WorldWideScience

Sample records for cecal diseases

  1. Correlation of Cecal Microflora of HLA-B27 Transgenic Rats with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Onderdonk, Andrew B; Richardson, James A.; Hammer, Robert E.; Taurog, Joel D.

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic rats with a high level of expression of the human major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-B27 develop chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and arthritis. Assessment of the cecal microflora showed a rise in numbers of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp., corresponding to the presence and severity of IBD in these rats.

  2. [Cecal volvulus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abita, T; Lachachi, F; Durand-Fontanier, S; Maisonnette, F; Roudaut, P Y; Valleix, D; Descottes, B

    2005-01-01

    The cecum is the second most common site of colonic volvulus after the sigmoid. The mechanism is torsion or hyperflexion of the enlarged, poorly-fixed, and hypermobile cecum. It presents clinically as an acute bowel obstruction with strangulation. Diagnosis can be made by plain abdominal X-ray in more than half the cases on the basis of cecal distention (with a classical "teardrop" or "comma" appearance), proximal small bowel distention with air-fluid levels, and a gasless distal colon. Barium enema shows lack of filling of the cecum, often with a "beaked" termination of the column of contrast. CT images are pathognomonic when they reveal a cecal "vortex". After surgical reduction of the torsion, ileo-cecal resection is usually the best therapeutic alternative. Cecopexy may be aDDrouriate in older and debilitated Datients if there is no concomitant cecal necrosis. PMID:16335894

  3. Apendicitis retro-cecal

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar Sánchez, Augusto

    2011-01-01

    Por definición, se llama apendicitis retro-cecal a la inflamación aguda o crónica del apéndice, cuando está situado en posición retrocecal,sea que acompañe a un ciego móvil y en consecuencia esté provisto de meso, o bien que con ciego fijo se encuentre sin meso y en posición retro-peritoneal, hallándose entonces en íntima relación con algunas formaciones anatómicas como el tejido conjuntivo peri-renal, el nervio génito.crural derecho, el fémoro cutáneo, el obsturador y el uréter derecho. Con ...

  4. A Rare Cause of Acute Abdomen: Idiopathic Isolated Cecal Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender Özer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic isolated cecal necrosis is a clinical problem characterized by right-sided inferior abdominal pain. It is rarely seen, develops due to decreased blood flow to the colon and, imitates acute appendicitis. Its clinical signs are similar to many illnesses causing sensitivity in the right inferior quadrant and, the diagnosis is generally determined during surgery. An 86-year-old male patient presented with the complaints of abdominal pain, trichiniasis, nausea and vomiting. Surgical intervention was decided when physical examination and laboratory results were taken into consideration. After diagnostic laparoscopy, right hemicolectomy was performed because of cecal necrosis. While the mortality and morbidity rates for ischemic bowel disease are high, prognosis for early diagnosed patients with isolated cecal necrosis is better, provided that timely surgical treatment is decided.

  5. Case report of idiopathic cecal perforation presenting as acute appendicitis on ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calista Harbaugh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cecal perforation is an uncommon phenomenon in a pediatric population. It has been linked to a number of underlying medical conditions, which may result in focal inflammation or relative ischemia including hematologic malignancy, infection, and inflammatory bowel disease. We present an otherwise healthy 16-year-old male diagnosed with acute uncomplicated appendicitis on ultrasound, who was found to have cecal perforation with normal appendix intraoperatively, ultimately requiring ileocectomy. With this report, we aim to present the numerous pathophysiologic etiologies of cecal perforation, and to promote a comprehensive differential diagnosis despite the clinical and radiologic findings consistent with uncomplicated appendicitis.

  6. Cecal bascule: an unusual pathology of cecal dilation. Case report and brief review

    OpenAIRE

    Oza, Veeral; Johnson, Andrea; Pfeil, Sheryl

    2013-01-01

    Patients with multiple comorbidities often develop decreased intestinal motility resulting in abdominal distention. A variety of etiologies such as electrolyte abnormalities, medications, and sometimes unusual anatomical pathologies are responsible for this distention. Cecal bascule represents an exceedingly rare anatomical variance that leads to abdominal distention, and mimics a potentially isolated cecal distention. This rare diagnosis, if missed, can lead to severe complications. We prese...

  7. Carcinoid tumor of the cecal appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carcinoid tumors of the cecal appendix are the most frequent of all appendicular tumors, with no clinical manifestations in general. The general objective of this paper was to present an interesting case of carcinoid tumor found in a 26 years-old woman, whose clinical picture was diagnosed as subacute appendicitis. She was hospitalized and treated with antibiotics with good recovery and discharged 10 days later. She had no abdominal tumors confirmed clinically and echographically at that time. Three months later, the patient was operated on and underwent cecal appendicectomy. The pathological anatomy analysis yielded argentaffinoma in the distal third of the cecal appendix with mucosal infiltration. She was referred to the oncology service to be followed up. She has been free from any complication with good recovery for 10 years. The annual ultrasound and the CT scan show that there is neither regional adenopathy nor hepatic metastasis

  8. Extramedullary plasmacytoma of small bowel mesentery in associated with cecal cancer: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Sun; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Park, Choog Ki; Park, Dong Woo [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Wook; Oh, Young Ha [Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma is a rare disease that is histopathologically defined as a solitary tumor composed of a monoclonal proliferation of cells with plasmacytic differentiation in an extramedullary site. Most of these tumors occur in the submucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract, and they rarely occur in the small bowel mesentery. We report here on a case of extramedullary plasmacytoma of the small bowel mesentery that was in association with a cecal cancer. Abdominal ultrasound and CT revealed a lobulated soft tissue mass with a cystic portion and peripheral calcification. In this case, the preoperative radiological diagnosis was difficult due to accompanying cecal cancer.

  9. Doença de Crohn isolada do apêndice cecal como causa de enterorragia Crohn’s disease isolated of the appendix as a source of enterorrhagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sizenando Ernesto de Lima Jr.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: A doença de Crohn isolada do apêndice é doença de paciente jovem, relativamente rara, com quadro histopatológico semelhante ao da doença de Crohn típica. Seu quadro clínico, em geral, simula o da apendicite aguda, com manifestações protraídas e na palpação do abdome, além dos sinais de irritação peritonial, nota-se com freqüência, um tumor palpável. OBJETIVO: Apresentar um caso de doença de Crohn isolada do apêndice que se manifestou por enterorragia e cuja origem foi identificada pela colonoscopia. PACIENTE: Masculino, com 16 anos de idade, sem outras manifestações digestivas apresentou dois episódios de enterorragia com intervalo de cerca de 1 ano. No segundo episódio, a colonoscopia identificou o sangramento como proveniente do óstio apendicular. RESULTADO: Indicada a exploração cirúrgica, constatou-se que o ceco e o íleo eram normais e que o apêndice cecal estava com sinais inflamatórios e bloqueado pelo omento, realizando-se a apendicectomia. O exame anatomopatológico revelou tratar-se de processo inflamatório crônico com infiltrado linfoplasmocitário e granulomas esparsos, sugestivo de doença de Crohn. Em acompanhamento clínico, não apresentou manifestações de doença digestiva e a colonoscopia, realizada após 2 anos, não mostrou evidências de recidiva ou propagação da doença para o íleo. CONCLUSÃO: Neste caso, como nos demais relatados na literatura, a apendicectomia é possivelmente curativa, devendo o paciente ser acompanhado, pelo menos, por 5 anos. No diagnóstico diferencial das enterorragias em pacientes jovens, a doença de Crohn isolada do apêndice também pode ser considerada.BACKGROUND: Crohn’s disease confined to the appendix is relatively rare as a sole primary manifestation of the disease. Young people are more affected. The medical history and the physical examination are similar to the findings in acute appendicitis, but the manifestations are protracted. On

  10. Cecal bascule after spinal cord injury: A case series report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yuichi; McLean, Susan F.; Tyroch, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cecal bascule is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction associated with upward and anterior folding of the ascending colon. We report three patients who presented with spinal cord injury complicated with a cecal bascule. Diagnosis and management of cecal bascule is discussed. Presentation of cases Patient 1: 59-year-old male sustained a traumatic brain injury and cervical spinal cord injury after a motorcycle crash. He had abdominal distension and the diagnosis of cecal bascule was made. Cecopexy was performed. Patient 2: 51-year-old male sustained an unstable C7 vertebral fracture with a cord contusion and quadriplegia after a diving incident. After an unsuccessful medical management of the colonic distension, the patient was taken for a laparotomy and cecal bascule was found. A cecostomy and a cecopexy were performed. Patient 3: 63-year-old male was transferred after a fall. He had diffuse degenerative changes in the thoracic and lumbar spine. He was found to have a perforated cecal bascule. He had a right hemicolectomy with an ileocolic anastomosis. Discussion We suggest the possibility of spinal cord injury being a risk factor for cecal bascule. Currently, right hemicolectomy is recommended for the treatment of cecal bascule. Cecopexy is also acceptable treatment option for a case in which the patient will be undergoing an operation with an insertion of hardware. Conclusion The diagnosis of cecal bascule should be considered for trauma patients with cecal distention without delay in order to prevent disastrous complications. PMID:27077698

  11. Isolated non-hemorrhagic cecal varices

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, James D.; Lacey, Brent W.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic varices (those outside of the gastro-esophageal region) are occasionally found on endoscopy in patients with portal hypertension; however they account for a small minority of all variceal bleeds. Cases of isolated cecal varices are quite rare and, when described, often present with acute hemorrhage or evidence of occult bleeding. We present the case of a 29-year-old male with a history of idiopathic portal vein thrombosis and known esophageal varices, who presented for evaluation of a...

  12. Suppression of Clostridium difficile by Normal Hamster Cecal Flora and Prevention of Antibiotic-Associated Cecitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Kenneth H.; Silva, Joseph; Fekety, F. Robert

    1981-01-01

    Administration of normal cecal homogenates decreased numbers of viable Clostridium difficile and prevented cecitis in antibiotic-challenged hamsters. Cecal anaerobes appeared to suppress C. difficile.

  13. Differences in CD8 alpha alpha and cecal microbiome community during proliferation and late cytolytic phases of Marek's disease virus (MDV) infection are associated with genetic resistance to Marek's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is growing awareness that microbes in the gut play an important role in the health and disease response of the host. In this study, using chicken and Marek's disease virus, an economically important pathogen, we correlate changes in immune cells with gut microbes and their function. We find th...

  14. Extensive Microbial and Functional Diversity within the Chicken Cecal Microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Sergeant, Martin J.; Chrystala Constantinidou; Tristan A Cogan; Bedford, Michael R.; Penn, Charles W.; Pallen, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Chickens are major source of food and protein worldwide. Feed conversion and the health of chickens relies on the largely unexplored complex microbial community that inhabits the chicken gut, including the ceca. We have carried out deep microbial community profiling of the microbiota in twenty cecal samples via 16S rRNA gene sequences and an in-depth metagenomics analysis of a single cecal microbiota. We recovered 699 phylotypes, over half of which appear to represent previously unknown speci...

  15. Inhibition of salmonella by cecal bacteria in media supplemented with lactate and succinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were conducted to examine the ability of cecal cultures from broilers to inhibit growth of Salmonella Typhimurium in vitro. Cecal contents from commercial broilers were combined, and 0.1 ml of the cecal slurry was added to media containing (g/l), tryptose, 10; yeast extract, 5; sodium ch...

  16. The efficacy of plant extracts on cecal amebiasis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enerst C. Ohanu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amebiasis caused by Entamoeba histolytica is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical countries. Treatment failure with specific chemotherapy has been reported suggesting the possibility of drug resistance. This study investigated the anti-amoebic effects of four plant extracts on cecal amebiasis in rats. The cecal amebiasis was induced by the injection of 3.0×105 troph/mL of E. histolytica parasite directly into the rat’s caecum. A total of 137 rats were used for these studies; five rats in each group for both positive and negative control, 15 rats in each group to test the four plant extracts and metronidazole. The infected rats were treated for cecal amebiasis using each of the four plant extracts at graded doses of 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg and with metronidzole at a dose of 62.5 mg/kg,100 mg/kg and 125 mg/kg for five consecutive days. The efficacy of the four plant extracts were evaluated based on Neal’s, 1951 method. The plant extracts of Garlic, Guava, Pawpaw and Pumpkin at 400 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg body-weight gave a cure rate of 80%, 100%, 60%, 40% and 40%, 80%, 40%, 0%, respectively. The mean parasite count in the cecal contents of the treated rats at a dose 400 mg/kg were 18.5±1.6, 0.0±0.0, 33.3±1.8 and 49.5±4.0, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. This study has revealed that Guava at a high dosing level (400 mg/kg body weight is as good as the standard drug in reducing the both parasite load (probably with limited side effect.

  17. Extensive microbial and functional diversity within the chicken cecal microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Sergeant

    Full Text Available Chickens are major source of food and protein worldwide. Feed conversion and the health of chickens relies on the largely unexplored complex microbial community that inhabits the chicken gut, including the ceca. We have carried out deep microbial community profiling of the microbiota in twenty cecal samples via 16S rRNA gene sequences and an in-depth metagenomics analysis of a single cecal microbiota. We recovered 699 phylotypes, over half of which appear to represent previously unknown species. We obtained 648,251 environmental gene tags (EGTs, the majority of which represent new species. These were binned into over two-dozen draft genomes, which included Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pullorum. We found numerous polysaccharide- and oligosaccharide-degrading enzymes encoding within the metagenome, some of which appeared to be part of polysaccharide utilization systems with genetic evidence for the co-ordination of polysaccharide degradation with sugar transport and utilization. The cecal metagenome encodes several fermentation pathways leading to the production of short-chain fatty acids, including some with novel features. We found a dozen uptake hydrogenases encoded in the metagenome and speculate that these provide major hydrogen sinks within this microbial community and might explain the high abundance of several genera within this microbiome, including Campylobacter, Helicobacter and Megamonas.

  18. Chromogranin A is a sensitive marker of progression or regression in ileo-cecal neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Højsgaard; Hilsted, Linda; Jensen, Claus Verner;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The correlation between plasma Chromogranin A concentrations and changes in tumor size evaluated by computed tomography (CT) - as a gold standard - was evaluated. Material and methods. One hundred and sixteen patients with CgA-producing ileo-cecal neuroendocrine tumors were...... evaluated by events, which were recorded when a CT was followed by another CT 1 - 12 months later. Change in tumor size was defined as regression, progression, or stable disease using RECIST criteria 1.1. Of 426 events, there were 97 with progression, 279 with stable disease, and 50 with regression. Based...... on the ROC curves a cutoff value of 25% change was selected to discriminate between increased, decreased, or unchanged CgA concentrations in plasma, using a sensitive radioimmunoassay with well-defined epitope specificity. Results. In the 97 events showing tumor progression diagnostic sensitivity and...

  19. Successful laparoscopic treatment of ileo-cecal endometriosis producing bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, A; Osuga, Y; Tsutsumi, O; Fujii, T; Okagaki, R; Taketani, Y

    2001-08-01

    Bowel endometriosis manifesting with ileus is difficult to diagnose, often requiring laparotomy for diagnosis and treatment. We report here a case of ileo-cecal endometriosis causing bowel obstruction. A diagnosis of intestinal endometriosis with menstruation-associated bowel symptoms was made, and the patient was successfully treated by laparoscopic ileo-cecal resection. PMID:11721734

  20. Inhibition of Salmonella Typhimurium by Anaerobic Cecal Bacteria in Media Supplemented with Lactate and Succinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of anaerobic cecal microflora of broilers to inhibit growth of Salmonella Typhimurium in media supplemented with lactate and succinate was examined. Cecal cultures were prepared by collecting ceca of processed broilers from a commercial processing facility, inoculating broth media with 1...

  1. Diagnosis of a cecal tumour with virtual colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors presented a 75-year-old female patient at high risk, suspected of a cecal cancer (CC) due to discomfort in the inguinal fossa, microcytic anemia (although she was postmenopausal), liquid stools and a positive faecal occult blood test. A standard examination of the large intestine was undertaken. Conventional colonoscopy was not completed and the results of barium enema were questionable. Therefore, virtual colonoscopy (VC) was performed, which helped to localize an accurate operation site. As a result, the patient underwent right hemicolectomy. Postoperative histopathological assessment confirmed an advanced cecal cancer. Traditionally, double-contrast barium enema is used to evaluate the colon in patients after incomplete colonoscopy. However, the accuracy of this test is lower in comparison to endoscopy or VC. An incomplete colonoscopy examination may occur in up to 10% of patients. Tortuous course of the colon, diverticulosis, strictures, obstructing mass and fixation of colonic loops due to adhesions after surgery are the most common causes of incomplete examinations. To sum up, VC can be an alternative method of evaluation of the large bowel in patients after an incomplete colonoscopy examination, as follows from the presented case and the available literature. (authors)

  2. Differential responses of cecal microbiota to fishmeal, Eimeria and Clostridium perfringens in a necrotic enteritis challenge model in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Dragana; Wu, Shu-Biao; Rodgers, Nicholas; Swick, Robert A; Moore, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes enteric diseases in animals and humans. In poultry, avian-specific C. perfringens strains cause necrotic enteritis, an economically significant poultry disease that costs the global industry over $2 billion annually in losses and control measures. With removal of antibiotic growth promoters in some countries this disease appears to be on the rise. In experimental conditions used to study disease pathogenesis and potential control measures, reproduction of the disease relies on the use of predisposing factors such as Eimeria infection and the use of high protein diets, indicating complex mechanisms involved in the onset of necrotic enteritis. The mechanisms by which the predisposing factors contribute to disease progression are not well understood but it has been suggested that they may cause perturbations in the microbiota within the gastrointestinal tract. We inspected changes in cecal microbiota and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) induced by Eimeria and fishmeal, in birds challenged or not challenged with C. perfringens. C. perfringens challenge in the absence of predisposing factors did not cause significant changes in either the alpha or beta diversity of the microbiota nor in concentrations of SCFA. Moreover, there was no C. perfringens detected in the cecal microbiota 2 days post-challenge without the presence of predisposing factors. In contrast, both fishmeal and Eimeria caused significant changes in microbiota, seen in both alpha and beta diversity and also enabled C. perfringens to establish itself post challenge. Eimeria had its strongest influence on intestinal microbiota and SCFA when combined with fishmeal. Out of 6 SCFAs measured, including butyric acid, none were significantly influenced by C. perfringens, but their levels were strongly modified following the use of both predisposing factors. There was little overlap in the changes caused following Eimeria and fishmeal treatments, possibly indicating multiple routes for

  3. Differential responses of cecal microbiota to fishmeal, Eimeria and Clostridium perfringens in a necrotic enteritis challenge model in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Stanley

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens causes enteric diseases in animals and humans. In poultry, avian-specific C. perfringens strains cause necrotic enteritis, an economically significant poultry disease that costs the global industry over $2 billion annually in losses and control measures. With removal of antibiotic growth promoters in some countries this disease appears to be on the rise. In experimental conditions used to study disease pathogenesis and potential control measures, reproduction of the disease relies on the use of predisposing factors such as Eimeria infection and the use of high protein diets, indicating complex mechanisms involved in the onset of necrotic enteritis. The mechanisms by which the predisposing factors contribute to disease progression are not well understood but it has been suggested that they may cause perturbations in the microbiota within the gastrointestinal tract. We inspected changes in cecal microbiota and short chain fatty acids (SCFA induced by Eimeria and fishmeal, in birds challenged or not challenged with C. perfringens. C. perfringens challenge in the absence of predisposing factors did not cause significant changes in either the alpha or beta diversity of the microbiota nor in concentrations of SCFA. Moreover, there was no C. perfringens detected in the cecal microbiota 2 days post-challenge without the presence of predisposing factors. In contrast, both fishmeal and Eimeria caused significant changes in microbiota, seen in both alpha and beta diversity and also enabled C. perfringens to establish itself post challenge. Eimeria had its strongest influence on intestinal microbiota and SCFA when combined with fishmeal. Out of 6 SCFAs measured, including butyric acid, none were significantly influenced by C. perfringens, but their levels were strongly modified following the use of both predisposing factors. There was little overlap in the changes caused following Eimeria and fishmeal treatments, possibly indicating

  4. Cecal lipoma with pseudomalignant features: A case report and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Panagiotis Katsinelos; Grigoris Chatzimavroudis; Christos Zavos; Ioannis Pilpilidis; Georgia Lazaraki; Basilis Papaziogas; George Paroutoglou; Jannis Kountouras; Dimitris Paikos

    2007-01-01

    Colonic lipoma is a well-documented benign neoplasia,endoscopically appearing as a smooth round yellowish polyp with a thick stalk or broad-based attachment. We describe a 63-year old woman with persistent abdominal pain, in whom colonoscopy revealed a cecal mass with malignant features. Based on the colonoscopy findings,right hemicolectomy was laparoscopically performed for a presumptive diagnosis of a cecal adenocarcinoma, but histological examination revealed a colonic lipoma with overlying mucosal ulceration.

  5. Influence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection on the composition of chicken cecal microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Videnska, Petra; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Faldynova, Marcela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Background Infection of newly hatched chicks with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) results in an inflammatory response in the intestinal tract which may influence the composition of gut microbiota. In this study we were therefore interested whether S. Enteritidis induced inflammation results in changes in the cecal microbiota. To reach this aim, we compared the cecal microbiota of non-infected chickens and those infected by S. Enteritidis by pyrosequencing the V3/V4 va...

  6. Effect of mannan oligosaccharides on the ileal morphometry and cecal fermentation of growing rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, V.M; Alves, A; Mourão, J.L.; Guedes, C.M.; Pinto, L; Spring, P; Kocher, A

    2004-01-01

    A common problem in rabbits is the occurrence of digestive disorders just after weaning. This problem is usually associated with instability of the cecal microflora and characterized by diarrhea, loss of appetite and increased mortality. In the current study the effects of a mannan oligosaccharide (MOS, Bio-MOS ® , Alltech Inc. USA) was compared to a commonly used antibiotic (AGP, Zn-Bacitracin). The current study investigated the effects of MOS and AGP on intestinal morphometry and cecal VF...

  7. Alteration of the rat cecal microbiome during colonization with the helminth Hymenolepis diminuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Erin A; Williamson, Lauren; Yoder, Anne D; Rawls, John F; Bilbo, Staci D; Parker, William

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome is now widely recognized as being important in health and disease, and makes up a substantial subset of the biome within the ecosystem of the vertebrate body. At the same time, multicellular, eukaryotic organisms such as helminths are being recognized as an important component of the biome that shaped the evolution of our genes. The absence of these macroscopic organisms during the early development and life of humans in Western culture probably leads to a wide range of human immunological diseases. However, the interaction between the microbiome and macroscopic components of the biome remains poorly characterized. In this study, the microbiome of the cecum in rats colonized for 2 generations with the small intestinal helminth Hymenolepis diminuta was evaluated. The introduction of this benign helminth, which is of considerable therapeutic interest, led to several changes in the cecal microbiome. Most of the changes were within the Firmicutes phylum, involved about 20% of the total bacteria, and generally entailed a shift from Bacilli to Clostridia species in the presence of the helminth. The results point toward ecological relationships between various components of the biome, with the observed shifts in the microbiome suggesting potential mechanisms by which this helminth might exert therapeutic effects. PMID:25942385

  8. Cecal infusion of nutrients improves nutritional status of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdassi, E; Raina, N; Allard, J P

    1995-11-01

    The role of colonic fermentation in providing energy was investigated in rats with small bowel transection (T) or 80% resection (SBR). Rats were randomized to receive for 12 d either saline (S) or the enteral solution (E) through a cecostomy to meet 30% of energy requirement; the rest (70%) was provided by parenteral nutrition. Although SBR-S rats lost weight significantly compared with d 1 of the study, SBR-E rats gained. Significantly greater carcass wet weight and fat were found in SBR-E and T-E rats compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. SBR-E and T-E rats had significantly greater colonic mucosal dry weight and protein compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. Cecal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) contents were also significantly higher in SBR-E and T-E rats compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. There was no significant effect of surgery (T vs. SBR) on any of the variables studied. These results suggest that the products of fermentation of an enteral solution infused through a cecostomy contribute substantially to energy requirement, maintenance of body composition and nutritional status of rats. PMID:7472670

  9. Campylobacter inoculation and quantification from broiler cecal samples to compare two plate counting methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderlise Borsoi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacteriosis is a zoonosis, a disease transmitted to humans from animals or animal products. The primarily source of Campylobacter infection in human is believed to be the handling and/or consumption of contaminated meat, especially poultry meat. Although in humans such infections are generally self-limiting, complications can arise and may include bacteraemia, Guillain-Barré syndrome, reactive arthritis and abortion. In this study, 32 birds were divided in 2 groups: a control (C group and an inoculated (I group, with 16 birds each. The I group was inoculated orally with 108 CFU/mL of Campylobacter jejuni ATCC 33291, whereas the C group was inoculated with a saline solution. Four chicks per group were euthanized by cervical dislocation at 0, 7, 14 and 21 days post-inoculation (pi. Cecum samples were collected for microbiological analyses. The samples were processed by two plate count methodologies, one developed by the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture in 2011 (B method and the other a serial dilution direct count method (A method. All birds from the C group remained negative until day 21. For the I group, the B method was found to be statistically superior to the A method for counting the recovered cells from the cecal contents at 7, 14 and 21 days pi. The microbiological direct plating counting method is a cost effective and rapid method to determine the level of contamination in broilers to help risk assessment programs at the industry level.

  10. In vitro fermentation response of laying hen cecal bacteria to combinations of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) prebiotic with alfalfa and layer ration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of combining a prebiotic with an alfalfa molting diet on fermentation by laying hen cecal bacteria. Cecal contents from laying hens were diluted to a 1:3000 concentration with an anaerobic dilution solution and added to serum tubes fi...

  11. Liquid enteral diets induce bacterial translocation by increasing cecal flora without changing intestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskel, Y; Udassin, R; Freund, H R; Zhang, J M; Hanani, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of intestinal motility and cecal bacterial overgrowth to liquid diet-induced bacterial translocation (BT). Three different commercially available liquid diets were offered to mice for 1 week. BT to the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), spleen, and liver were examined as well as cecal bacterial counts and populations, small bowel length and weight, and histopathologic changes in the ileal and jejunal mucosa. In addition, the effect of the various diets on intestinal motility was measured by the transit index of a charcoal mixture introduced into the stomach. The incidence of BT to the mesenteric lymph nodes was significantly and similarly increased (p Vivonex (30%), Ensure (30%), and Osmolite (33%) compared with chow-fed controls (0%). Compared with chow-fed controls, all three liquid diets were associated with the development of cecal bacterial overgrowth (p < .01). There were no significant changes in the transit index for the three liquid diet groups compared with the chow-fed controls. BT to the MLN was induced by all three liquid diets tested, casting some doubts as to their role in preventing BT in clinical use. BT was associated with a statistically significant increase in cecal bacterial count but was not associated with gut motility changes in this model. In fact, no significant changes in intestinal motility were noted in all groups tested. PMID:11284471

  12. Characterization of host responses induced by Toll-like receptor ligands in chicken cecal tonsil cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha-Abdelaziz, Khaled; Alkie, Tamiru Negash; Hodgins, Douglas C; Shojadoost, Bahram; Sharif, Shayan

    2016-06-01

    The innate responses of cecal tonsils against invading microorganisms are mediated by conserved pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs expressed by mammalian and avian immune system cells have the capability to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Although, the role of TLR ligands in innate and adaptive responses in chickens has been characterized in spleen and bursa of Fabricius, considerably less is known about responses in cecal tonsils. The aim of the current study was to assess responses of mononuclear cells from cecal tonsils to treatment with the TLR2, TLR4 and TLR21 ligands, Pam3CSK4, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), respectively. All three ligands induced significant up-regulation of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and CxCLi2/IL-8, whereas no significant changes were observed in expression of IL-13 or the antimicrobial peptides, avian β-defensin (AvBD) 1, AvBD2 and cathelicidin 3 (CATHL-3). In general, CpG ODN elicited the highest cytokine responses by cecal tonsil mononuclear cells, inducing significantly higher expression compared to LPS and Pam3CSK4, for IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-6 and CxCLi2 at various time points. These findings suggest the potential use of TLR21 ligands as mucosal vaccine adjuvants, especially in the context of pathogens of the intestinal tract. PMID:27185259

  13. Effect of Different Oligosaccharides on Immunity, and Cecal Microflora in Broilers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ying; SHAN An-shan

    2004-01-01

    One hundred and forty-four Avin broilers (1 d old) were randomly divided into six treatments, with three replicates of eight birds each to investigate the effect of different oligosaccharides on index of immune organ, cecal weight and microflora in broilers. The control group (Group Ⅰ) was fed with corn-soybean meal as basal diet, and the trial groups (group Ⅱ, Ⅲ, Ⅳ, Ⅴ and Ⅵ ) were fed with basal diet plus 0.1% manoligosaccharides (MOS), 0.3% soybean-oligosaccharides (SBOS), 0.3% fructooligosaccharides (FOS), 0.3% α -glucooligosaccharides(α -GOS) and 0.03% chlortetracycline (CTC), respectively. The results showed that oligosaccharides supplementation significantly (P<0.05) increased bifidobacteria concentration ofyoung broilers and did not affect on bifidobacteria or escherichia coli concentration of the birds ( P >0.05). Cecal weights of 21 d old broilers fed with FOS and α -GOS were significantly (P <0.05) increased, higher than those with MOS and SBOS, but addition of oligosaccharides had no effect on the birds. The effect of oligosaccharides on the cecal length was the same as on the cecal weights. Oligosaccharides supplement did not affect on indexes of immune organs.

  14. Effect of lactose on oro-cecal transit in lactose digesters and maldigesters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, T.; Priebe, M. G.; Welling, G. W.; Vonk, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background The transit time of the small intestine, in addition to lactase activity, may influence lactose digestion and thus play a role in the occurrence of lactose intolerance. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of lactose on the oro-cecal transit time (OCTT) in lactose d

  15. Cecal diverticulitis or appendicitis. When should I suspect? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pastore

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article was to report a case of cecal diverticulitis and point out the differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The clinical manifestations of these pathological conditions are similar, and the accurate diagnosis of cecal diverticulitis before the surgery is difficult. Therefore, most diagnoses are made during the surgery. Moreover, cecal diverticulum is uncommon in western countries, but it is prevalent in Asian people and their descendants. We report a case of a 55-year-old female patient, whose imaging exams (ultrasonography and computed tomography and blood tests were not enough to diagnose the affection, requiring laparotomy and pathological exams for the final diagnosis. Some studies suggesting the best practice in case of diverticulum of the cecum were revised, as the diagnosis usually occurs during the surgery.O objetivo deste trabalho foi relatar um caso de diverticulite no ceco e chamar a atenção para o diagnóstico diferencial com apendicite aguda. As manifestações clínicas das duas afecções são semelhantes, dificultando o diagnóstico exato de diverticulite cecal, além de ser incomum, em nosso meio, o aparecimento de divertículo em cólon direito, sendo essa entidade mais comum em asiáticos e em seus descendentes. Relata-se atendimento a uma paciente de 55 anos, cujos exames de imagem (ultrassonografia e tomografia computadorizada e de sangue não foram suficientes para o diagnóstico. Houve necessidade de realizar-se laparotomia exploradora e exames anatomopatológicos para a confirmação. Também foram revisados alguns trabalhos que sugerem qual a melhor conduta a ser tomada quando se encontra divertículo cecal no perioperatório, já que, na maioria das vezes, o diagnóstico é feito neste momento.

  16. Growth Performance, Relative Meat and Organ Weights, Cecal Microflora, and Blood Characteristics in Broiler Chickens Fed Diets Containing Different Nutrient Density with or without Essential Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Kang, Chang-Won; An, Byoung-Ki

    2016-04-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate whether dietary essential oils could affect growth performance, relative organ weights, cecal microflora, immune responses and blood profiles of broiler chickens fed on diets containing different nutrient densities. A total of eight hundred-forty 1-d-old male broiler chicks were randomly allotted into twenty-eight pens (7 pens per treatment, 30 chicks per pen). There were four experimental diets containing two different nutrient densities and supplemented with or without essential oils. Experimental period lasted for 35 days. No clear interaction between nutrient density and essential oils on any of growth performance-related parameters was observed. Live body weights were affected (pessential oils at 35 days. Essential oils significantly (pessential oil or nutrient density did not influence the relative percentages of breast and leg meats, the population of cecal microflora, blood parameters and antibody titers against Newcastle disease and infectious bronchitis in broiler chickens. It was concluded that dietary essential oils, independent to nutrient density, failed to stimulate feed intake, but increased growth performance in broiler chickens. PMID:26949956

  17. Coprophagous behavior of rabbit pups affects implantation of cecal microbiota and health status

    OpenAIRE

    Combes, Sylvie; Gidenne, Thierry; Cauquil, Laurent; Bouchez, Olivier; Fortun-Lamothe, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    During the first few weeks after delivery, female rabbits excrete fecal pellets, which are ingested by their pups. We hypothesized that maternal excretion of hard fecal pellets and the coprophagous behavior of their pups were involved in cecal microbiota implantation. Four groups were compared: in 1 group (FM), pups had free access to maternal fecal pellets; in a second group, ingestion of feces was prevented (NF); and in 2 additional groups, pups had access only to fecal pellets excreted by ...

  18. Effect of different levels of copper on growth performance and cecal ecosystem of newly weaned piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Wen Chen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to investigate the effects of different levels of copper sulfate on the growth performance and cecal ecosystem in newly weaned piglets. One hundred piglets weaned at 28±2 d were randomly allocated to 4 treatments with 5 replicates of 5 piglets each. Piglets received for 28 d the base diet with i no addition (control or with copper addition (from copper sulfate at ii 100, iii 175, and iv 250 mg/kg-1. On day 21, twenty piglets were randomly selected (one from each replicate to slaughter and investigate the population and diversity of cecal microorganisms. The results showed that the diets containing 175 and 250 mg/kg-1 copper improved the average daily gain (ADG by 51% and 60% and decreased the feed to gain ratio (F/G by 21% and 16%, respectively. Adding 175 or 250 mg/kg-1 copper improved crude protein, ether extract, calcium and phosphorus digestibility. Viable counts of Enterobacteriaceae and Lactobacilli in cecum tended to be reduced, while the concentrations of cecal volatile fatty acids (VFA were increased in pigs fed diet supplemented as copper level increased. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR results showed that adding 175 or 250 mg/kg-1 copper reduced the lactobacilli in cecum. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE maps showed that band numbers and intensity of cecal bacterial 16S rDNA decreased as the copper levels increased. The results suggested that the effects of high dietary copper on microflora and their activities and metabolic products might contribute to the intestinal health and result in improved growth performance.

  19. Effect of different levels of copper on growth performance and cecal ecosystem of newly weaned piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Feng Mei

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to investigate the effects of different levels of copper sulfate on the growth performance and cecal ecosystem in newly weaned piglets. One hundred piglets weaned at 28±2 d were randomly allocated to 4 treatments with 5 replicates of 5 piglets each. Piglets received for 28 d the base diet with i no addition (control or with copper addition (from copper sulfate at ii 100, iii 175, and iv 250 mg/kg–1. On day 21, twenty piglets were randomly selected (one from each replicate to slaughter and investigate the population and diversity of cecal microorganisms. The results showed that the diets containing 175 and 250 mg/kg–1 copper improved the average daily gain (ADG by 51% and 60% and decreased the feed to gain ratio (F/G by 21% and 16%, respectively. Adding 175 or 250 mg/kg–1 copper improved crude protein, ether extract, calcium and phosphorus digestibility. Viable counts of Enterobacteriaceae and Lactobacilli in cecum tended to be reduced, while the concentrations of cecal volatile fatty acids (VFA were increased in pigs fed diet supplemented as copper level increased. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR results showed that adding 175 or 250 mg/kg–1 copper reduced the lactobacilli in cecum. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE maps showed that band numbers and intensity of cecal bacterial 16S rDNA decreased as the copper levels increased. The results suggested that the effects of high dietary copper on microflora and their activities and metabolic products might contribute to the intestinal health and result in improved growth performance.

  20. Prior esophagogastroduodenoscopy does not affect the cecal intubation time at bidirectional endoscopies

    OpenAIRE

    Öner, Osman Zekai; Demirci, Rojbin Karakoyun; Gündüz, Umut Rıza; Aslaner, Arif; KOÇ, Ümit; Bülbüller, Nurullah

    2013-01-01

    Bidirectional endoscopy (BE) is often used to assess patients for the reason of anemia or to screen asymptomatic population for malignancy. Limited clinical data favors to perform first the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy, but its effect to the duration of colonoscopy is yet to be determined. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy on the time to achieve cecal intubation during colonoscopy in patients undergoing BE. Pati...

  1. Cecal bacterial communities in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans and captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushida, Kazunari; Segawa, Takahiro; Tsuchida, Sayaka; Murata, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Preservation of indigenous gastrointestinal microbiota is deemed to be critical for successful captive breeding of endangered wild animals, yet its biology is poorly understood. Here, we investigated cecal bacterial communities in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans (Lagopus muta japonica) and compared them with those in Svalbard rock ptarmigans (L. m. hyperborea) in captivity. Ultra-deep sequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated that the community structure of cecal microbiota in wild rock ptarmigans was remarkably different from that in captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans. Fundamental differences between bacterial communities in the two groups of birds were detected at the phylum level. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Synergistetes were the major phyla detected in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans, whereas Firmicutes alone occupied more than 80% of abundance in captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans. Furthermore, unclassified genera of Coriobacteriaceae, Synergistaceae, Bacteroidaceae, Actinomycetaceae, Veillonellaceae and Clostridiales were the major taxa detected in wild individuals, whereas in zoo-reared birds, major genera were Ruminococcus, Blautia, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia. Zoo-reared birds seemed to lack almost all rock ptarmigan-specific bacteria in their intestine, which may explain the relatively high rate of pathogenic infections affecting them. We show evidence that preservation and reconstitution of indigenous cecal microflora are critical for successful ex situ conservation and future re-introduction plan for the Japanese rock ptarmigan. PMID:26468217

  2. Fermentation of carbohydrate in rat ileal excreta is enhanced with cecal inocula compared with fecal inocula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsma, D J; Marlett, J A

    1996-02-01

    The differential fermentative capacities of microflora from two regions of the large bowel and how fermentation was altered by prior exposure of the microflora to the substrate to be fermented were studied using an in vitro fermentation system. Bacterial inocula were prepared from cecal contents and feces from three groups of rats fed purified diets containing 100 g/kg dietary fiber from canned peas or psyllium seed husk, or a nonpurified diet containing 170 g/kg dietary fiber. The substrate for all fermentations was ileal excreta from colectomized rats fed a purified diet containing 100 g/kg dietary fiber from canned peas. Anaerobic fermentations were conducted for 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 96 h. Sugars of the unfermented polysaccharides were measured by gas chromatography following acid hydrolysis; disappearance was the measure of fermentation. Independent of inoculum source, > 90% of the starch and arabinose and 75% of the uronic acids, but psyllium seed husk fermented starch faster (P < 0.05) and non-starch glucose, arabinose and uronic acids more slowly (P < 0.05) than inocula adapted to peas or nonpurified diet. Bacterial efficiency of carbohydrate utilization, the increase in muramic acid/mole carbohydrate fermented, was greatest (P < 0.05) with cecal inocula adapted to peas. We conclude that using cecal microflora as the inoculum source provides a more accurate index of fermentation during transit through the large bowel and that noncellulosic and storage polysaccharides of the plant cell wall are utilized before cellulose. PMID:8632231

  3. Physical Activity Differentially Affects the Cecal Microbiota of Ovariectomized Female Rats Selectively Bred for High and Low Aerobic Capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Wen Liu

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is considered a relevant factor in obesity and associated metabolic diseases, for which postmenopausal women are particularly at risk. Increasing physical activity has been recognized as an efficacious approach to prevent or treat obesity, yet the impact of physical activity on the microbiota remains under-investigated. We examined the impacts of voluntary exercise on host metabolism and gut microbiota in ovariectomized (OVX high capacity (HCR and low capacity running (LCR rats. HCR and LCR rats (age = 27 wk were OVX and fed a high-fat diet (45% kcal fat ad libitum and housed in cages equipped with (exercise, EX or without (sedentary, SED running wheels for 11 wk (n = 7-8/group. We hypothesized that increased physical activity would hinder weight gain, increase metabolic health and shift the microbiota of LCR rats, resulting in populations more similar to that of HCR rats. Animals were compared for characteristic metabolic parameters including body composition, lipid profile and energy expenditure; whereas cecal digesta were collected for DNA extraction. 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon Illumina MiSeq sequencing was performed, followed by analysis using QIIME 1.8.0 to assess cecal microbiota. Voluntary exercise decreased body and fat mass, and normalized fasting NEFA concentrations of LCR rats, despite only running one-third the distance of HCR rats. Exercise, however, increased food intake, weight gain and fat mass of HCR rats. Exercise clustered the gut microbial community of LCR rats, which separated them from the other groups. Assessments of specific taxa revealed significant (p<0.05 line by exercise interactions including shifts in the abundances of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Relative abundance of Christensenellaceae family was higher (p = 0.026 in HCR than LCR rats, and positively correlated (p<0.05 with food intake, body weight and running distance. These findings demonstrate that exercise differentially

  4. Responses in ileal and cecal bacteria to low and high amylose/amylopectin ratio diets in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu-Heng; Yang, Can; Wright, André-Denis G; He, Jun; Chen, Dai-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Dietary starch that escapes digestion in the small intestine may serve as a carbon source for bacterial fermentation in the distal intestine. This study aimed to compare the bacterial community in the ileal and cecal digesta of growing pigs fed diets with low (0.14, LR pigs) and high (0.43, HR pigs) amylose/amylopectin ratio. Pyrosequencing based on MiSeq 2000 platform showed that in ileum digesta, Bacteroidetes of LR pigs was markedly higher than that in HR pigs (P Halomonas pacifica, Escherichia fergusonii, and Actinobacillus minor which belong to class Gammaproteobacteria were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in HR pigs with a significant increase (P < 0.01) of Lactobacillus acetotolerans-like bacteria. Therefore, the changed bacterial community may lead to a transformation of microbial function, such as the alteration of fermentation mode which is showed on the change of microbial metabolites like the concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), to a response to the switch of dietary composition, and in turn, to help host absorb and utilize nutrients efficiently. The increase of dietary amylose induced the reduction of conditioned pathogens which may probably be due to the increase of some probiotics such as Lactobacillus, thus reducing the risk of intestinal disease. PMID:26318448

  5. A new oral formulation for the release of sodium butyrate in the ileo-cecal region and colon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aldo Roda; Patrizia Simoni; Maria Magliulo; Paolo Nanni; Mario Baraldini; Giulia Roda; Enrico Roda

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To develop a new formulation with hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose and Shellac coating for extended and selective delivery of butyrate in the ileo-caecal region and colon.METHODS:One-gram sodium butyrate coated tablets containing 13C-butyrate were orally administered to 12 healthy subjects and 12 Crohn's disease patients and the rate of 13C-butyrate absorption was evaluated by 13CO2 breath test analysis for eight hours.Tauroursodeoxycholic acid(500 mg)was co-administered as a biomarker of oro-ileal transit time to determine also the site of release and absorption of butyrate by the time of its serum maximum concentration.RESULTS:The coated formulation delayed the 13C-butyrate release by 2-3 h with respect to the uncoated tablets.Sodium butyrate was delivered in the intestine of all subjects and a more variable transit time was found in Crohn's disease patients than in healthy subjects.The variability of the peak 13CO2 in the kinetic release of butyrate was explained by the inter-subject variability in transit time.However,the coating chosen ensured an efficient release of the active compound even in patients with a short transit time.CONCLUSION:Simultaneous evaluation of breath 13CO2 and tauroursodeoxycholic acid concentrationtime curves has shown that the new oral formulation consistently releases sodium butyrate in the ileo-cecal region and colon both in healthy subjects and Crohn's disease patients with variable intestinal transit time.This formulation may be of therapeutic value in inflammatory bowel disease patients due to the appropriate release of the active compound.

  6. Comparison and Efficacy of LigaSure and Rubber Band Ligature in Closing the Inflamed Cecal Stump in a Rat Model of Acute Appendicitis

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Chieh Yeh; Chia-Ing Jan; Horng-Ren Yang; Po-Han Huang; Long-Bin Jeng; Wen-Pang Su; Hui-Chen Chen

    2015-01-01

    Safety of either LigaSure or rubber band in closing inflamed appendiceal stump in acute appendicitis has been less investigated. In this study, cecal ligation followed by resecting inflamed cecum was performed to mimic appendectomy in a rat model of acute appendicitis. Rats were sacrificed immediately (Group A) and 7 days (Group B) after cecal resection, respectively. The cecal stumps were closed by silk ligature (S), 5 mm LigaSure (L), or rubber band (R). Seven days after cecal resection, th...

  7. In vitro anaerobic incubation of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and laying hen cecal bacteria in poultry feed substrates and a fructooligosaccharide prebiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donalson, L M; Kim, Woo-Kyun; Chalova, V I; Herrera, P; Woodward, C L; McReynolds, J L; Kubena, L F; Nisbet, D J; Ricke, S C

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of combining a prebiotic with poultry feeds on the growth of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (ST) in an in vitro cecal fermentation system. Cecal contents from three laying hens were pooled and diluted to a 1:3000 concentration in an anaerobic dilution solution. The cecal dilution was added to sterile test tubes filled with alfalfa and layer ration with and without fructooligosaccharide (FOS). Two controls containing cecal dilutions and anaerobic dilution solution were used. The samples were processed in the anaerobic hood and incubated at 37 degrees C. Samples were inoculated with Salmonella at 0 and 24h after in vitro cecal fermentation and plated at 0 and 24h after inoculation with ST. Plates were incubated for 24h and colony forming units (CFU) enumerated. The samples immediately inoculated with ST without prior cecal fermentation did not significantly lower ST counts 24h later. However, samples pre-incubated for 24h with cecal microflora prior to ST inoculation exhibited reduced ST CFU by approximately 2 logarithms, with the most dramatic decreases seen in alfalfa and layer ration combined with FOS. The addition of FOS to feed substrate diets in combination with cecal contents acted in a synergistic manner to decrease ST growth only after ST was introduced to 24h cecal incubations. PMID:17588782

  8. Production of amines in equine cecal contents in an in vitro model of carbohydrate overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S R; Rycroft, A; Elliott, J

    2002-10-01

    Acute laminitis can be induced experimentally in horses by the administration of carbohydrate, resulting in fermentation within the cecum and ischemia-reperfusion of the digits. The products of fermentation that trigger acute laminitis are as yet unknown; however, compounds such as amines might play a role due to their potential vasoactive properties. The objectives of this study were to quantify the amines present in equine cecal contents and to use a model of carbohydrate overload in vitro to test the hypothesis that carbohydrate fermentation is associated with increased amine production. Cecal contents from each horse were divided into aliquots and incubated anaerobically with either cornstarch or inulin (a form of fructan carbohydrate; both 1 g/100 mL). The pH was measured and samples were taken at the same time for amine measurement by HPLC at 2-h intervals over a 24-h period. In a second set of experiments, the effects of the antibiotic virginiamycin (1 mg/100 mL), calcium (CaPO4; 0.3 g/100 mL), and plant steroidal saponin (Yucca schidigera extract; 0.1 g/100 mL) were examined on pH and amine concentrations in cecal contents incubated with starch or inulin. Both starch and inulin caused significant time-dependent falls in pH, from 6.7 +/- 0.1 at 0 h to 5.2 +/- 0.1 (starch) and 5.0 +/- 0.1 (inulin) at 24 h. Fermentation of carbohydrate was also associated with increased production of phenylethylamine and isoamylamine (two- to threefold increases) as well as putrescine and cadaverine (1.5- to twofold increases). Virginiamycin inhibited the fall in pH and increases in production of phenylethylamine and isoamylamine, while calcium phosphate moderated the changes in pH only. Yucca schidigera extract was without effect. These data show that fermentation of carbohydrate by equine cecal microbiota may lead to increased production of amines. PMID:12413088

  9. Dietary resistant dextrins positively modulate fecal and cecal microbiota composition in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliżewska, Katarzyna; Libudzisz, Zdzisława; Barczyńska, Renata; Kapuśniak, Janusz; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the effect of dietary resistant dextrins, as potential prebiotics, on the intestinal microflora of young rats. Enzyme-resistant dextrin, prepared by heating of potato starch in the presence of hydrochloric (0.1% dsb) and tartaric (40% dsb) acid at 130ºC for 2 h (CA-dextrin). The experiment was performed on 24 Wistar male rats at 3-wk of age, divided by analogues in three experimental groups (control, starch and dextrin). Analyses determined the overall bacterial counts and the counts of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides and Clostridium strains within the feces and cecal contents of rats using fluorescence in situ hybridization method. CA-dextrin had no effect on primary growth indicators (body weight, body weight gain, dietary consumption) or the mass of the small intestine and the cecum, but dextrins caused a reduction in pH and the concentration of ammonia within the cecal contents. That supplementation of diet with resistant dextrins had a positive effect on composition of intestinal microflora in rats. It increased the counts of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains both in the feces and in the cecum. Moreover, it reduced the counts of Clostridium and Bacteroides strains. These results may suggest that resistant dextrins exerted a prebiotic-like effect in the large intestine. PMID:26610307

  10. Analysis of Resistant Starches in Rat Cecal Contents Using Fourier Transform Infrared Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Timothy J. [Ames Laboratory; Ai, Yongfeng [Iowa State University; Jones, Roger W. [Ames Laboratory; Houk, Robert S. [Ames Laboratory; Jane, Jay-lin [Iowa State University; Zhao, Yinsheng [Iowa State University; Birt, Diane F. [Iowa State University; McClelland, John F. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-01-29

    Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) qualitatively and quantitatively measured resistant starch (RS) in rat cecal contents. Fisher 344 rats were fed diets of 55% (w/w, dry basis) starch for 8 weeks. Cecal contents were collected from sacrificed rats. A corn starch control was compared against three RS diets. The RS diets were high-amylose corn starch (HA7), HA7 chemically modified with octenyl succinic anhydride, and stearic-acid-complexed HA7 starch. To calibrate the FTIR-PAS analysis, samples from each diet were analyzed using an enzymatic assay. A partial least-squares cross-validation plot generated from the enzymatic assay and FTIR-PAS spectral results for starch fit the ideal curve with a R2 of 0.997. A principal component analysis plot of components 1 and 2 showed that spectra from diets clustered significantly from each other. This study clearly showed that FTIR-PAS can accurately quantify starch content and identify the form of starch in complex matrices.

  11. Efeito da microbiota cecal e do Lactobacillus salivarius inoculados in ovo em aves desafiadas com Salmonella enterica sorovar Enteritidis Effect of cecal microflora and Lactobacillus salivarius in ovo administration used on chicken previously challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L. Andreatti Filho

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Ovos embrionados provenientes de matrizes pesadas foram inoculados na câmara de ar com microbiota cecal total, microbiota cecal diluída e cultura de Lactobacillus salivarius, no 18º dia de incubação. Dois dias após o nascimento, as aves foram desafiadas com Salmonella enterica sorovar Enteritidis (SE e, cinco dias após o desafio, avaliou-se a presença da bactéria no fígado e ceco. O efeito de exclusão competitiva, após o desafio com SE, somente foi observado pela ausência da bactéria no fígado das aves tratadas in ovo com L. salivarius. A inoculação in ovo de microbiota cecal indefinida ou diluída não reduziu a colonização de SE no fígado e no ceco das aves, incluindo, neste último, também o tratamento com L. salivarius. Nenhum dos tratamentos in ovo determinou índice de eclodibilidade superior a 65%.Commercial 18-day-old incubating chicken embryos were inoculated with total or diluted cecal microbiota and Lactobacillus salivarius cultures directly into the inner air sac. Two days after hatching, the chicks were challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE, and five days later the presence of bacteria in cecum and liver was evaluated. The competitive exclusion effect was determined by the search for SE in the liver of chicks treated in ovo with L. salivarius and challenged with SE. The in ovo inoculation of total or diluted cecal microbiota, in addition to the L. salivarius treatment did not significantly decrease the colonization of SE in liver and cecum. All treatments resulted in hatchability of 65% or less.

  12. Characterization of prominent nitrate-reducing and amino acid-utilizing bacteria from nitrotoxin-enriched equine cecal populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the present study, populations of equine cecal microbes enriched for enhanced rates of 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA) or nitrate metabolism were diluted and cultured for NPA-metabolizing bacteria on a basal enrichment medium (BEM) or tryptose soy agar (TSA) medium supplemented with either 5 mM NP...

  13. Integrated datasets characterize metabolic interactions between mouse’s colonic mucosa, colonic-cecal contents and feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pattern of metabolites produced by the gut microbiome comprises a phenotype indicative of the means by which that microbiome affects the gut. We characterized that phenotype by conducting metabolomic analyses of the colonic-cecal contents, comparing that to the metabolite patterns of feces and c...

  14. Molecular Properties of Guar Gum and Pectin Modify Cecal Bile Acids, Microbiota, and Plasma Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarzadegan, Tannaz; Marungruang, Nittaya; Fåk, Frida; Nyman, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) act as signaling molecules in various physiological processes, and are related to colonic microbiota composition as well as to different types of dietary fat and fiber. This study investigated whether guar gum and pectin-two fibers with distinct functional characteristics-affect BA profiles, microbiota composition, and gut metabolites in rats. Low- (LM) or high-methoxylated (HM) pectin, and low-, medium-, or high-molecular-weight (MW) guar gum were administered to rats that were fed either low- or high-fat diets. Cecal BAs, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and microbiota composition, and plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) levels were analyzed, by using novel methodologies based on gas chromatography (BAs and SCFAs) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Strong correlations were observed between cecal BA and SCFA levels, microbiota composition, and portal plasma LBP levels in rats on a high-fat diet. Notably, guar gum consumption with medium-MW increased the cecal amounts of cholic-, chenodeoxycholic-, and ursodeoxycholic acids as well as α-, β-, and ω-muricholic acids to a greater extent than other types of guar gum or the fiber-free control diet. In contrast, the amounts of cecal deoxycholic- and hyodeoxycholic acid were reduced with all types of guar gum independent of chain length. Differences in BA composition between pectin groups were less obvious, but cecal levels of α- and ω-muricholic acids were higher in rats fed LM as compared to HM pectin or the control diet. The inflammatory marker LBP was downregulated in rats fed medium-MW guar gum and HM pectin; these two fibers decreased the cecal abundance of Oscillospira and an unclassified genus in Ruminococcaceae, and increased that of an unclassified family in RF32. These results indicate that the molecular properties of guar gum and pectin are important for their ability to modulate cecal BA formation, gut microbiota composition, and high-fat diet induced

  15. Molecular Properties of Guar Gum and Pectin Modify Cecal Bile Acids, Microbiota, and Plasma Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tannaz Ghaffarzadegan

    Full Text Available Bile acids (BAs act as signaling molecules in various physiological processes, and are related to colonic microbiota composition as well as to different types of dietary fat and fiber. This study investigated whether guar gum and pectin-two fibers with distinct functional characteristics-affect BA profiles, microbiota composition, and gut metabolites in rats. Low- (LM or high-methoxylated (HM pectin, and low-, medium-, or high-molecular-weight (MW guar gum were administered to rats that were fed either low- or high-fat diets. Cecal BAs, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA and microbiota composition, and plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP levels were analyzed, by using novel methodologies based on gas chromatography (BAs and SCFAs and 16S rRNA gene sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Strong correlations were observed between cecal BA and SCFA levels, microbiota composition, and portal plasma LBP levels in rats on a high-fat diet. Notably, guar gum consumption with medium-MW increased the cecal amounts of cholic-, chenodeoxycholic-, and ursodeoxycholic acids as well as α-, β-, and ω-muricholic acids to a greater extent than other types of guar gum or the fiber-free control diet. In contrast, the amounts of cecal deoxycholic- and hyodeoxycholic acid were reduced with all types of guar gum independent of chain length. Differences in BA composition between pectin groups were less obvious, but cecal levels of α- and ω-muricholic acids were higher in rats fed LM as compared to HM pectin or the control diet. The inflammatory marker LBP was downregulated in rats fed medium-MW guar gum and HM pectin; these two fibers decreased the cecal abundance of Oscillospira and an unclassified genus in Ruminococcaceae, and increased that of an unclassified family in RF32. These results indicate that the molecular properties of guar gum and pectin are important for their ability to modulate cecal BA formation, gut microbiota composition, and high

  16. Comparison and efficacy of LigaSure and rubber band ligature in closing the inflamed cecal stump in a rat model of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Jan, Chia-Ing; Yang, Horng-Ren; Huang, Po-Han; Jeng, Long-Bin; Su, Wen-Pang; Chen, Hui-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Safety of either LigaSure or rubber band in closing inflamed appendiceal stump in acute appendicitis has been less investigated. In this study, cecal ligation followed by resecting inflamed cecum was performed to mimic appendectomy in a rat model of acute appendicitis. Rats were sacrificed immediately (Group A) and 7 days (Group B) after cecal resection, respectively. The cecal stumps were closed by silk ligature (S), 5 mm LigaSure (L), or rubber band (R). Seven days after cecal resection, the LigaSure (BL) and silk subgroups (BS) had significantly less intra-abdominal adhesion and better laparotomy wound healing than rubber band subgroup (BR). The initial bursting pressure at cecal stump was comparable among the three methods; along with tissue healing process, both BL and BS provided a higher bursting pressure than BR 7 days after appendectomy. BL subgroup had more abundant hydroxyproline deposition than BS and BR subgroup. Furthermore, serum TNF-α in BR group kept persistently increasing along with time after cecal resection. Thus, the finding that LigaSure but not rubber band is safe in sealing off the inflamed cecal stump in rat model of acute appendicitis suggests the possibility of applying LigaSure for appendectomy via single port procedure or natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). PMID:25699264

  17. Comparison and Efficacy of LigaSure and Rubber Band Ligature in Closing the Inflamed Cecal Stump in a Rat Model of Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chieh Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Safety of either LigaSure or rubber band in closing inflamed appendiceal stump in acute appendicitis has been less investigated. In this study, cecal ligation followed by resecting inflamed cecum was performed to mimic appendectomy in a rat model of acute appendicitis. Rats were sacrificed immediately (Group A and 7 days (Group B after cecal resection, respectively. The cecal stumps were closed by silk ligature (S, 5 mm LigaSure (L, or rubber band (R. Seven days after cecal resection, the LigaSure (BL and silk subgroups (BS had significantly less intra-abdominal adhesion and better laparotomy wound healing than rubber band subgroup (BR. The initial bursting pressure at cecal stump was comparable among the three methods; along with tissue healing process, both BL and BS provided a higher bursting pressure than BR 7 days after appendectomy. BL subgroup had more abundant hydroxyproline deposition than BS and BR subgroup. Furthermore, serum TNF-α in BR group kept persistently increasing along with time after cecal resection. Thus, the finding that LigaSure but not rubber band is safe in sealing off the inflamed cecal stump in rat model of acute appendicitis suggests the possibility of applying LigaSure for appendectomy via single port procedure or natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES.

  18. Cecal duplication cyst: A rare case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Shyam Raj Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Duplication cysts of the alimentary tract are very rare congenital anomalies. Out of all these cases, two-thirds of them manifest before the age of 2 years. They are common in ileum, but very rare in cecum. Some of them may remain asymptomatic and present in the adulthood. The lesion may be tubular or cystic. Several theories have been postulated, but true etiology is not known. We hereby report a case of a 10-year-old female who presented with abdominal pain in the pediatric surgery outpatient department. Diagnosis of cecal duplication cyst was confirmed on histopathology. This report implies that although alimentary tract duplications are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children who presents with acute abdominal pain.

  19. Comparison of conventional culture methods and two commercial enzyme immunoassays for detection of Salmonella in porcine fecal samples and cecal contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    1997-01-01

    Two commercial enzyme immunoassays, designated EIA-1 and EIA-2, for the detection of salmonella in feces and cecal contents were compared to conventional culture methods. Out of 362 cecal content samples, 35 were positive by EIA-1 and 30 were positive by EIA-2 and conventional methods. Out of 189...... method is rapid, requiring only 24 hours, and may he more sensitive than the EIA-2 assay and conventional culture techniques. Enzyme immunoassays for the detection elf salmonella in fecal samples or cecal contents provide a reasonable alternative to conventional culture techniques....

  20. Efeito da microbiota cecal e do Lactobacillus salivarius inoculados in ovo em aves desafiadas com Salmonella enterica sorovar Enteritidis Effect of cecal microflora and Lactobacillus salivarius in ovo administration used on chicken previously challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    OpenAIRE

    R.L Andreatti Filho; A.S. Okamoto; E.T. Lima; P.R. Gratão; S.R. DelBem

    2006-01-01

    Ovos embrionados provenientes de matrizes pesadas foram inoculados na câmara de ar com microbiota cecal total, microbiota cecal diluída e cultura de Lactobacillus salivarius, no 18º dia de incubação. Dois dias após o nascimento, as aves foram desafiadas com Salmonella enterica sorovar Enteritidis (SE) e, cinco dias após o desafio, avaliou-se a presença da bactéria no fígado e ceco. O efeito de exclusão competitiva, após o desafio com SE, somente foi observado pela ausência da bactéria no fíga...

  1. Inhibition of Escherichia coli Translocation from the Gastrointestinal Tract by Normal Cecal Flora in Gnotobiotic or Antibiotic-Decontaminated Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Rodney D.

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli C25 maintained population levels of 109 to 1010 per g of cecum and translocated to 100% of the middle mesenteric lymph nodes in gnotobiotic mice monoassociated with E. coli C25. Intragastric inoculation of these mice with the cecal contents from specific-pathogen-free mice reduced the population levels of E. coli C25 to 106 per g of cecum and completely inhibited translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes. Intragastric inoculation with heat-treated, Formalintreated, or filte...

  2. A comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomolnaya Lydia M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial food borne illnesses worldwide. A major source of infection for humans is consumption of chicken or egg products that have been contaminated with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, however our knowledge regarding colonization and persistence factors in the chicken is small. Results We compared intestinal and systemic colonization of 1-week-old White Leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant CBA/J mice during infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium ATCC14028, one of the most commonly studied isolates. We also studied the distribution of wild type serotype Typhimurium ATCC14028 and an isogenic invA mutant during competitive infection in the cecum of 1-week-old White Leghorn chicks and 8-week-old CBA/J mice. We found that although the systemic levels of serotype Typhimurium in both infected animal models are low, infected mice have significant splenomegaly beginning at 15 days post infection. In the intestinal tract itself, the cecal contents are the major site for recovery of serotype Typhimurium in the cecum of 1-week-old chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice. Additionally we show that only a small minority of Salmonellae are intracellular in the cecal epithelium of both infected animal models, and while SPI-1 is important for successful infection in the murine model, it is important for association with the cecal epithelium of 1-week-old chicks. Finally, we show that in chicks infected with serotype Typhimurium at 1 week of age, the level of fecal shedding of this organism does not reflect the level of cecal colonization as it does in murine models. Conclusion In our study, we highlight important differences in systemic and intestinal colonization levels between chick and murine serotype Typhimurium infections, and provide evidence that suggests that the role of SPI-1 may not be the same during colonization of both animal models.

  3. Short communication. Effects of purslane extract on performance, immunity responses and cecal microbial population of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad R. Ghorbani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to evaluate the effect of purslane extract on performance, cecal microflora composition and immune responses of broiler chickens. One hundred and ninety two 1–day old broiler chicks (Ross 308 were allocated randomly in 4 groups with 4 replicates to receive diets supplemented with 0 (control, 100, 200 and 300 ppm of purslane extract for 42 days. Body weight gain, feed intake (FI and feed conversion ratio were measured weekly and calculated for starter (1-21 d, grower (22-42 d and overall periods (1-42 d. All diets were isocaloric, isonitrogenous and provided ad libitum. Antibody response against sheep red blood cell (SRBC was measured on d-28 and d-42. At the age of 42 d, eight chicks per treatment killed aseptically for enumeration of cecal bacteria. The results of this experiment indicated that FI increased significantly with inclusion of purslane extract in grower and overall period (p≤0.05. Purslane extract did not affect coliform and Escherichia coli populations but increased Lactobacillus population of cecal content significantly (p≤0.05. There were no significant differences in primary and secondary antibody titer against SRBC and no differences among the treatments for relative weight of thymus and spleen (p>0.05. Relative weight of bursa was affected with inclusion of purslane extract in the diet. Therefore, it was concluded that purslane inclusion had a positive significant effect on cecal microflora composition, but had no effect on immune response of broiler chickens.

  4. Molecular Analysis of the Microbial Diversity Present in the Colonic Wall, Colonic Lumen, and Cecal Lumen of a Pig

    OpenAIRE

    Pryde, Susan E.; Anthony J. Richardson; Stewart, Colin S.; Flint, Harry J.

    1999-01-01

    Random clones of 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequences were isolated after PCR amplification with eubacterial primers from total genomic DNA recovered from samples of the colonic lumen, colonic wall, and cecal lumen from a pig. Sequences were also obtained for cultures isolated anaerobically from the same colonic-wall sample. Phylogenetic analysis showed that many sequences were related to those of Lactobacillus or Streptococcus spp. or fell into clusters IX, XIVa, and XI of gram-positive bacteria...

  5. Cecal ligation and puncture followed by MRSA pneumonia increases mortality in mice and blunts production of local and systemic cytokines

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Enjae; Perrone, Erin E.; Liang, Zhe; Elise R Breed; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Clark, Andrew T.; Fox, Amy C.; Dunne, W. Michael; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.; Richard S Hotchkiss; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2012-01-01

    Mortality in the ICU frequently results from the synergistic effect of two temporally-distinct infections. This study examined the pathophysiology of a new model of intraabdominal sepsis followed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia. Mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy followed three days later by an intratracheal injection of MRSA or saline. Both CLP/saline and sham/MRSA mice had 100% survival while animals with CLP followed by MRSA ...

  6. Pathological study on the effect of vitamin D3 on sepsis experimentally induced in rats by cecal ligation and punctures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Al-Saidya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the Vitamin D3 on the rats with sepsis that experimentally induced by cecal ligation and puncture. 100 Rats were divided into 5 groups, these include untreated control group, sham-operated group, CLP group and 2 treated groups pretreated daily a Subcutaneous injections of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 100 ng/kg for 3 days, then one of the pretreated groups subjected to sepsis accomplished by abdominal surgery comprising a cecal ligation and puncture. The following parameters were recorded: survival rate, hematological examinations and histopathological changes of the liver and heart were examined. It was found that vitamin D3 pretreated showed improvement in the survival rats and enhancement in the blood leukocyte count, also protect the rats from thrombocytopenia and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC, but vitamin D3 pretreated show slight improvement in the histopathological lesions in the liver and heart due to cecal ligation and puncture sepsis.

  7. Anthocyanins in Strawberry Polyphenolic Extract Enhance the Beneficial Effects of Diets with Fructooligosaccharides in the Rat Cecal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotschki, Bartosz; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy; Jurgoński, Adam; Kołodziejczyk, Krzysztof; Milala, Joanna; Kosmala, Monika; Zduńczyk, Zenon

    2016-01-01

    The administration of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) beneficially modulates gastrointestinal functions and may enhance the metabolism of polyphenols. However, different polyphenolic components in the diet may have different influences on the activities of the digestive enzymes and microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, a 4-week study of forty-eight male Wistar rats was conducted to investigate the physiological response of the rat cecal environment to diets without and with FOS that contained two different strawberry polyphenolic extracts, specifically EP (polyphenolic profile 60, 35, 5, and 0% ellagitannins, proanthocyanidins, flavonols, anthocyanins, respectively) and EPA (polyphenolic profile: 50, 35, 6, and 9%, respectively). When combined with FOS, both extracts beneficially enhanced the acidification of the cecal digesta (P≤0.05 vs the groups without extracts), but the dietary combination of EPA and FOS elicited the greatest reduction in putrefactive short-chain fatty acid production and the lowest fecal β-glucuronidase activity in the cecum (P≤0.05 vs group EP). Moreover, the addition of dietary FOS elevated the metabolism of the examined strawberry extracts in the cecum and thereby increased the concentrations of the metabolites in the cecal digesta and urine (P≤0.05 vs the group with cellulose). Overall, both strawberry extracts modulated the effects of FOS in the gastrointestinal tract; however, the combination with EPA extract that contained anthocyanins exhibited greater beneficial effects in the lower gut environment than the EP extract. PMID:26882456

  8. Metabolic changes at the early stage of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture in rats and the interventional effects of Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Tang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yufen; Gao, Na; Zhang, Zhongxiao; Zu, Xianpeng; Hu, Zhenlin; Zhang, Weidong; Yin, Jun; Liu, Xinru

    2016-07-15

    Sepsis is a disease with high mortality that requires rapid diagnosis and treatment. This study used a metabolomic approach to profile the metabolic changes at the early stage of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in rats and investigated the interventional effects of Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Tang (HLJDT). Male SD rats were intragastrically administered 270mg/kg HLJDT 2h prior to CLP, serum extracts were profiled by liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC-Q-TOF-MS) and multivariate analytical (MVA) methods were employed to evaluate the metabolic changes of extracts. A Partial Least-Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) score plot indicated that septic rats undergo significant metabolic changes 2h after CLP, and HLJDT administration could reverse the metabolic changes induced by CLP. Sixteen biomarkers involved in amino acid metabolism, unsaturated fatty acid metabolism, purine metabolism, and lipid metabolism were identified after Orthogonal Partial Least-Squares Analysis (OPLS). Among the 16 metabolites, 10 were regulated by HLJDT. This study established the foundation for further research of the early diagnosis biomarkers and therapeutic evaluation biomarkers discovery of sepsis. PMID:26365787

  9. Desempenho produtivo e atividade microbiana cecal de coelhos alimentados com dietas contendo diferentes níveis de amido Performance and cecal microbial activity of growing rabbits fed diets with different starch levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Martins Varela de Arruda

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a influência do amido dietético sobre o rendimento produtivo e a atividade microbiana cecal de coelhos em crescimento, quatro dietas experimentais foram elaboradas de forma a conter níveis crescentes de amido (23, 28, 33 e 38% de amido total na base da MS, os quais foram fornecidos a 32 coelhos da raça Nova Zelândia Branco, distribuídos em gaiolas de engorda individuais, seguindo um delineamento em blocos casualizados. Houve efeito linear decrescente para consumo e conversão alimentar, em que valores de 108,67 g/d e 3,216, respectivamente, foram obtidos para os animais alimentados com 38% de amido dietético. No entanto, o ganho de peso e o rendimento de carcaça não foram influenciados pelos tratamentos. Por outro lado, os valores de pH, as concentrações totais e as proporções molares dos ácidos graxos voláteis não foram influenciados pelos tratamentos, porém, para o ácido propiônico, houve efeito linear decrescente, sendo a maior proporção molar (12,06% verificada no conteúdo cecal de coelhos alimentados com 23% de amido dietético. O milho-grão apresentou maior influência sobre a atividade microbiana cecal que o amido de milho purificado, porém, sem alterar o desempenho e rendimento de carcaça.With the objective to evaluate the effect of dietary starch on the productive yield and cecal microbial activity for rabbits in the growing, four experimental diets were formulated to contain increasing corn starch levels (23, 28, 33 and 38 % total starch levels in dry matter basis. A total of 32 White New Zealand rabbits were allotted to finishing cages in a completely randomized block design. The results showed a decreasing linear effect for the feed intake and feed:gain ratio, where values of 108.67g/d and 3.216, respectively, were recorded for animals fed 38% dietary starch. However, no difference was observed for the weight gain and carcass yield. Regarding to cecal microbial activity, pH and

  10. Effect of dietary levan fructan supplementation on growth performance, meat quality, relative organ weight, cecal microflora, and excreta noxious gas emission in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P Y; Wang, J P; Kim, I H

    2013-11-01

    A total of 720 1-d-old male Ross broilers (BW of 48.0±0.3 g) were used to evaluate the effects of dietary levan fructan supplementation on growth performance, meat quality, relative organ weight, cecal microflora, and excreta noxious gas emission in broilers. This experiment lasted 31 d. Broilers were randomly allotted to 1 of 3 dietary treatments: 1) CON, basal diet, 2) CON+0.25% fructan (FC1), and 3) CON+0.50% fructan (FC2). Each treatment contained 16 pens with 15 chicks per pen. Broilers on levan fructan supplementation treatments (FC1+FC2) had a lower (P=0.005 for d 15 to 31) ADFI and greater (P=0.005 for d 15 to 31 and P=0.022 for d 1 to 31) G:F than those on the CON. A decreased (P=0.031) relative spleen weight was observed with levan fructan supplementation treatments compared with the CON. Cecal E. coli and C. perfringens concentrations in levan fructan treatments were decreased, while cecal Lactobacillus, as well as Bifidobacteria, concentrations in levan fructan treatments were increased compared with the CON. However, excreta NH3 concentrations were decreased (P=0.013) in levan fructan treatments compared with the CON. In conclusion, fructan supplementation improved later stage growth performance, increased cecal Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria concentrations, and decreased cecal E. coli and C. perfringens concentrations, as well as excreta NH3 concentrations, in broilers. PMID:24045474

  11. Behavioral deficits in sepsis-surviving rats induced by cecal ligation and perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Barichello

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis and its complications are the leading causes of mortality in intensive care units, accounting for 10-50% of deaths. Intensive care unit survivors present long-term cognitive impairment, including alterations in memory, attention, concentration, and/or global loss of cognitive function. In the present study, we investigated behavioral alterations in sepsis-surviving rats. One hundred and ten male Wistar rats (3-4 months, 250-300 g were submitted to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP, and 44 were submitted to sham operation. Forty-four rats (40% survived after CLP, and all sham-operated animals survived and were used as control. Twenty animals of each group were used in the object recognition task (10 in short-term memory and 10 in long-term memory, 12 in the plus-maze test and 12 in the forced swimming test. Ten days after surgery, the animals were submitted individually to an object recognition task, plus-maze and forced swimming tests. A significant impairment of short- and long-term recognition memory was observed in the sepsis group (recognition index 0.75 vs 0.55 and 0.74 vs 0.51 for short- and long-term memory, respectively (P < 0.05. In the elevated plus-maze test no difference was observed between groups in any of the parameters assessed. In addition, sepsis survivors presented an increase in immobility time in the forced swimming test (180 vs 233 s, P < 0.05, suggesting the presence of depressive-like symptoms in these animals after recovery from sepsis. The present results demonstrated that rats surviving exposure to CLP, a classical sepsis model, presented recognition memory impairment and depressive-like symptoms but not anxiety-like behavior.

  12. PD-L1 Blockade Attenuated Sepsis-Induced Liver Injury in a Mouse Cecal Ligation and Puncture Model

    OpenAIRE

    Weimin Zhu; Rui Bao; Xiaohua Fan; Tianzhu Tao; Jiali Zhu; Jiafeng Wang; Jinbao Li; Lulong Bo; Xiaoming Deng

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a major role in hypermetabolism and produces acute phase proteins during systemic inflammatory response syndrome and it is of vital importance in host defense and bacteria clearance. Our previous studies indicated that programmed death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) are crucial modulators of host immune responses during sepsis. Our current study was designed to investigate the role of PD-L1 in sepsis-induced liver injury by a mouse cecal ligation and pun...

  13. Digestibilidad in vitro Prececal y Cecal de plantas forrajeras tropicales para la nutrición en cerdos

    OpenAIRE

    Carvajal Tapia, Juliana Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Con el objetivo de evaluar nutricionalmente el follaje de leguminosas tropicales Canavalia (C. brasiliensis), Desmodium (D. velutinum), Caupi (V. unguiculata), Stylosanthes (S. guianensis), Cratylia (C argentea), Lablab (L purpureus), Centrosema (C. molle) y Centrocema brasilianum mediante pruebas de composición química, digestibilidad in vitro prececal de materia seca,(DIMS) energía (DIVE) y proteína (DIVP) y fermentación in vitro cecal. Se encontró C. molle y V. unguiculata tuvieron valores...

  14. Effects of probiotic inclusion levels in broiler nutrition on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, plasma immunoglobulins, and cecal microflora composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountzouris, K C; Tsitrsikos, P; Palamidi, I; Arvaniti, A; Mohnl, M; Schatzmayr, G; Fegeros, K

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of inclusion levels of a 5-bacterial species probiotic in broiler nutrition. Five hundred twenty-five 1-d-old male Cobb broilers were allocated in 5 experimental treatments for 6 wk. The experimental treatments received a corn-soybean coccidiostat-free basal diet and depending on the addition were labeled as follows: no addition (C), 10(8) cfu probiotic/kg of diet (P1), 10(9) cfu probiotic/kg of diet (P2), 10(10) cfu probiotic/kg of diet (P3), and 2.5 mg of avilamycin/kg of diet (A). Each treatment had 3 replicates of 35 broilers each. Treatment effects on broiler growth performance and biomarkers such as ileal and total tract nutrient digestibility, plasma Ig concentration, and cecal microflora composition were determined. Differences among treatments were considered significant when P feed conversion ratio values were similar and significantly better for P1 (1.80) and A (1.80) compared with P2 (1.87), C (1.89), and P3 (1.92). Ileal apparent digestibility coefficients (ADC) of CP and ether extract were higher in A. Generally, treatments A and P1 showed an improved total tract ADC for DM, organic matter, ash, ether extract, and AME(n) values. The total tract ADC of CP was higher in P1, C, and P2. There were no differences between treatments regarding plasma Ig in 14- and 42-d-old broilers. Treatments P2 and P3 were effective at beneficially modulating cecal microflora composition. In particular, the lower cecal coliform concentration (log cfu/g of wet digesta) was seen in P2 (6.12) and P3 (4.90) in 14- and 42-d-old broilers, respectively, whereas at 42 d, P3 and P2 had the highest Bifidobacterium (8.31; 8.08) and Lactobacillus concentrations (8.20; 7.86), respectively. It is concluded that probiotic inclusion level had a significant effect on broiler growth responses, nutrient ADC, AME(n), and cecal microflora composition. PMID:20008803

  15. Comparison of conventional culture methods and two commercial enzyme immunoassays for detection of Salmonella in porcine fecal samples and cecal contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    1997-01-01

    Two commercial enzyme immunoassays, designated EIA-1 and EIA-2, for the detection of salmonella in feces and cecal contents were compared to conventional culture methods. Out of 362 cecal content samples, 35 were positive by EIA-1 and 30 were positive by EIA-2 and conventional methods. Out of 189...... fecal samples, 41 were positive by EIA-1, 30 were positive by EIA-2, and 24 were positive by conventional culture methods. The EIA-1 assay method detected more positive samples overall, although only comparison of the fecal samples was statistically significant. The results indicate that the EIA-1...... method is rapid, requiring only 24 hours, and may he more sensitive than the EIA-2 assay and conventional culture techniques. Enzyme immunoassays for the detection elf salmonella in fecal samples or cecal contents provide a reasonable alternative to conventional culture techniques....

  16. Synchronous cecal adenocarcinoma and multiple colonic in situ carcinomas in hamartomatous polyps in a case of isolated Peutz–Jeghers syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahia Z Gad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Yahia Z Gad1, Doaa H Bakr1, Mohammad G El-Ebeidy21Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, Mansoura Specialized Medical Hospital, Mansoura University, Mansoura, EgyptBackground: Peutz–Jeghers syndrome (PJS is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation and hamartomatous polyps of the entire gastrointestinal tract. A Peutz–Jeghers polyp (PJP in a patient without pigmentation or a family history of the disease is called an isolated or solitary PJP. Individuals with PJS carry a very high risk of developing gastrointestinal (GI as well as extra-GI malignancies. This case report documents lesion multiplicity and their malignant potential in a young patient with PJS presenting in a serious condition for the first time.Case report: An 18-year-old female Egyptian patient was admitted with hematochezia and remarkable anemia. After appropriate resuscitation and consent, colonoscopic evaluation revealed seven pedunculated colonic polyps at the ascending and the transverse colon, and numerous variable-sized sessile polyps were scattered all over the colon. To establish hemostasis, endoscopic polypectomy for pedunculated polyps and argon plasma photocoagulation for the bleeding sessile polyps were performed. Histopathological examination revealed cecal adenocarcinoma in one specimen and two simultaneous in situ carcinoma at the transverse and the sigmoid colon in the mucosae of the excised histologically proven hamartomatous polyps. Additionally, one focal in situ carcinoma in the resected colon was detected.Conclusions: When considering the family history, serious GI neoplastic lesions may be unmasked in young patients with PJS who present with hematochezia, even in the absence of its characteristic mucocutaneous pigmented lesions. GI endoscopic surveillance programs should be adopted for diagnosed cases of PJS and their families. Genetic prenatal screening for early detection is the best option for

  17. Delayed Treatment with Sodium Hydrosulfide Improves Regional Blood Flow and Alleviates Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP)-Induced Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Akbar; Druzhyna, Nadiya; Szabo, Csaba

    2016-08-01

    Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis is a serious medical condition, caused by a severe systemic infection resulting in a systemic inflammatory response. Recent studies have suggested the therapeutic potential of donors of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel endogenous gasotransmitter and biological mediator in various diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of H2S supplementation in sepsis, with special reference to its effect on the modulation of regional blood flow. We infused sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a compound that produces H2S in aqueous solution (1, 3, or 10 mg/kg/h, for 1 h at each dose level) in control rats or rats 24 h after CLP, and measured blood flow using fluorescent microspheres. In normal control animals, NaHS induced a characteristic redistribution of blood flow, and reduced cardiac, hepatic, and renal blood flow in a dose-dependent fashion. In contrast, in rats subjected to CLP, cardiac, hepatic, and renal blood flow was significantly reduced; infusion of NaHS (1 mg/kg/h and 3 mg/kg/h) significantly increased organ blood flow. In other words, the effect of H2S on regional blood flow is dependent on the status of the animals (i.e., a decrease in blood flow in normal controls, but an increase in blood flow in CLP). We have also evaluated the effect of delayed treatment with NaHS on organ dysfunction and the inflammatory response by treating the animals with NaHS (3 mg/kg) intraperitoneally (i.p.) at 24 h after the start of the CLP procedure; plasma levels of various cytokines and tissue indicators of inflammatory cell infiltration and oxidative stress were measured 6 h later. After 24 h of CLP, glomerular function was significantly impaired, as evidenced by markedly increased (over 4-fold over baseline) blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels; this increase was also significantly reduced by treatment with NaHS. NaHS also attenuated the CLP-induced increases in malondialdehyde levels (an index of

  18. Metabolomic Analyses of Brain Tissue in Sepsis Induced by Cecal Ligation Reveal Specific Redox Alterations-Protective Effects of the Oxygen Radical Scavenger Edaravone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hara, Naomi; Chijiiwa, Miyuki; Yara, Miki;

    2015-01-01

    analyzing the preventive effect of the free radical scavenger edaravone on sepsis-induced brain alterations. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and the mice were divided into three groups-CLP vehicle (CLPV), CLP and edaravone (MCI-186, 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) (CLPE), and...... induced by cecal ligation alters cerebral redox status and supports a proapoptotic phenotype. The free radical scavenger edavarone reduces mortality of septic mice and protects against sepsis-induced neuronal cell death....

  19. Western diet enhances hepatic inflammation in mice exposed to cecal ligation and puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houghton Jeff

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obese patients display an exaggerated morbidity during sepsis. Since consumption of a western-style diet (WD is a major factor for obesity in the United States, the purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of chronic WD consumption on hepatic inflammation in mice made septic via cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. Feeding mice diets high in fat has been shown to enhance evidence of TLR signaling and this pathway also mediates the hepatic response to invading bacteria. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combined effects of sepsis and feeding WD on TRL-4 signaling would exacerbate hepatic inflammation. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed purified control diet (CD or WD that was enriched in butter fat (34.4% of calories for 3 weeks prior to CLP. Intravital microscopy was used to evaluate leukocyte adhesion in the hepatic microcirculation. To demonstrate the direct effect of saturated fatty acid on hepatocytes, C3A human hepatocytes were cultured in medium containing 100 μM palmitic acid (PA. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to assess mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4 and interleukin-8 (IL-8. Results Feeding WD increased firm adhesion of leukocytes in the sinusoids and terminal hepatic venules by 8-fold six hours after CLP; the increase in platelet adhesion was similar to the response observed with leukocytes. Adhesion was accompanied by enhanced expression of TNF-α, MCP-1 and ICAM-1. Messenger RNA expression of TLR-4 was also exacerbated in the WD+CLP group. Exposure of C3A cells to PA up-regulated IL-8 and TLR-4 expression. In addition, PA stimulated the static adhesion of U937 monocytes to C3A cells, a phenomenon blocked by inclusion of an anti-TLR-4/MD2 antibody in the culture medium. Conclusions These findings indicate a link between obesity-enhanced susceptibility to sepsis and

  20. Use of an electromagnetic colonoscope to assess maneuvers associated with cecal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leighton Jonathan A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe and effective colonoscopy is aided by the use of endoscopic techniques and maneuvers (ETM during the examination including patient repositioning, stiffening of the endoscope and abdominal pressure. Aim To better understand the use and value of ETM during colonoscopy by using a device that allows real-time imaging of the colonoscope insertion shaft. Methods The use of ETM during colonoscopy and their success was recorded. Experienced colonoscopists and endoscopy assistants used a commercially available electromagnetic (EM transmitter and a special adult variable stiffness instrument with 12 embedded sensors to examine 46 patients. In 5 of these a special EM probe passed through the instrument channel of a standard pediatric variable stiffness colonoscope was used instead of the EM colonoscope. Results Thirty-nine men and 7 women with a mean age of 64 years (range 33–90 were studied. The cecum was intubated in 93.5% (43/46. The mean time to reach the cecum was 10.6 minutes (range 3–25. ETM were used a total of 174 times in 41 of the patients to assist with cecal intubation. When ETM were required to reach the cecum, and the cecum was intubated, an average of 3.82 ETM/patient was used. While ETM were used most often when the tip of the colonoscope was in the left side of the colon (rectum 5.0%, sigmoid colon 20.7%, descending colon 5.0%, and splenic flexure 11.6%, when the instrument was in the transverse colon (14.8%, hepatic flexure (20.7% and ascending colon (19.8% the use of ETM was also required. When the colonoscope tip was in the transverse colon, hepatic flexure and ascending colon, ETM success rates were less (61.1%, 52.0%, and 41.7% respectively compared to the left colon success rates (rectum 83.3%, sigmoid colon 84.0%, descending colon 100%, and splenic flexure 85.7%. Conclusion The EM colonoscope allows imaging of the insertion shaft without fluoroscopy and is a useful device for evaluating the efficacy of

  1. Probiotic level effects on growth performance, carcass traits, blood parameters, cecal microbiota, and immune response of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourakbari, Mohammadreza; Seidavi, Alireza; Asadpour, Leila; Martínez, Andrés

    2016-05-31

    Probiotic effects on growth performance, carcass traits, blood parameters, cecal microbiota, and immune response of broilers were studied. Two hundred one-day-old male chickens were allocated to one of five treatments (four replicates of 10 birds per treatment): control, and the same control diet supplemented with 0.005%, 0.01%, 0.015% and 0.02% probiotics. Probiotics in feed at 0.01% or higher levels of supplementation improved body weight gain (+12%) and feed conversion rate (-5%) compared with the control. There were no effects on carcass traits, but the relative weights of drumsticks and wings showed increasing and decreasing linear responses, respectively, to probiotic supplementation level. Blood plasma glucose and albumin contents linearly increased (from 167.1 to 200.5 mg dl-1, and from 1.70 to 3.25 g dl-1) with increasing probiotic supplementation. Triglycerides and cholesterol contents were lower in probiotic supplemented treatments (average contents 71.3 and 125.3 mg dl-1 vs. 92.6 and 149.9 mg dl-1 in the control). Probiotics decreased cecal Escherichia coli counts, but had no effects on immunity related organs or immune response. The linear trends, either positive or negative, observed in many of the parameters studied, suggest that more studies are needed to establish the optimal concentration of probiotics in broiler feed. PMID:27254451

  2. Effects of natural blend of essential oil on growth performance, blood biochemistry, cecal morphology, and carcass quality of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, F; Ronchi, A; Castelli, P; Sparks, N

    2014-01-01

    The study evaluated the effect of a novel commercial preparation of natural blend of essential oils from basil, caraway, laurel, lemon, oregano, sage, tea, and thyme (Tecnaroma Herbal Mix PL) on growth performance, blood biochemistry, cecal morphology, and carcass quality of broilers. Six nutritionally adequate wheat and soybean-based diets were generated by the addition of Tecnaroma Herbal Mix PL at 0, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 g/t of feed. The diets were fed as crumbs in the starter phase (d 0-10) and as pellets during the grower (d 10-24) and finisher (d 24-42) phases. Nine hundred sixty 1-d-old chicks were allocated to the 6 dietary treatments each having 8 replicate pens with 20 birds per pen. The data obtained were analyzed using ANOVA with a P feed to gain ratio compared with the control group during grower phase and overall performance. The blood biochemistry results showed no differences (P > 0.05) between treatments. The carcass weight, breast weight, and relative percentage of breast meat increased (P feed was optimum for enhancing breast meat yield and nutrient utilization as indicated by increased (P < 0.05) cecal villus surface area. PMID:24570432

  3. Effect of propolis alcoholic extract on the weight gain, carcass traits and cecal pH of growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseli Alves Ferreira Zanato

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of different rates of propolis alcoholic extract (PAE on the weight gain, carcass traits and cecal pH of growing rabbits. Forty White New Zealand rabbits were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design consisting of four treatments and ten replicates per treatment. The rabbits were allocated individually in wire cages containing a nipple drinker and a semi-automatic feeder. The treatments were: T1 = control, T2 = 1ml of ethanol, T3 = 0.8ml of PAE, and T4 = 1.5ml of PAE. Commercial feed and water were provided ad libitum to the animals, and the treatment with cereal alcohol and PAE was administered orally using a 2ml syringe. It was concluded that the addition of PAE to the rabbits’ feeding resulted in weight gain, carcass traits and cecal pH similar to those of animals which received the diets with ethanol without any addition, except for the paw weight, that was higher in the rabbits which were given PAE, and for the gastric system, that had a higher weight in the rabbits which received no addition to their diet.

  4. Effects of apples and specific apple components on the cecal environment of conventional rats: role of apple pectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markowski Jaroslaw

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our study was part of the large European project ISAFRUIT aiming to reveal the biological explanations for the epidemiologically well-established health effects of fruits. The objective was to identify effects of apple and apple product consumption on the composition of the cecal microbial community in rats, as well as on a number of cecal parameters, which may be influenced by a changed microbiota. Results Principal Component Analysis (PCA of cecal microbiota profiles obtained by PCR-DGGE targeting bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed an effect of whole apples in a long-term feeding study (14 weeks, while no effects of apple juice, purée or pomace on microbial composition in cecum were observed. Administration of either 0.33 or 3.3% apple pectin in the diet resulted in considerable changes in the DGGE profiles. A 2-fold increase in the activity of beta-glucuronidase was observed in animals fed with pectin (7% in the diet for four weeks, as compared to control animals (P Bacteroidetes, whereas bands that became more prominent represented mainly Gram-positive anaerobic rods belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, and specific species belonging to the Clostridium Cluster XIVa. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed a lower amount of given Bacteroidetes species in the pectin-fed rats as well as in the apple-fed rats in the four-week study (P Clostridium coccoides (belonging to Cluster XIVa, as well as of genes encoding butyryl-coenzyme A CoA transferase, which is involved in butyrate production, was detected by quantitative PCR in fecal samples from the pectin-fed animals. Conclusions Our findings show that consumption of apple pectin (7% in the diet increases the population of butyrate- and β-glucuronidase producing Clostridiales, and decreases the population of specific species within the Bacteroidetes group in the rat gut. Similar changes were not caused by consumption of whole apples, apple juice, purée or pomace.

  5. Rat cecal inocula produce different patterns of short-chain fatty acids than fecal inocula in in vitro fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsma, D J; Marlett, J A

    1995-10-01

    The effects of bacterial collection site, bacterial adaption to substrate and duration of fermentation on short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production were studied using an in vitro fermentation system. Cecal and fecal inocula from rats fed purified diets containing 100 g/kg dietary fiber from canned peas or psyllium seed husk, or a nonpurified diet containing 170 g/kg dietary fiber fermented ileal excreta from colectomized rats fed a purified diet containing 100 g/kg dietary fiber from canned peas. The SCFA concentration, measured by gas chromatography, in anaerobic fermentations of 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h, increased (P psyllium seed husk at most time points. We conclude that collection site, adaptation of bacteria to the substrate to be fermented and duration of fermentation significantly influence the results of in vitro fermentation studies. PMID:7562080

  6. Effects of apples and specific apple components on the cecal environment of conventional rats: Role of apple pectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Tine Rask; Hansen, Max; Bergström, Anders;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Our study was part of the large European project ISAFRUIT aiming to reveal the biological explanations for the epidemiologically well-established health effects of fruits. The objective was to identify effects of apple and apple product consumption on the composition of the cecal...... study (14 weeks), while no effects of apple juice, puree or pomace on microbial composition in cecum were observed. Administration of either 0.33 or 3.3% apple pectin in the diet resulted in considerable changes in the DGGE profiles. A 2-fold increase in the activity of beta-glucuronidase was observed......-glucuronidase producing Clostridiales, and decreases the population of specific species within the Bacteroidetes group in the rat gut. Similar changes were not caused by consumption of whole apples, apple juice, puree or pomace....

  7. Prevalência de helmintíases em apêndices cecais Prevalence of helmintiasis in cecal appendices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Beatriz Gehlen Ferrari

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar a prevalência do diagnóstico de helmintíases em apêndices cecais removidos por procedimentos cirúrgicos em municípios do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul e enviados para o Instituto de Patologia de Passo Fundo. MÉTODO: Estudo transversal de prevalência. Analisados 3.646 laudos de apêndices cecais do Instituto de Patologia de Passo Fundo, no período de 01 de maio de 1995 a 24 de abril de 2001. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de helmintos nas peças cirúrgicas foi de 3,07 % (n=112, com a enterobíase perfazendo 66,07% (n=74 dos casos, seguidos por angiostrongilíase 20,54 % 9 (n=23, multiparasitose 5,35% (n=6, teníase 4,47% (n=5, ascaridíase 2,68 % (n=3 e um caso de ovo de helminto não identificado. O diagnóstico histopatológico de apendicite aguda, ocorreu em 75,09% dos casos associados à helmintíase. CONCLUSÃO: A prevalência do diagnóstico histopatológico de helmintíases em apêndices cecais ressecados, por provável diagnóstico clínico de apendicite ou abdômen agudo, encontrados em nosso meio foi semelhante aos descritos mundialmente. O exame histopatológico pode revelar helmintos ou ovos durante ou após a intervenção.BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to report the prevalence of the helmintíases in cecal appendices surgically removed. METHOD: Transversal study of prevalence. Analyzed 3.646 reports of cecal appendices from the Instituto de Pathologia de Passo Fundo, from May 01, 1995 to April 24, 2001. RESULTS: The prevalence of helmints on the surgical speciments was 3.07% (n=112, with the enterobiases present in 66.07% (n=74 of the cases, followed by angiostrongyliasis in 20.54% (n=23, multiparasitosis 5.35% (n=6, teniasis 4.47% (n=5, ascariadiasis 2.68% (n=3 and one case of an unidentified worm's egg. Males were 53.57% and 46.43% were females, with mean age of 19 ± 12 years. The histopatological diagnosis of acute appendicitis, occurred in 75.09% of the cases associated to helmint

  8. Molecular identification and characterization of ileal and cecal fungus communities in broilers given probiotics, specific essential oil blends, and under mixed Eimeria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Michael E; Hernandez, Charles A; Barbosa, Nei A; Sakomura, Nilva K; Dowd, Scott E; Oviedo-Rondón, Edgar O

    2012-09-01

    Broiler digestive tract fungal communities have gained far less scrutiny than that given corresponding bacterial communities. Attention given poultry-associated fungi have focused primarily on feed-associated toxin-producers, yeast, and yeast products. The current project focused on the use of pyrosequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to identify and monitor broiler digestive fungal communities. Eight different treatments were included. Four controls were an Uninfected-Unmedicated Control, an Unmedicated-Infected Control, the antibiotic bacitracin methylene disalicylate plus the ionophore monensin as Positive Control, and the ionophore monensin alone as a Negative Control. Four treatments were two probiotics (BC-30 and Calsporin) and two specific essential oil blends (Crina Poultry Plus and Crina Poultry AF). All chickens except the Unmedicated-Uninfected Control were given, at 15 days of age, a standard oral Eimeria inoculum of sporulated oocysts. Ileal and cecal digesta were collected at pre-Eimeria infection at 14 days of age and at 7 days post-Eimeria infection at 22 days of age. Extracted cecal DNA was analyzed by pyrosequencing to examine the impact of diet supplements and Eimeria infection on individual constituents in the fungal community, while DGGE was used to compare more qualitative changes in ileal and cecal communities. Pyrosequencing identified three phyla, seven classes, eight orders, 13 families, 17 genera, and 23 fungal species. Ileal and cecal DGGE patterns showed fungal communities were clustered mainly into pre- and post-infection patterns. Post-infection Unmedicated-Uninfected patterns were clustered with pre-infection groups demonstrating a strong effect of Eimeria infection on digestive fungal populations. These combined techniques offered added versatility towards unraveling the effects of enteropathogen infection and performance enhancing feed additives on broiler digestive microflora. PMID:22779701

  9. Absorptive activity of calcium in the isolated cecal epithelium adaptively increased by 2 week's feeding of difructose anhydride III in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Mineo, Hitoshi; Amano, Midori; Chiji, Hideyuki; Shigematsu, Norihiro; Tomita, Fusao; Hara, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    We compared net Ca absorption and Lucifer Yellow (LY), a paracellular passage dye, permeability in the epithelium isolated from the rat small intestine, cecum, and colon after feeding with control and difructose anhydride (DFA) III diets for 14 days using the Ussing chamber system. Feeding of DFA III increased net Ca transport and LY passage in the cecal but not in small intestinal or colonic epithelium. Ability of paracellular Ca passage via Tight-junction (TJ) in the cecum was changed adapt...

  10. Effect of lactulose supplementation on growth performance, intestinal histomorphology, cecal microbial population, and short-chain fatty acid composition of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Ali; Ergün, Ahmet

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary lactulose supplementation on broiler growth performance, intestinal histomorphology, cecal microflora, and cecal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations. A total of 245 one-day-old male broiler chickens were randomly assigned to 5 different treatments, with 7 replicates including 7 birds each. The birds received the same basal diet based on corn--soybean meal, and lactulose was included in the diet at 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, or 0.8% at the expense of corn and/or soybean meal. The body weight gain (linear, P=0.027) and feed conversion (linear, P=0.003) from 0 to 21 d showed significant improvement as dietary lactulose was increased from 0.2 to 0.8%. However, dietary lactulose did not affect broiler performance at the end of the experiment (42 d). Furthermore, intestinal measurements and the goblet cell count of broilers fed a lactulose-containing diet differed from those of birds fed a diet that did not contain lactulose. In addition, a significant quadratic response in the Lactobacillus count (P≤0.001) was observed at 42 d on increasing the level of lactulose. The cecal coliform bacterial population was not affected by the dietary treatments. Supplementation with lactulose significantly increased the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, and total SCFA measured on d 7 and d 42. In conclusion, inclusion of lactulose in the diet can enhance broiler performance and intestinal morphology by selectively stimulating intestinal microflora and increasing cecal SCFA concentrations. PMID:26188035

  11. Growth Performance, Relative Meat and Organ Weights, Cecal Microflora, and Blood Characteristics in Broiler Chickens Fed Diets Containing Different Nutrient Density with or without Essential Oils

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Kang, Chang-Won; An, Byoung-Ki

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate whether dietary essential oils could affect growth performance, relative organ weights, cecal microflora, immune responses and blood profiles of broiler chickens fed on diets containing different nutrient densities. A total of eight hundred-forty 1-d-old male broiler chicks were randomly allotted into twenty-eight pens (7 pens per treatment, 30 chicks per pen). There were four experimental diets containing two different nutrient densities and sup...

  12. Successional changes in the chicken cecal microbiome during 42 days of growth are independent of organic acid feed additives

    OpenAIRE

    Oakley, Brian B; Buhr, R Jeff; Ritz, Casey W; Kiepper, Brian H; Berrang, Mark E.; Seal, Bruce S.; Cox, Nelson A

    2014-01-01

    Background Poultry remains a major source of foodborne bacterial infections. A variety of additives with presumed anti-microbial and/or growth-promoting effects are commonly added to poultry feed during commercial grow-out, yet the effects of these additives on the gastrointestinal microbial community (the GI microbiome) as the bird matures remain largely unknown. Here we compared temporal changes in the cecal microbiome to the effects of formic acid, propionic acid, and medium-chain fatty ac...

  13. Maximizing the general success of cecal intubation during propofol sedation in a multi-endoscopist academic centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donà Barbara M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achieving the target of 95% colonoscopy completion rate at centres conducting colorectal screening programs is an important issue. Large centres and teaching hospitals employing endoscopists with different levels of training and expertise risk achieving worse results. Deep sedation with propofol in routine colonoscopy could maximize the results of cecal intubation. Methods The present study on the experience of a single centre focused on estimating the overall completion rate of colonoscopies performed under routine propofol sedation at a large teaching hospital with many operators involved, and on assessing the factors that influence the success rate of the procedure and how to improve this performance, analyzing the aspects relating to using of deep sedation. Twenty-one endoscopists, classified by their level of specialization in colonoscopic practice, performed 1381 colonoscopies under deep sedation. All actions needed for the anaesthesiologist to restore adequate oxygenation or hemodynamics, even for transient changes, were recorded. Results The "crude" overall completion rate was 93.3%. This finding shows that with routine deep sedation, the colonoscopy completion rate nears, but still does not reach, the target performance for colonoscopic screening programs, at centers where colonoscopists of difference experience are employed in such programs. Factors interfering with cecal intubation were: inadequate colon cleansing, endoscopists' expertise in colonoscopic practice, patients' body weight under 60 kg or age over 71 years, and the need for active intervention by the anaesthesiologist. The most favourable situation - a patient less than 71 years old with a body weight over 60 kg, an adequate bowel preparation, a "highly experienced specialist" performing the test, and no need for active anaesthesiological intervention during the procedure - coincided with a 98.8% probability of the colonoscopy being completed

  14. Effects of a probiotic, Enterococcus faecium, on growth performance, intestinal morphology, immune response, and cecal microflora in broiler chickens challenged with Escherichia coli K88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, G T; Zeng, X F; Chen, A G; Zhou, L; Zhang, L; Xiao, Y P; Yang, C M

    2013-11-01

    The effects of feeding dehydrated Enterococcus faecium on growth performance, immune response, and cecal microflora in broiler chickens challenged with Escherichia coli K88 were investigated. Two hundred eighty-eight 1-d-old birds were randomly assigned to 4 treatments: negative control birds (N-con) fed a basal diet and not challenged with E. coli K88; positive control birds (P-con) fed a basal diet and challenged with E. coli K88; birds fed a basal diet including dehydrated E. faecium (Ef) at 1 × 10(9) cfu/kg of feed and challenged with E. coli K88; and birds fed a basal diet including the antibiotic colistine sulfate (Anti) at 10 mg/kg of feed and challenged with E. coli K88. Birds fed E. faecium had greater (P Clostridium perfringens on d 28, greater Lactobacillus counts on d 14 and 21, and greater (P < 0.05) Bifidobacterium in their cecal contents on d 21 than did the P-con birds. These results suggest that E. faecium can promote growth performance, improve intestinal morphology, and beneficially manipulate the cecal microflora in broilers challenged with E. coli K88. PMID:24135599

  15. Metagenomic analysis reveals a functional signature for biomass degradation by cecal microbiota in the leaf-eating flying squirrel (Petaurista alborufus lena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Hsiao-Pei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animals co-evolve with their gut microbiota; the latter can perform complex metabolic reactions that cannot be done independently by the host. Although the importance of gut microbiota has been well demonstrated, there is a paucity of research regarding its role in foliage-foraging mammals with a specialized digestive system. Results In this study, a 16S rRNA gene survey and metagenomic sequencing were used to characterize genetic diversity and functional capability of cecal microbiota of the folivorous flying squirrel (Petaurista alborufus lena. Phylogenetic compositions of the cecal microbiota derived from 3 flying squirrels were dominated by Firmicutes. Based on end-sequences of fosmid clones from 1 flying squirrel, we inferred that microbial metabolism greatly contributed to intestinal functions, including degradation of carbohydrates, metabolism of proteins, and synthesis of vitamins. Moreover, 33 polysaccharide-degrading enzymes and 2 large genomic fragments containing a series of carbohydrate-associated genes were identified. Conclusions Cecal microbiota of the leaf-eating flying squirrel have great metabolic potential for converting diverse plant materials into absorbable nutrients. The present study should serve as the basis for future investigations, using metagenomic approaches to elucidate the intricate mechanisms and interactions between host and gut microbiota of the flying squirrel digestive system, as well as other mammals with similar adaptations.

  16. Effect of dietary inclusion of sorghum milling waste on growth response, nutrient utilisation, gut characteristics and cecal microflora of weaner rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oso, Oladele A; Sobayo, Richard; Jegede, Vincent; Fafiolu, Adeboye; Iyasere, Oluwaseun Serah; Dele, Peter; Bamgbose, Adeyemi; Cecilia, Adesida

    2011-06-01

    Growth response, nutrient digestibility and cecal microflora of 80 male, mixed breed weaner rabbits fed with varying dietary inclusions of sorghum milling waste (SMW) was investigated. Four experimental diets were formulated such that SMW was included at 0 (control), 100, 200 and 300 g/kg, respectively. Each dietary treatment was performed on 20 rabbits. Feed intake increased (P < 0.05) while final live weight and feed conversion ratio of rabbits decreased (P < 0.05) following increased dietary inclusion of SMW. Rabbits fed with 100 and 200 g/kg SMW had similar feed conversion ratios, weight gain, crude fiber, dry matter and crude protein digestibility values. Rabbits fed with 300 g/kg SMW recorded the lowest (P < 0.05) hot carcass weight, dressing percentage and rack weight. Similar dressing percentage and rack weight were recorded for rabbits fed with control diet, 100 and 200 g/kg SMW. The weight of cecal content increased (P < 0.05) with increased dietary inclusion levels of SMW. Rabbits fed with 300 g/kg SMW recorded the lowest (P < 0.05) coliform and lactobaccillus counts. Dietary inclusion of up to 200 g/kg SMW supported improved growth response and carcass yield without imposing any detrimental effect on cecal microflora. PMID:21615842

  17. Simultaneous malignancies consisting of cecal cancer, sigmoid colon cancer and pleomorphic sarcoma around the left iliac bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 71-year-old woman, who had surgery and subsequent irradiation for uterine canner 29 years prior, developed pain around her left hip and leg. Computed tomography showed a soft tissue density mass around the left iliac bone measuring 13 cm in diameter. An incisional biopsy revealed a pleomorphic sarcoma. On positron emission tomography and colonoscopy, a cecal cancer a sigmoid colon cancer were detected. These two colonic cancers were surgically removed to prevent bowel obstruction. Both of the tumors presented as bulky masses with well-defined margins invading the proper muscle layers and the surrounding colonic wall; they exhibited dysplasia, foamy cells, and thickened arterial walls that showed hyalinization, indicating radiation-induced colitis. Namely, all these tumors including the pleomorphic sarcoma around the iliac bone were considered to be radiation-induced tumors. Radiation-induced cancer is a late complication of irradiation and when diagnosed is often advanced. Both patients and clinicians should be cognizant of the potential consequences of irradiation; appropriate follow-up should be instituted. (author)

  18. PD-L1 Blockade Attenuated Sepsis-Induced Liver Injury in a Mouse Cecal Ligation and Puncture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver plays a major role in hypermetabolism and produces acute phase proteins during systemic inflammatory response syndrome and it is of vital importance in host defense and bacteria clearance. Our previous studies indicated that programmed death-1 (PD-1 and its ligand programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 are crucial modulators of host immune responses during sepsis. Our current study was designed to investigate the role of PD-L1 in sepsis-induced liver injury by a mouse cecal ligation and puncture (CLP model. Our results indicated that there was a significant increase of PD-L1 expression in liver after CLP challenge compared to sham-operated controls, in terms of levels of mRNA transcription and immunohistochemistry. Anti-PD-L1 antibody significantly alleviated the morphology of liver injury in CLP mice. Anti-PD-L1 antibody administration decreased ALT and AST release in CLP mice, decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA in liver after sepsis challenge. Thus, anti-PD-L1 antibody might have a therapeutic potential in attenuating liver injury in sepsis.

  19. Campylobacter inoculation and quantification from broiler cecal samples to compare two plate counting methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Anderlise Borsoi; Camila Cristina Gonsalves; Edson Ricardo Marcondes Pires; Laura Beatriz Rodrigues; Luciana Ruschel dos Santos; Vladimir Pinheiro do Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacteriosis is a zoonosis, a disease transmitted to humans from animals or animal products. The primarily source of Campylobacter infection in human is believed to be the handling and/or consumption of contaminated meat, especially poultry meat. Although in humans such infections are generally self-limiting, complications can arise and may include bacteraemia, Guillain-Barré syndrome, reactive arthritis and abortion. In this study, 32 birds were divided in 2 groups: a control (C) group...

  20. Resistant starch alters gut microbiome and metabolomic profiles concurrent with amelioration of chronic kidney disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Dorothy A; Piccolo, Brian D; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Liu, Shuman; Lau, Wei L; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Nazertehrani, Sohrab; Moore, Mary E; Marco, Maria L; Martin, Roy J; Adams, Sean H

    2016-05-01

    Patients and animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit profound alterations in the gut environment including shifts in microbial composition, increased fecal pH, and increased blood levels of gut microbe-derived metabolites (xenometabolites). The fermentable dietary fiber high amylose maize-resistant starch type 2 (HAMRS2) has been shown to alter the gut milieu and in CKD rat models leads to markedly improved kidney function. The aim of the present study was to identify specific cecal bacteria and cecal, blood, and urinary metabolites that associate with changes in kidney function to identify potential mechanisms involved with CKD amelioration in response to dietary resistant starch. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with adenine-induced CKD were fed a semipurified low-fiber diet or a high-fiber diet [59% (wt/wt) HAMRS2] for 3 wk (n = 9 rats/group). The cecal microbiome was characterized, and cecal contents, serum, and urine metabolites were analyzed. HAMRS2-fed rats displayed decreased cecal pH, decreased microbial diversity, and an increased Bacteroidetes-to-Firmicutes ratio. Several uremic retention solutes were altered in the cecal contents, serum, and urine, many of which had strong correlations with specific gut bacteria abundances, i.e., serum and urine indoxyl sulfate were reduced by 36% and 66%, respectively, in HAMRS2-fed rats and urine p-cresol was reduced by 47% in HAMRS2-fed rats. Outcomes from this study were coincident with improvements in kidney function indexes and amelioration of CKD outcomes previously reported for these rats, suggesting an important role for microbial-derived factors and gut microbe metabolism in regulating host kidney function. PMID:26841824

  1. Cecal ligation and puncture followed by MRSA pneumonia increases mortality in mice and blunts production of local and systemic cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Enjae; Perrone, Erin E.; Liang, Zhe; Breed, Elise R.; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Clark, Andrew T.; Fox, Amy C.; Dunne, W. Michael; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality in the ICU frequently results from the synergistic effect of two temporally-distinct infections. This study examined the pathophysiology of a new model of intraabdominal sepsis followed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia. Mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy followed three days later by an intratracheal injection of MRSA or saline. Both CLP/saline and sham/MRSA mice had 100% survival while animals with CLP followed by MRSA pneumonia had 67% seven-day survival. Animals subjected to CLP/MRSA had increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) concentrations of MRSA compared to sham/MRSA animals. Animals subjected to sham/MRSA pneumonia had increased BAL levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and G-CSF compared to those given intratracheal saline while CLP/MRSA mice had a blunted local inflammatory response with markedly decreased cytokine levels. Similarly, animals subjected to CLP/saline had increased peritoneal lavage levels of IL-6 and IL-1β compared to those subjected to sham laparotomy while this response was blunted in CLP/MRSA mice. Systemic cytokines were upregulated in both CLP/saline and sham/MRSA mice, and this was blunted by the combination of CLP/MRSA. In contrast, no synergistic effect on pneumonia severity, white blood cell count or lymphocyte apoptosis was identified in CLP/MRSA mice compared to animals with either insult in isolation. These results indicate that a clinically relevant model of CLP followed by MRSA pneumonia causes higher mortality than could have been predicted from studying either infection in isolation, and this was associated with a blunted local (pulmonary and peritoneal) and systemic inflammatory response and decreased ability to clear infection. PMID:21937950

  2. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi;

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition of...... human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should not...... stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases. The...

  3. Effects of Clostridium butyricum on growth performance, immune function, and cecal microflora in broiler chickens challenged with Escherichia coli K88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Cao, G T; Zeng, X F; Zhou, L; Ferket, P R; Xiao, Y P; Chen, A G; Yang, C M

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of Clostridium butyricumon growth performance, immune function, and cecal microflora in broiler chickens challenged with Escherichia coli K88. Three hundred sixty 1-d-old broiler chickens were randomly divided into 4 treatments: negative control (NC) birds were fed a basal diet and not challenged with E. coli K88; positive control (PC) birds were fed a basal diet and challenged with E. coli K88; C. butyricum treatment (CB) birds were fed a diet containing 2 × 10(7) cfu C. butyricum/kg of diet and challenged with E. coli K88; and colistin sulfate treatment (CS) birds were fed a diet containing 20 mg of colistin sulfate/kg of diet and challenged with E. coli K88. Birds fed CB had greater (P Clostridium perfringens counts at 21 d postchallenge compared with the PC birds. The CB treatment increased (P chickens. PMID:24570422

  4. Effects of Dietary Fermented Chlorella vulgaris (CBT(®)) on Growth Performance, Relative Organ Weights, Cecal Microflora, Tibia Bone Characteristics, and Meat Qualities in Pekin Ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S T; Zheng, L; Kwon, H J; Choo, Y K; Lee, K W; Kang, C W; An, B K

    2015-01-01

    Fermented Chlorella vulgaris was examined for its effects on growth performance, cecal microflora, tibia bone strength, and meat qualities in commercial Pekin ducks. A total of three hundred, day-old male Pekin ducks were divided into three groups with five replicates (n = 20 ducklings per replicate) and offered diets supplemented with commercial fermented C. vulgaris (CBT(®)) at the level of 0, 1,000 or 2,000 mg/kg, respectively for 6 wks. The final body weight was linearly (p = 0.001) increased as the addition of fermented C. vulgaris into diets increased. Similarly, dietary C. vulgaris linearly increased body weight gain (p = 0.001) and feed intake (p = 0.001) especially at the later days of the feeding trial. However, there was no C. vulgaris effect on feed efficiency. Relative weights of liver were significantly lowered by dietary fermented C. vulgaris (linear effect at p = 0.044). Dietary fermented C. vulgaris did not affect total microbes, lactic acid bacteria, and coliforms in cecal contents. Finally, meat quality parameters such as meat color (i.e., yellowness), shear force, pH, or water holding capacity were altered by adding fermented C. vulgaris into the diet. In our knowledge, this is the first report to show that dietary fermented C. vulgaris enhanced meat qualities of duck meats. In conclusion, our study indicates that dietary fermented C. vulgaris exerted benefits on productivity and can be employed as a novel, nutrition-based strategy to produce value-added duck meats. PMID:25557680

  5. Chronic kidney disease-induced HMGB1 elevation worsens sepsis and sepsis-induced acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Huang, Yuning; Hu, Xuzhen; Zhou, Hua; Tsuji, Takayuki; Chen, Richard; Jeffrey B Kopp; Schnermann, Jürgen; Yuen, Peter S.T.; Star, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed that kidney dysfunction/interstitial fibrosis by folate predisposes mice to sepsis mortality (normal/sepsis: 15%; folate/sepsis: 90%); agents that increased survival in normal septic mice were ineffective in the two-stage model. We used a recently characterized 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) mouse model of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) to study how CKD impacts sepsis and acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by cecal ligation-puncture (CLP). CKD intensified sepsis severity (...

  6. Distribution of Lymphocytes in the Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissues (MALT) of Naturally Occurring Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) in Chicken

    OpenAIRE

    M. M. Uddin*, M. Z. I. Khan1, K. N. Islam, A. S. M. G. Kibria, G. N. Adhikary2, M. N. H. Parvez3, J. Basu, M. B. Uddin4 and M. M. Rahman5

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate changes in the number and distribution of lymphocytes in the mucosa associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of digestive tract (proventriculus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum and cecal tonsils) and respiratory system (lungs) of chicken infected by Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV). Samples were divided into two groups; IBDV infected group (21, 24 and 30 days old) and control group (non infected birds; 21 days old). Haematoxylin and eosin stained slides wer...

  7. Características do líquido peritoneal de eqüinos normais após punção cecal percutânea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valadão Carlos Augusto Araújo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliados 10 eqüinos da raça Manga Larga, machos, inteiros clinicamente sadios, submetidos à punção cecal percutânea. Analisou-se a resposta clínica, celular, bioquímica e microbiológica do líquido peritoneal por um período de 24 horas após a punção cecal, nos tempos T0, T6, T12 e T24. Foi observada elevação na freqüência respiratória em T6 e na temperatura retal entre T6 e T12. Decorridas 24 horas da punção cecal, ocorreu aumento na concentração de proteínas totais do líquido peritoneal e na atividade da fosfatase alcalina. Tanto a atividade da ALT quanto os níveis de hemoglobina apresentaram diminuição em T6. Não foram registradas alterações na celularidade do plasma ou do líquido peritoneal e obteve-se resultado negativo para a cultura microbiológica do líquido. Considerando a inexistência de efeitos adversos, além das poucas alterações descritas, conclui-se que a punção cecal percutânea é um procedimento seguro e factível, se praticada criteriosamente.

  8. Decreased IgA+ B Cells Population and IgA, IgG, IgM Contents of the Cecal Tonsil Induced by Dietary High Fluorine in Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangping Wang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is an environmental and industrial pollutant that affects various organs in humans and animals. The cecal tonsil is an important component of the mucosal immune system and performs important and unique immune functions. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary high fluorine on the quantities of IgA+ B cells in the cecal tonsil by immunohistochemistry, and the immunoglobulin A (IgA, immunoglobulin G (IgG and immunoglobulin M (IgM contents in the cecal tonsil by ELISA. A total of 280 one-day-old avian broilers were divided into four groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet (fluorine 22.6 mg/kg or the same diet supplemented with 400, 800 and 1,200 mg/kg fluorine (high fluorine groups I, II and III in the form of sodium fluoride, respectively, throughout a 42-day experimental period. The results showed that the quantities of IgA+ B cells were lower (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01 and the IgA, IgG, and IgM contents were decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01 in high fluorine groups II and III in comparison with those of control group. It was concluded that dietary fluorine, in the 800–1,200 mg/kg range, could reduce the numbers of the IgA+ B cells and immunoglobulin contents in the cecal tonsil, implying the local mucosal immune function was ultimately impacted in broilers.

  9. Pomegranate protects liver against cecal ligation and puncture-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in rats through TLR4/NF-κB pathway inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makled, Mirhan N; El-Awady, Mohammed S; Abdelaziz, Rania R; Atwan, Nadia; Guns, Emma T; Gameil, Nariman M; Shehab El-Din, Ahmed B; Ammar, Elsayed M

    2016-04-01

    Acute liver injury secondary to sepsis is a major challenge in intensive care unit. This study was designed to investigate potential protective effects of pomegranate against sepsis-induced acute liver injury in rats and possible underlying mechanisms. Pomegranate was orally given (800mg/kg/day) for two weeks before sepsis induction by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Pomegranate improved survival and attenuated liver inflammatory response, likely related to downregulation of mRNA expression of toll like recptor-4, reduced nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB subunit p65, decreased mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and reduction in myeloperoxidase activity and mRNA expression. Pomegranate also decreased CLP-induced oxidative stress as reflected by decreased malondialdehyde content, and increased reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase activity. These results confirm the antiinflammatory and antioxidant effects of pomegranate in CLP-induced acute liver injury mediated through inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB pathway, lipid peroxidation and neutrophil infiltration. PMID:27011232

  10. Effects of Fructooligosaccharides,compared with Direct-Fed Microbial Bacteria,and Zinc Bacitracin on Cecal Microbial Populations and Performance of Broilers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of dietary fructooligosaccharides(FOS),compared with direct-fed microbial bacteria (DFM),and zinc bacitracin ,on cecal microbial populations and performance of broiler Chickens. One hundred and ninety-two broilers (Avian) were randomly assigned to four groups,with four replicates of 12 birds each. The control group was fed with the basal diet,without any drug additive. FOS,DFM and zine bacitracin was respectively added to the basal diet at the level of 1.5% ,800 mg@kg-1 and 300 mg@ kg-1 to form the experimental diets. Body weight ,feed intake and feed efficiency were measured weekly. The feeding trial started at 1 d and ended at 21 d. At day 14 and day 21 ,four broilers per group were killed and cecum waa taken to determined microflors and pH. The results showed that dietary FOS increased bifidobactrial concentration by 1. 75-fold( P <0. 05) at 14 d of age and 1.45-fold( P <0. 05) at 21 d of age compared with control. FOS had no effect on concnetrations of E. coli and pH. There were no dietary effects of FOS,DFM,and zinc bacitracin on weight gain,feed intake,feed conversion( P >0. 05).

  11. Cystathionine-γ-lyase gene silencing with siRNA in monocytes/ macrophages attenuates inflammation in cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis in the mouse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Badiei; ST Chambers; RR Gaddam; M Bhatia

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen sulphide is an endogenous inflammatory mediator produced by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in macrophages. To determine the role of H2S and macrophages in sepsis, we used small interference RNA (siRNA) to target the CSE gene and investigated its effect in a mouse model of sepsis. Cecal ligation puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis is characterized by increased levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, morphological changes in liver and pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the liver and lung. SiRNA treatment attenuated inflammation in the liver and lungs of mice following CLP-induced sepsis. Liver MPO activity increased in CLP-induced sepsis and treatment with siRNA significantly reduced this. Similarly, lung MPO activity increased following induction of sepsis with CLP while siRNA treatment significantly reduced MPO activity. Liver and lung cytokine and chemokine levels in CLP-induced sepsis reduced following treatment with siRNA. These findings show a crucial pro-inflammatory role for H2S synthesized by CSE in macrophages in sepsis and suggest CSE gene silencing with siRNA as a potential therapeutic approach for this condition.

  12. Delayed ischemic cecal perforation despite optimal decompression after placement of a self-expanding metal stent: report of a case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, Filip Krag; Pilsgaard, Bo; Meisner, Søren;

    2004-01-01

    Endoscopic deployment of self-expanding metal stents offers an alternative to surgical intervention in rectocolonic obstructions. Reported clinical failures in the literature are all related to the site of stent placement. We report a case of serious intra-abdominal disease after technically and...... clinically successful stent deployment: a potentially dangerous situation of which the surgeon should be aware. A previously healthy 72-year-old female was referred to our department with symptoms of an obstructing colorectal tumor. Successful stent placement resulted in resolution of the obstructive......, probably caused by ischemic conditions developed before stent-decompression of the colon was revealed during the operation. The patient died in the postoperative course. We discuss the observation of patients treated with self-expanding metal stents based on the selection-strategy used to allocate patients...

  13. Involvement of Central Endothelin ETA and Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors and Arginine Vasopressin Release in Sepsis Induced by Cecal Ligation and Puncture in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite-Avalca, Mariane C G; Lomba, Luis A; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda L; Brito, Haissa O; Fraga, Daniel; Zampronio, Aleksander R

    2016-09-01

    We previously reported that endothelin-1 (ET-1) reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory currents in vasopressinergic magnocellular cells through the activation of endothelin ETA receptors in rat brain slices. This effect was abolished by a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, suggesting the involvement of endocannabinoids. The present study investigated whether the blockade of ETA or CB1 receptors during the phase of increased levels of ET-1 after severe sepsis increases the survival rate of animals concomitantly with an increase in plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels. Sepsis was induced in male Wistar rats by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Treatment with the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (Rim; 10 and 20 mg/kg, orally) 4 h after CLP (three punctures) significantly increased the survival rate compared with the CLP per vehicle group. Intracerebroventricular treatment with the ETA receptor antagonist BQ123 (100 pmol) or with Rim (2 μg) 4 and 8 h after CLP but not the ETB receptor antagonist BQ788 (100 pmol), also significantly improved the survival rate. Sham-operated and CLP animals that were treated with Rim had significantly lower core temperature than CLP animals. However, oral treatment with Rim did not change bacterial count in the peritoneal exudate, neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity, leucopenia or increased plasma interleukin-6 levels induced by CLP. Both Rim and BQ123 also increased AVP levels 12 h after CLP. The blockade of central CB1 and ETA receptors in the late phase of sepsis increased the survival rate, reduced body temperature and increased the circulating AVP levels. PMID:26925810

  14. Cecal ligation and puncture followed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia increases mortality in mice and blunts production of local and systemic cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Enjae; Perrone, Erin E; Liang, Zhe; Breed, Elise R; Dominguez, Jessica A; Clark, Andrew T; Fox, Amy C; Dunne, W Michael; Burd, Eileen M; Farris, Alton B; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-01-01

    Mortality in the intensive care unit frequently results from the synergistic effect of two temporally distinct infections. This study examined the pathophysiology of a new model of intra-abdominal sepsis followed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia. Mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy followed 3 days later by an intratracheal injection of MRSA or saline. Both CLP/saline and sham/MRSA mice had 100% survival, whereas animals with CLP followed by MRSA pneumonia had 67% 7-day survival. Animals subjected to CLP/MRSA had increased bronchoalveolar lavage concentrations of MRSA compared with sham/MRSA animals. Animals subjected to sham/MRSA pneumonia had increased bronchoalveolar lavage levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor compared with those given intratracheal saline, whereas CLP/MRSA mice had a blunted local inflammatory response with markedly decreased cytokine levels. Similarly, animals subjected to CLP/saline had increased peritoneal lavage levels of IL-6 and IL-1β compared with those subjected to sham laparotomy, whereas this response was blunted in CLP/MRSA mice. Systemic cytokines were upregulated in both CLP/saline and sham/MRSA mice, and this was blunted by the combination of CLP/MRSA. In contrast, no synergistic effect on pneumonia severity, white blood cell count, or lymphocyte apoptosis was identified in CLP/MRSA mice compared with animals with either insult in isolation. These results indicate that a clinically relevant model of CLP followed by MRSA pneumonia causes higher mortality than could have been predicted from studying either infection in isolation, and this was associated with a blunted local (pulmonary and peritoneal) and systemic inflammatory response and decreased ability to clear infection. PMID:21937950

  15. The Effects of Sub-Chronic Treatment with Pioglitazone on the Septic Mice Mortality in the Model of Cecal Ligation and Puncture: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Shafaroodi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome caused by an infection and remains as a major challenge in health care. Many studies have reported that pioglitazone may display anti-inflammatory effects. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of subchronic treatment with pioglitazone on high-grade septic mice survival and nitrergic system involvement. Diffused sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP surgery in male NMRI mice (20-30 g. Pioglitazone (5,10 and 20 mg/kg was administered by gavage daily for 5 days prior to surgery. Nitric oxide involvement was assessed by sub-chronic administration of a non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NAME and a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, aminoguanidine. TNF-α  and IL-1β plasma levels were measured by ELISA. Pioglitazone (10 and 20 mg/kg significantly improved survival rate in septic mice. The chronic intraperitoneally co-administration of L-NAME (0.5 mg/kg, daily or aminoguanidine (1 mg/kg, daily with a daily dose of pioglitazone, 5 mg/kg, significantly increased the survival rate. This survival improving effect was accompanied by a significant reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β plasma levels. In conclusion, sub-chronic pioglitazone treatment can improve survival in mouse sepsis model by CLP. Inhibition of nitric oxide release, probably through inducible nitric oxide synthase at least in part is responsible for this effect. Suppression of TNF-α and IL-1β could be another mechanism in pioglitazone-induced survival improving effect in septic mice.

  16. NF-κB Inhibition after Cecal Ligation and Puncture Reduces Sepsis-Associated Lung Injury without Altering Bacterial Host Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Since the NF-κB pathway regulates both inflammation and host defense, it is uncertain whether interventions targeting NF-κB would be beneficial in sepsis. Based on the kinetics of the innate immune response, we postulated that selective NF-κB inhibition during a defined time period after the onset of sepsis would reduce acute lung injury without compromising bacterial host defense. Methods. Mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. An NF-κB inhibitor, BMS-345541 (50 µg/g mice, was administered by peroral gavage beginning 2 hours after CLP and repeated at 6 hour intervals for 2 additional doses. Results. Mice treated with BMS-345541 after CLP showed reduced neutrophilic alveolitis and lower levels of KC in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared to mice treated with CLP+vehicle. In addition, mice treated with CLP+BMS had minimal histological evidence of lung injury and normal wet-dry ratios, indicating protection from acute lung injury. Treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor did not affect the ability of cultured macrophages to phagocytose bacteria and did not alter bacterial colony counts in blood, lung tissue, or peritoneal fluid at 24 hours after CLP. While BMS-345541 treatment did not alter mortality after CLP, our results showed a trend towards improved survival. Conclusion. Transiently blocking NF-κB activity after the onset of CLP-induced sepsis can effectively reduce acute lung injury in mice without compromising bacterial host defense or survival after CLP.

  17. The Use of Steered Ileo-cecal Valve Cannulated Pigs to Evaluate the Effects of Adding Phytase or Beta-mannanase to the Diet on Amino Acid, Mineral and Energy Utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Radcliffe, John Scott

    2000-01-01

    Forty-six barrows fitted with steered ileo-cecal valve cannulas were used in four experiments to evaluate the effects of supplementing swine diets with microbial phytase or beta-mannanase on the apparent ileal (AID) and/or apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of amino acids, N, Ca, P, DM and energy. In Exp. 1, the addition of phytase to low CP corn-soybean meal based diets increased the AID of Ca (P < .01), P (P < .001), and all amino acids (P < .10) measured except Leu, Ser, Pro, Met, ...

  18. Atividade microbiana cecal e contribuição nutricional da cecotrofia em coelhos alimentados com rações contendo diferentes fontes de fibra e níveis de amido

    OpenAIRE

    Arruda Alex Martins Varela de; Lopes Darci Clementino; Ferreira Walter Motta; Rostagno Horacio Santiago; Queiroz Augusto Cesar de; Pereira Elzânia Sales; Silva José Francisco da; Jham Gulab Newandram

    2003-01-01

    Objetivou-se neste estudo a avaliação da atividade microbiana cecal e a contribuição nutricional da cecotrofia em coelhos alimentados com rações contendo diferentes níveis de amido (22 a 32% em média) mediante a inclusão de milho grão e diferentes fontes de fibra (feno de alfafa ou casca de soja), em esquema fatorial 2x2. No primeiro experimento, 40 coelhos alojados em gaiolas de engorda individuais, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado e alimentados à vontade dos 45 aos 85 dias de idade,...

  19. Distribution of Lymphocytes in the Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissues (MALT of Naturally Occurring Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD in Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Uddin*, M. Z. I. Khan1, K. N. Islam, A. S. M. G. Kibria, G. N. Adhikary2, M. N. H. Parvez3, J. Basu, M. B. Uddin4 and M. M. Rahman5

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate changes in the number and distribution of lymphocytes in the mucosa associated lymphoid tissues (MALT of digestive tract (proventriculus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum and cecal tonsils and respiratory system (lungs of chicken infected by Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV. Samples were divided into two groups; IBDV infected group (21, 24 and 30 days old and control group (non infected birds; 21 days old. Haematoxylin and eosin stained slides were prepared for microscopic studies to observe the distribution and the number of lymphocytes in the mucosa of the digestive tract and respiratory system. Lymphocytes were significantly (P<0.05 lower in proventriculus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, cecal tonsils and lungs of IBDV infected chickens than the control. Moreover, the reduction in lymphocytes number was maximum in duodenum and cecal tonsils, while minimal in lungs. Depletion of lymphocyte was mainly in the lamina propria and the core of the villi and depletion increased with the advance of age of IBDV infected chicken. These results demonstrate that IBDV destroys the lymphocytes of the MALT and suppresses the immunity.

  20. Gene deletion of P-Selectin and ICAM-1 does not inhibit neutrophil infiltration into peritoneal cavity following cecal ligation-puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hess Karen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophil infiltration is one of the critical cellular components of an inflammatory response during peritonitis. The adhesion molecules, P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1, mediate neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions and the subsequent neutrophil transendothelial migration during the inflammatory response. Despite very strong preclinical data, recent clinical trials failed to show a protective effect of anti-adhesion therapy, suggesting that the length of injury might be a critical factor in neutrophil infiltration. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the role of P-selectin and ICAM-1 in neutrophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity during early and late phases of peritonitis. Methods Peritonitis was induced in both male wild-type and P-selectin/ICAM-1 double deficient (P/I null mice by cecal ligation-puncture (CLP. Peripheral blood and peritoneal lavage were collected at 6 and 24 hours after CLP. The total leukocyte and neutrophil contents were determined, and neutrophils were identified with the aid of in situ immunohistochemical staining. Comparisons between groups were made by applying ANOVA and student t-test analysis. Results CLP induced a severe inflammatory response associated with a significant leukopenia in both wild-type and P/I null mice. Additionally, CLP caused a significant neutrophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity that was detected in both groups of mice. However, neutrophil infiltration in the P/I null mice at 6 hours of CLP was significantly lower than the corresponding wild-type mice, which reached a similar magnitude at 24 hours of CLP. In contrast, in peritonitis induced by intraperitoneal inoculation of 2% glycogen, no significant difference in neutrophil infiltration was observed between the P/I null and wild-type mice at 6 hours of peritonitis. Conclusions The data suggest that alternative adhesion pathway(s independent of P-selectin and ICAM

  1. Inhalation of hydrogen gas attenuates brain injury in mice with cecal ligation and puncture via inhibiting neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingling; Xie, Keliang; Chen, Hongguang; Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Yuan; Yu, Yang; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao

    2014-11-17

    During the development of sepsis, the complication in central nervous system (CNS), appearing early and frequently relative to other systems, can obviously increase the mortality of sepsis. Moreover, sepsis survivors also accompany long-term cognitive dysfunction, while the ultimate causes and effective therapeutic strategies of brain injury in sepsis are still not fully clear. We designed this study to investigate the effects of 2% hydrogen gas (H2) on brain injury in a mouse model of sepsis. Male ICR mice were underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham operation. 2% H2 was inhaled for 60min beginning at both 1 and 6h after sham or CLP operation, respectively. H2 concentration in arterial blood, venous blood and brain tissue was detected after H2 inhalation separately. The survival rate was observed and recorded within 7 days after sham or CLP operation. The histopathologic changes and neuronal apoptosis were observed in hippocampus by Nissl staining and TUNEL assay. The permeability of brain-blood barrier (BBB), brain water content, inflammatory cytokines, activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT) and oxidative products (MDA and 8-iso-PGF2α) in serum and hippocampus were detected at 24h after sham or CLP operation. The expressions of nucleus and total nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and cytoplasmic heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) in hippocampus were measured at 24h after sham or CLP operation. We assessed their cognitive function via Y-maze and Fear Conditioning test on day 3, 5, 7 and 14 after operation. H2 treatment markedly improved the survival rate and cognitive dysfunction of septic mice. CLP mice showed obvious brain injury characterized by aggravated pathological damage, BBB disruption and brain edema at 24h after CLP operation, which was markedly alleviated by 2% H2 treatment. Furthermore, we found that the beneficial effects of H2 on brain injury in septic mice were linked to the decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines and

  2. Phylum Level Change in the Cecal and Fecal Gut Communities of Rats Fed Diets Containing Different Fermentable Substrates Supports a Role for Nitrogen as a Factor Contributing to Community Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kalmokoff

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation differs between the proximal and distal gut but little is known regarding how the bacterial communities differ or how they are influenced by diet. In order to investigate this, we compared community diversity in the cecum and feces of rats by 16S rRNA gene content and DNA shot gun metagenomics after feeding purified diets containing different fermentable substrates. Gut community composition was dependent on the source of fermentable substrate included in the diet. Cecal communities were dominated by Firmicutes, and contained a higher abundance of Lachnospiraceae compared to feces. In feces, community structure was shifted by varying degrees depending on diet towards the Bacteroidetes, although this change was not always evident from 16S rRNA gene data. Multi-dimensional scaling analysis (PCoA comparing cecal and fecal metagenomes grouped by location within the gut rather than by diet, suggesting that factors in addition to substrate were important for community change in the distal gut. Differentially abundant genes in each environment supported this shift away from the Firmicutes in the cecum (e.g., motility towards the Bacteroidetes in feces (e.g., Bacteroidales transposons. We suggest that this phylum level change reflects a shift to ammonia as the primary source of nitrogen used to support continued microbial growth in the distal gut.

  3. Transcriptome analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 grown in vitro in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of human gut microbiota associated rats reveals an adaptive expression of metabolic and virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Guillaume; Jubelin, Grégory; Garneau, Philippe; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Martin, Christine; Beaudry, Francis; Harel, Josée

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a leading cause of bloody diarrhea and renal failures in human. Understanding strategies employed by EHEC to colonize the intestine is of major importance since to date no cure exists to eradicate the pathogen. In this study, the adaptive response of EHEC to the intestinal milieu conditioned by a human microbiota was examined. A transcriptomic analysis was performed on the EHEC strain EDL933 incubated in vitro in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of human microbiota-associated rats (HMC) compared with EDL933 incubated in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of germ-free rat (GFC). EDL933 switches from a glycolytic metabolic profile in the GFC to an anaplerotic metabolic profile in HMC. The expression of several catabolism genes was strongly affected such as those involved in the utilization of sugars, glycerol, N-acetylneuraminic acid, amino acids and secondary metabolites. Interestingly, expression level of critical EHEC O157:H7 virulence genes including genes from the locus of enterocyte effacement was reduced in HMC. Altogether, these results contribute to the understanding of EHEC adaptive response to a digestive content and highlight the ability of the microbiota to repress EHEC virulence gene expression. PMID:25290220

  4. 谷氨酰胺对饲喂高精料奶山羊盲肠黏膜形态及炎症因子 mRNA 表达的影响%Effects of Glutamine on Cecal Mucosal Morphology and Inflammatory Cytokine mRNA Expressions of Dairy Goats Fed a High Concentrate Diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉洁; 刘军花; 许婷婷; 毛胜勇

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of glutamine ( Gln) on cecal mucosa morphology and inflammatory cytokine mRNA expressions of dairy goats fed a high concentrate diet.Twelve healthy dairy goats were randomly assigned to control group ( n =6, fed a high concentrate diet) and Gln group ( n=6 , supplemental level of Gln was 50 g/d) .After a 28-day experimental period, four goats in each group were slaughtered to collect cecal mucosa.The changes of tissue morphology of cecal mucosa, the mR-NA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines in cecal mucosa and the concentrations of volatile fatty acids in cecal contents were measured.The results showed as follows: Gln supplementation did not affect the concen-trations of volatile fatty acids, lactic acid and endotoxin contents in cecal (P>0.05); the supplementation of Gln played roles in keeping the integrity and enhancing tight junction of cecal mucosa; the supplementation of Gln significantly decreased the mRNA expression level of tumor necrosis factorα( P0 .05 ) .It is suggested that Gln supplementation can enhance cecal mucosa tight junctions release cecal mucosal inflammatory response, to a certain extent, which is benefit for maintenance of mucosal barrier function of hindgut under the condition of the high concentrate diet.%本试验旨在研究谷氨酰胺对饲喂高精料奶山羊盲肠黏膜形态及炎症因子mRNA表达的影响。采用随机区组设计,将12头健康奶山羊随机分为对照组( n=6,饲喂高精料)和谷氨酰胺组( n=6,谷氨酰胺添加量为50 g/d)。试验期28 d。每组各选取4头山羊进行屠宰,取盲肠黏膜,观察组织形态学变化,检测盲肠黏膜炎症因子mRNA的表达量、盲肠内容物挥发性脂肪酸浓度。结果表明:添加谷氨酰胺对盲肠食糜中挥发性脂肪酸、乳酸及内毒素浓度无显著影响(P>0.05);添加谷氨酰胺保持了盲肠黏膜的完整性,紧密连

  5. In situ caecal degradation of roughages in horses Degradação cecal in situ de alimentos volumosos em equinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Pimentel Silva

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the in situ degradation of dry matter (DM, neutral detergent fiber (NDF and crude protein (CP in roughages by the in situ caecal digestion technique in horses. The roughages evaluated were: Lucerne hay (Medicago sativa, peanut (Arachis pintoi cv. Amarillo, desmodio(Desmodium ovalifolium, stylo (Stylosanthes guianensis cv. Mineirão, pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan, lime-yellow pea (Macrotyloma axillare and coastcross hay (Cynodon dactylon cv. coastcross. The assay was conducted in a complete randomized design with seven roughages and three replications. One mare with a cannula fitted in the caecum was used, fed diet consisting of coastcross hay (80% and concentrate (20% at 2.0% BW, four times a day. Nylon 6.5 × 20 cm bags were used with 45 μ/pore, containing 5.2 g DM/bag, inserting 3 or 4 bags in the caecum at the times of 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 and 48 hours incubation. The caecum in situ degradability parameters of nutrients were obtained by Ørskov model. The DM degradability parameters of all the roughages were significant. There was no fit to the model for pigeon pea for CP and NDF and desmodio. Peanut, stylo and lime-yellow pea presented larger potentially degradable DM with values of 53, 46.5 and 40%, respectively, and higher values for the soluble fraction of 20, 21, 28.6%, with high degradability rates of 10.36, 20.26 and 14.8% h-1. Higher NDF degradation rates were observed in these foodstuffs with values of 9.1 and 11.3, 11.2% h-1, high potentially degradable fraction with values of 55, 51.8 and 47.2%, and greater CP degradation at 48 hours with values of 87, 95, and 94.8%. Peanut, stylo and lime-yellow pea presented potential for use in horses diets.Objetivou-se avaliar a degradação da matéria seca (MS, fibra em detergente neutro (FDN e proteína bruta de alimentos volumosos pela técnica da digestão cecal in situ em equinos. Avaliaram-se as forrageiras: feno de alfafa (Medicago sativa

  6. Infecções parasitárias do apêndice cecal e suas relações com apendicite aguda Parasitic infection of the appendix and its possible relationship to acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Fernandes da Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigou-se a prevalência de infecções parasitárias do apêndice cecal e suas relações com a apendicite. Dos 1.600 apêndices estudados 24 (1,5% apresentaram infecção parasitária. Enterobius vermicularis foi encontrado em 23 casos (95,8% e Taenia sp em apenas um (4,2%. Dezesseis pacientes (66,7% eram menores de 10 anos; 15 eram masculinos e 9 femininos. A análise histopatológica demonstrou inflamação aguda supurativa em 12 casos (50%, eosinofilia em 13 (54,2% e hiperplasia linfóide em 10 (41,7%. Complicações como peritonite ocorreram em 11 e gangrena em 3 casos. As infecções parasitárias do apêndice são causa pouco freqüente de apendicite aguda em crianças e adolescentes.From 1,600 surgically removed appendices, 24 (1.5% were found to have helminths. Enterobius vermicularis was observed in 23 of the 24 specimens (95.8% and Taenia sp was detected in only 1 (4.2% case. Sixteen patients (66.7% were less than 10 year-old; 15 patients were male and 9 female. Pathologic analysis disclosed acute neutrophilic inflammation in 12 cases and lymphoid hyperplasia in 10 of the 24 appendices. Gangrenous appendicitis was diagnosed in 3 cases and peritonitis was found in 11 of the 24 infested appendices. Parasitic infection of the appendix is an uncommon cause of acute appendicitis in children and adolescents.

  7. Digestibilidade in vitro de leguminosas do semiárido com inóculo cecal de avestruzes In vitro digestibility of legumes from semi-arid with caecal inoculum liquor of ostriches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Martins Varela de Arruda

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Para avaliar a digestibilidade in vitro de leguminosas do semiárido nordestino usando inóculo cecal de avestruzes por meio da técnica Tilley e Terry Reversa, usou-se o feno de alfafa (Medicago sativa como referência aos fenos de canafístula (Senna multijuga, de cunhã (Clitoria ternatea, de leucena (Leucaena leucocephala, de mata-pasto (Senna obtusifolia e de sabiá (Mimosa caesalpiniifolia. Verificou-se, pelo teste de Duncan (PTo evaluate the in vitro digestibility of forage legume from semi-arid northeast region using caecal inoculum liquor of ostriches with Reverse Tilley and Terry technique, the alfalfa hay (Medicago sativa was used as reference food for comparison between hays of canephori (Senna multijuga, clitoria (Clitoria ternatea, leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala, kills pasture (Senna obtusifolia and thrush (Mimosa caesalpiniifolia. There was, by Duncan test (P<0.05, significant difference to in vitro digestibility of the nutritional fractions among the legume hays resulting in general mean value of 49.62% for dry matter (DIVMS, of 23.38% for crude protein (DIVPB, of 17.88% for insoluble protein in neutral detergent fiber (DIVPIDN, of 34.52% for neutral detergent fiber (DIVFDN and of 42.07% for neutral detergent fiber corrected for ash and protein (DIVFDNcp. The nutritional composition of feedstuffs influenced the fermentative activity of microorganisms from cecum-colon of ostriches in these in vitro incubations, and the better digestibility values were observed for alfalfa hay, followed by kills pasture and leucaena hays, wich were higher than other legumes from semi-arid.

  8. Atividade microbiana cecal e contribuição nutricional da cecotrofia em coelhos alimentados com rações contendo diferentes fontes de fibra e níveis de amido Caecal microbial activity and caecotrophy nutritional contribution in rabbits fed diets with different starch levels and fiber sources

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Martins Varela de Arruda; Darci Clementino Lopes; Walter Motta Ferreira; Horacio Santiago Rostagno; Augusto Cesar de Queiroz; Elzânia Sales Pereira; José Francisco da Silva; Gulab Newandram Jham

    2003-01-01

    Objetivou-se neste estudo a avaliação da atividade microbiana cecal e a contribuição nutricional da cecotrofia em coelhos alimentados com rações contendo diferentes níveis de amido (22 a 32% em média) mediante a inclusão de milho grão e diferentes fontes de fibra (feno de alfafa ou casca de soja), em esquema fatorial 2x2. No primeiro experimento, 40 coelhos alojados em gaiolas de engorda individuais, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado e alimentados à vontade dos 45 aos 85 dias de idade,...

  9. The Severity of Cecal Ligature and Puncture-Induced Sepsis Correlates with the Degree of Encephalopathy, but the Sepsis Does Not Lead to Acute Activation of Spleen Lymphocytes in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremias, I C; Victorino, V J; Machado, J L; Barroso, W A; Ariga, S K; Lima, T M; Soriano, F G

    2016-07-01

    Septic encephalopathy represents the most frequently observed form of encephalopathy in intensive care units. Interactions between the immune and nervous systems have been observed in experimental sepsis. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to characterize the effect of different severities of sepsis on encephalopathy and the inflammatory profile of the spleen. We hypothesized that different grades of sepsis severity would lead to variations in encephalopathy and activation of spleen cells. We induced sepsis of different severities in Balb/c mice by cecal ligature and puncture (CLP). Six and 12 h after CLP induction, behavioral impairment was assessed by the SmithKline/Harwell/Imperial College/Royal Hospital/Phenotype Assessment (SHIRPA) test. The animals were then killed, and the plasma, spleen, and hippocampus were removed. Levels of the encephalopathy marker S100β were measured in plasma. Spleens were weighed and then a characterization of splenic lymphocytes was performed by flow cytometry (cytotoxic T lymphocyte, T helper lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, T regulatory cells, and Th17 cells). Cytokine levels in the spleen and hippocampus were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and cytokine levels in plasma were performed with MilliPlex® technology. Our results showed that behavioral impairment as measured by the SHIRPA test and elevation in plasma S100β levels were significant in moderate and severe CLP groups compared to those in the sham control group. Regarding immunological alterations, we were unable to observe changes in the weights of the spleen and the profile of lymphocytes 6 h after CLP. However, several cytokines, including IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1β, were increased in spleen and plasma. In conclusion, we observed variations in encephalopathy as measured by plasma S100β, which were mediated by the severity of sepsis; however, we did not observe a different activation of spleen cells 6 h post-CLP, despite evidence of

  10. Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ePublications > Our ePublications > Lung disease fact sheet ePublications Lung disease fact sheet This information in Spanish (en ... disease? More information on lung disease What is lung disease? Lung disease refers to disorders that affect ...

  11. In vivo observation of mesenteric leukocyte-endothelial interactions after cecal ligation/puncture and surgical sepsis source control Avaliação in vivo da interação leucócito-endotélio mesentérico após ligadura e punção cecal e remoção cirúrgica do foco sééptico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi K. Nakagawa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP has been used as a useful model for the induction of polymicrobial sepsis. Necrotic tissue resection and peritoneal lavage (REL are the surgical procedures for controlling perforated appendicitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the rat mesentery in vivo after CLP and REL. METHODS: Thirty-seven male Wistar rats (250-300 g underwent laparotomy and were randomly assigned to the following groups: 1 SHAM; 2 CLP: animals submitted to CLP, 3 CLP+REL: animals submitted to CLP and REL. Mesenteric leukocyte-endothelial interactions were studied by intravital microscopy assessed once in each animal (3-5 postcapillary venules, 15-25 µm diameter 24 hours after intervention. Follow-up was performed in all animals; this included analysis of glycemia, lactate, hematocrit, white blood cell count as well as a functional score that was the sum of scoring on the following parameters: alertness, mobility, piloerection, diarrhea, encrusted eyes, and dirty nose and tail. RESULTS: None of the animals showed significant changes in body weight (265 ± 20 g or in hematocrit levels (46% ± 2% during the experimental protocol. Compared to SHAM animals, CLP animals showed an increased number of rolling (2x, adherent, and migrating leukocytes (7x in the mesenteric microcirculation, an increase in blood glucose (136 ± 8 mg/dL, lactate (3.58 ± 0.94 mmol/L, white cell count (23,570 ± 4,991 cells/mm³ and functional alterations (score 11 ± 1, characterized by impaired alertness and mobility, and presence of piloerection, diarrhea, encrusted eyes, and dirty nose and tail. The REL procedure normalized the number of rolling, adherent, and migrated leukocytes in the mesentery; glycemia; lactate; and white blood cell count. The REL procedure also improved the functional score (7 ± 1. CONCLUSION: Local and systemic inflammation was induced by CLP, while REL completely overcame the inflammatory

  12. Avian gyrovirus 2 and avirulent Newcastle disease virus coinfection in a chicken flock with neurologic symptoms and high mortalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolnik, Celia; Wandrag, Daniel B R

    2014-03-01

    A disease with severe neurologic symptoms caused 100% mortality in a small broiler operation in the Gauteng Province, South Africa in late March 2013. Routine diagnostic PCR testing failed to identify a possible cause of the outbreak; thus, samples were submitted for virus isolation, serology, and bacteriology. An avirulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain isolated was identified as a V4-like genotype 1 strain, by DNA sequencing, with a cleavage site of 112GKQGR decrease L117. Real-time reverse transcription PCR identified NDV in the brain but not in cecal tonsils or pooled tracheas, spleens, lungs, and livers. A random amplification deep sequencing of a transcriptome library generated from pooled tissues produced 927,966 paired-end reads. A contig of 2,309 nucleotides was identified as a near-complete avian gyrovirus 2 (AGV2) genome. This is the first report on the African continent of AGV2, which has been reported in southern Brazil, The Netherlands, and Hong Kong thus far. A real-time PCR for AGV2 only detected the virus in the brain but not in cecal tonsils or pooled tracheas, spleens, lungs, and livers. Sequence reads also mapped to the genomes of mycoplasma, Escherichia coli, avian leukosis virus subtype J, and Marek's disease virus but excluded influenza A virus, Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale, avian rhinotracheitis virus, avian encephalomyelitis virus, and West Nile virus. Air sac swabs were positive on bacterial culture for E. coli. The possibility of a synergistic pathogenic effect between avirulent NDV and AGV2 requires further investigation. PMID:24758119

  13. Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri ameliorates disease due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in germfree mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Kathryn A; Honkala, Alexander; Auchtung, Thomas A; Britton, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Strains of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are a group of Shiga toxin-producing food-borne pathogens that cause severe hemorrhagic colitis and can lead to hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a life-threatening condition that principally affects children and for which there is no effective treatment. We used a germfree mouse model of renal and enteric disease due to EHEC to determine if probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 is effective in suppressing disease symptoms caused by EHEC. When germfree Swiss Webster mice are monocolonized with EHEC, they develop disease characterized by weight loss, cecal luminal fluid accumulation, and renal tubular necrosis. When L. reuteri was administered 1 day prior to EHEC challenge and every other day thereafter, EHEC colonization was suppressed and mice were significantly protected from the manifestations of disease. Protection from disease did not require the induction of the antimicrobial compound reuterin in L. reuteri prior to treatment. The twice-daily administration of L. reuteri appeared more effective than every-other-day administration. These data indicated that L. reuteri partially protects mice from disease manifestations of EHEC. PMID:20974822

  14. Tumores del apéndice cecal: Análisis anatomoclínico y evaluación de la sobrevida alejada Appendiceal tumors: Retrospective review of 67 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JEAN MICHEL BUTTE B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Los tumores del apéndice cecal corresponden al 0,5% de las neoplasias gastrointestinales y su pronóstico depende del tipo de tumor. Objetivos: Analizar las características de los tumores apendiculares y los factores que influyen en su sobrevida. Material y Métodos: Estudio retrospectivo de los pacientes con un tumor apendicular operados entre 1981 y 2006 en el Hospital de la P. Universidad Católica. Se evaluaron las características clínicas, anatomopatológicas (AP y la sobrevida alejada. Se utilizó la prueba de Fisher, el test de Wilcoxon y curvas de Kaplan-Meier. Resultados: Se operaron 67 enfermos, 39 mujeres y 28 hombres con una edad de 45,3 + 19,6 años. En 59 enfermos la operación se realizó por sospecha de apendicitis aguda, la que se confirmó en el estudio AP en 37 de ellos. En 36 pacientes se demostró un carcinoma neuroendocrino, en 18 un tumor benigno, en 7 un adenocarcinoma, en 5 un adenocarcinoide y en uno un carcinoma neuroendocrino y un cistoadenoma mucinoso. Se realizó una hemicolectomía en un segundo tiempo operatorio a 9 enfermos: 4 con un carcinoide, 3 con un adenocarcinoma, 1 con un adenocarcinoide y uno con un pseudomixoma peritoneal. La sobrevida a 5 años fue de 100% en los enfermos con un tumor benigno, 97% en los con un carcinoma neuroendocrino, 75% en los con un adenocarcinoide y 62% en los con un adenocarcinoma (pBackground: Appendiceal tumors correspond to 0.5% of all gastrointestinal tumors and their prognosis depends on the type of lesion. Aim: To analyze the clinical and pathological features of appendiceal tumors and their prognosis. Material and methods: Review of medical records of patients in whom an appendiceal tumor was detected during the pathological study in a Clinical Hospital, between 1981 and 2006. Results: Sixty seven patients were identified (mean age 45.3+ 19.6 years, 39 females. Fifty nine were operated due to the suspicion of an acute appendicitis, that was confirmed

  15. Glomerular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  16. Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Article Body What is Kawasaki disease? Kawasaki disease is a serious and perplexing disease, the cause of which is ... influenza) with aspirin has been linked with a serious disease called Reye syndrome. Always consult your pediatrician before ...

  17. Ribbing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc

  18. Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that ... higher if a family member has had the disease. No treatment can stop the disease. However, some ...

  19. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living ... to live NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  20. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Heart Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Disease Print A A ... chest pain, heart attacks, and strokes . What Is Heart Disease? The heart is the center of the cardiovascular ...

  1. Lyme disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Causes Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi ( B burgdorferi ). Blacklegged ticks and other species of ... Names Borreliosis; Bannwarth syndrome Images Lyme disease organism, Borrelia burgdorferi Tick, deer engorged on the skin Lyme disease - ...

  2. Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited disease that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to waste ... express emotions. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease, you have a 50 percent chance of ...

  3. Krabbe disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Krabbe disease. Some people have had a bone marrow transplant in the early stages of the disease, but ... counseling is recommended for people with a family history of Krabbe disease who are considering having children. ...

  4. Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Congenital Amaurosis Macular Degeneration Retinitis Pigmentosa Stargardt Disease Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & ... for retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa (RP), Usher syndrome and macular degeneration . Back to top What ...

  5. Reportable diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notifiable diseases ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). Last updated May 4, 2015. Available at: wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss . Accessed September 9, 2015.

  6. Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory ... small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an ...

  7. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wilson disease. Health care providers do not use brain imaging tests to diagnose Wilson disease, though certain findings ... testing. [ Top ] Clinical Trials The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and other ...

  8. Farber's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Farber's Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Ceramidase Deficiency Table of Contents ( ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Farber's Disease? Farber’s disease, also known as Farber's lipogranulomatosis, describes ...

  9. Sandhoff Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body. Sandhoff disease is a severe form of Tay-Sachs disease, the incidence of which had been particularly ... gene therapy seen in an animal model of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases for use in humans. NIH ...

  10. Legionnaires' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung disease Have a weak immune system Legionnaires' disease is serious and can be life-threatening. However, most people recover with antibiotic treatment. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  11. Ribbing disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukkada Philson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc.

  12. Celiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hero Brokalaki; Nikolaos Fotos

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is a small intestine disease caused by the immunological response to gluten, a component of wheat, rye and barley. The worldwide prevalence of celiac disease ranges between 0.2% and 2.2 %. The clinical features of celiac disease includes diarrhea, steatorrhea, flatulence, abdominal pain and weight loss. The asymptomatic type of celiac disease is characterized by soft or normally shaped stool, weakness, lassitude and moderate weight loss. In children, celiac disease usually aris...

  13. Parkinson's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Playfer, J R

    1997-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common disabling disease of old age. The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on clinical signs and has poor sensitivity, with about 25% of patients confidently diagnosed as having the disease actually having other conditions such as multi-system atrophy and other parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Benign essential tremor and arteriosclerotic pseudo-parkinsonism can easily be confused with Parkinson's disease. The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown...

  14. Butyrate enhances disease resistance of chickens by inducing antimicrobial host defense peptide gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Achanta, Mallika; Schreiber, Nicole B; Bommineni, Yugendar R; Dai, Gan; Jiang, Weiyu; Lamont, Susan; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Beker, Ali; Teeter, Robert G; Zhang, Guolong

    2011-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) constitute a large group of natural broad-spectrum antimicrobials and an important first line of immunity in virtually all forms of life. Specific augmentation of synthesis of endogenous HDPs may represent a promising antibiotic-alternative approach to disease control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous administration of butyrate, a major type of short-chain fatty acids derived from bacterial fermentation of undigested dietary fiber, is capable of inducing HDPs and enhancing disease resistance in chickens. We have found that butyrate is a potent inducer of several, but not all, chicken HDPs in HD11 macrophages as well as in primary monocytes, bone marrow cells, and jejuna and cecal explants. In addition, butyrate treatment enhanced the antibacterial activity of chicken monocytes against Salmonella enteritidis, with a minimum impact on inflammatory cytokine production, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst capacities of the cells. Furthermore, feed supplementation with 0.1% butyrate led to a significant increase in HDP gene expression in the intestinal tract of chickens. More importantly, such a feeding strategy resulted in a nearly 10-fold reduction in the bacterial titer in the cecum following experimental infections with S. enteritidis. Collectively, the results indicated that butyrate-induced synthesis of endogenous HDPs is a phylogenetically conserved mechanism of innate host defense shared by mammals and aves, and that dietary supplementation of butyrate has potential for further development as a convenient antibiotic-alternative strategy to enhance host innate immunity and disease resistance. PMID:22073293

  15. Newcastle disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcastle disease (ND), referred to as Exotic Newcastle disease (END) in the U. S., is an acute viral disease of domestic poultry and many other bird species and a recognized worldwide problem. Occurrence of END is due to an infection with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and is a ...

  16. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  17. Whipple's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Whipple Disease Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is Whipple disease? Whipple disease is a rare bacterial infection ...

  18. [Prion diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoĭda, N I; Zavalishin, I A

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases are a family of progressive neurodegenerative disorders caused by prions. There are four human prion diseases: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome, fatal insomnia and Kuru. They can arise in three different ways: acquired, familial or sporadic. We review clinical presentations, pathophysiology, morphological picture, diagnostic procedures and available treatment options of prion diseases. PMID:23235426

  19. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  20. SPF鸡盲肠复合微生态制剂代替抗生素预防肉仔鸡沙门菌感染%Prevention of Salmonella infection in broilers with SPF chicken cecal probiotics complex instead of antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏红; 胡明; 骆延波; 朱小玲; 张世栋; 张波; 吴润; 刘玉庆

    2012-01-01

    目的 在雏鸡盲肠尽快建立完整健康菌群,通过“竞争排除(Competitive exclusion,CE)”抑制病原菌定植感染.方法 提取SPF鸡盲肠菌群,排除沙门菌感染的可能,制成复合微生态制剂,在鸡胚孵化19 d啄壳时和21 d雏鸡全出壳时进行两次喷雾接种,监测鸡群沙门菌抗体和粪便中沙门菌,测定成活率、生产性能.结果 进行喷雾接种后的小鸡至12日龄可以完全不使用抗生素,成活率、采食量与体重略高于使用抗生素的对照组,能提高饲料报酬,饲养12、24、35 d均未检出粪便沙门菌和血液沙门菌抗体,全程无沙门菌感染.结论 SPF鸡盲肠复合微生态制剂能代替抗生素预防肉仔鸡沙门菌感染.%Objective To establish complex and complete cecal flora chickens to prevent the colonization and infection of pathogens by competitive exclusion (CE). Method Complex microecological preparation was extracted from caecum flora of SPF chickens which were excluded from the possibility of Salmonella infection. The preparation was sprayed on eggs at 19 days ( when they pecking the shells) and 21 days ( when they pecking fully out of shells) of hatching, respectively. Salmonella in the excrement or its antibodies in the blood were monitored and the survival rate and production performance were recorded and analyzed. Result The inoculated chicken no longer needed antibiotics up to 12 days after birth; Their survival rate, weight and feed intake were slightly higher compared with the control group. A better feed reward could be observed. No Salmonella in the excrement or its antibodies in the blood could be observed after the chickens were fed for 12, 24 or 35 days. There was no Salmonella infection during the growth of these chickens. Conclusion Salmonella infection in broilers can be prevented with SPF chicken cecal probiotics complex instead of antibiotics.

  1. Lyme Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Weil, M L

    1989-01-01

    Lyme disease, caused by spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. The clinical presentation varies depending on the stage of the illness: early disease includes erthyma migrans, early disseminated disease includes multiple erythema migrans, meningitis, cranial nerve palsies and carditis; late disease is primarily arthritis. The symptoms and signs of infection resolve in the vast majority of patients after appropriate treatment with antimicr...

  2. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson disease is a rare inherited disorder that prevents your body from getting rid of extra copper. You need ... copper into bile, a digestive fluid. With Wilson disease, the copper builds up in your liver, and ...

  3. Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. ... nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood ...

  4. Legionnaires' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legionnaires' disease is a type of pneumonia caused by bacteria. You usually get it by breathing in mist from ... spread from person to person. Symptoms of Legionnaires' disease include high fever, chills, a cough, and sometimes ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

  6. Raynaud's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud's disease is a rare disorder of the blood vessels, usually in the fingers and toes. It causes the ... secondary Raynaud's, which is caused by injuries, other diseases, or certain medicines. People in colder climates are ...

  7. Addison Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  8. Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder in which you do not have enough of an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase. ... It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types 1 ...

  9. Fifth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifth disease is a viral infection caused by parvovirus B19. The virus only infects humans; it's not the same parvovirus that dogs and cats can get. Fifth disease mostly affects children. Symptoms can include a low ...

  10. Meniere's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meniere's disease is a disorder of the inner ear. It can cause severe dizziness, a roaring sound in your ... together over several days. Some people with Meniere's disease have "drop attacks" during which the dizziness is ...

  11. Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden Cardiac Arrest Vulnerable Plaque Valve Disease | Share Related terms: heart valves, valve insufficiency, valve regurgitation, valve stenosis, valvular ...

  12. Fifth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and mouth ...

  13. Endocrine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fibrosis Research Identifies Key Hurdle in Quest for Cystic Fibrosis Treatment More Research News Clinical Trials Clinical trials offer ... people and opportunities to help researchers find better treatments in the ... Fibrosis Graves' Disease Hashimoto's Disease Human Growth Hormone and ...

  14. Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some examples of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, ... Toll-Free: 877-226-4267 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, HHS Phone: ...

  15. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Added Sugar Intake and Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality Among US Adults, examines the relationship between consuming too much added sugar and the risk of heart disease death. When it Comes to Blood Pressure, Make Control ...

  16. Huntington disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington chorea ... Huntington disease is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 4. The defect causes a part of ... 10 to 28 times. But in persons with Huntington disease, it is repeated 36 to 120 times. ...

  17. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... descriptions of some of the more common autoinflammatory diseases. The Immune System Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) Neonatal Onset Multisystem ... and monocytes to destroy harmful substances. In autoinflammatory diseases, this innate immune system causes inflammation for unknown reasons. It reacts, ...

  18. Legionnaire disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Legionnaire disease is an infection of the lungs and airways. It is caused by Legionella bacteria. Causes The bacteria that cause Legionnaire disease have ...

  19. Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or fungal infections Hemorrhage into the adrenal glands Tumors Risk factors for the autoimmune type of Addison disease include other autoimmune diseases : Swelling (inflammation) of the thyroid gland that often results in reduced thyroid function ( chronic ...

  20. Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enabling JavaScript. Top Banner Content Area Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Lyme Disease Lyme ... research with the major goals of developing better means of diagnosing, treating, and preventing the disease. To accomplish ...

  1. Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease early before it causes damage to the intestine. But because it's easy to confuse the symptoms with other intestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease , or lactose intolerance , teens with ...

  2. Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  3. Fifth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are otherwise healthy. But for some people fifth disease cause serious health complications. People with weakened immune systems caused ... transplants, or HIV infection are at risk for serious complications from fifth disease. It can cause chronic anemia that requires medical ...

  4. Menetrier's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a weakened immune system, CMV can cause serious disease, such as retinitis, which can lead to blindness. ... weakened immune system in order to prevent a serious disease from developing as a result of CMV. Antiviral ...

  5. Legionnaires' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common name for one of the several illnesses caused by Legionnaires' disease bacteria (LDB). Legionnaires' disease is an infection of the ... Legion Convention in Philadelphia. L. pneumophila had undoubtedly caused previous ... disease bacteria (LDB). L. pneumophila is a gram-negative rod ...

  6. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a review article on the autoinflammatory diseases, narrating its historical origin and describing the protein and molecular structure of the Inflammasome, the current classification of the autoinflammatory diseases and a description of the immuno genetics and clinical characteristics more important of every disease.

  7. Paddlefish Diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durborow, R.M.; Kuchta, Roman; Scholz, Tomáš

    Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc, 2015 - (Mims, S.; Shelton, W.), s. 227-265 ISBN 9780813810584 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : brown blood disease * immunity * interferon regulatory factor * paddlefish diseases * Southern Regional Aquaculture Center Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine

  8. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know what causes some brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. The symptoms of brain diseases vary widely depending on the specific problem. In some cases, damage is permanent. In other cases, treatments such as surgery, medicines, or physical therapy can correct the source of the problem or ...

  9. Lyme Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ozdemir, Davut; İnce, Nevin

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is caused by the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. Humans are infected by a tick bite to the skin. This disease is a non-contagious infectious disease. It has been known since the 19th century. LD has a worldwide distribution. It is endemic in Europe, North and South America. There are case reports since 1990 in Turkey. The clinical presentation varies depending on the stage of the disease. Lyme disease is classified into three stages: early localized dise...

  10. Glomerular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaden, Shelly L

    2011-08-01

    Glomerular diseases are a leading cause of chronic kidney disease in dogs but seem to be less common in cats. Glomerular diseases are diverse, and a renal biopsy is needed to determine the specific glomerular disease that is present in any animal. Familial glomerulopathies occur in many breeds of dogs. However, most dogs with glomerular disease have acquired glomerular injury that is either immune-complex mediated or due to systemic factors, both of which are believed to be the result of a disease process elsewhere in the body (i.e., neoplastic, infectious, and noninfectious inflammatory disorders). A thorough clinical evaluation is indicated in all dogs suspected of having glomerular disease and should include an extensive evaluation for potential predisposing disorders. Nonspecific management of dogs with glomerular disease can be divided into 3 major categories: (1) treatment of potential predisposing disorders, (2) management of proteinuria, and (3) management of uremia and other complications of glomerular disease and chronic kidney disease. Specific management of specific glomerular diseases has not been fully studied in dogs. However, it may be reasonable to consider immunosuppressive therapy in dogs that have developed a form of glomerulonephritis secondary to a steroid-responsive disease (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus) or have immune-mediated lesions that have been documented in renal biopsy specimens. Appropriate patient monitoring during therapy is important for maximizing patient care. The prognosis for dogs and cats with glomerular disease is variable and probably dependent on a combination of factors. The purpose of this article is to discuss the general diagnosis and management of dogs with glomerular disease. PMID:21782143

  11. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hero Brokalaki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a small intestine disease caused by the immunological response to gluten, a component of wheat, rye and barley. The worldwide prevalence of celiac disease ranges between 0.2% and 2.2 %. The clinical features of celiac disease includes diarrhea, steatorrhea, flatulence, abdominal pain and weight loss. The asymptomatic type of celiac disease is characterized by soft or normally shaped stool, weakness, lassitude and moderate weight loss. In children, celiac disease usually arises between the first and the third year of age, with diarrhea, flatulence and low weight. The malabsorption in small intestine causes many extaintestinal manifestations, such us anemia, bone abnormalities, hemorrhage and neuropathy. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histological examination of tissue samples taken by duodenum due gastroscopy and by the detection of certain antibodies in blood (anti-GL-IgG, anti-GL-IgA, ΕΜΑ-IgA και anti-tTg-IgA. The only therapeutic approach to celiac disease is a gluten-free diet and, if it is necessary, the administration of iron, folic acid, calcium and vitamins (K, B12. The prognosis of celiac disease is excellent, if there is an early diagnosis and the patient keeps for life a gluten free diet.

  12. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  13. [Moyamoya disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esin, R G; Isayeva, Yu N; Gorobets, E A; Tokareva, N V; Esin, O R

    2016-01-01

    Moya-moya is a rare cerebrovascular disease characterized by the progressive occlusion of cerebral vessels with partial switching off the circle of Willis and arteries that feed it. The article provides a review of literature, modern diagnostic criteria and a description of a single clinical case. The onset of the disease in this patient was characterized by headache and speech disorders.An analysis of speech disorders showed that they were systemic. They were registered at all language levels (phonetic, lexical,morphological, syntactic). A long diagnostic search may be explained by clinical manifestations that are atypical for other cerebrovascular diseases and by the rarity of the disease. PMID:27386589

  14. Coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Peter H R; Jabri, Bana

    2003-08-01

    Coeliac disease is a genetically-determined chronic inflammatory intestinal disease induced by an environmental precipitant, gluten. Patients with the disease might have mainly non-gastrointestinal symptoms, and as a result patients present to various medical practitioners. Epidemiological studies have shown that coeliac disease is very common and affects about one in 250 people. The disease is associated with an increased rate of osteoporosis, infertility, autoimmune diseases, and malignant disease, especially lymphomas. The mechanism of the intestinal immune-mediated response is not completely clear, but involves an HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 restricted T-cell immune reaction in the lamina propria as well as an immune reaction in the intestinal epithelium. An important component of the disease is the intraepithelial lymphocyte that might become clonally expanded in refractory sprue and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Study of the mechanism of the immune response in coeliac disease could provide insight into the mechanism of inflammatory and autoimmune responses and lead to innovations in treatment. PMID:12907013

  15. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  16. Quality of colonoscopy and spectrum of lower gastrointestinal disease as determined by colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To document the quality of colonoscopy practice and the pattern of colonic disease including polyp detection rate at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan, from May 2013 to June 2014. Methodology: This retrospective study recorded demographics of patients, indications and quality indices of 505 colonoscopies performed during the study period. Preparation was done with low residue diet and polyethylene glycol. Conscious sedation was generally used. Quality indices studied were compared with guideline standard. Results:Out of 505 colonoscopy patients, 305 were males and 200 were females. The indications for colonoscopic examination were lower gastrointestinal bleeding (26.5%, n=134), screening for colorectal cancer (14.1%, n=71), chronic diarrhea (12.9%, n=65), abdominal pain (10.9%, n=55), anemia (9.1%, n=46), constipation (7.3%, n=37), hematochezia and diarrhea (6.3%, n=32), altered bowel habits (5.1%, n=26), weight loss (3.6%, n=18), colonic thickening on CT scan (3.0%, n=15) and others (1.2%, n=6). Bowel preparation was adequate (in 92%, n=465) cases. Cecal intubation rate was 88.71% (n=448). Endoscopic diagnoses were hemorrhoids (36.2%, n=183), normal (22%, n=111), polyps (11.3%, n=57), ulcerative colitis (8.7%, n=44), cancer (4%, n=20), diverticulosis (3.4%, n=17), infective colitis (2.6%, n=13), intestinal TB (2.6%, n=13), non-specific colitis (2.2%, n=11), proctitis (1.8%, n=9) and others (5.3%, n=27). Conclusion: There is room for improvement in quality of colonoscopy, cecal intubation rate is slightly below the recommended standard and polyp detection rate is quite low however, it is not clear if the low rate of polyp detection is due to missed lesions or low population incidence. Time to reach caecum and withdrawal time should clearly be documented in the notes which can help to evaluate quality of the procedure in a better way

  17. Atividade microbiana cecal e contribuição nutricional da cecotrofia em coelhos alimentados com rações contendo diferentes fontes de fibra e níveis de amido Caecal microbial activity and caecotrophy nutritional contribution in rabbits fed diets with different starch levels and fiber sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Martins Varela de Arruda

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste estudo a avaliação da atividade microbiana cecal e a contribuição nutricional da cecotrofia em coelhos alimentados com rações contendo diferentes níveis de amido (22 a 32% em média mediante a inclusão de milho grão e diferentes fontes de fibra (feno de alfafa ou casca de soja, em esquema fatorial 2x2. No primeiro experimento, 40 coelhos alojados em gaiolas de engorda individuais, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado e alimentados à vontade dos 45 aos 85 dias de idade, foram abatidos para coleta dos conteúdos ileais e cecais. A concentração de ácidos graxos voláteis foi influenciada pela interação entre tratamentos, sendo 93,82 mmol/l para ração de maior nível de amido com casca de soja e 80,03 mmol/l para ração de menor nível de amido com feno de alfafa. No segundo experimento, 40 coelhos aos 65 dias de idade, alojados em gaiolas de engorda individuais, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, foram alimentados à vontade por 10 dias, e receberam colares de madeira para permitir a coleta total de cecotrofos. Houve influência da interação entre tratamentos sobre os teores de proteína e energia dos cecotrofos, sendo de 29,66% e 4204,87 kcal/kg para ração contendo maiores níveis de amido e casca de soja e de 27,98% e 4080,46 kcal/kg para ração contendo menores níveis de amido e feno de alfafa. As rações de alto amido ou com casca de soja propiciaram maior enriquecimento do conteúdo cecal e melhor aporte nutricional para os coelhos.The objective of this study was to evaluate the caecal microbial activity and caecotrophy nutritional contribution in rabbits fed diets with differents starch levels (22 or 32% on average from a high or low inclusion of corn grain and differents fiber sources (alfalfa hay or soybean hulls, in a 2x2 factorial design. In the first experiment, 40 rabbits were individually housed in fattening cages within entirely randomized design, and fed ad libitum from 45 to 85

  18. Hartnup disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerajani Hemangi

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of Hartnup disease is presented - the patient being an 11 year old school girl suffering from a typically pellagroid rash in the absence of any other signs of malnutrition. No accompanying neurological or psychiatric features are seen, but electro-encephalography revealed abnormal baseline activity. Investigations and management are detailed and the literature on Hartnup disease reviewed.

  19. Hartnup disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jerajani Hemangi; Amladi Sangeeta; Kohli Malavika; Parekh Roopali

    1994-01-01

    A rare case of Hartnup disease is presented - the patient being an 11 year old school girl suffering from a typically pellagroid rash in the absence of any other signs of malnutrition. No accompanying neurological or psychiatric features are seen, but electro-encephalography revealed abnormal baseline activity. Investigations and management are detailed and the literature on Hartnup disease reviewed.

  20. Alexander Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alexander disease is a progressive and often fatal disease. The destruction of white matter is accompanied by the formation of Rosenthal fibers, which are abnormal clumps of protein that accumulate in non-neuronal cells ... are sometimes found in other disorders, but not in the same amount or area ...

  1. Facioscapulohumeral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padberg, George Waltherus Adrianus Maria

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss several aspects of facioscapulohumeral disease, also called "autosomal dominant facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy" or "Landouzy-Dejerine type of muscular dystrophy" or "Landouzy-Dejerine' s disease" . We consider this disorder well defined and recognizabl

  2. Tickborne Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye rash similar to that found in Lyme disease, which is caused by bacteria transmitted by the deer tick. Although researchers know that the lone star tick transmits the infectious agent that causes STARI, they ... both bacterial diseases. Babesiosis is caused by parasites carried by deer ...

  3. Whipple's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Complete blood count ( CBC ) Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to check for the bacteria that cause the disease Small bowel biopsy Upper GI endoscopy (viewing the intestines with a flexible, lighted tube in a process called enteroscopy ) This disease may ...

  4. Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... simply be displayed as a subtle area of pink or red skin rather than the classic bull's-eye rash. Overview Lyme disease is the result of infection with the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. The disease is transmitted by infected ticks that also feed on mice and deer. The tick can be found attached ...

  5. Barlow's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sozen, Yunus V.; Tozun, Remzi; Berkman, Mahmut; Akalin, Yilmaz; Kara, Ayhan Nedim

    2004-01-01

    Scurvy that is so rare nowadays is clinically and radiologically very well defined. Two cases brought to our clinic in 1979 and 1980 are presented because ths disease process was so far advanced and because the clinical ond especsally radiological manifesations of the disease were so typical. The radiological and clinical characteristics of scurvy are elucidated because of these two cases.

  6. Parasitic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foundations of roentgenological semiotics of parasitic diseases of lungs, w hich are of the greatest practical value, are presented. Roentgenological pictu res of the following parasitic diseases: hydatid and alveolar echinococcosis, pa ragonimiasis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiasis, bilharziasis (Schistosomias is) of lungs, are considered

  7. Whipple's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... she sends a report to the gastroenterologist for review. Read more in Upper GI Endoscopy at www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov. How is Whipple disease treated? The health care provider prescribes antibiotics to destroy the T. whipplei bacteria and treat Whipple disease. Health care providers choose ...

  8. Pneumococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 000 adults age 65 years and older. Pneumococcal disease can cause serious illness and lifelong complications. Pneumococcal meningitis can cause hearing loss, seizures, blindness, and paralysis. Serious heart problems are ... its worst forms, pneumococcal disease kills one in every four to five people ...

  9. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  10. Wilson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Amirian

    1986-07-01

    Full Text Available The reported case is a 9-year old female who was presented with following clinical signs and symptoms: Excessive salivation, difficulty in speaking and writing, deteriorating school performance, spasticity, dysarthria, dysphagia, tremor of the wrists and shoulders. The initial impression was Wilson's disease. Increased copper in the urine after 24 hour treatment with D-penicillamine, low serum copper level and low ceruloplasmin and presence of kayser-fleischer rings in ophthalmologic slit lamp examination confirmed the diagnosis of Wilson's disease and treatment with D-penicillamine was started. It is important to keep Wilson's disease in mind in evaluating patients with presentation similar to that of this patient. Wilson's disease is a recessively inherited defect of copper metabolism. In 70-805 of cases, the presenting clinical manifestations are hepatic or neurological. kayser-fleischer ring is present in 75% of children who present with hepatic symptoms and in all children with neurological changes. The histologic appearance of liver biopsy in Wilson's disease is not pathognomonic. The early diagnosis and treatment of Wilson's disease is extremely important, as effective therapy is available. D-penicillamine is the most effective drug in treating Wilson's disease.

  11. Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    Crohn\\'s disease is a disorder mediated by T lymphocytes which arises in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of a breakdown in the regulatory constraints on mucosal immune responses to enteric bacteria. Regulation of immune reactivity to enteric antigens has improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of Crohn\\'s disease, and has expanded therapeutic options for patients with this disorder. Disease heterogeneity is probable, with various underlying defects associated with a similar pathophysiological outcome. Although most conventional drug treatments are directed at modification of host response, therapeutic manipulation of the enteric flora is becoming a realistic option.

  12. Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in your body tissues. If you have a metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of metabolic disorders. Mitochondria are small structures that produce energy in ...

  13. Chagas disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect control with insecticides and houses that are less likely to have high insect populations will help control the spread of the disease. Blood banks in Central and South America screen donors for ...

  14. Pompe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weakness progressing to respiratory weakness and death from respiratory failure after a course lasting several years. The heart ... the age of one year from either cardiorespiratory failure or respiratory infection. For individuals with late onset Pompe disease, ...

  15. Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senile dementia - Alzheimer type (SDAT); SDAT; Dementia - Alzheimer ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more likely ...

  16. Menetrier's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... campuses in Maryland and Arizona Research Resources Protocols, repositories, mouse models, plasmids, and more Technology Advancement & Transfer ... through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, ...

  17. Gaucher disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzyme replacement therapy is available. A bone marrow transplant may be needed in severe cases. ... is recommended for prospective parents with a family history of Gaucher disease. Testing can determine if parents ...

  18. Leishmaniasis Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Parasites - Leishmaniasis Parasites Home Share Compartir Disease Ulcerative skin lesion, ... border, on a Guatemalan patient who has cutaneous leishmaniasis. (Credit: B. Arana, MERTU, Guatemala) Marked splenomegaly (enlargement/ ...

  19. Legionnaires disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHale, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the history of legionnaires disease, its formation and occurrence, air conditioning systems and cooling towers where legionella has been shown to exist, and precautions in the mining environment. 4 figs.

  20. Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis ...

  1. Sever's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results from physical activities and sports that involve running and jumping, especially those that take place on hard surfaces, such as track, basketball, soccer, and gymnastics. Sever's disease also can result from ...

  2. Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thyroid disease may be sensitive to harmful side effects from iodine. Taking iodine drops or eating foods containing large amounts of iodine—such as seaweed, dulse, or kelp—may cause or worsen hyperthyroidism. ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about 5 to 10 percent of people with Parkinson's have "early-onset" disease which begins before the age of 50. Early-onset forms of Parkinson's are often inherited, though not always, and some ...

  4. Pick disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... legal advice early in the course of the disorder. Advance care directive , power of attorney, and other legal actions can make it easier to make decisions regarding the care of the person with Pick disease.

  5. Hashimoto's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a disease that keeps your body from absorbing vitamin B12 and making enough healthy red blood cells Lupus — ... or more tests. Sometimes, routine screening of thyroid function reveals a mildly underactive thyroid in a person ...

  6. Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senile dementia - Alzheimer type (SDAT); SDAT; Dementia - Alzheimer ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more ...

  7. Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most cases, people only take this medication for short periods of time since it can increase the chance of developing megacolon. Bowel Rest Sometimes Crohn's disease symptoms are severe and a person may need to ...

  8. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 25 years and access publications (since 1985) and patents resulting from NIH funding. PubMed is a free ... http://www.nidcr.nih.gov National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Website: http://www. ...

  9. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008119 Therapeutic effect of neuropeptide PACAP27 on Parkinson′s disease in mice. WANG Gang(王刚), et al.Dept Neurol & Neurol Instit, Ruijin Hosp, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Med Sch, Shanghai 200025. Chin J Neurol 2007;40(12):837-841. Objective To investigate the effects of different doses of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) on the functional and morphological outcome in a mice model of Parkinson′s disease (PD) re

  10. Celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Caspary, Wolfgang F

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for cli...

  11. Celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Holtmeier Wolfgang; Caspary Wolfgang F

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalenc...

  12. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010380 Evaluation non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and its influence on ability of daily living. WANG Rongfei(王荣飞),et al. Dept Neurol,1st Hosp,Guangzhou Med Coll,Guangzhou 510000. Chin J Neurol 2010;43(4):273-276. Objective To evaluate the non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD),and its influence on ability of daily living (ADL) in PD

  13. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  14. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women. Coronary heart disease ...

  15. Learning about Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page. Learning About Crohn's Disease What is Crohn's disease? What are the symptoms ... disease Additional Resources for Crohn's Disease What is Crohn's disease? Crohn's disease, an idiopathic (of unknown cause), chronic ...

  16. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  17. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if they have a history of: Abnormal cholesterol Diabetes Heart disease (coronary artery disease) High blood pressure ( hypertension ) Kidney disease involving hemodialysis Smoking Stroke ( cerebrovascular disease )

  18. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina;

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins......, which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers, and...... small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include...

  19. Myocardial disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930497 Ectopic expression and the significanceof HLA—class II antigens in the myocardium ofpatients with dilated cardiomyopathy.LI Yunyou(李运友),et al.lst Affili Hosp,Nanjing MedCoil,Nanjing,210029.Chin J Cardiol 1993;21(1):15—16.Expression of HLA—class II antigens(DQ,DP)in the myocardium of patients with differentheart diseases and normal controls was studiedwith indirect immunofluorescence(IIF).Thepositive rates in different groups were observedas follows:dilated cardiomyopathy(DCM,12/13,+++),rheumatic heart disease(2/4,++),congenital heart diseases(1/14,+),left a-trial myxoma(0/1)and normal controls(1/8,

  20. Hansen's disease: a vanishing disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinésio Talhari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction, implementation, successes and failures of multidrug therapy (MDT in all Hansen's disease endemic countries are discussed in this paper. The high efficacy of leprosy treatment with MDT and the global reduction of prevalence led the World Health Organization, in 1991, to establish the goal of elimination of Hansen's disease (less than 1 patient per 10,000 inhabitants to be accomplished by the year 2000. Brazil, Nepal and East Timor are among the few countries that didn't reach the elimination goal by the year 2000 or even 2005. The implications of these aspects are highlighted in this paper. Current data from endemic and previously endemic countries that carry a regular leprosy control programme show that the important fall in prevalence was not followed by the reduction of the incidence. This means that transmission of Mycobacterium leprae is still an issue. It is reasonable to conclude that we are still far from the most important goal of Hansen's disease control: the interruption of transmission and reduction of incidence. It is necessary to emphasize to health managers the need of keeping Hansen's disease control activities to better develop control programmes in the future. The recent international proposal to interrupt the transmission of leprosy by the year 2020 seems to unrealistic and it is discussed in this paper. The possibility of epidemiological impact related to the human immunodeficiency virus/Hansen's disease coinfection is also considered.

  1. Meniere's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feel better when they awaken. How can I reduce the frequency of Ménière’s disease episodes? Avoid stress and excess salt ingestion, caffeine, smoking, and alcohol. Get regular sleep and eat properly. Remain physically active, but avoid ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... second most common disorder of this type after Alzheimer's disease. It progresses slowly as small clusters of ... vitamin D deficiency in the development of Parkinson's. Vitamin D, which can enter ... K, Richards MB, Meng C, Priestley B, Fernandez HH, Cambi F, Umbach DM, Blair A, ...

  3. Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Law, Ian; Jønch, Aia;

    2011-01-01

    In this open-label pilot study, the authors evaluated the effect of memantine on the distribution of brain glucose metabolism in four Huntington's disease (HD) patients as determined by serial 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose [F(18)]FDG-PET scans over a period of 3-4 months (90-129 days, with one patient...

  4. Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to probe the cause and progression of such circuit defects in HD. Scientists are also using stem cells to study disease mechanisms and test potential therapeutic drugs. The NINDS-funded PREDICT-HD study seeks to identify biomarkers (biological changes that can be used to predict, diagnose, ...

  5. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    2.1 Viral disease2004002 M gene sequence analyses on Guangdong SARS CoV isolates. ZHOU Huiqiong (周惠琼), et al. Dis Contr & Prev Center, Guangdong Prov, Guangzhou 510300. Chin J Microbiol Immunol 2003; 23 (12) : 923 -925.Objective:To analyze the variation of M gene by sequenc-

  6. Extraphyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009250 Effects of bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on depression in patients with parkinson’s disease. WANG Xuelian(王学廉),et al.Dept Neurosurg,Tangdu Hosp,4th Milit Med Univ,Xi’an,710038.Chin J Nerv Ment Dis,2009;35(2):88-92.

  7. Neurologic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain, spinal cord, and nerves make up the nervous system. Together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong ... develops, such as spina bifida Degenerative diseases, where nerve cells are ... to the spinal cord and brain Seizure disorders, such as epilepsy ...

  8. Prionic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q-C Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative illnesses due to the accumulation of small infectious pathogens containing protein but apparently lacking nucleic acid, which have long incubation periods and progress inexorably once clinical symptoms appear. Prions are uniquely resistant to a number of normal decontaminating procedures. The prionopathies [Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD and its variants, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI] result from accumulation of abnormal isoforms of the prion protein in the brains of normal animals on both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The accumulation of this protein or fragments of it in neurons leads to apoptosis and cell death. There is a strong link between mutations in the gene encoding the normal prion protein in humans (PRNP - located on the short arm of chromosome 20 – and forms of prion disease with a familial predisposition (familial CJD, GSS, FFI. Clinically a prionopathy should be suspected in any case of a fast progressing dementia with ataxia, myoclonus, or in individuals with pathological insomnia associated with dysautonomia. Magnetic resonance imaging, identification of the 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, tonsil biopsy and genetic studies have been used for in vivo diagnosis circumventing the need of brain biopsy. Histopathology, however, remains the only conclusive method to reach a confident diagnosis. Unfortunately, despite numerous treatment efforts, prionopathies remain short-lasting and fatal diseases.

  9. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... salts such as zinc acetate (Galzin), blocks the digestive tract’s absorption of copper from food. Although most people ... Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Established in 1980, the ... digestive diseases to people with digestive disorders and to ...

  10. Infectious Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010400 The genetic characterization of VP1 region of Coxsackie virus A10 isolated from hand, foot and mouth disease cases in Shandong Province of China.YANG He(杨赫), et al.Instit Epidemiol & Health Statistic, Sch Public Health, Shandong Univ, Jinan 250012.Chin J Infect Dis

  11. Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to worms that can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies can lead to Giardia infections. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis, which is dangerous for pregnant women. Others, like malaria, are common in other parts ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/research/parkinsonsweb/index.htm NIH Patient Recruitment for Parkinson's Disease Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical ... 800-655-2273 Fax: 408-734-8522 Parkinson's Resource Organization ... Health and Human Services, Education, May 22, 2002. September 1999 Parkinson's ...

  13. Gum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... embarrassing (like bad breath) to the serious — like pain and tooth loss (which is both embarrassing and serious!). What ... also feed the acids that eat into your tooth enamel. If you have braces, ... certain medicines increase the risk of gum disease. Running yourself ...

  14. Celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, E; Assiri, A; Guandalini, S

    2013-10-01

    Celiac disease, with a prevalence around 1% of the general population, is the most common genetically-induced food intolerance in the world. Triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals, this enteropathy may appear at any age, and is characterized by a wide variety of clinical signs and symptoms. Among them, gastrointestinal presentations include chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss or failure to thrive in children; but extra-intestinal manifestations are also common, and actually appear to be on the rise. They include a large variety of ailments, such as dermatitis Herpetiformis, anemia, short stature, osteoporosis, arthritis, neurologic problems, unexplained elevation of transaminases, and even female infertility. For the clinician interested in oral diseases, celiac disease can lead to delayed tooth eruption, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent oral aphthae. Diagnosing celiac disease requires therefore a high degree of suspicion followed by a very sensitive screening test: serum levels of the autoantibody anti-tissue transglutaminase. A positive subject will then be confirmed by an intestinal biopsy, and will then be put on a strict gluten-free diet, that in most cases will bring a marked improvement of symptoms. Newer forms of treatment which in the future will probably be available to the non-responsive patients are currently being actively pursued. PMID:23496382

  15. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina;

    2015-01-01

    small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include...

  16. Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  17. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    2.1 Viral disease2003263 Isolation, identification and sequence analyses of dengue virus type 2 strain GD19/2001. REN Rui-wen(任瑞文), et al. Milit Med Instit Guangzhou Milit District, Guangzhou 510507. Chin J Epidemiol 2003; 24 (4):288-290. Objective:To identify the virus isolated from patients

  18. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    -derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  19. Leigh's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impairment of respiratory and kidney function. In Leigh’s disease, genetic mutations in mitochondrial DNA interfere with the energy sources that run cells in an area of the brain that plays a role in motor movements. The primary function of mitochondria is to convert the energy in glucose and ...

  20. Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by finding certified gluten-free foods. For instance, gluten-free oats are now available for people with celiac disease. The best approach is to read labels , but here are a few foods to steer clear of until you ... packaged rice mixes lunchmeats sausages instant cocoa ...

  1. Celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder,induced by the intake of gluten proteins present in wheat, barley and rye. Contrary to common belief,this disorder is a protean systemic disease, rather than merely a pure digestive alteration. CD is closely associated with genes that code HLA-Ⅱ antigens, mainly of DQ2 and DQ8 classes. Previously, it was considered to be a rare childhood disorder, but is actually considered a frequent condition, present at any age, which may have multiple complications. Tissue transglutaminase-2(tTG), appears to be an important component of this disease, both, in its pathogenesis and diagnosis. Active CD is characterized by intestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms, villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, and strongly positive tTG auto-antibodies. The duodenal biopsy is considered to be the "gold standard" for diagnosis, but its practice has significant limitations in its interpretation, especially in adults. Occasionally, it results in a false-negative because of patchy mucosal changes and the presence of mucosal villous atrophy is often more severe in the proximal jejunum, usually not reached by endoscopic biopsies. CD is associated with increased rates of several diseases, such as iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, dermatitis herpetiformis,several neurologic and endocrine diseases, persistent chronic hypertransami-nasemia of unknown origin,various types of cancer and other autoimmune disorders.Treatment of CD dictates a strict, life-long gluten-free diet, which results in remission for most individuals,although its effect on some associated extraintestinal manifestations remains to be established.

  2. Bacterial disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930445 A report on investigation of an outbreakof legionnaires’disease in a hotel in Beijing.DENG Changying(邓长英),et al.Beijing ArmedForce General Hosp,Beijing,100027.Chin J Epi-demiol 1993;14(2):78—79.During the period from February to March,1992,an outbreak of upper respiratory infection(influenza—like syndrome)took place in a hotelin Beijing.An epidemiological investigation andbacteriological examination were carried out inthis hotel.The results showed that it was anoutbreak of Legionnaires’disease caused by Le-gionella pneumophila serogroup 10(Lpl0).Theincidence was 13.51%(5/37).This is the firstreport on Lp10 infection in China.

  3. Peyronie disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyronie disease, or Induratio Penis Plastica, is characterized by the presence of one or more fibrous plaques at the albuginea penis, on the cavernous bodies or on the intercavernous septum. First of all, Induratio Penis Plastica ethiology is described, and its clincs and therapy. Past imaging methods are then considered (i.e. conventional radiology, cavernosography, CT and US). The authors report on their 4-year (1983-1987) experience with US in 62 males. Various different probes were employed, especially small-part 7.5 MHz probes. The results are similar to those reported in international literature. The use of high frequency probes allow the evaluation of local hypoechoic lesions even in the early phase of the disease, thus helping make therapy more effective

  4. Thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications

  5. Morgellons disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients. PMID:18318880

  6. "Chronic Lyme Disease"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area "Chronic Lyme Disease" What is "chronic Lyme disease?" Lyme disease is an infection caused by ... J Med 357:1422-30, 2008). How is Lyme disease treated? For early Lyme disease, a short ...

  7. Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease (SCD) Email this page Print this page Sickle cell disease (SCD) Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a disease of the hemoglobin. ... and form a sickle or a cresent. Tweet Sickle cell disease (SCD) Symptoms of SCD How transplant can ...

  8. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women. Coronary heart ...

  9. Fungal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930031 Experimental studies on lung lesionsof rabbits caused by streptomyces thermohy-groscopicus.LIU Fang(刘仿),et al.Dept Mi-crobiol,Hubei Med Coll,Xianning Branch,437100.Chin J Tuberc & Respir Dis 1992;15(4):207—208.Imitating the natural way of infection ofFarmer’s lung disease,we succeeded in inducingChina Medical Abstracts(Internal Medicine)

  10. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    4.1 Viral disease2003021 Analysis on the epidemiologic features of Dengue fever in Guangdong province, 1990 - 2000. LUO Huiming(罗会明), et al. Dis Contr & Prev Center Guangdong Prov, Guangzhou 510300. Chin J Epi-demiol 2002;23(6):427-430.Objective: To determine the epidemiological characteristics and risk factors of Dengue fever in Guangdong province in 1990 - 2000, and to develop the strategy for

  11. Parkinson's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolters, E C; Calne, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease there is degeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra, with consequent depletion of the neurotransmitter dopamine. The triad of tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia is the clinical hallmark. Drugs currently used for palliative therapy fall into three categories: anticholinergic agents, dopamine precursors (levodopa combined with extracerebral decarboxylase inhibitors) and artificial dopamine agonists. It has been argued, on theoretical grounds, that some drugs slow the ...

  12. Infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central nervous system infections represents a group of life-threatening diseases that present a formidable challenge to physicians. Despite the development of effective antimicrobial agents and modern surgical techniques, significant mortality and morbidity with CNS infections persist. Since the introduction of computed tomography, there is evidence of a marked decrease in mortality among patients with brain abscesses, although the morbidity has not changed significantly. CT correlation with pathology of the various CNS infections may aid in earlier diagnosis and bring about further disease in morbidity and mortality. Infections reach the brain or meninges mainly by two routes: (1) hematogenous dissemination from a distant infective focus to the meninges, corticomedullary junction, and choroid plexus; (2) direct extension by bony erosion for an adjacent focus of suppuration (otitis, mastoidits, sinusitis), by transmission along anaostomotic veins from the face, scalp, and orbits, and by transmission along cranial nerves following neurosurgery or traumatic craniocerebral wounds. Certain external factors serve to enhance the risk of intracranial infections, such as radiation; immunosuppressive or steroid therapy; cyanotic congenital heart disease; systemic illness such as diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, or cirrhosis; leukemia, lymphoma, or agammaglobulinemia; severe body stress; midline bony fusion defects; surgical or traumatic craniocerebral injury; and pulmonary or other systemic infections

  13. Cecal diverticulitis mimicking acute Appendicitis: a report of 4 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtulus Idris

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diverticulum of the cecum is a rare, benign, generally asymptomatic lesion that manifests itself only following inflammatory or hemorrhagic complications. Most patients with inflammation of a solitary diverticulum of the cecum present with abdominal pain that is indistinguishable from acute appendicitis. The optimal management of this condition is still controversial, ranging from conservative antibiotic treatment to aggressive resection. We describe four cases that presented with symptoms suggestive of appendicitis, but were found at operation to have an inflamed solitary diverticulum.

  14. Anesthesia for hemicolectomy in a known porphyric with cecal malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B K Naithani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative management of a known acute intermittent porphyria patient is a challenge requiring awareness of factors, which trigger an acute crisis, clinical features of a porphyric attack, knowledge of safe pharmacologic intervention, and preparedness for reintubation and ventilatory support. The classical signs of a porphyric crisis such as pain abdomen, vomiting and neuropsychiatric symptoms are masked under general anesthesia and can be confused with postoperative pain and vomiting and postoperative cognitive dysfunction, especially for intra-abdominal surgeries. Eternal vigilance for onset of an acute crisis is imperative. After a crisis of acute intermittent porphyria, residual paresis may persist for years in the absence of further attacks.

  15. Activity and cellular localization of amylases of rabbit cecal bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sirotek, Kamil; Marounek, Milan; Suchorská, O.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 4 (2006), s. 309-312. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 848.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : amylases Subject RIV: GH - Livestock Nutrition Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2006

  16. Huntington's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Branka

    2009-01-01

    Die Huntington''sche Krankheit (Huntington''s disease, HD) ist eine tödliche neurodegenerative Erkrankung mit einem extensiven Verlust von Neuronen im Striatum. Die Ursache für HD ist eine genetische Mutation, bei der eine CAG-Wiederholungssequenz verlängert wird. Im resultierenden Protein, das Huntingtin (htt) genannt wurde, diese Mutation führt zur Missfaltung und Aggregation von htt. Ich habe untersucht ob die Bildung von htt-Aggregaten die Transkription von Genen dass sie von HD-asso...

  17. Infectious Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    2.1 Viral disease 2006009 Correlation analysis of type A influenza virus genetic variation characteristic with survival selective pressure ZHOU xiao -ming(周晓明 ) ,et al. Sch Pub Health,Fudan Univ. Shanghai 200032. China J Infect Dis 2005;23(4) :221 -224 Objective:To study the relationship betweer. type A influenza virus genetic variation with survival selective pressure to find possible vaccine conserved antigen target. Methods:Seven strains of same HA (Hemagglutinin) serotype, regional and isolation time closely related type A influenza virus were selected with full HA gene coding sequence , Blast2 program was used to calculate the param-

  18. [Renal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  19. [Bone diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:26946704

  20. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. ...

  1. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease Updated:May 20,2016 View an animation of ... call 9-1-1. Risk Factors and Coronary Heart Disease Major risk factors that can't be changed ...

  2. Buerger's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Buerger's disease, angiographic findings are not pathognomonic, but in most cases they are diagnostic. We reviewed peripheral angiography of 36 cases of Buerger's disease who were suspected clinically during the period from Jan. 1979 to Dec. 1984. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of the cases were 34 males and 2 females (17:1) and most common in 4th decade. Eighty-six percents of the patients were smokers. 2. Chief complaints on admission were ulceration, pain at rest, coldness, and discoloration. 3. The anterior tibial artery was affected most commonly (88%) and posterior tibial (76%), perineal (68%), popliteal (22%), and femoral artery (15%) in order.4. The angiographic findings were 1) In all cases, there was absence of arteriosclerotic lesions and showed smooth vessel walls in non-affected arteries. 2) Direct corkscrew type collaterals were found in 2% of the lesions, and indirect type collaterals in 81%. The tree-root or spider's leg type collaterals were also found in 74%. 3) Standing-wave patterns were found in 30% which affected above the popliteal artery. 4) Early venous drainage was found in 16% of the lesions.

  3. Thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter reviews the correlation between thyroid disease, other than cancer, and radiation in the literature. Radiation-induced thyroid disturbance is discussed in the context of external and internal irradiation. External irradiation of 10 to 40 Gy may lower thyroid function several months or years later. Oral administration of I-131 is widely given to patients with Basedow's disease; it may also lower thyroid function with increasing radiation doses. When giving 70 Gy or more of I-131, hypothyroidism has been reported to occur in 20-30% and at least 10%. Thyroiditis induced with internal I-131 irradiation has also been reported, but no data is available concerning external irradiation-induced thyroiditis. The incidence of nodular goiter was found to be several ten times higher with external irradiation than internal irradiation. Thyroid disturbance is correlated with A-bomb survivors. A-bomb radiation can be divided into early radiation within one minute after A-bombing and the subsequent residual radiation. Nodular goiter was significantly more frequent in the exposed group than the non-exposed group; it increased with increasing radiation doses and younger age (20 years or less) at the time of exposure. The incidence of decrease in thyroid function was higher with increasing radiation doses. However, in the case of Nagasaki, the incidence of hypothyroidism was significantly higher in the low-dose exposed group, especially A-bomb survivors aged 10-39 at the time of exposure and women. (N.K.)

  4. [Morton's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomoto, Shinji; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2014-12-01

    Morton's disease refers to neuralgia at the web space of the toes with a pseudo-neuroma. It commonly occurs in the third web space of the foot in middle-aged and older women. The pseudo-neuroma is thought to be a secondary change after entrapment or repeated microtrauma. Patients complain of forefoot pain while walking. Typically, symptoms are caused by tight high-heeled shoes. The physical examination includes palpation of the web spaces and Mulder's test. Weight bearing foot radiographs are used to evaluate the deformity of the foot, especially at metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints. MRI is useful for differential diagnosis of pseudo-neuroma, MTP joint arthritis, and interdigital bursitis. Conservative treatments are shoe modification, use of orthotic insoles, and injection of corticosteroids and local anesthesia. The injections are useful not only for the treatment but also for diagnosis of Morton's disease. If the local injection is not temporally effective, surgical treatment is not indicated. If the conservative treatment fails, surgical treatment is indicated. The most common surgery is excision of the pseudo-neuroma. The surgery is usually performed using a dorsal approach. PMID:25475032

  5. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Browse Related Terms Progression of Liver Disease , Family History of Liver Disease , Liver Wellness , Liver Failure , Liver Biopsy Home > Your Liver > Liver Disease Information > The Progression ...

  6. Diseases of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different forms of skull diseases viz. inflammatory diseases, skull tumors, primary and secondary bone tumors, are considered. Roentgenograms in some above-mentioned diseases are presented and analysed

  7. Studies on the susceptibility of ostriches (Struthio camelus to the Indonesian velogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darminto

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of ostriches (Struthio camelus to the Indonesian velogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV was evaluated by artificial infection . Twelve - 5 to 6 week old ostriches were divided into 3 groups each containing 4 birds . The first group was inoculated through respiratory system by dropping directly the virus solution into the nostrils, while the second group was inoculated through digestive system by dropping directly the virus solution into the oesophagus, with the dose of infection 106ELDSo (50%-embryo lethal dose per bird . Meanwhile, the third group was treated as uninfected control . All infected birds developed antibody responses, but only two inoculated birds from the first group and two inoculated birds from the second group developed clinical signs of Newcastle disease (ND, with no specific pathological alterations . Infected birds, either sicks or healthy, excreted the challenge viruses through the respiratory system and still be detected up to the end of this experiment, ie . 15 days post-inoculation . The challenge viruses can be re-isolated from the brain, trachea, lungs, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, small intestine, cecal-tonsil, and proventriculus of the infected birds . This study concludes that: (1 the ostriches are susceptible to the infection of the Indonesian velogenic strain ofNDV; (2 all infected birds developed immune responses, but only half of them develops el jtigi aj i disease ; (3 the infected birds excreted the challenge viruses for a considerable long time which may play role as the Mginiseti.ce ofinfectron the other healthy ostriches ; and (4 the challenge viruses can be re-isolated from various organs of the birds . .

  8. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  9. Disease Outbreak News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and response operations Diseases Biorisk reduction Disease Outbreak News (DONs) Latest DONs 26 August 2016 Middle East ... Disease outbreaks by country RSS feeds Disease outbreak news Announcement: WHO to change the way it reports ...

  10. Alzheimer's Disease Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Fact Sheet The Genetics of Disease ...

  11. About Alzheimer's Disease: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Treatment How is Alzheimer's disease treated? What ... being researched? What are clinical trials? How is Alzheimer's disease treated? Alzheimer's disease is complex, and it ...

  12. Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Celiac Disease › Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease It is estimated that up to 20% of ... continuing to ingest gluten. Causes of Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease Continuing Gluten Ingestion The most common reason for ...

  13. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often do not consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  14. Learning about Your Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your disease Email this page Print this page Learning about your disease Learn more about common diseases ... may be a treatment option for you. Tweet Learning about your disease Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Acute ...

  15. Mad Cow Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Mad Cow Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Mad Cow Disease Print A ... likely are people to get it? What Is Mad Cow Disease? Mad cow disease is an incurable, fatal brain ...

  16. Kidney Disease of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  17. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  18. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... percent, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  19. Lyme Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Lyme Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Lyme Disease Print A ... Pacific Northwest, and the northern Midwest states. About Lyme Disease Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium ...

  20. Mitral Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that are ... Transplantation End-stage Lung Disease Adult Lung Transplantation Pediatric Lung ... Aortic Aneurysm Mitral Valve Disease Overview The mitral valve is ...

  1. Acid Lipase Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease, ... Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs when ...

  2. Prion Diseases as Transmissible Zoonotic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Su Yeon; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Ju, Young Ran; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases, also called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), lead to neurological dysfunction in animals and are fatal. Infectious prion proteins are causative agents of many mammalian TSEs, including scrapie (in sheep), chronic wasting disease (in deer and elk), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE; in cattle), and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD; in humans). BSE, better known as mad cow disease, is among the many recently discovered zoonotic diseases. BSE cases were first r...

  3. Osler's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osler's disease, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder leading to abnormal blood vessel formation in the skin, mucous membranes and often in organs, such as the lungs, liver and brain (arteriovenous malformations AVM). Various types are known. Patients may present with epistaxis. Teleangiectasia can be identified by visual inspection during physical examination of the skin or oral cavity or by endoscopy. Diagnosis is made after clinical examination and genetic testing based on the Curacao criteria. Modern imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become more important as they can depict the AVMs. Pulmonary AVMs can be depicted in CT imaging even without the use of a contrast agent while other locations including the central nervous system (CNS) usually require administration of contrast agents. Knowledge of possible clinical manifestations in various organs, possible complications and typical radiological presentation is mandatory to enable adequate therapy of these patients. Interventional procedures are becoming increasingly more important in the treatment of HHT patients. (orig.)

  4. Alzheimer disease: An interactome of many diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji S Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease (AD is an outcome as well as source of many diseases. Alzheimer is linked with many other diseases like Diabetes type 2, cholesterolemia, hypertension and many more. But how each of these diseases affecting other is still unknown to scientific community. Signaling Pathways of one disease is interlinked with other disease. But to what extent healthy brain is affected when any signaling in human body is disturbed is the question that matters. There is a need of Pathway analysis, Protein-Protein interaction (PPI and the conserved interactome study in AD and linked diseases. It will be helpful in finding the potent drug or vaccine target in conscious manner. In the present research the Protein-Protein interaction of all the proteins involved in Alzheimer Disease is analyzed using ViSANT and osprey tools and pathway analysis further reveals the significant genes/proteins linking AD with other diseases.

  5. Modeling Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Background Information > Modeling Infectious Diseases Fact Sheet Modeling Infectious Diseases Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Using computers to prepare ... Content Area Predicting the potential spread of an infectious disease requires much more than simply connecting cities on ...

  6. Alzheimer's Disease Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer's Disease Medications Fact Sheet Treatment for Mild to ...

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers The National Institute on Aging ... Repository for Alzheimer's Disease ADC Directory Arizona Arizona Alzheimer’s Disease Center/Sun Health Research Institute Eric Reiman, ...

  8. Understanding Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Understanding Alzheimer's Disease: What You Need to Know Introduction Many ...

  9. About Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms Early signs and symptoms Mild Alzheimer's ... more about other early signs of Alzheimer's » Mild Alzheimer's disease As the disease progresses, people experience greater ...

  10. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Celiac Disease Many kids have sensitivities to certain foods, and ... protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, consuming gluten ...

  11. Cyanotic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001104.htm Cyanotic heart disease ... heart disease refers to a group of many different heart defects that are present at birth (congenital). They result in a low blood oxygen level. ...

  12. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular heartbeats, called ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  13. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Alan ... hormone. Why does hypothyroidism increase your risk for heart disease? Both thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) are related ...

  14. What Is Vascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our CEO Board of Directors Scientific Advisory Board History of Vascular Cures Impact Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic ...

  15. Diabetes and Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our CEO Board of Directors Scientific Advisory Board History of Vascular Cures Impact Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic ...

  16. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  17. Alzheimer's Disease Information Page

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Alzheimer's Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Alzheimer's Disease? Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related, ...

  18. Motor Neuron Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Motor Neuron Diseases Fact Sheet See a list of all ... can I get more information? What are motor neuron diseases? The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a ...

  19. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral ...

  20. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Kidney Disease What are my kidneys and ... urine until releasing it through urination. How can diabetes affect my kidneys? Too much glucose , also called ...

  1. Lyme disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  2. Adult Still's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  3. Other Retinal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Congenital Amaurosis Macular Degeneration Retinitis Pigmentosa Stargardt Disease Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & ... affected by retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration, Usher syndrome and the entire spectrum of retinal diseases. ...

  4. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  5. Parkinson disease - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may ...

  6. Parkinson disease - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads to ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may come ...

  7. Lyme disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a ...

  8. Lung Diseases and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Lung Diseases and Conditions Breathing is a complex process. If ... lead to a disease called COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). COPD prevents proper airflow in and out of ...

  9. Eye Disease Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jobs Home > Eye Health Information > Eye Disease Simulations Eye Disease Simulations Listen Age-Related Macular Degeneration Cataract Diabetic ... information page Back to top Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic Eye Disease information page Back to top Glaucoma Glaucoma information ...

  10. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Sickle Cell Disease New supplement from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine describes the state of sickle cell disease related care in the United States. Read Supplement » ... are affected by sickle cell disease. More WEBINAR ...

  11. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Español The term sickle cell disease (SCD) ... common forms of SCD. Some Forms of Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin SS Hemoglobin SC Hemoglobin Sβ 0 thalassemia ...

  12. Diabetes and kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... Diabetic kidney disease is a major cause of sickness and death in people with diabetes. It can ...

  13. Genetics and Neuromuscular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dermatomyositis Inclusion-body myositis Diseases of Neuromuscular Junction Myasthenia gravis Lambert-Eaton (myasthenic) syndrome Congenital myasthenic syndromes Diseases of Peripheral Nerve Charcot-Marie- ...

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin can develop emphysema. Other risk factors for COPD are: Exposure to ...

  15. Parasitic diseases of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roentgenologic semiotics of the main parasitic diseases of lungs is described: echinococcosis, paragonimiasis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiosis and some rarely met parasitic diseases

  16. Liver in systemic disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Potential causes of abnormal liver function tests include viral hepatitis, alcohol intake, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, autoimmune liver diseases, hereditary diseases, hepatobiliary malignancies or infection, gallstones and drug-induced liver injury. Moreover, the liver may be involved in systemic diseases that mainly affect other organs. Therefore, in patients without etiology of liver injury by screening serology and diagnostic imaging, but who have systemic diseases, the abnormal liver function test results might be caused by the systemic disease. In most of these patients, the systemic disease should be treated primarily. However, some patients with systemic disease and severe liver injury or fulminant hepatic failure require intensive treatments of the liver.

  17. C-reactive protein levels in the perioperative period as a predictive marker of endoscopic recurrence after ileo-colonic resection for Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaculli, E; Agostini, M; Biancone, L; Fiorani, C; Di Vizia, A; Montagnese, F; Sibio, S; Manzelli, A; Tesauro, M; Rufini, A; Sica, G S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the perioperative behavior of C-reactive protein (CRP) in Crohn's disease (CD) patients undergoing elective ileo-cecal (IC) resection and to identify association between perioperative CRP levels and endoscopic recurrence at 1 year. Study hypothesis was that perioperative CRP changes are disease specific and could detect subset of patients with more aggressive pathopysiology. Seventy-five patients undergoing IC resection for CD were prospectively enrolled. Serial CRP levels were assessed: preoperative, postoperative day 1 (POD1) and day 5 (POD5). CD patients' values were compared against same interval assessments of control groups undergoing right colectomy and appendicectomy. At POD1, the serum concentration increase was significantly higher in CD patients than in controls. Comparing with control groups, CRP levels remained remarkably high and showed a lower reduction in CD at POD5. Difference between groups was statistically significant. Optimal cutoff levels have been identified: serum CRP concentrations of >39.8 mg/l at POD1 and of >23.2 mg/l at POD5 have shown a significant association to endoscopic recurrence when using bivariate correlation. In this preliminary series, binary logistic regression could not demonstrate statistical relationship between endoscopic recurrence and any of the variables evaluated as prognostic factor. This is the only study so far that investigates and confirms a disease-specific upregulation of CRP response in the perioperative period for CD patients undergoing surgery. The postoperative CRP levels and kinetics seem to be related to the grade of mucosal inflammation and recurrence rate according to our 12 months endoscopic evaluation. PMID:27551522

  18. What Causes Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Disease? Research suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) begins with damage to the lining and ... causing coronary microvascular disease (MVD). Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects the heart's tiny arteries. The cause ...

  19. What Is Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Crohn's Disease What is Crohn's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents As ... large intestine, leading to the anus. Who Gets Crohn's Disease? Both men and women can get Crohn's disease, ...

  20. Small animal disease surveillance: respiratory disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Fernando; Daly, Janet M.; Philip H Jones; Dawson, Susan; Gaskell, Rosalind; Menacere, Tarek; Heayns, Bethaney; Wardeh, Maya; Newman, Jenny; Everitt, Sally; Day, Michael J.; McConnell, Katie; Noble, Peter J.M.; Radford, Alan D

    2016-01-01

    This second Small Animal Disease Surveillance report focuses on syndromic surveillance of i) respiratory disease in veterinary practice and ii) feline calicivirus (FCV) based on laboratory diagnosis, in a large veterinary-visiting pet population of the UK between January 2014 and December 2015. Presentation for respiratory disease comprised 1.7%, 2.3% and 2.5% of canine, feline and rabbit consultations, respectively. In dogs, the most frequent respiratory sign reported was coughing (71.1% of ...

  1. Lyme Disease and Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, James M.; Cox, Susan M.

    1995-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly transmitted vector-borne disease in the United States, with many regions of the country at risk. Like other spirochete-borne infections, Lyme disease progresses in stages, making diagnosis in the early stages of the illness and prompt treatment important for cure. An early diagnosis is made difficult by the less-than-ideal serologic tests and the varied clinical presentations of the disease. Although Lyme disease has been reported in pregnancy, the transmissi...

  2. Pregnancy and periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sağlam, Ebru; SARUHAN, Nesrin; Çanakçı, Cenk Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Some maternal immunological changes due to pregnancy increases susceptibility to infections. Periodontal disease, the main cause is plaque, is a common disease which is seen multifactorial and varying severity. There are many clinical criteria for diagnosis of periodontal disease. Correlation between pregnancy and periodontal inflammation is known for many years. Periodontal disease affects pregnant’s systemic condition and also has negative effects on fetus. Periodontal disease increases the...

  3. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, disease. PMID:27479950

  4. Renal cystic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of renal cystic disease and a presentation of simple renal cysts. Subsequent chapters cover cystic disease in association with renal neoplasms and medullary sponge kidney. The chapters addressing autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease discuss and differentiate the infantile and adult forms of the disease. There are also separate discussions of medullary cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and cysts of the renarenal sinus.

  5. Treating neglected tropical diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Director: Mectizan Donation Program, Georgia, USA. www.mectizan.org

    2013-01-01

    The name neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) covers a range of diseases that cause disability, early death, and slowed physical and mental development. The first two in entries Table 1 are diseases that cause blindness. These diseases of neglected and impoverished peoples maintain a cycle of poverty and delayed development of the populations affected. The diseases themselves have been neglected in the push to control malaria, TB and AIDS.

  6. Prion diseases as transmissible zoonotic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Su Yeon; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Ju, Young Ran; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2013-02-01

    Prion diseases, also called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), lead to neurological dysfunction in animals and are fatal. Infectious prion proteins are causative agents of many mammalian TSEs, including scrapie (in sheep), chronic wasting disease (in deer and elk), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE; in cattle), and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD; in humans). BSE, better known as mad cow disease, is among the many recently discovered zoonotic diseases. BSE cases were first reported in the United Kingdom in 1986. Variant CJD (vCJD) is a disease that was first detected in 1996, which affects humans and is linked to the BSE epidemic in cattle. vCJD is presumed to be caused by consumption of contaminated meat and other food products derived from affected cattle. The BSE epidemic peaked in 1992 and decreased thereafter; this decline is continuing sharply owing to intensive surveillance and screening programs in the Western world. However, there are still new outbreaks and/or progression of prion diseases, including atypical BSE, and iatrogenic CJD and vCJD via organ transplantation and blood transfusion. This paper summarizes studies on prions, particularly on prion molecular mechanisms, BSE, vCJD, and diagnostic procedures. Risk perception and communication policies of the European Union for the prevention of prion diseases are also addressed to provide recommendations for appropriate government policies in Korea. PMID:24159531

  7. About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics What is Alzheimer's disease? What happens to ... with Alzheimer's disease? What is dementia? What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain ...

  8. Carrageenan Gum and Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli in a Piglet Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Impact on Intestinal Mucosa-associated Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyaka, Peris M; Sepehri, Shadi; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) including Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Adherent invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) pathotype has been increasingly implicated in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. In a 21-day study, we investigated the effects of AIEC strain UM146 inoculation on microbiota profile of the ileal, cecal, ascending and descending colon in a pig model of experimental colitis. Carrageenan gum (CG) was used to induce colitis in weaner piglets whereas AIEC strain UM146 previously isolated from a CD patient was included to investigate a cause or consequence effect in IBD. Treatments were: (1) control; (2) CG; (3) AIEC strain UM146; and (4) CG+UM146. Pigs in groups 2 and 4 received 1% CG in drinking water from day 1 of the study while pigs in groups 3 and 4 were inoculated with UM146 on day 8. Following euthanization on day 21, tissue mucosal scrapings were collected and used for DNA extraction. The V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was then subjected to Illumina sequencing. Microbial diversity, composition, and the predicted functional metagenome were determined in addition to short chain fatty acids profiles in the digesta and inflammatory cytokines in the intestinal tissue. CG-induced colitis decreased bacterial species richness and shifted community composition. At the phylum level, an increase in Proteobacteria and Deferribacteres and a decrease in Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were observed in CG and CGUM146 compared to control and UM146. The metabolic capacity of the microbiome was also altered in CG and CGUM146 compared to UM146 and control in the colon. We demonstrated that CG resulted in bacterial dysbiosis and shifted community composition similar to what has been previously observed in IBD patients. However, AIEC strain UM146 alone did not cause any clear changes compared to CG or control in our experimental IBD pig model. PMID:27092122

  9. Chronic granulomatous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGD; Fatal granulomatosis of childhood; Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood; Progressive septic granulomatosis ... In chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), immune system cells called ... some types of bacteria and fungi. This disorder leads to long- ...

  10. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare, degenerative brain disorder. Symptoms usually start around age 60. Memory problems, behavior changes, vision ... during a medical procedure Cattle can get a disease related to CJD called bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) ...

  11. Kennedy's Disease Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of great accomplishments. It is passed on from generation to generation in families worldwide. Males generally inherit the disease ... on the picture above. Spinal Bulbar Muscular Atrophy , X-linked Spinal Bulbar Muscular Atrophy, SBMA, neuromuscular disease, ...

  12. Cat Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an illness caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. Almost half of all cats carry the infection ... symptoms of CSD, call your doctor. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  13. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring ... United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other ...

  14. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It causes too much of a fatty substance to build up in the ... mental and physical problems. Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the first few ...

  15. Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  16. Lewy Body Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewy body disease is one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly. Dementia is the loss of mental ... to affect normal activities and relationships. Lewy body disease happens when abnormal structures, called Lewy bodies, build ...

  17. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  18. Sickle Cell Disease Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Sickle Cell Disease Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... True or False: Only African Americans get sickle cell disease. A True B False 2. True or ...

  19. Celiac disease - sprue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Addison's disease Down syndrome Intestinal cancer Intestinal lymphoma Lactose intolerance Thyroid disease Type 1 diabetes ... unchanged) Diarrhea , either constant or off and on Lactose intolerance (common when the person is diagnosed, usually goes ...

  20. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000106.htm Heart disease - risk factors To use the sharing features on ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. Changing ...

  1. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) KidsHealth > For Teens > Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Print ... healthy teens can have GERD, too. What Is GERD? Gastroesophageal (pronounced: gas-tro-ih-sah-fuh-JEE- ...

  2. Collagen vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many of many ...

  3. HIV and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sheets Permission to Use Fact Sheets Sponsors and Advertising Privacy Policy Project ... Disease WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT KIDNEY DISEASE? WHAT IS NORMAL KIDNEY FUNCTION? HOW DO I KNOW IF THERE ARE PROBLEMS ...

  4. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TDP43-related Dementia 2013 Andrew Watt Characterisation of Tau Imaging Ligands for Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias 2010 Marco Prado The Prion Protein as a Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer's Disease 2007 ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TDP43-related Dementia 2013 Andrew Watt Characterisation of Tau Imaging Ligands for Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias 2010 Marco Prado The Prion Protein as a Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer's Disease 2007 ...

  6. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  7. Celiac disease - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002443.htm Celiac disease - nutritional considerations To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Celiac disease is an immune disorder passed down through families. ...

  8. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Mar 23,2016 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  9. Lyme Disease Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Lyme Disease Tests Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... else I should know? How is it used? Lyme disease tests are used to determine if a person ...

  10. Lung disease - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/health/dci/Diseases/Asthma/Asthma_WhatIs.html Emphysema/COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease): COPD Foundation -- www.copdfoundation.org National Emphysema Foundation -- www.emphysemafoundation.org National Heart, Lung, and ...

  11. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and level of C-reactive protein, which is produced only when inflammation is present. ... people with occlusive peripheral arterial disease also have coronary artery disease. Amputation of a limb may be necessary if ...

  12. About Alzheimer's Disease: Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Causes Age-related changes in the brain Genetics Health, ... for the Causes of AD" NIA Information on Causes Alzheimer’s Disease in People with Down Syndrome Understanding ...

  13. Alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the disease. Learn More A New Home for Parkinson's Science An open access journal, enabling professionals and ... Contact the HelpLine Parkinson's News Upcoming Events National Parkinson Foundation (NPF) and the Parkinson's Disease Foundation (PDF) ...

  15. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want ... resources & more. Order Free Materials Today What is Parkinson’s Disease? Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and ...

  16. Managing Your Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Foundation Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  18. Lyme Disease Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lyme disease FAQ Health care providers Educational materials Data and Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... in the northeast and upper Midwest. Lyme Disease Data File To facilitate the public health and research ...

  19. Gum Disease in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Periodontist Gum Disease In Children Chronic gingivitis. aggressive periodontitis and generalized aggressive periodontitis are types ... children. Types of periodontal diseases in children Chronic gingivitis is common in children. It usually causes gum ...

  20. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... we see Common vision problems Age-Related Eye Diseases Eye Health Tips Podcasts Text Messages Vision-Related Terms, ... los Ojos Cómo hablarle a su oculista Diabetic Eye Disease Listen View this module and educate yourself, family, ...

  1. Learning about Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mouse Models Of Huntington's Disease 1998 News Release Learning About Huntington's Disease What do we know about ... and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Huntington's Outreach ...

  2. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 269 KB). Alternate Language URL Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Page Content On this page: ... responds by decreasing TSH production. [ Top ] How does pregnancy normally affect thyroid function? Two pregnancy-related hormones— ...

  3. Celiac disease - sprue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Addison disease Down syndrome Intestinal cancer Intestinal lymphoma Lactose intolerance Thyroid disease Type 1 diabetes Symptoms The symptoms ... unchanged) Diarrhea , either constant or off and on Lactose intolerance (common when the person is diagnosed, often goes ...

  4. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It causes too much of a fatty substance to build ... cells, causing mental and physical problems. Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the first ...

  5. Cat scratch disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat scratch disease is an infectious illness associated with cat scratches, bites, or exposure to cat saliva, causing chronic swelling of the lymph nodes. Cat scratch disease is possibly the most common cause of ...

  6. Myonecrosis of Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behcet's disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown cause characterized by intermittent episodes of acute inflammation manifested by oral aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. We report a rare case of myonecrosis associated with Behcet's disease. Myonecrosis of Behcet's disease can mimic soft tissue abscess and therefore awareness of this entity in the appropriate clinical setting is important for initiation of appropriate and timely treatment. (orig.)

  7. Endemic treponemal diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, M; Solomon, AW; Mabey, DC

    2014-01-01

    : The endemic treponemal diseases, consisting of yaws, bejel (endemic syphilis) and pinta, are non-venereal infections closely related to syphilis, and are recognized by WHO as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Despite previous worldwide eradication efforts the prevalence of yaws has rebounded in recent years and the disease is now a major public health problem in 14 countries. Adequate data on the epidemiology of bejel and pinta is lacking. Each disease is restricted to a specific ecologic...

  8. Self Inflicted Dermatological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul H. Aydemir

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This group of diseases are characterised with the aggravated types of stress releasing behaviors like scratching, picking, squeezing, and sucking. Lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, neurotic excoriations, trichotillomani, and onychotillomani are the diseases in this group. Depression, anxiety, and obsesif compulsive disease are the main underlying psychologic diseases. They need a skillfull psychiatric approach in addition to dermatologic treatment, and should be treated with patience in a long duration.

  9. Self Inflicted Dermatological Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ertuğrul H. Aydemir

    2010-01-01

    This group of diseases are characterised with the aggravated types of stress releasing behaviors like scratching, picking, squeezing, and sucking. Lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, neurotic excoriations, trichotillomani, and onychotillomani are the diseases in this group. Depression, anxiety, and obsesif compulsive disease are the main underlying psychologic diseases. They need a skillfull psychiatric approach in addition to dermatologic treatment, and should be treated with patien...

  10. Lyme Disease and Oncothermia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne disease with multiple organ failures, and systemic disorders. Dramatic change becomes apparent in the chronic phase of the disease. Chronic fatigue syndrome, lapse of concentration, depression, joint pain, and muscle pain are a few, but major clinical symptoms characterizing the disease. The human immune system is defenseless. Borrelia uses various mechanisms to escape from immunoattacks or antibiotic therapies. This “stealth phenomenon” needs new therapeutic prin...

  11. Caroli disease and cholangiocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sezer, Semih; TAYFUR, Öykü; ŞENGÜL, Ayşegül; ÖZİN, Yasemin; Parlak, Erkan; KAÇAR, Sabite; OĞUZ, Dilek; Şaşmaz, Nurgül

    2009-01-01

    Caroli's disease is a congenital disorder characterized by focal and/or diffuse cystic dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts. These patients have increased incidence of bile duct stones, recurrent cholangitis attacks and cholangiocarcinoma risk. Caroli's disease rarely metastasizes to distant sites. Treatment depends on the localization and extent of the disease. Cholangiocellular carcinoma developing from an underlying Caroli's disease is difficult to diagnose with various imaging techniques...

  12. Iron and Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Fargion, Silvia; Mattioli, Michela; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica; Fiorelli, Gemino

    2000-01-01

    A mild to moderate iron excess is found in patients with liver diseases apparently unrelated to genetic hemochromatosis. Iron appears to affect the natural history of hepatitis C virus-related chronic liver diseases, alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by leading to a more severe fibrosis and thus aiding the evolution to cirrhosis.Ahigher frequency of mutations of the HFE gene, the gene responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis, is found in patients with liver diseases a...

  13. Parkinson's disease and anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, K; Bennett, G

    2001-01-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest in the subject of anxiety in patients with Parkinson's disease. Up to 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience clinically significant anxiety. This anxiety may be a psychological reaction to the stress of the illness or may be related to the neurochemical changes of the disease itself. Antiparkinsonian drugs may have a role in the pathogenesis of the anxiety. The anxiety disorders in Parkinson's disease patients appear to be clustered in th...

  14. Methamphetamine and Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Noelia Granado; Sara Ares-Santos; Rosario Moratalla

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder predominantly affecting the elderly. The aetiology of the disease is not known, but age and environmental factors play an important role. Although more than a dozen gene mutations associated with familial forms of Parkinson's disease have been described, fewer than 10% of all cases can be explained by genetic abnormalities. The molecular basis of Parkinson's disease is the loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia (caudate/putamen) due to t...

  15. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  16. Overview of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Overview of Infectious Diseases Page Content Article Body I nfectious diseases are ... worms Last Updated 11/21/2015 Source Immunizations & Infectious Diseases: An Informed Parent's Guide (Copyright © 2006 American Academy ...

  17. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Heart diseases that affect women more than men include Coronary ...

  18. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Apr 18,2016 Heart disease risk rises for everyone as they age, but ... women is seen about 10 years after menopause. Heart disease is the leading killer of women . Estrogen Levels ...

  19. Living with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Disease If you have coronary heart disease (CHD), you can take steps to control its ... the section of this article titled "How Is Heart Disease Treated?" You also can visit the Health Topics ...

  20. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart disease risk factors causes coronary MVD. Although death rates from heart disease have dropped in the last 30 years, they ... stopped her "dead in her tracks." Jennifer reminds us how heart disease takes too many of our moms, sisters, and ...

  1. Metastatic Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanka, Padmavathy; Lanka, Lakshmana Rao; Sylvester, N.; Lakshmi, M. Dhana; Ethirajan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease, first described in 1922, is characterized by segmental granulomatous inflammation of the intestinal tract and frequently involves the cutaneous tissues as well. Cutaneous Crohn's disease (CCD) is synonymous with metastatic Crohn's disease (MSD). A case of CCD, without any gastrointestinal involvement is reported for its rarity. PMID:24616854

  2. Metastatic Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Padmavathy Lanka; Lakshmana Rao Lanka; Sylvester, N.; M Dhana Lakshmi; Ethirajan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Crohn′s disease, first described in 1922, is characterized by segmental granulomatous inflammation of the intestinal tract and frequently involves the cutaneous tissues as well. Cutaneous Crohn′s disease (CCD) is synonymous with metastatic Crohn′s disease (MSD). A case of CCD, without any gastrointestinal involvement is reported for its rarity.

  3. [Fatigue in neuromuscular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, B.G.M. van; Kalkman, J.S.; Schillings, M.L.; Werf, S.P. van der; Bleijenberg, G.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Chronic fatigue is a symptom of diseases such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's and cerebrovascular disease. Fatigue can also be present in people with no demonstrable somatic disease. If certain criteria are met, chronic-fatigue syndrome may be diagnosed in these cases. Fatigue is a multi-

  4. Childhood Contagious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these diseases are so common in children. Contagious diseases are often caused by the spread of bacteria (such as in scarlet fever) or viruses (such as in chickenpox, measles, hand-foot-and-mouth disease, and quite a few others) in droplets of ...

  5. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke Heart Disease Risk Factors Recommend ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke File Formats Help: How do ...

  6. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sickle cell disease? Sickle cell disease, also called sickle cell anemia, is a hereditary condition (which means it runs ... or blocks blood and oxygen reaching nearby tissues. Sickle cell disease ... the whites of the eyes) Anemia (the decreased ability of the blood to carry ...

  7. Peripheral Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or atherectomy may be used to help improve blood flow. What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? How is peripheral artery disease evaluated? How ... PAD are diabetes, smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Most cases occur in ... is peripheral artery disease evaluated? Several imaging tests can be used to ...

  8. Living with Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Crohn's Disease Living with Crohn's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Photo ... Why have you chosen to speak out about Crohn's disease? For many years I really didn't talk ...

  9. What Is Crohn's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are Crohn's & Colitis? > What is Crohn’s Disease? Crohn’s Disease is a Chronic Condition By understanding your body ... live a full and rewarding life What is Crohn’s Disease? Email Print + Share Named after Dr. Burrill B. ...

  10. Learning about Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... suggest that these genes are also involved in early-onset Parkinson's disease (diagnosed before the age of 30) or ... LRRK2 causes Parkinson's Disease [interscience.wiley.com] Hereditary Early-Onset Parkinson's Disease Caused by Mutations in PINK1 [sciencemag.org] ...

  11. Candidate parasitic diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Behbehani, K

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses five parasitic diseases: American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease), dracunculiasis, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis and schistosomiasis. The available technology and health infrastructures in developing countries permit the eradication of dracunculiasis and the elimination of lymphatic filariasis due to Wuchereria bancrofti. Blindness due to onchocerciasis and transmission of this disease will be prevented in eleven West African countries; transmission of Chagas dise...

  12. Glycation in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente Miranda, Hugo; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2016-06-01

    Glycation is a spontaneous age-dependent posttranslational modification that can impact the structure and function of several proteins. Interestingly, glycation can be detected at the periphery of Lewy bodies in the brain in Parkinson's disease. Moreover, α-synuclein can be glycated, at least under experimental conditions. In Alzheimer's disease, glycation of amyloid β peptide exacerbates its toxicity and contributes to neurodegeneration. Recent studies establish diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying this connection remain unclear. We hypothesize that hyperglycemia might play an important role in the development of these disorders, possibly by also inducing protein glycation and thereby dysfunction, aggregation, and deposition. Here, we explore protein glycation as a common player in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and propose it may constitute a novel target for the development of strategies for neuroprotective therapeutic interventions. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26946341

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) LRRK2-Related Parkinson Disease Parkin Type of Early-Onset Parkinson Disease Parkinson Disease Overview PINK1 Type of Young- ... Parkinson disease 5 Parkinson disease 6, autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson disease 7 Parkinson disease 8, autosomal dominant Parkinson ...

  14. Genetics of complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling; Møller, Gert Lykke; Koefoed, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    A complex disease with an inheritable component is polygenic, meaning that several different changes in DNA are the genetic basis for the disease. Such a disease may also be genetically heterogeneous, meaning that independent changes in DNA, i.e. various genotypes, can be the genetic basis...... for the disease. Each of these genotypes may be characterized by specific combinations of key genetic changes. It is suggested that even if all key changes are found in genes related to the biology of a certain disease, the number of combinations may be so large that the number of different genotypes may be close...

  15. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent sudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. synringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine. (MG)

  16. Disease: H00061 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00061 Prion diseases; Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD); Gerstmann-Straussler diseas...e (GSD); Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSSD); Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) Prion diseases, also t...ermed transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that... affect humans and a number of other animal species. The etiology of these diseases...vely folded protein, PrPC. Neurodegenerative disease hsa05020 Prion diseases PRNP (mutation) [HSA:5621] [KO:

  17. Fight against infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, K; Kamakura, M; Kitamura, K

    1996-08-01

    During early Meiji era in Japan, there were frequent epidemics of fatal acute communicable diseases such as cholera, dysentery and smallpox, and preventive measures and preparations for acute infectious diseases were urgently needed. Together with improvement of scientific preparations, the Communicable Disease Prevention Law was promulgated in 1897. Then gradually until 1940's, the focus of preventive measures have been shifted from acute infectious diseases to chronic ones, particularly tuberculosis. After the World War II, except the short period of social confusion, major legally-defined communicable diseases had been decreasing rapidly mainly due to the use of antibiotics and improvement of environmental sanitation. At the same time, the introduction of preventive vaccination marked a new era for the prevention of infectious diseases and was largely responsible for the remarkable decrease of infant mortality in Japan. Recently the concept of defense by vaccination against infectious diseases has evolved from group-oriented to individual-oriented, so that the Preventive Vaccination Law was drastically revised in 1994. Currently, effective counter-measures against newly emerged infectious diseases, as viral hepatitis, institution-acquired infection, viral hemorrhagic fever etc., have been implemented. For the future, improvement of infections disease surveillance, vaccine development and expansion of vaccination coverage along with monitoring side-effects, preventive health education on AIDS/STDs, addressing the special needs of foreigners living in Japan and international collaboration for disease control abroad are all vital to the success of protection of the public's health from infectious diseases in Japan. PMID:8800275

  18. Diagnosis of Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Lukacs, Zoltan; Straub, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Pompe disease (acid maltase deficiency, glycogen storage disease type II) in children and adults can be challenging because of the heterogeneous clinical presentation and considerable overlap of signs and symptoms found in other neuromuscular diseases. This review evaluates some of...... the methods used in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of late-onset Pompe disease. Muscle biopsy is commonly used as an early diagnostic tool in the evaluation of muscle disease. However, experience has shown that relying solely on visualizing a periodic acid-Schiff-positive vacuolar myopathy...... to identify late-onset Pompe disease often leads to false-negative results and subsequent delays in identification and treatment of the disorder. Serum creatine kinase level can be normal or only mildly elevated in late-onset Pompe disease and is not very helpful alone to suggest the diagnosis, but...

  19. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  20. Genetics of Proteasome Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldrin V. Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a large, multiple subunit complex that is capable of degrading most intracellular proteins. Polymorphisms in proteasome subunits are associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and cancer. One polymorphism in the proteasome gene PSMA6 (−8C/G is associated with three different diseases: type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and coronary artery disease. One type of proteasome, the immunoproteasome, which contains inducible catalytic subunits, is adapted to generate peptides for antigen presentation. It has recently been shown that mutations and polymorphisms in the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit PSMB8 are associated with several inflammatory and autoinflammatory diseases including Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, CANDLE syndrome, and intestinal M. tuberculosis infection. This comprehensive review describes the disease-related polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with human diseases and the physiological modulation of proteasome function by these polymorphisms. Given the large number of subunits and the central importance of the proteasome in human physiology as well as the fast pace of detection of proteasome polymorphisms associated with human diseases, it is likely that other polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with diseases will be detected in the near future. While disease-associated polymorphisms are now readily discovered, the challenge will be to use this genetic information for clinical benefit.

  1. Coeliac disease and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Whether there is an association between coeliac disease and epilepsy is uncertain. Recently, a syndrome of coeliac disease, occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcification has been described, mostly in Italy. We measured the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients attending a seizure clinic, and investigated whether cerebral calcification occurred in patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy. Screening for coeliac disease was by IgA endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. Of 177 patients screened, four patients were positive. All had small-bowel histology typical of coeliac disease. The overall frequency of coeliac disease in this mixed patient sample was 1 in 44. In a control group of 488 pregnant patients, two serum samples were positive (1 in 244). Sixteen patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy, who had previously attended this hospital, were identified. No patient had cerebral calcification on CT scanning. Coeliac disease appears to occur with increased frequency in patients with epilepsy, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Cerebral calcification is not a feature of our patients with epilepsy and coeliac disease, and may be an ethnically-or geographically-restricted finding.

  2. Multiple cystic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Angélica Ferreira Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and accurate diagnosis of the majority of these diseases without recourse to open-lung biopsy. The main diseases in this group that are discussed in this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and folliculin gene-associated syndrome (Birt–Hogg–Dubé; other rare causes of cystic lung disease, including cystic metastasis of sarcoma, are also discussed. Disease progression is unpredictable, and understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and their appearance during evolution of the disease are essential for management. Correlation of disease evolution and clinical context with chest imaging findings provides important clues for defining the underlying nature of cystic lung disease, and guides diagnostic evaluation and management.

  3. Multiple cystic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Francisco, Flavia Angélica; Soares Souza, Arthur; Zanetti, Gláucia; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-12-01

    Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and accurate diagnosis of the majority of these diseases without recourse to open-lung biopsy. The main diseases in this group that are discussed in this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and folliculin gene-associated syndrome (Birt-Hogg-Dubé); other rare causes of cystic lung disease, including cystic metastasis of sarcoma, are also discussed. Disease progression is unpredictable, and understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and their appearance during evolution of the disease are essential for management. Correlation of disease evolution and clinical context with chest imaging findings provides important clues for defining the underlying nature of cystic lung disease, and guides diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:26621970

  4. Disease: H01077 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ts or patients with underlying disease. Infectious disease Bordetella hinzii Amoxic... the genus Bordetella that is isolated from poultry with respiratory disease. B. hinzii may cause disease in immunocompromised patien

  5. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to run events. Please support us. Donate | Volunteer Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Discussion on Inspire Support Community ... Liver > Liver Disease Information > Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Explore this section to learn ...

  6. Mad Cow Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Mad Cow Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Mad Cow Disease Print A ... Contagious? What Is Being Done About It About Mad Cow Disease Mad cow disease has been in the headlines ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: prion disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or, more commonly, "mad cow disease." Another example of an acquired human prion disease ... forms of prion disease , including kuru and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, are not inherited. Related Information What does it ...

  8. Disease: H00921 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available terion to establish the diagnosis. Congenital disorder; Eye disease; Hematologic disease; Skin and connective tissue disea...se; Nervous system disease TINF2 [HSA:26277] [KO:K11112] Dyskeratos

  9. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  10. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have liver disease, you are at risk for pulmonary ... to the liver without cirrhosis. How does liver disease relate to pulmonary hypertension? Liver disease can cause what is known ...

  11. Disease: H01151 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available infections in patients with underlying diseases. Infectious disease Brevundimonas vesicularis Brevundimonas...d-stage renal disease Autoimmune diseases Vancomycin [ATC: J01XA01] Ceftazidime [ATC:J01DD02] Levofloxacin [

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Sandhoff disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Health Topic: Degenerative Nerve Diseases Health Topic: Tay-Sachs Disease Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ... UK) National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association Genetic Testing Registry (1 ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  14. Dynamics of interacting diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz, Joaquín; Meloni, Sandro; Moreno, Yamir

    2014-01-01

    Current modeling of infectious diseases allows for the study of complex and realistic scenarios that go from the population to the individual level of description. Most epidemic models however assume that the spreading process takes place on a single level (be it a single population, a meta-population system or a network of contacts). The latter is in part a consequence of our still limited knowledge about the interdependency of the many mechanisms and factors involved in disease spreading. In particular, interdependent contagion phenomena can only be addressed if we go beyond the scheme one pathogen-one network. In this paper, we study a model that allows describing the spreading dynamics of two concurrent diseases and apply it to a paradigmatic case of disease-disease interaction: the interaction between AIDS and Tuberculosis. Specifically, we characterize analytically the epidemic thresholds of the two diseases for different scenarios and also compute the temporal evolution characterizing the unfolding dyn...

  15. Interstitial lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina M. Antoniou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases are a group of diffuse parenchymal lung disorders associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Knowledge achieved in recent years has resulted in the publication of the new classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, according to which there are three groups: major, rare and unclassified. The novelty of the new classification comes from the fact that difficult to classify entities can be treated according to the disease behaviour classification. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is the most lethal amongst the interstitial lung diseases and presents high heterogeneity in clinical behaviour. A number of biomarkers have been proposed in order to predict the course of the disease and group patients with the same characteristics in clinical trials. Early diagnosis and disease stratification is also important in the field of other interstitial lung diseases.

  16. Spectrum of cardiorenal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter A. McCullough

    2005-01-01

    @@ Cardiorenal disease The modern day,worldwide epidemics of obesity and hypertension (HTN) are central drivers of a secondary epidemic of type 2 diabetes with combined chronic kidney disease (CKD)and cardiovascular disease (CVD).1 Approximately half of those with diabetes will develop CKD.2 Conversely,half of all cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are due to diabetic nephropathy.With the aging of the general population and cardiovascular care shifting towards the elderly,an understanding of why decreasing levels of renal function act as a major adverse prognostic factor after a variety of cardiac events is imperative.The heart and kidney are inextricably linked via hemodynamic and neurohumoral function (Fig.1).Considerable evidence shows that CKD accelerates atherosclerosis,myocardial disease,valvular disease,and promotes an array of cardiac arrhythmias.3

  17. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  18. Sulfadiazine for kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, R.R.; Bernier, A.F.; Whipple, W.J.; Burrows, R.E.

    1951-01-01

    The blueback salmon fingerlings (Oncorhynchus nerka) at the U.S. Fish-Cultural Station at Winthrop, Washington, underwent an infection that was caused by a very short, Gram-positive, nonmotile, rod-shaped bacterium. A further description is impossible at this time, as the organism has not been grown satisfactorily for proper identification. The disease was characterized by white, raised areas of dead tissue mainly in the kidney: for this reason it is referred to as kidney disease. Belding and Merrill (1935) described a disease among the brook, brown, and rainbow trout at a State hatchery in Massachusetts which, from the description, might be the same as kidney disease. J.H. Wales of the California Division of Fish and Game described (unpublished manuscript, 1941) a disease in hatchery trout in California which seems to be identical to kidney disease.

  19. CDC Disease Detective Camp

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-02

    The CDC Disease Detective Camp gives rising high school juniors and seniors exposure to key aspects of the CDC, including basic epidemiology, infectious and chronic disease tracking, public health law, and outbreak investigations. The camp also helps students explore careers in public health.  Created: 8/2/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/2/2010.

  20. Adult congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Morphet, John AM

    2006-01-01

    One million people over the age of 20 suffer from congenital heart disease in the United States. These adult patients can slip through the cracks of our medical system; many are too old to be cared for in most pediatric institutions by pediatric cardiologists and, unfortunately, most adult cardiologists are not trained in congenital heart disease. Therefore, it is important to identify the common lesions in adult congenital heart disease and how they should be managed. Acyanotic congenital he...

  1. Diseases Transmitted by Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Matthew E

    2015-08-01

    Although many people these days actually work very hard at leisure time activities, diseases are most commonly acquired from birds during the course of work in the usual sense of the term, not leisure. However, travel for pleasure to areas where the diseases are highly endemic puts people at risk of acquiring some of these bird-related diseases (for example, histoplasmosis and arbovirus infections), as does ownership of birds as pets (psittacosis). PMID:26350315

  2. Alzheimer's disease and stigmatization

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios Kosmidis; Aggeliki Nousi; Stavros Τoulis; Antigoni Fountouki; Dimitrios Theofanidis

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The main objective of the study was to explore social bias experienced by patients with Alzheimer's disease and to investigate the knowledge of a sample of the general population regarding this particular disease. Method: The sample consisted of 91 individuals who were first degree relatives of members of three Centers of Open Protection for the Elderly, who did not suffer from dementia as they have recently undergone screening for Alzheimer's disease. A survey design was adopted using a...

  3. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history sta...

  4. Neuro-Sweet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Gemma; Archibald, Neil; Turnbull, Doug

    2012-04-01

    Sweet's syndrome, or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is a multisystem, inflammatory disease characterised by tender skin lesions and neutrophilic infiltration of various organs, including the nervous system. A rare condition, neuro-Sweet's can present with a wide variety of neurological symptoms dependent on the region of the CNS affected. Here we present a case of neuro-Sweet's disease in association with Crohn's disease. PMID:22450461

  5. Psoriasis, a Systemic Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Nilgün Atakan; Sibel Doğan

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease which is characterized by plaques with shiny white desquamation on the skin. It affects 1 to 3% of different ethnic populations. The disease significantly lowers the quality of life for the patients as the lesions appear on visible regions such as the scalp, face and extremities causing pruritus and extensive use of topical agents with a poor rate of recovery and the disease has a recurrent course with frequent attacks. Psoriasis was previously assu...

  6. Hyperosmia in Lyme disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Neurological involvement in Lyme disease has been reported to include meningitis, cranial neuropathy and radiculoneuritis. While it is known that in some cases of asceptic meningitis patients may develop hyperosmia, the association between hyperosmia and Lyme disease has not previously been studied. Objective To carry out the first systematic study to ascertain whether hyperosmia is also a feature of Lyme disease. Method A questionnaire regarding abnormal sensory sensitivity in respect of ...

  7. Epidemiology of Lyme Disease

    OpenAIRE

    White, Dennis J

    1991-01-01

    Investigation of the epidemiology of Lyme disease depends upon information generated from several sources. Human disease surveillance can be conducted by both passive and active means involving physicians, public health agencies and laboratories. Passive and active tick surveillance programs can document the extent of tick-borne activity, identify the geographic range of potential vector species, and determine the relative risk of exposure to Lyme disease in specific areas. Standardized labor...

  8. Zygomycetes in Human Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ribes, Julie A.; Vanover-Sams, Carolyn L.; Baker, Doris J.

    2000-01-01

    The Zygomycetes represent relatively uncommon isolates in the clinical laboratory, reflecting either environmental contaminants or, less commonly, a clinical disease called zygomycosis. There are two orders of Zygomycetes containing organisms that cause human disease, the Mucorales and the Entomophthorales. The majority of human illness is caused by the Mucorales. While disease is most commonly linked to Rhizopus spp., other organisms are also associated with human infection, including Mucor,...

  9. Inhalational Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    S Kowsarian; Farzaneh; F Jamshidiha

    2010-01-01

    Inhalational lung diseases are among the most important occupational diseases. Pneumoconiosis refers to a group of lung diseases result from inhalation of usually inorganic dusts such as silicon dioxide, asbestos, coal, etc., and their deposition in the lungs. The resultant pulmonary disorders depend on the susceptibility of lungs; size, concentration, solubility and fibrogenic properties of the inhaled particles; and duration of exposure. Radiographic manifestations of pneumoconiosis become ...

  10. Demystifying Dutch disease

    OpenAIRE

    Naoko C. Kojo

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the theory of Dutch disease and its implications for practical policy questions. Dutch disease is a term that is well-known to economists and development practitioners. But it is also a concept that is often conflated with "resource curse" and misinterpreted as a "disease" that necessarily causes adverse impacts on the economy. The paper points out that many of the seem...

  11. Laparoscopy in Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu, Murali N.; Trang, Alfred C.; Salky, Barry A.

    2007-01-01

    Crohn's disease represents a challenging operative dilemma. The nature of the disease increases the technical complexity of operations, their morbidity, and the likelihood of multiple operations. In this setting, the advantages of laparoscopic surgery, including shorter hospital stays, less adhesion formation, fewer wound complications, and faster recovery of bowel function, are particularly beneficial to the patient. Patients with Crohn's disease requiring operations in the elective and semi...

  12. Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this: Main Content Area Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) Phagocyte (purple) engulfing Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (yellow). Credit: NIAID CGD is a genetic disorder in which white blood ...

  13. Autoimmunity in Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Martorell, P; Roep, B O; Smit, J W A; Martorell, P M

    2002-08-01

    Addison's disease has a low incidence and is most frequently the result of an autoimmune disease in developed countries. Addison's disease can present as an isolated entity or in combination with other autoimmune diseases: Addison's disease can be part of the distinct polyglandular autoimmune syndromes APS I and II. Autoantibodies in patients with isolated Addison's disease are directed against the enzymes involved in steroid synthesis, P45oc21, P45oscc and P45oc17. Addison's disease, both isolated and in the context of APS II, has been associated with the haplotype HLA-A1, -B8 and DR3. The value of the increased expression of these molecules on adrenocortical cells could point towards an infectious pathogenesis. Given the prevalence, up to 80 %, of autoantibodies in Addison's disease as well as the high predictive value for developing the disease when antibodies are present (41% in three years), we advise screening high-risk populations, such as patients with other autoimmune endocrinopathies or their relatives for the presence of these antibodies. The adrenocortical function of patients positive for antibodies should be followed yearly. PMID:12430572

  14. Digestive Diseases Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Image Library Digestive Disease, Nutrition, and Weight-control Materials Healthy eating, physical activity, and weight control materials available from NIDDK's Weight-control Information Network(WIN) ...

  15. Neuroinflammation in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a monogenic neurodegenerative disease characterized by abnormal motor movements, personality changes and early death. In contrast to other neurodegenerative diseases, very little is known about the role of neuroinflammation in HD. While the current data clearly demonstrate the existence of inflammatory processes in HD pathophysiology, the question of whether neuroinflammation is purely reactive or might actively participate in disease pathogenesis is currently a matter of ongoing research and debate. This review will try to shed some light on the current state of research in this area and provide an outlook on potential future developments. PMID:20535620

  16. Epigenetics in neonatal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xue-feng; DU Li-zhong

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the role of epigenetic regulation in neonatal diseases and better understand Barker's "fetal origins of adult disease hypothesis".Data sources The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from the articles published in Medline/PubMed between January 1953 and December 2009.Study selection Articles associated with epigenetics and neonatal diseases were selected.Results There is a wealth of epidemiological evidence that lower birth weight is strongly correlated with an increased risk of adult diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. This phenomenon of fetal origins of adult disease is strongly associated with fetal insults to epigenetic modifications of genes. A potential role of epigenetic modifications in congenital disorders, transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM), intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) have been studied.Conclusions Acknowledgment of the role of these epigenetic modifications in neonatal diseases would be conducive to better understanding the pathogenesis of these diseases, and provide new insight for improved treatment and prevention of later adult diseases.

  17. Optogenetics for neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Kiara T; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are devastating conditions that lead to progressive degeneration of neurons. Neurodegeneration may result in ataxia, dementia, and muscle atrophies, etc. Despite enormous research efforts that have been made, there is lack of effective therapeutic interventions for most of these diseases. Optogenetics is a recently developed novel technique that combines optics and genetics to modulate the activity of specific neurons. Optogenetics has been implemented in various studies including neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the recent advance in using this technique for the studies of common neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27186317

  18. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; Khoury, Joseph El;

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and...... trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded...... therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease....

  19. Neuroimaging of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main purposes of neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease have been moved from diagnosis of advanced Alzheimer's disease to diagnosis of very early Alzheimer's disease at a prodromal stage of mild cognitive impairment, prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease, and differential diagnosis from other diseases causing dementia. Structural MRI studies and functional studies using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and brain perfusion SPECT are widely used in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Outstanding progress in diagnostic accuracy of these neuroimaging modalities has been obtained using statistical analysis on a voxel-by-voxel basis after spatial normalization of individual scans to a standardized brain-volume template instead of visual inspection or a conventional region of interest technique. In a very early stage of Alzheimer's disease, this statistical approach revealed gray matter loss in the entorhinal and hippocampal areas and hypometabolism or hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex. These two findings might be related in view of anatomical knowledge that the regions are linked through the circuit of Papez. This statistical approach also offers accurate evaluation of therapeutical effects on brain metabolism or perfusion. The latest development in functional imaging relates to the final pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease-amyloid plaques. Amyloid imaging might be an important surrogate marker for trials of disease-modifying agents. (author)

  20. Eye Disease and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo

    This research advances the hypothesis that cross-country variation in the historical incidence of eye disease has influenced the current global distribution of per capita income. The theory is that pervasive eye disease diminished the incentive to accumulate skills, thereby delaying the fertility...... transition and the take-off to sustained economic growth. In order to estimate the influence from eye disease incidence empirically, we draw on an important fact from the field of epidemiology: Exposure to solar ultraviolet B radiation (UVB-R) is an underlying determinant of several forms of eye disease; the...

  1. Moyamoya disease: Diagnostic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyamoya disease is a progressive vasculopathy leading to stenosis of the main intracranial arteries. The incidence of moyamoya disease is high in Asian countries; in Europe and North America, the prevalence of the disease is considerably lower. Clinically, the disease may be of ischaemic, haemorrhagic and epileptic type. Cognitive dysfunction and behavioral disturbance are atypical symptoms of moyamoya disease. Characteristic angiographic features of the disease include stenosis or occlusion of the arteries of the circle of Willis, as well as the development of collateral vasculature. Currently, magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography with multi-row systems are the main imaging methods of diagnostics of the entire range of vascular changes in moyamoya disease. The most common surgical treatment combines the direct arterial anastomosis between the superficial temporal artery and middle cerebral, and the indirect synangiosis involving placement of vascularised tissue in the brain cortex, in order to promote neoangiogenesis. Due to progressive changes, correct and early diagnosis is of basic significance in selecting patients for surgery, which is the only effective treatment of the disease. An appropriate qualification to surgery should be based on a comprehensive angiographic and imaging evaluation of brain structures. Despite the rare occurrence of moyamoya disease in European population, it should be considered as one of causes of ischaemic or haemorrhagic strokes, especially in young patients

  2. Lyme disease and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that is wide-spread in North America, especially in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This disease could negatively influence efforts to conserve natural populations in two ways: (1) the disease could directly affect wild animal health; and (2) tick control efforts could adversely affect natural populations and communities. Lyme disease affects several domestic animals, but symptoms have been reported in only a few wild species. Direct effects of Lyme disease on wild animal populations have not been reported, but the disease should be considered as a possible cause in cases of unexplained population declines in endemic areas. Methods available to manage ticks and Lyme disease include human self-protection techniques, manipulation of habitats and hosts species populations, biological control, and pesticide applications. The diversity of available techniques allows selection of approaches to minimize environmental effects by (1) emphasizing personal protection techniques, (2) carefully targeting management efforts to maximize efficiency, and (3) integrating environmentally benign techniques to improve management while avoiding broad-scale environmentally destructive approaches. The environmental effects of Lyme disease depend, to a large extent, on the methods chosen to minimize human exposure to infected ticks. Conservation biologists can help design tick management programs that effectively lower the incidence of human Lyme disease while simultaneously minimizing negative effects on natural populations.

  3. Creativity and neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Lealani Mae Y

    2014-08-01

    Although humans have long valued creativity, the generation of such innovation is still incompletely understood. Looking at the healthy brain, researchers have localized certain parts for a basic understanding of these mechanisms. By researching the brain affected by neurological disease, scientists have observed unique manifestations of creativity, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and parkinsonian spectrum disorders, and stroke, which help clarify these creative underpinnings. Incorporating both healthy and disease models of cerebral functioning, neurological and neuroscientific research from recent years has built on established theories and expanded current knowledge. PMID:24938215

  4. Interstitial lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease; Alveolitis; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis (IPP) ... The lungs contain tiny air sacs (alveoli), which is where oxygen is absorbed. These air sacs expand with each ...

  5. Smoking and Parkinson's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Godwin-Austen, R. B.; Lee, P. N.; Marmot, M.G.; Stern, G M

    1982-01-01

    In a case control study of the relationship between smoking habits and Parkinson's disease a negative association was demonstrated with a relative risk of 0 x 52. A history of smoking up to 20 years earlier was associated with a risk of developing Parkinson's disease equal to about half that in non-smokers. The type of disease, age of onset and rate of progression were associated with a similar reduction in risk implying that in respect of smoking history the disease is homogeneous. The posit...

  6. Neurodegenerative disease. Genetic discrimination in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulst, Stefan M

    2009-10-01

    A survey conducted in Canada examined the prevalence of perceived genetic discrimination against patients with Huntington disease. The respondents reported discrimination not only by insurance or mortgage companies, but also in family and social contexts. Discrimination was more frequently attributed to family history than to genetic test results. PMID:19794509

  7. Association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have supported the notion that subjects with periodontitis and patients with multiple tooth extractions as a result of chronic advanced periodontal disease (PDD) have a greater risk of developing Cardiovascular disease (CVD) than those who had little or no periodontal infection. Periodontitis may predispose affected patients to CVD by elevating systemic C-reactive protein level and pro-inflammatory activity in atherosclerotic lesions and accelerate development of cardiovascular diseases, Oral health variables including loss of teeth, positive plaque Benzoyl-D-L-Arginine- Naphthyl Amide test (BANA) scores, and compliant of xerostomia may by considered as risk indicators for CVD. Exact mechanism which links PDD and CVD has not been firmly established. The link between PDD and CVD may be attributed to bacteria entering blood stream and attaching to the fatty plaque in coronary artery and contributing to clot formation which can lead to heart attack. Inflammation caused by PDD increases the plaque build up. The association between the two disease entities is cause for concern. However, dental and medical practitioners should be aware of these findings to move intelligently to interact with inquiring patients with periodontitis. They should be urged to maintain medical surveillance of their cardiovascular status, and work on controlling or reducing all known risk factors associated with CVD, including periodontal infection. (author)

  8. Defining an emerging disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future. PMID:26470448

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Peter J; Burney, Peter G J; Silverman, Edwin K; Celli, Bartolome R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease with high global morbidity and mortality. COPD is characterized by poorly reversible airway obstruction, which is confirmed by spirometry, and includes obstruction of the small airways (chronic obstructive bronchiolitis) and emphysema, which lead to air trapping and shortness of breath in response to physical exertion. The most common risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking, but other environmental factors, such as exposure to indoor air pollutants - especially in developing countries - might influence COPD risk. Not all smokers develop COPD and the reasons for disease susceptibility in these individuals have not been fully elucidated. Although the mechanisms underlying COPD remain poorly understood, the disease is associated with chronic inflammation that is usually corticosteroid resistant. In addition, COPD involves accelerated ageing of the lungs and an abnormal repair mechanism that might be driven by oxidative stress. Acute exacerbations, which are mainly triggered by viral or bacterial infections, are important as they are linked to a poor prognosis. The mainstay of the management of stable disease is the use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, whereas corticosteroids are beneficial primarily in patients who have coexisting features of asthma, such as eosinophilic inflammation and more reversibility of airway obstruction. Apart from smoking cessation, no treatments reduce disease progression. More research is needed to better understand disease mechanisms and to develop new treatments that reduce disease activity and progression. PMID:27189863

  10. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    In this podcast, Dr. Tom Frieden, CDC Director, discusses the number one killer in the United States - heart disease and stroke.  Created: 9/3/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/6/2014.

  11. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone populations

  12. Digestive system diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roentgenosemiotics of gastrointestinal diseases in children is considered. Roentgenological methods of examinations such as roentgenoscopy, roentgenography, contrast media examinations are described in detail. Roentgenograms of gastrointestinal organs in children with various diseases of esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, liver, hepatobiliary system, pancreas are presented

  13. Thyroid Disease Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Thyroid Disease Definitions KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease Definitions Print A A A Text Size ... sweat, mucous, and tears. goiter: This is a thyroid gland that is enlarged to the point that ...

  14. Psoriasis, a Systemic Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün Atakan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease which is characterized by plaques with shiny white desquamation on the skin. It affects 1 to 3% of different ethnic populations. The disease significantly lowers the quality of life for the patients as the lesions appear on visible regions such as the scalp, face and extremities causing pruritus and extensive use of topical agents with a poor rate of recovery and the disease has a recurrent course with frequent attacks. Psoriasis was previously assumed to be a cutaneous disease resulting from epidermal cell hyperproliferation for a long time. However, studies conducted on the etiopathogenesis of the disease revealed that psoriasis is a chronic autoinflammatory disease which is caused by immune system dysregulation. Recently, the frequent association of psoriasis with other autoinflammatory diseases, comorbidities and complications which indeed shorten life expectancy concluded that psoriasis is a systemic disease and created a major difference in its treatment and follow-up modalities. In this review, the comorbidities, which are shown to be related to systemic inflammation and which also share a common pathogenesis with psoriasis, will be discussed. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 119-22

  15. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACG on Facebook About ACG ACG Store ACG Patient Education & Resource Center Home GI Health and Disease Recursos en Español What is a Gastroenterologist? Podcasts and Videos GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity © ...

  16. Disease quantification in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Tanja Maria; Kamp, Søren; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2013-01-01

    Accurate documentation of disease severity is a prerequisite for clinical research and the practice of evidence-based medicine. The quantification of skin diseases such as psoriasis currently relies heavily on clinical scores. Although these clinical scoring methods are well established and very ...

  17. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158. ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  18. Management of diverticular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützer, Roland H; Kruis, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Diverticular disease is a common condition in Western countries and the incidence and prevalence of the disease is increasing. The pathogenetic factors involved include structural changes in the gut that increase with age, a diet low in fibre and rich in meat, changes in intestinal motility, the concept of enteric neuropathy and an underlying genetic background. Current treatment strategies are hampered by insufficient options to stratify patients according to individual risk. One of the main reasons is the lack of an all-encompassing classification system of diverticular disease. In response, the German Society for Gastroenterology and Digestive Diseases (DGVS) has proposed a classification system as part of its new guideline for the diagnosis and management of diverticular disease. The classification system includes five main types of disease: asymptomatic diverticulosis, acute uncomplicated and complicated diverticulitis, as well as chronic diverticular disease and diverticular bleeding. Here, we review prevention and treatment strategies stratified by these five main types of disease, from prevention of the first attack of diverticulitis to the management of chronic complications and diverticular bleeding. PMID:26170219

  19. Oxysterols and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkhem, Ingemar; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Leoni, Valerio;

    2013-01-01

    Oxysterols are important for cholesterol homeostasis in the brain and may be affected in neurodegenerative diseases. The levels of the brain-derived oxysterol 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OH) have been reported to be markedly reduced in the circulation of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (Lee...

  20. What Is Celiac Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... needs. Over time, celiac disease can cause anemia, infertility, weak and brittle bones, an itchy skin rash, and other health problems. Fast Facts Celiac disease is an immune disorder in which people can't eat gluten or use items with gluten in them. Celiac ...

  1. Nutrition and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Klaus-Peter

    2011-10-01

    Celiac disease affects about 1% of the European and North American population. The classical clinical presentation is with symptoms of malabsorption. Serologic studies demonstrate that most celiac patients present with oligosymptomatic (silent), latent, potential, and extraintestinal forms. The disease is defined as an immune-mediated systemic disorder of genetically disposed individuals (HLA-DQ2/8) induced by the alcohol-soluble fractions of cereals and characterized by gluten-dependent symptoms, celiac-specific antibodies (against tissue transglutaminase 2), and a Marsh 2-3 enteropathy. In the last 60 years, a strict and lifelong gluten-free diet has been demonstrated to be effective and safe, preventing most potential complications of the disease, including autoimmune disease, osteoporosis, infertility, prematurity, and malignancy. Among patients with celiac disease, the toxicity of oats seems to be less than wheat, barley, and rye. The introduction of oats into the diet of patients with celiac disease should increase taste, fiber content, diversity, compliance with the diet, and quality of life. The clinical studies provide limited results in favor of a general harmlessness of oats for celiac disease patients. Patients with celiac disease who consume oats (20-25 g/d for children, 50-70 g/d for adults) need proper follow-up. PMID:21939908

  2. Lyme Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Lyme Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Lyme Disease Print A A A Text Size What's ... Fight the Bite en español La enfermedad de Lyme In the spring and summer, you might hear ...

  3. Paget’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bertoldi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paget’s disease of bone is the most common metabolic bone disease after osteoporosis and affects 2-4% of adults over 55 years of age. Its etiology is only partly understood and includes both genetic and environmental factors. The disease may be asymptomatic and can be uncovered incidentally on x-ray or in biochemical tests performed for another condition. It can also manifest itself with bone pain, deformity, fracture or other complications. Paget’s disease is diagnosed by x-rays and in general has very typical radiological features, but occasionally the clinical picture may be unusual and a differential diagnosis of sclerotic or lytic metastases needs to be considered. Plasma total alkaline phosphatase activity is the most clinically useful indicator of disease activity. It is elevated in most untreated patients, but may be within the normal range in patients with monostotic or limited disease. Bisphosphonate therapy is indicated for patients with symptoms and should also be considered in patients with disease sites that suggest a risk of complications, such as long bones, vertebrae or base of the skull. Orthopedic surgery in Paget’s disease patients includes almost exclusively the correction of fractures and arthroplasty.

  4. Women and Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹国如

    2005-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading killer of Americans. But it kills more women than men. The American Heart Association says heart disease and other cardiovascular (心血管的) disorders kill about five hundred thousand women a year. That is more than the next seven causes of death combined.

  5. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise Houlberg; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  6. Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, C. David

    1988-01-01

    Reviews epidemiological studies of cardiovascular diseases especially coronary heart disease (CHD), to document their major public health importance, changes in mortality during this century, and international comparisons of trends. Finds major risk factors for CHD are determined in large part by psychosocial and behavioral mechanisms. Asserts…

  7. [Infectious diseases research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge. PMID:19195467

  8. Koi Herpesvirus Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2011-01-01

    This leaflet gives information on Koi herpesvirus disease (KHV). KHV is caused by koi herpesvirus (or cyprinid herpesvirus-3) a double stranded DNA virus of the family Herpesviridae. KHV is listed as a non-exotic disease under EU Directive 2006/88/EC and is notifiable in Ireland according to S.I. No. 261 of 2008.

  9. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called pulmonary fibrosis. Breathing in dust or other particles in the air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among coal miners, from inhaling coal dust Farmer's lung, from inhaling farm dust Asbestosis, from inhaling ...

  10. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease and depression often go hand-in-hand. You are are more likely to feel sad or depressed after a heart attack ... heart disease. The good news is that treating depression may help improve both your mental and physical ...

  11. Anthocyanins and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthocyanins are red, blue, and purple pigments distributed throughout nature, and in our diet. One potential health benefit of dietary anthocyanins is protection against cardiovascular disease (CVD). Evidence for beneficial effects of anthocyanins with respect to heart disease comes from epidemio...

  12. Swimming Associated Disease Outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabelli, V. J.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of recreational waterborne outbreaks and cases of disease, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) retrospective and prospective epidemiological studies; (2) predictive models of the risk of recreational waterborn disease. A list of 35 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treated? Living With Lou Gehrig's Disease en español Esclerosis lateral amiotrófica What Is Lou Gehrig's Disease? Lou ... elimination to figure out the answer to a multiple-choice question on a test.) One of the ...

  14. Viral disease in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of infectious disease has been an important issue for poultry breeders, particularly since the introduction of high density rearing. Selection for enhanced genetic resistance to disease is an important factor for poultry breeding companies in gaining market share, maintaining consumer confid...

  15. Forecasting Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic models of infectious disease systems abound and are used to study the epidemiological characteristics of disease outbreaks, the ecological mechanisms affecting transmission, and the suitability of various control and intervention strategies. The dynamics of disease transmission are non-linear and consequently difficult to forecast. Here, we describe combined model-inference frameworks developed for the prediction of infectious diseases. We show that accurate and reliable predictions of seasonal influenza outbreaks can be made using a mathematical model representing population-level influenza transmission dynamics that has been recursively optimized using ensemble data assimilation techniques and real-time estimates of influenza incidence. Operational real-time forecasts of influenza and other infectious diseases have been and are currently being generated.

  16. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  17. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  18. Hyperosmia in Lyme disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant K. Puri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurological involvement in Lyme disease has been reported to include meningitis, cranial neuropathy and radiculoneuritis. While it is known that in some cases of asceptic meningitis patients may develop hyperosmia, the association between hyperosmia and Lyme disease has not previously been studied. Objective To carry out the first systematic study to ascertain whether hyperosmia is also a feature of Lyme disease. Method A questionnaire regarding abnormal sensory sensitivity in respect of the sense of smell was administered to 16 serologically positive Lyme disease patients and to 18 control subjects. Results The two groups were matched in respect of age, sex and body mass. None of the 34 subjects was suffering from migraine. Eight (50% of the Lyme patients and none (0% of the controls suffered from hyperosmia (p=0.0007. Conclusion This first systematic controlled study showed that Lyme disease is associated with hyperosmia.

  19. Autophagy in Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. S. Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy exerts a homeostatic function that promotes cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can interact with other vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms, and thereby potentially influence disease pathogenesis. Macrophages deficient in autophagic proteins display enhanced caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production and the activation of the inflammasome. Autophagy provides a functional role in infectious diseases and sepsis by promoting intracellular bacterial clearance. Mutations in autophagy-related genes, leading to loss of autophagic function, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases that involve inflammation, including cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with inflammation.

  20. Autophagosomes and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beau, Isabelle; Mehrpour, Maryam; Codogno, Patrice

    2011-04-01

    The autophagosome is a double-membrane bound compartment that initiates macroautophagy, a degradative pathway for cytoplasmic material terminating in the lysosomal compartment. The discovery of ATG genes involved in the formation of autophagosomes has greatly increased our understanding of the molecular basis of macroautophagy, and its role in cell function. Macroautophagy plays a pivotal role in cell fitness by removing obsolete organelles and protein aggregates. Its stimulation is an adaptive response to stressful situations, such as nutrient deprivation, intended to maintain a level of ATP compatible with cell survival. Macroautophagy is central for organ homeostasis, embryonic development, and longevity. Malfunctioning autophagy is observed in many human diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac and muscular diseases, infectious and inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and obesity. Discovering potential drug therapies that can be used to modulate macroautophagy is a major challenge, and likely to enhance the therapeutic arsenal against many human diseases. PMID:21256243