dietary-exposure experiments in the laboratory. In the first experiment, survival, larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity did not differ between ladybirds consuming Bt or non-Bt maize pollen. In the second experiment, none of the tested lethal and sublethal parameters of P. japonica were negatively affected when fed a rapeseed pollen-based diet containing Cry1Ie protein at 200 μg/g dry weight of diet. In contrast, the larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity of P. japonica were significantly adversely affected when fed diet containing the positive control compound E-64. In both experiments, the bioactivity of the Cry1Ie protein in the food sources was confirmed by bioassays with a Cry1Ie-sensitive lepidopteran species. These results indicated that P. japonica are not affected by the consumption of Cry1Ie-expressing maize pollen and are not sensitive to the Cry1Ie protein, suggesting that the growing of Bt maize expressing Cry1Ie protein will pose a negligible risk to P. japonica.

  9. Consumption of Bt Maize Pollen Containing Cry1Ie Does Not Negatively Affect Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghui; Liu, Yanmin; Yin, Xinming; Romeis, Jörg; Song, Xinyuan; Chen, Xiuping; Geng, Lili; Peng, Yufa; Li, Yunhe

    2017-03-16

    Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are prevalent predators and pollen feeders in East Asian maize fields. They are therefore indirectly (via prey) and directly (via pollen) exposed to Cry proteins within Bt-transgenic maize fields. The effects of Cry1Ie-producing transgenic maize pollen on the fitness of P. japonica was assessed using two dietary-exposure experiments in the laboratory. In the first experiment, survival, larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity did not differ between ladybirds consuming Bt or non-Bt maize pollen. In the second experiment, none of the tested lethal and sublethal parameters of P. japonica were negatively affected when fed a rapeseed pollen-based diet containing Cry1Ie protein at 200 μg/g dry weight of diet. In contrast, the larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity of P. japonica were significantly adversely affected when fed diet containing the positive control compound E-64. In both experiments, the bioactivity of the Cry1Ie protein in the food sources was confirmed by bioassays with a Cry1Ie-sensitive lepidopteran species. These results indicated that P. japonica are not affected by the consumption of Cry1Ie-expressing maize pollen and are not sensitive to the Cry1Ie protein, suggesting that the growing of Bt maize expressing Cry1Ie protein will pose a negligible risk to P. japonica.

  10. Transcriptome-Wide Analysis of SAMe Superfamily to Novelty Phosphoethanolamine N-Methyltransferase Copy in Lonicera japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent methyltransferase superfamily plays important roles in plant development. The buds of Lonicera japonica are used as Chinese medical material and foods; chinese people began domesticating L. japonica thousands of years ago. Compared to the wild species, L. japonica var. chinensis, L. japonica gives a higher yield of buds, a fact closely related to positive selection over the long cultivation period of the species. Genome duplications, which are always detected in the domestic species, are the source of the multifaceted roles of the functional gene. In this paper, we investigated the evolution of the SAMe genes in L. japonica and L. japonica var. chinensis and further analyzed the roles of the duplicated genes among special groups. The SAMe protein sequences were subdivided into three clusters and several subgroups. The difference in transcriptional levels of the duplicated genes showed that seven SAMe genes could be related to the differences between the wild and the domesticated varieties. The sequence diversity of seven SAMe genes was also analyzed, and the results showed that different gene expression levels between the varieties could not be related to amino acid variation. The transcriptional level of duplicated PEAMT could be regulated through the SAM–SAH cycle.

  11. Consumption of Bt Maize Pollen Containing Cry1Ie Does Not Negatively Affect Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghui; Liu, Yanmin; Yin, Xinming; Romeis, Jörg; Song, Xinyuan; Chen, Xiuping; Geng, Lili; Peng, Yufa; Li, Yunhe

    2017-01-01

    Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are prevalent predators and pollen feeders in East Asian maize fields. They are therefore indirectly (via prey) and directly (via pollen) exposed to Cry proteins within Bt-transgenic maize fields. The effects of Cry1Ie-producing transgenic maize pollen on the fitness of P. japonica was assessed using two dietary-exposure experiments in the laboratory. In the first experiment, survival, larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity did not differ between ladybirds consuming Bt or non-Bt maize pollen. In the second experiment, none of the tested lethal and sublethal parameters of P. japonica were negatively affected when fed a rapeseed pollen-based diet containing Cry1Ie protein at 200 μg/g dry weight of diet. In contrast, the larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity of P. japonica were significantly adversely affected when fed diet containing the positive control compound E-64. In both experiments, the bioactivity of the Cry1Ie protein in the food sources was confirmed by bioassays with a Cry1Ie-sensitive lepidopteran species. These results indicated that P. japonica are not affected by the consumption of Cry1Ie-expressing maize pollen and are not sensitive to the Cry1Ie protein, suggesting that the growing of Bt maize expressing Cry1Ie protein will pose a negligible risk to P. japonica. PMID:28300767

  12. Application of nondestructive methods to evaluate mechanical properties of 32-year-old Taiwan incense cedar (Calocedrus formosana wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ming Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the physical and mechanical properties of standing Taiwan incense cedar (Calocedrus formosana using nondestructive techniques (NDT. In addition, the relationship between characteristics of standing trees and wood properties was established. Results indicated that the velocity values and bending properties decreased as tree height increased. In addition, velocity values of specimens were greater than those of logs and standing trees. After regressive analysis, the correlation coefficients (r were 0.79 for standing trees and logs and 0.70 for logs and specimens. Not only the velocities measured by ultrasonic wave (Vu, tap tone (Vf, and vibration (Vt methods, but dynamic MOE also correlated well with the static bending properties of specimens. In addition, the values of dynamic and static MOE showed the following trend: DMOEu > DMOEf > DMOEt > MOE. For all specimens, the r values were found to be 0.92 for MOE and DMOEt, and 0.75 for MOR and DMOEt. Therefore, it was assumed that the nondestructive testing methods can provide basic information about standing trees and specimens for future management practices and utilization of Taiwan incense cedar.

  13. Multiple views of the October 2003 Cedar Fires captured by the High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, E.; Nayak, A.; Vernon, F.; Braun, H.; Matthews, J.

    2004-12-01

    Late October 2003 brought devastating fires to the entire Southern California region. The NSF-funded High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network (HPWREN - http://hpwren.ucsd.edu/) cameras captured the development and progress of the Cedar fire in San Diego County. Cameras on Mt. Laguna, Mt. Woodson, Ramona Airport, and North Peak, recording one frame every 12 seconds, allowed for a time-lapse composite showing the fire's formation and progress from its beginnings on October 26th, to October 30th. The time-lapse camera footage depicts gushing smoke formations during the day, and bright orange walls of fire at night. The final video includes time synchronized views from multiple cameras, and an animated map highlighting the progress of the fire over time, and a directional indicator for each of the displaying cameras. The video is narrated by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection Fire Captain Ron Serabia (retd.) who was working then as a Air Tactical Group Supervisor with the aerial assault on the Cedar Fire Sunday October 26, 2004. The movie will be made available for download from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Visualization Center Visual Objects library (supported by the OptIPuter project) at http://www.siovizcenter.ucsd.edu.

  14. The western red cedar (Thuja plicata) 8-8' DIRIGENT family displays diverse expression patterns and conserved monolignol coupling specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung K.; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Fujita, Masayuki; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of a multigene family of the first class of dirigent proteins (namely that mainly involved in 8-8' coupling leading to (+)-pinoresinol in this case) is reported, this comprising of nine western red cedar (Thuja plicata) DIRIGENT genes (DIR1-9) of 72-99.5% identity to each other. Their corresponding cDNA clones had coding regions for 180-183 amino acids with each having a predicted molecular mass of ca. 20 kDa including the signal peptide. Real time-PCR established that the DIRIGENT isovariants were differentially expressed during growth and development of T. plicata (P < 0.05). The phylogenetic relationships and the rates and patterns of nucleotide substitution suggest that the DIRIGENT gene may have evolved via paralogous expansion at an early stage of vascular plant diversification. Thereafter, western red cedar paralogues have maintained an high homogeneity presumably via a concerted evolutionary mode. This, in turn, is assumed to be the driving force for the differential formation of 8-8'-linked pinoresinol derived (poly)lignans in the needles, stems, bark and branches, as well as for massive accumulation of 8-8'-linked plicatic acid-derived (poly)lignans in heartwood.

  15. Bioactivities of a New Pyrrolidine Alkaloid from the Root Barks of Orixa japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chao Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new pyrrolidine alkaloid named (Z-3-(4-hydroxybenzylidene-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-one was isolated from the ethanol extract of the root barks of Orixa japonica. The structure of the new alkaloid was elucidated on the basis of NMR and MS analysis. The compound exhibited larvicidal activity against the fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti (LC50 = 232.09 μg/mL, Anopheles sinensis (LC50 = 49.91 μg/mL, and Culex pipiens pallens (LC50 = 161.10 μg/mL. The new alkaloid also possessed nematicidal activity against Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (LC50 = 391.50 μg/mL and Meloidogynein congnita (LC50 = 134.51 μg/mL. The results indicate that the crude ethanol extract of O. japonica root barks and its isolated pyrrolidine alkaloid have potential for development into natural larvicides and nematicides.

  16. Phenotypic Expression of Whitebacked Planthopper Resistance in the Newly Established japonica / indica Doubled Haploid Rice Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazushige SOGAWA; SUN Zong-xiu; QIAN Qian; ZENG Da-li

    2004-01-01

    A new doubled haploid (DH) rice population was established from a cross between WBPH-resistant japonica Chunjiang 06 (C J-06) and susceptible indica TN1. Sucking inhibitory and ovicidal resistance of the DH rice lines were evaluated on the basis of non-preference response of WBPH immigrants and honeydew excretion by WBPH females, and appearance of watery lesions in the necrotic discoloration of leaf sheaths ovipositied by WBPH,respectively. Both the major gene resistance to WBPH, sucking inhibitory and ovicidal resistance, showed 1 (resistant): 1 (susceptible) segregation ratio in the DH population. Relative density of WBPH populations and damage scores in the DH population indicated combined functions of both the major resistance genes as well as QTLs affecting the host plant response to WBPH infestations. Thus, the newly developed CJ-06/TN1 DH population could be a useful material to analyze major genes and QTLs for WBPH resistance in japonica rice.

  17. Eimeria spp. from Japanese quails (Coturnix japonica: new characteristic features and diagnostic tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno P. Berto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese quail Coturnix japonica originated from North Africa, Europe and Asia, is used worldwide as an experimental animal and model for aviculture. The current paper characterizes Eimeria bateri, Eimeria tsunodai and Eimeria uzura recovered from C. japonica. Based on the fact that quails have a global distribution, as are their coccidia, the findings of this study should provide the means for diagnosis of those Eimeria spp. in other regions and continents. Eimeria bateri showed the greatest intensity of infection and shed oocysts from the fourth day after infection; in contrast, E. tsunodai and E. uzura shed oocysts from the fifth day after infection. The three species shared a high degree of similarity and were all polymorphic. Yet, the application of line regressions, histograms and ANOVA provided means for the identification of these species. Finally, the algorithm was very efficient since verified that resultant values were not superimposed.

  18. Effect of Biochar on Relieving Cadmium Stress and Reducing Accumulation in Super japonica Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen-yu; MENG Jun; DANG Shu; CHEN Wen-fu

    2014-01-01

    It is of great importance to solve the threats induced by cadmium pollution on crops. This paper examined the effect of biochar on cadmium accumulation in japonica rice and revealed the mechanism underlying the response of protective enzyme system to cadmium stress. Biochar derived from rice straw was applied at two application rates under three cadmium concentrations. Shennong 265, super japonica rice variety, was selected as the test crop. The results indicated that cadmium content in above-ground biomass of rice increased with increasing soil cadmium concentrations, but the biochar application could suppress the accumulation of cadmium to some extent. Under high concentrations of cadmium, content of free proline and MDA (malondialdehyde) were high, so did the SOD (superoxide dismutase), POD (peroxidase) and CAT (catalase) activity in the lfag leaf of rice. However, the protective enzyme activities remained at low level when biochar was added.

  19. Complete genome sequence of the actinobacterium Amycolatopsis japonica MG417-CF17T (=DSM 44213T) producing (S,S)-N,N′-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Evi; Albersmeier, Andreas; Spohn, Marius

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Amycolatopsis japonica MG417-CF17T (=DSM 44213T) which was identified as the producer of (S,S)-N,N′-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid during a screening for phospholipase C inhibitors. The genome of A. japonica MG417-CF17T consists of two replicons: the chro......We report the complete genome sequence of Amycolatopsis japonica MG417-CF17T (=DSM 44213T) which was identified as the producer of (S,S)-N,N′-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid during a screening for phospholipase C inhibitors. The genome of A. japonica MG417-CF17T consists of two replicons...

  20. Expression of stress response HSP70 gene in Asian paddle crabs, Charybdis japonica, exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-nonylphenol (NP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kiyun; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2013-06-01

    The Asian paddle crab, Charybdis japonica, is a potential bio-indicator reflecting marine sediment toxicity as well as a commercially important species living along coastal areas in Korea. This study investigated its stress response by looking at the heat shock protein (HSP70) gene of C. japonica when the organism is exposed to bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-nonylphenol (NP). We characterized partial sequence of HSP70 as the stressresponse gene of C. japonica. The nucleotide sequence of C. japonica HSP70 is over 90% homologous with the corresponding gene of other crabs. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed a close relationship between C. japonica HSP70 and HSP70 in other species of lobster and shrimps. HSP70 mRNA transcripts were detected in all the examined tissues of C. japonica, with the highest level in gills, the organ that most frequently came into contact with the external BPA or NP-laden water. As no reference data were available for C. japonica crab exposure, the BPA and NP 24-h LC50 values have not been previously determined. The expression of the C. japonica HSP70 gene to various BPA or NP concentrations during short and longer times was assessed. Gene expression was significantly induced in concentration- and time-dependent manners after BPA or NP exposures. These results support the postulation that crab C. japonica HSP70 could be a potential stress response molecular marker to monitor marine ecosystems.

  1. Transcriptome sequencing and comparative analysis of Saccharina japonica (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae under blue light induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunyan Deng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Light has significant effect on the growth and development of Saccharina japonica, but there are limited reports on blue light mediated physiological responses and molecular mechanism. In this study, high-throughput paired-end RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq technology was applied to transcriptomes of S. japonica exposed to blue light and darkness, respectively. Comparative analysis of gene expression was designed to correlate the effect of blue light and physiological mechanisms on the molecular level. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: RNA-seq analysis yielded 70,497 non-redundant unigenes with an average length of 538 bp. 28,358 (40.2% functional transcripts encoding regions were identified. Annotation through Swissprot, Nr, GO, KEGG, and COG databases showed 25,924 unigenes compared well (E-value <10(-5 with known gene sequences, and 43 unigenes were putative BL photoreceptor. 10,440 unigenes were classified into Gene Ontology, and 8,476 unigenes were involved in 114 known pathways. Based on RPKM values, 11,660 (16.5% differentially expressed unigenes were detected between blue light and dark exposed treatments, including 7,808 upregulated and 3,852 downregulated unigenes, suggesting S. japonica had undergone extensive transcriptome re-orchestration during BL exposure. The BL-specific responsive genes were indentified to function in processes of circadian rhythm, flavonoid biosynthesis, photoreactivation and photomorphogenesis. SIGNIFICANCE: Transcriptome profiling of S. japonica provides clues to potential genes identification and future functional genomics study. The global survey of expression changes under blue light will enhance our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying blue light induced responses in lower plants as well as facilitate future blue light photoreceptor identification and specific responsive pathways analysis.

  2. Protein markers associated with fertility restoration in japonica rice (Oryza sativaL.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@As genetic markers, seed storage proteins have characters of high level of polymorphism, less environmental influence, and simple genetic control. In this study, Kinmaze (CK), Liuqianxin A, Liuqianxin B, Liuqianxin R, 77302-1, Ninghui3-2, C57, Chinsurah Boro Ⅱ, TN1, IR8, IR2A, and F1 and F2 of Liuqianxin A/77302-1 were used to detect protein markers associated with fertility restoration in japonica rice.

  3. Extraction and Separation of Fucoidan from Laminaria japonica with Chitosan as Extractant

    OpenAIRE

    Ronge Xing; Song Liu; Huahua Yu; Xiaolin Chen; Yukun Qin; Kecheng Li; Pengcheng Li

    2013-01-01

    Herein the extraction method of fucoidan from Laminaria japonica is reported. Firstly, chitosan, chitosan-N-2-hydroxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (HACC), and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CPAB) were used to extract the fucoidan. The results showed that chitosan was the optimal extractant compared with the other two extractants. After extraction, different aqueous solutions, including NaCl, KCl, and HCl (pH2), were used to separate fucoidan from chitosan-fucoidan complex. The resul...

  4. Structural analysis of sulfated fucan from Saccharina japonica by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Weihua; Guo, Zhimou; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Quanbin

    2013-03-22

    Desulfation of a fucoidan from Saccharina japonica by treatment with DMSO-MeOH resulted in partial degradation of polymeric molecules by methanolysis giving rise to a mixture of neutral, monosulfated, and disulfated fucooligosaccharides in the form of methyl glycosides. These oligomeric fragments were characterized by ESI-MS and ESI-CID-MS/MS. It was found that oligosaccharide structures coincided with the polysaccharide backbone built up mainly of (1→3)-linked fucose residues sulfated at positions 4 and 2.

  5. Optimization of levels of seaweed japonica saccharine and chenopodium quinoa wild in developing cereal bar

    OpenAIRE

    Ana LÃvia Brasil Silva

    2015-01-01

    Seaweed japonica saccharine, popularly known as "Kombu" is a food rich in protein, fiber and micronutrients. This algae has antioxidant properties, anti-viral, anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic. Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) is considered a pseudocereal whose main characteristic is the quality of its protein and is recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an ideal food for its nutritional composition is higher than most cereals. The addition of these two ingredien...

  6. Evaluation of pomegranate (Punica granatum) pericarp aqueous extract on Eimeria spp. from Japanese quails (Coturnix japonica)

    OpenAIRE

    Berto, Bruno P.; Helcio R. Borba; Hataânderson Luiz C. dos Santos; Lima,Viviane M.; Walter Flausino; Teixeira-Filho,Walter L.; Lopes,Carlos Wilson G.

    2014-01-01

    Antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antiparasitic properties have been associated with the extract of pomegranate (Punica granatum) in several animals and conditions. The Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), originated from North Africa, Europe and Asia, is used worldwide as an experimental animal and model for aviculture. The current study investigated the effects of the pomegranate pericarp aqueous extract on the shedding, viability and morphometry of three Eimeria spp. from Japanese quails...

  7. Semen-Like Floral Scents and Pollination Biology of a Sapromyophilous Plant Stemona japonica (Stemonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gao; Jürgens, Andreas; Shao, Lidong; Liu, Yang; Sun, Weibang; Xia, Chengfeng

    2015-03-01

    By emitting scent resembling that of organic material suitable for oviposition and/or consumption by flies, sapromyophilous flowers use these flies as pollinators. To date, intensive scent analyses of such flowers have been restricted to Apocynaceae, Annonaceae, and Araceae. Recent studies have suggested that the wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from sapromyophilous flowers play an important role in attracting saprophagous flies by mimicking different types of decomposing substrates (herbivore and carnivore feces, carrion, and the fruiting bodies of fungi, etc.). In this study, we report the flower visitors and the floral VOCs of Stemona japonica (Blume) Miquel, a species native to China. The flowers do not produce rewards, and pollinators were not observed consuming pollen, thus suggesting a deceptive pollination system. Headspace samples of the floral scent were collected via solid-phase micro-extraction and analysed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Main floral scent compounds were 1-pyrroline (59.2%), 2-methyl-1-butanol (27.2%), and 3-methyl-1-butanol (8.8%), and resulted in a semen-like odor of blooming flowers. The floral constituents of S. japonica were significantly different from those found in previous sapromyophilous plants. An olfaction test indicated that 1-pyrroline is responsible for the semen-like odor in S. japonica flowers. Main flower visitors were shoot flies of the genus Atherigona (Muscidae). Bioassays using a mixture of all identified floral volatiles revealed that the synthetic volatiles can attract Atherigona flies in natural habitats. Our results suggest that the foul-smelling flowers of S. japonica may represent a new type of sapromyophily through scent mimicry.

  8. Reproductive strategy of the intertidal seagrass Zostera japonica under different levels of disturbance and tidal inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suonan, Zhaxi; Kim, Seung Hyeon; Qin, Le-Zheng; Lee, Kun-Seop

    2017-10-01

    Zostera japonica populations along the coastline of the northwestern Pacific Ocean are declining, mainly due to anthropogenic and natural disturbances. Although reproductive strategy is an important factor in achieving population persistence, changes in the reproductive strategy of Z. japonica under anthropogenic disturbances and tidal stresses are largely unknown. Thus, the duration and frequency of flowering, reproductive effort, potential seed production, and seed density in sediments were measured at three study stations (undisturbed upper, undisturbed lower, and disturbed stations), which were classified based on the levels of inundation stress and clamming activity, in monospecific meadows of Z. japonica on the southern coast of Korea. The flowering duration was approximately six months in the disturbed station, with disturbance due to clam harvesting, whereas the duration was about five months in the undisturbed lower station, and only three months in the undisturbed upper station. The maximum flowering frequency was 25.5% in the disturbed station, which was approximately 4- and 2-fold higher than in the undisturbed upper (6.1%) and lower (12.3%) stations, respectively. A similar trend in reproductive effort was also found among the three study stations. Potential seed production was 7850, 6220, and 1560 seeds m-2 in the disturbed, undisturbed lower, and undisturbed upper stations, respectively. The annual maximum seed density in sediments was also higher in the disturbed and undisturbed lower stations than in the undisturbed upper station, but the densities were relatively low (ranging from 71 to 254 seeds m-2) at all three study stations. It was found that the allocation to sexual reproduction was highest in the disturbed station, followed by the undisturbed lower station, and lowest in the undisturbed upper station, suggesting that sexual reproduction in Z. japonica tends to be enhanced under disturbed and inundated environmental conditions for population

  9. STUDY ON THE BLOOD FAT REGULATION OF THE FUCOIDA-GALACTOSAN SULFATE (FGS) FROM LAMINARIA JAPONICA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    FGS was isolated and purified from laminaria japonica by enzymolysis, chromatography methods and so on. The high blood fat model was established by feeding mouse on high fat feedstuff Compared with control group, the concentration of HDL-C, the ratio of HDL-C/TC increased; while the concentration of TC, LDL-C and TG decreased in experimental groups. Conclusion: FGS was an effective serum hipid regulator and can be developed as medicine and heahh food.

  10. A survey of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) farming in selected areas of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Nasar Md. Aminoor Rahman; Md. Nazmul Hoque; Anup Kumar Talukder; Ziban Chandra Das

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the status, problems and prospects of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) farming in selected areas of Bangladesh. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 14 districts of Bangladesh, viz., Dhaka, Narayanganj, Munshiganj, Mymensingh, Netrakona, Faridpur, Jessore, Khulna, Satkhira, Kushtia, Bogra, Naogaon, Comilla, and Sylhet during the period from July 2011 to June 2012. A total of 52 quail farmers were interviewed for data collection using a structured...

  11. Antioxidant Activities of Achyranthes japonica Nakai Extract and Its Application to the Pork Sausages

    OpenAIRE

    Park, J. H.; Kang, S. N.; Shin, D.; Hur, I. C.; Kim, I S; Jin, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Influence of Achyranthes japonica Nakai Extract (AJNE) on properties of pork sausages were studied in the present investigation. AJNE was added to sausages alone or in combination with ascorbic acid to obtain a comparative analysis on properties of control and ascorbic acid added-sausages. Results showed that addition of 0.05% AJNE led to a decrease in color L* and whiteness (W), and an increase in color b* of pork sausage samples (p

  12. Carbon-Isotope Chemostratigraphy of the Yellow Cat Member of the Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, C. A.; Hatzell, G.; Suarez, M. B.; Salazar-Verdin, J.; Al-Suwaidi, A. H.; Kirkland, J. I.

    2014-12-01

    Paleosols and lacustrine sediments of the Yellow Cat Member (YCM), Cedar Mountain Formation (CMF), Eastern Utah were collected at the "Lake Madsen" (a dominantly lacustrine section) and Doelling's Bowl (a mixed lacustrine/ palustrine/ paleosol section) and analyzed for bulk organic carbon isotopes (δ13Corg) . The YCM is thought to span the Barremian to Aptian based on dinosaur faunal assemblages. Correlation with distinct carbon isotope excursions (CIE) specifically those associated with the Selli Event or OAE 1a would allow insight into the response of terrestrial ecosystems to C-cycle perturbations during the Aptian, and may improve chronostratigraphy. Lake Madsen data ranges between a minimum of -28.5‰ and a maximum of -21.4‰ with an average of ~ -25‰ and shows a stepped negative isotope excursion of -3‰., with three distinct negative steps starting ~ 7.5 m above the Jurassic Morrison Formation and an intervening large positive excursion ~ 4.5 m from the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone (~119Ma) Member of the CMF. Doelling's Bowl data spans a longer vertical distance and ranges from a minimum of -29.0‰ to a maximum of -25.7‰, averages -27.7‰ and is somewhat cyclic in nature. δ13Corg chemostratigraphic profile for Doelling's Bowl poorly correlates to the Lake Madsen section, likely due to recycling of organic C and wet/dry cycles of the palustrine environment. Correlation of the Lake Madsen section to marine δ13CCO3 curve from Cismon Valley of the southern Alps indicates the lower Aptian C-isotope excursions C1 to C6, with the distinctive C3 negative CIE occur at the top of the Yellow Cat Member, therefore documenting a terrestrial manifestation of the CIE associated with OAE1a - Selli Event. This suggests the age of the majority of the Yellow Cat Member is Barremian to lower Aptian and the Barremian-Aptian boundary occurs at the top of the Member ~ 25cm below the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone. Further isotopic analysis of vertebrate

  13. LEBANON AFTER THE CEDAR REVOLUTION/ARE KNUDSEN AND MICHAEL KERR (eds; LEBANON: A HISTORY, 600--2011/by WILLIAM HARRIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Salameh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available LEBANON AFTER THE CEDAR REVOLUTION, ARE KNUDSEN AND MICHAEL KERR (eds; London: C. Hurst & Company, 2012. 323 pp. $29.95. LEBANON: A HISTORY, 600--2011, WILLIAM HARRIS; Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. 360 pp. $34.95.

  14. Growing C-D-R (Cedar): Working the Intersections of Interest Convergence and Whiteness as Property in the Affirmative Action Legal Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson Dorsey, Dana N.; Venzant Chambers, Terah T.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we extend Bell's work on interest convergence by using Harris' work on whiteness as property to articulate a cycle of interest convergence, interest divergence, and imperialistic reclamation, or convergence-divergence-reclamation (C-D-R, pronounced "cedar"). We then apply the C-D-R cycle lens to the evolution of federal…

  15. Changes in heartwood chemistry of dead yellow-cedar trees that remain standing for 80 years or more in southeast Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick G. Kelsey; Paul E. Hennon; Manuela Huso; Joseph G. Karchesy

    2005-01-01

    We measured the concentrations of extractable bioactive compounds in heartwood of live yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis noothtensis) trees and five classes of standing snags (1-5, averaging 4, 14,26,5 1, and 81 years since-death, respectively) to determine how the concentrations changed in the slowly deteriorating snags. Three individuals from each of...

  16. Antioxidant and isozyme features of two strains of Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi; Li, Yongqi; Yu, Zhiming

    2007-01-01

    Healthy sporophytes of two gametophyte mutants of Laminaria japonica with different heat resistances: kelp 901 ( 901, with comparatively stronger heat-resistance) and Rongcheng No.1 ( RC, sensitive to heat stress), were respectively collected during October to December 2002 from Yantai and Rongcheng Sea Farm in the Shandong Peninsula of China. The contents of some biochemical materials and antioxidant capacity were analyzed under controlled laboratory conditions to identify if there is any relation between the overall antioxidant capacity and the heat-resistance in L. japonica and to understand possible mechanism of heat-resistance. Results show that: (1) the overall antioxidant capacity in healthy sporophyte of 901, such as vitamin E, polyphenol, and ascorbic acid contents and the enzymatic activity of SOD, POD, CAT, Gpx, PPO, and PAL, were not always higher than that of RC under controlled laboratory conditions, and no significance ( P>0.05) was shown in total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) in 901 and RC. Result suggested that the difference in antioxidant capacity was not a decisive factor for different heat-resistances in L. japonica; (2) the simultaneous assay on isozymes was carried out using vertical polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Considerable differences in peroxide (PRX), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), malic enzyme (ME), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were obtained in 901 and RC from either the band number, relative mobility ( R f ), or staining intensity, and ME could be used as an indicator to distinguish healthy sporophyte of 901 and RC under controlled laboratory conditions.

  17. A relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide from the starfish Aphelasterias japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Masatoshi; Katayama, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    Relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) in starfish is the first identified invertebrate gonadotropin responsible for final gamete maturation. In this study, a new ortholog RGP was identified from Aphelasterias japonica. The DNA sequence encoding A. japonica RGP (AjaRGP) consists of 342 base pairs with an open reading frame encoding a peptide of 113 amino acids (aa), including a signal peptide (26aa), B-chain (20aa), C-peptide (42aa), and A-chain (25aa). AjaRGP is a heterodimeric peptide with disulfide cross-linkages. Comparing with Asterias amurensis RGP (AamRGP) and Patiria (=Asterina) pectinifera RGP (PpeRGP), the amino acid identity levels of AjaRGP with respect to AamRGP and PpeRGP are 84% and 58% for the A-chain and 90% and 68% for the B-chain, respectively. This suggests that AjaRGP is closer to AmaRGP rather than PpeRGP. Although chemical synthetic AjaRGP can induce gamete spawning and oocyte maturation in ovarian fragments of A. japonica, the ovary of P. pectinifera fails to respond to AjaRGP. This suggests that AjaRGP acts species-specifically.

  18. Traits Related to Chilling-Induced Photoinhibition in Leaves of indica and japonica Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Su-qin; JI Ben-hua; JIAO De-mao

    2004-01-01

    Physiological indices related to PS Ⅱ photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) and membrane lipid peroxidation were measured in leaves of indica rice cv Shanyou 63 and japonica rice 9516 at different temperatures and light intensities for four days. No obvious changes in Fv/Fm and MDA were observed in both indica and japonica rice at moderate temperature and medium PFD,implying neither photoinhibition nor photooxidation happened in these cases. In indica rice either at medium temperature with higher PFD or at lower temperature with medium PFD Fv/Fm dropped obviously with no changes in MDA contents, and photoinhibition appeared while photooxidation did not occur. However, D1 protein, Fv/Fm, (A+Z)/(A+Z+V), and SOD activities dropped, and O2 -. production and MDA content increased accordingly, as well as both photoinhibition and photooxidation appeared in two rice varieties at lower temperature and higher PFD. Experiment with inhibitors at lower temperature and higher PFD showed that as compared with japonica rice the decrements appeared in D1 protein contents, SOD activities, and (A+Z)/(A+Z+V) ratios, the xanthophyll cycle and non-photochemical quench (qN) were inhibited in a more degree, as well as increments of MDA content were greater, thus exhibiting more distinct photoinhibition and photooxidation in indica rice. It is suggested that Fv/Fm and membrane lipid peroxidation product-MDA were the key indices to predict and diagnose photooxidation.

  19. Novel neutrophil inhibitory factor homologue in the buccal gland secretion of Lampetra japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhuang; Bai, Jie; Sun, Jing; Wu, Yu; Yu, Shui Yan; Guo, Ren Yong; Liu, Xin; Li, Qing Wei

    2011-07-01

    Abstract To identify the functional gene fragment, a neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF) like protein was found in the buccal gland of Lampetra japonica, suggesting that this related lamprey protein represents a novel class of integrin receptor antagonists. The recombinant Lampetra japonica-NIF like (rLj-NIF) was identified by SDS-PAGE and purified by using His·Bind affinity chromatography. Effect of rLj-NIF on neutrophil migration suggested that rLj-NIF can act as a neutrophil inhibitory factor. Besides that, oxidative burst activity of neutriphil was tested by flow cytometry using dihydrorhodamine (DHR123) as a fluorogenic substrate, and the data suggested that the mean fluorescence intensity significantly decreased compared with positive controls (pNIF could also prevent the binding of β2 integrins to the surface of PMN and its FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies (pNIF like protein is secreted by the stage of the parasite at the site of attachment. rLj-NIF plays an essential role in physiological reaction of neutrophil by a novel class of β2 integrin receptor antagonists. The activity of immunosuppressant of L. japonica-NIF could have potential medicinal value in anti-inflammation and therapy of autoimmune diseases.

  20. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of chemical constituents in Ardisiae Japonicae Herba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke-Yun; Gao, Wen; Li, Shang-Zhen; Wu, Wei; Li, Pei; Dou, Li-Li; Wang, Yuan-Zhong; Liu, E-Hu

    2017-09-19

    Ardisiae Japonicae Herba is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of bronchitis conjunctivitis, pneumonia and trauma. In this work, a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry method was firstly established for the separation and structural identification of the chemical constituents in Ardisiae Japonicae Herba. A total of 15 compounds including coumarins, flavonoid glycosides, and catechins were identified or tentatively characterized based on their chromatographic behaviors and mass spectral fragmentation and by comparisons with the reference standards. Furthermore, a simple high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection method was developed to for the simultaneous determination of five major constituents. Results obtained from method validations including linearity, precision, repeatability, stability and recovery showed that the established method was reliable and accurate. Bergenin and quercitrin were found to be the most abundant constituents and could be served as chemical markers for quality control of Ardisiae Japonicae Herba. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Several Immunostimulants on Phenoloxidase and Hemocytes of the Crab Charybdis japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Tingjun; YU Miaomiao; YANG Lingling; SHI Zhenping; SUN Wenjie; CONG Rishan; YANG Xiuxia; JIANG Guojian

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the stimulating effects of immunostimulants on the autogenous immunocompetence of crabs and the possible mechanisms involved, the immunostimulating effects of β-1,3-glucan, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), inactivated Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio anguillarum on phenoloxidase (PO) and hemocytes of Charybdis japonica were investigated in this study. It was found that the yields and the enzymatic activities of purified PO in C. japonica increased significantly after the crabs were treated with immunostimulants, while the unit enzymatic activities remained almost the same. After treatment with β-1,3-glucan and LPS, the amount of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and the number of mitochondria in both semigranular cells and granular cells increased greatly, and the number of cytoplasmic granules decreased but with enlarged volume. However, the corresponding characteristics of hyaline cells remained almost the same. On the other hand, the number of granules in semigranular cells decreased greatly, and the number of mitochondria of hyaline cells increased greatly, after treatment with inactivated vibrios. It may be concluded that the effect of polysaccharide immunostimulants on the innate immune system of C. japonica is different from that of inactivated vibrio immunostimulants. The immunity-enhancing mechanism of polysaccharides in crab autogenous immunocompetence is probably accomplished by the increased yields of PO and total PO activities, while that of inactivated vibrios is probably accomplished by the partially increased yields of PO and total PO activities as well as the significantly improved phagocytotic abilities of semigranular cells and hyaline cells.

  2. Proteomics analysis of UV-irradiated Lonicera japonica Thunb. with bioactive metabolites enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Li, Ximin; Zheng, Wen; Fu, Zhirong; Li, Wenting; Ma, Luyu; Li, Ke; Sun, Lianli; Tian, Jingkui

    2013-12-01

    A previous study showed that the contents of caffeoylquinic acids and iridoids, the major bioactive components in the postharvest Lonicera japonica Thunb., were induced by enhanced ultraviolet (UV)-A or UV-B irradiation. To clarify the UV-responsive key enzymes in the bioactive metabolites biosynthetic pathway and the related plant defense mechanism in L. japonica, 2DE in combination with MALDI-TOF/TOF MS was employed. Seventy-five out of 196 differential proteins were positively identified. Based on the functions, these proteins were grouped into nine categories, covering a wide range of molecular processes including the secondary metabolites (caffeoylquinic acids and iridoids) biosynthetic-related proteins, photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, stress, DNA, transport-related proteins, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, cell wall. Of note is the increasing expression of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase and 5-enol-pyruvylshikimate-phosphate synthase, which was crucial to supply more precursor for the secondary metabolites including caffeoylquinic acids and iridoids. Thus, this study provides both the clues at the protein level for the increase of the two bioactive components upon UV irradiation and the profile of UV-responsive proteins in L. japonica.

  3. Overcoming inter-subspecific hybrid sterility in rice by developing indica-compatible japonica lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jie; Xu, Xiaomei; Li, Wentao; Zhu, Wenyin; Zhu, Haitao; Liu, Ziqiang; Luan, Xin; Dai, Ziju; Liu, Guifu; Zhang, Zemin; Zeng, Ruizhen; Tang, Guang; Fu, Xuelin; Wang, Shaokui; Zhang, Guiquan

    2016-06-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is an important staple crop. The exploitation of the great heterosis that exists in the inter-subspecific crosses between the indica and japonica rice has long been considered as a promising way to increase the yield potential. However, the male and female sterility frequently occurred in the inter-subspecific hybrids hampered the utilization of the heterosis. Here we report that the inter-subspecific hybrid sterility in rice is mainly affected by the genes at Sb, Sc, Sd and Se loci for F1 male sterility and the gene at S5 locus for F1 female sterility. The indica-compatible japonica lines (ICJLs) developed by pyramiding the indica allele (S-i) at Sb, Sc, Sd and Se loci and the neutral allele (S-n) at S5 locus in japonica genetic background through marker-assisted selection are compatible with indica rice in pollen fertility and in spikelet fertility. These results showed a great promise of overcoming the inter-subspecific hybrid sterility and exploiting the heterosis by developing ICJLs.

  4. The non-indigenous Paranthura japonica Richardson, 1909 in the Mediterranean Sea: travelling with shellfish?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. MARCHINI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An anthurid isopod new to the Mediterranean Sea has recently been observed in samples from three localities of the Italian coast: the Lagoon of Venice (North Adriatic Sea, La Spezia (Ligurian Sea and Olbia (Sardinia, Tyrrhenian Sea. The specimens collected showed strong affinity to a species originally described from the NW Pacific Ocean: Paranthura japonica Richardson, 1909. The comparison with specimens collected from the Bay of Arcachon (Atlantic coast of France, where P. japonica had been recently reported as non-indigenous, confirmed the identity of the species. This paper reports the most relevant morphological details of the Italian specimens, data on the current distribution of the species and a discussion on the pathways responsible for its introduction. The available data suggest that the presence of this Pacific isopod in several regions of coastal Europe might be due to a series of aquaculture-mediated introduction events that occurred during the last decades of the 1900s. Since then, established populations of P. japonica, probably misidentified, remained unnoticed for a long time.

  5. The Role of TGF-β1 in Mice Hepatic Fibrosis by Schistosomiasis Japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the role of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in mice with hepatic fibrosis caused by Schistosomiasis Japonica, ELISA ,VG staining and multimedia color hieroglyph quantitative analysis were used to study the change of the serum TGF-β1, liver collagen fiber and reticular fiber in mice. The level of serum TGF-β1 in experimental group was significantly higher than that in control group (P<0.01 orP<0.05) 8, 10, 12 weeks after infected by schistosomiasis. After infection, the level of liver collagen fiber and reticular fiber, and that of TGF -β1 increased over time (P< 0.01 or P<0. 05). In mice infected by Schistosomiasis Japonica, the level of TGF-β1 increased with prolongation of infection time, and with the increase of liver collagen fiber and reticular fiber. TGFβ1 plays an important role of immunomodulation in hepatic fibrosis formation caused by Schistosomiasis Japonica.

  6. Use of a pollen-based diet to expose the ladybird beetle Propylea japonica to insecticidal proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Zhang

    Full Text Available A rape seed pollen-based diet was developed and found to be suitable for use in a dietary exposure assay for Propylea japonica. Using the diet, we established and validated a dietary exposure assay by using the protease inhibitor E-64 as positive control. Dose-dependent responses were documented for all observed life-table parameters of P. japonica including survival, pupation and eclosion rates, development time and adult weight. Results suggested that the dietary assay can detect the effects of insecticidal compounds on the survival and development of P. japonica. Using the established dietary assay, we subsequently tested the toxicity of Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1F proteins that are expressed by transgenic maize, cotton or rice plants to P. japonica larvae. The diet containing E-64 was included as a positive control. Survival and development of P. japonica larvae were not adversely affected when the diet contained purified Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, or Cry1F at 500 µg/g diet representing a worst-case exposure scenario. In contrast, P. japonica larvae were adversely affected when the diet contained E-64. The bioactivity and stability of the Cry proteins in the diet and Cry protein uptake by the ladybird larvae were confirmed by bioassay with a Cry-sensitive insect species and by ELISA. The current study describes a suitable experimental system for assessing the potential effects of gut-active insecticidal compounds on ladybird beetle larvae. The experiments with the Cry proteins demonstrate that P. japonica larvae are not sensitive to Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1F.

  7. Use of a pollen-based diet to expose the ladybird beetle Propylea japonica to insecticidal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Li, Yunhe; Romeis, Jörg; Yin, Xinming; Wu, Kongming; Peng, Yufa

    2014-01-01

    A rape seed pollen-based diet was developed and found to be suitable for use in a dietary exposure assay for Propylea japonica. Using the diet, we established and validated a dietary exposure assay by using the protease inhibitor E-64 as positive control. Dose-dependent responses were documented for all observed life-table parameters of P. japonica including survival, pupation and eclosion rates, development time and adult weight. Results suggested that the dietary assay can detect the effects of insecticidal compounds on the survival and development of P. japonica. Using the established dietary assay, we subsequently tested the toxicity of Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1F proteins that are expressed by transgenic maize, cotton or rice plants to P. japonica larvae. The diet containing E-64 was included as a positive control. Survival and development of P. japonica larvae were not adversely affected when the diet contained purified Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, or Cry1F at 500 µg/g diet representing a worst-case exposure scenario. In contrast, P. japonica larvae were adversely affected when the diet contained E-64. The bioactivity and stability of the Cry proteins in the diet and Cry protein uptake by the ladybird larvae were confirmed by bioassay with a Cry-sensitive insect species and by ELISA. The current study describes a suitable experimental system for assessing the potential effects of gut-active insecticidal compounds on ladybird beetle larvae. The experiments with the Cry proteins demonstrate that P. japonica larvae are not sensitive to Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1F.

  8. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling to quantify effects of peak-flow management on channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat in the Cedar River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Christiana; Czuba, Jonathan A.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    The Cedar River in Washington State originates on the western slope of the Cascade Range and provides the City of Seattle with most of its drinking water, while also supporting a productive salmon habitat. Water-resource managers require detailed information on how best to manage high-flow releases from Chester Morse Lake, a large reservoir on the Cedar River, during periods of heavy precipitation to minimize flooding, while mitigating negative effects on fish populations. Instream flow-management practices include provisions for adaptive management to promote and maintain healthy aquatic habitat in the river system. The current study is designed to understand the linkages between peak flow characteristics, geomorphic processes, riverine habitat, and biological responses. Specifically, two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling is used to simulate and quantify the effects of the peak-flow magnitude, duration, and frequency on the channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat. Two study reaches, representative of the typical geomorphic and ecologic characteristics of the Cedar River, were selected for the modeling. Detailed bathymetric data, collected with a real-time kinematic global positioning system and an acoustic Doppler current profiler, were combined with a LiDAR-derived digital elevation model in the overbank area to develop a computational mesh. The model is used to simulate water velocity, benthic shear stress, flood inundation, and morphologic changes in the gravel-bedded river under the current and alternative flood-release strategies. Simulations of morphologic change and salmon-redd scour by floods of differing magnitude and duration enable water-resource managers to incorporate model simulation results into adaptive management of peak flows in the Cedar River. PDF version of a presentation on hydrodynamic modelling in the Cedar River in Washington state. Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2010.

  9. A multidisciplinary study of the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Mussentuchit Wash, Utah: a determination of the paleoenvironment and paleoecology of the Eolambia caroljonesa dinosaur quarry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, J.R.; Brinkman, D.; Nichols, D.J.; Layer, P.; Burge, D.; Thayn, D.

    2007-01-01

    A quarry within the Cedar Mountain Formation in Mussentuchit Wash, Emery County, Utah, produced a fossil assemblage containing the remains of at least eight juvenile iguanodontid dinosaurs (Eolambia caroljonesa). The Cedar Mountain Formation lies stratigraphically between the Tithonian-Berriasian (Upper Jurassic) Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation and the Cenomanian (Upper Cretaceous) Dakota Formation. Detailed stratigraphic, sedimentological, geochronological, palynological, and paleontological data have been collected along a measured section at the site of the Cifelli #2 Eolambia caroljonesa Quarry. These data provide a chronostratigraphic and a biostratigraphic framework for the Cedar Mountain Formation and allow a detailed reconstruction of the paleoenvironment and the paleoecology of the local paleogeographic area from which E. caroljonesa have been recovered. Three 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 96.7 to 98.5 Ma have been obtained three stratigraphically distinct altered volcanic ash layers within the Mussentuchit Member, one of which passes through the E. caroljonesa quarry, that indicate that the quarry is latest Albian in age and that the stratigraphic boundary between the Mussentuchit Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation and the overlying Dakota Formation is at or near the Albian/Cenomanian boundary. Sedimentological and biostratigraphic data suggest that significant long-term and short-term climatic changes are recorded in the Cedar Mountain Formation. During deposition of the lower part of the formation, climatic conditions were warm and arid to semi-arid. During deposition of the upper part of the formation, conditions became more humid. The progressive change in climatic conditions was probably related to the transgression of the Mowry Sea from the north. Cyclic sedimentation in the Mussentuchit Member suggests high-frequency changes from wet to dry periods. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficient indica and japonica rice identification based on the InDel molecular method: Its implication in rice breeding and evolutionary research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Rong Lu; Xingxing Cai; Xin Jin

    2009-01-01

    An efficient molecular method for the accurate and efficient identification of indica and japonica rice was created based on the poly-morphisms of insertion/deletion (InDel) DNA fragments obtained from the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) to the entire genomic sequences of indica (93-11) and japonica rice (Nipponbare). The 45 InDel loci were validated experimentally by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in 44 typical indica and japonica rice varieties, including 93-11 and Nipponbare. A neutrality test of the data matrix generated from electrophoretic banding patterns of various InDel loci indicated that 34 InDel loci were strongly associated with the differentiation of indica and japonica rice. More extensive analyses involving cultivated rice varieties from 11 Asian countries, and 12 wild Oryza species with various origins confirmed that indica and japonica characteristics could accurately be determined via calculating the average frequency of indica- or japonica-specific alleles on different InDel loci across the rice genome. This method was named as the "InDel molecular index" that combines molecular and statistical methods in determining the indica and japonica characteristics of rice varieties. Compared with the traditional methods based essentially on morphology, the InDel molecular index provides a very accurate, rapid, simple, and efficient method for identifying indica and japonica rice. In addition, the InDel index can be used to determine indica or japonica characteristics of wild Oryza species, which largely extends the utility of this method. The InDel molecular index provides a new tool for the effective selection of appropriate indica or japonica rice germplasm in rice breeding. It also offers a novel model for the study of the origin, evolution, and genetic differentiation of indica and japonica rice adapted to various environmental changes.

  11. Pyrolysis kinetics study of three biomass solid wastes for thermochemical conversion into liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuly, S. S.; Parveen, M.; Islam, M. R.; Rahman, M. S.; Haniu, H.

    2017-06-01

    Pyrolysis has been considered as the most efficient way of producing liquid fuel from biomass and its wastes. In this study the thermal degradation characteristics and pyrolysis kinetics of three selected biomass samples of Jute stick (Corchorus capsularis), Japanese cedar wood (Cryptomeria japonica) and Tamarind seed (Tamarindus indica) have been investigated in a nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates of 10°C/min and 60°C/min over a temperature range of 30°C to 800°C. The weight loss region for the three biomass solid wastes has shifted to a higher temperature range and the weight loss rate has increased with increasing heating rate. In this case, the three biomass samples have represented the similar behavior. The initial reaction temperature has decreased with increasing heating rate but the reaction range and reaction rate have increased. The percentage of total weight loss is higher for cedar wood than jute stick and tamarind seed. For the three biomass wastes, the overall rate equation has been modeled properly by one simplified equation and from here it is possible to determine kinetic parameters of unreacted materials based on Arrhenious form. The calculated rate equation compares thoroughly well with the measured TG and DTG data.

  12. Oral immunotherapy for pollen allergy using T-cell epitope-containing egg white derived from genetically manipulated chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kawabe

    Full Text Available Peptide immunotherapy using T-cell epitopes is expected to be an effective treatment for allergic diseases such as Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica; Cj pollinosis. To develop a treatment for pollen allergy by inducing oral tolerance, we generated genetically manipulated (GM chickens by retroviral gene transduction, to produce a fusion protein of chicken egg white lysozyme and a peptide derived from seven dominant human T-cell epitopes of Japanese cedar pollen allergens (cLys-7crp. The transgene sequence was detected in all chickens transduced with the retroviral vector. Transduction efficiency in blood cells correlated to transgene expression. Western blot analysis revealed that cLys-7crp was expressed in the egg white of GM hens. Mice induced to develop allergic rhinitis by Cj pollinosis were fed with cLys-7crp-containing egg white produced by GM chickens. Total and Cj allergen (Cry j 1-specific IgE levels were significantly decreased in allergic mice fed with cLys-7crp-containing egg white compared with allergic mice fed with normal egg white. These results suggest that oral administration of T-cell epitope-containing egg white derived from GM chickens is effective for the induction of immune tolerance as an allergy therapy.

  13. Effect of odors from coniferous woods on contingent negative variation (CNV); Shinyojuzai no nioi ga zuihansei insei hendo (CNV) ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terauchi, F. [Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Kubo, M.; Aoki, H. [Chiba University, Chiba (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Ogama, T. [Chiba University, Chiba (Japan). Faculty of Education

    1996-04-15

    In order to clarify the effect of odors of seven coniferous woods on human, contingent negative variation (CNV) and electroencephalogram (EEG) were measured. Four of the species used, hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtuse), sugi (Cryptomeria japonica), akamatsu (Pinus densiflora), and hiba (Thujopsis dolabrata var.hondai), were grown in Japan, and three of them, Alaska cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and western red cedar (Thuja plicata), were grown in the United States. The concentrations of their wood odors were analysed by gas-liquid chromatography. The total concentration of monoterpene hydrocarbon in the wood odors was held to less than 3ppb. The amplitudes of early components of CNV and the {alpha}/{beta} wave ratio of EEG at the frontal (Fz) and central (Cz) regions between in the presence and absence of wood odors were compared. 5 male and 5 female volunteers ranging in age from 20 to 26 were examined. The result obtained are summarized as follows: (1) In the presence of wood odors, the early CNV amplitudes at Fz decreased at a statistical level of significance of 5% or better. (2) The {alpha}/{beta} wave ratio of EEG increased significantly at Cz with bibs wood odor (p<0.01). (3) The decrease of the early CNV amplitude at Fz is related to the concentration of {alpha}-pinene in the wood odors. 19 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Characterization of genome-wide microsatellites of Saccharina japonica based on a preliminary assembly of Illumina sequencing reads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linan; Peng, Jie; Li, Xiaojie; Cui, Cuiju; Sun, Juan; Yang, Guanpin

    2016-06-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) function widely and locate dependently in genome. However, their characteristics are often ignored due to the lack of genomic sequences of most species. Kelp ( Saccharina japonica), a brown macroalga, is extensively cultured in China. In this study, the genome of S. japonica was surveyed using an Illumina sequencing platform, and its microsatellites were characterized. The preliminarily assembled genome was 469.4 Mb in size, with a scaffold N50 of 20529 bp. Among the 128370 identified microsatellites, 90671, 25726 and 11973 were found in intergenic regions, introns and exons, averaging 339.3, 178.8 and 205.4 microsatellites per Mb, respectively. These microsatellites distributed unevenly in S. japonica genome. Mononucleotide motifs were the most abundant in the genome, while trinucleotide ones were the most prevalent in exons. The microsatellite abundance decreased significantly with the increase of motif repeat numbers, and the microsatellites with a small number of repeats accounted for a higher proportion of the exons than those of the intergenic regions and introns. C/G-rich motifs were more common in exons than in intergenic regions and introns. These characteristics of microsatellites in S. japonica genome may associate with their functions, and ultimately their adaptation and evolution. Among the 120140 pairs of designed microsatellite primers, approximately 75% were predicted to be able to amplify S. japonica DNA. These microsatellite markers will be extremely useful for the genetic breeding and population evolution studies of kelp.

  15. Effect of ecological environments on subspecies characteristics and economic traits in filial generations of cross between indica and japonica rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai XU; Wenfu CHEN; Hongguang LIU; Chunjie ZHU; Li YANG; Yanhua GUO; Jiayu WANG; Qianhua YANG; Zhengjin XU; Jiakui ZHENG

    2008-01-01

    Two recombinant inbred lines (RILs) populations, RILSA derived from the cross between "Zhongyouzao8" (indica) and "Toyonihiki" (japonica) rice cultivars, and RILSB derived from the cross between "Qishanzhan" (indica) and "Akihikari" (japonica) rice cultivars, were grown in Liaoning and Sichuan Provinces, China to understand the effects of ecological environments on the subspecies characteristics and economic traits in filial generations of cross between indica and japonica. The results showed that both the subspecies characteristics and economic traits changed significantly. The effects of ecological environments on Cheng's index and six subspecies characteristics were different on the basis of populations or characteristics. The distribution of Cheng's index in RILSA was japonicalinous in Liaoning and Sichuan. The distribution of Cheng's index in RILSB approached to normal distribution in Liaoning, but it wasjaponicalinous in Sichuan. As a whole, the two populations were more japonicalious in Sichuan than in Liaoning. The panicle number, seed setting rate and per-thousand-grain weight were decreased significantly in Sichuan. The grain number per panicle showed no significant change. A significant positive correlation was found between Cheng's index and the economic traits, including six subspe-cies traits. It suggested that the reason that the filial genera-tion of cross between indica and japonica in northern China showed japonieanous subspecies characteristics might be the artificial selection by breeders on the economic traits. In addition, indica-japonica differentiation and the relationship with ecological environments were discussed.

  16. Comparative Analysis of the 100kb Region Containing the Pi-kh Locus Between indica and japonica Rice Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.P. Kumar; V. Dalal; N.K. Singh; T.R. Sharma

    2007-01-01

    We have recently cloned a pathogen inducible blast resistance gene Pi-kh from the indica rice line Tetep using a positional cloning approach. In this study, we carried out structural organization analysis of the Pi-kh locus in both indica and japonica rice lines. A 100 kb region containing 50 kb upstream and 50 kb downstream sequences flanking to the Pi-kh locus was selected for the investigation. A total of 16 genes in indica and 15 genes in japonica were predicted and annotated in this region. The average GC content of indica and japonica genes in this region was 53.15% and 49.3%, respectively. Both indica and japonica sequences were polymorphic for simple sequence repeats having mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, and pentanucleotides. Sequence analysis of the specific blast resistant Pi-kh allele of Tetep and the susceptible Pi-kh allele of the japonica rice line Nipponbare showed differences in the number and distribution of motifs involved in phosphorylation, resulting in the resistance phenotype in Tetep.

  17. Prospect of the QTL-qSB-9Tq utilized in molecular breeding program of japonica rice against sheath blight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The major QTL-qSB-9Tq conferring partial resistance to rice (Oryza sativa L.) sheath blight (Rhizoctonia solani Kühn) has been verified on chromosome 9 of the indica rice cultivar, Teqing. In this study, the prospect of this QTL utilized in molecular breeding program of japonica rice for sheath blight resistance was investigated. Most of the japonica rice cultivars showed lower level of sheath blight resistance than the indica rice cultivars. At the corresponding site of qSB-9Tq, nine typical japonica rice culfivars from different ecological regions or countries proved to possess the susceptible allele(s). Introgression of qSB-9Tq into these cultivars enhanced their resistance level by decreasing sheath blight score of 1.0 (0.5-1.3), which indicated that qSB-9Tq had a large potential in strengthening the resistance of japonica rice to sheath blight. The use of the three molecular markers, which were polymorphic between Teqing and many japonica rice cultivars, promotes the application of qSB-9Tq in a concrete molecular breeding program.

  18. Genetic Diversity of Marine Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria as Revealed by Genomic and Proteomic Analyses of 'Candidatus Scalindua japonica'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Mizuto, Keisuke; Kimura, Zenichiro; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2017-09-11

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria affiliated with the genus 'Candidatus Scalindua' are responsible for significant nitrogen loss in oceans, and thus their ecophysiology is of great interest. Here, we enriched a marine anammox bacterium, 'Ca. S. japonica' from a Hiroshima bay sediment in Japan, and comparative genomic and proteomic analyses of 'Ca. S. japonica' were conducted. Sequence of the 4.81-Mb genome containing 4,019 coding regions of genes (CDSs) composed of 47 contigs was determined. In the proteome, 1,762 out of 4,019 CDSs in the 'Ca. S. japonica' genome were detected. Based on the genomic and proteomic data, the core anammox process and carbon fixation of 'Ca. S. japonica' were further investigated. Additionally, the present study provides the first detailed insights into the genetic background responsible for iron acquisition and menaquinone biosynthesis in anammox bacterial cells. Comparative analysis of the 'Ca. Scalindua' genomes revealed that the 1,502 genes found in the 'Ca. S. japonica' genome were not present in the 'Ca. S. profunda' and 'Ca. S. rubra' genomes, showing a high genomic diversity. This result may reflect a high phylogenetic diversity of the genus 'Ca. Scalindua'. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. New basal iguanodonts from the Cedar Mountain formation of Utah and the evolution of thumb-spiked dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T McDonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Basal iguanodontian dinosaurs were extremely successful animals, found in great abundance and diversity almost worldwide during the Early Cretaceous. In contrast to Europe and Asia, the North American record of Early Cretaceous basal iguanodonts has until recently been limited largely to skulls and skeletons of Tenontosaurus tilletti. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein we describe two new basal iguanodonts from the Yellow Cat Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation of eastern Utah, each known from a partial skull and skeleton. Iguanacolossus fortis gen. et sp. nov. and Hippodraco scutodens gen. et sp. nov. are each diagnosed by a single autapomorphy and a unique combination of characters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Iguanacolossus and Hippodraco add greatly to our knowledge of North American basal iguanodonts and prompt a new comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of basal iguanodont relationships. This analysis indicates that North American Early Cretaceous basal iguanodonts are more basal than their contemporaries in Europe and Asia.

  20. Clinical decision making and outcome in the routine care of people with severe mental illness across Europe (CEDAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puschner, B; Becker, T; Mayer, B;

    2016-01-01

    and Satisfaction Scale (CDIS) measured involvement and satisfaction with a specific decision at all time points. Primary outcome was patient-rated unmet needs measured with the Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule (CANSAS). Mixed-effects multinomial regression was used to examine differences......Aims. Shared decision making has been advocated as a means to improve patient-orientation and quality of health care. There is a lack of knowledge on clinical decision making and its relation to outcome in the routine treatment of people with severe mental illness. This study examined preferred...... and experienced clinical decision making from the perspectives of patients and staff, and how these affect treatment outcome. Methods. "Clinical Decision Making and Outcome in Routine Care for People with Severe Mental Illness" (CEDAR; ISRCTN75841675) is a naturalistic prospective observational study...

  1. A tale of two seagrasses: Comparing the science and management of Zostera marina and Zostera japonica in the Pacific Northwest - CERF

    Science.gov (United States)

    On the Pacific coast of North America, at least two congeners of Zostera occur: native Z. marina, and introduced, Z. japonica. Z. marina is protected by State and Federal laws as essential fish habitat. Z. japonica is considered “invasive” and therefore, ecologicall...

  2. Water-soluble low-molecular-weight -(1, 3–1, 6 D-Glucan inhibit cedar pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Jippo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, asthma, and food allergies has increased in several countries. Mast cells have critical roles in various biologic processes related to allergic diseases. Mast cells express the high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin (Ig E on their surface. The interaction of multivalent antigens with surface-bound IgE causes the secretion of granule-stored mediators, as well as the de novosynthesis of cytokines. Those mediators and cytokines proceed the allergic diseases. We investigated the effects of water-soluble, low-molecular-weight -(1, 3–1, 6 D-glucan isolated from Aureobasidium pullulans 1A1 strain black yeast (LMW--glucan on mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions. We reported that LMW--glucan dose-dependently inhibited the degranulation of mast cells. Furthermore, we found that orally administered LMW--glucan inhibited the IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA reaction in mice. Here, we examined if LMW--glucan had effects on Japanese cedar pollinosis. Findings: In a clinical study, a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study in 65 subjects (aged 2262 was performed. This study was undertaken 3 weeks before and until the end of the cedar pollen season. During the study, all subjects consumed one bottle of placebo or LMW--glucan daily and all subjects were required to record allergic symptoms in a diary. The LMW--glucan group had a significantly lower prevalence of sneezing, nose-blowing, tears, and hindrance to the activities of daily living than the placebo group. Conclusions: These results suggested that LMW--glucan could be an effective treatment for allergic diseases

  3. Bench-scale gasification of cedar wood--part II: effect of operational conditions on contaminant release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljbour, Salah H; Kawamoto, Katsuya

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the evolution profile of tar in the product gas during cedar biomass gasification. We also discuss the evolution of other contaminants (H(2)S, COS, NH(3), HCN, and HCl). The cedar wood was gasified under various operating conditions in a bench-scale externally heated updraft gasifier; this was followed by thermal reforming. Tar levels in the product gas were significantly affected by the operating conditions used. At a gasification temperature of 923 K, there was no clear relation between the evolution of phenolic tar in the product gas as a function of residence time. The evolution of PAH tar at a low gasification temperature was lower than the evolution of phenolic tar. With increasing temperature, the proportion of PAH tar content became significant. At a gasification temperature of 1223 K, increasing the residence time reduced the content of PAH tar owing to a catalytic effect associated with ash generation at high temperatures. Increasing the steam-to-carbon (S/C) ratio under thermal conditions had a slight effect on PAH conversion. However, increasing the equivalence ratio (ER) effectively reduced the tar levels. The conversion of fuel-sulfur and fuel-nitrogen to volatile-sulfur and volatile-nitrogen, respectively, increased with increasing S/C ratio and ER. The evolutions of COS and HCN gases were much smaller than the evolution of H(2)S and NH(3). The evolution of HCl in the product gas decreased slightly with increasing ER. Increasing the S/C ratio decreased the HCl levels in the product gas. The effect of temperature on contaminant levels could not be fully understood due to limited availability of experimental data at various temperatures. We also compare our findings with data in the literature.

  4. The Cedar Project WelTel mHealth intervention for HIV prevention in young Indigenous people who use illicit drugs: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongbloed, Kate; Friedman, Anton J; Pearce, Margo E; Van Der Kop, Mia L; Thomas, Vicky; Demerais, Lou; Pooyak, Sherri; Schechter, Martin T; Lester, Richard T; Spittal, Patricia M

    2016-03-09

    Despite successes in preventing and treating HIV, Indigenous people in Canada continue to face disproportionately high rates of HIV infection. Programs that support healing from lifetime trauma, support connection to culture, and reduce drug-related harms are critical to preventing HIV among young Indigenous people who use drugs. The Cedar Project WelTel mHealth intervention proposed here is a structured mobile-phone initiative to connect young Indigenous people who use drugs with Cedar Case Managers in a community-based setting. The intervention consists of a package of supports, including a mobile phone and cellular plan, weekly two-way text messaging, and support from Cedar Case Managers. The Cedar Project WelTel mHealth study is a multi-site Zelen pre-randomized trial to measure the effect of a two-way supportive text-message intervention to reduce HIV vulnerability among young Indigenous people who use illicit drugs in two Canadian cities. The trial is nested within the Cedar Project, an ongoing cohort study addressing HIV and hepatitis C vulnerability among young Indigenous people who use drugs in Vancouver and Prince George, British Columbia. The Cedar Project Partnership, an independent body of Indigenous Elders, leaders, and health/social service experts, governs all aspects of the study. Two hundred participants will be followed over a 16-month period, with HIV propensity score at 6 months as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes include HIV propensity at 1 year, HIV risk, resilience, psychological distress, access to drug-related services, and connection to culture measured at 6 months and 1 year. Primary analysis is by intention to treat. Culturally safe interventions that address barriers to HIV prevention while supporting the strength of young Indigenous people who use drugs are urgently needed. Despite presenting a tremendous opportunity to connect young, highly transient Indigenous people who use drugs to prevention services, supportive two-way m

  5. Avaliação de alguns alimentos para codornas japonesas (Coturnix coturnix japonica Evaluation of the some feedstuffs for japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Scapinello

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Um ensaio de digestibilidade foi conduzido com o objetivo de determinar os valores energéticos da farinha de carne e ossos, farinha de peixe, farelo de algodão, sorgo e triticale para codornas japonesas (Coturnix coturnix japonica. Foram utilizadas 288 codornas machos, com 55 dias de idade, distribuídas em um delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado com seis tratamentos e seis repetições, sendo a unidade experimental constituída por oito codornas. Utilizou-se a metodologia de coleta total de excretas, sendo que os alimentos substituíram em 30% uma ração-referência à base de milho e farelo de soja. Os coeficientes de metabolização da matéria seca (CMMS e da energia bruta (CMEB do sorgo e do triticale foram superiores (P A digestibility trial was carried out to evaluate energy values of meat-bone meal, fish meal, cottonseed meal, sorghum and triticale for japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica. Two hundred and eighty-eight 55day-old male quails were distributed in a completely randomized design, with six treatments and six replications, and eight quails per experimental unit. The methodology consisted of total of excretion collection and replacement of 30% reference diet based on corn and soybean meal by feefstuff. The dry matter metabolization coefficients (DMMC and gross energy metabolization coefficients (GEMC of the sorghum and triticale were highest (P < .05. The GEMC (% and corrected aparent metabolizable energy values (kcal/kg resulted in 39.48 and 1,346; 54.59 and 2,425; 27.05 and 1,120; 82.06 and 3,047; 77.69 and 2,908, respectively, for meat-bone meal, fish meal, cottonseed meal, sorghum and triticale.

  6. Maize benefits the predatory beetle, Propylea japonica (Thunberg, to provide potential to enhance biological control for aphids in cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Ouyang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biological control provided by natural enemies play an important role in integrated pest management. Generalist insect predators provide an important biological service in the regulation of agricultural insect pests. Our goal is to understand the explicit process of oviposition preference, habitat selection and feeding behavior of predators in farmland ecosystem consisting of multiple crops, which is central to devising and delivering an integrated pest management program. METHODOLOGY: The hypotheses was that maize can serve as habitat for natural enemies and benefits predators to provide potential to enhance biological control for pest insects in cotton. This explicit process of a predatory beetle, Propylea japonica, in agricultural ecosystem composed of cotton and maize were examined by field investigation and stable carbon isotope analysis during 2008-2010. PRINCIPAL FINDING: Field investigation showed that P. japonica adults will search host plants for high prey abundance before laying eggs, indicating indirectly that P. japonica adults prefer to inhabit maize plants and travel to cotton plants to actively prey on aphids. The δ(13C values of adult P. japonica in a dietary shift experiment found that individual beetles were shifting from a C(3- to a C(4-based diet of aphids reared on maize or cotton, respectively, and began to reflect the isotope ratio of their new C(4 resources within one week. Approximately 80-100% of the diet of P. japonica adults in maize originated from a C(3-based resource in June, July and August, while approximately 80% of the diet originated from a C(4-based resource in September. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Results suggest that maize can serve as a habitat or refuge source for the predatory beetle, P. japonica, and benefits predators to provide potential to enhance biological control for insect pests in cotton.

  7. Analysis of Saccharina japonica transcriptome using the high-throughput DNA sequencing technique and its vanadium-dependent haloperoxidase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiayuan; WANG Xumin; CHI Shan; WU Shuangxiu; SUN Jing; LIU Cui; CHEN Shengping; YU Jun; LIU Tao

    2014-01-01

    Saccharina is one of the most important cold-water living marine brown algal genera. In this study we ana-lyzed the transcriptome of S. japonica, which belongs to the 1 000 Plants (OneKP) Project, by using a next-generation high-throughput DNA sequencing technique. About 5.16 GB of raw data were generated, and 65 536 scaffolds with an average length of 454 bp were assembled with SOAP de novo assembly method. In total, 19 040 unigenes were identified by BLAST;25 734 scaffolds were clustered into 37 Gene ontology functional groups;6 760 scaffolds were classified into 25 COG categories, as well as 2 665 scaffolds that were assigned to 306 KEGG pathways. Majority of the unigenes exhibited more similarities to algae including brown algae and diatom than other cyanobacteria, marine diatom, and plant. Saccharina japonica has the outstanding capability to accumulate halogen such as Br and I via halogenation processes from seawater. We acquired 42 different vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases (vHPO) in S. japonica transcriptome data, including 5 segments of vanadium-dependent iodoperoxidase (vIPO) and 37 segments of vanadium-de-pendent bromoperoxidase (vBPO). Complicated analyses of identified fulllength S. japonica vBPO1 and S. japonica vBPO2 revealed the importance of vBPO among species of brown algae and the strong relationship between marine algal vBPOs and vIPOs. This study will enhance our understanding of the biological charac-teristics and economic values of S. japonica species.

  8. Fallopia japonica, a Natural Modulator, Can Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa Yehia Eid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy is controlled by the decrease of intracellular drug accumulation, increase of detoxification, and diminished propensity of cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. ATP-binding cassette (ABC membrane transporters with intracellular metabolic enzymes contribute to the complex and unresolved phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR. Natural products as alternative medicine have great potential to discover new MDR inhibitors with diverse modes of action. In this study, we characterized several extracts of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM plants (N = 16 for their interaction with ABC transporters, cytochrome P3A4 (CYP3A4, and glutathione-S-transferase (GST activities and their cytotoxic effect on different cancer cell lines. Fallopia japonica (FJ (Polygonaceae shows potent inhibitory effect on CYP3A4 P-glycoprotein activity about 1.8-fold when compared to verapamil as positive control. FJ shows significant inhibitory effect (39.81% compared with the known inhibitor ketoconazole and 100 μg/mL inhibited GST activity to 14 μmol/min/mL. FJ shows moderate cytotoxicity in human Caco-2, HepG-2, and HeLa cell lines; IC50 values were 630.98, 198.80, and 317.37 µg/mL, respectively. LC-ESI-MS were used to identify and quantify the most abundant compounds, emodin, polydatin, and resveratrol, in the most active extract of FJ. Here, we present the prospect of using Fallopia japonica as natural products to modulate the function of ABC drug transporters. We are conducting future study to evaluate the ability of the major active secondary metabolites of Fallopia japonica to modulate MDR and their impact in case of failure of chemotherapy.

  9. Subspecific Characteristics and Classification of Rice Varieties Developed Through Indica and Japonica Crossing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zheng-jin; LI Jin-quan; HUANG Rui-dong; JIANG Jian; CHEN Wen-fu; ZHANG Long-bu

    2005-01-01

    Six characteristics, i.e., hull color, chaff and leaf pubescences, length of 1st and 2nd rachis, grain length/width ratio and phenol reaction, of rice progenies from indica and japonica crossing were studied using the Cheng's index classification method. The results indicated that F1 generations performed more like indica, while F2 generations were approximately in a normal distribution. Both of the rice progenies were more affected by indica and female parents than by japonica and male parents. Among the six Cheng's index traits of the parents and F1 generations, and between the traits and Cheng's indexes, significant correlations (both at α=0.05 and α=0.01) were found in most cases. No significant correlations were found among the 6 Cheng's index traits of F2 generations in most cases, but significant correlations (α=0.01) existed between these traits and Cheng's indexes. The six Cheng's index traits of F2 ranged successively, and many individuals showed over-parent genetics, with the same trends in both direct cross and reciprocal cross. Among the 6 index traits,chaff and leaf pubescences almost presented in a two-peak value, while the others in a mono-peak value. The hull color,phenol reaction and length of 1 st and 2nd rachis were distributed in deviation, with the first two traits presented more in japonica individuals and the last trait more in indica. The grain length/width ratios were nearly in a normal distribution.

  10. Simultaneous quantification of seven bioactive components in Caulis Lonicerae Japonicae by high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zheng-Ming; Li, Hui-Jun; Li, Ping; Chen, Jun; Tang, Dan

    2007-06-01

    This study presents a new HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of seven major components, namely chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, loganin, sweroside, secoxyloganin, rutin and luteolin 7-O-glucoside in Caulis Lonicerae Japonicae, a commonly used traditional Chinese medicinal herb derived from the caulis of Lonicera japonica Thunb. These seven compounds, belonging to the chemical types of phenolic acids, iridoids and flavonoids, were separated on a C18 column (250 x 4.6 mm, 5.0 microm) with the column temperature at 30 degrees C. The mobile phase was composed of (A) aqueous acetic acid (0.4%, v/v) and (B) acetonitrile using a gradient elution of 10% B at 0-12 min, 10-17% B at 12-25 min and 17% B at 25-35 min. The flow rate was 1.0 mL/min and detection wavelength was set at 245 nm. The limit of detection (S/N = 3) ranged from 0.10 to 0.23 microg/mL and the limit of quantification (S/N = 10) ranged from 0.69 to 3.56 microg/mL. All calibration curves showed good linear regression (r2 > 0.9990) within the test ranges. The intra- and inter-day precisions as determined from sample solutions were below 1.24 and 2.28%, respectively. The recoveries for seven compounds were found to range from 94.2 to 103.6%. This verified method has been successfully applied to evaluation of commercial samples of Caulis Lonicerae Japonicae from different markets in China.

  11. Characterization of the promoter region of biosynthetic enzyme genes involved in berberine biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Yamada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs, a plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4’OMT and CYP719A1 were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4’OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed.

  12. Antioxidative effect of loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) fruit skin extract in soybean oil

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of solvent and ultrasound-assisted extraction methods with supercritical fluid extraction on antioxidant activity of loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) fruit skin extract in stability of soybean oil at 25°C. Oxidative stability alterations of soybean oils containing 400 (SEA) and 1000 ppm (SEB) of ethanol extract, 400 (SSA) and 1000 ppm (SSB) of supercritical CO2 extract, 400 (SUA) and 1000 ppm (SUB) of ultrasound-assisted extract, and 100 ppm...

  13. New data about optic properties of biominerals from some brown algae Undaria pinnatifida and Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamirsky, I. E.; Chung, G.; Gutnikov, S. A.; Golokhvast, K. S.

    2016-11-01

    For the first time we made an attempt to study morphological types of phytoliths in the same species of multicellular brown algae (Undaria pinnatifida, Laminaria japonica) growing in different locations. However, in all samples only shapeless silicon dioxide particles were found. Some of them had rough edges, the other had smooth edges. We assume that the rough-edged shapeless phytolithes were formed within cells and smooth-edged - in the intercellular space. Verification of this assumption needs confirmation by detection of similar structures in the tissues of live algae.

  14. Complete mitochondrial genomes of three mitten crabs, Eriocheir sinensis, E. hepuensis, and E. japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Huang, Lei; Cheng, Qixuan; Lu, Guoqing; Wang, Chenghui

    2016-01-01

    Taxonomic classification of three mitten crabs (Eriocheir sinensis, E. hepuensis, and E. japonica) has long been controversial. In this study, the complete mitogenomes of the three crabs were reported. The three mitogenomes were conserved in the organization of genes with 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and 1 control region. Nucleotide variations among the crabs were identified in both coding and non-coding regions. In addition, variable numbers of tandem repeats in control region were identified in the mitten crabs. The mitogenome sequences provide a valuable resource to elucidate taxonomic relationship and evolutionary history of the three mitten crabs.

  15. Oriental orchid (Cymbidium pumilum) attracts drones of the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) as pollinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, M; Ono, M; Asada, S; Yoshida, T

    1991-12-01

    The discovery that drones of the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) pollinate the oriental orchid (Cymbidium pumilum) is reported. Drones are attracted to the orchid flower aroma mainly during their mating flights in April through May. Some drones cluster on the flower racemes and others insert their heads deep into the flowers. Drones with pollinia on their scutellum visit other orchids, which facilitates pollination. Individual workers and swarming colonies are also strongly attracted by the flower aroma, but the allopatric western honeybee (Apis mellifera) is not attracted.

  16. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated GUS gene transfer to Sophora japonica L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiao-ying; Wang Hua-fang; Yin Wei-lun; Zhu Zhen

    2006-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of Sophorajaponica was standardized using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 that harbored the binary vector pBI121 containing genes for β-glucuronidase (GUS) and neomycin phosphotransterase (npt Ⅱ). S. japonica transformants were selected by the ability of the leaf explants to produce kanamycin-resistant calli that regenerated into kanamycin-resistant plantlets. Successful transformation was confirmed by histochemical assay for GUS activity, PCR analysis and Southern blot. The period of nearly two months was required for the regeneration of transgenic plantlets from the explants. The transformed plants resembled their parents in morphology.

  17. Morfologia testicular e reserva espermática na codorna japonesa (Coturnix coturnix japonica)

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Lara e Lanna

    2012-01-01

    Apesar do melhoramento genético e do potencial de crescimento da coturnicultura, a seleção para características reprodutivas recebe baixa prioridade e nenhum parâmetro confiável é utilizado como preditivo da fertilidade em codornas. A localização intra-abdominal dos testículos é o principal entrave para a criação de tal parâmetro. No presente estudo caracterizouse a morfologia testicular e a reserva espermática na codorna japonesa (Coturnix coturnix japonica). A biometria e a histomorfometria...

  18. DNA damage in gill cells of Corbicula japonica exposed to natural and anthropogenic stressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Vladimirovna Slobodskova

    2015-06-01

    The results are presented as the percentage distribution of nuclei in the various damage classes and summarized in an index of DNA integrity or genetic damage index GDI (Cavas, Kohen, 2008: The results from our study showed significant level of DNA damage from the C. japonica which were collected from polluted sites. Unpolluted sites were described as with no or minimal DNA strand breaks. Mollusks collected at polluted areas (estuary Razdolnaya river, lagoon Tihaya showed high levels of DNA damage, GDI is equal to 3.22±0.2 and 3.11±0.7 in gills respectively. C. japonica obtained from a ‘clean’ areas (estuary Artemovka river, estuary Partizanskaya river demonstrate less high level of DNA damage destruction, GDI is equal to 0,6±0,08 and 0,71±0,12 in gills respectively. Lipid peroxidation level was assayed measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA, a decomposition product of polyunsaturated fatty acids hydro peroxides were determined by the TBA reaction. The absorbance was read at 532 nm after removal of substances (TBARS formed was calculated by using an extinction coefficient of 1.56*105 M-1 cm -1 formed per g dry weight. C. japonica sampled at Artemovka estuary, Partizanskaya estuary, Razdolnaya estuary, Tihaya lagoon showed LPX level (3.46±0.59, 5.62±0.82, 12.85±0.52, 15.32±1.13 nmol TBARS/g dry wt in gills respectively. In conclusion, it can be noted that in the course of the experiment we found a clear relationship between the amount of DNA damage and the level of peroxidation products (MDA in the gills of bivalve C. japonica, collected from sites with varying degrees of anthropogenic load. It should be emphasized that the shellfish that live in polluted areas are likely to be in a state of oxidative stress, which is one of the causes the degradation of DNA.

  19. Aspects of the Genotype-Environment Interaction at the Japanese Quail (Coturnix-Coturnix Japonica

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    Teofil Oroian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the problems of genotype-environment interaction at three Coturnix Coturnix Japonica varieties. The environment where the experiment took place is perfect identically for all the activities, to ensure that the observed differences at the followed traits to be strictly attributed to the genotype differences. We analyzed the body weight, eggs weight, eggs large and small diameter, yolk and egg white weight, egg-shell weight. The data were statistically interpreted using the average and dispersal indices estimation, and the significance testing using Student test.

  20. Two neutral alleles of improving male gamete abortion in indica-japonica hybrid rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@It was difficult to use the pronounced heterosis of indica-japonica hybrids rice due to the panicle sterility caused by male and female gamete abortion. The female gamete abortion in most of subspecific hybrids could be solved by using an abortion-neutral gene S5-n, a wide compatibility gene. The problem of male gamete abortion indicated by distorted segregation of marker genes remained to be studied. Segregation distortion via male gamete had been reported on chromosomes 3, 7, 8, 11, and 12.

  1. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling to quantify effects of peak-flow management on channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat in the Cedar River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnas, C. R.; Czuba, J. A.; Gendaszek, A. S.; Magirl, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    The Cedar River in Washington State originates on the western slope of the Cascade Range and provides the City of Seattle with most of its drinking water, while also supporting a productive salmon habitat. Water-resource managers require detailed information on how best to manage high-flow releases from Chester Morse Lake, a large reservoir on the Cedar River, during periods of heavy precipitation to minimize flooding, while mitigating negative effects on fish populations. Instream flow-management practices include provisions for adaptive management to promote and maintain healthy aquatic habitat in the river system. The current study is designed to understand the linkages between peak flow characteristics, geomorphic processes, riverine habitat, and biological responses. Specifically, two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling is used to simulate and quantify the effects of the peak-flow magnitude, duration, and frequency on the channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat. Two study reaches, representative of the typical geomorphic and ecologic characteristics of the Cedar River, were selected for the modeling. Detailed bathymetric data, collected with a real-time kinematic global positioning system and an acoustic Doppler current profiler, were combined with a LiDAR-derived digital elevation model in the overbank area to develop a computational mesh. The model is used to simulate water velocity, benthic shear stress, flood inundation, and morphologic changes in the gravel-bedded river under the current and alternative flood-release strategies. Simulations of morphologic change and salmon-redd scour by floods of differing magnitude and duration enable water-resource managers to incorporate model simulation results into adaptive management of peak flows in the Cedar River.

  2. Crystal Structure of Jun a 1, the Major Cedar Pollen Allergen from Juniperus ashei, Reveals a Parallel β-Helical Core*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Edmund W.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; White, Mark A.; Brooks, Edward G.; Goldblum, Randall M.

    2008-01-01

    Pollen from cedar and cypress trees is a major cause of seasonal hypersensitivity in humans in several regions of the Northern Hemisphere. We report the first crystal structure of a cedar allergen, Jun a 1, from the pollen of the mountain cedar Juniperus ashei (Cupressaceae). The core of the structure consists primarily of a parallel β-helix, which is nearly identical to that found in the pectin/pectate lyases from several plant pathogenic microorganisms. Four IgE epitopes mapped to the surface of the protein are accessible to the solvent. The conserved vWiDH sequence is covered by the first 30 residues of the N terminus. The potential reactive arginine, analogous to the pectin/pectate lyase reaction site, is accessible to the solvent, but the substrate binding groove is blocked by a histidine-aspartate salt bridge, a glutamine, and an α-helix, all of which are unique to Jun a 1. These observations suggest that steric hindrance in Jun a 1 precludes enzyme activity. The overall results suggest that it is the structure of Jun a 1 that makes it a potent allergen. PMID:15539389

  3. Antioxidant and isozyme features of two strains of Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG You; TANG Xuexi; LI Yongqi; YU Zhiming

    2007-01-01

    Healthy sporophytes of two gametophyte mutants of Laminariajaponica with different heat resistances: kelp 901 (901, with comparatively stronger heat-resistance) and Rongcheng No. 1 (RC, sensitive to heat stress), were respectively collected during October to December 2002 from Yantai and Rongcheng Sea Farm in the Shandong Peninsula of China. The contents of some biochemical materials and antioxidant capacity were analyzed under controlled laboratory conditions to identify if there is any relation between the overall antioxidant capacity and the heat-resistance in L. japonica and to understand possible mechanism of heat-resistance. Results show that: (1) the overall antioxidant capacity in healthy sporophyte of 901, such as vitamin E, polyphenol, and ascorbic acid contents and the enzymatic activity of SOD, POD, CAT, Gpx, PPO, and PAL, were not always higher than that of RC under controlled laboratory conditions, and no significance (P>0.05) was shown in total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) in 901and RC. Result suggested that the difference in antioxidant capacity was not a decisive factor for different heat-resistances in L. japonica; (2) the simultaneous assay on isozymes was carried out using vertical polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Considerable differences in peroxide (PRX), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), malic enzyme (ME), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)were obtained in 901 and RC from either the band number, relative mobility (Rf), or staining intensity, and ME could be used as an indicator to distinguish healthy sporophyte of 901 and RC under controlled laboratory conditions.

  4. Antibacterial low-molecular-weight compounds produced by the marine bacterium Rheinheimera japonica KMM 9513(T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinovskaya, Natalia I; Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I

    2017-05-01

    Strain KMM 9513(T) was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the Sea of Japan seashore and selected due to its ability to inhibit indicator bacterial growth. The strain KMM 9513(T) has been recently described as a novel species Rheinheimera japonica. This study was undertaken to determine which substances produced by strain KMM 9513(T) could be responsible for its antimicrobial activity. Eight compounds were obtained from an ethyl acetate extract of R. japonica KMM 9513(T). The structures of five diketopiperazines (4-8) and diisobutyl-, dibutyl- and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalates (1-3) were established on the basis of detailed interpretation of NMR data, by Marfey method and optical rotation data. The structures of diketopiperazines were determined as cyclo-(L-valyl-L-proline), cyclo-(L-valyl-D-proline), cyclo-(L-phenylalanyl-L-proline), cyclo-(L-leucyl-L-proline), and cyclo-(L-phenylalanyl-D-proline). Compounds 1-3, 5 and 8 revealed antimicrobial activities against Bacillus subtilis and/or Enterococcus faecium and Staphylococcus aureus. In this paper, we describe the isolation and structural elucidation of the isolated compounds 1-8. This is the first report of the characterisation of low molecular weight antibacterial metabolites produced by a member of the genus Rheinheimera.

  5. Programmed cell death in Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyta) tissues infected with alginic acid decomposing bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gaoge; LIN Wei; ZHANG Lijing; YAN Xiaojun; DUAN Delin

    2004-01-01

    TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) is a sensitive and valid method for detecting DNA cleavage in programmed cell death (PCD). Using this method, DNA cleavage was observed in Laminaria japonica sporophytic tissues, which were infected with alginic acid decomposing bacterium. It was found that DNA cleavage occurred 5 min after the infection, the fragments with 3′-OH groups of cleaved nuclear DNA increased with time of infection and spread from the infection site. Although no typical DNA ladder (200 bp/180 bp) was detected by routine agarose gel electrophoresis, the cleavage of nuclear DNA fragments of 97~48.5 kb could be detected by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). By using CaspGLOWTM fluorescein active caspase-3 staining method, caspase-3 activity has been detected in response to the infection of alginic acid decomposing bacterium. Our results are similar to the observations in hypersensitive response (HR) of higher plant, suggesting that the rapid cell death of L. Japonica infected by alginic acid decomposing bacterium might be involved in PCD, and indicating that the occurrence of PCD is an active defense process against the pathogen's infection.

  6. Blooming biology and pollen abundance of Anemone japonica Houtt.= Anemone x hybrida hort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Denisow

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies were carried out between 2002 and 2003 and in 2005 in the Botanical Garden in Lublin. The blooming and the pollen flow of Anemone japonica Houtt. (=A. x hybrida hort were observed. The blooming of the perennial took place in the middle and end of summer. The number of flowers per inflorescence and the mass of pollen produced in anthers significantly depended on insolation conditions and were greater on sunny plots. Anemone japonica is characterized by the variability of many features which directly influence the amount of delivered pollen. The number of stamens varied from 175 to 507 per flower, the mass of pollen from 1.1mg to 4.9 mg per 100 anthers, the number of flowers from 25 to 118 per one inflorescence and from 355⋅m-2 to 2202⋅m-2. Therefore the pollen efficiency varied widely from 1.3g⋅m-2 to 27.7g⋅m-2 and reached 15.3 g ⋅ m-2 on average.

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhiza formation in cordate gametophytes of two ferns, Angiopteris lygodiifolia and Osmunda japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura-Tsujita, Yuki; Sakoda, Aki; Ebihara, Atsushi; Yukawa, Tomohisa; Imaichi, Ryoko

    2013-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is common among land plants including pteridophytes (monilophytes and lycophytes). In pteridophytes with diplohaplontic life cycle, mycorrhizal formations were mostly reported for sporophytes, but very few for gametophytes. To clarify the mycorrhizal association of photosynthetic gametophytes, field-collected gametophytes of Angiopteris lygodiifolia (Marattiaceae, n = 52) and Osmunda japonica (Osmundaceae, n = 45) were examined using microscopic and molecular techniques. Collected gametophytes were mostly cut into two pieces. One piece was used for light and scanning microscopic observations, and the other for molecular identification of plant species (chloroplast rbcL sequences) and mycorrhizal fungi (small subunit rDNA sequences). Microscopic observations showed that 96 % (50/52) of Angiopteris and 95 % (41/43) of Osmunda gametophytes contained intracellular hyphae with arbuscules and/or vesicles and fungal colonization was limited to the inner tissue of the thick midribs (cushion). Fungal DNA analyses showed that 92 % (48/52) of Angiopteris and 92 % (35/38) of Osmunda have sequences of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, which were highly divergent but all belonged to Glomus group A. These results suggest that A. lygodiifolia and O. japonica gametophytes consistently form arbuscular mycorrhizae. Mycorrhizal formation in wild fern gametophytes, based on large-scale sampling with molecular identification of host plant species, was demonstrated for the first time.

  8. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles with antibacterial activities using aqueous Eriobotrya japonica leaf extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Bo; Tang, Ren-Cheng

    2017-03-01

    An eco-friendly approach for the preparation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from silver nitrate solution using aqueous Eriobotrya japonica leaf extract was investigated. The reduction of silver ions in solution was monitored using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, and the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs at 435 nm was observed. The proper condition to biosynthesize AgNPs using E. japonica leaf extract was optimized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering measurement (DLS). The biosynthesised nanoparticles were characterised using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), DLS, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). XRD and EDX analyses confirmed the crystalline character of AgNPs and the presence of elemental silver. The prepared AgNPs were spherical in shape, and their average particle size determined by TEM was about 20 nm. Furthermore the AgNPs were found to exhibit effective antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

  9. Cytological features of oogenesis and their evolutionary significance in the fern Osmunda japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian-Guo; Dai, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Quan-Xi

    2012-03-01

    The development of the egg and canal cells in the fern Osmunda japonica Thunb. was studied during oogenesis by transmission electron microscopy. The mature egg possesses no fertilization pore and no typical egg envelope. In addition, an extra wall formed around the canal cells during oogenesis and apparently blocked protoplasmic connections between the egg and the canal cells. The periodic acid Schiff (PAS) reaction revealed that the extra wall was most likely composed of polysaccharides. Maturation of the egg was accompanied by the formation of a separation cavity above the egg and by some changes in the morphology of the nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles. The chromatin of the nucleus becomes condensed and the upper surface of the nucleus becomes closely associated with the plasmalemma. Amyloplasts in the egg cytoplasm were numerous and conspicuous, with most in close proximity to the nucleus. Finally, the cytoplasm on one side of the egg became vesiculated and the overlying plasmalemma was easily disrupted. These cytological features of the egg and the canal cells during oogenesis in O. japonica are markedly different from those of the leptosporangiate ferns and suggest a significant evolutionary divergence in reproductive cellular features between Osmundaceae and leptosporangiate ferns.

  10. Optimization of saccharification and ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) from seaweed, Saccharina japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ji-Suk; Cho, YuKyeong; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol was produced using the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) method with macroalgae polysaccharide from the seaweed Saccharina japonica (Sea tangle, Dasima) as biomass. The seaweed was dried by hot air, ground with a hammer mill and filtered with a 200-mesh sieve prior to pretreatment. Saccharification was carried out by thermal acid hydrolysis with H(2)SO(4) and the industrial enzyme, Termamyl 120 L. To increase the yield of saccharification, isolated marine bacteria were used; the optimal saccharification conditions were 10% (w/v) seaweed slurry, 40 mM H(2)SO(4) and 1 g dcw/L isolated Bacillus sp. JS-1. Using this saccharification procedure, the reducing sugar concentration and viscosity were 45.6 ± 5.0 g/L and 24.9 cp, respectively, and the total yield of the saccharification with optimal conditions and S. japonica was 69.1%. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was carried out for ethanol production. The highest ethanol concentration, 7.7 g/L (9.8 ml/L) with a theoretical yield of 33.3%, was obtained by SSF with 0.39 g dcw/L Bacillus sp. JS-1 and 0.45 g dcw/L of the yeast, Pichia angophorae KCTC 17574.

  11. Salicylic acid and heat acclimation pretreatment protects Laminaria japonica sporophyte (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, You

    2010-07-01

    Possible mediatory roles of heat acclimation and salicylic acid in protecting the sporophyte of marine macroalga Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress were studied. Heat stress resulted in oxidative injury in the kelp blades. Under heat stress significant accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malonaldehyde (MDA), a membrane lipid peroxidation product, and a drastic decrease in chlorophyll a content were recorded. Activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system was drastically affected by heat stress. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly increased while peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were greatly inhibited and, simultaneously, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase was activated while polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was inhibited. Both heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous application of salicylic acid alleviated oxidative damage in kelp blades. Blades receiving heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous salicylic acid prior to heat stress exhibited a reduced increase in H2O2 and MDA content, and a lower reduction in chlorophyll a content. Pretreatment with heat acclimation and salicylic acid elevated activities of SOD, POD, CAT, GPX and PPO. Considering these results collectively, we speculate that the inhibition of antioxidant enzymes is a possible cause of the heat-stress-induced oxidative stress in L. japonica, and enhanced thermotolerance may be associated, at least in part, with the elevated activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system.

  12. Antiatherogenic Effect of Camellia japonica Fruit Extract in High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Ho Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia is a well-known etiological factor for cardiovascular disease and a common symptom of most types of metabolic disorders. Camellia japonica is a traditional garden plant, and its flower and seed have been used as a base oil of traditional cosmetics in East Asia. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of C. japonica fruit extracts (CJF in a high fat diet- (HFD- induced hypercholesterolemic rat model. CJF was administered orally at three different doses: 100, 400, and 800 mg·kg−1·day−1 (CJF 100, 400, and 800, resp.. Our results showed that CJF possessed strong cholesterol-lowering potency as indicated by the decrease in serum total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, accompanied by an increase in serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL. Furthermore, CJF reduced serum lipid peroxidation by suppressing the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance. In addition, oil red O (ORO staining of rat arteries showed decreased lipid-positive staining in the CJF-treated groups compared to the control HFD group. Taken together, these results suggest that CJF could be a potent herbal therapeutic option and source of a functional food for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis and other diseases associated with hypercholesterolemia.

  13. [Effects of spacing on the yields and canopy structure of japonica rice at full heading stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-peng; Wang, Shu; Huang, Yuan-cai; Jia, Bao-yan; Wang, Yan; Zeng, Qun-yun

    2015-11-01

    With three panicle types of rice varieties and hybrids in Liaoning as entries, the effects of spacing of Japonica rice on light interception capacity, population light distribution, light conversion efficiency at full heading stage and yield were studied. The results showed that the leaf area indices at full heading stage, closely related to light interception, increased first and then decreased with the decrease of transplanting density. The extinction coefficient in one day increased first and then decreased, and the K value increased with the increase of planting density. Yield was positively correlated with canopy extinction coefficient and inclinations of the upper three leaves. In terms of energy efficiency, the yields were positively correlated to flag leaf stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration and transpiration rate. At the configuration of high (15 cm x 25 cm) and low (20 cm x 30 cm and 20 cm x 35 cm) densities, Japonica rice could increase light interception capability and optical conversion efficiency, but could not obtain high and stable yields due to limitation by lodging and panicles of per unit area, respectively. At the configurations of 15 cm x 30 cm and 20 cm x 25 cm, it was easy to get adequate panicles, optimize the structure of the canopy, reduce lodging risk, and obtain high yield.

  14. Eriobotrya japonica seed biocomposite efficiency for copper adsorption: Isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamic and desorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Mehwish; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Iqbal, Munawar; Noreen, Saima

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption techniques are widely used to remove pollutants from wastewater; however, composites are gaining more importance due to their excellent adsorption properties. Bentonite composite with Eriobotrya japonica seed was prepared and used for the adsorption of copper (Cu) metal from aqueous media. The process variables such as pH, Cu(II) ions initial concentration, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were optimized for maximum Cu(II) adsorption. At pH 5, adsorbent dose 0.1 g, contact time 45 min, Cu(II) ions initial concentration 75 mg/L and temperature 45 °C, maximum Cu(II) adsorption was achieved. Desorption studies revealed that biocomposite is recyclable. Langmuir, Freundlich and Harkins-Jura isotherms as well as pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order kinetics models were applied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0)) suggest that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm fitted well to the adsorption data. Results showed that biocomposite was more efficient for Cu(II) adsorption in comparison to individuals native Eriobotrya japonica seed biomass and Na-bentonite.

  15. Flavonoids from Machilus japonica Stems and Their Inhibitory Effects on LDL Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-Jin Joo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Stems of Machilus japonica were extracted with 80% aqueous methanol (MeOH and the concentrated extract was successively extracted with ethyl acetate (EtOAc, normal butanol (n-BuOH, and water. Six flavonoids were isolated from the EtOAc fraction: (+-taxifolin, afzelin, (−-epicatechin, 5,3'-di-O-methyl-(−-epicatechin, 5,7,3'-tri-O-methyl-(−-epicatechin, and 5,7-di-O-methyl-3',4'-methylenedioxyflavan-3-ol. The chemical structures were identified using spectroscopic data including NMR, mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy. This is the first report of isolation of these six compounds from M. japonica. The compounds were evaluated for their diphenyl picryl hydrazinyl scavenging activity and inhibitory effects on low-density lipoprotein oxidation. Compounds 1 and 3–6 exhibited DPPH antioxidant activity equivalent with that of ascorbic acid, with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 0.16, 0.21, 0.17, 0.15 and 0.07 mM, respectively. The activity of compound 1 was similar to the positive control butylated hydroxytoluene, which had an IC50 value of 1.9 µM, while compounds 3 and 5 showed little activity. Compounds 1, 3, and 5 exhibited LDL antioxidant activity with IC50 values of 2.8, 7.1, and 4.6 µM, respectively.

  16. Allergy-preventive effects of chlorogenic acid and iridoid derivatives from flower buds of Lonicera japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Hisae; Ogawa, Yuko; Iwaoka, Emiko; Ishiguro, Kyoko

    2011-01-01

    Allergy-preventive activity of flower buds of Lonicera japonica THUNB. was found in the 35% EtOH extract (LJ) using an in vivo assay, The assay system uses monitoring of a decrease in blood flow (BF) in the tail vein of mice subjected to sensitization with hen-egg white lysozyme (HEL). Bioassay-guided fractionation of the 35% EtOH extract led to isolation of chlorogenic acid (1) and three known iridoid derivatives, loganin (2), secoxyloganin (3) and sweroside (4), all of which inhibited the BF decrease. This suggested that the flower buds of L. japonica and compounds isolated from them have allergy-preventive properties. The structure-activity relationship of iridoid derivatives, morroniside (5), geniposide (6), asperuloside (7), aucubin (8) and catalpol (9), were also tested using the same bioassay method. Compounds 2-5 and 9 having the sp(3) atom at C-8 showed an allergy-preventive effect, while compounds 6, 7 and 8 having a double bond at C-7, C-8 did not.

  17. Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx Flavonoids Fraction Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-jun Chu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx (Maxim. Hara, belonging to the Labiatae family, is widely used as an anti-inflammatory and antitumor drug for the treatment of different inflammations and cancers. Aim of the Study. To investigate therapeutic effects and possible mechanism of the flavonoids fraction of Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx (Maxim. Hara (RJFs in acute lung injury (ALI mice induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Materials and Methods. Mice were orally administrated with RJFs (6.4, 12.8, and 25.6 mg/kg per day for 7 days, consecutively, before LPS challenge. Lung specimens and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were isolated for histopathological examinations and biochemical analysis. The level of complement 3 (C3 in serum was quantified by a sandwich ELISA kit. Results. RJFs significantly attenuated LPS-induced ALI via reducing productions of the level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, and significantly reduced complement deposition with decreasing the level of C3 in serum, which was exhibited together with the lowered myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and nitric oxide (NO and protein concentration in BALF. Conclusions. RJFs significantly attenuate LPS-induced ALI via reducing productions of proinflammatory mediators, decreasing the level of complement, and reducing radicals.

  18. Metabolism of polychaete Neanthes japonica Izuka: relations to temperature, salinity and body weight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong; XIAN Weiwei; SUN Shichun

    2009-01-01

    Polychaete Neanthesjaponica is a species geographically specific in China and Japan with important scientific implication and commercial value. In this study, the relations of body weight, salinity and temperature to oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion of N. japonica were determined. Threedifferent groups in body weight (large: 2.34±0.36 g, middle: 1.50±0.21 g and small: 0.62±0.12 g) were set for all experiments. Results show that the body weight is negatively related to the rates of oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion; and the relationship is significant. The oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion at 24℃ decreased at salinity from 5 to 30 and increased above 30, indicating that both lower and higher salinity are adverse and certain degree of salinity stress is necessary for enhancing the energy demand. At salinity 30, rising temperature from 18℃ to 30℃, the oxygen consumption increased before 27℃ and then decreased. However, the relation of ammonia excretion and temperature seems more complex. Two-way ANOVA shows that salinity, temperature and body weight all have a significant effect on the oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion of the worm. Moreover, interaction between salinity/temperature and body weight is also significant. O:N (oxygen/nitrogen) ratio varies greatly in this case from 5.97 to 463.22, indicating that N. japonica can regulate the type of metabolic substrate against environment changes.

  19. [Research on ursolic acid production of Eriobotrya japonica cell suspension culture in WAVE bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-hua; Yao, De-heng; Xu, Jian; Wang, Wei; Chang, Qiang; Su, Ming-hua

    2015-05-01

    Through scale-up cultivation of Eriobotrya japonica suspension cells using WAVE bioreactor, the cell growth and ursolic acid (UA) accumulation were studied. The comparison test was carried out in the flask and the reactor with cell dry weight (DW) and UA content as evaluation indexes. The culture medium, DW and UA content were compared in 1 L and 5 L working volumes of bioreactor. The orthogonal test with main actors of inoculation amount, speed and angle of rotation was developed to find the optimal combination, in 1 L working volume of bioreactor. DW of the cell growth and the UA content in bioreactor were higher than those of the shaker by 105.5% and 27.65% respectively. In bioreactor, the dynamic changes of elements in the fluid culture, the dry weight of the cell growth and the UA content in 1 L and 5 L working volumes were similar. Inoculation of 80 g, rotational speed of 26 r · min(-1), and angle of 6 ° was the optimal combination, and the cell biomass of 19.01 g · L(-1) and the UA content of 27.750 mg · g(-1) were achieved after 100 h cultivation in 1 L working volume of bioreactor. WAVE Bioreactor is more suitable than flasks for the E. japonica cell suspension culture, and culture parameters can be achieved from 1 L to 5 L amplification.

  20. Indica-Japonica differentiation of rice cultivars viewed from variations in key characters and isozymes, with special reference to landraces from the Himalayan hilly areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, R; Morishima, H

    1992-07-01

    To assess the extent of differentiation into the Indica and Japonica types of Asian rice in its diversity center, we investigated landraces collected from the hilly areas of Nepal, Sikkim and Assam. We examined variations in four key characters and six isozyme loci known to be diagnostic for classifying Indica and Japonica types, and compared the results with those from a control set of rice cultivars representing the whole of Asia. The hill cultivars showed a high level of genetic diversity in key characters as well as in isozymes. A marked feature found in their character variation was the occurrence of various atypical cultivars that were intermediate between the Indica and Japonica types. With respect to isozymes, however, the hill cultivars could be classified mostly as either Indicas or Japonicas, although the patterns of allelic association were more random than in the control cultivars. Indica-Japonica variation in key characters and in isozymes corresponded well with each other in the controls, but not in the hill cultivars. This means that nonrandom association in characters as well as in genes (gametic disequilibrium) is not fully developed in the diversity center. Populations of hill cultivars were highly polymorphic genetically, but did not show a trend to Indica-Japonica differentiation within their populations. The process of Indica-Japonica differentiation is discussed in view of these observations.

  1. Surface-Water Quantity and Quality of the Upper Milwaukee River, Cedar Creek, and Root River Basins, Wisconsin, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David W.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission (SEWRPC), collected discharge and water-quality data at nine sites in previously monitored areas of the upper Milwaukee River, Cedar Creek, and Root River Basins, in Wisconsin from May 1 through November 15, 2004. The data were collected for calibration of hydrological models that will be used to simulate how various management strategies will affect the water quality of streams. The data also will support SEWRPC and Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) managers in development of the SEWRPC Regional Water Quality Management Plan and the MMSD 2020 Facilities Plan. These management plans will provide a scientific basis for future management decisions regarding development and maintenance of public and private waste-disposal systems. In May 2004, parts of the study area received over 13 inches of precipitation (3.06 inches is normal). In June 2004, most of the study area received between 7 and 11 inches of rainfall (3.56 inches is normal). This excessive rainfall caused flooding throughout the study area and resultant high discharges were measured at all nine monitoring sites. For example, the mean daily discharge recorded at the Cedar Creek site on May 27, 2004, was 2,120 cubic feet per second. This discharge ranked ninth of the largest 10 mean daily discharges in the 75-year record, and was the highest discharge recorded since March 30, 1960. Discharge records from continuous monitoring on the Root River Canal near Franklin since October 1, 1963, indicated that the discharge recorded on May 23, 2004, ranked second highest on record, and was the highest discharge recorded since March 4, 1974. Water-quality samples were taken during two base-flow events and six storm events at each of the nine sites. Analysis of water-quality data indicated that most concentrations of dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand, fecal coliform bacteria, chloride, suspended

  2. 桂东南低山区柳杉人工林生态系统碳储量分配特征%Study on Carbon Storage and Allocation of Cryptomeria fortunei Plantation in the Low Mountain of Southeast Guangxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋林; 林宁; 莫德祥; 卓宇

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The forest carbon sink of Cryptomeria fortunei Plantation in the low mountain of subtropical region was studied. [ Method] The carbon content .storage and accumulation pattern of 31-year-old C. Fortunei plantation were revealed in Liuwan Forestry Farm of Guangxi Province. [ Result] (1) The carbon content in different organs in tree layer ranged from 498.5 - 530.3 g/kg , and decreased in the order as leaf > dead wood branch > stem > major root > branch > fine root > bark > medium root > coarse root. The carbon density decreased drastically with the increase of soil deepness. (2 ) The total carbon storages of C. Fortunei plantation ecosystem was estimated as 393. 651 t /hm2, of the total storage of carbon was 29.22% accounted in vegetation layer, and accounted for 70.78% in soil layer. The annual carbon net fixation of plantation was estimated up to 3. 709 t/( hm2 · A) , and annual carbon net fixation in the tree layer was 3. 537 t/(hm2 · A). (3) The carbon storage in the 0-20 cm top soil layer was 132.418 t/hm2, being especially higher than that of vegetation layer. [ Condusion ] The conservation of vegetation and topsoil in the low mountain of southern subtropical region could be helpful to the longtime soil carbon stability.%[目的]对南亚热带低山区柳杉人工林碳汇进行研究.[方法]研究广西国营六万林场低山区的31年生柳杉人工林生态系统碳素含量、碳储量及其空间分配特征.[结果](1)柳杉人工林不同器官平均碳素含量变化在498.5 ~ 530.3 g/kg,其含量排列为:叶子>枯枝>树干>根蔸>枝条>细根>干皮>中根>粗根;碳素含量随土壤深度的增加而逐渐减少.(2)低山区柳杉人工林的生态系统碳储量为393.651 t/hm2,其中植被层碳储量占生态系统碳储量的29.22%,而0~100 cm土壤层占70.78%.31年生柳杉人工林年净固碳量估算为3.709 t/(hm2·a),其中乔木层的年净固碳量为3.537 t/(hm2·a).(3)0~20cm

  3. Variation along ITS markers across strains of Fibrocapsa japonica (Raphidophyceae) suggests hybridisation events and recent range expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, WHCF; de Boer, MK; Vrieling, EG; Connell, LB; Gieskes, WWC

    2001-01-01

    The flagellate micro-alga Fibrocapsa japonica can form harmful algal blooms:along all temperate coastal regions of the world. The species was first observed in coastal waters of Japan and the western US in the 1970s-, it has been reported regularly worldwide since. To unravel whether this apparent r

  4. Diaphorina citri Induces Huanglongbing-Infected Citrus Plant Volatiles to Repel and Reduce the Performance of Propylaea japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yongwen; Lin, Sheng; Akutse, Komivi S.; Hussain, Mubasher; Wang, Liande

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of plant pathogens through insect vectors is a complex biological process involving interactions between the host plants, insects, and pathogens. Simultaneous impact of the insect damage and pathogenic bacteria in infected host plants induce volatiles that modify not only the behavior of its insect vector but also of their natural enemies, such as parasitoid wasps. Therefore, it is essential to understand how insects such as the predator ladybird beetle responds to volatiles emitted from a host plant and how the disease transmission alters the interactions between predators, vector, pathogens, and plants. In this study, we investigated the response of Propylaea japonica to volatiles from citrus plants damaged by Diaphorina citri and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus through olfactometer bioassays. Synthetic chemical blends were also used to determine the active compounds in the plant volatile. The results showed that volatiles emitted by healthy plants attracted more P. japonica than other treatments, due to the presence of high quantities of D-limonene and beta-ocimene, and the lack of methyl salicylate. When using synthetic chemicals in the olfactory tests, we found that D-limonene attracted P. japonica while methyl salicylate repelled the predator. However, beta-ocimene attracted the insects at lower concentrations but repelled them at higher concentrations. These results indicate that P. japonica could not efficiently search for its host by using volatile cues emitted from psyllids- and Las bacteria-infected citrus plants. PMID:28083006

  5. Effect of photoperiod on body weight gain, and daily energy intake and energy expenditure in Japanese quail (Coturnix c. Japonica)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, P; Visser, GH; Daan, S

    2000-01-01

    Effect of photoperiod and food duration on body weight gain, energy intake, energy expenditure, and sexual development were investigated in two strains of Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica), bred for meat (broilers) or egg production (layers), from 7 to 71 days of age. In a first experiment

  6. Molecular basis underlying the S5-dependent reproductive isolation and compatibility of indica/japonica rice hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qing; Zhang, Meijing; Lu, Jufei; Wang, Hongmei; Lin, Bing; Liu, Qiaoquan; Chao, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Chunxia; Gu, Minghong; Xu, Mingliang

    2012-03-01

    The S5 locus regulates spikelet fertility of indica/japonica hybrid rice (Oryza sativa). There are three alleles at the S5 locus, including an indica allele (S5i), a japonica allele (S5j), and a wide-compatibility allele (S5n). This study analyzed the molecular basis for S5-dependent reproductive isolation and compatibility of indica/japonica rice hybrids. Three S5 alleles were expressed at extremely low levels, and only in the ovary. S5n was more similar to S5i in both RNA and protein expression profiles. The S5 locus was not essential for embryo sac development, although deleterious interactions between S5i and S5j resulted in reduced rates of spikelet fertility. The yeast two-hybrid system was used to test direct interactions between S5-encoded proteins. The results indicated that the S5i- and S5j-encoded eukaryotic aspartyl proteases formed both homodimers and heterodimers, whereas the S5n-encoded aspartyl protease was incapable of dimerization. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that a single amino acid difference between S5i- and S5j-encoded aspartyl proteases (phenylalanine/leucine at residue 273) was primarily responsible for embryo sac abortion. The S5 locus may have promoted the subspeciation of indica and japonica, but it also enables gene flow between them.

  7. Diaphorina citri Induces Huanglongbing-Infected Citrus Plant Volatiles to Repel and Reduce the Performance of Propylaea japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yongwen; Lin, Sheng; Akutse, Komivi S; Hussain, Mubasher; Wang, Liande

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of plant pathogens through insect vectors is a complex biological process involving interactions between the host plants, insects, and pathogens. Simultaneous impact of the insect damage and pathogenic bacteria in infected host plants induce volatiles that modify not only the behavior of its insect vector but also of their natural enemies, such as parasitoid wasps. Therefore, it is essential to understand how insects such as the predator ladybird beetle responds to volatiles emitted from a host plant and how the disease transmission alters the interactions between predators, vector, pathogens, and plants. In this study, we investigated the response of Propylaea japonica to volatiles from citrus plants damaged by Diaphorina citri and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus through olfactometer bioassays. Synthetic chemical blends were also used to determine the active compounds in the plant volatile. The results showed that volatiles emitted by healthy plants attracted more P. japonica than other treatments, due to the presence of high quantities of D-limonene and beta-ocimene, and the lack of methyl salicylate. When using synthetic chemicals in the olfactory tests, we found that D-limonene attracted P. japonica while methyl salicylate repelled the predator. However, beta-ocimene attracted the insects at lower concentrations but repelled them at higher concentrations. These results indicate that P. japonica could not efficiently search for its host by using volatile cues emitted from psyllids- and Las bacteria-infected citrus plants.

  8. Identification of SNPs in closely-related temperate japonica rice cultivars using restriction enzyme-phased sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Very low polymorphism in the germplasm typically used by breeding programs poses a significant bottleneck with regarding to molecular breeding and the exploitation of breeding materials for quantitative trait analyses. California rice varieties, derived from a very small base of temperate japonica g...

  9. Spatial genetic structure of Salvia japonica Thunb. population (Labiatae in Botanical Garden of Osaka City University, Kisaichi, Osaka Prefecture, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUDARMONO

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvia japonica Thunb. (Japan: Aki-no-Tamurasou was a perennial herb, protandry insect-pollinated, and self-incompatible with water-flow dispersed seed. We used allozyme loci to know genetic structure of a S. japonica population. We examined spatial autocorrelation of individuals within five distance class with Moran`s I statistics. The area of observation was in plot 5x5 m2 in Botanical Garden of Osaka City University, Kisaichi, Katano, Osaka Prefecture. The 8 loci examined were polymorphic, namely Aat-1, Aat-2, Pgi, Mnr, Pgm-1, Pgm-2, Idh, and 6-Pgd. Low levels of genetic diversity were found for 29 individuals. Ninety-two percent cases for all of distance class were similar and only 8% (8 of 105 cases were significant differences. This result indicated that the spatial genetic distributions in all of distance classes were all similar and no spatial autocorrelation of genotypes. Only in distance class 2 had one significantly positive cases (0.15 in Pgm-1c, indicating that spatial genetic structure in the study population was weak at most. In the other word that spatial pattern of the individuals within S. japonica population was random. Overall of the result was indicating that genotype among individuals of S. japonica changed distantly and tended to isolation in distance by seed dispersed.

  10. Sympatric spawning but allopatric distribution of Anguilla japonica and Anguilla marmorata: temperature- and oceanic current-dependent sieving.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-San Han

    Full Text Available Anguilla japonica and Anguilla marmorata share overlapping spawning sites, similar drifting routes, and comparable larval durations. However, they exhibit allopatric geographical distributions in East Asia. To clarify this ecological discrepancy, glass eels from estuaries in Taiwan, the Philippines, Indonesia, and China were collected monthly, and the survival rate of A. marmorata under varying water salinities and temperatures was examined. The composition ratio of these 2 eel species showed a significant latitude cline, matching the 24 °C sea surface temperature isotherm in winter. Both species had opposing temperature preferences for recruitment. A. marmorata prefer high water temperatures and die at low water temperatures. In contrast, A. japonica can endure low water temperatures, but their recruitment is inhibited by high water temperatures. Thus, A. japonica glass eels, which mainly spawn in summer, are preferably recruited to Taiwan, China, Korea, and Japan by the Kuroshio and its branch waters in winter. Meanwhile, A. marmorata glass eels, which spawn throughout the year, are mostly screened out in East Asia in areas with low-temperature coastal waters in winter. During summer, the strong northward currents from the South China Sea and Changjiang River discharge markedly block the Kuroshio invasion and thus restrict the approach of A. marmorata glass eels to the coasts of China and Korea. The differences in the preferences of the recruitment temperature for glass eels combined with the availability of oceanic currents shape the real geographic distribution of Anguilla japonica and Anguilla marmorata, making them "temperate" and "tropical" eels, respectively.

  11. Development and validation of a habitat suitability model for the non-indigenous seagrass Zostera japonica in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed a spatially-explicit, flexible 3-parameter habitat suitability model that can be used to identify and predict areas at higher risk for non-native dwarf eelgrass (Zostera japonica) invasion. The model uses simple environmental parameters (depth, nearshore slope, and s...

  12. Identity and specificity of Rhizoctonia-like fungi from different populations of Liparis japonica (Orchidaceae in Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Ding

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal association is known to be important to orchid species, and a complete understanding of the fungi that form mycorrhizas is required for orchid ecology and conservation. Liparis japonica (Orchidaceae is a widespread terrestrial photosynthetic orchid in Northeast China. Previously, we found the genetic diversity of this species has been reduced recent years due to habitat destruction and fragmentation, but little was known about the relationship between this orchid species and the mycorrhizal fungi. The Rhizoctonia-like fungi are the commonly accepted mycorrhizal fungi associated with orchids. In this study, the distribution, diversity and specificity of culturable Rhizoctonia-like fungi associated with L. japonica species were investigated from seven populations in Northeast China. Among the 201 endophytic fungal isolates obtained, 86 Rhizoctonia-like fungi were identified based on morphological characters and molecular methods, and the ITS sequences and phylogenetic analysis revealed that all these Rhizoctonia-like fungi fell in the same main clade and were closely related to those of Tulasnella calospora species group. These findings indicated the high mycorrhizal specificity existed in L. japonica species regardless of habitats at least in Northeast China. Our results also supported the wide distribution of this fungal partner, and implied that the decline of L. japonica in Northeast China did not result from high mycorrhizal specificity. Using culture-dependent technology, these mycorrhizal fungal isolates might be important sources for the further utilizing in orchids conservation.

  13. Influence of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 intake on faecal microbiota in individuals with Japanese cedar pollinosis during the pollen season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odamaki, Toshitaka; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Noritoshi; Kondo, Shizuki; Miyaji, Kazuhiro; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Togashi, Hideo; Enomoto, Tadao; Benno, Yoshimi

    2007-10-01

    It has been reported that intake of yogurt or powder supplemented with the Bifidobacterium longum BB536 probiotic strain alleviated subjective symptoms and affected blood markers of allergy in individuals with Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCPsis) during the pollen seasons of 2004 and 2005, based on randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Furthermore, the 2004 study found that intestinal bacteria such as the Bacteroides fragilis group significantly fluctuated during the pollen season in JCPsis individuals and intake of BB536 yogurt tended to suppress these fluctuations. The present study investigated faecal microbiota to examine whether any changes occurred during the pollen season and whether any influence was exerted by intake of BB536 powder in the 2005 pollen season, which happened to be a heavy season, to confirm the 2004 findings and to evaluate the relationship of microbiota with symptom development. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 44 JCPsis subjects received BB536 or a placebo for 13 weeks during the pollen season. Another 14 Japanese cedar pollen (JCP)-specific IgE negative healthy subjects received placebo for the same period. Faecal samples were collected before (week 0), during (weeks 4, 8 and 13) and after (week 17) intervention, and out of JCP season (week 28). Faecal microbiota were analysed using terminal-RFLP (T-RFLP) and real-time PCR methods. Principal component analysis based on T-RFLP indicated distinct patterns of microbiota between healthy subjects and JCPsis subjects in the placebo group, but an intermediate pattern in the BB536 group at week 13, the last stage of the pollen season. The coordinate of principal component 1 at week 13 correlated with composite scores of JCPsis symptoms recorded during the pollen season. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and the Bacteroides fragilis group were identified as the main contributors to microbiotal fluctuations. Real-time PCR indicated that BB536 intake suppressed

  14. Simulation of daily streamflows at gaged and ungaged locations within the Cedar River Basin, Iowa, using a Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, conducted a study to examine techniques for estimation of daily streamflows using hydrological models and statistical methods. This report focuses on the use of a hydrologic model, the U.S. Geological Survey's Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System, to estimate daily streamflows at gaged and ungaged locations. The Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System is a modular, physically based, distributed-parameter modeling system developed to evaluate the impacts of various combinations of precipitation, climate, and land use on surface-water runoff and general basin hydrology. The Cedar River Basin was selected to construct a Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model that simulates the period from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2010. The calibration period was from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2004, and the validation periods were from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2010 and January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010. A Geographic Information System tool was used to delineate the Cedar River Basin and subbasins for the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model and to derive parameters based on the physical geographical features. Calibration of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model was completed using a U.S. Geological Survey calibration software tool. The main objective of the calibration was to match the daily streamflow simulated by the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model with streamflow measured at U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gages. The Cedar River Basin daily streamflow model performed with a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency ranged from 0.82 to 0.33 during the calibration period, and a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency ranged from 0.77 to -0.04 during the validation period. The Cedar River Basin model is meeting the criteria of greater than 0.50 Nash-Sutcliffe and is a good fit for streamflow conditions for the calibration period at all but one location, Austin, Minnesota

  15. Higher fine-scale genetic structure in peripheral than in core populations of a long-lived and mixed-mating conifer - eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Madhav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fine-scale or spatial genetic structure (SGS is one of the key genetic characteristics of plant populations. Several evolutionary and ecological processes and population characteristics influence the level of SGS within plant populations. Higher fine-scale genetic structure may be expected in peripheral than core populations of long-lived forest trees, owing to the differences in the magnitude of operating evolutionary and ecological forces such as gene flow, genetic drift, effective population size and founder effects. We addressed this question using eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis as a model species for declining to endangered long-lived tree species with mixed-mating system. Results We determined the SGS in two core and two peripheral populations of eastern white cedar from its Maritime Canadian eastern range using six nuclear microsatellite DNA markers. Significant SGS ranging from 15 m to 75 m distance classes was observed in the four studied populations. An analysis of combined four populations revealed significant positive SGS up to the 45 m distance class. The mean positive significant SGS observed in the peripheral populations was up to six times (up to 90 m of that observed in the core populations (15 m. Spatial autocorrelation coefficients and correlograms of single and sub-sets of populations were statistically significant. The extent of within-population SGS was significantly negatively correlated with all genetic diversity parameters. Significant heterogeneity of within-population SGS was observed for 0-15 m and 61-90 m between core and peripheral populations. Average Sp, and gene flow distances were higher in peripheral (Sp = 0.023, σg = 135 m than in core (Sp = 0.014, σg = 109 m populations. However, the mean neighborhood size was higher in the core (Nb = 82 than in the peripheral (Nb = 48 populations. Conclusion Eastern white cedar populations have significant fine-scale genetic structure at short

  16. Morfo-anatomia das folhas da nespereira Eriobotrya japonica Lindl., Rosaceae Leaf morpho-anatomy of loquat Eriobotrya japonica Lindl., Rosaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. de Souza

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Eriobotrya japonica, Rosaceae, é uma espécie conhecida popularmente como nespereira, cujas folhas são empregadas na medicina tradicional como agente hipoglicemiante e no tratamento de doenças da pele. O presente trabalho objetivou caracterizar morfo-anatomicamente as folhas, a fim de fornecer subsídios farmacognósticos ao controle de qualidade da droga vegetal e taxonômicos à família. O material botânico foi fixado e submetido às técnicas usuais de microscopia ótica e eletrônica de varredura. As folhas são simples, alternas, lanceoladas, de limbo inteiro e margem denteada. A epiderme foliar é uniestratificada e revestida por cutícula espessada e levemente estriada. Tricomas tectores unicelulares longos são encontrados em ambas as faces, sendo numerosos na abaxial. A folha é hipoestomática, revelando estômatos anomocíticos. O mesofilo é dorsiventral e os feixes vasculares de pequeno porte são colaterais e podem apresentar extensão de bainha. A nervura principal possui formato biconvexo e o pecíolo circular, sendo ambos percorridos por feixes vasculares anficrivais. Foram observados idioblastos contendo cristais de oxalato de cálcio, mucilagem e compostos fenólicos.The leaves of Eriobotrya japonica , Rosaceae, popularly known as loquat, are used in folk medicine for their hypoglycemic properties and to treat cutaneous diseases. The aim of this work was to study the leaf morpho-anatomy of the drug for pharmacognostic and taxonomic purposes. The botanical material was prepared for the usual optical and scanning microtechniques. The leaves are simple, alternate and lanceolate, with entire blade and dentate margins. The epidermis is uniseriate and coated by a thick and slightly striated cuticle. Both surfaces are hairy, particularly the lower, with long unicellular non-glandular trichomes. Anomocytic stomata occur exclusively on the lower surface. The mesophyll is dorsiventral and the small bundles are collateral and may

  17. Characterization of pollen dispersion in the neighborhood of Tokyo, Japan in the spring of 2005 and 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yoshinaga; Ohno, Hideki; Oh-ishi, Shuji; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Kizaki, Takako; Yoshizumi, Kunio

    2008-03-01

    The behavior of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) pollens in an urban area was examined through the measurements of the dispersion characteristics at the various sampling locations in both outdoor and indoor environments. Airborne pollens were counted continuously for three months during the Japanese cedar pollen and Japanese cypress seasons in 2005 and 2006 by the use of Durham's pollen trap method in and around Tokyo, Japan. The dispersion of pollens at the rooftop of Kyoritsu Women's University was observed to be at extremely high levels in 2005 compared with previously reported results during the past two decades. As for Japanese cedar pollen, the maximum level was observed as 440 counts cm(-2) day(-1) on 18 March 2005. Japanese cypress pollen dispersed in that area in the latter period was compared with the Japanese cedar pollen dispersions. The maximum dispersion level was observed to be 351 counts cm(-2) day(-1) on 7 April 2005. Total accumulated dispersions of Japanese cedar and Japanese cypress pollens were 5,552 and 1,552 counts cm(-2) for the three months (Feb., Mar. and Apr.) in 2005, respectively. However, the dispersion of both pollens in 2006 was very low. The total accumulated dispersions of Japanese cedar and Japanese cypress pollens were 421 and 98 counts cm(-2) for three months (Feb., Mar. and Apr.) in 2006, respectively. Moreover, the pollen deposition on a walking person in an urban area showed that the pollen counts on feet were observed to be extremely high compared with the ones on the shoulder, back and legs. These findings suggested that pollen fell on the surface of the paved road at first, rebounded to the ambient air and was deposited on the residents again. Furthermore, the regional distribution of the total pollen dispersion in the South Kanto area was characterized on 15-16 March 2005 and on 14-15 March 2006. Although the pollen levels in 2005 were much higher than in 2006, it was

  18. De novo Transcriptome Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani AG1 IA Strain Early Invasion in Zoysia japonica Root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Ai, Lin; Wang, Li; Yin, Pingping; Liu, Chenglan; Li, Shanshan; Zeng, Huiming

    2016-01-01

    Zoysia japonica brown spot was caused by necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia solani invasion, which led to severe financial loss in city lawn and golf ground maintenance. However, little was known about the molecular mechanism of R. solani pathogenicity in Z. japonica. In this study we examined early stage interaction between R. solani AG1 IA strain and Z. japonica cultivar "Zenith" root by cell ultra-structure analysis, pathogenesis-related proteins assay and transcriptome analysis to explore molecular clues for AG1 IA strain pathogenicity in Z. japonica. No obvious cell structure damage was found in infected roots and most pathogenesis-related protein activities showedg a downward trend especially in 36 h post inoculation, which exhibits AG1 IA strain stealthy invasion characteristic. According to Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database classification, most DEGs in infected "Zenith" roots dynamically changed especially in three aspects, signal transduction, gene translation, and protein synthesis. Total 3422 unigenes of "Zenith" root were predicted into 14 kinds of resistance (R) gene class. Potential fungal resistance related unigenes of "Zenith" root were involved in ligin biosynthesis, phytoalexin synthesis, oxidative burst, wax biosynthesis, while two down-regulated unigenes encoding leucine-rich repeat receptor protein kinase and subtilisin-like protease might be important for host-derived signal perception to AG1 IA strain invasion. According to Pathogen Host Interaction (PHI) database annotation, 1508 unigenes of AG1 IA strain were predicted and classified into 37 known pathogen species, in addition, unigenes encoding virulence, signaling, host stress tolerance, and potential effector were also predicted. This research uncovered transcriptional profiling during the early phase interaction between R. solani AG1 IA strain and Z. japonica, and will greatly help identify key pathogenicity of AG1 IA strain.

  19. De novo Transcriptome Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani AG1 IA Strain Early Invasion in Zoysia japonica Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Ai, Lin; Wang, Li; Yin, Pingping; Liu, Chenglan; Li, Shanshan; Zeng, Huiming

    2016-01-01

    Zoysia japonica brown spot was caused by necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia solani invasion, which led to severe financial loss in city lawn and golf ground maintenance. However, little was known about the molecular mechanism of R. solani pathogenicity in Z. japonica. In this study we examined early stage interaction between R. solani AG1 IA strain and Z. japonica cultivar “Zenith” root by cell ultra-structure analysis, pathogenesis-related proteins assay and transcriptome analysis to explore molecular clues for AG1 IA strain pathogenicity in Z. japonica. No obvious cell structure damage was found in infected roots and most pathogenesis-related protein activities showedg a downward trend especially in 36 h post inoculation, which exhibits AG1 IA strain stealthy invasion characteristic. According to Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database classification, most DEGs in infected “Zenith” roots dynamically changed especially in three aspects, signal transduction, gene translation, and protein synthesis. Total 3422 unigenes of “Zenith” root were predicted into 14 kinds of resistance (R) gene class. Potential fungal resistance related unigenes of “Zenith” root were involved in ligin biosynthesis, phytoalexin synthesis, oxidative burst, wax biosynthesis, while two down-regulated unigenes encoding leucine-rich repeat receptor protein kinase and subtilisin-like protease might be important for host-derived signal perception to AG1 IA strain invasion. According to Pathogen Host Interaction (PHI) database annotation, 1508 unigenes of AG1 IA strain were predicted and classified into 37 known pathogen species, in addition, unigenes encoding virulence, signaling, host stress tolerance, and potential effector were also predicted. This research uncovered transcriptional profiling during the early phase interaction between R. solani AG1 IA strain and Z. japonica, and will greatly help identify key pathogenicity of AG1 IA strain

  20. Effect of pollen exposure on serum IgE and IgG antibody responses in Japanese cedar pollinosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Imaoka

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the IgE and IgG antibody responses in Japanese cedar pollinosis patients before and after the pollination season for 2 years. The sera from 90 patients in 1990 and 87 in 1991, living in five regions in the Tokyo area, were obtained before and after the pollination season. In all patients, changes (increase then decrease in specific IgE levels were detected after natural pollen exposure. Total IgE and specific IgG concentrations also changed. However, the degree of change in specific IgE was greater than those in total IgE and specific IgG. Then, the geometric means of specific and total IgE levels were compared among the five regions. These levels were found to be highest in the region where the pollen count was the highest. These findings suggest that IgE antibody production is more stimulated after natural pollen exposure compared to IgG antibody production, and is dependent on the amount of allergens.

  1. The non-pathogenic Henipavirus Cedar paramyxovirus phosphoprotein has a compromised ability to target STAT1 and STAT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Kim G; Marsh, Glenn A; Wang, Lin-Fa; Netter, Hans J

    2015-12-01

    Immune evasion by the lethal henipaviruses, Hendra (HeV) and Nipah virus, is mediated by its interferon (IFN) antagonist P gene products, phosphoprotein (P), and the related V and W proteins, which can target the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 proteins to inhibit IFN/STAT signaling. However, it is not clear if the recently identified non-pathogenic Henipavirus, Cedar paramyxovirus (CedPV), is also able to antagonize the STAT proteins. We performed comparative studies between the HeV P gene products (P/V/W) and CedPV-P (CedPV does not encode V or W) and demonstrate that differences exist in their ability to engage the STAT proteins using immunoprecipitation and quantitative confocal microscopic analysis. In contrast to HeV-P gene encoded proteins, the ability of CedPV-P to interact with and relocalize STAT1 or STAT2 is compromised, correlating with a reduced capacity to inhibit the mRNA synthesis of IFN-inducible gene MxA. Furthermore, infection studies with HeV and CedPV demonstrate that HeV is more potent than CedPV in inhibiting the IFN-α-mediated nuclear accumulation of STAT1. These results strongly suggest that the ability of CedPV to counteract the IFN/STAT response is compromised compared to HeV.

  2. EVALUATION OF COLOR OF THE JUVENILE AND MATURE CEDAR WOOD BY MEANS OF CIEL*a*b* METHOD

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    Rafael de Avila Delucis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to characterize the radial profile of cedar wood (Cedrela fissilis by the colorimetric technique. Three different trees of approximately 100 years old were selected in Canguçu, Rio Grande do Sul. From each felled tree, discs were removed at breast height (1,3 m with a thickness of 20 cm and subsequently samples were segmented in centimeter lengths from pith to bark. The samples were conditioned at equilibrium moisture content of 12%, to carry out the colour evaluation with a portable colorimeter Konica Minolta brand in accordance with the CIEL*a*b* method. To determine the segregation of juvenile and mature woods position was employed the apparent specific gravity to 12% (ρa12% as a parameter. With colorimetric analysis, it was found that the lightness, the green-red coordinate and hue angle presented intimate relation with the transition from juvenile and adult logs. Has a result of blueyellow coordinate and chromaticity showed approximately a linear trend in pith-bark direction.

  3. Effects of drought preconditioning on thermotolerance of photosystem II and susceptibility of photosynthesis to heat stress in cedar seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladjal, Mehdi; Epron, Daniel; Ducrey, Michel

    2000-12-01

    Changes in photosystem II (PSII) thermotolerance during drought and recovery were studied under controlled conditions in three Mediterranean cedar species (Cedrus brevifolia Henry, C. libani Loudon and C. atlantica Manetti). The temperature at which the quantum yield of PSII photochemistry was reduced by 15% of its value at 25 degrees C was 3 to 4 degrees C higher in drought-treated plants than in well-watered plants. The drought-induced increase in PSII thermotolerance was already evident 8 days after water had been withheld from the seedlings, when net CO(2) assimilation was still at 80% of its initial value, and was visible for up to 12 days after re-watering. When seedlings of the three species were exposed to temperatures above 45 degrees C for 5 h, both maximal quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and net CO(2) assimilation rate were significantly reduced in unconditioned seedlings, whereas drought-preconditioned seedlings were almost unaffected by the heat treatment. Drought-preconditioned seedlings still exhibited a higher tolerance to heat stress than unconditioned seedlings 60 days after re-watering, although the transient, drought-induced osmotic adjustment had fully disappeared. Among species, C. atlantica was the most heat sensitive, whereas the heat treatment had no significant effect on the parameters measured in C. brevifolia.

  4. Phylogeography of North African Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica, Pinaceae): Combined molecular and fossil data reveal a complex Quaternary history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrab, Anass; Hampe, Arndt; Lepais, Olivier; Talavera, Salvador; Vela, Errol; Stuessy, Tod F

    2008-10-01

    Northwest Africa is a major hotspot of plant biodiversity, but very little is known about the Quaternary range dynamics of plant species in this region. Here we investigate the range-wide population structure and phylogeography of Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica), an emblematic forest tree endemic to Morocco and Algeria. We genotyped 261 individuals from 11 populations using AFLP markers. Data were analyzed using both conventional F(ST)-based techniques and Bayesian clustering. Overall population differentiation was high (F(ST) = 0.25). Two major groups of populations were identified, one distributed through the Rif and Middle Atlas mountains in Morocco and the other through the Algerian Tell Atlas and Aurès mountains as well as the Middle Atlas. Combined molecular and fossil data indicate that C. atlantica survived the Last Glacial Maximum in at least three disjunct refugia along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, whereas the Middle Atlas, today the core of the species range, has been colonized relatively recently (<10000 yr BP). The colonization history of individual populations has left clear imprints in their present-day diversity, which may vary greatly even between nearby stands. Our study illustrates how integrating different data sources and analytical approaches can help elucidate complex range dynamics that would otherwise remain undeciphered.

  5. AVO analysis and modeling applied to fracture detection in coalbed methane reservoirs, Cedar Hill Field, San Juan basin, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, A.C.B. [Petrobras, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Davis, T.L.; Anderson, J.E.; Benson, R.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Cedar Hill Field in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, produces methane from fractured coalbed of the Fruitland Formation. The presence of fracturing is critical to methane production due to the absence of matrix permeability in the coals. To help characterize this coalbed reservoir a three-dimensional, multicomponent seismic survey was acquired in this field. Prestack P-wave amplitude data are used to delineate zones of larger Poisson`s ratio contrasts (or higher crack densities) in coalbed methane reservoir, while source-receiver azimuth sorting is used to detect preferential directions of azimuthal anisotropy. Two modeling techniques (using ray tracing and reflectivity methods) predict the effects of fractured coal-seam zones on non-normal P-wave reflectivity. Synthetic CMP gathers are generated for a horizontally layered earth model, which uses elastic parameters derived from sonic and density log measurements. Fracture density variations in the coalbeds are simulated by anisotropic modeling. The large acoustic impedance contrasts associated with the sandstone/coal interfaces dominate the P-wave reflectivity response. They far outweigh the effects of contrasts in anisotropy parameters, for the computed models. Seismic AVO analysis of nine macrobins obtained from the 3-D volume confirms model predictions. Areas with large AVO productions identify coal zones with large Poisson`s ratio contrast, therefore high fracture density.

  6. Chemical Constituents of Sophora japonica Leaves%槐叶化学成分研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁义平; 束晓云; 唐于平

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To study the chemical constituents in the leaves of Sophora japonica. Method:The constituents were isolated by column chromatography and their structures were elucidated by physico-chemical properties and spectroscopic analysis. Result: Fifteen compounds were isolated and identified as quercetin ( 1 ),kaempferol (2) , isorhamnetin (3), genistein ( 4 ) , prunetin (5) , daidzein ( 6 ), calycosin (7), pyrocatechol (8) , protocatechuric acid (9), eicosyl behenate (10) , eicosanol ( 11 ), behenic acid (12) ,β-sitosterol (13) ,stigmasterol ( 14 ) and daucosterol ( 15 ). Conclusion: All of the constituents are obtained in the leaves of S. japonica; among them, compounds 7-10, 12 and 14 are reported in this species for the first time. The results are helpful for the comprehensive utilization of pagoda tree resources.%目的:研究槐Sophora japonica L.叶的化学成分.方法:采用有机溶剂提取,反复硅胶柱色谱和重结晶法进行分离纯化,根据化合物的理化性质和波谱数据鉴定其结构.结果:从槐叶二氯甲烷萃取部分共分离得到了3个黄酮醇,4个异黄酮以及8个其他类成分,分别鉴定为槲皮素(quercetin,1),山柰酚(kaempferol,2),异鼠李素(isorhamnetin,3),染料木素(genistein,4),樱黄素(prunetin,5),大豆黄素(daidzein,6),毛蕊异黄酮(calycosin,7),儿茶酚(pyrocatechol,8),原儿茶酸(protocatechuric acid,9),二十二烷酸二十烷酯(eicosyl behenate,10),二十醇(eicosanol,11),二十二烷酸(behenic acid,12),β-谷甾醇(β-sitosterol,13),豆甾醇(stigmasterol,14)和胡萝卜苷(daucosterol,15).结论:这些化合物均为首次从槐叶中分离得到,其中化合物7~10,12,14为首次从该种植物中分得,这些研究为槐叶及槐资源的综合利用提供了基础.

  7. Vertical Distribution of Termites on Trees in Two Forest Landscapes in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hou-Feng; Yeh, Hsin-Ting; Chiu, Chun-I; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2016-03-25

    Termites are a key functional group in the forest ecosystem, but they damage trees. To investigate the termite infestation pattern on the whole tree, we cut 108 blackboard trees,Alstonia scholaris(L.) R. Br., and 50 Japanese cedars,Cryptomeria japonica (L. f.) D. Don, into sections. The bark surface and cross sections of the tree trunk were examined along the axes. A high percentage of blackboard trees (92.6%) was infested by fungus-growing termites,Odontotermes formosanus(Shiraki), but damage was limited to the bark surface at a 2-m height. The infestation rate of dampwood termites,Neotermes koshunensis(Shiraki), was only 4.6% (5/108), and all infestations were associated with trunk wounds.N. koshunensiswas found at significantly higher portion of a tree thanO. formosanus Among 50 Japanese cedars, 20 living trees were not infested by any termites, but 26 of the 30 dead trees were infested by subterranean termites,Reticulitermes flaviceps(Oshima), which excavated tunnels in the trunk. The infestation rate at basal sections was higher than that at distal sections. Only one Japanese cedar tree was infested by another dampwood termite,Glyptotermes satsumensis(Matsumura). The two dominant termite species,O. formosanusandR. flaviceps, had subterranean nests and infested trees from bottom up. The two primitive termitesN. koshunensis andG. satsumensishad low infestation rates and are most likely to infest trees by alates from top down. The niche segregation in trees of three termite families, Kalotermitidae, Rhinotermitidae, and Termitidae, was distinct.

  8. Dry deposition of acidic air pollutants to tree leaves, determined by a modified leaf-washing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mirai; Takamatsu, Takejiro; Koshikawa, Masami K.; Yamamura, Shigeki; Inubushi, Kazuyuki

    Dry deposition fluxes ( FL) of NO 3- and SO 42- to leaf surfaces were measured for Japanese red pine ( Pinus densiflora), Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria japonica), Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa), and Japanese white oak ( Quercus myrsinaefolia), together with atmospheric concentrations ( CL) of NO x (NO + NO 2), T-NO 3 (gaseous HNO 3 + particulate NO 3-) and SO x (gaseous SO 2 + particulate SO 42-) around the leaves in a suburban area of Japan, using a modified leaf-washing technique. FL of NO 3- and SO 42- decreased as follows: pine >> cedar > cypress ≥ oak and pine >> cedar > oak ≥ cypress, respectively. FL of NO 3- for all tree species fluctuated synchronously with CL of T-NO 3. FL of SO 42- fluctuated with CL of SO x, but the dominant pollutant deposited (SO 2 or SO 42-) appeared to differ for different tree species. Dry deposition conductance ( KL) of T-NO 3 and SO x was derived as an FL/ CL ratio. Seasonal variations of KL likely reflect the gas/particle ratios of T-NO 3 and SO x, which were affected by meteorological conditions such as temperature. Dry deposition velocities ( Vd) of T-NO 3 and SO x were obtained as the mathematical product of annual mean KL and the total leaf surface areas in the forests. The comparison of Vd among tree species indicated that the loads of acidic air pollutants were higher to coniferous forests than broad-leaved forest because of the higher KL and/or larger leaf surface areas.

  9. Chaenomeles japonica, Cornus mas, Morus nigra fruits characteristics and their processing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarko, Tomasz; Duda-Chodak, Aleksandra; Satora, Paweł; Sroka, Paweł; Pogoń, Piotr; Machalica, Justyna

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the suitability of Japanese quince (Chaenomeles japonica), cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) and black mulberry (Morus nigra) fruits as raw materials for processing. All analyzed fruits were characterized by high antioxidant activity and total phenolic content. Fruits of Japanese quince and cornelian cherry had also high acidity. Products such as fruit wines and liquors were prepared from the tested fruits. In respect of soluble solid content and reducing sugars content the obtained wine should be classified as dry wines. All analyzed liquors were characterized by similar alcohol content and the soluble solid content. Moreover, liquors made from Japanese quince and cornelian cherry were characterized by high total acidity and antioxidant capacity. The results of sensory analysis showed high commercial potential of the examined fruits.

  10. Resistance Evaluation of Some Hybrid Rice, Conventional Early Indica and Late Japonica Rice to Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ying; Adreit Henry; ZHU Xu-dong; Milazzo Joelle; CHEN Hong-qi; Tharreau Didier

    2003-01-01

    Thirty isolates of Magnaporthe grisea collected from 18 provinces/cities representing 21 pathotypes and 9 different lineages were inoculated to rice varieties with known resistance genes and some hybrid rices,conventional early indica and late japonica varieties cultivated recently in China.Virulence spectrum of the 30 isolates was very different,showing that they recognize numerous different resistance genes.Varieties also revealed very different resistance patterns showing that they carry different resistance genes or combinations of resistance genes.On the basis of comparisons with international differential varieties with known resistance genes,resistance genes in certain Chinese varieties could be speculated.The results indicated that some of them were resistant to most of the isolates tested and that they could be of interest as resistance sources for hybrid parents or to be planted in the field directly.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of a Fucoidan-Degrading Bacterium from Laminaria japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; LI Bafang; ZHAO Xue; PIAO Meizi

    2014-01-01

    Fucoidan, a polysaccharide containing abundant fucose and sulfate ester group, was prepared from Laminaria japonica. In order to obtain fucoidan-degrading enzyme, bacteria capable of degrading fucoidan were screened from kelp. A bacterial strain named RC2-3 was obtained, which degraded fucoidan by the maximum extent of 54%± 1.3%, the highest among all bacterial isolates. High-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) showed that the molecular weight of fucoidan was gradually reduced by RC2-3 with culturing time, suggesting the production of fucoidan-degrading enzyme by RC2-3. Phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rDNA) sequence showed that RC2-3 belonged to the family Flavobacteriaceae. However, it showed dif-ferent physiological and biochemical characteristics from the known Flavobacteriaceae members producing fucoidan-degrading enzyme, thus RC2-3 was proposed to be a new member of this family.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a fucoidan-degrading bacterium from Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Li, Bafang; Zhao, Xue; Piao, Meizi

    2013-11-01

    Fucoidan, a polysaccharide containing abundant fucose and sulfate ester group, was prepared from Laminaria japonica. In order to obtain fucoidan-degrading enzyme, bacteria capable of degrading fucoidan were screened from kelp. A bacterial strain named RC2-3 was obtained, which degraded fucoidan by the maximum extent of 54% ± 1.3%, the highest among all bacterial isolates. High-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) showed that the molecular weight of fucoidan was gradually reduced by RC2-3 with culturing time, suggesting the production of fucoidan-degrading enzyme by RC2-3. Phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rDNA) sequence showed that RC2-3 belonged to the family Flavobacteriaceae. However, it showed different physiological and biochemical characteristics from the known Flavobacteriaceae members producing fucoidan-degrading enzyme, thus RC2-3 was proposed to be a new member of this family.

  13. Streptococcus mutans sortase A inhibitory metabolites from the flowers of Sophora japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Woo-Young; Won, Tae Hyung; Ahn, Chan-Hong; Lee, So-Hyoung; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Ki-Bong

    2015-04-01

    A new maltol derivative (2) along with three known maltol derivative (1) and flavonol glycosides (3 and 4) were isolated from the dried flowers of Sophora japonica. Based upon the results of combined spectroscopic methods, the structure of new compound (2) was determined to be maltol-3-O-(4'-O-cis-p-coumaroyl-6'-O-(3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaroyl))-β-glucopyranoside, an isomer of 1. These compounds strongly inhibited the action of sortase A (SrtA) from Streptococcus mutans, a primary etiologic agent of human dental caries. The onset and magnitude of inhibition of the saliva-induced aggregation in S. mutans treated with compound 2 (4×IC50) were comparable to the behavior of untreated srtA-deletion mutant.

  14. Short-term toxicity of polystryrene microplastics on mysid shrimps Neomysis japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxin; Wang, Xiao; Luo, Xianxiang; Zheng, Hao

    2017-04-01

    Plastic debris especially microplastics (MPs) have become a global concern for the aggravating pollution in the oceans. In this study, the physico-chemical properties of fluorescently labeled polystyrene (PS) beads and the effects of PS-MPs on the survival of mysid shrimps (Neomysis japonica) were investigated. PS-MPs were identified to have spherical shape, uniform size and stable green fluorescence. The results showed that PS beads had little effects on the mortality of shrimps under a short-term (72 h) exposure with concentrations of 50 μg L-1 and 500 μg L-1. However, PS-MPs had severe short-term toxicity on the survival of mysid shrimps, resulting in 30% mortality especially in a 72 h exposure with the higher concentration of 1000 μg L-1. These findings provide new insights into the toxic effects of MPs on marine invertebrates.

  15. Composition and cytotoxicity of a novel polysaccharide from brown alga (Laminaria japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhenfei; Liu, Min; Fang, Zhexiang; Wu, Jiulin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2012-08-01

    A novel polysaccharide WPS-2-1, with an average molecular weight of 80 kDa, was purified from aqueous extracts of Laminaria japonica. Monosaccharides analysis revealed that WPS-2-1 was composed of mannose, rhamnose and fucose with a molar ratio of 1.0:2.3:1.2. Analysis by periodate oxidation-Smith degradation indicated that WPS-2-1 had a backbone of array by (1→4)-glycosidic linkages. Cytotoxicity assay showed that WPS-2-1 presented significantly higher antitumor activities against A375 and BGC823 cells with a dose-dependent manner, and exhibited lower cytotoxicity to vascular smooth muscle cells. The results suggested that WPS-2-1 should be explored as a potential antitumor agent with low toxicity.

  16. Extraction and separation of polysaccharides from Laminaria japonica by size-exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Row, Kyung Ho

    2015-04-01

    A large number of studies have suggested that polysaccharides, such as fucoidan and laminarin, in various seaweeds have significant biological properties. A different distribution of molecular weights is a prominent sign of many polysaccharides. Therefore, a simple, fast and reliable high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) method was proposed to separate fucoidan and laminarin from Laminaria japonica. After evaluating the different separation conditions for HPSEC, such as the type of mobile phase and flow rate, an acid extraction method was established and optimized by a systematic investigation of the influencing factors. Under the optimal conditions, 169.2 and 383.8 mg g(-1) of fucoidan and laminarin, respectively, were extracted. This method is suitable for the extraction and separation of polysaccharides with good reproducibility of the retention time, acceptable linearity, small relative standard deviation and low detection limits. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Effect of Lonicera japonica extract on Mycoplasma gallisepticum in naturally infected broiler flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müştak, H K; Torun, E; Özen, D; Yücel, G; Akan, M; Diker, K S

    2015-01-01

    1. In this study, the effect of chlorogenic acid extract from Lonicera japonica Thunb. on Mycoplasma gallisepticum infections and the performance of broiler flocks was investigated. 2. A total of 360 Ross-308 broiler chicks taken from M. gallisepticum seropositive flocks were divided equally into three groups designated as control (nothing administered), antibiotic (Tylosin tartrate given for the first 3 d and d 20-22) and test group (chlorogenic acid extract given twice a day on d 16 and 22). 3. Broiler performance analysis, serological tests (slide agglutination), molecular identification (polymerase chain reaction) and histopathological examination were performed to detect M. gallisepticum. 4. The results show that chlorogenic acid not only increases live body weight but is also an alternative treatment option in M. gallisepticum-infected broiler flocks.

  18. The use of scaning electron microscopy in postvaccinal evaluation of tracheal epithelium of Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santin Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the use of scanning electron microscopy in the study of the post-vaccinal respiratory reaction of the tracheal epithelium of quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica immunized against Newcastle disease. A number of 36 quails were distributed into four groups: T1 fraction three-quarters control birds (non-vaccinated; T2 fraction three-quarters birds vaccinated with Ulster 2C strain; t3 fraction three-quarters birds vaccinated with B1 strain; t4 fraction three-quarters birds vaccinated with LaSota strain. Regardless the experimental group, birds did not show detectable clinical signs of post-vaccinal respiratory reaction. However, the analysis of tracheal fragments by scanning electron microscopy showed that birds vaccinated with B1 and LaSota strains developed epithelial sloughing of the trachea, whereas those vaccinated Ulster 2C strain did not develop this change, demonstrating intact tracheal epithelium, similar to the control group.

  19. Purification and characterization of vitellin in mature ovary of marine crab Charybdis japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Song; GUO Chengxiu; LIU Fengsong; LIANG Xiaohui

    2008-01-01

    Vitellin of mature female marine crab Charybdis japonica was purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC,DEAE-cellulose-16 anion exchange column).The apparent molecular mass of the vitellin is 546 ku based on the data of native-PAGE.Under denatured condition (SDS-PAGE),it was found that vitellin was composed of four polypeptides each at 120,100,65,and 55 ku.One disulfide bond was detected in the binding of polypeptide subunits.The purified vitellin,contained 4.47% phosphor and 10.6% polysaccharides,and was identified as glyco-lipo-carotenoprotein,according to the PAGE staining data.The purified vitellin can be used as antigen to raise polyclonal antisera in further application.

  20. Glucosylated caffeoylquinic acid derivatives from the flower buds of Lonicera japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three new glucosylated caffeoylquinic acid isomers (1–3, along with six known compounds, have been isolated from an aqueous extract of the flower buds of Lonicera japonica. Structures of the new compounds were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods as (−-4-O-(4-O-β-d-glucopyranosylcaffeoylquinic acid (1, (−-3-O-(4-O-β-d-glucopyranosylcaffeoylquinic acid (2, and (−-5-O-(4-O-β-d-glucopyranosylcaffeoylquinic acid (3, respectively. In the preliminary in vitro assays, two known compounds methyl caffeate and 2ʹ-O-methyladenosine showed inhibitory activity against Coxsackie virus B3 with IC50 values of 3.70 μmol/L and 6.41 μmol/L and SI values of 7.8 and 12.1, respectively.