WorldWideScience

Sample records for cea center cleanup

  1. Situation 2002: release monitoring and surveillance of environment of Cea centers; Bilan 2002: controle des rejets et surveillance de l'environnement des centres CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This publication renders an account of the situation of the releases of liquid and gaseous radioactive effluents, for the year 2002, as well as the radioactivity levels measured in the vicinity of Cea centers through the systematic surveillance of atmosphere, waters, vegetation and milk. An analysis on five years allows to follow their evolution. (N.C.)

  2. Evaluation 2000 and regulation and method. Release monitoring and environmental surveillance around Cea centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    This publication counts for the year 2000 for the evaluation of liquid and gaseous radioactive effluents releases and the radioactivity levels measured in the vicinity of Cea centers, through the air, water, vegetation and milk surveillance. An analysis of the results from 1996 to 2000 allows to follow their evolution. A second booklet develops the sampling and measurement methods made on effluents in environment. It present besides the regulation applied to effluents monitoring. (N.C.)

  3. Assessment 2000 and regulation and method. Releases control and environmental survey of the CEA Centers; Bilan 2000 et reglementation et methode. Controle des rejets et surveillance de l'environnement des centres CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The environment quality around the CEA centers is a major interest of its safety policy. These documents contribute to the public information on the radioactive liquid and gaseous releases of the CEA, according to the ministry authorization. The radioactivity monitoring activity, and the survey methods are also presented. Data analysis from 1996 to 2000, allows to follow the evolution. (A.L.B.)

  4. Incineration as a radioactive waste volume reduction process for CEA nuclear centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atabek, R.; Chaudon, L.

    1994-01-01

    Incineration processes represent a promising solution for waste volume reduction, and will be increasingly used in the future. The features and performance specifications of low-level waste incinerators with capacities ranging from 10 to 20 kg - h -1 at the Fontenay-aux-Roses, Grenoble and Cadarache nuclear centers in France are briefly reviewed. More extensive knowledge of low-level wastes produced in facilities operated by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has allowed us to assess the volume reduction obtained by processing combustible waste in existing incinerators. Research and development work is in progress to improve management procedures for higher-level waste and to build facilities capable of incinerating α - contaminated waste. (authors). 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. 15 CFR 950.7 - Center for Environmental Assessment Services (CEAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) The following are examples of CEAS projects and services: (1) CEAS prepares data-based studies and... experiment design, data analysis, and data management support to project managers and produces merged... global oceanographic data base from observations taken during the First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE). (b...

  6. 2004 annual report. Defense, safety, energy, information, health. CEA in the center of big European challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document is the 2004 annual report of the French atomic energy commission (CEA). It presents the R and D activities of the CEA in three main domains: 1 - defense and safety, maintaining perenniality of nuclear dissuasion and nuclear safety: supplying nuclear weapons to armies, maintaining dissuasion capability with the simulation program, sharing R and D means with the scientific community and the industrial world, designing and maintaining naval nuclear propulsion reactors, cleansing Marcoule and Pierrelatte facilities, monitoring treaties and fighting against proliferation and terrorism; 2 - energy, developing more competitive and cleaner energy sources: nuclear waste management, optimization of industrial nuclear activities, future nuclear systems and new energy technologies, basic research on energy, radiobiology and toxicology; 3 - information and health, valorizing industry thanks to technological research and supplying new tools for health and medical research: micro- and nano-technologies, software technologies, basic research for industrial innovation, nuclear technologies for health and bio-technologies. (J.S.)

  7. Evaluation 2000 and regulation and method. Release monitoring and environmental surveillance around Cea centers; Bilan 2000 et reglementation et methode. Controle des rejets et surveillance de l'environnement des centres CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    This publication counts for the year 2000 for the evaluation of liquid and gaseous radioactive effluents releases and the radioactivity levels measured in the vicinity of Cea centers, through the air, water, vegetation and milk surveillance. An analysis of the results from 1996 to 2000 allows to follow their evolution. A second booklet develops the sampling and measurement methods made on effluents in environment. It present besides the regulation applied to effluents monitoring. (N.C.)

  8. Release monitoring and environmental surveillance of Cea centers. Assessment and regulation and method 1999; Controle des rejets et surveillance de l'environnement des centres CEA. Bilan et reglementation et methode 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The quality of the natural environment around the centers of the Commissariat a l Energie Atomique is an important point of its safety policy. The environmental protection is based on the control of risks coming from research and development activities of its installations. It aims to reduce as low as possible, the impact of its activities on man and his environment. This publication develops the sampling and measurement methods that are made on effluents and in environment, according to the radionuclides characteristics, that are present. It gives also the regulation that applied to the effluents monitoring. The results of radioactive effluents releases (liquid and gaseous) and the surveillance of environment around cea centers is given in the 'Bilan 1999' publication. An analysis of these results on the 1995-1999 period allows to follow their evolution. (N.C.)

  9. Environmental Assessment For Cleanup and Closure of the Energy Technology Engineering Center. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-03-01

    DOE analyzed two cleanup and closure alternatives and the No Action Alternative, in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (10 CFR Part 1021). Under Alternative 1, DOE is proposing to clean up the remaining ETEC facilities using the existing site specific cleanup standard of 15 mrem/yr. (plus DOE's As Low As Reasonably Achievable--ALARA-principle) for decontamination of radiological facilities and surrounding soils (Alternative 1). An annual 15-millirem additional radiation dose to the maximally exposed individual (assumed to be an individual living in a residential setting on Area IV) from all exposure pathways (air, soil, groundwater) equates to an additional theoretical lifetime cancer risk of no more than 3 x 10-4 (3 in 10,000). For perspective, it is estimated that the average individual in the United States receives a dose of about 300 millirem each year from natural sources of radiation. However, actual exposures generally will be much lower as a result of the application of the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle. Based on post-remediation verification sampling previous cleanups have generally resulted in a 2 x 10-6 level of residual risk. DOE would decontaminate, decommission, and demolish the remaining radiological facilities. DOE would also decommission and demolish the one remaining sodium facility and all of the remaining uncontaminated support buildings for which it is responsible. The ongoing RCRA corrective action program, including groundwater treatment (interim measures), would continue. Other environmental impacts would include 2.5 x 10-3 fatalities as a result of LLW shipments and 6.0 x 10-3 fatalities as a result of emission exhaust from all shipments. DOE would also decommission and demolish the remaining sodium facility and decommission and

  10. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: IBM Corporation-TJ Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    IBM Corporation -TJ Watson Research Center is located in southern Yorktown near the boundary separating the Town of Yorktown from the Town of New Castle. The site occupies an area of approximately 217 acres and adjoins land uses are predominantly residenti

  11. Cleanup of a HLW nuclear fuel-reprocessing center using 3-D database modeling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    A significant challenge in decommissioning any large nuclear facility is how to solidify the large volume of residual high-level radioactive waste (HLW) without structurally interfering with the existing equipment and piping used at the original facility or would require rework due to interferences which were not identified during the design process. This problem is further compounded when the nuclear facility to be decommissioned is a 35 year old nuclear fuel reprocessing center designed to recover usable uranium and plutonium. Facilities of this vintage usually tend to lack full documentation of design changes made over the years and as a result, crude traps or pockets of high-level contamination may not be fully realized. Any miscalculation in the construction or modification sequences could compound the overall dismantling and decontamination of the facility. This paper reports that development of a 3-dimensional (3-D) computer database tool was considered critical in defining the most complex portions of this one-of-a-kind vitrification facility

  12. Decontamination and dismantling at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the dismantling policy at the CEA (French Research Center on the atomic energy), the financing of the decontamination and the dismantling, the regulatory framework, the knowledge and the technology developed at the CEA, the radiation protection, the environment monitoring and the installations. (A.L.B.)

  13. 2004 annual report. Defense, safety, energy, information, health. CEA in the center of big European challenges; Rapport annuel 2004. Defense, securite, energie, information, sante. Le CEA au coeur des grands defis europeens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This document is the 2004 annual report of the French atomic energy commission (CEA). It presents the R and D activities of the CEA in three main domains: 1 - defense and safety, maintaining perenniality of nuclear dissuasion and nuclear safety: supplying nuclear weapons to armies, maintaining dissuasion capability with the simulation program, sharing R and D means with the scientific community and the industrial world, designing and maintaining naval nuclear propulsion reactors, cleansing Marcoule and Pierrelatte facilities, monitoring treaties and fighting against proliferation and terrorism; 2 - energy, developing more competitive and cleaner energy sources: nuclear waste management, optimization of industrial nuclear activities, future nuclear systems and new energy technologies, basic research on energy, radiobiology and toxicology; 3 - information and health, valorizing industry thanks to technological research and supplying new tools for health and medical research: micro- and nano-technologies, software technologies, basic research for industrial innovation, nuclear technologies for health and bio-technologies. (J.S.)

  14. Decontamination and dismantling at the CEA; L'assainissement et le demantelement au CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This document presents the dismantling policy at the CEA (French Research Center on the atomic energy), the financing of the decontamination and the dismantling, the regulatory framework, the knowledge and the technology developed at the CEA, the radiation protection, the environment monitoring and the installations. (A.L.B.)

  15. Utility of CEA and CA 15-3 measurements in non-purulent pleural exudates in the diagnosis of malignancy: A single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, José M; Civit, Carme; Esquerda, Aureli; Salud, Antonieta; Bielsa, Silvia

    2017-08-01

    To establish the diagnostic accuracy of pleural fluid (PF) CEA and CA 15-3 in identifying malignancy, and to determine the additional value of these markers in patients with malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) with false negative results from cytological fluid examination. PF concentrations of CEA and/or CA 15-3 were determined in 1,575 patients with non-purulent exudates, 549 of whom had confirmed MPEs, 284 probable MPEs, and 742 benign effusions. Tumor marker cut-off points were set to ensure 100% specificity for malignant effusion. The 41, 40 and 60% of MPE patients had high PF levels of CEA (>45ng/mL), CA 15-3 (>77 UI/l) or both, respectively. These percentages were 30, 19 and 41% in MPEs with positive pleural biopsy and negative PF cytology; and 24, 13 and 35% in clinical MPEs without histocytological confirmation. Tumor markers were of no value in lymphomas and mesotheliomas. The area-under-the-curve for CEA was 0.819 (95% CI: 0,793-0,845) and for CA 15-3, it was 0.822 (95% CI: 0,796-0,847). The use of tumor markers compared to cytology alone, increased the diagnosis of malignancy by 14%. Measurements of PF CEA and CA 15-3 may complement pleural cytology in the identification of MPEs. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. CEA Annual report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The CEA, a prominent player in research development and innovation, is active in three main domains: energy, health care and information technology, defense and security. This annual report presents the CEA activities for the year 2007 in these three main areas: science and technology working for nuclear deterrence and global security, the energies without greenhouse effect gases emission against the climatic change, researches in the information sciences and technologies for a better communication and health. The CEA safety, organization, communication and international relations are also presented. (A.L.B.)

  17. Life sciences at CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents briefly the organization of the - Direction des Sciences du Vivant - of french atomic energy commission (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA)) and their main axes of research (F.M)

  18. CEA financial report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This document provides financial data on the CEA for the year 2007. The management report (budget, resources, expenditures) and the accounting are detailed. The main management events of the year 2007 are presented. (A.L.B.)

  19. HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the ∼200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by the

  20. Trajectories of Scores on a Screening Instrument for PTSD Among World Trade Center Rescue, Recovery, and Clean-Up Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Carey B; Caramanica, Kimberly; Welch, Alice E; Stellman, Steven D; Brackbill, Robert M; Farfel, Mark R

    2015-06-01

    The longitudinal course of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) over 8-9 years was examined among 16,488 rescue and recovery workers who responded to the events of September 11, 2001 (9/11) at the World Trade Center (WTC; New York, NY), and were enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry. Latent class growth analysis identified 5 groups of rescue and recovery workers with similar score trajectories at 3 administrations of the PTSD Checklist (PCL): low-stable (53.3%), moderate- stable (28.7%), moderate-increasing (6.4%), high-decreasing (7.7%), and high-stable (4.0%). Relative to the low-stable group, membership in higher risk groups was associated with 9/11-related exposures including duration of WTC work, with adjusted odds ratios ranging from 1.3 to 2.0, witnessing of horrific events (range = 1.3 to 2.1), being injured (range = 1.4 to 2.3), perceiving threat to life or safety (range = 2.2 to 5.2), bereavement (range = 1.6 to 4.8), and job loss due to 9/11 (range = 2.4 to 15.8). Within groups, higher PCL scores were associated with adverse social circumstances including lower social support, with B coefficients ranging from 0.2 to 0.6, divorce, separation, or widowhood (range = 0.4-0.7), and unemployment (range = 0.4-0.5). Given baseline, exposure-related, and contextual influences that affect divergent PTSD trajectories, screening for both PTSD and adverse circumstances should occur immediately, and at regular intervals postdisaster. © 2015 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  1. CEA 2005 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This document is the 2005 activity report of the French atomic energy commission (CEA). The CEA is a main actor of nuclear research, development and innovation and is involved in three main domains: energy, defense/security, and information/health technologies thanks to high quality research works. With a manpower of 15000 researchers and collaborators with internationally acknowledged competences, the CEA is a driving force of industrial innovation and develops partnerships with French and European industries. It also warrants the perenniality of nuclear dissuasion. This report presents these different aspects of the CEA activities: 1 - defense-security: simulation program, opening to the scientific community, nuclear warheads, nuclear propulsion, cleansing of Rhone valley facilities, permanent monitoring of treaties respect, fight against terrorism; 2 - energy: optimization of the industrial park, advances in long lived radioactive wastes management, future nuclear systems, cleansing and dismantling integration, European nuclear energy research, new energy technologies; 3 - information and health technologies: major challenge of micro- and nano-technologies, key role of software technologies and complex systems; 4 - big research facilities opened to the scientific and industrial communities; 5 - scientific status: scientific evaluation process, prices and honors; 6 - programs support: revisited strategic control, confirmed simplification, active employment and training policy, teaching and training, technological valorization, international relations, communication, continuous quality approach, mastery of facilities safety, security, environmental control, a key-year for information systems. A financial report is attached to the document. (J.S.)

  2. Presentation of CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The organization of the CEA, its missions and means are presented. Its activities in the field of light water reactors, fast neutron reactors and PWR reactors of small and medium power for electricity and/or heat generation are emphasized [fr

  3. The Worker Component At The World Trade Center Cleanup: Addressing Cultural And Language Differences In Emergency Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, B.; Carpenter, C.; Blair. D.

    2003-02-24

    On September 11, 2001, the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) caused astronomical loss of life and property. Systems in place to manage disaster response were strained to the limit because key first responders were among the casualties when the twin towers collapsed. In addition, the evolution of events required immediate response in a rapidly changing and extremely hazardous situation. Rescue, recovery, and clean up became an overpowering and sustained effort that would utilize the resources of federal, state and local governments and agencies. One issue during the response to the WTC disaster site that did not receive much attention was that of the limited and non-English speaking worker. The Operating Engineers National HAZMAT Program (OENHP), with its history of a Hispanic Outreach Program, was acutely aware of this issue with the Hispanic worker. The Hispanic population comprises approximately 27% of the population of New York City (1). The extremely unfortunate and tragic events of that day provided an opportunity to not only provide assistance for the Hispanic workers, but also to apply lessons learned and conduct studies on worker training with language barriers in a real life environment. However, due to the circumstances surrounding this tragedy, the study of these issues was conducted primarily by observation. Through partnerships with other organizations such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the New York Health Department, the New York Department of Design and Construction (DDC), the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH), and private companies such as 3M and MSA, OENHP was able to provide translated information on hazards, protective measures, fit testing of respirators, and site specific safety and health training. The OENHP translated materials on hazards and how to protect workers into Spanish to assist in getting the information to the limited and non- English speaking workers.

  4. Enduring mental health morbidity and social function impairment in world trade center rescue, recovery, and cleanup workers: the psychological dimension of an environmental health disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellman, Jeanne Mager; Smith, Rebecca P; Katz, Craig L; Sharma, Vansh; Charney, Dennis S; Herbert, Robin; Moline, Jacqueline; Luft, Benjamin J; Markowitz, Steven; Udasin, Iris; Harrison, Denise; Baron, Sherry; Landrigan, Philip J; Levin, Stephen M; Southwick, Steven

    2008-09-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) attacks exposed thousands of workers to hazardous environmental conditions and psychological trauma. In 2002, to assess the health of these workers, Congress directed the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to establish the WTC Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program. This program has established a large cohort of WTC rescue, recovery, and cleanup workers. We previously documented extensive pulmonary dysfunction in this cohort related to toxic environmental exposures. Our objective in this study was to describe mental health outcomes, social function impairment, and psychiatric comorbidity in the WTC worker cohort, as well as perceived symptomatology in workers' children. Ten to 61 months after the WTC attack, 10,132 WTC workers completed a self-administered mental health questionnaire. Of the workers who completd the questionnaire, 11.1% met criteria for probable post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 8.8% met criteria for probable depression, 5.0% met criteria for probable panic disorder, and 62% met criteria for substantial stress reaction. PTSD prevalence was comparable to that seen in returning Afghanistan war veterans and was much higher than in the U.S. general population. Point prevalence declined from 13.5% to 9.7% over the 5 years of observation. Comorbidity was extensive and included extremely high risks for impairment of social function. PTSD was significantly associated with loss of family members and friends, disruption of family, work, and social life, and higher rates of behavioral symptoms in children of workers. Working in 9/11 recovery operations is associated with chronic impairment of mental health and social functioning. Psychological distress and psychopathology in WTC workers greatly exceed population norms. Surveillance and treatment programs continue to be needed.

  5. Treatment with Ca-DTPA of internal contaminations by plutonium and americium: Recommendations for writing protocols in Cea and AREVA centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grappin, L.; Legoff, J.P.; Andre, F.; Carbone, L.; Agrinier, A.L.; Courtay, C.; Aninat, M.; Amabile, J.C.; Florin, A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide physicians working in a B.N.F. (Basic Nuclear Facility) with recommendations for the drafting of Ca-DTPA treatment protocols for internal contamination by actinides. These recommendations are based on the results of injections carried out by Cea and AREVA doctors in a working group, with the collaboration of the Army Radiation Protection Service. The study focused on Ca-DTPA IV injection. Other dosage forms, routes of administration as well as adjuvant treatments are also mentioned. For cases of contaminated wounds and inhalation, indicators for treatment with Ca-DTPA, particularly its initialization, the dosage, duration, frequency of administration, the criteria for ending the treatment, then its efficiency and dosimetry gain are covered. A guide for the prescription of the radio toxicological monitoring necessary for the treatment and the dosimetric evaluation is proposed. (authors)

  6. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Grenoble; Rapport transparence et securite nucleaire 2007 CEA Grenoble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Grenoble for the year 2007. Since 2002 the Passage project aims to realize the decontamination and the dismantling of old nuclear installations of the CEA Grenoble. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the year 2007 saw two main steps of the Passage project: the decommissioning of the Siloette reactor, a public consultation about the Lama laboratory dismantling. (A.L.B.)

  7. CEA - Annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The CEA, a prominent player in research development and innovation, is active in 3 main areas: energy, health care and information technology and defense and security. This annual report presents the CEA activity for the year 2006 in these three main areas: Science and technology working for nuclear deterrence and global security (the simulation programs, the nuclear warheads, the nuclear propulsion, the decommissioning, the fighting against nuclear proliferation and monitoring international treaties, the global security); health and information technology (micro and nano technologies and systems); energy from nuclear fission and fusion and other technologies that do not emit greenhouse gases (progress for the nuclear industry, sustainable management of radioactive materials and waste, nuclear systems of the future, new energy technologies). (A.L.B.)

  8. CEA 2009 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After an indication of several key figures about the activity of the CEA (Centre d'Etudes Atomiques) and its relationship with the academic as well as the industrial field, in France and worldwide, this 2009 annual report presents its various research programs in the field of defence and of global security: basic research (nuclear weapons and propulsion, struggle against proliferation and terrorism) and applied research (nuclear deterrence, national and international security). Then, it presents the programs in the field of de-carbonated energy: basic research (in material science and in life sciences) and applied research (fission energy, fusion energy, new energy technologies). A last group of research programs deals with information and health technologies and concerns life and material sciences, micro- and nano-technologies, software technologies. Interaction with other research institutions and bodies is also evoked. A brief scientific assessment is proposed. Finally, the different structures building the CEA are presented

  9. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Marcoule; Rapport transparence et securite nucleaire 2007 CEA Marcoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Marcoule for the year 2007. Since its creation in 1955 the center realizes industrial and scientific activities relative to the civil and military applications of the radioactivity. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the following two base activities are detailed: Atalante and Phenix. (A.L.B.)

  10. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ephraim, K.H.; Cox, P.H.; Hamer, C.J.A. v.d.; Berends, W.; Delhez, H.

    1977-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex of antigen determinants and also the carrier of these determinants. Chemically it is a glycoprotein. Its occurrence in blood serum or urine is correlated with malignant disease. Several radioimmunoassays (RIA) have been developed, one by Hoffmann-Laroche and one by the Rotterdam Radiotherapeutic Institute. Both methods and the Hoffmann assay kit are tested. Specifications are given for isolation of the antigen, preparation of the antiserum, and the execution of the RIA. Biochemical and clinical aspects are discussed

  11. Balance 2003 of the risks control at the Cea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    As a research center on the energy, the information and health technologies and the defense, the Cea activities are indissociable from the risk control notion. To organize the risks management, the Cea decided to create in july 2003 a special pole of risks control and management. This presentation is based on some major topics of the risks control: the environmental impact control, the occupational risks control, the installations safety control and the hazardous matter transport control. (A.L.B.)

  12. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Saclay; Rapport transparence et securite nucleaire 2007 CEA Saclay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Saclay for the year 2007. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially two public consultation on release authorizations and the Neurospin installations, the dismantling of the 49 nuclear installation, the shutdown of the learning reactor ULYSSE are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  13. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Cadarache; Rapport transparence et securite nucleaire 2007 CEA Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Cadarache for the year 2007. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the report discusses the beginning of the RJH reactor construction, the fourth generation reactors research programs, the implementing of la Rotonde the new radioactive wastes management installation, the renovation of the LECA. (A.L.B.)

  14. Cleanups in My Community

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Cleanups in My Community (CIMC) is a public web application that enables integrated access through maps, lists and search filtering to site-specific information EPA...

  15. CEA and its radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marano, S.

    1999-01-01

    CEA annually produces about 3500 tons of radioactive wastes in its 43 basic nuclear installations. CEA ranks third behind EDF and Cogema. Low-level wastes (A wastes) are sent to ANDRA (national agency for the management of nuclear wastes)whereas medium-level wastes (B wastes) are stored by CEA itself. CEA has checked off its storing places and has set up an installation Cedra to process and store ancient and new nuclear wastes. 3 other installations are planned to operate within 6 years: Agate (Cadarache) will treat liquid effluents, Stella (Saclay) will process liquid wastes that are beta or gamma emitters, and Atena (Marcoule) will treat and store radioactive sodium coming from Phenix reactor and IPSN laboratories. The use of plasma torch for vitrifying wastes is detailed, the management of all the nuclear wastes produced by CEA laboratories and installations is presented. (A.C.)

  16. Immunological comparison of ovarian and colonic CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtin, P.; Gendron, M.C.; Maunoury, M.T.; Lamerz, R.; Schnabel, G.

    1982-01-01

    Ovarian and colonic CEA were compared immunologically by means of antisera prepared against each of them. CEAs of both origins were found identical by immunodiffusion methods. In radioimmunological experiments, slight differences were observed between some but not all ovarian CEAs and colonic CEAs and also between different preparations of colonic CEA: no organ specificity of ovarian CEA could be demonstrated. Finally, CEA level was measured in 41 sera of patients with ovarian carcinoma by two radioimmunoassays, one using colonic CEA as tracer and standard and anti-colonic CEA serum, the other using ovarian CEA and anti-ovarian CEA serum: the values given by the two assays were highly correlated (rsub(s) = 0.8107), meaning that an organ specific assay for ovarian CEA is not needed. (Auth.)

  17. Balance 2003 of the risks control at the Cea; Bilan 2003 de la maitrise des risques au CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    As a research center on the energy, the information and health technologies and the defense, the Cea activities are indissociable from the risk control notion. To organize the risks management, the Cea decided to create in july 2003 a special pole of risks control and management. This presentation is based on some major topics of the risks control: the environmental impact control, the occupational risks control, the installations safety control and the hazardous matter transport control. (A.L.B.)

  18. CEA sustainable development report 2007; CEA rapport developpement durable 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The CEA, a prominent player in research development and innovation, is active in three main domains: energy, health care and information technology, defense and security. This annual report presents the CEA activities in the domain of the sustainable development. The first part is devoted to the environment preservation policy (energy, water, air, chemistry, wastes, transport, buildings). The second part shows the dynamic governance in the domain of the risks management. The last part presents the CEA activities of research for the sustainable development. (A.L.B.)

  19. CEA Annual report 2007; CEA rapport annuel 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The CEA, a prominent player in research development and innovation, is active in three main domains: energy, health care and information technology, defense and security. This annual report presents the CEA activities for the year 2007 in these three main areas: science and technology working for nuclear deterrence and global security, the energies without greenhouse effect gases emission against the climatic change, researches in the information sciences and technologies for a better communication and health. The CEA safety, organization, communication and international relations are also presented. (A.L.B.)

  20. CEA financial report 2007; CEA rapport financier 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This document provides financial data on the CEA for the year 2007. The management report (budget, resources, expenditures) and the accounting are detailed. The main management events of the year 2007 are presented. (A.L.B.)

  1. CEA - Risk control report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwaerde, Daniel; Bonnevie, Edwige; Maillot, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    After introductory presentations by CEA managers in charge of risk management and controls, this document presents and comments the actions undertaken by the CEA and the obtained results in terms of risk management in different fields: environment protection and control, facilities safety, health and radiation protection, transport of hazardous materials, waste management, sites protection, installations and assets, emergency response, legal risk management, internal inspections and audits. Other topics are addressed like the presentation of the risk control sector, and the role of the CEA in the relationship between research and industry

  2. CEA sustainable development report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The CEA, a prominent player in research development and innovation, is active in three main domains: energy, health care and information technology, defense and security. This annual report presents the CEA activities in the domain of the sustainable development. The first part is devoted to the environment preservation policy (energy, water, air, chemistry, wastes, transport, buildings). The second part shows the dynamic governance in the domain of the risks management. The last part presents the CEA activities of research for the sustainable development. (A.L.B.)

  3. CEA - 2014 risk management assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnevie, Edwige; Verwaerde, Daniel; Maillot, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    After introducing presentations of CEA managers in charge of risk management and controls, this document presents and comments the actions undertaken by the CEA and the obtained results in terms of risk management in different fields: protection and control of the environment, installation safety, health, safety and radiation protection, transport of hazardous materials, waste management, protection of sites, installations and heritage, management of emergency situations, management of legal risks, internal audits and controls. Other topics are addressed like the presentation of the risk management department, and the role of the CEA in the relationship between research and industry

  4. CEA 2011, a look back at a year of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    For this year 2011, marked by the Fukushima accident, the goal is improved safety. This is a key issue being addressed by CEA, while at the same time boosting its R and D on low-carbon energies, defense and security, Health technologies, information technologies and very large research Infrastructures. With more than 650 priority patents filed in 2011, CEA maintains its position as the leading French research organization. CEA stands in 4. place among the European research organizations, in terms of the number of projects (535, including 70 that it coordinates) and financing obtained (nearly euros 55 M) under the European Commission's FP7 framework programme. CEA's civil programs are 30% funded from external revenues (partner companies, national incentive funds, local authorities and European Union), 49% from the Government and, finally, 21% from two funds dedicated to clean-up of civil and defense facilities. Of the euros 1, 391 M devoted to low-carbon energies, research into the new energy technologies and nuclear systems of the future each received a budget of euros 151 M in 2011. CEA plays a key role in the European Energy Research Alliance, as a founding member, a member of the executive committee and a member of the secretariat. It is France's representative. EERA has launched 13 joint programs, including 6 in 2011. It pools the research efforts of more than 150 institutes and universities, with more than 2, 000 staff employed full-time. CEA is present in 8 programs, with 100 full-time staff, in other words 5% of the total partner commitment. This special issue of 'Defis du CEA' journal deals with the main results of the researches carried out in 2011 at the CEA. Contents: 1 - Facts and figures 2011: Intellectual Property, European Financing, Budget, Nuclear Safety, European Research Programs, International Relations, International Collaboration, Spin-off, Scientific Excellence, Training; 2 - Low-carbon energies: Biofuels, Solar Photovoltaic, Nuclear, Energy

  5. CEA 2011, a look back at a year of research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    For this year 2011, marked by the Fukushima accident, the goal is improved safety. This is a key issue being addressed by CEA, while at the same time boosting its R and D on low-carbon energies, defense and security, Health technologies, information technologies and very large research Infrastructures. With more than 650 priority patents filed in 2011, CEA maintains its position as the leading French research organization. CEA stands in 4. place among the European research organizations, in terms of the number of projects (535, including 70 that it coordinates) and financing obtained (nearly euros 55 M) under the European Commission's FP7 framework programme. CEA's civil programs are 30% funded from external revenues (partner companies, national incentive funds, local authorities and European Union), 49% from the Government and, finally, 21% from two funds dedicated to clean-up of civil and defense facilities. Of the euros 1, 391 M devoted to low-carbon energies, research into the new energy technologies and nuclear systems of the future each received a budget of euros 151 M in 2011. CEA plays a key role in the European Energy Research Alliance, as a founding member, a member of the executive committee and a member of the secretariat. It is France's representative. EERA has launched 13 joint programs, including 6 in 2011. It pools the research efforts of more than 150 institutes and universities, with more than 2, 000 staff employed full-time. CEA is present in 8 programs, with 100 full-time staff, in other words 5% of the total partner commitment. This special issue of 'Defis du CEA' journal deals with the main results of the researches carried out in 2011 at the CEA. Contents: 1 - Facts and figures 2011: Intellectual Property, European Financing, Budget, Nuclear Safety, European Research Programs, International Relations, International Collaboration, Spin-off, Scientific Excellence, Training; 2 - Low-carbon energies: Biofuels, Solar

  6. Cleanup of contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beone, G.; Carbone, A.I.; Zagaroli, M.

    1989-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of contaminated areas cleanup, in order to eliminate every possible damage for man safety and environment and to site recovery for some utilization, The first step of cleanup operation is site characterization, that is followed by a pianificazion activity for a better definition of staff qualification, technology to be used, protection and prevention instruments for the risks due to contaminants handling. The second section describes the different remedial technologies for contaminated sites. Remedial technologies may be divided into on-site/off-site and in-situ treatments, according to whether materials (waste, soil, water) are moved to another location or not, respectively. Finally, it is outlined that contaminated areas cleanup is a typical multidisciplinary activity because very different competences are required. (author)

  7. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Grenoble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Grenoble for the year 2007. Since 2002 the Passage project aims to realize the decontamination and the dismantling of old nuclear installations of the CEA Grenoble. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the year 2007 saw two main steps of the Passage project: the decommissioning of the Siloette reactor, a public consultation about the Lama laboratory dismantling. (A.L.B.)

  8. Environmental compliance and cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the roles of the principal agencies, organizations, and public in environmental compliance and cleanup of the Hanford Site. Regulatory oversight, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the role of Indian tribes, public participation, and CERCLA Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee Activities are all discussed

  9. The CEA at the heart of great new challenges - Annual report 2015. The CEA - Financial report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) is a key player in research, development and innovation in four main areas: defence and security, nuclear energy (fission and fusion), technological research for industry, fundamental research in the physical sciences and life sciences. Drawing on its widely acknowledged expertise, the CEA actively participates in collaborative projects with a large number of academic and industrial partners. The CEA is established in nine centers spread throughout France. It works in partnership with many other research bodies, local authorities and universities. Within this context, the CEA is a stakeholder in a series of national alliances set up to coordinate French research in energy (ANCRE), life sciences and health (AVIESAN), digital science and technology (ALLISTENE), environmental sciences (AllEnvi) and human and social sciences (ATHENA). The CEA in figures (2015): 9 research centres; 15958 technicians, engineers, researchers and staff; 51 joint research units (UMR); 53 framework agreements with universities and schools; 753 priority patents filed in 2015; 27 Equipex (facilities of excellence); 33 Labex (Laboratories of excellence); 3 Idex (Initiatives of excellence); 187 start-ups since 1972 in the innovative technologies sector; 4,1 billion euros budget; 438 ongoing European projects in 2015. This document is the activity report of CEA over the year 2015 (Defence, energy, technologies, fundamental research..). It is followed by a Management and a financial report (annual Financial Statements)

  10. Scientific evaluation at the CEA; Evaluation scientifique au CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    This report presents a statement of the scientific and technical activity of the French atomic energy commission (CEA) for the year 1998. This evaluation is made by external and independent experts and requires some specific dispositions for the nuclear protection and safety institute (IPSN) and for the direction of military applications (DAM). The report is divided into 5 parts dealing successively with: part 1 - the CEA, a public research organization (civil nuclear research, technology research and transfers, defence activities); the scientific and technical evaluation at the CEA (general framework, evaluation of the IPSN and DAM); part 2 - the scientific and technical councils (directions of fuel cycle, of nuclear reactors, and of advanced technologies); part 3 - the scientific councils (directions of matter and of life sciences); the nuclear protection and safety institute; the direction of military applications; part 4 - the corresponding members of the evaluation; part 5 - the list of scientific and technical councils and members. (J.S.)

  11. Scientific evaluation at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents a statement of the scientific and technical activity of the French atomic energy commission (CEA) for the year 1998. This evaluation is made by external and independent experts and requires some specific dispositions for the nuclear protection and safety institute (IPSN) and for the direction of military applications (DAM). The report is divided into 5 parts dealing successively with: part 1 - the CEA, a public research organization (civil nuclear research, technology research and transfers, defence activities); the scientific and technical evaluation at the CEA (general framework, evaluation of the IPSN and DAM); part 2 - the scientific and technical councils (directions of fuel cycle, of nuclear reactors, and of advanced technologies); part 3 - the scientific councils (directions of matter and of life sciences); the nuclear protection and safety institute; the direction of military applications; part 4 - the corresponding members of the evaluation; part 5 - the list of scientific and technical councils and members. (J.S.)

  12. CEA Annual progress report 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This annual report presents the general organization of the CEA, the international relations and politics in nuclear field, the activities (military application, nuclear applied research, ANDRA (National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management), nuclear safety and protection, fundamental research, applied research other than nuclear), the industrial group; among topics about men and means, the budget execution of the public establishment of research. In annex, the nuclear power plants around the world and the principal legislative texts related to CEA or atomic energy published in 1986 [fr

  13. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Marcoule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Marcoule for the year 2007. Since its creation in 1955 the center realizes industrial and scientific activities relative to the civil and military applications of the radioactivity. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the following two base activities are detailed: Atalante and Phenix. (A.L.B.)

  14. CEA 2005 annual report; CEA rapport annuel 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This document is the 2005 activity report of the French atomic energy commission (CEA). The CEA is a main actor of nuclear research, development and innovation and is involved in three main domains: energy, defense/security, and information/health technologies thanks to high quality research works. With a manpower of 15000 researchers and collaborators with internationally acknowledged competences, the CEA is a driving force of industrial innovation and develops partnerships with French and European industries. It also warrants the perenniality of nuclear dissuasion. This report presents these different aspects of the CEA activities: 1 - defense-security: simulation program, opening to the scientific community, nuclear warheads, nuclear propulsion, cleansing of Rhone valley facilities, permanent monitoring of treaties respect, fight against terrorism; 2 - energy: optimization of the industrial park, advances in long lived radioactive wastes management, future nuclear systems, cleansing and dismantling integration, European nuclear energy research, new energy technologies; 3 - information and health technologies: major challenge of micro- and nano-technologies, key role of software technologies and complex systems; 4 - big research facilities opened to the scientific and industrial communities; 5 - scientific status: scientific evaluation process, prices and honors; 6 - programs support: revisited strategic control, confirmed simplification, active employment and training policy, teaching and training, technological valorization, international relations, communication, continuous quality approach, mastery of facilities safety, security, environmental control, a key-year for information systems. A financial report is attached to the document. (J.S.)

  15. Nondestructive testing at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colomer, J.; Lucas, G.

    1976-01-01

    The different nondestructive testing methods used at the CEA are presented: X-ray or gamma radiography, X-ray stress analysis, neutron radiography, ultrasonic testing, eddy currents, electrical testing, microwaves, thermal testing, acoustic emission, optical holography, tracer techniques. (102 references are cited) [fr

  16. The CEA budget in 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    In 1982, the amount of the CEA budget will be 13.4 billions French Francs. The main characteristics are the priority for employment and investments. In this budget programs are adapted to fit R and D to the government policy: innovation, industrial valorization and fundamental research especially thermonuclear fusion and in the electronuclear field to safety, reprocessing and radioactive waste management [fr

  17. Evaluation of contaminated groundwater cleanup objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arquiett, C.; Gerke, M.; Datskou, I.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Restoration Program will be responsible for remediating the approximately 230 contaminated groundwater sites across the DOE Complex. A major concern for remediation is choosing the appropriate cleanup objective. The cleanup objective chosen will influence the risk to the nearby public during and after remediation; risk to remedial and non-involved workers during remediation; and the cost of remediation. This paper discusses the trends shown in analyses currently being performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories' (ORNL's) Center for Risk Management (CRM). To evaluate these trends, CRM is developing a database of contaminated sites. This paper examines several contaminated groundwater sites selected for assessment from CRM's data base. The sites in this sample represent potential types of contaminated groundwater sites commonly found at an installation within DOE. The baseline risk from these sites to various receptors is presented. Residual risk and risk during remediation is reported for different cleanup objectives. The cost associated with remediating to each of these objectives is also estimated for each of the representative sites. Finally, the general trends of impacts as a function of cleanup objective will be summarized. The sites examined include the Savannah River site, where there was substantial ground pollution from radionuclides, oil, coal stockpiles, and other forms of groundwater contamination. The effects of various types of groundwater contamination on various types of future user is described. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  18. INIS, CEA and nuclear terminology; INIS, CEA et terminologie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surmont, J.; Brulet, C.; Constant, A.; Guille, N.; Le Blanc, A.; Mouffron, O.; Anguise, P.; Jouve, J.J

    2007-07-01

    This poster, prepared for the fifth edition of the meetings of scientific and technical information professionals (RPIST, Nancy (France)), presents, first, the INIS information system, its content and coverage, the French participation to this system and the role of the CEA-Saclay as France's official representative for this system. Then it presents the INIS thesaurus with its different levels as a terminological tool for the indexing of documents and for searching documents inside the database. Finally, the very first electronic version of the multilingual thesaurus is introduced. Several national INIS centres, including the CEA-Saclay, have contributed to the translation of lists of new terms and of forbidden terms (synonyms). (J.S.)

  19. CEA - Annual report 2006; CEA - Rapport annuel 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The CEA, a prominent player in research development and innovation, is active in 3 main areas: energy, health care and information technology and defense and security. This annual report presents the CEA activity for the year 2006 in these three main areas: Science and technology working for nuclear deterrence and global security (the simulation programs, the nuclear warheads, the nuclear propulsion, the decommissioning, the fighting against nuclear proliferation and monitoring international treaties, the global security); health and information technology (micro and nano technologies and systems); energy from nuclear fission and fusion and other technologies that do not emit greenhouse gases (progress for the nuclear industry, sustainable management of radioactive materials and waste, nuclear systems of the future, new energy technologies). (A.L.B.)

  20. The CEA program on boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guillou, G.; Brunet, M.; Girard, J.P.; Flory, D.

    1982-01-01

    The research program on the application of noise analysis on boiling detection in a fast subassembly began 10 years ago at the CEA, mainly in the Nuclear Center of Cadarache. Referring exclusively to the aspects of premature detection of the boiling phenomenon it can be said that this program is organized around the following three detection techniques: acoustic noise analysis; neutron noise analysis; temperature noise analysis. Its development is in conjunction with in-pile experiments in Phenix or Rapsodie as well as 'ex-pile' (boiling experiments through electric heating). Three detection techniques were developed independent of each other, but that they were regrouped during the execution of the most important experiments and with the 'Super Phenix' project. The noise analysis system ANABEL with which Superphenix will be equipped with shows the industrial interest in detection methods based on noises. One of the results of the CEA program today is the possibility to evaluate the potential capacity for boiling detection in the subassembly. But in order to obtain the necessary funds from the commercial nuclear plant operators it is mandatory to have successful demonstrations which will be the objective of the future program

  1. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Saclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Saclay for the year 2007. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially two public consultation on release authorizations and the Neurospin installations, the dismantling of the 49 nuclear installation, the shutdown of the learning reactor ULYSSE are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  2. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Cadarache for the year 2007. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the report discusses the beginning of the RJH reactor construction, the fourth generation reactors research programs, the implementing of la Rotonde the new radioactive wastes management installation, the renovation of the LECA. (A.L.B.)

  3. The CEA/CD3-bispecific antibody MEDI-565 (MT111) binds a nonlinear epitope in the full-length but not a short splice variant of CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li; Oberst, Michael D; Huang, Jiaqi; Brohawn, Philip; Morehouse, Chris; Lekstrom, Kristen; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Wu, Herren; Yao, Yihong; Coats, Steven R; Dall'Acqua, William; Damschroder, Melissa; Hammond, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    MEDI-565 (also known as MT111) is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody in development for the treatment of patients with cancers expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). MEDI-565 binds CEA on cancer cells and CD3 on T cells to induce T-cell mediated killing of cancer cells. To understand the molecular basis of human CEA recognition by MEDI-565 and how polymorphisms and spliced forms of CEA may affect MEDI-565 activity, we mapped the epitope of MEDI-565 on CEA using mutagenesis and homology modeling approaches. We found that MEDI-565 recognized a conformational epitope in the A2 domain comprised of amino acids 326-349 and 388-410, with critical residues F(326), T(328), N(333), V(388), G(389), P(390), E(392), I(408), and N(410). Two non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs10407503, rs7249230) were identified in the epitope region, but they are found at low homozygosity rates. Searching the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank® database, we further identified a single, previously uncharacterized mRNA splice variant of CEA that lacks a portion of the N-terminal domain, the A1 and B1 domains, and a large portion of the A2 domain. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of multiple cancers showed widespread expression of full-length CEA in these tumors, with less frequent but concordant expression of the CEA splice variant. Because the epitope was largely absent from the CEA splice variant, MEDI-565 did not bind or mediate T-cell killing of cells solely expressing this form of CEA. In addition, the splice variant did not interfere with MEDI-565 binding or activity when co-expressed with full-length CEA. Thus MEDI-565 may broadly target CEA-positive tumors without regard for expression of the short splice variant of CEA. Together our data suggest that MEDI-565 activity will neither be impacted by SNPs nor by a splice variant of CEA.

  4. INIS, CEA and nuclear terminology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surmont, J.; Brulet, C.; Constant, A.; Guille, N.; Le Blanc, A.; Mouffron, O.; Anguise, P.; Jouve, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    This poster, prepared for the fifth edition of the meetings of scientific and technical information professionals (RPIST, Nancy (France)), presents, first, the INIS information system, its content and coverage, the French participation to this system and the role of the CEA-Saclay as France's official representative for this system. Then it presents the INIS thesaurus with its different levels as a terminological tool for the indexing of documents and for searching documents inside the database. Finally, the very first electronic version of the multilingual thesaurus is introduced. Several national INIS centres, including the CEA-Saclay, have contributed to the translation of lists of new terms and of forbidden terms (synonyms). (J.S.)

  5. CEA: risk management assessment 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, Bernard; Bonnevie, Edwige; Maillot, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    This report proposes a qualitative and quantitative overview of CEA activities in the field of risk management during 2011. These activities concerned the impact on the environment, the safety of installations, the management of professional risks (safety and health at work), the radiological protection of workers, the transports of hazardous materials, waste management, protection of sites, installations and heritage, the management of emergency situations, the management of law risks, controls and audits

  6. Treatment with Ca-DTPA of internal contaminations by plutonium and americium: Recommendations for writing protocols in Cea and AREVA centers; Traitement par le Ca-DTPA des contaminations internes par le plutonium et l'americium: recommandations pour la redaction de protocoles dans les centres CEA et AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grappin, L. [CEA Cadarache, DEN, Service de Sante au Travail, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Legoff, J.P.; Andre, F. [CEA Valduc, Service de Sante au Travail, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Carbone, L.; Agrinier, A.L. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, Service de Sante au Travail, 30 (France); Courtay, C.; Aninat, M. [AREVA, Service de Sante au Travail, La Hague, 50 - Beaumont-Hague (France); Amabile, J.C. [SPRA, HIA Percy, 92 - Clamart (France); Florin, A. [CEA Saclay, SDM Service de Sante au Travail, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this document is to provide physicians working in a B.N.F. (Basic Nuclear Facility) with recommendations for the drafting of Ca-DTPA treatment protocols for internal contamination by actinides. These recommendations are based on the results of injections carried out by Cea and AREVA doctors in a working group, with the collaboration of the Army Radiation Protection Service. The study focused on Ca-DTPA IV injection. Other dosage forms, routes of administration as well as adjuvant treatments are also mentioned. For cases of contaminated wounds and inhalation, indicators for treatment with Ca-DTPA, particularly its initialization, the dosage, duration, frequency of administration, the criteria for ending the treatment, then its efficiency and dosimetry gain are covered. A guide for the prescription of the radio toxicological monitoring necessary for the treatment and the dosimetric evaluation is proposed. (authors)

  7. CEA - Assessment of risk management 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, Bernard; Bonnevie, Edwige; Maillot, Bernard

    2014-06-01

    After some introducing texts by CEA managers, this report proposes a rather detailed overview and presentation of CEA activities, objectives and obtained results in different fields: protection and control of the environment, installation safety, health, safety and radiation protection, transports of hazardous materials, waste management, protection of sites, installations and heritage, management of emergency situations, management of legal risks, internal controls and audits, activity of the risk management department, CEA activities from research to industry

  8. Las Gramináceas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robledo Emilio

    1939-08-01

    Full Text Available Las gramináceas son plantas conocidas desde la antigüedad más remota. Tan importantes son las gramináceas desde el punto de vista bromatológico, que los hombres pueden ser clasificados en comedores de trigo, de arroz, de maíz, de mijo, de sorgo, de tocusso, de tef, etc. El área de distribución de las gramíneas es inmensa: se las encuentra desde las orillas del mar y en las aguas dulces, hasta las nieves perpetuas; sólo en las aguas saladas desconocidas. En punto de tamaño, las hay desde unos centímetros hasta nuestra guadua gigantesca, de treinta y más metros de altura. Dicha distribución se halla en relación con el clima, pero también es influida por los hábitos de los pueblos, por la civilización, por el comercio o por otras circunstancias.

  9. CEA - 2012 Annual Report, 2012 Financial Statements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In its first part, this report proposes an overview of activities within the CEA. They concern the CEA's programs on low on carbon energies and associated fundamental researches, on defence and global security and associated fundamental researches, on information technologies and associated fundamental researches, on health technologies and associated fundamental researches, and on very large research infrastructures and associated fundamental researches. The second part addresses the scientific assessment, activities related to teaching and training, to innovation towards enterprises, and to support to valorization. It also indicates prices awarded to the CEA. The third part addresses CEA management and institutional relationships, human resources, international relationships, activities related to communication and information diffusion, and risk management. The fourth part describes the CEA organization, its governance and its various bodies. The second volume contains the financial statements for 2012

  10. CEA SMAD 2016 Digitizer Evaluation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Bion J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated an updated SMAD digitizer, developed by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). The SMAD digitizers are intended to record sensor output for seismic and infrasound monitoring applications. The purpose of this digitizer evaluation is to measure the performance characteristics in such areas as power consumption, input impedance, sensitivity, full scale, self-noise, dynamic range, system noise, response, passband, and timing. The SMAD digitizers have been updated since their last evaluation by Sandia to improve their performance when recording at a sample rate of 20 Hz for infrasound applications and 100 Hz for hydro-acoustic seismic stations. This evaluation focuses primarily on the 20 Hz and 100 Hz sample rates. The SMAD digitizers are being evaluated for potential use in the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test- Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

  11. Memoirs of a Cea veteran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puill, A.

    2001-01-01

    A brief account is given of the way in which nuclear energy has developed in France and elsewhere over the last fifty years: options developed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), naval propulsion, development of pressurised water reactors, MOX and thorium fuels. Afterwards, the prospectives for the 21. century will be discussed. Considering that natural resources are depleting while releases of both greenhouse gases and world population are increasing, an active energy policy will have to be implemented with due consideration for social equity and solidarity. It is in this context that the developed countries will have to give preference, beyond savings, to renewable sources of energy, including of course, nuclear energy. Nuclear energy can continue to develop in the long term, provided fast breeder technology is developed at some point. As far as transport is concerned, hydrogen technology, which is clean and renewable, is promising, provided it is generated by nuclear energy. (author)

  12. Memoirs of a Cea veteran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puill, A

    2001-07-01

    A brief account is given of the way in which nuclear energy has developed in France and elsewhere over the last fifty years: options developed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), naval propulsion, development of pressurised water reactors, MOX and thorium fuels. Afterwards, the prospectives for the 21. century will be discussed. Considering that natural resources are depleting while releases of both greenhouse gases and world population are increasing, an active energy policy will have to be implemented with due consideration for social equity and solidarity. It is in this context that the developed countries will have to give preference, beyond savings, to renewable sources of energy, including of course, nuclear energy. Nuclear energy can continue to develop in the long term, provided fast breeder technology is developed at some point. As far as transport is concerned, hydrogen technology, which is clean and renewable, is promising, provided it is generated by nuclear energy. (author)

  13. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the status of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE`s 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM`s accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document.

  14. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the status of Environmental Management's (EM's) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE's 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM's accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document

  15. Innovative technologies for groundwater cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    These notes provide a broad overview of current developments in innovative technologies for groundwater cleanup. In this context, groundwater cleanup technologies include site remediation methods that deal with contaminants in ground water or that may move from the vadose zone into ground water. This discussion attempts to emphasize approaches that may be able to achieve significant improvements in groundwater cleanup cost or effectiveness. However, since data for quantitative performance and cost comparisons of new cleanup methods are scarce, preliminary comparisons must be based on the scientific approach used by each method and on the site-specific technical challenges presented by each groundwater contamination situation. A large number of technical alternatives that are now in research, development, and testing can be categorized by the scientific phenomena that they employ and by the site contamination situations that they treat. After reviewing a representative selection of these technologies, one of the new technologies, the Microbial Filter method, is discussed in more detail to highlight a promising in situ groundwater cleanup technology that is now being readied for field testing

  16. CA 19-9 as a marker in addition to CEA to monitor colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiksma, Jolanda; Grootendorst, Diana C; van der Linden, Peter Willem G

    2014-12-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen is the commonly used tumor marker in patients with colorectal cancer, and CA 19-9 might be an additional marker. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate whether CA 19-9 levels can be used to monitor the disease process in patients with colorectal cancer who had no elevated CEA levels. The secondary aim was to determine if preoperative increased levels of CEA and CA 19-9 were associated with mortality. Two sets of data from patients with histologically confirmed colorectal cancer, were included in a single-center study. First, patients with a minimum of 3 serial measurements of CA 19-9 and CEA tumor markers were related to the clinical course of their disease. Second, patients with preoperative levels of CEA and CA 19-9 were related to survival. In patients with colorectal cancer and 3 serial measurements of tumor markers, 7.3% had only increased CA 19-9 levels without increased CEA levels, and 55.4% of the patients had an increase of CA 19-9 and CEA levels. In the patients with available preoperative markers, patients with only an increase of CA 19-9 had a significantly decreased 5-year survival compared with patients with an increase of only CEA (P = .013). CA 19-9 can be used as additional marker to follow the disease process in patients with colorectal cancer without an increase in CEA level. Patients with preoperative increased CA 19-9 level had a poorer 5-year survival than patients with preoperative increased CEA levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomass gasification hot gas cleanup for power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiant, B.C.; Bachovchin, D.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States); Carty, R.H.; Onischak, M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Horazak, D.A. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Reading, PA (United States); Ruel, R.H. [The Pacific International Center for High Technology Research, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    In support of the US Department of Energy`s Biomass Power Program, a Westinghouse Electric led team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C), and the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR), is conducting a 30 month research and development program. The program will provide validation of hot gas cleanup technology with a pressurized fluidized bed, air-blown, biomass gasifier for operation of a gas turbine. This paper discusses the gasification and hot gas cleanup processes, scope of work and approach, and the program`s status.

  18. Comparison of Ablation Predictions for Carbonaceous Materials Using CEA and JANAF-Based Species Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.

    2011-01-01

    In most previous work at NASA Ames Research Center, ablation predictions for carbonaceous materials were obtained using a species thermodynamics database developed by Aerotherm Corporation. This database is derived mostly from the JANAF thermochemical tables. However, the CEA thermodynamics database, also used by NASA, is considered more up to date. In this work, the FIAT code was modified to use CEA-based curve fits for species thermodynamics, then analyses using both the JANAF and CEA thermodynamics were performed for carbon and carbon phenolic materials over a range of test conditions. The ablation predictions are comparable at lower heat fluxes where the dominant mechanism is carbon oxidation. However, the predictions begin to diverge in the sublimation regime, with the CEA model predicting lower recession. The disagreement is more significant for carbon phenolic than for carbon, and this difference is attributed to hydrocarbon species that may contribute to the ablation rate.

  19. CEA - 2011 annual report, 2011 financial statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    The first report, available both in French and English, presents the different current programs: low carbon energies and associated fundamental researches, global defence and safety and associated researches, information technologies and associated researches, technologies for health and associated fundamental researches, very large research infrastructures and associated fundamental researches. It then addresses the CEA openness: assessment, teaching and training, research valorisation, awards, and the support to various programs: steering activity by the CEA, human resources, international relationships, communication, risk management, information systems. The last part describes the CEA organisation. The second report presents the different financial and accounting data and tables

  20. Recycling Facilities - Land Recycling Cleanup Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Land Recycling Cleanup Location Land Recycling Cleanup Locations (LRCL) are divided into one or more sub-facilities categorized as media: Air, Contained Release or...

  1. Report of transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Fontenay aux Roses; Rapport transparence et securite nucleaire 2007 CEA Fontenay aux Roses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Fontenay aux roses for the year 2007. After many years of decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations, the Center is now devoted (since 2005) to the development of research programmes on biology and biomedical technologies. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  2. Regarding the old Cea factory of the Bouchet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    1997-10-01

    This article si devoted to the Cea site of the Bouchet. Radiation monitoring have been made and the information about it, given to the populations around the site. The wastes with a value upper than this one chosen for low activity wastes have been sent to the storage center of Manche plant, the other ones whom activity level was lower than this one advocated for low level radioactive wastes were used for the base of A87 motorway. The two little rivers have been cleaned out and the sediments tipped out in the decantation basin of the Cea site. Radiation monitoring for the radon have to be made to control the right progress of these decontamination operations. All these operations have been made in dialogue with S.N.P.E.( the national society of powders and explosives), the D.R.I.R.E.( regional direction of research industry and environment), O.P.R.I. (office of protection against ionizing radiations) and the Cea. (N.C.)

  3. The CEA-Industrie Group of Companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 financial and technological status of the CEA-Industry Group of Companies is summarized. The activities, technological innovations, and areas of development perspectives of the CEA-Industry Group of Companies, chiefly concentrated in fields relating to nuclear energy, are described. The principal business sectors of the group involve nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear plants and maintenance, computer applications and life science. Some activities of the group are extended to management, construction and financial fields

  4. CEA - Assessment of risk management for 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnevie, Edwige

    2013-06-01

    This report proposes an overview of the main events, actions performed by the CEA, and facts for 2012 regarding protection and monitoring of the environment, installation safety, occupational health and safety, radiological protection of workers, transportation of hazardous materials, waste management, protection of sites, installations and heritage, emergency situation management, legal risk management, internal controls and audits. It also presents the organisation and action of the risk management department within the CEA

  5. Saclay - 50 years / CEA 1945-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Central in the infrastructure through which France obtains some 80% of its electric power from nuclear energy stands the French Atomic Energy Authority (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique - CEA). This year the CEA celebrates its Golden Jubilee. Mastery of nuclear energy goes hand-in-hand with fundamental research in the fields of nuclear and sub-nuclear physics, and the founders of the CEA, like F. Joliot and F. Perrin, considered it essential to relaunch fundamental research in France after the Second World War. In particular, A. Messiah's courses on quantum mechanics made a considerable contribution to the re-establishment of a French school of atomic and sub-atomic physics. As the CEA expanded and nuclear industry grew up, the need was shown for close links between fundamental research and its applications. In addition, the CEA realized how important it was to become a part of the national and international scientific community as highly effective cooperation was developing. The CEA has drawn a wealth of scientific, cultural and intellectual benefits from its collaboration with CERN. During the same period, as fundamental particle physics research has been making spectacular progress, its requirements have grown commensurately. It is not therefore surprising that CERN needs partners capable of bringing together the domains of fundamental research and major equipment and of promoting a dialogue between research and industry. As was pointed out by Jacques Haissinski, head of the Department of Astrophysics, Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics and Associated Instruments (DAPNIA), the CEA, set up to develop major programmes for applying nuclear processes, is particularly well equipped to design, build and operate the huge instruments for exploring the infinitely small and the infinitely large. Tomorrow's nuclear industry needs and will continue to need fundamental research, with its openness and its cooperation. Particle physics needs and will continue

  6. Development of teleoperated cleanup system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Ho; Park, J. J.; Yang, M. S.; Kwon, H. J.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the development of a teleoperated cleanup system for use in a highly radioactive environment of DFDF(DUPIC Fuel Demonstration Facility) at KAERI where direct human access to the in-cell is strictly limited. The teleoperated cleanup system was designed to remotely remove contaminants placed or fixed on the floor surface of the hot-cell by mopping them with wet cloth. This cleanup system consists of a mopping slave, a mopping master and a control console. The mopping slave located at the in-cell comprises a mopping tool with a mopping cloth and a mobile platform, which were constructed in modules to facilitate maintenance. The mopping master that is an input device to control the mopping slave has kinematic dissimilarity with the mopping slave. The control console provides a means of bilateral control flows and communications between the mopping master and the mopping slave. In operation, the human operator from the out-of-cell performs a series of decontamination tasks remotely by manipulating the mopping slave located in-cell via a mopping master, having a sense of real mopping. The environmental and mechanical design considerations, and control systems of the developed teleoperated cleanup system are also described

  7. 1999 scientific evaluation at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents a statement of the scientific and technical activity of the French atomic energy commission (CEA) for the year 1999. This evaluation is made by external and independent experts and requires some specific dispositions for the nuclear protection and safety institute (IPSN) and for the direction of military applications (DAM). The report is divided into 4 parts dealing successively with: 1)the CEA, a public research organization (strategy, research programs, new organization of the CEA activities, civil nuclear research, technology research and transfer, defence activities, transfer of knowledge) 2)the scientific evaluation at the CEA (evaluations of the civil applications of the CEA, IPSN, DAM, INSTN (national institute for nuclear sciences and techniques) 3)synthesis of the 1999 scientific and technical evaluation for each operational directions of the CEA (directions of fuel cycle, of nuclear reactors, of advanced technologies, of materials sciences, of life sciences, of military applications, of the nuclear protection and safety institute and of the national institute for nuclear sciences and techniques) 4)the corresponding members of the evaluation and the list of scientific and technical councils and members

  8. The CEA and the alternative energies. Press tour 25 and 26 november 1999; Le CEA et les energies alternatives. Voyage de presse les 25 et 26 novembre 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carola, G. [CEA/Grenoble, 38 (France); Ngo, Ch. [CEA, Dir. de la Strategie et de l' Evaluation, 75 - Paris (France); Mermilliod, N.; Serre-Combe, P. [CEA/Grenoble, Dir. des Technologies Avancees, DTA, 38 (France); Sanglan, P. [Air Liquide, 38 - Sassenage (France); De La Graviere, M. [CEA/Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dieudonne, O.; Malbranche, Ph. [CEA/Cadarache, Dir. des Reacteurs Nucleaires, DRN, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1999-11-01

    In the framework of the public information on the CEA center of Cadarache and Grenoble, a presentation of the researches concerning the alternative energies is proposed. The Cea is commissioned by the Public Authorities, to keep the nuclear option open and for the long-dated, to develop renewable energies. In this domain researches on fuel cells and photovoltaic solar energy are performed. The principle and the applications of the fuel cell and the photovoltaic are recalled to introduce the research programs and the partners. (A.L.B.)

  9. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, C.

    1998-06-30

    This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE`s national strategy, the Richland Operations Office`s Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established.

  10. Radioactivity and radioprotection: the every day life in a nuclear installation. Press tour at CEA/GRENOBLE 18 november 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    In the framework of the public information, this paper gives a general information on the radioactivity and the radioprotection at the CEA/Cadarache center. A first part is devoted to a presentation of the radioactivity with definitions and radiation effects on the human being and the environment. An other part presents the radioprotection activities and regulations. The last part deals with specific activities of the CEA/Cadarache: the CASCAD installations for spent fuels storage, the LECA Laboratory for the Examination of Active Fuels and a dismantling installation for big irradiated objects. Historical aspects of the CEA/Cadarache are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  11. The dismantling of CEA nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piketty, Laurence

    2016-03-01

    After having indicated locations of French nuclear installations which are currently being dismantled (about 30 installations), and recalled the different categories of radioactive wastes with respect to their activity level and the associated storage options, this article gives an overview of various aspects of dismantling, more precisely in the case of installations owned and managed by the CEA. These operations comprise the dismantling itself, the recovery and packaging of wastes, old effluents and spent fuels. The organisation and responsible departments within the CEA are presented, and the author outlines some operational problematic issues met due to the age of installations (traceability of activities, regulation evolutions). The issue of financing is then discussed, and its uncertainties are outlined. The dismantling strategy within the CEA-DEN is described, with reference to legal and regulatory frameworks. The next parts of the article address the organisation and the economic impact of these decontamination and dismantling activities within the CEA-DEN, highlight how R and D and advanced technology are a support to this activities as R and D actions address all scientific and technical fields of nuclear decontamination and dismantling. An overview of three important dismantling works is proposed: Fontenay-aux-Roses, the Marcoule CEA centre (a reference centre in the field of nuclear dismantling and decontamination) and the Grenoble CEA centre (reconversion in R and D activities in the fields of technologies of information, of communication, technologies, for health, and in renewable energies). The last part addresses the participation to the Strategic Committee of the Nuclear Sector (CSFN)

  12. Coolant cleanup system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Atsushi; Usui, Naoshi; Yamamoto, Michiyoshi; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the electric conductivity of reactor water lower and to minimize the heat loss in the cleanup system by providing a low temperature cleanup system and a high temperature cleanup system together. Constitution: A low temperature cleanup system using ion exchange resins as filter aids and a high temperature cleanup system using inorganic ion exchange materials as filter aids are provided in combination. A part of the reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel is passed through a conductivity meter, one portion of which flows into the high temperature cleanup system having no heat exchanger and filled with inorganic ion exchange materials by way of a first flow rate control valve and the other portion of which flows into the low temperature cleanup system having heat exchangers and filled with the ion exchange materials by way of a second control valve. The first control valve is adjusted so as to flow, for example, about more than 15% of the feedwater flow rate to the high temperature cleanup system and the second control valve is adjusted with its valve opening degree depending on the indication of the conductivity meter so as to flow about 2 - 7 % of the feedwater flow rate into the low temperature cleanup system, to thereby control the electric conductivity to between 0.055 - 0.3 μS/cm. (Moriyama, K.)

  13. The CEA and the alternative energies. Press tour 25 and 26 november 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carola, G.; Ngo, Ch.; Mermilliod, N.; Serre-Combe, P.; Sanglan, P.; De La Graviere, M.; Dieudonne, O.; Malbranche, Ph.

    1999-11-01

    In the framework of the public information on the CEA center of Cadarache and Grenoble, a presentation of the researches concerning the alternative energies is proposed. The Cea is commissioned by the Public Authorities, to keep the nuclear option open and for the long-dated, to develop renewable energies. In this domain researches on fuel cells and photovoltaic solar energy are performed. The principle and the applications of the fuel cell and the photovoltaic are recalled to introduce the research programs and the partners. (A.L.B.)

  14. 1999 scientific evaluation at the CEA; L'evaluation scientifique 1999 au CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This report presents a statement of the scientific and technical activity of the French atomic energy commission (CEA) for the year 1999. This evaluation is made by external and independent experts and requires some specific dispositions for the nuclear protection and safety institute (IPSN) and for the direction of military applications (DAM). The report is divided into 4 parts dealing successively with: 1)the CEA, a public research organization (strategy, research programs, new organization of the CEA activities, civil nuclear research, technology research and transfer, defence activities, transfer of knowledge) 2)the scientific evaluation at the CEA (evaluations of the civil applications of the CEA, IPSN, DAM, INSTN (national institute for nuclear sciences and techniques) 3)synthesis of the 1999 scientific and technical evaluation for each operational directions of the CEA (directions of fuel cycle, of nuclear reactors, of advanced technologies, of materials sciences, of life sciences, of military applications, of the nuclear protection and safety institute and of the national institute for nuclear sciences and techniques) 4)the corresponding members of the evaluation and the list of scientific and technical councils and members.

  15. Reactor water clean-up device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Koji; Egashira, Yasuo; Shimada, Fumie; Igarashi, Noboru.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To save a low temperature reactor water clean-up system indispensable so far and significantly simplify the system by carrying out the reactor water clean-up solely in a high temperature reactor water clean-up system. Constitution: The reactor water clean-up device comprises a high temperature clean-up pump and a high temperature adsorption device for inorganic adsorbents. The high temperature adsorption device is filled with amphoteric ion adsorbing inorganic adsorbents, or amphoteric ion adsorbing inorganic adsorbents and anionic adsorbing inorganic adsorbents. The reactor water clean-up device introduces reactor water by the high temperature clean-up pump through a recycling system to the high temperature adsorption device for inorganic adsorbents. Since cations such as cobalt ions and anions such as chlorine ions in the reactor water are simultaneously removed in the device, a low temperature reactor water clean-up system which has been indispensable so far can be saved to realize the significant simplification for the entire system. (Seki, T.)

  16. DOE cleanup chief sees contracting changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Thomas P. Grumbly, the US Department of Energy's top cleanup official, has ruled out the agency's use of further Environmental Restoration Management Contracts for remediating former nuclear weapon production sites. At a special briefing earlier this month he also noted other steps DOE was taking to accede to mounting pressure that it hire more plant workers for cleanups

  17. Observation on CEA and IL-6 contents in gastric juice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zhonglin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of CEA and IL-6 contents in blood and gastric juice in patients with gastric cancer and gastritis. Methods: CEA and IL-6 contents in blood and gastric juice were measured with RIA in 60 patients and 30 controls. Results: Gastric juice CEA and IL-6 contents in patients with gastric carcinoma were significantly higher than those in the controls (p < 0.001), however, CEA and IL-6 contents in patients with gastritis and controls were not much different. Conclusion: Gastric juice CEA and IL-6 assay is of diagnostic significance in patients with gastric malignant tumor

  18. The CEA contribution to quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapin, M.; Colomer, J.

    1979-01-01

    The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique has developed original methods and techniques for testing delicate components of the primary circuit of pressure water reactors. These techniques make use of a very wide range of non destructive testing methods: Eddy currents, particularly multiple frequencies, for testing steam generator tubes, gudgeon and other pins focused ultrasonics for testing all the welds of the reactor vessel and its cover plate, mixed welds of steam vessels and generators, low welds of the pressurizer and gudgeon pins from the inside. On site use is effected with specific machines intended either for inspecting the tube bundles of steam generators under the responsibility of INTERCONTROLE Co., or for the complete examination of the reactor vessel by mixed CEA/INTERCONTROLE crews under the responsibility of the CEA. All these operations are subjected to a programme of quality assurance that provides the guaranty of execution complying with the procedures in force [fr

  19. The CEA and nuclear energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    With PWR reactors, CEA has applied a large part of its activities on steam generators, whilst other technical studies have involved components, maintenance, thermo-hydraulics, safety, materials, instrumentation apparatus and controls. For small light-water reactors, studies carried out have led to development of the Thermos Project: demonstrating the validity of urban heating derived from a pool-type reactor. Other studies have involved fast reactors (manufacture of fissile fuel assemblies, contributions toward the development of the Superphenix project and longer-term studies involving the overall breeder line). Finally, studies on the retreatment of irradiated fuels: aside from the retreatment of irradiated fuel programmes, CEA is pursuing its work on the TOR Project (large-scale pilot for retreatment of fast-neutron fuels) [fr

  20. CEA decommissioning experience. Results and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nokhamzon, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    The CEA was one of the first actors of dismantling to develop a savoir-faire' in this field: for more than 20 years now, it has been running decontamination and dismantling operations of the Research and Development (R and D) installations which were used for the adjustment and improvement of the French nuclear programme. The experience accumulated during the dismantling operations of the CEA installations can be turned to account by the manufacturers responsible for the future dismantling operations next century. But today, to develop a market, technical and economic solutions are no longer sufficient. They must be accepted: this is a question of ethics. Now, in the same way as the whole of nuclear field, dismantling (and mainly the wastes) is likely to worry the public opinion. (author)

  1. CEA: assessment of risk management 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    This report proposes an overview of CEA activities in the field of risk management in different areas: impact on the environment, installation safety, management of occupational risks (occupational health and safety), radiological protection of workers, transportation of hazardous materials, waste management, protection of sites, installations and heritage, management of emergency situations, management of law risks, controls and audits. It finally presents the risk management department

  2. Enhancing aquifer cleanup with reinjection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, W.F.; Ziagos, J.; Rice, D. Jr.; Krauter, P.; Nichols, E.

    1992-09-01

    Injection of water or steam, with or without chemical surfactants, is a common petroleum industry technique to enhance product recovery. In the geothermal industry, reinjection (reinjection is used to mean the injection of ground water that was previously injected) of heat- depleted subsurface fluids is commonly used to maintain reservoir pressure, thus prolonging field productivity. The use reinjection in ground-water remediation projects allows for the application of both traditional production field management and a variety of additional enhancements to the cleanup process. Development of the ideas in this paper was stimulated by an initial suggestion by Dr. Jacob Bear (personal discussions, 1990--1991) that reinjected water might be heated to aid the desorption process

  3. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km 2 Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal

  4. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  5. Recent advances in ignition target physics at CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassart, J.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the Ignition Physics Program at CEA is to burn DT capsules on the Laser Mega Joule (LMJ) at the beginning of the next decade. Recent progress on Laser Plasma Interaction, hohlraum energetics, symmetry, ablator physics and hydrodynamic instabilities allow to remove most of these latter, to precise laser and target specifications and to elaborate a strategy toward ignition. These studies include theoretical work, numerical simulations, diagnostics developments and experiments partly done in collaboration with the US DOE. Construction of facilities is ongoing: LMJ beam prototype is planed to fire 7 kJ at the center of the target chamber at 0.35 mm at the end of 2002 and the LMJ (a 240 beams 1.8 MJ laser) is planned to be ready for experiments at the end of 2009. (author)

  6. The CEA's waste management strategy; La strategie de gestion des dechets du CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behar, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dall' ava, D. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' assainissement et du demantelement nucleaire, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fillion, E. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Direction de la protection et de la surete nucleaire, 92 (France)

    2011-02-15

    The CEA is tasked with carrying out certain research activities: within the Military Applications Division (DAM), research is focused on the nuclear deterrence and, within the Nuclear Energy Division, on developing the industrial nuclear systems of the future and optimising existing nuclear systems in partnership with EDF and AREVA. These major research and development themes entail a need for nuclear research and support facilities which must be maintained at a high level of performance and safety and, also, constantly upgraded to handle the research activities and programmes for which they are used. The CEA strategy is based on the right packaging of the radioactive liquid or solid waste into a form required for its transport, storage or disposal. The Caraibes software allows an efficient traceability of the waste packages. Most of the radioactive effluent processing stations of CEA are being upgraded

  7. Challenges encountered in hydrocarbon contaminated soil cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzarettro, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Much of the author's experience relating to the cleanup of hydrocarbon contaminated soils has been garnered from serving the city of Santa Fe Springs, California as a redevelopment consultant and project manager. In this paper, the author's comments will be centered on that community. To set the stage the author believes it might be helpful to relate some of the history and background of Santa Fe Springs (SFS). The community was first founded as an agricultural settlement in the latter part of the nineteenth century, with virtually all of the farms and ranches either planted in orchards or engaged in raising cattle and livestock. The Southern Pacific Railroad had a line running through the area primarily to serve the needs of the ranchers and farmers. The community at the time was known as Fulton Wells in honor of a large hotel complex which had been erected around a well-known mineral spring touted for its curative value. The local population had been aware for some time of the presence of brackish water in shallow wells and of the peculiar odor which permeated much of the surrounding area

  8. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, CEA ratio, and treatment outcome of rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiation and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kai-Lin; Chang, Shih-Ching; Chu, Lee-Shing; Wang, Ling-Wei; Yang, Shung-Haur; Liang, Wen-Yih; Kuo, Ying-Ju; Lin, Jen-Kou; Lin, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Wei-Shone; Jiang, Jeng-Kae; Wang, Huann-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    To investigate serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Between 2000 and 2009, 138 patients with advanced rectal cancer receiving CRT before surgery at our hospital were retrospectively classified into 3 groups: pre-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group L; n = 87); pre-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml and post-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group H-L; n = 32); and both pre- and post-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml (group H-H; n = 19). CEA ratio (defined as post-CRT CEA divided by pre-CRT CEA), post-CRT CEA level and other factors were reviewed for prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was better in groups L (69.0%) and H-L (74.5%) than in group H-H (44.9%) (p = 0.024). Pathologic complete response was observed in 19.5%, 21.9% and 5.3% of groups L, H-L and H-H respectively (p = 0.281). Multivariate analysis showed that ypN stage and pCR were independent prognostic factors for DFS and that post-CRT CEA level was independently predictive of pCR. As a whole, post-CRT CEA <2.61 ng/ml predicted pCR (sensitivity 76.0%; specificity 58.4%). For those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml, post-CRT CEA and CEA ratio both predicted pCR (sensitivity 87.5%, specificity 76.7%). In patients with pre-CRT serum CEA ≥6 ng/ml, those with “normalized” CEA levels after CRT may have similar DFS to those with “normal” (<6 ng/ml) pre-CRT values. Post-CRT CEA level is a predictor for pCR, especially in those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml

  9. Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Dardenne, Yves M.

    2016-02-02

    Apparatus, systems, and methods for nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting include the steps of identifying an area; collecting samples; sample preparation; identification, assay, and analysis; and relating the samples to the area.

  10. Assessment, Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Assessment, Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES) is an online database for Brownfields Grantees to electronically submit data directly to EPA.

  11. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  12. Coolant clean-up and recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takao.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the service life of mechanical seals in a shaft sealing device, eliminate leakages and improve the safety by providing a recycle pump for feeding coolants to a coolant clean-up device upon reactor shut-down and adapting the pump treat only low temperature and low pressure coolants. Constitution: The system is adapted to partially take out coolants from the pipeways of a recycling pump upon normal operation and feed them to a clean-up device. Upon reactor shut-down, the recycle pump is stopped and coolants are extracted by the recycle pump for shut-down into the clean-up device. Since the coolants are not fed to the clean-up device by the recycle pump during normal operation as conducted so far, high temperature and high pressure coolants are not directly fed to the recycle pump, thereby enabling to avoid mechanical problems in the pump. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Bioavailability: implications for science/cleanup policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denit, Jeffery; Planicka, J. Gregory

    1998-12-01

    This paper examines the role of bioavailability in risk assessment and cleanup decisions. Bioavailability refers to how chemicals ''behave'' and their ''availability'' to interact with living organisms. Bioavailability has significant implications for exposure risks, cleanup goals, and site costs. Risk to human health and the environment is directly tied to the bioavailability of the chemicals of concern.

  14. Status of Cea spallation modules for ads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enderle, R.; Poitevin, Y.; Deffain, J.P.; Bergeron, J.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of CEA studies on ADS dedicated to waste transmutation, a liquid metal reference concept and an alternative solid target have been evaluated to produce neutrons inside the spallation module. This work examines the design (neutronic, thermohydraulic and mechanical aspects) and the performances of both options. It is shown that a liquid Pb-Bi target offers more possibilities regarding to high protons current densities (possible industrial extrapolation) but that a solid target made with tungsten particles offers also interesting ability to create a neutrons flux appropriated (strong spectrum and flat axial distribution) to an sub-critical core dedicated to incineration. (author)

  15. Una nueva Lecitidácea colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugand Armando

    1941-11-01

    Full Text Available Esta nueva especie de Grias tiene cierta afinidad con G. peruviana Miers, distinguiéndose principalmente por tener racimos florales muy alargados y leñosos, hojas en la generalidad más largas y de márgenes enteras o muy escasamente sinuado-aserradas, de consistencia bastante floja y membranácea, y por la pubescencia que recubre los pedicelos, bracteolas, sépalos y la parte superior del raquis en los racimos. La madera despide un hedor excremental que prevalece aun en los trozos secos por mucho tiempo.

  16. A monkey antigen crossreacting with carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, E.; Vuento, M.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1976-01-01

    Normal monkey tissues were found to contain an antigen which crossreacts immunologically with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) of the human digestive tract. The monkey antigen reacted with complete or partial identity to the normal crossreacting antigen (NCA) in humans when tested in immunodiffusion against anti-CEA or anti-NCA. Extracts of monkey tissues inhibited in radioimmunoassays measuring human NCA. It is possible that monkey foetuses and colonic tumours contain CEA. Images Fig. 1 PMID:823952

  17. Role of Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gaur, Rajesh

    2004-01-01

    .... Recent studies suggest that overexpression of CEA promotes tumorogenesis by inhibiting cell differentiation, and by preventing anoikis, a type of apoptotic program which destroys cells that lose...

  18. Cutoff Values of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in Normal Korean Adults and Factors Influencing Serum CEA Level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Soon; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    1994-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic Antigen is one of most frequently checked tumor markers in cancer management. We performed statistical analysis with serum CEA data of 2626 persons who received regular health examination and were thought to be free of active disease to determine the cutoff values of serum CEA level in normal Korean adults and to study the factors influencing serum CEA levels in normal subjects. 1) The cutoff values of serum CEA in normal Korean adults in general were 9.28 ng/ml for men, 5.90 ng/ml for women. 2) Serum CEA level was influenced by age, present smoking history, sex, and abnormal findings in chest X ray. 3) Serum CEA level had no correlation with the history of amount of alcohol consumption or obesity. 4) Cutoff values of serum CEA in normal Korean adults were tabulated according to age, sex, and smoking history. Serum CEA level was influenced by age, sex, present smoking history and abnormal findings in chest X ray and cutoff values of serum CEA were tabulated according to age, sex, and smoking history.

  19. Simplifying CEA through Excel, VBA, and Subeq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Ryan

    2004-01-01

    Many people use compound equilibrium programs for very different reasons, varying from refrigerators to light bulbs to rockets. A commonly used equilibrium program is CEA. CEA can take various inputs such as pressure, temperature, and volume along with numerous reactants and run them through equilibrium equations to obtain valuable output information, including products formed and their relative amounts. A little over a year ago, Bonnie McBride created the program subeq with the goal to simplify the calling of CEA. Subeq was also designed to be called by other programs, including Excel, through the use of Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The largest advantage of using Excel is that it allows the user to input the information in a colorful and user-friendly environment while allowing VBA to run subeq, which is in the form of a FORTRAN DLL (Dynamic Link Library). Calling subeq in this form makes it much faster than if it were converted to VBA. Since subeq requires such large lists of reactant and product names, all of which can't be passed in as an array, subeq had to be changed to accept very long strings of reactants and products. To pass this string and adjust the transfer of input and output parameters, the subeq DLL had to be changed. One program that does this is Compaq Visual FORTRAN, which allows DLLs to be edited, debugged, and compiled. Compaq Visual FORTRAN uses FORTRAN 90/95, which has additional features to that of FORTRAN 77. My goals this summer include finishing up the excel spreadsheet of subeq, which I started last summer, and putting it on the Internet so that others can use it without having to download my spreadsheet. To finish up the spreadsheet I will need to work on debugging current options and problems. I will also work on making it as robust as possible, so that all errors that may arise will be clearly communicated to the user. New features will be added old ones will be changed as I receive comments from people using the spreadsheet

  20. On the Possibility of a Bridge between CBA and CEA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olai Hansen, Bodil; Hougaard, Jens Leth; Keiding, Hans

    In a recent work by Dolan and Edlin, it is concluded that no link can be established between cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA). However, the conclusion seems to depend rather heavily on what is understood by a link between CBA and CEA as well as on the exact meaning...

  1. CEA programme on gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Chapelot, Ph.; Gauthier, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Future nuclear energy systems studies conducted by the CEA aim at investigating and developing promising technologies for future reactors, fuels and fuel cycles, for nuclear power to play a major part in sustainable energy policies. Reactors and fuel cycles are considered as integral parts of a nuclear system to be optimised as a whole. Major goals assigned to future nuclear energy systems are the following: reinforced economic competitiveness with other electricity generation means, with a special emphasis on reducing the investment cost; enhanced reliability and safety, through an improved management of reactor operation in normal and abnormal plant conditions; minimum production of long lived radioactive waste; resource saving through an effective and flexible use of the available resources of fissile and fertile materials; enhanced resistance to proliferation risks. The three latter goals are essential for the sustainability of nuclear energy in the long term. Additional considerations such as the potentialities for other applications than electricity generation (co-generation, production of hydrogen, sea water desalination) take on an increasing importance. Sustainability goals call for fast neutron spectra (to transmute nuclear waste and to breed fertile fuel) and for recycling actinides from the spent fuel (plutonium and minor actinides). New applications and economic competitiveness call for high temperature technologies (850 deg C), that afford high conversion efficiencies and hence less radioactive waste production and discharged heat. These orientations call for breakthroughs beyond light water reactors. Therefore, as a result of a screening review of candidate technologies, the CEA has selected an innovative concept of high temperature gas cooled reactor with a fast neutron spectrum, robust refractory fuel, direct conversion with a gas turbine, and integrated on-site fuel cycle as a promising system for a sustainable energy development. This objective

  2. Dispersion of Radionuclides and Exposure Assessment in Urban Environments: A Joint CEA and LLNL Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, Lee [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gowardhan, Akshay [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lennox, Kristin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yu, Kristen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Armand, Patrick [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Paris (France); Duchenne, Christophe [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Paris (France); Mariotte, Frederic [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Paris (France); Pectorin, Xavier [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Paris (France)

    2014-12-19

    In the interest of promoting the international exchange of technical expertise, the US Department of Energy’s Office of Emergency Operations (NA-40) and the French Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA) requested that the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California host a joint table top exercise with experts in emergency management and atmospheric transport modeling. In this table top exercise, LLNL and CEA compared each other’s flow and dispersion models. The goal of the comparison is to facilitate the exchange of knowledge, capabilities, and practices, and to demonstrate the utility of modeling dispersal at different levels of computational fidelity. Two modeling approaches were examined, a regional scale modeling approach, appropriate for simple terrain and/or very large releases, and an urban scale modeling approach, appropriate for small releases in a city environment. This report is a summary of LLNL and CEA modeling efforts from this exercise. Two different types of LLNL and CEA models were employed in the analysis: urban-scale models (Aeolus CFD at LLNL/NARAC and Parallel- Micro-SWIFT-SPRAY, PMSS, at CEA) for analysis of a 5,000 Ci radiological release and Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Models (LODI at LLNL/NARAC and PSPRAY at CEA) for analysis of a much larger (500,000 Ci) regional radiological release. Two densely-populated urban locations were chosen: Chicago with its high-rise skyline and gridded street network and Paris with its more consistent, lower building height and complex unaligned street network. Each location was considered under early summer daytime and nighttime conditions. Different levels of fidelity were chosen for each scale: (1) lower fidelity mass-consistent diagnostic, intermediate fidelity Navier-Stokes RANS models, and higher fidelity Navier-Stokes LES for urban-scale analysis, and (2) lower-fidelity single

  3. DOE pursuing accelerated cleanup at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgman, T.

    1996-01-01

    The timing is right, and officials at Fernald are ready to initiate final cleanup actions-at an accelerated pace. open-quotes We have a viable, aggressive plan in place that will reduce the risks associated with the site by accelerating the cleanup schedule, and save a lot of time and money in the process,close quotes said Don Ofte, president of the Fernald Environmental Restoration management Corporation (FERMCO). Ofte is referring to the accelerated cleanup plan that the U.S. Department of Energy has approved to complete the remediation of Fernald in approximately 10 years-instead of 25-30 years-at a cost savings to taxpayers of almost $3 billion. This article describes the scenario at Fernald and politically which has lead to this decision

  4. Cost-effectiveness of a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based follow-up programme for colorectal cancer (the CEA Watch trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, C. J.; Wiggers, T.; Grossmann, I.; de Bock, G. H.; Vermeulen, K. M.

    Aim The study CEA Watch (Netherlands Trial Register 2182) has shown that an intensified follow-up schedule with more frequent carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) measurements but fewer outpatient visits detects more curable recurrences compared with the usual follow-up protocol in colorectal cancer (CRC)

  5. HARVESTING EMSP RESEARCH RESULTS FOR WASTE CLEANUP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Nielson, R. Bruce; Phillips, Ann Marie; Lebow, Scott

    2003-02-27

    The extent of environmental contamination created by the nuclear weapons legacy combined with expensive, ineffective waste cleanup strategies at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites prompted Congress to pass the FY96 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, which directed the DOE to: ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research, which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs'', ''develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and'' ''seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective.'' In response, the DOE initiated the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP)-a targeted, long-term research program intended to produce solutions to DOE's most pressing environmental problems. EMSP funds basic research to lower cleanup cost and reduce risk to workers, the public, and the environment; direct the nation's scientific infrastructure towards cleanup of contaminated waste sites; and bridge the gap between fundamental research and technology development activities. EMSP research projects are competitively awarded based on the project's scientific, merit coupled with relevance to addressing DOE site needs. This paper describes selected EMSP research projects with long, mid, and short-term deployment potential and discusses the impacts, focus, and results of the research. Results of EMSP research are intended to accelerate cleanup schedules, reduce cost or risk for current baselines, provide alternatives for contingency planning, or provide solutions to problems where no solutions exist.

  6. Contribution of the C.E.A. to standardization of nuclear plant equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumax, P.; Seran, R.

    1980-01-01

    In research and production laboratories working in the nuclear field standardization of equipments greatly improves the profits of the installation and the protection of individuals and goods. The standardization effort on technical equipments of shielding, handling, detection and safety (so called P.M.D.S.) initiated by the C.E.A. in 1967 is being carried out now within the Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (I.P.S.N.) by a technical Service specialized in protection and dosimetry (S.T.E.P.D.). Its purpose is to establish standardization documents for internal use and to take part in the work of official standardization organizations. The benefits of standardization are reviewed. The achievements of the various working groups common to C.E.A. centers are stated and the documents published or to be published are listed [fr

  7. Radioactivity and radioprotection: the every day life in a nuclear installation. Press tour at CEA/GRENOBLE 18 november 1999; Radioactivite et radioprotection: la vie quotidienne dans une installation nucleaire. Voyage de presse au Centre CEA/CADARACHE 18 novembre 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    In the framework of the public information, this paper gives a general information on the radioactivity and the radioprotection at the CEA/Cadarache center. A first part is devoted to a presentation of the radioactivity with definitions and radiation effects on the human being and the environment. An other part presents the radioprotection activities and regulations. The last part deals with specific activities of the CEA/Cadarache: the CASCAD installations for spent fuels storage, the LECA Laboratory for the Examination of Active Fuels and a dismantling installation for big irradiated objects. Historical aspects of the CEA/Cadarache are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  8. Radioactive Waste and Clean-up Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, G.

    2001-01-01

    The main objectives of the Radioactive Waste and Clean-up division of SCK-CEN are outlined. The division's programme consists of research, development and demonstration projects and aims to contribute to the objectives of Agenda 21 on sustainable development in the field of radioactive waste and rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated sites

  9. Flood Cleanup to Protect Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    During a flood cleanup, the indoor air quality in your home or office may appear to be the least of your problems. However, failure to remove contaminated materials and to reduce moisture and humidity can present serious long-term health risks.

  10. US nuclear cleanup shows signs of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renner, R.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's program for dealing with the radioactive and hazardous wastes at its former nuclear weapons production sites and at the national laboratories has been criticized for its expense and slow pace of cleanup. The largest environmental restoration and waste management program in the world faces formidable technical and scientific problems and these, according to numerous investigative committees and commissions, have been compounded by poor management, misuse of technology, and failure to appreciate the need for new basic scientific knowledge to solve many of the cleanup problems. In the past three years, DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM), often spurred by congressional action, has begun to trim costs and accomplish more. New measures have been introduced to improve contract efficiency, better utilize existing remediation technologies, renegotiate compliance agreements, and begin basic research. Environmental Management Assistant Undersecretary Alvin Alm, appointed in May 1996, is seeking to solidify these changes into an ambitious plan to clean up most of DOE's 130 sites by 2006. But there are widespread doubts that EM has the money, skill, and will to turn itself around. There are also concerns that, in the name of efficiency and economy, EM may be negotiating lower cleanup standards and postponing some difficult cleanup tasks. This article discusses these issues. 7 refs

  11. Assessment of synfuel spill cleanup options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, S.E.; Wakamiya, W.; English, C.J.; Strand, J.A.; Mahlum, D.D.

    1982-04-01

    Existing petroleum-spill cleanup technologies are reviewed and their limitations, should they be used to mitigate the effects of synfuels spills, are discussed. The six subsections of this report address the following program goals: synfuels production estimates to the year 2000; possible sources of synfuel spills and volumes of spilled fuel to the year 2000; hazards of synfuels spills; assessment of existing spill cleanup technologies for oil spills; assessment of cleanup technologies for synfuel spills; and disposal of residue from synfuel spill cleanup operations. The first goal of the program was to obtain the most current estimates on synfuel production. These estimates were then used to determine the amount of synfuels and synfuel products likely to be spilled, by location and by method of transportation. A review of existing toxicological studies and existing spill mitigation technologies was then completed to determine the potential impacts of synthetic fuel spills on the environment. Data are presented in the four appendixes on the following subjects: synfuel production estimates; acute toxicity of synfuel; acute toxicity of alcohols.

  12. Radioactive Waste and Clean-up: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, G.

    2000-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Radioactive Waste and Clean-up Division performs studies and develops strategies, techniques and technologies in the area of radioactive waste management, the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear installations and the remediation of radioactive-contaminated sites. These activities are performed in the context of our responsibility towards the safety of present and future generations and contribute to achieve intrageneration equity

  13. Effectiveness of cleanup criteria relative to an accidental nuclear release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Yuan, Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    In the event of an accidental nuclear release, the associated long-term radiological risks would result primarily from ground contamination pathways. Cleanup of the contaminated ground surfaces is a necessary step toward reducing the radiological risk to the general population. Ideally, the radiological risk decreases as the level of cleanup effort increases; however, as the cleanup criterion (i.e., the required contaminant concentration after cleanup) becomes more stringent, the cleanup effort may become prohibitively costly. This study examines several factors that are important in determining the effectiveness of the cleanup criteria for selected radionuclides: (a) annual individual dose commitment (mrem/yr), (b) total population environmental dose commitment (person-rem), and (c) total area (km 2 ) requiring cleanup following an accident. To effectively protect the general population, the benefits of cleanup should be weighed against the potentially large increase in cleanup area (and the associated costs) as the cleanup criterion becomes more stringent. The effectiveness of cleanup will vary, depending largely on site-specific parameters such as population density and agricultural productivity as well as on the amount and type of radionuclide released. Determination of an optimum cleanup criterion should account for all factors, including a comprehensive cost/benefit analysis

  14. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - Recovery Act Funded Cleanups, National Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer provides access to Recovery Act Funded Cleanup sites as part of the CIMC web service. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was signed into law...

  15. The organisation of criticality hazard prevention at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijuin, Dominique; Carros, Helene; Sevestre, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the organisation of criticality hazard prevention at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). This new organization has been experimented since the end of year 2000. During the first semester of year 2002, the CEA nuclear inspection team, who is in charge of the control function at the CEA general administration level, has performed an inquiry to check the effectiveness of the new organization. The conclusions of this inquiry are very positive; a few recommendations are now taken in to account to further improve the efficiency of this organization. (J.P.N.)

  16. CEA celebrates the jubilee of ZOE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loverini, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the saga of the first French nuclear reactor ZOE. As soon as 1939 Frederic Joliot had an intuition of the possibility of using fissioning nuclei to produce energy. 3 patents describing the concept of a nuclear reactor highlighting the role of natural uranium as fuel, heavy water as moderator, were registered. The only producer in the world of heavy water was a Norwegian firm, a fierce competition with Germany for the control of deuterium broke out. Eventually 185 Kg of heavy water were secretly convoyed in Great-britain. Because of the development of the war, the small scientist team in charge of the project has had to move from France to Great-britain then to Canada. At the end of the war, the 'Commissariat a l'energie atomique' (CEA) was created, its first aim was to design a nuclear reactor as soon as possible. In 1948 the first criticality of ZOE is reached, 6 years later than the team led by Enrico Fermi did in Chicago. In 1976 ZOE was decommissioned and is now a small museum dedicated to nuclear energy. (A.C.)

  17. CEA nuclear energy Directorate - Activity report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    After an overview of the activities of the Directorate at the international level, of its scientific activities, and of the consideration given to quality, and a presentation of the transverse program on advanced materials, this report proposes presentations of activities in different domains: future nuclear industrial systems (reactors of 4. generation, back-end of the future cycle, sustainable management of nuclear materials, fundamental scientific and technological research), optimization of the present industrial nuclear activity (reactors of 2. and 3. generation, front-end and back-end of the fuel cycle), the main tools for nuclear development (numerical simulation, the Jules Horowitz reactor), valorisation, economic support of Haute-Marne and Meuse territories (the Syndiese project), nuclear dismantling and decontamination (dismantling projects, projects and works in Fontenay-aux-Roses, Grenoble and Saclay, waste and material flow management, nuclear service facilities, transports). It also presents the activities of some specific CEA centres like Marcoule (R and D in fuel cycle), Cadarache (future energies) and Saclay (nuclear sciences and simulation of reactors and fuel cycle)

  18. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) dynamics in stomach cancer patients receiving cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasoedov, D.V.; Krupka, I.N.; V'yunitskaya, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    Radioimmunologic assays of blood serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level were conducted at major stages of treatment of gastric cancer by subtotal stomach resection and gastrectomy with preliminary cryotreatment and thawing of tumor. A short-term rise in CEA level occurred in 53.9 % of cases 3-4 days after combined therapy. A decrease in CEA concentration at discharge from hospital as compared with preoperative level and that registered 3-4 days after operation was observed in 50 and 75 % of cases of combined therapy, respectively, and 47.5 and 37.5 % of controls (surgery without cryotreatment). There was nocorrelation between cryotreatment and changes in CEA level in gastric ulcer patients

  19. Cleanup around an old waste site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergaast, G.; Moffett, D.; Lawrence, B.E.

    1988-01-01

    42,500 m 3 of contaminated soil were removed from off-site areas around an old, low-level radioactive waste site near Port Hope, Ontario. The cleanup was done by means of conventional excavation equipment to criteria developed by Eldorado specific to the land use around the company's waste management facility. These cleanup criteria were based on exposure analyses carried out for critical receptors in two different scenarios. The excavated soils, involving eight different landowners, were placed on the original burial area of the waste management facility. Measures were also undertaken to stabilize the soils brought on-site and to ensure that there would be no subsequent recontamination of the off-site areas

  20. The possible role of tumor antigen CA 15-3, CEA and ferritin in malignant and benign disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafija Serdarević

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Serum CA15-3 has been one of the most reliable tumor markers used in monitoring of breast cancer patients. To increase its sensitivity, the combined measurement of other tumor markers (CEA and ferritin with CA15-3 was investigated. The aim of this study was determination of CA 15-3, CEA and ferritin in female patients with breast cancer, lung cancer and mastitisMethods: 300 patients with carcinoma, hospitalized at Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Department for Oncology at the University Clinics Center of Sarajevo and 200 healthy subjects were compared.Results: In patients with breast cancer the mean value of tumor markers were CEA 155.61 ng/mL, CA 15-3 106.38 U/mL and ferritin 197.03 ng/mL. In patients with lung cancer CEA was 58.97 ng/ml, CA 15-3 40.62 U/mL and ferritin 544.16 ng/mL. Patients with mastitis had CEA 5.17 ng/mL, CA 15-3 112.67 U/mL and ferritin 174.92 ng/mL. The control group had values of tumor markers CEA 1.62 ng/mL, CA 15-3 11.72 U/mL and ferritin 85.35 ng/mL. We found good correlation between CA 15-3 and CEA correlation coeffi cient was r = 0.750. There was a low correlation between CA 15-3 and ferritin with correlation coeffi cient r = 0.274.Conclusions: The CA 15-3 and CEA are useful markers in patients with confi rmed diagnosis of breast and lung cancers. The ferritin concentration has not increased in patients with breast cancer but it increased inlung patients. The future study has to make investigations of tumor markers and ferritin in different stage of breast cancer.

  1. Prioritization of environmental cleanup problems at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassbender, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    New technologies and scientific research are needed to clean up the Hanford Site. However, there is insufficient funding to develop every technology that is identified or to undertake every scientific research project that is proposed. Thus, the Department of Energy (DOE) must focus its resources on science and technology (S ampersand T) that will have the most significant impacts on the overall cleanup effort. Hanford has recognized the importance of identifying and prioritizing its most critical problems and the most promising solutions to them. Hanford cleanup will require numerous decisions about technology development and implementation, which will be complicated because there are substantial uncertainties about the risks and the costs of new technologies. Further, the choice of a specific technology for a specific application must be evaluated with respect to multiple (and often conflicting) objectives (e.g., risk reduction, increasing effectiveness, cost reduction, increasing public acceptability, regulatory compliance). This paper provides an overview of the decision analysis methodology that was used to prioritize S ampersand T needs for Hanford cleanup

  2. Accelerating cleanup. Paths to closure Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.

    1998-01-01

    This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE's national strategy, the Richland Operations Office's Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established

  3. Cleanup standards and pathways analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    Remediation of a radioactively contaminated site requires that certain regulatory criteria be met before the site can be released for unrestricted future use. Since the ultimate objective of remediation is to protect the public health and safety, residual radioactivity levels remaining at a site after cleanup must be below certain preset limits or meet acceptable dose or risk criteria. Release of a decontaminated site requires proof that the radiological data obtained from the site meet the regulatory criteria for such a release. Typically release criteria consist of a composite of acceptance limits that depend on the radionuclides, the media in which they are present, and federal and local regulations. In recent years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a pathways analysis model to determine site-specific soil activity concentration guidelines for radionuclides that do not have established generic acceptance limits. The DOE pathways analysis computer code (developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the DOE) is called RESRAD (Gilbert et al. 1989). Similar efforts have been initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop and use dose-related criteria based on genetic pathways analyses rather than simplistic numerical limits on residual radioactivity. The focus of this paper is radionuclide contaminated soil. Cleanup standards are reviewed, pathways analysis methods are described, and an example is presented in which RESRAD was used to derive cleanup guidelines

  4. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as tumor marker in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunnet, M; Sorensen, J B

    2012-05-01

    The use of CEA as a prognostic and predictive marker in patients with lung cancer is widely debated. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results from studies made on this subject. Using the search words "CEA", "tumor markers in lung cancer", "prognostic significance", "diagnostic significance" and "predictive significance", a search was carried out on PubMed. Exclusion criteria was articles never published in English, articles before 1981 and articles evaluating tumor markers in lung cancer not involving CEA. Initially 217 articles were found, and 34 were left after selecting those relevant for the present study. Four of these included both Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) patients, and 31 dealt solely with NSCLC patients. Regarding SCLC no studies showed that serum level of CEA was a prognostic marker for overall survival (OS). The use of CEA serum level as a prognostic marker in NSCLC was investigated in 23 studies and the use of CEA plasma level in two. In 18 (17 serum, 1 plasma) of these studies CEA was found to be a useful prognostic marker for either OS, recurrence after surgery or/and progression free survival (PFS) in NSCLC patients. Interestingly, an overweight of low stage (stage I-II) disease and adenocarcinoma (AC) patients were observed in this group. The remaining 7 studies (6 serum, 1 plasma) contained an overweight of patients with squamous carcinoma (SQ). One study found evidence for that a tumor marker index (TMI), based on preoperative CEA and CYFRA21-1 serum levels, is useful as a prognostic marker for OS in NSCLC. Six studies evaluated the use of CEA as a predictive marker for risk of recurrence and risk of death in NSCLC patients. Four of these studies found, that CEA was useful as a predictive marker for risk of recurrence and risk of death measured over time. No studies found CEA levels useful as a diagnostic marker for lung cancer. With regard to NSCLC the level of CEA measured in tumor tissue in

  5. Demodicidosis en pacientes con rosácea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edhizon Trejo Mucha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la frecuencia de demodicidosis y sus características clínicas en pacientes con rosácea. Materiales y métodos: Estudio de casos y controles en 42 pacientes con rosácea y 42 controles para describir la presencia y densidad de D. folliculorum. El estudio se realizó en el Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia entre marzo y setiembre del 2004, utilizándose la técnica de Tello. Resultados: Demodex folliculorum fue encontrado en los 42 pacientes con rosácea (100% y en 13 (31,0% del grupo control, (p= 0,000. La exposición a gatos, la crianza de roedores y cerdos, la seborrea y el uso de corticoides tópicos fueron mas frecuentes en los pacientes con rosácea. Conclusiones: La presencia de Demodex folliculorum fue más frecuente en los pacientes con rosácea. (Rev Med Hered 2007;18:15-21.

  6. Fusion technology. Annual report of the. Association Cea/EURATOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magaud, P.; Le Vagueres, F.

    1996-01-01

    In 1996, the French EURATOM-CEA Association made significant contributions to the European technology programme. This work is compiled in this report as follows: the ITER CEA activities and related developments are described in the first section; blankets and material developments for DEMO, long term safety studies are summarised in the second part; the Underlying Technology activities are compiled in the third part of this report. In each section, the tasks are sorted out to respect the European presentation. For an easy reading, appendix 4 gives the list of tasks in alphabetical order with a page reference list. The CEA is in charge of the French Technology programme. Three specific organizational directions of the CEA, located on four sites (see appendix 5) are involves in this programme: Advanced Technologies Direction (DTA), for Material task; Nuclear Reactors Direction (DRN), for Blanket design, Neutronic problems, Safety tasks; Physical Sciences Direction (DSM) uses the competence of the Tore Supra team in the Magnet design and plasma Facing Component field. The CEA programme is completed by collaborations with Technicatome, COMEX-Nucleaire and Ecole Polytechnique. The breakdown of the programme by Directions is presented in figure 1. The allocation of tasks is given in appendix 2 and in appendix 3, the related publications. (author)

  7. Moderator clean-up system in a heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasada, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the fluctuation of the poison concentration in heavy water moderator due to a heavy water clean-up system. Constitution: To a calandria tank filled with heavy water as poison-containing moderators, are connected both end of a pipeway through which heavy water flows and to which a clean-up device is provided. Strongly basic resin is filled within the clean-up device and a cooler is disposed to a pipeway at the upstream of the clean-up device. In this structure, the temperature of heavy water at the inlet of the clean-up device at a constant level between the temperature at the exit of the cooler and the lowest temperature for the moderator to thereby decrease the fluctuation in the poison concentration in the heavy water moderator due to the heavy water clean-up device. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. 2nd CEAS Specialist Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Mulder, Bob; Choukroun, Daniel; Kampen, Erik-Jan; Visser, Coen; Looye, Gertjan

    2013-01-01

    Following the successful 1st CEAS (Council of European Aerospace Societies) Specialist Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control (CEAS EuroGNC) held in Munich, Germany in 2011, Delft University of Technology happily accepted the invitation of organizing the 2nd  CEAS EuroGNC in Delft, The Netherlands in 2013. The goal of the conference is to promote new advances in aerospace GNC theory and technologies for enhancing safety, survivability, efficiency, performance, autonomy and intelligence of aerospace systems using on-board sensing, computing and systems. A great push for new developments in GNC are the ever higher safety and sustainability requirements in aviation. Impressive progress was made in new research fields such as sensor and actuator fault detection and diagnosis, reconfigurable and fault tolerant flight control, online safe flight envelop prediction and protection, online global aerodynamic model identification, online global optimization and flight upset recovery. All of these challenges de...

  9. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as tumor marker in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mie Grunnet; Sorensen, J B

    2012-01-01

    The use of CEA as a prognostic and predictive marker in patients with lung cancer is widely debated. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results from studies made on this subject. Using the search words "CEA", "tumor markers in lung cancer", "prognostic significance", "diagnostic...... significance" and "predictive significance", a search was carried out on PubMed. Exclusion criteria was articles never published in English, articles before 1981 and articles evaluating tumor markers in lung cancer not involving CEA. Initially 217 articles were found, and 34 were left after selecting those....... Interestingly, an overweight of low stage (stage I-II) disease and adenocarcinoma (AC) patients were observed in this group. The remaining 7 studies (6 serum, 1 plasma) contained an overweight of patients with squamous carcinoma (SQ). One study found evidence for that a tumor marker index (TMI), based...

  10. Shoreline clean-up methods : biological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoura, S.T. [Oil Spill Response Limited, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    The cleanup of oil spills in shoreline environments is a challenging issue worldwide. Oil spills receive public and media attention, particularly in the event of a coastal impact. It is important to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of cleanup methods when defining the level of effort and consequences that are appropriate to remove or treat different types of oil on different shoreline substrates. Of the many studies that have compared different mechanical, chemical and biological treatments for their effectiveness on various types of oil, biological techniques have received the most attention. For that reason, this paper evaluated the effectiveness and effects of shoreline cleanup methods using biological techniques. It summarized data from field experiments and oil spill incidents, including the Exxon Valdez, Sea Empress, Prestige, Grand Eagle, Nakhodka, Guanabara Bay and various Gulf war oil spills. Five major shoreline types were examined, notably rocky intertidal, cobble/pebble/gravel, sand/mud, saltmarsh, and mangrove/sea-grass. The biological techniques that were addressed were nutrient enrichment, hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria, vegetable oil biosolvents, plants, surf washing, oil-particle interactions and natural attenuation. The study considered the oil type, volume and fate of stranded oil, location of coastal materials, extent of pollution and the impact of biological techniques. The main factors that affect biodegradation of hydrocarbons are the volume, chemical composition and weathering state of the petroleum product as well as the temperature, oxygen availability of nutrients, water salinity, pH level, water content, and microorganisms in the shoreline environment. The interaction of these factors also affect the biodegradation of oil. It was concluded that understanding the fate of stranded oil can help in the development of techniques that improve the weathering and degradation of oil on complex shoreline substrates. 39 refs.

  11. Preplanning of early cleanup. Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A pre-study 'Pre-planning of early cleanup after fallout of radioactive material' made by Studvik EcoSafe has pointed out the need and request for pre-planning of actions. Based on the pre-study this project was started with the goal to work out guidelines and checklists. Because of the common interest between the Nordic countries NKS is the organization responsible for the project. The results of the project will be a document pointing out what can be planned in advance, including guidelines and checklists, regarding early cleanup actions after a nuclear plant accident in or in the vicinity of the Nordic countries. In this work 'early' means the three first weeks after an accident. The project only deals with questions concerning external radiation. The document shall be usable by persons in charge of planning or decision makers on the appropriate level of organization for each country. The document shall principally be aimed towards persons without professional competence in the field of radiology. The result will be presented for a limited number of generalized environments and fallout situations: urban/suburban/rural (concentrating on urban/suburban); regional differences (in for example house types and constructing material); dry or wet deposition. Five housing environments, ten cleanup actions and wet or dry deposition are treated. For 66 combinations calculations are made and the results are documented as data sheets, each describing the beneficial effects, costs and disadvantages of application of a feasible method for cleaning in the early phase of a specific type of surface in one of five different urban or suburban environments. This data forms the foundation for the recommendations on guidelines, which are the ultimate goal of the EKO-5 project. (EG)

  12. Oil spill cleanup method and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayes, F.M.

    1980-06-24

    A method for removing oil from the surface of water where an oil spill has occurred, particularly in obstructed or shallow areas, which comprises partially surrounding a hovercraft with a floating oil-collecting barrier, there being no barrier at the front of the hovercraft, moving the oil-barrier-surrounded-hovercraft into oil contaminated water, and collecting oil gathered within the barrier behind the hovercraft through a suction line which carries the oil to a storage tank aboard the hovercraft. The invention also embodies the hovercraft adapted to effect an oil spill cleanup.

  13. The CEA-industrie Group. Report for 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    From the end of 1983, the whole affiliates and participations of CEA are hept by CEA-industry. The group activity is principally in the nuclear field. Cogema and the whole fuel cycle, construction, maintenance, improvement of nuclear power plants, research reactors and naval propulsion boilers and the sector Power plants and nuclear services (Framatome, Technicatome, Intercontrole, Stmi, principally). A non-nuclear sector comes from new techniques or activities developed for the nuclear needs: computer science (CISI), biomedical field (ORIS-industrie), different activities such as ultrafiltration or robotics-productics [fr

  14. The opening of the CEA to the general public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deloche, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The relationships between science and society have evolved considerably over the past years, just like the perception of the nuclear industry in the French public opinion. Recent psychosociological surveys show that only half of the French population is familiar with the CEA and that the public would like to obtain new elements of judgment in order to be able to develop a direct appreciation of the activities of a research organization such as the Atomic Energy Commission. It is essential to meet the public's expectations, to keep it properly informed of the CEA's research activities, and to help it understand the relevance of the results obtained and the solutions offered to decision-makers, i.e. industrialists and public authorities. One way to answer the public opinion's questions and to meet its expectations is to allow a rowing number of visitors to see who we are, what we study in our laboratories, and how we work to contribute to scientific progress and to the diffusion of technology, in a manner that is useful to society as a whole. This describes the spirit and the objective that governed the very idea and elaboration of the program entitled 'Opening of the CEA to the general public'. This operation consists not only in having communication specialists guide visitors throughout the facilities and equipment of the CEA, but also in encouraging researchers and groups of visitors to meet in the laboratories. A 'CEA - communication' network is under construction. It already has nearly 600 members. Communication is considered to be a real calling that falls within the scope of the CEA's strategy, and the work accomplished in this respect is recognized to the same extent as research. To this end, a charter for the CEA - communication network will be signed by every contributor and manager. A training scheme focused on public speaking and scientific vulgarization was initiated. 50 members of the network have already been trained, and 250 will be in 1999

  15. Coolant cleanup system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Araki, Hidefumi.

    1993-01-01

    The cleanup system of the present invention removes impurity ions and floating materials accumulated in a reactor during evaporation of coolants in the nuclear reactor. That is, coolants pass pipelines from a pressure vessel using pressure difference between a high pressure in the pressure vessel and a low pressure at the upstream of a condensate filtration/desalting device of a condensate/feed water system as a driving source, during which cations and floating materials are removed in a high temperature filtration/desalting device and coolants flow into the condensate/feedwater system. Impurities containing anions are removed here by the condensates filtration/desalting device. Then, they return to the pressure vessel while pressurized and heated by a condensate pump, a feed water pump and a feed water heater. At least pumps, a heat exchanger for heating, a filtration/desalting device for removing anions and pipelines connecting them used exclusively for the coolant cleanup system are no more necessary. (I.S.)

  16. Complete solid state lighting (SSL) line at CEA LETI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, I. C.; Ferret, P.; Dussaigne, A.; Bougerol, C.; Salomon, D.; Chen, X. J.; Charles, M.; Tchoulfian, P.; Gasse, A.; Lagrange, A.; Consonni, M.; Bono, H.; Levy, F.; Desieres, Y.; Aitmani, A.; Makram-Matta, S.; Bialic, E.; Gorrochategui, P.; Mendizabal, L.

    2014-09-01

    With a long experience in optoelectronics, CEA-LETI has focused on Light Emitting Diode (LED) lighting since 2006. Today, all the technical challenges in the implementation of GaN LED based solid state lighting (SSL) are addressed at CEA-LETI who is now an RandD player throughout the entire value chain of LED lighting. The SSL Line at CEA-LETI first deals with the simulation of the active structures and LED devices. Then the growth is addressed in particular 2D growth on 200 mm silicon substrates. Then, technological steps are developed for the fabrication of LED dies with innovative architectures. For instance, Versatile LED Array Devices are currently being developed with a dedicated μLED technology. The objective in this case is to achieve monolithical LED arrays reported and interconnected through a silicon submount. In addition to the required bonding and 3D integration technologies, new solutions for LED chip packaging, thermal management of LED lamps and luminaires are also addressed. LETI is also active in Smart Lighting concepts which offer the possibility of new application fields for SSL technologies. An example is the recent development at CEA LETI of Visible Light Communication Technology also called LiFi. With this technology, we demonstrated a transmission rate up to 10 Mb/s and real time HD-Video transmission.

  17. Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in colorectal cancer follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer follow-up aims to detect recurrent disease as soon as possible, since earlier detection of recurrent disease is associated with greater chances for cure. A part of follow-up is the measurement of Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in the blood of the patient. This tumor marker is

  18. Foreword and introductory comments to CEA annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This article is a foreword to the annual report of the Commisariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and summarises the main achievements of the research teams such as the commissioning of the electron-positron collision ring (LEP), the fuel reprocessing plant at The Hague, the PROTEINE 2000 programme, the laser enrichment programme and advances in microelectronics. (author)

  19. CEA data and methods for control rod calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatores, M.

    1988-01-01

    Methods and data used at CEA for LMFBR control rod calculations are presented. The performances of both the design methods and of the refined methods for the SUPER PHENIX start-up experiments are given. New developments for future core design and operation are also reported, together with the role of integral experiments to validate them. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs, 11 tabs

  20. Criticality accident studies and methodology implemented at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbry, Francis; Fouillaud, Patrick; Reverdy, Ludovic; Mijuin, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Based on the studies and results of experimental programs performed since 1967 in the CRAC, then SILENE facilities, the CEA has devised a methodology for criticality accident studies. This methodology integrates all the main focuses of its approach, from criticality accident phenomenology to emergency planning and response, and thus includes aspects such as criticality alarm detector triggering, airborne releases, and irradiation risk assessment. (author)

  1. Fast reactor physics at CEA: present studies and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, P.

    1980-09-01

    This paper aims at giving a general survey of the fast reactor core physics and shielding studies wich are in progress at CEA (1979-1983) in order to solve the neutronic problems related to: - core design optimization, - reactor operation and fuel management, - safety, for the development of fast commercial breeders in France after the SUPER-PHENIX 1 construction is achieved

  2. How Packaging Fleet Renewal Fits French CEA Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumesnil, J.; Malvache, P.; Hugon, F.C.; Sollacaro, M.

    2006-01-01

    CEA's (French Atomic Energy Agency) packaging fleet is dedicated to transportation of test irradiated fuels, of research reactors fuels, of navy propulsion fuels, and of waste coming from and to nuclear plants or facilities. This fleet encompasses more than 30 types of casks ranging from 5 to 30 tons, with either recent designs or other dating back to the seventies. A study has been launched in order to perform a global analysis of the life expectancy of the existing CEA and COGEMA Logistics cask fleets with respect to a 2015 target, in order to anticipate its renewal, while limiting the number of type of cask. Key elements like periodical evolutions of design and transport regulations, lessons learnt of existing casks (design, approval and extensions, operational feedback, maintenance and dismantling) are taken into account in order to ensure compliance and availability of the fleet. Moreover, from design to cask delivery, including regulatory tests, safety analysis report/ CoC, and manufacturing, 3 to 5 years is needed. Therefore cask development should be taken into account earlier of invest and research's programs. The paper will address the current life expectancy study of CEA and COGEMA Logistics packaging fleet, based on lessons learnt and regulation evolution and on general R and D plans by user facilities. It will show how a comprehensive optimized fleet is made available to CEA and other customers. Such a fleet combines optimized investment and uses, thus entailing synergies for well-mastered costs of transports. (authors)

  3. Serum CEA (carcino-embryonic antigen) monitoring after surgery for cancer of the rectum and colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginster, J.Y.; Desaive, C.; Collette, J.; Zangerle, P.F.; Denis, D.; Franchimont, P.

    1984-01-01

    Fifty four patients, operated for colorectal cancer have been followed up for 2 to 100 months after surgery by carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) determinations and classical, clinical, biological, radiological, echographical, isotopical and tomoscanninvestigations. Each new serum sample has been assayed for CEA with previously collected samples within the same patients. This repetition of CEA on the same samples allows to check the good reproducibility of CEA radioimmunoassay (variation coefficient between assay is less than 10%) and to get a complete profile of CEA level evaluation within the same assay. There is a good correlation between clinical evolution and CEA levels. In 42 patients, CEA levels remained or became normal ( 20 ng ml) at the same time or before clinical and/or paraclinical evidences for metastases or local recurrence. These results showed CEA assay in a quantitative parameter to assess the follow-up of colorectal cancer complementary to clinical, biological, radiological, echographical and isotopical criterias [fr

  4. Architecture synthesis basis for the Hanford Cleanup system: First issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.J.

    1994-06-01

    This document describes a set of candidate alternatives proposed to accomplish the Hanford Cleanup system functions defined in a previous work. Development of alternatives is part of a sequence of system engineering activities which lead to definition of all the products which, when completed, accomplish the cleanup mission. The alternative set is developed to functional level four or higher depending on need

  5. Review of State Soil Cleanup Levels for Dioxin (December 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This final report summarizes a survey of state soil cleanup levels for dioxin and characterizes the science underlying these values. The objective of this project was to summarize existing state cleanup levels for dioxin in soil, together with their scientific bases where availa...

  6. Design and operational experience with a portable tritium cleanup system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J.L.; Wilson, S.W.; Garcia, F.

    1991-06-01

    We built a portable tritium cleanup system to scavenge tritium from contaminated gases in any tritium-containing system in the LLNL Tritium Facility. The cleanup system uses standard catalytic oxidation of tritium to water followed by water removal with a molecular sieve dryer. The cleanup unit, complete with instrumentation, is contained in a portable cart that is rolled into place and connected to the apparatus to be cleaned. The cleanup systems is effective, low-tech, simple, and reliable. The nominal flow rate of the system is 30 liters/minute, and the decontamination factor is > 1000. In this paper we will show design information on our portable cleanup system, and will discuss our operational experience with it over the past several years

  7. Radioactive Waste and Clean-up: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, G.

    2007-01-01

    The primary mission of the Radioactive Waste and Clean-up division is to propose, to develop and to evaluate solutions for a safe, acceptable and sustainable management of radioactive waste. The Radioactive Waste and Clean-up division programme consists in research, studies, development and demonstration aiming to realise the objective of Agenda 21 on sustainable development in the field of radioactive waste and rehabilitation on radioactively contaminated sites. Indeed, it participates in the realisation of an objective which is to ensure that radioactive wastes are safely managed, transported, stored and disposed of, with a view to protecting human health and the environment, within a wider framework of an interactive and integrated approach to radioactive waste management and safety. We believe that nuclear energy will be necessary for the sustainable development of mankind in the 21st century, but we well understand that it would not be maintained if it is not proven that within benefits of nuclear energy a better protection of the environment is included. Although the current waste management practices are both technically and from the environmental point of view adequate, efforts in relation of future power production and waste management technologies should be put on waste minimisation. Therefore, the new and innovative reactors, fuel cycle and waste management processes and installations should be designed so that the waste generation can be kept in minimum. In addition to the design, the installations should be operated so as to create less waste; consideration should be given e.g. to keeping water chemistry clean and other quality factors. SCK-CEN in general and the Radioactive Waste and Clean-up division in particular are present in international groups preparing the development of innovative nuclear reactors, as Generation 4 and INPRO. Because performance assessments are often black boxes for the public, demonstration is needed for the acceptation of

  8. Coolant clean-up apparatus for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonekawa, Yasumasa; Akita, Minoru; Moritani, Kenji.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the occurrence of heat fatigue crackings due to the temperature difference between cleaned water and feed water at the portion on the pipeway where the two fluids are joined. Constitution: In the coolant clean-up system of a BWR type reactor, coolants are taken out from the side of the recycling system pump cooled by way of a regenerative heat exchanger and a non-regenerative heat exchanger and then flow into a filtering desalter for purification. Then, the purified water is joined with the feed water and returned to the inside of the reactor. Coolants for the auxiliary equipment cooler are recycled through non-regenerative heat exchanger and the flow control valve for the coolants is adjusted such that the temperature for the cleaned water accords with that of the feed water, whereby the temperature of the purified water is controlled to eliminate the temperature difference with the feed water. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Rocky Flats cleanup receives new deadline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Rocky Flats nuclear weapon plant near Denver narrowly missed a court-ordered shutdown of virtually all cleanup activities when it failed to meet an Aug. 22 deadline for a state permit to store mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes on site. US District Court Judge Lewis Babcock granted a 90-day stay of contempt charges against the US Dept. of Energy, but left open the possibility of civil penalties under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. DOE's problems stem from a lawsuit the Sierra Club won two years ago in which Babcock gave Rocky Flats until Aug. 22 to obtain a RCRA permit or interim status from Colorado to store 600 cu yd of mixed wastes. If DOE failed to do so, the court said it could not generate further hazardous wastes at the site

  10. Helping with the clean-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peelle, E.

    1990-01-01

    Successes in public involvement efforts for nuclear waste management are so few that they deserve careful documentation and analysis. This paper chronicles the goals, process, problems and outcomes of one such success, the Northwest Defense Waste Citizens Forum (CF), created by the DOE-Richland manager in 1986 to advise DOE on its plans for nuclear waste disposal and cleanup of the Hanford site n eastern Washington state. In the evolving, often-controversial, highly-visible area of agency-public interactions, citizen task forces (TFs) have been shown to be useful in developing public policy at the local level. Making them work at the state level is more problematic. This case shows that a diverse, two-state citizen group can make significant contributions to complex EIS evaluations with heavy technical components. The CFs principal contribution to public policy was communication of its findings to business and professional groups, to area political representatives and state agencies, thereby laying the ground work for refocusing the Northwest upon the need for action on DW cleanup at Hanford. In going well beyond NEPA requirements for public involvement in agency decision making, DOE-Richland demonstrated innovative ways of dealing with the difficult issues of public confidence and public trust by means of agency openness, responsiveness to citizen needs for information, and good faith two-way communication. The success of this pro-active DOE initiative was due to many factors including selecting the right issue (existing wastes), structuring the CF at a broad, regional level, and intensive implementation of trust-building strategies

  11. Industrial irradiation. Saclay, Grenoble, Cadarache: three great operation centres for the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolo, J.M.; Bornes, F.; Siadous, R.; Fontenille, J.; Ramiere, R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives an inventory of the equipments and installations available in the Saclay, Grenoble and Cadarache CEA centres (France) and devoted to industrial irradiations. These equipments are used for processes adjustments, nuclear qualification of systems or components, or for the study of the behaviour of experiments in extreme conditions. Industrial irradiation is commonly used for the radio-sterilization of surgery and medical materials and bio-materials, for the manufacturing of long-life strong reticulated and solvent-resistant plastics from polyethylene, for the sterilization of food products, for the long-time qualification of materials (metals, polymers..) and components for nuclear applications etc. The CEA provides irradiation equipments to industrialists, together with a high level technical and scientific support for the choice of the proper equipment, the determination of test conditions, the dosimetric follow up and the interpretation of results. The technical characteristics and performances of these equipments are briefly summarized for each laboratory and center. Contact addresses are given too. (J.S.)

  12. Historical Waste Retrieval and Clean-up Operations at Nuclear facility no.56, at the Cadarache Nuclear Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santucci, C.

    2008-01-01

    Among the different activities of the CEA research centre in Cadarache, located in the south of France, one of the most important involves cleaning, cleansing dismantling, decommissioning, and recovery of legacy wastes. This presentation will give an overview of the waste retrieval project from the historical interim storage facility called INB 56. The project is divided into three different sub-projects: the historical unpacked waste retrieval, the historical canister retrieval and the draining and clean-up of the spent fuel pools. All the described operations are conducted in accordance with the ALARA principle and the optimization of the waste categorization. The overall project, including the complete clean-up of the facility and its de-licensing, is due to end by 2020. The aim of this document is to outline the general ongoing historical waste retrieval operations and future projects on the INB 56 at the Cadarache research centre. In the final analysis, it can be seen that most of the waste is to be sent to the new CEDRA facility. Nevertheless one major goal of this project is to optimize the waste categorization and therefore to send the canisters to the ANDRA LLW site whenever possible. Two means will allow us to reach this goal: - The sorting out of un-packed waste in order to constitute a LLW canister - A wide range of measurements (gamma spectrometry, neutron measurement, tomography) in order to assess the exact nature of the contents in the historical canisters. Taking waste treatment and conditioning into account well in advance is a factor of prime importance that must be managed early in the elaboration of the decommissioning scenario. Precise knowledge of the physical and radiological inventories is of the utmost importance in defining the best waste pathway. Overall operations on the facility are due to end by 2020 including complete clean-up of the facility and its de-licensing

  13. Coolant clean-up system in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuburaya, Hirobumi; Akita, Minoru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Okura, Minoru; Tsuji, Akio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure a sufficient urging pressure at the inlet of a coolant clean-up system pump in a nuclear reactor and eliminate radioactive contaminations to the pump. Constitution: Coolant clean-up system (CUW) pump in a nuclear reactor is disposed to the downstream of a filtration desalter and, for compensating the insufficiency of the urging pressure at the pump inlet, the reactor water intake port to the clean-up system is disposed to the downstream of the after-heat removing pump and the heat exchanger. By compensating the net positive suction head (NPSH) of the clean-up system from the residual heat removing system, the problems of insufficient NPSH for the CUW pump upon reactor shut-down can be dissolved and, accordingly, the reactor clean-up system can be arranged in the order of the heat exchanger, clean-up device and pump. Thus, the CUW pump acts on reactor water after cleaned-up in the clean-up device to reduce the radioactivity contamination to the pump. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Tritium research laboratory cleanup and transition project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.J.

    1997-02-01

    This Tritium Research Laboratory Cleanup and Transition Project Final Report provides a high-level summary of this project's multidimensional accomplishments. Throughout this report references are provided for in-depth information concerning the various topical areas. Project related records also offer solutions to many of the technical and or administrative challenges that such a cleanup effort requires. These documents and the experience obtained during this effort are valuable resources to the DOE, which has more than 1200 other process contaminated facilities awaiting cleanup and reapplication or demolition

  15. Overview of CEA research in the field of radionuclides migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Trotignon, L.; Tevissen, E.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a synthetic status of the researches conducted within the Nuclear Energy Division (CEA/DEN) in the field of radionuclides migration in three specific areas which have been chosen for their representativeness and potential impact: the migration of RN in PWR reactors, the migration of RN from a deep geological repository and the migration processes in the surface environments. In addition, some status is given about more generic research which is conducted in the field of RN speciation in the aqueous phase and at the interfaces and regarding chemistry / transport couplings. Additional information about the human and technical means involved in these fields of research in CEA/DEN is finally given in the Appendix. (authors)

  16. Annual report of the Association EURATOM/Cea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magaud, Ph.; Le Vagueres, F.

    2002-01-01

    This annual report presents research activities, which have been performed in 2002 by the French EURATOM-Cea association in the frame of the European technology program. The first section describes EFDA (European fusion development agreement) activities and related developments carried out by the association. The second one is dedicated to the underlying technology program and finally the third one presents the inertial confinement fusion activities. In each section the tasks are sorted out according to the EFDA main fields: physics (heating and current drive, remote participation, diagnostics), vessel/in-vessel (vessel/blanket, plasma facing components, remote handling), magnet, tritium breeding and materials (water cooled lithium lead blanket, helium cooled pebble bed blanket, helium cooled lithium lead blanket, reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, advanced materials, neutron source, fuel cycle), safety and environment, system studies (power plant conceptual studies, socio-economic studies) and JET technology activities. The EURATOM-Cea association is involved in all these studies

  17. Annual report of the Association EURATOM/Cea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaud, Ph.; Le Vagueres, F

    2002-07-01

    This annual report presents research activities, which have been performed in 2002 by the French EURATOM-Cea association in the frame of the European technology program. The first section describes EFDA (European fusion development agreement) activities and related developments carried out by the association. The second one is dedicated to the underlying technology program and finally the third one presents the inertial confinement fusion activities. In each section the tasks are sorted out according to the EFDA main fields: physics (heating and current drive, remote participation, diagnostics), vessel/in-vessel (vessel/blanket, plasma facing components, remote handling), magnet, tritium breeding and materials (water cooled lithium lead blanket, helium cooled pebble bed blanket, helium cooled lithium lead blanket, reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, advanced materials, neutron source, fuel cycle), safety and environment, system studies (power plant conceptual studies, socio-economic studies) and JET technology activities. The EURATOM-Cea association is involved in all these studies.

  18. R and D on Transmutation at CEA: Recent Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royet, V.; Delahaye, T.; Lebreton, F.; Picart, S.; Caisso, M.; Gauthe, A.; Ode, D.; Tronche, E.; Bayle, J.P; Warin, D.; Bejaoui, S.; Delage, F.

    2015-01-01

    In the field of minor actinide transmutation in future Generation IV SFR reactor, CEA investigates in priority the recycling of Americium (Am) in the radial blankets located in the outer core area (AmBB: Americium Bearing Blankets). This paper gives an overview of the recent outcomes of the R and D programme carried out at CEA in the different fields of research: from powder elaboration to experimental irradiation. Concerning the powder elaboration, several batches have been produced by the oxalic co-conversion route as well as by the Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletizing. Different tests have been then performed for the fabrication of pellets according to the current specifications of AmBB. For these two processes, different additional developments of innovative technologies have been achieved well adapted with the processes constraints and hot cell operating. Information on irradiation programmes (MARIOS in HFR and ongoing DIAMINO in Osiris) are presented. The next steps of the programme will then be tackled. (authors)

  19. CEA A BIOCHEMICAL MARKER FOR DIAGNOSIS AND PROGNOSIS OF GASTROINTESTINAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathibha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Serum tumor markers (TM are widely used for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment of cancer. Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA is one of the most widely investigated tumor markers in gastrointestinal (GI cancers. Estimation of circulating tumor markers is a non- invasive quantitative method. Serum levels of CEA were studied for diagnosis and prognosis of gastrointestinal malignancies. 140 subjects were undertaken out of which 35 normal and remaining 105 were GI cancer patients. Serum levels of CEA were analyzed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. Result of serum CEA levels of the GI cancer patients and normal subjects were analyzed statistically. It was observed that there was significant increase in (P <0.01 in CEA levels of oesophagus, stomach and colon cancer patients as compared to normal subjects. The levels of CEA decreased significantly after the surgery but the decrease in levels of CEA was not up to the levels as normal control subjects.

  20. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster dsplays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume II covers papers presented at sessions 5 and 6 on system for the production of synthesis gas, and on system for the production of power. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  1. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume I covers information presented at sessions 1 through 4 on systems for the production of Co-products and industrial fuel gas, environmental projects, and components and materials. Individual papers have been processed for the Energy Data Base.

  2. RELAP4/MOD-5-CEA pump coastdown experiment simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, R.C.; Freitas, R.L.

    1988-07-01

    Since is important the theoretical-experimental comparison to evaluate the computer codes, these paper presents the simulation with RELAP4/MOD5 Code of a loss of power energy in the pump of the ''Circuito Experimental de Agua-CEA''. From the results attained, the existing models in the Code showed to be very satisfatory quantitative and qualitative behavior of the attained experimental results. (author) [pt

  3. The CEA and alternative energies. 8 April 2010 press conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the CEA's strategy in terms of alternative energies and the various implemented research programs which mainly concern the building sector and the transport sector. After a recall of the energy and climate context, a presentation of the NTE program (Nouvelles Technologies de l'Energie, new energy technologies), the different topics and projects are presented: photovoltaic solar energy and its integration in building; batteries, hydrogen and fuel cells for applications in transports; second-generation bio-fuels

  4. CEA - Nuclear Energy Division. Report on Sustainable Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    The Sustainable Radioactive Waste Management Act of June 28, 2006, specified clear guidelines for spent nuclear fuel management. It states two complementary principles: - The policy of treating and recycling spent nuclear fuel is valid for reducing the quantity and toxicity of suitably packaged ultimate radioactive waste-forms. - The reference process for high-activity and long-lived ultimate waste is deep geological disposal. The report prepared by the CEA in response to these requirements was completed after several years of work in cooperation with the other French actors in this field (EDF, AREVA) and with contribution of the CNRS and Andra. It addresses the following topics in several volumes: n guidelines for research on 4. generation systems, and a description of the various systems examined; - the results of research coordinated by the CEA on partitioning and transmutation of long-lived radioactive elements; - choices proposed for the Astrid integrated technology demonstrator - a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) - and a reasonable timetable for its construction; - a review of research conducted around the world on 4. generation systems based on fast neutron reactors (FNRs). The principal results and findings compiled by the CEA from these studies are summarized in this document

  5. Ior-CEA-1: Labelling, quality control and clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    Within the Co-ordinated Programme on Labelling, Quality Control and Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibodies, the IAEA has made a great effort to expand efficient labelling methods, mainly those with radioisotopes which have been used for radioimmunoscintigraphy. In this sense, more recently 99 Tc m has been mostly employed in the majority of the investigations due to its ideal physical characteristics. Efficient labelling of monoclonal antibodies depends on a number of factors including the method and way of the label incorporation into the protein. During the last years several direct labelling approaches have been developed, which led to attain simple and inexpensive methods for medical practice, as well as safe and stable techniques which bring accurate and good quality images. Accordingly, this paper describes the results obtained during last five years which come from the comparison among different labelling systems, passing through the quality control to test the labelled monoclonal stability and the protein bioreactivity, to continue in the clinical evaluation of ior-CEA-1, as well as the evaluation of other antibodies. Up to now we have evaluated more than 70 patients with the anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (ior-CEA-1), examined in different clinical assays such as: pilot, phase I-II and extensive phase III-IV trials, whose results are encouraging. It confirms that the employed labelling approach was safe and adequate

  6. Cleanup Verification Package for the 300-18 Waste Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capron, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 300-18 waste site. This site was identified as containing radiologically contaminated soil, metal shavings, nuts, bolts, and concrete

  7. Considering Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) During the Cleanup Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    This memorandum provides direction to improve the decision-making process as it relates to site assessment, characterization, and cleanup activities, to ensure EPA's Office of Land and Emergency Management is considering TEK when tribes provide it to EPA.

  8. Radiation Dose to Post-Chernobyl Cleanup Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation dose calculation for post-Chernobyl Cleanup Workers in Ukraine - both external radiation exposure due to fallout and internal doses due to inhalation (I131 intake) or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs.

  9. Rosácea fulminante: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Otávio Alquezar Gozzano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: Rosácea fulminante (RF ou pioderma facial é uma doença rara, descrita em 1940 por Kierland e O’Leary. É considerada uma variante extrema de rosácea conglobata, esta, consiste em formação de placas e abscessos hemorrágicos na pele. A RF tem sua etiologia desconhecida, porém há teorias que relacionam seu acometimento com a variação de hormônios femininos e a ingestão de vitamina B12. A RF é frequente em mulheres, principalmente pós- adolescentes. Apresenta-se abruptamente na face, amiúde na região mento- mandibular, através de pápulas inflamatórias, pústulas, cistos e nódulos com comedões escassos ou inexistentes, além de abcessos, sem manifestações sistêmicas e com a recidiva rara. Seu diagnóstico é fundamentalmente clínico, apenas com a história do paciente, sem necessidade de exames complementares. Para o tratamento, são utilizados corticoides orais, isotretinoína oral e antibióticos a fim de minimizar as sequelas físicas e psicológicas. Objetivo: Relatar caso de paciente com diagnóstico de rosácea fulminante. Metodologia: Paciente diagnosticada com rosácea fulminante atendida em serviço ambulatorial e revisão de literatura. Relato de caso: Paciente do sexo feminino, 19 anos, refere lesões súbitas em face há uma semana. Nega quadro acneico anterior, histórias de alergias e outras comorbidades. Relata ausência de uso de anticoncepcionais orais há 5 meses e data de última menstruação há 3 semanas, sem atraso menstrual. Ao exame: pápulas eritematosas e pústulas, além de pequenos nódulos inflamatórios na face. Hipótese diagnóstica: RF. Como conduta, foi prescrito tetraciclina. Conclusões: A RF é uma forma infrequente de rosácea, sendo importante o diagnóstico precoce e tratamento eficaz, a fim de melhorar a qualidade de vida do paciente.

  10. Intensified follow-up in colorectal cancer patients using frequent Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA) measurements and CEA-triggered imaging : Results of the randomized "CEAwatch" trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, C. J.; Zhan, Z.; van den Heuvel, E.; Grossmann, I.; Doornbos, P. M.; Havenga, K.; Manusama, E.; Klaase, J.; van der Mijle, H. C. J.; Lamme, B.; Bosscha, K.; Baas, P.; van Ooijen, B.; Nieuwenhuijzen, G.; Marinelli, A.; van der Zaag, E.; Wasowicz, D.; de Bock, G. H.; Wiggers, T.

    Aim: The value of frequent Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA) measurements and CEA-triggered imaging for detecting recurrent disease in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients was investigated in search for an evidence-based follow-up protocol. Methods: This is a randomized-controlled multicenter prospective

  11. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-2 Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capron, J.M.; Anselm, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-2 Burial Ground. This burial ground, formerly called Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 1, was the original solid waste disposal site for the 100-F Area. Eight trenches contained miscellaneous solid waste from the 105-F Reactor and one trench contained solid waste from the biology facilities

  12. Spent fuel pool cleanup and stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.

    1987-06-01

    Each of the plutonium production reactors at Hanford had a large water-filled spent fuel pool to provide interim storage of irradiated fuel while awaiting shipment to the separation facilities. After cessation of reactor operations the fuel was removed from the pools and the water levels were drawn down to a 5- to 10-foot depth. The pools were maintained with the water to provide shielding and radiological control. What appeared to be a straightforward project to process the water, remove the sediments from the basin, and stabilize the contamination on the floors and walls became a very complex and time consuming operation. The sediment characteristics varied from pool to pool, the ion exchange system required modification, areas of hard-pack sediments were discovered on the floors, special arrangements to handle and package high dose rate items for shipment were required, and contract problems ensued with the subcontractor. The original schedule to complete the project from preliminary engineering to final stabilization of the pools was 15 months. The actual time required was about 25 months. The original cost estimate to perform the work was $2,651,000. The actual cost of the project was $5,120,000, which included $150,000 for payment of claims to the subcontractor. This paper summarizes the experiences associated with the cleanup and radiological stabilization of the 100-B, -C, -D, and -DR spent fuel pools, and discusses a number of lessons learned items

  13. Development of international criteria for the cleanup of contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann-Jensen, P.; Barraclough, I.; Meck, R.; Gnugnoli, G.; Stegnar, P.

    1999-01-01

    IAEA TECDOC-987, Application of radiation protection principles to the cleanup of contaminated areas, provides a coherent framework and consistent guidance needed for approaches to cleanup that encompass the entire range of contamination situations. A major goal of cleanup is usually to re-establish that the environment can acceptably support habitation and use. Difficult situations include chronic exposures due to radioactivity associated with the discovery of contamination from a previously discontinued practice and post-accident situations. and post-accident situations. The concepts of justification, optimization, and limitation can be applied to cleanup from 'trivial' to 'intolerable' situations by taking into account not only radiological risk, but the entire range of social values including the ability of the society to feed and shelter itself and to sustain a productive economy. TECDOC-987 proposes six ranges, or bands, of doses that correspond to trivial, acceptable, tolerable - clean-up unlikely (unless constrained), tolerable - clean-up likely, unacceptable, and intolerable risks. Remedial actions may vary from 'none' to elaborate decontamination or restricted or prohibited use. (author)

  14. Sustaining the Dream: A Response to Excessive Positivism in Person-Centered Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Craig A.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to "Excessive Positivism in Person-Centered Planning," by Steve Holburn and Christine D. Cea. The author begins by complementing Holburn and Cea on their courage to voice concerns that perhaps may not appear to be politically correct or perhaps too bold to express in the context of a journal like…

  15. Atualidades e perspectivas das Anonáceas no mundo

    OpenAIRE

    São José,Abel Rebouças; Pires,Mônica de Moura; Freitas,Afonso Lúcio Gomes Estrela de; Ribeiro,Denis Pereira; Perez,Luis Alfonso Aguilar

    2014-01-01

    Várias espécies da família Annonaceae produzem frutos comestíveis cultivados em pomares comerciais ou coletados de forma extrativista, em diversas partes do mundo. O gênero Annona possui elevado número de espécies nativas, no entanto poucas produzem frutos comestíveis. Algumas são cultivadas comercialmente, outras são obtidas de forma extrativista. As principais anonáceas cultivadas no mundo são: Annona muricata, Annona squamosa e Annona cherimola, com destaque também para a atemoia (híbrido ...

  16. Innovaciones en el agrodesarrollo de las cactáceas

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Alberto Padrón Pereira

    2012-01-01

    La globalización de los mercados ofrece nuevas oportunidades de desarrollo del campo en especial a recursos subutilizados en algunos países como las cactáceas, debido en parte a que, en cada país, los modelos culturales y de cultivo son diferentes. El cambio climático está generando nuevas dinámicas en dichos modelos que pueden llegar a ser sostenibles o disruptivas y las cáctaceas se presentan en ciertos aspectos como alternativas para la sustentabilidad de algunos sistemas; aunque también p...

  17. Status of CEA studies on desalination on July 1, 1967

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyghe, J.; Vignet, P.; Courvoisier, P.; Frejacques, M.; Coriou, M.; Agostini, M.; Lackme, C.; CORPEL, M.; Thiriet, L.

    1967-01-01

    This publication contains a set of articles reporting studies on desalination performed within the CEA: preliminary draft of a desalination plant coupled with a nuclear reactor; the reverse osmosis; corrosion problems in seawater desalination plants; optimisation program of a distillation-based seawater desalination plant; activities of the department of analysis and applied chemistry in the field of desalination; abstract of a lecture on studies on price functions; studies of the department of steady isotopes on the formation of tartar depositions and their prevention; studies performed within the thermal transfer department

  18. Producing energy without greenhouse effect gases: the CEA action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Major actor in the domain of new energy technologies, the CEA manages the french research on the hydrogen and the fuel cells. It is also implied with INES (National Institute for the Solar Energy) in the photovoltaic and thermal solar. With the IFP (French Petroleum Institute), it manages research on biofuels. Of course the thermonuclear fusion, for the development of the energy of the future, is in its research program too. This information document presents the possibilities of these energies and the associated research programs. (A.L.B.)

  19. The 1988 CEA progress report on laser research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 CEA progress report, concerning laser investigations, is presented. The aim of the research programs on laser/matter interactions is to contribute to the military application works on this field, as well as to the development of the inertial confinement fusion physics. The activities related to the installation and starting of Phebus laser system are described. The development of soft x-ray instrumentation are included. In the field of numerical simulations, the improvement of FCI 1 and 2 codes are extended for increasing the field of the physical phenomena taken into account and getting their use more flexible to the experiment analysis [fr

  20. Baseline carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) serum levels predict bevacizumab-based treatment response in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Gerald W; Braemswig, Kira H; Martel, Alexandra; Unseld, Matthias; Heinze, Georg; Brodowicz, Thomas; Scheithauer, Werner; Kornek, Gabriela; Zielinski, Christoph C

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) affects tumorigenesis by enhancing tumor cell survival and by inducing tumor angiogenesis. This study aimed to evaluate baseline CEA serum levels to predict bevacizumab-based therapy effect and survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Two hundred and ninety eight mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus either bevacizumab or cetuximab were analyzed in a retrospective study. Disease control (DC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival were assessed and related to pretreatment CEA serum levels. Patients with baseline CEA serum levels below the statistical median of 26.8 ng/mL (group I) were compared with patients with higher CEA levels (group II). The cetuximab-based treatment cohort was analyzed for specificity assessment of CEA to predict the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor effect in mCRC. Baseline CEA serum levels inversely correlated with therapeutic response in patients receiving bevacizumab-based treatment (disease control rate, 84% vs 60%), inversely correlated with median PFS leading to a median PFS benefit of 2.1 months for patients in group I when compared with group II, as well as inversely correlated with median overall survival (37.5 months vs 21.4 months). In an independent cohort of 129 patients treated with cetuximab-based therapy, no association of therapeutic response or PFS with CEA serum levels was found. As expected, baseline CEA levels were prognostic for mCRC. These data give first evidence that baseline serum CEA levels might constitute an important predictor for the efficacy of first-line bevacizumab-based therapy in patients with mCRC. Previously, we found that CEA induces angiogenesis independent of VEGF. The data presented here now give first evidence that baseline serum CEA levels in patients might constitute an important predictor for the efficacy of first-line bevacizumab-based therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:24850362

  1. Evaluation of the nuclear installations safety of the CEA in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverie, M.

    1999-09-01

    Michel Laverie, Director of the nuclear safety and quality at the Cea, took stoke of the CEA nuclear installations in 1998. After a recall of the nuclear safety policy and organization, the author presents the risks factors bound to the CEA activities as the dismantling, the wastes and the human factors. A last part is devoted to the list of the accidents occurred during 1998 in the nuclear installations. Tables and statistics illustrate this analysis. (A.L.B.)

  2. Postoperative serum CEA level as predictive factor for survival in patients with colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemberger, J.J.; Bogar, M.L.; Takacs Kucsera, M.F.; Csernetics, I.F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: It is known that routine follow-up of patients with resected colorectal cancer includes serial CEA determinations. In this retrospective study we have investigated relationship between CEA level and survival and whether achieved results enable differentiation of tumors with slow and rapid growth. Material and Methods: Mainly between 1995 and 1999 periodic CEA determination by IRMA were performed in 269 patients after curative resection of colorectal carcinoma. Number of CEA determination/patient were 2-16(median 6). Survival ranged 4,5 and>249,7 months. Based on CEA results patients were divided in group with normal (<10ng/ml) and elevated (=10ng/ml) values regardless of postoperative treatment. Survival curves were computed by Kaplan-Meier method and difference was evaluated by logrank test and difference between proportions. Results:Normal end elevated CEA was found in 193 and 76 patients, respectively. The difference of survival curves between patients with normal and elevated CEA are highly significant (p<0,0001). However, only 10 months after tumor resection is the difference between survived proportions significant suggesting already presence of CEA produced micrometastases contributing to progression of neoplastic process. The mean survival time at normal and elevated CEA values are 142,54±17,86(median 128,60±24,04) and 34,15±4,28 (median 25,20±1,97) months, respectively. No significant difference of survival was found regarding tumor localization. Conclusion:The results show that with regard to CEA level it is possible to divide colorectal tumors on marker negative and positive. Marker negative are with slower growth and relatively good prognosis. Marker positive are associated with elevated CEA level and with considerable shorter survival. Postoperative CEA level is valuable parameter in prediction of patient's outcome

  3. Prognostic impact of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) on patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hara, Kazuo; Hijioka, Susumu; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Hirayama, Yutaka; Hieda, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Tsukasa; Okuno, Nozomi; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Yasumasa; Yamao, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is one of the most widely used tumor markers, and its level is increased in 30-60% of patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). However, little is known about the implications of CEA as a prognostic marker in metastatic PC. The purpose of this study was to examine the usefulness of CEA levels as a prognostic marker in patients with metastatic PC. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from a computerized database. A total of 433 patients with metastatic disease were analyzed. Median overall survival (OS) was significantly shorter for patients with high CEA (>5 ng/ml) than with normal CEA (≤5 ng/ml) (6.8 vs. 10.3 months, respectively; p CEA level was an independent predictive factor for OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-2.26). In the high CEA group, OS in patients treated with combination chemotherapy was similar to that with single-agent chemotherapy (median, 7.1 vs. 6.8 months; HR for OS, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.71-1.40). The present results show that CEA level is an independent prognostic factor in patients with metastatic PC. A combination chemotherapy regimen may offer modest survival benefit in patients with high CEA. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Influencing factors on the serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in benign liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pompecki, R.; Mehl, H.; Fehr, R.; Braun, H. von

    1982-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was determined in the sera of 452 patients with benign liver diseases by radioimmunoassay (CEA-RIA Kit, Abbott). The CEA-level exceeded 2.5 ng/ml in 39 percent and 5.0 ng/ml in 9 percent of the cases. Independent influences of age, nicotin, and alcohol consumption and connective tissue proliferation of the liver on the CEA level were demonstrated and quantified by two- and higher-dimensional contingency table analysis. Toxic liver diseases were combined with elevated serum CEA values more often than inflammatory diseases. This aspect could not be investigated independently since there were only a few cases of toxic liver diseases without alcohol consumption. Sex and relative body weight do not seem to affect the CEA level. Additional diseases of the gastrointestinal tract or the cardiovascular system did not influence the serum CEA level in liver diseases. Therefore, in patients with benign liver diseases, an elevated serum CEA level indicates increased proliferation of the connective tissue. Age, nicotin, and alcohol consumption have to be considered independently in the clinical judgement of elevated serum CEA levels, irrespective of the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  5. 3rd CEAS Specialist Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Drouin, Antoine; Roos, Clément

    2015-01-01

    The two first CEAS (Council of European Aerospace Societies) Specialist Conferences on Guidance, Navigation and Control (CEAS EuroGNC) were held in Munich, Germany in 2011 and in Delft, The Netherlands in 2013. ONERA The French Aerospace Lab, ISAE (Institut Supérieur de l’Aéronautique et de l’Espace) and ENAC (Ecole Nationale de l’Aviation Civile) accepted the challenge of jointly organizing the 3rd edition. The conference aims at promoting new advances in aerospace GNC theory and technologies for enhancing safety, survivability, efficiency, performance, autonomy and intelligence of aerospace systems. It represents a unique forum for communication and information exchange between specialists in the fields of GNC systems design and operation, including air traffic management. This book contains the forty best papers and gives an interesting snapshot of the latest advances over the following topics: l  Control theory, analysis, and design l  Novel navigation, estimation, and tracking methods l  Aircr...

  6. Radioiodination of monoclonal antibody intact anti-CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, H.; Souza, I.T.T.; Silva, C.P.G.

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine a convenient system that can be used to iodinate monoclonal antibodies which is rapid, simple, efficient and reproducible, and which can be accomplished in radiopharmaceutical laboratories. It is important to remember that antibodies are sensitive biochemicals, subject to losses of the activity that is essential to their mode of action, namely the ability to bind specific antigen. The advent of solid phase iodination agents has greatly expanded the range of gentle iodination techniques available for iodinating sensitive biological materials. The agent most widely used is the Iodogen (1,3,4,6 tetrachloro-3a-6a diphenylglycoluril) method. Anti-CEA 4C sub(11) IgG sub(2a,k) (prepared in the Ludwig Institute-Sao Paulo-Brazil ) is used as model to evaluate the Iodogen methodology. The miniature chromatographic system, also rapid, accurate, simple, efficient was elaborated to determine the labelling efficiency incorporation of iodine into immunoglobulin, and the radiochemical purity of sup(131)I-anti-CEA. (author)

  7. A Novel Carcinoembryonic Antigen T-Cell Bispecific Antibody (CEA TCB) for the Treatment of Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacac, Marina; Fauti, Tanja; Sam, Johannes; Colombetti, Sara; Weinzierl, Tina; Ouaret, Djamila; Bodmer, Walter; Lehmann, Steffi; Hofer, Thomas; Hosse, Ralf J; Moessner, Ekkehard; Ast, Oliver; Bruenker, Peter; Grau-Richards, Sandra; Schaller, Teilo; Seidl, Annette; Gerdes, Christian; Perro, Mario; Nicolini, Valeria; Steinhoff, Nathalie; Dudal, Sherri; Neumann, Sebastian; von Hirschheydt, Thomas; Jaeger, Christiane; Saro, Jose; Karanikas, Vaios; Klein, Christian; Umaña, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    CEA TCB is a novel IgG-based T-cell bispecific (TCB) antibody for the treatment of CEA-expressing solid tumors currently in phase I clinical trials (NCT02324257). Its format incorporates bivalent binding to CEA, a head-to-tail fusion of CEA- and CD3e-binding Fab domains and an engineered Fc region with completely abolished binding to FcγRs and C1q. The study provides novel mechanistic insights into the activity and mode of action of CEA TCB. CEA TCB activity was characterized on 110 cell lines in vitro and in xenograft tumor models in vivo using NOG mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Simultaneous binding of CEA TCB to tumor and T cells leads to formation of immunologic synapses, T-cell activation, secretion of cytotoxic granules, and tumor cell lysis. CEA TCB activity strongly correlates with CEA expression, with higher potency observed in highly CEA-expressing tumor cells and a threshold of approximately 10,000 CEA-binding sites/cell, which allows distinguishing between high- and low-CEA-expressing tumor and primary epithelial cells, respectively. Genetic factors do not affect CEA TCB activity confirming that CEA expression level is the strongest predictor of CEA TCB activity. In vivo, CEA TCB induces regression of CEA-expressing xenograft tumors with variable amounts of immune cell infiltrate, leads to increased frequency of activated T cells, and converts PD-L1 negative into PD-L1-positive tumors. CEA TCB is a novel generation TCB displaying potent antitumor activity; it is efficacious in poorly infiltrated tumors where it increases T-cell infiltration and generates a highly inflamed tumor microenvironment. Clin Cancer Res; 22(13); 3286-97. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL's Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed

  9. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed.

  10. UTILIZING THE RIGHT MIX OF ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergren, C; Wade Whitaker, W; Mary Flora, M

    2007-05-25

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Figure 1 is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina. During operations, which started in 1951, hazardous substances (chemicals and radionuclides) were released to the environment. The releases occurred as a result of inadvertent spills and waste disposal in unlined pits and basins which was common practice before environmental regulations existed. The hazardous substances have migrated to the vadose zone and groundwater in many areas of the SRS, resulting in 515 waste units that are required by environmental regulations, to undergo characterization and, if needed, remediation. In the initial years of the SRS environmental cleanup program (early 1990s), the focus was to use common technologies (such as pump and treat, air stripping, excavation and removal) that actively and tangibly removed contamination. Exclusive use of these technologies required continued and significant funding while often failing to meet acceptable clean-up goals and objectives. Recognizing that a more cost-effective approach was needed, SRS implemented new and complementary remediation methods focused on active and passive technologies targeted to solve specific remediation problems. Today, SRS uses technologies such as chemical/pH-adjusting injection, phytoremediation, underground cutoff walls, dynamic underground stripping, soil fracturing, microbial degradation, baroballs, electrical resistance heating, soil vapor extraction, and microblowers to more effectively treat contamination at lower costs. Additionally, SRS's remediation approach cost effectively maximizes cleanup as SRS works proactively with multiple regulatory agencies. Using GIS, video, animation, and graphics, SRS is able to provide an accurate depiction of the evolution of SRS groundwater and vadose zone cleanup activities to convince stakeholders and regulators of the effectiveness of various cleanup

  11. Historical research in the Hanford site waste cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, Michele S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will acquaint the audience with role of historical research in the Hanford Site waste cleanup - the largest waste cleanup endeavor ever undertaken in human history. There were no comparable predecessors to this massive waste remediation effort, but the Hanford historical record can provide a partial road map and guide. It can be, and is, a useful tool in meeting the goal of a successful, cost-effective, safe and technologically exemplary waste cleanup. The Hanford historical record is rich and complex. Yet, it poses difficult challenges, in that no central and complete repository or data base exists, records contain obscure code words and code numbers, and the measurement systems and terminology used in the records change many times over the years. Still, these records are useful to the current waste cleanup in technical ways, and in ways that extend beyond a strictly scientific aspect. Study and presentations of Hanford Site history contribute to the huge educational and outreach tasks of helping the Site's work force deal with 'culture change' and become motivated for the cleanup work that is ahead, and of helping the public and the regulators to place the events at Hanford in the context of WWII and the Cold War. This paper traces historical waste practices and policies as they changed over the years at the Hanford Site, and acquaints the audience with the generation of the major waste streams of concern in Hanford Site cleanup today. It presents original, primary-source research into the waste history of the Hanford Site. The earliest, 1940s knowledge base, assumptions and calculations about radioactive and chemical discharges, as discussed in the memos, correspondence and reports of the original Hanford Site (then Hanford Engineer Works) builders and operators, are reviewed. The growth of knowledge, research efforts, and subsequent changes in Site waste disposal policies and practices are traced. Examples of the strengths and limitations of the

  12. Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in integrated

  13. Control of effluents and environmental surveillance of the CEA centres. 1997 status; Controle des rejets et surveillance de l'environnement des centres CEA. Bilan 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The environmental quality in the vicinity of CEA facilities is a major concern of the safety policy of the CEA. The aim of this document is to inform the public about the gaseous and liquids radioactive effluents released by the CEA centres under the permission of the ministry. It provides a status of the effluents and of the radioactivity levels measured near the CEA centres in 1997, using air, water, vegetation and milk samples. A comparison is made with the measurements performed during the 1993-1996 period. The data presented comes from the regulatory registers transmitted to the agency for the protection against ionizing radiations (OPRI) which belongs to the ministry of health. (J.S.)

  14. Hearing of Mr Bernard Bigot, general administrator of the Atomic Energy Commissariat (CEA), on the CEA missions and on Cadarache events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    In this hearing by the Sustainable Development and Land Planning Commission of the French National Assembly, the role and missions of the CEA are presented while evoking its relationship with the State. The CEA representative evokes the various research activities in three main domains: energy, defence, information and health technologies. Then, he discusses the problem of the ageing and dismantling of some installations, notably in the plutonium Technology workshop (ATPu) in Cadarache. He describes this installation, the processes in which it is involved, the safety and security requirements, and comments the problem which occurred in this workshop (plutonium retention in glove boxes). Then he answers several questions asked by the Commission members about the way the CEA handled this incident, and about its severity. Other aspects are addressed like the importance of the nuclear industry and the role the CEA could have in the management of renewable energies at the national level

  15. Remote handling systems help TMI-2 cleanup efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    As the cleanup at Three Mile Island-2 reactor progresses, the use of remote handling technology will play an important role in the upcoming decontamination of the reactor building basement and the defueling of the reactor. The Remote Reconnaissance Vehicle, Rover, and its use in cleanup tasks are described. Possible concepts for second-generation vehicles are discussed. Earlier less-advanced remote handling equipment used at TMI-2 are also described. Techniques planned for reactor defueling using the Remotely Operated Service Arm, Rosa, and advanced remote handling technology is presented

  16. Biotechnologies for Marine Oil Spill Cleanup: Indissoluble Ties with Microorganisms

    KAUST Repository

    Mapelli, Francesca

    2017-05-13

    The ubiquitous exploitation of petroleum hydrocarbons (HCs) has been accompanied by accidental spills and chronic pollution in marine ecosystems, including the deep ocean. Physicochemical technologies are available for oil spill cleanup, but HCs must ultimately be mineralized by microorganisms. How environmental factors drive the assembly and activity of HC-degrading microbial communities remains unknown, limiting our capacity to integrate microorganism-based cleanup strategies with current physicochemical remediation technologies. In this review, we summarize recent findings about microbial physiology, metabolism and ecology and describe how microbes can be exploited to create improved biotechnological solutions to clean up marine surface and deep waters, sediments and beaches.

  17. Scientific evaluation at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). 2005-2006 annual report; L'evaluation scientifique au CEA. Rapport annuel 2005-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This report aims at presenting the scientific evaluation activities carried out at the CEA during the years 2005-2006. The evaluation system is described in detail. It comprises two aspects: the evaluation of the scientific policy implemented by the scientific Council and by the visiting committee of the CEA, and the evaluation of the laboratories, performed by a pool of 36 scientific councils. The evaluation by external and independent parties is the key point of this system. This document makes a status of the evaluations performed in 2005 and 2006. It presents a synthesis of the conclusions of the evaluation authorities. The actions implemented by the CEA to take into consideration the recommendations are also reported with the improvements noticed. The two topics examined by the scientific Committee and by the visiting committee were dealing with the energy domain, which is a strategic issue for the CEA. The examination of the researches on future nuclear reactors and on new energy technologies have shown the major role played by the CEA in the recent advances in these domains. About 95% of the laboratories activity was examined during the 2002-2005 period. The richness of the remarks and recommendations made by the scientific councils should allow the CEA to improve the quality and relevance of its research works. The start-up of the 2006-2009 evaluation cycle has been the occasion to modify the evaluation of some research domains in order to take into account the evolution of programs. The evaluation system of the CEA is highly consistent with the AERES principles. Its implementation, adapted to each type of activity (fundamental research, applied research, technological developments) allows the CEA to follow up a permanent improvement approach. (J.S.)

  18. Reversible high blood CEA and CA19-9 concentrations in a diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the same time, the tumor markers also declined to normal. (CEA 3.8 ng/ml, CA19-9 26.58 U/ml). CEA and CA 19-9 are closely related with gastrointes- tinal cancers, although they are not suggested for cancer screening (1). Pancreatic cancer may cause diabetes by destroying islet cells, inducing pancreas inflammation, ...

  19. Tumor, serum and urine carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in upper urinary tract urothelial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, V.; Ignjatovic, M.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the possible diagnostic value of a CEA test in cancer of the renal pelvis and ureter. Thirty-eight patients with upper urinary tract cancer, 15 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, 6 kidney carcinoma patients and 25 healthy adults were studied. CEA was determined in tumor tissue, serum and urine, by using a monoclonal radioimmunoassay. Increased serum CEA level was found in 7 out of 27 patients (26%) with active cancer of the renal pelvis and ureter. None of 11 patients with inactive cancer had an increased serum CEA level. No significant correlation was found between the serum CEA level and the histological grading. The tumor CEA content varied markedly, from values obtainted in normal urothelium up to 840 ng/g wet weight. CEA content of tumor tissue did not correlate with the serum level. Our data suggest that serum and urine CEA have not diagnostic accuracy for clinical diagnosis of upper tract urothelial cancer. (orig.) [de

  20. Recapitulative list of the C.E.A. reports published by the French Atomic Energy Commission (n.757-1062, december 1957-december 1958) supplement to C.E.A. reports n. 593 and 756

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmiterlow, C.G.; Cohen, Y.

    1958-01-01

    Recapitulative list of the C.E.A. reports published by the French Atomic Energy Commission. (number 757-1062, december 1957 - december 1958). Supplement to C.E.A. reports number 593 and 756. (author) [fr

  1. Urinary metabolites before and after cleanup and subjective symptoms in volunteer participants in cleanup of the Hebei Spirit oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Mina; Kwon, Hojang; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Lim, Sinye; Yoo, Seung Jin; Kim, Eun-Jung; Park, Seok Gun; Lee, Jeongae; Chung, Bong Chul

    2012-07-01

    On December 7th, 2007, the Hong Kong tanker Hebei Spirit (HS) (146,848 tons) was crushed by a crane ship near the shore of Taean, Korea. More than 12,547 kl of crude oil spilled into the sea and contaminated the western coastline of the Korean peninsula. For a period of six months after the accident, approximately 1,000,000 volunteers participated in the cleanup. Our goal in this study was to examine the exposure status and acute health effects on volunteers that participated in the oil spill cleanup. A survey questionnaire was filled out by 565 volunteers, requesting information regarding physical symptoms. Out of the total number of participants, urine samples from 105 university student volunteers were collected before and after the cleanup work, and metabolite levels of volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were analyzed. Volunteers that participated for longer cleanup work reported an increase in physical symptoms including visual disturbance, nasal and bronchus irritation, headaches, heart palpitations, fatigue and fever, memory and cognitive disturbance, and abdominal pain. The levels of t,t-muconic acid, mandelic acid, and 1-hydroxypyrene were significantly higher in samples after cleanup than those measured before participation (plevel between the post- to pre-cleanup levels, no other physical symptoms demonstrated a significant association with changes observed in the levels of urinary metabolites. Based on the significant increase of subjective symptoms in volunteers participating in the study, monitoring of the long term health effects, focusing on those with longer exposure, is warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. HANDBOOK ON THE BENEFITS, COSTS, AND IMPACTS OF LAND CLEANUP AND REUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summarizes the theoretical and empirical literature addressing benefit-cost and impact assessment of the land cleanup and reuse scenario. When possible, recommendations are provided for conducting economic analysis of land cleanup and reuse sites and programs. The knowledge base ...

  3. Planning for cleanup of large areas contaminated as a result of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The cleanup of large areas of contaminated as a result of an accident at a nuclear facility could cost hundreds of millions of dollars and cause inconvenience to the public. Such a cleanup programme would be undertaken only if the detriment to health and social life resulting from cleanup activities would be less than that resulting from further exposures. All reasonable means should, however, be used to minimize the costs and detriment to humans of such a cleanup. For such a cleanup to be carried out safely, efficiently and as quickly as possible under adverse conditions requires: Good preliminary and final planning; A cleanup team having a well defined management structure and well trained personnel; and Suitable cleanup methods and equipment and cleanup criteria. 35 refs, 8 figs, 5 tabs

  4. Technical papers presented at a DOE meeting on criteria for cleanup of transuranium elements in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    Transuranium element soil contamination cleanup experience gained from nuclear weapons accidents and cleanup at Eniwetok Atoll was reviewed. Presentations have been individually abstracted for inclusion in the data base

  5. The stationary storage of energy. Available technologies and CEA researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    After a discussion of the main challenges related to the stationary storage of energy, this publication proposes an overview of the different available technologies: plant for transfer of energy by pumping, compressed air, energy flywheels, hydrogen, lithium-ion battery, redox-flow battery, thermal storage by sensitive heat, thermal-chemical storage coupled to a thermal solar system, thermal storage by phase change, superconductive inductance storage, super-capacitors. It discusses the criteria of choice of storage technology, either for electric energy storage or for heat storage. It proposes an overview of researches performed within the CEA on storage systems: electrochemical, thermal, and hydrogen-based storages. The final chapter addresses current fundamental researches on storage in the field of lithium-ion batteries, hydrogen as a fuel, and thermoelectricity

  6. Development of radiolabelling techniques of anti-CEA monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglia, S.G. de

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to label monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies with 99 Tc m such as the ior-CEA-1 antibody and polyclonal IgG using a direct method, to check the radiochemical and biological behavior of labelled products, to prepare it under sterile and apyrogenic conditions as a lyophilized kit and to employ it in clinical trials. In addition, a photoactivation method was used to label polyclonal IgG with 99 Tc m and to compare with the established method using mercaptoethanol (2-ME) as the reducing agent. Finally polyclonal IgG was labelled using an indirect method in which a chelator was covalently attached to the protein and the 99 Tc m added as glucoheptonate complex. The properties of 99 Tc m when labelled with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies by different methods were assessed by in vitro and in vivo studies

  7. Recent advances in indirect drive ICF target physics at CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassart, J.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of Target Physics Program at CEA is the achievement of ignition on the LMJ, a glass laser facility of 1.8 MJ which will be completed by 2008. It is composed of theoretical work, experimental work and numerical simulations. An important part of experimental studies is made in collaboration with U.S. DOE Laboratories: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Experiments were performed on Phebus, NOVA (LLNL) and OMEGA (LLE) ; they included diagnostics developments. Recent efforts have been focused on Laser Plasma Interaction, hohlraum energetics, symmetry, ablator physics and hydrodynamic instabilities. Ongoing work prepare the first experiments on the LIL which is a prototype facility of the LMJ (8 of its 240 beams). They will be performed by 2002. Recent progress in ICF target physics allows us to precise laser specifications to achieve ignition with reasonable margin. (author)

  8. General rules for radiation protection within the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FUSIL, L.

    2012-03-01

    This report first describes the organisation, scope of application and principles of radiation protection within the CEA. The second part proposes an overview of rules applicable to workers exposed to ionizing radiation. These rules concern the personnel classification, exposure limits, individual control, and training of workers in radiation protection. The third part addresses the technical rules for premise laying-out: protection zoning, indicators aimed at controlling the compliance of premise classification, radiological survey and control of premise classification. The fourth part addresses the modalities of access, stay and operation in regulated zone. The next part indicates and comments arrangements specific to ionizing radiation sources and to ionizing radiation emitting equipment (authorization and possession modalities, training, certification, controls, operation zoning, etc.), specific orders (radiological control of wastes, hardware, tools and equipment management), rules related to abnormal occupational situations (alarms, contamination event, radiological events), and the different studies and analysis of radiation protection implemented during the different phases of an installation lifetime

  9. Atualidades e perspectivas das Anonáceas no mundo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Rebouças São José

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Várias espécies da família Annonaceae produzem frutos comestíveis cultivados em pomares comerciais ou coletados de forma extrativista, em diversas partes do mundo. O gênero Annona possui elevado número de espécies nativas, no entanto poucas produzem frutos comestíveis. Algumas são cultivadas comercialmente, outras são obtidas de forma extrativista. As principais anonáceas cultivadas no mundo são: Annona muricata, Annona squamosa e Annona cherimola, com destaque também para a atemoia (híbrido entre A. squamosa x A. cherimola. Economicamente, são importantes para muitos países da África, Ásia e também da América Central, do Norte e do Sul. Os principais países produtores são: Austrália, Chile, Espanha, Estados Unidos, Nova Zelândia e Israel para cherimólia; México, Brasil, Venezuela e Costa Rica para graviola; e Índia, Brasil, Tailândia, Filipinas e Cuba para pinha. A produtividade de frutos das anonáceas nos diversos países produtores é relativamente baixa, em função do uso inadequado de técnicas de manejo (irrigação, fertilização, podas, polinização, controle de insetos e enfermidades, etc.. No Brasil, os cultivos comerciais mais relevantes com anonáceas são: pinha (A. squamosa L., graviola (A. muricata L. e atemoia. O objetivo deste trabalho é apresentar a situação atual e as perspectivas para as anonáceas no Brasil e no mundo. O cultivo é caracteristicamente de pequenos agricultores, usando especialmente a mão de obra familiar. De um modo geral, esses cultivos apresentam relevância socioeconômica nos países que possuem produção comercial pela geração de emprego e renda, e vêm, recentemente, ganhando importância no mercado mundial, dada sua condição de fruta exótica e pela sua qualidade, dentre as quais o valor nutracêutico (vitaminas, antioxidantes e outras propriedades funcionais. A expansão do consumo e sua maior relevância no mercado mundial dependem de ações relativas

  10. Marine Debris Clean-Ups as Meaningful Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepath, Carl M.; Bacon, Joseph Scott

    2010-01-01

    This seven to eight week hands-on Marine Debris Clean-up Project used a service project to provide an introduction of marine science ecology, watershed interrelationships, the scientific method, and environmental stewardship to 8th grade middle school students. It utilized inquiry based learning to introduce marine debris sources and impacts to…

  11. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-2 Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.S.

    2006-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-2 Burial Ground, also referred to as Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2; Burial Ground No. 2; 318-2; and Dry Waste Burial Site No. 2. This waste site was used primarily for the disposal of contaminated equipment, materials and laboratory waste from the 300 Area Facilities

  12. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-2 Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. S. Thompson

    2006-12-28

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-2 Burial Ground, also referred to as Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2; Burial Ground No. 2; 318-2; and Dry Waste Burial Site No. 2. This waste site was used primarily for the disposal of contaminated equipment, materials and laboratory waste from the 300 Area Facilities.

  13. Future site use and cleanup strategy alternatives: The Hanford approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, M.; Breckel, J.; Rasmussen, J.; Smith, R.; Bergman, T.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear weapons materials production is no longer the mission of the Hanford Site, a 560-square-mile area in southeastern Washington's Columbia Basin. Environmental remediation, including removal of radioactive and hazardous contaminants, waste management and disposal decommissioning of old facilities, and restoration of land and groundwater, has become the site's major mission. The mission is conducted within the framework of the Tri-Party Agreement between USDOE, USEPA, and the State of Washington. There is broad public interest in cleanup and the future of the Hanford Site. A facilitated process to develop alternative future use and cleanup scenarios is about to begin. The process will introduce some traditional tools of land use planning alongside environmental regulations and cleanup technologies in order to develop an integrated vision. Many interests, including local governments, Indian Tribes, state and federal agencies, business, agriculture, labor, environmental, and recreational groups will be involved. It is hoped a widely shared vision of the site's future will both guide and sustain support for cleanup and restoration

  14. Cleanup Verification Package for the 300 VTS Waste Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. W. Clark and T. H. Mitchell

    2006-03-13

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 300 Area Vitrification Test Site, also known as the 300 VTS site. The site was used by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as a field demonstration site for in situ vitrification of soils containing simulated waste.

  15. Buying time: Franchising hazardous and nuclear waste cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a private franchise approach to long-term custodial care, monitoring and eventual cleanup of hazardous and nuclear waste sites. The franchise concept could be applied to Superfund sites, decommissioning commercial reactors and safeguarding their wastes and to Department of Energy sites. Privatization would reduce costs by enforcing efficient operations and capital investments during the containment period, by providing incentives for successful innovation and by sustaining containment until the cleanup`s net benefits exceed its costs. The franchise system would also permit local governments and citizens to demand and pay for more risk reduction than provided by the federal government. In principle, they would have the option of taking over site management. The major political drawback of the idea is that it requires society to be explicit about what it is willing to pay for now to protect current and future generations. Hazardous waste sites are enduring legacies of energy development. Abandoned mines, closed refineries, underground storage tanks and nuclear facilities have often become threats to human health and water quality. The policy of the United States government is that such sites should quickly be made nonpolluting and safe for unrestricted use. That is, the policy of the United States is prompt cleanup. Orphaned commercial hazardous waste sites are addressed by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Superfund program. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. A risk-based approach to cleanup: Problems and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.

    1995-10-01

    This paper details information dealing with the meetings of the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU). Topics discussed include: Radtest program to summarize all data on radiation doses resulting from nuclear weapons testing; current status of US cleanup strategies; development of new milestones for the project due to reduced budgets; health hazards; and risk reduction

  17. Enewetak fact book (a resume of pre-cleanup information)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, W.

    1982-09-01

    The book contains a group of short treatises on the precleanup condition of the islands in Enewetak Atoll. Their purpose was to provide brief guidance to the radiological history and radiological condition of the islands for use in cleanup of the atoll

  18. Enewetak fact book (a resume of pre-cleanup information)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, W. (comp.)

    1982-09-01

    The book contains a group of short treatises on the precleanup condition of the islands in Enewetak Atoll. Their purpose was to provide brief guidance to the radiological history and radiological condition of the islands for use in cleanup of the atoll. (ACR)

  19. Three Mile Island Cleanup: experiences, waste disposal, and environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, L.J.; Opelka, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    These papers were presented in a two-session symposium during the American Institute of Chemical Engineers 1981 Summer National meeting in Detroit, Michigan, August 16-19, 1981. The cleanup activities described included the venting of the gases, mostly krypton-85, from the reactor containment building and several entries of personnel into the containment building to determine the physical conditions and the levels of radiation and radioactive contamination. Results of the latest process development tests of the flowsheet for the submerged Demineralizer Water Treatment System for decontaminating the water in the containment building were presented. The status of existing knowledge of radiation effects on ion exchange materials used in radioactive waste management were reviewed. A program to demonstrate incorporation of the loaded zeolite into a glass as a final waste form was also described. The generation, classification, treatment, and disposal of solid waste forms resulting from the cleanup were discussed with special consideration of the ion exchange media used for cleanup of liquids with relatively high radionuclide concentrations. The radiological, socioeconomic, and psychological impacts of the cleanup were evaluated. This work formed the basis for the recent issuance by the NRC of a programmatic environmental impact statement relative to decontamination and disposal of the radioactive wastes resulting from the accidents

  20. 40 CFR 761.125 - Requirements for PCB spill cleanup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... electrical substations. Spills which occur in outdoor electrical substations, as defined under § 761.123... post-cleanup sampling as specified under § 761.130. At such times as outdoor electrical substations are... will jeopardize the integrity of the electrical equipment at the substation, the EPA regional office...

  1. Recapitulative list of the C.E.A. reports published by the French Atomic Energy Commission (n.757-1062, december 1957-december 1958) supplement to C.E.A. reports n. 593 and 756; Liste recapitulative des rapports C.E.A. publies par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (du n.757 a 1062, decembre 1957-decembre 1958) complement aux rapports C.E.A. n. 593 et 756

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmiterlow, C.G.; Cohen, Y. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Recapitulative list of the C.E.A. reports published by the French Atomic Energy Commission. (number 757-1062, december 1957 - december 1958). Supplement to C.E.A. reports number 593 and 756. (author) [French] Liste recapitulative des rapports C.E.A. publies par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (du numero 757 au numero 1062, decembre 1957 - decembre 1958). Complement aux rapports C.E.A. numero 593 et 756. (auteur)

  2. Cleanup procedures at the Nevada Test Site and at other radioactively contaminated sites including representative costs of cleanup and treatment of contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talmage, S.S.; Chilton, B.D.

    1987-09-01

    This review summarizes available information on cleanup procedures at the Nevada Test Site and at other radioactively contaminated sites. Radionuclide distribution and inventory, size of the contaminated areas, equipment, and cleanup procedures and results are included. Information about the cost of cleanup and treatment for contaminated land is presented. Selected measures that could be useful in estimating the costs of cleaning up radioactively contaminated areas are described. 76 refs., 16 tabs

  3. Bacteria Provide Cleanup of Oil Spills, Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Marshall Space Flight Center, Micro-Bac International Inc., of Round Rock, Texas, developed a phototrophic cell for water purification in space. Inside the cell: millions of photosynthetic bacteria. Micro-Bac proceeded to commercialize the bacterial formulation it developed for the SBIR project. The formulation is now used for the remediation of wastewater systems and waste from livestock farms and food manufacturers. Strains of the SBIR-derived bacteria also feature in microbial solutions that treat environmentally damaging oil spills, such as that resulting from the catastrophic 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico.

  4. Clinical Significance of Plasma CEA Levels in the Patients with Cervical Carcinoma during Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Sung Beom; Kim, Joo Young; Choi, Myung Sun; Rha, Joong Yeol; Lee, Min Jae [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-12-15

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been studied in the field of gynecologic malignancy to determine whether it can be used as a tumor marker for early detection of recurrence or evaluation of therapeutic results. From January 1985 through December 1989, a total of 239 cervical cancer patients were entered for an analysis of plasma CEA level in the group with cervical cancer compared to the control group consisting of 65 normal healthy women and 18 women with benign gynecologic disease. Plasma CEA levels appear to be directly related with the tumor extension and as stages advance, the incidence of patients with abnormal plasma CEA levels is increased. Also, there seems to be a little higher incidence of abnormal CEA levels in patients with adenocarcinomas or adenosquamous carcinoma but not statistically significant because of small number of patients. When the patients developed recurrence, plasma CEA levels are markedly elevated in the majority, particularly in patients with hepatic metastases. In conclusion, serial plasma CEA checks could be used to detect recurrence during follow-up after treatment of cervical cancer.

  5. Clinical investigation of serum CEA in 120 patients with colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yusheng; Yang Liting; Yu Yunyun; Yu Suqing; Ma Shuqin

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between serum CEA and colorectal cancer, the pre-and postoperative serum CEA in 120 patients with colorectal cancer was measured by RIA, with other 24 cases of healthy donors as control. The results showed that serum CEA in control group and patient group were 9.84±2.44 ng/mL, 38, 85±19.21 ng/mL respectively, while colonic cancer group 37.43±18.58 ng/mL, rectal cancer group 39.72±20.67 ng/mL. There was significant difference between patient group and control group (P 0.05). Serum CEA of 37 among 44 cases with positive CEA findings decreased to 11.21±3.65 ng/mL during two months follow-up post-operation, whereas 50.63±24.38 ng/mL in 7/44 cases undergoing non-radical operation. The serum CEA of 41 recurrence cases was 43.12±17.15 ng/mL at six-year post-operation, with 87.80% of three-year recurrence rate. It suggested that the serum CEA test is a convenient method for colorectal cancer to preoperatively diagnose it, evaluate postoperative curative effect and detect tumor recurrence and metastasis

  6. Levels of CEA among vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, H.A. (City Univ. of New York, NY); Snyder, J.; Lewinson, T.; Woo, C.; Lilis, R.; Selikoff, I.J

    1978-09-01

    In 1974, vinyl chloride exposed workers were found to have an increased risk of malignant disease (hemangiosarcoma of the liver). We have examined 1,147 workers exposed to vinyl chloride monomer in three VC/PVC polymerization plants, and 269 workers from a PVC extrusion plant manufacturing PVC textile leather, exposed to much lower concentrations of vinyl chloride. Included among the comprehensive clinical and laboratory studies conducted was the CEA titer. We obtained, respectively, 1,115 and 248 CEA titers. Multiple factors were demonstrated which affected the distribution of CEA titers. Cigarette use had the greatest effect, followed by history of specific past illnesses and alcohol intake history. After removing these possible confounding effects, the distribution of CEA titers among the polymerization workers was significantly different from the extrusion plant group and from an unexposed comparison group. Of the six job categories analyzed, only production and maintenance workers had CEA titer distributions significantly different from the comparison group and the extrusion workers. The investigation demonstrates that occupational exposures in VC/PVC polymerization plants can cause elevations in the CEA titers of otherwise healthy individuals. Prospective follow-up is necessary before conclusions can be drawn concerning the usefulness of the CEA titer as a predictive indicator of possible increased risk.

  7. A study of factors influencing plasma CEA levels in an unselected population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbeth, B; Bagrel, A

    1980-01-01

    Plasma carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels were measured by an immunoenzymic method (Abbott) in 1020 subjects attending the Preventive Medicine Centre (Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy). The results are assessed in relation to: sex, age, body build, fasting/normal food intake, smoking, alcohol intake, drug medication, and working environment. The mean plasma CEA level is 1.53 ng/ml. 87% of the total group has levels less than 2.5 ng/ml, 11.2% levels between 2.5 ng/ml and 5 ng/ml and 1.8% levels above 5 ng/ml. One person had a level above 10 ng/ml. Men had significantly higher CEA levels than women. Smoking was more frequent in both men and women with CEA levels above 2.5 ng/ml. Only in men were age, alcohol consumption and a poor work environment significantly associated with CEA levels higher than 2.5 ng/ml. Obesity in women was related to higher CEA levels. Food intake and drug medication were without influence on the CEA level.

  8. Recent developments in matter of strong motions data bank creation held by ENEA (Rome), Imperial College (London) and CEA/IPSN (Paris)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goula, X.; Mohammadioun, G.; Bommer, J.

    1988-03-01

    A pooling of strong motion data held by ENEA (Rome), Imperial College (London) and CEA/IPSN (Paris) will, in the future, give rise to a unified set of data, accessible from any one of the three centers, composed of a data bank of uncorrected accelerograms associated with an accessory data base containing as ample information as possible concerning the earthquake itself and the recording conditions. All three centers are equipped with VAX computer material, and a DECNET link is currently under consideration. The data thus structured is destined to form the basis of a European strong-motion data bank [fr

  9. Identification of CEA-interacting proteins in colon cancer cells and their changes in expression after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byong Chul [Colorectal Cancer Branch, Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Seung Gu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level has been recognized as a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer, and associated with response of rectal cancer to radiotherapy. This study aimed to identify CEA-interacting proteins in colon cancer cells and observe post-irradiation changes in their expression. CEA expression in colon cancer cells was examined by Western blot analysis. Using an anti-CEA antibody or IgG as a negative control, immunoprecipitation was performed in colon cancer cell lysates. CEA and IgG immunoprecipitates were used for liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Proteins identified in the CEA immunoprecipitates but not in the IgG immunoprecipitates were selected as CEA-interacting proteins. After radiation treatment, changes in expression of CEA-interacting proteins were monitored by Western blot analysis. CEA expression was higher in SNU-81 cells compared with LoVo cells. The membrane localization of CEA limited the immunoprecipitation results and thus the number of CEA-interacting proteins identified. Only the Ras-related protein Rab-6B and lysozyme C were identified as CEA-interacting proteins in LoVo and SNU-81 cells, respectively. Lysozyme C was detected only in SNU-81, and CEA expression was differently regulated in two cell lines; it was down-regulated in LoVo but up-regulated in SNU-81 in radiation dosage-dependent manner. CEA-mediated radiation response appears to vary, depending on the characteristics of individual cancer cells. The lysozyme C and Rab subfamily proteins may play a role in the link between CEA and tumor response to radiation, although further studies are needed to clarify functional roles of the identified proteins.

  10. Identification of CEA-interacting proteins in colon cancer cells and their changes in expression after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Byong Chul; Yeo, Seung Gu

    2017-01-01

    The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level has been recognized as a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer, and associated with response of rectal cancer to radiotherapy. This study aimed to identify CEA-interacting proteins in colon cancer cells and observe post-irradiation changes in their expression. CEA expression in colon cancer cells was examined by Western blot analysis. Using an anti-CEA antibody or IgG as a negative control, immunoprecipitation was performed in colon cancer cell lysates. CEA and IgG immunoprecipitates were used for liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Proteins identified in the CEA immunoprecipitates but not in the IgG immunoprecipitates were selected as CEA-interacting proteins. After radiation treatment, changes in expression of CEA-interacting proteins were monitored by Western blot analysis. CEA expression was higher in SNU-81 cells compared with LoVo cells. The membrane localization of CEA limited the immunoprecipitation results and thus the number of CEA-interacting proteins identified. Only the Ras-related protein Rab-6B and lysozyme C were identified as CEA-interacting proteins in LoVo and SNU-81 cells, respectively. Lysozyme C was detected only in SNU-81, and CEA expression was differently regulated in two cell lines; it was down-regulated in LoVo but up-regulated in SNU-81 in radiation dosage-dependent manner. CEA-mediated radiation response appears to vary, depending on the characteristics of individual cancer cells. The lysozyme C and Rab subfamily proteins may play a role in the link between CEA and tumor response to radiation, although further studies are needed to clarify functional roles of the identified proteins

  11. Fusion technology. Annual report of the. Association Cea/EURATOM; Technologie de fusion.Rapport annuel de l`association CEA/Euratom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaud, P.; Le Vagueres, F.

    1996-12-31

    In 1996, the French EURATOM-CEA Association made significant contributions to the European technology programme. This work is compiled in this report as follows: the ITER CEA activities and related developments are described in the first section; blankets and material developments for DEMO, long term safety studies are summarised in the second part; the Underlying Technology activities are compiled in the third part of this report. In each section, the tasks are sorted out to respect the European presentation. For an easy reading, appendix 4 gives the list of tasks in alphabetical order with a page reference list. The CEA is in charge of the French Technology programme. Three specific organizational directions of the CEA, located on four sites (see appendix 5) are involves in this programme: Advanced Technologies Direction (DTA), for Material task; Nuclear Reactors Direction (DRN), for Blanket design, Neutronic problems, Safety tasks; Physical Sciences Direction (DSM) uses the competence of the Tore Supra team in the Magnet design and plasma Facing Component field. The CEA programme is completed by collaborations with Technicatome, COMEX-Nucleaire and Ecole Polytechnique. The breakdown of the programme by Directions is presented in figure 1. The allocation of tasks is given in appendix 2 and in appendix 3, the related publications. (author).

  12. Use of radioimmunodetection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and ferritin in diagnosis of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamyatin, S.S.; Zakharychev, V.D.

    1989-01-01

    To study the diagnostic value of radioimmunoassay (RIA) of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and ferritin the level of this markers under lung cancer depending on the tumor localization and the process stage is determined. It is shown that determination of CEA and ferritin level in a number of patients with the peripheral lung cancer allows on the confirm the diagnosis. In case of the central cancer an increase of CEA level testifies to the tumor germination into the adjacent organs and lung tissue and allows one to determine the stage and operability of the disease. 10 refs.; 3 tabs

  13. The evaluation of the year 1999. Report of the Safety Administrative Staff; Bilan 1999. Le rapport de la Direction centrale de la securite. Controle des rejets et surveillance de l'environnement des centres CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The environmental quality around the CEA's Centers is a constant care of its safety policy. In this context a continuously control of the effluents and the air is monitoring. In order to inform the public this report presents the evaluation of the liquid or gaseous radioactive effluents, for the year 1999. A part is devoted to the regulations and the methods used to control the environmental quality around the centers. (A.L.B.)

  14. Progress in fusion reactors blanket analysis and evaluation at CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proust, E.; Gervaise, F.; Carre, F.; Chevereau, G.; Doutriaux, D.

    1986-09-01

    In the frame of the recent CEA studies aiming at the development, evaluation and comparison of solid breeder blanket concepts in view of their adaptation to NET, the evaluation of specific questions related to the first wall design, the present paper examines first the performances of a helium cooled toroidal blanket design for NET, based on innovative Beryllium/Ceramics breeder rod elements. Neutronic and thermo-mechanical optimisation converges on a concept featured by a breeding capability in excess of 1.2, a reasonnable pumping power of 1% and a narrow breeder temperature range (470+-30 deg C of the breeder), the latter being largely independent of the power level. This design proves naturally adapted to ceramic breeder assigned to very strict working conditions, and provides for any change in the thermal and heat transfer characteristics over the blanket lifetime. The final section of the paper is devoted to the evaluation of the heat load poloidal distribution and to the irradiation effects on first wall structural materials

  15. CEA's waste management policy and strategy. Lessons learned - 59201

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dall'ava, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Radioactive wastes are generated during operation as well as during the decontamination and dismantling of CEA's nuclear facility/installation. The safe and responsible management of radioactive wastes at all stages is an essential requirement of the regulatory system. The management covers the whole sequence of operations starting with the generation of waste and ending with its disposal. The disposal here means discarding of waste with no intention for retrieval. It is important to note here that the safety principles and practices that are applicable during the operational phase are also applicable during the decommissioning phase. As the radioactive waste arising is an inevitable outcome of decommissioning work, all the regulatory requirements associated with decommissioning remain in force in waste management. This presentation deals initially with the regulatory standards related to the management of wastes. As the management of radioactive wastes inevitably includes treatment and conditioning of wastes, following treatment and conditioning of wastes, storage, transportation and eventual disposal are the logical outcome of the radioactive wastes, processes are at any time improved based on the feedback experience and the lessons learned. (author)

  16. CEA distribution transformer purchasing specifications (DTWG-01,02,03)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.

    1999-01-01

    Purchasing specifications for three types of distribution transformers are presented. The specifications were compiled by the Canadian Electricity Association at the suggestion made in 1989 by the Canadian Utilities Material Management Group. The specifications cover pole mounted single phase distribution transformers (DTWG-01), low-profile, single phase, dead-front pad-mounted distribution transformers (DTWG-02), and three phase, dead-front pad-mounted distribution transformers (DTWG-03). The specifications were compiled by a task force of CEA member utilities, using CSA standards as the governing standards in all three cases. The first edition of the purchasing specifications was issued in 1993. The second edition, consisting mainly of revisions based on experiences learned from using the first edition, and the addition of the appropriate clauses of CSA standards, was published in 1998. Based on a three-year average of the number of transformers purchased annually (about 58,000) at an estimated total cost of $ 120 million, use of the Purchasing Specifications is said to have resulted in savings of about 7 per cent or $ 8.4 million

  17. The use and evolution of the CEA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossillon, F.; Chauvez, C.

    1964-01-01

    The authors successively examine the different research reactors in use in the French C.E.A. Nuclear Centres. They trace briefly their histories, describing how they have been used up to the present, and how they have been adapted to changes in programme by means of certain modifications. They also describe the reasons which have led to the elaboration of the project for the new reactor Osiris. Zoe, the oldest reactor in the CEA, has been in service in the Centre de Fontenay-aux-Roses since 1948. It is used mainly for measurements of absorption cross-sections in graphite, and for various short irradiations which do not require high fluxes. The reactor EL 2, in service since 1952, was used for the first studies on gas cooling. It has also been widely used for the production of radioisotopes and for a large number of experiments in the fields of physics, metallurgy and physical chemistry. The ageing of certain elements of the reactor has led to the decision to close it down in the near future The reactor EL 3 has been widely used for experiments in physics and in the investigation of fuels. The possibilities of the reactor in fast neutron irradiations will be considerably improved by the adoption of a new type of core (the 'snow crystal' structure). Triton-I, a 2 MW swimming-pool reactor, is used for the most part for fast neutron and gamma irradiations. The modifications being carried out on it at present should result in an increase in the power of the reactor up to 4 or 5 MW. In a neighbouring compartment is housed Triton-II which is of the same general structure, as Triton-I, but whose maximum power is 100 kW. Triton-II is used solely for studies on shielding. Melusine, a 2 MW swimming-pool reactor, has been in use in the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble since 1959. It has supported a very high programme concerned mainly with solid state physics, fundamental research into refractory fissile materials and special graphites, and the study of the behaviour of

  18. Report on transparency and nuclear safety - Grenoble CEA centre - 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the different nuclear base installations (INB) of the Grenoble CEA centre, gives an overview of measures regarding safety within these installations (organisation, general arrangements, human and organizational factors, arrangements related to different risks, management of emergency situations, inspections, audits and second-level controls, arrangements and main events specific to the different installations and buildings) and of measures related to radiation protection (organisation and results, main events). It reports the significant events related to safety and radiation protection which occurred in 2012 and were declared to the ASN, and discusses how the return-on-experience has been used. It reports and comments the results of measurements of radiological and chemical gaseous and liquid effluents, of surveys of the environment. It also presents the environmental management approach. The next part addresses the management of radioactive wastes which are warehoused on this site: arrangements aimed at limiting their volume, and at limiting their impact on health and on the environment, waste production and removal, nature and quantities of warehoused wastes. Remarks and recommendations of the CHSCT are given

  19. Training implications of skills needed for environmental cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, C.; Hensley, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Lehr, J.

    1995-03-01

    Well-trained staff are needed to perform the diverse tasks associated with environmental cleanup. Although educational and training programs are intended to help professionals learn relevant environmental skills, these programs may or may not be teaching the most appropriate skills. This project investigated the skills needed to carry out environmental activities at a headquarters office of a federal agency. The primary skills needed for environmental cleanup activities emphasize program management, problem solving/critical thinking, and communications. Furthermore, using Bloom`s taxonomy of educational objectives, most of these skills fell into the areas of {open_quotes}application{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}evaluation.{close_quotes} The results of this investigation suggest that rather than focusing on discipline-specific activities, such as helping improve people`s knowledge about regulatory requirements, training and education should emphasize complex problem-solving skills.

  20. Health conditions among workers who participated in the cleanup of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarli, Z.; Abdulina, A.

    1996-01-01

    People who took part in the Chernobyl accident cleanup have been registered upon their return to Kyrgyzstan since 1991, and their children since 1992. Later, citizens affected by the Semipalatinsk and Chelyabinsk contamination incidents were included for registration and health care purposes. The effects of the nuclear waste depositories in the Mailuu-Suu region were examined with the assistance of the Kansas University Medical Center (United States of America). All these investigations of affected people indicated apparent increases in a number of symptoms and illnesses when compared to the rest of the population. Samples sizes ranged from several hundred to several thousand. Above-normal radiation levels and/or the stress and fear of living in contaminated areas can lead to significant increases in nervous disorders, cardiovascular diseases and other problems. The most significant increase was in the suicide rate. 6 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  1. Cleanup Verification Package for the 600-259 Waste Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Capron

    2006-02-09

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 600-259 waste site. The site was the former site of the Special Waste Form Lysimeter, consisting of commercial reactor isotope waste forms in contact with soils within engineered caissons, and was used by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to collect data regarding leaching behavior for target analytes. A Grout Waste Test Facility also operated at the site, designed to test leaching rates of grout-solidified low-level radioactive waste.

  2. Myelodysplastic syndromes in Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluzman, Daniil F; Sklyarenko, Lilia M; Koval, Stella V; Rodionova, Nataliia K; Zavelevich, Michael P; Ivanivskaya, Tetiana S; Poludnenko, Liudmyla Yu; Ukrainskaya, Nataliia I

    2015-10-01

    The studies of the recent decades posed the question of the association between radiation exposure and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). This association has been proved in secondary MDS originating upon exposure to chemotherapeutics and/or radiation therapy. The long-term study in Japanese atomic (A)-bomb survivors demonstrated the significant linear dose-response for MDS confirming the link between radiation exposure and this form of hematopoietic malignancies. All these findings provide the strong basis for studying MDS in the persons exposed to radiation following the Chernobyl disaster, especially those in the cohort of Chernobyl clean-up workers of 1986-1987. The data on MDS among Chernobyl clean-up workers (1986-1987) diagnosed in 1996-2012 at the reference laboratory of RE Kavetsky Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology are summarized. MDS cases were diagnosed in 23 persons (21 males and 2 females) having been exposed to radiation as clean-up workers of 1986-1987. Refractory anemia (RA) has been detected in 13, refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS)-in 2, and refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB)-in 8 patients. The median age of those MDS patients was 62.0 years. In addition, 5 cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) were recorded in the group of Chernobyl clean-up workers with the median time of 14.8 years from 1986-1987 to diagnosis. The association between radiation exposure and MDS is discussed. The suggested life-long risk for myelodysplastic syndromes among A-bomb survivors in Japan highlights the importance of the continuing follow-up studies in the affected populations in the post-Chernobyl period.

  3. Public participation in the evaluation of innovative environmental cleanup technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.; McCabe, G.; Serie, P.; Niesen, K.

    1994-08-01

    Technologies for remediation of contamination are urgently needed to clean up US Department of Energy (DOE) sites across the country. DOE is managing a national program to develop, demonstrate, and deploy new technologies with promise to expedite this cleanup. The Integrated Demonstration for Cleanup of Volatile Organic Compounds at Arid Sites (VOC-Arid ID) is one such effort. Time and resources, however, are too limited to be invested in methods of remediation that will never be deployed because they have not been rigorously evaluated or because they face the withering opposition of stakeholders. Therefore the VOC-Arid ID is assessing technology both in terms of its technical effectiveness and its stakeholder acceptability. Only if a technology performs as required and is acceptable to regulators, users of technology, and the public will the VOC-Arid ID recommend its use. What distinguishes public involvement in the VOC-Arid ID is the direct influence stakeholders have on the design of technology demonstrations by working directly with technology developers. Stakeholders participated in defining the criteria with which innovative environmental cleanup technology is being evaluated. The integrated demonstration is committed to providing stakeholders with the information they've indicated they need to reach reasoned judgments about the use of specific cleanup technologies. A guiding principle of the VOC-Arid ID is that stakeholder participation improves the technologies being developed, enhances the acceptance of the technologies, and will lead to the broad and timely deployment of appropriate and effective methods of environmental remediation. The VOC-Arid ID has involved stakeholders from the host demonstration site, Hanford, Washington, and from other and sites where the ID technologies may be deployed

  4. The Prognostic Significance of Pretreatment Serum CEA Levels in Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis Including 14651 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kai; Yang, Li; Hu, Bing; Wu, Hao; Zhu, Hong; Tang, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Background Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is commonly used as a serum tumor marker in clinical practice; however, its prognostic value for gastric cancer patients remains uncertain. This meta-analysis was performed to assess the prognostic value of CEA and investigate CEA as a tumor marker. Methods PubMed, EMBASE and other databases were searched for potentially eligible studies. Forty-one studies reporting the prognostic effect of pretreatment serum CEA expression in gastric cancer patients were selected. Data on 14651 eligible patients were retrieved for the meta-analysis. Based on the data extracted from the available literature, the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for an adverse prognosis were estimated for gastric cancer patients with elevated pretreatment serum levels of CEA (CEA+) relative to patients with normal pretreatment CEA levels (CEA-). Results The CEA+ patients had a significantly poorer prognosis than the CEA- patients in terms of overall survival (OS: HR 1.716, 95% CI 1.594 - 1.848, P 0.05). In the pooled analyses of multivariate-adjusted HRs, the results suggested that pretreatment serum CEA may be an independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer (OS: HR 1.681, 95% CI 1.425 - 1.982; DSS: HR 1.900, 95% CI 1.441 - 2.505; DFS: HR 2.579, 95% CI 1.935 - 3.436). Conclusion/Significance The meta-analysis based on the available literature supported the association of elevated pretreatment serum CEA levels with a poor prognosis for gastric cancer and a nearly doubled risk of mortality in gastric cancer patients. CEA may be an independent prognostic factor for gastric cancer patients and may aid in determining appropriate treatment which may preferentially benefit the CEA+ patients. PMID:25879931

  5. Numerical Platon: A unified linear equation solver interface by CEA for solving open foe scientific applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secher, Bernard; Belliard, Michel; Calvin, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a tool called 'Numerical Platon' developed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). It provides a freely available (GNU LGPL license) interface for coupling scientific computing applications to various freeware linear solver libraries (essentially PETSc, SuperLU and HyPre), together with some proprietary CEA solvers, for high-performance computers that may be used in industrial software written in various programming languages. This tool was developed as part of considerable efforts by the CEA Nuclear Energy Division in the past years to promote massively parallel software and on-shelf parallel tools to help develop new generation simulation codes. After the presentation of the package architecture and the available algorithms, we show examples of how Numerical Platon is used in sequential and parallel CEA codes. Comparing with in-house solvers, the gain in terms of increases in computation capacities or in terms of parallel performances is notable, without considerable extra development cost

  6. Numerical Platon: A unified linear equation solver interface by CEA for solving open foe scientific applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secher, Bernard [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Nuclear Energy Division (DEN) (France); CEA Saclay DM2S/SFME/LGLS, Bat. 454, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)], E-mail: bsecher@cea.fr; Belliard, Michel [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Nuclear Energy Division (DEN) (France); CEA Cadarache DER/SSTH/LMDL, Bat. 238, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Calvin, Christophe [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Nuclear Energy Division (DEN) (France); CEA Saclay DM2S/SERMA/LLPR, Bat. 470, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2009-01-15

    This paper describes a tool called 'Numerical Platon' developed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). It provides a freely available (GNU LGPL license) interface for coupling scientific computing applications to various freeware linear solver libraries (essentially PETSc, SuperLU and HyPre), together with some proprietary CEA solvers, for high-performance computers that may be used in industrial software written in various programming languages. This tool was developed as part of considerable efforts by the CEA Nuclear Energy Division in the past years to promote massively parallel software and on-shelf parallel tools to help develop new generation simulation codes. After the presentation of the package architecture and the available algorithms, we show examples of how Numerical Platon is used in sequential and parallel CEA codes. Comparing with in-house solvers, the gain in terms of increases in computation capacities or in terms of parallel performances is notable, without considerable extra development cost.

  7. Significance of changes of serum NSE and CEA levels in patients with pneumonia and malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hengguo; Luo Nanping; Wang Ruishan; Bai Lu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the significance of changes of serum NSE and CEA levels in patients with pneumonia and malignant tumors. Methods: Serum NSE (with RIA) and CEA (with ECLIA) levels in patients with pneumonia or various kinds of malignant tumors (altogether 140 patients) and 32 controls. Results: Serum NSE and CEA levels were significantly higher in patients with lung cancer, gastric cancer, renal cancer, brain tumor and pneumonia than those in the controls (P<0.05,P <0. 05 ,P <0. 01, P<0.01, P<0.01). Positive rate of serum NSE highest in patients with pneumonia, followed successively by renal cancer, brain tumor and lung cancer. NSE levels were positively correlated with CEA levels (r=0.29, P<0.05). Conclusion: As a tumor marker, NSE has important clinical significance in the diagnoses of malignant tumor and pneumonia. (authors)

  8. Characterization of plutonium contamination at Maralinga: Dosimetry and cleanup criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.B.; Martin, L.J.; Williams, G.A.; Harries, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    An area of South Australia remained contaminated following British atomic tests at Maralinga during 1955-1963. Of importance is the long lived 239 Pu of which some 24 kg was explosively dispersed in several 'minor trials'. The extent, quantities and physical characteristics of the plutonium have been assessed and estimates of dose, dominated by the inhalation pathway in the critical group of Aborigines living a semi-traditional lifestyle, have been made for potential occupants. Dosimetry, together with social and economic factors, underpins the setting of cleanup criteria in terms of activity concentrations averaged over large areas and permissible concentrations of contaminated particles. The possibility of intentional behaviour such as fragment scavenging has also influenced limits on particulate contamination. Rehabilitation of the most contaminated areas is underway, with scraping of surface soil and burial on site completed. Vehicular-mounted radiation detector systems for wide area and particle monitoring have been developed, and procedures established for determining cleanup boundaries and for the verification monitoring to ensure that the cleanup process has met the specified criteria. Data are being obtained for a final dose and health risk assessment of the cleaned up site. (author)

  9. Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement implementation successes and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    On July 19, 1996 the US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Colorado (CDPHE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) entered into an agreement called the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) for the cleanup and closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Rocky Flats). Major elements of the agreement include: an Integrated Site-Wide Baseline; up to twelve significant enforceable milestones per year; agreed upon soil and water action levels and standards for cleanup; open space as the likely foreseeable land use; the plutonium and TRU waste removed by 2015; streamlined regulatory process; agreement with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) to coordinate activities; and a risk reduction focus. Successful implementation of RFCA requires a substantial effort by the parties to change their way of thinking about RFETS and meet the deliverables and commitments. Substantial progress toward Site closure through the implementation of RFCA has been accomplished in the short time since the signing, yet much remains to be done. Much can be learned from the Rocky Flats experience by other facilities in similar situations

  10. Thyroid disorders in Chernobyl clean-up workers from Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurjane, N.; Orlikovs, G.; Ritenberga, R.; Skudra, M.; Lemane, R.; Lemanis, A.; Curbakova, E.; Groma, V.; Socnevs, A.

    1999-01-01

    The condition of thyroid was examined in 2188 Chernobyl clean-up workers residing in Latvia and a control group consisting of 1041 employees of the Ministry of International Affairs. Thyroid examinations included palpation, ultrasonography, selective scintigraphy and detection of the level of thyroid hormones in blood serum:L STH (thyroid-stimulating hormone), total T3 (triiodothyronine), and T4 (thyroxine). Thyroid was registered in 394 Chernobyl clean-up workers. Of these cases, 28 patients with suspected thyroid cancer were operated, and morphological examinations revealed papillary adenocarcinoma (in 5 patients), follicular adenocarcinoma (2), nodular colloid goiter (16); toxic diffuse goiter (1), papillary-follicular adenoma (3), and chronic thyroiditis (1). It was determined that the thyroid pathology in the Chernobyl clean-up workers had a tendency to progress (27 cases in 1987 versus 394 cases in 1998 in total; and absence of thyroid cancer in 1987, compared with 7 cases in 1998); thyroid nodules increased twice (64 cases in 1997, compare with 126 cases in 1998). (author)

  11. Lessons learned at TMI: cleanup for respiratory protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parfitt, B.A.; Gee, E.F.

    1987-01-01

    The March 28, 1979, accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) presented GPU Nuclear with technical challenges unprecedented in the nuclear power industry. Among these challenges were a myriad of health physics problems that had to be solved to ensure a radiologically safe environment for workers performing cleanup activities. The application of the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) philosophy has been a fundamental aspects in protecting cleanup workers. The unique conditions produced by the accident, however, have necessitated novel and innovative approaches in making this philosophy effective. The option to use respirators is based on which method will result in the lowest radiation dose to the worker. Inherent to this program has been the training of workers to overcome the perception that any internal contamination is of foremost concern and is orders of magnitude greater in biological effect than an identical external dose. It is, of course, the total dose (internal dose plus external dose) that must be minimized to implement a true ALARA philosophy. The need for considering the total radiation dose when making decisions to use respirators has been clear during the TMI-2 cleanup. Prescribing respirators is not always good for the ALARA concept

  12. CEA A BIOCHEMICAL MARKER FOR DIAGNOSIS AND PROGNOSIS OF GASTROINTESTINAL CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Prathibha; Vishnu Datt

    2016-01-01

    Serum tumor markers (TM) are widely used for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment of cancer. Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) is one of the most widely investigated tumor markers in gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Estimation of circulating tumor markers is a non- invasive quantitative method. Serum levels of CEA were studied for diagnosis and prognosis of gastrointestinal malignancies. 140 subjects were undertaken out of which 35 normal and remaining 105 were GI cancer patients. Ser...

  13. Comparison of CA15-3 and CEA in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovaca, Z.; Mijatovic, J.; Matavulj, A.; Kovacevic, P.; Ponorac, N.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Tumor markers are potentially powerful means for obtaining information about cancers whilst causing minimal morbidity, inconvenience and cost. CA 15-3 and CEA are considered useful tumor markers in monitoring breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate which of these two markers are in better correlate with the disease in patients surgically treated for breast cancer. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed values of CA15-3 and CEA in 342 patients (median age 52.18 years, range 27-78 years) with surgically treated and pathologically proven breast cancer. CA15-3 and CEA was measured by radioimmunoassay. CA15-3 levels above 30 U/ml and CEA levels above 5 ng/ml were considered as positive values. Results: Out of 342 patients, 86 had elevated CA15-3 levels (sensitivity: 25.1%) and 68 of 342 patients had positive CEA levels (sensitivity 19.9%). Two hundred thirty seven (237) of the patients suffering from breast cancer (69.3%) did not have metastatic disease. In this group CA15-3 sensitivity was 94.5%, while CEA sensitivity was 87.3%. One hundred and five (105) patients (30.7%) had metastatic disease. In this group, CA15-3 sensitivity was 69.5% and CEA sensitivity was 36.2% (P < 0.05). With regard to the correlation of the two tumor markers with clinical course patients had significantly higher levels of CA15-3 than of CEA in metastatic breast cancer. Conclusion: This result suggests CA15-3 to be the more sensitive and more specific of the two tumor markers for metastatic breast cancer detection and monitoring

  14. Scientific evaluation at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). 2005-2006 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This report aims at presenting the scientific evaluation activities carried out at the CEA during the years 2005-2006. The evaluation system is described in detail. It comprises two aspects: the evaluation of the scientific policy implemented by the scientific Council and by the visiting committee of the CEA, and the evaluation of the laboratories, performed by a pool of 36 scientific councils. The evaluation by external and independent parties is the key point of this system. This document makes a status of the evaluations performed in 2005 and 2006. It presents a synthesis of the conclusions of the evaluation authorities. The actions implemented by the CEA to take into consideration the recommendations are also reported with the improvements noticed. The two topics examined by the scientific Committee and by the visiting committee were dealing with the energy domain, which is a strategic issue for the CEA. The examination of the researches on future nuclear reactors and on new energy technologies have shown the major role played by the CEA in the recent advances in these domains. About 95% of the laboratories activity was examined during the 2002-2005 period. The richness of the remarks and recommendations made by the scientific councils should allow the CEA to improve the quality and relevance of its research works. The start-up of the 2006-2009 evaluation cycle has been the occasion to modify the evaluation of some research domains in order to take into account the evolution of programs. The evaluation system of the CEA is highly consistent with the AERES principles. Its implementation, adapted to each type of activity (fundamental research, applied research, technological developments) allows the CEA to follow up a permanent improvement approach. (J.S.)

  15. Diagnostic test pepsinogen I and combination with tumor marker CEA in gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembiring, J.; Sarumpaet, K.; Ganie, R. A.

    2018-03-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fifth leading cause of cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality globally. Human pepsinogens (HP) are considered promising serological biomarkers for the screening of atrophic gastritis (AG) and GC. HP are biochemically and immunochemically classified into two groups: pepsinogen I (PG I) and PG II. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a glycoprotein, which is present in normal mucosal cells but increased amounts are associated with adenocarcinoma, especially colorectal cancer. CEA in combination with other tumour markers can be used in pre-operative staging and thereby assist in the planning of the type of surgery required and future management options. The purpose of this study was to diagnose test PG I and combination with tumor marker CEA in 32 patients suspected with GC. There was a significant difference in levels of CEA between GC group with non-GC with a value p <0.001. PGI sensitivity was 70.58% and specificity 93.3%. The sensitivity of PGI and CEA combination of 94.1% and specificity 80%. The area of AUC obtained was 92.7% at 95% confidence interval (82.7-100%). This AUC value indicated that the value of diagnostic accuracy of the PGI and CEA combinations of 92.7%.

  16. Evaluation of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) density as a prognostic factor for percutaneous ablation of pulmonary colorectal metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ya Ruth; Glenn, Derek; Liauw, Winston; Power, Mark; Zhao, Jing; Morris, David L

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) density and other clinicopathological factors for percutaneous ablation of pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer. CEA density was calculated as: "absolute serum CEA pre-ablation/volume of all lung metastases [mm 3 ]". Median CEA density was the cut-off for high and low groups. Cox-regression was used to determine prognostic factors for survival. A total of 85 patients (102 ablation sessions) were followed for a median of 27 months. High CEA density was significantly associated with worse overall survival compared to low CEA density (adjusted HR: 2.12; 95 % CI: 1.22-3.70, p=0.002; median survival: 25.7 vs. 44.3 months). The interval between primary resection of the colorectal carcinoma and first ablation was also a prognostic factor, a duration >24 months being associated with better survival compared to a shorter interval (0-24 months) (adjusted HR: 0.55; 95 % CI: 0.31-0.98, p=0.04). Moreover, a disease-free interval >24 months was significantly associated with low CEA density compared to a shorter interval (0-24 months) (adjusted OR: 0.29; 95 % CI: 0.11-0.77, p=0.01). Serum CEA density and interval between primary resection of a colorectal carcinoma and pulmonary ablation are independent prognostic factors for overall survival. In two patients with identical CEA serum levels, the patient with the lower/smaller pulmonary tumour load would have a worse prognosis than the one with the higher/larger pulmonary metastases. • CEA density is an independent prognostic factor for colorectal pulmonary metastases. • A lower CEA density is associated with better overall survival. • CEA may play a functional role in tumour progression. • High CEA density is associated with smaller tumours. • Interval between pulmonary ablation and primary colorectal carcinoma is a prognostic factor.

  17. Selection, affinity maturation, and characterization of a human scFv antibody against CEA protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavoni, Emiliano; Flego, Michela; Dupuis, Maria Luisa; Barca, Stefano; Petronzelli, Fiorella; Anastasi, Anna Maria; D'Alessio, Valeria; Pelliccia, Angela; Vaccaro, Paola; Monteriù, Giorgia; Ascione, Alessandro; De Santis, Rita; Felici, Franco; Cianfriglia, Maurizio; Minenkova, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Background CEA is a tumor-associated antigen abundantly expressed on several cancer types, including those naturally refractory to chemotherapy. The selection and characterization of human anti-CEA single-chain antibody fragments (scFv) is a first step toward the construction of new anticancer monoclonal antibodies designed for optimal blood clearance and tumor penetration. Methods The human MA39 scFv, selected for its ability to recognize a CEA epitope expressed on human colon carcinomas, was first isolated from a large semi-synthetic ETH-2 antibody phage library, panned on human purified CEA protein. Subsequently, by in vitro mutagenesis of a gene encoding for the scFv MA39, a new library was established, and new scFv antibodies with improved affinity towards the CEA cognate epitope were selected and characterized. Results The scFv MA39 antibody was affinity-maturated by in vitro mutagenesis and the new scFv clone, E8, was isolated, typed for CEA family member recognition and its CEACAM1, 3 and 5 shared epitope characterized for expression in a large panel of human normal and tumor tissues and cells. Conclusion The binding affinity of the scFv E8 is in a range for efficient, in vivo, antigen capture in tumor cells expressing a shared epitope of the CEACAM1, 3 and 5 proteins. This new immunoreagent meets all criteria for a potential anticancer compound: it is human, hence poorly or not at all immunogenic, and it binds selectively and with good affinity to the CEA epitope expressed by metastatic melanoma and colon and lung carcinomas. Furthermore, its small molecular size should provide for efficient tissue penetration, yet give rapid plasma clearance. PMID:16504122

  18. Selection, affinity maturation, and characterization of a human scFv antibody against CEA protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Santis Rita

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CEA is a tumor-associated antigen abundantly expressed on several cancer types, including those naturally refractory to chemotherapy. The selection and characterization of human anti-CEA single-chain antibody fragments (scFv is a first step toward the construction of new anticancer monoclonal antibodies designed for optimal blood clearance and tumor penetration. Methods The human MA39 scFv, selected for its ability to recognize a CEA epitope expressed on human colon carcinomas, was first isolated from a large semi-synthetic ETH-2 antibody phage library, panned on human purified CEA protein. Subsequently, by in vitro mutagenesis of a gene encoding for the scFv MA39, a new library was established, and new scFv antibodies with improved affinity towards the CEA cognate epitope were selected and characterized. Results The scFv MA39 antibody was affinity-maturated by in vitro mutagenesis and the new scFv clone, E8, was isolated, typed for CEA family member recognition and its CEACAM1, 3 and 5 shared epitope characterized for expression in a large panel of human normal and tumor tissues and cells. Conclusion The binding affinity of the scFv E8 is in a range for efficient, in vivo, antigen capture in tumor cells expressing a shared epitope of the CEACAM1, 3 and 5 proteins. This new immunoreagent meets all criteria for a potential anticancer compound: it is human, hence poorly or not at all immunogenic, and it binds selectively and with good affinity to the CEA epitope expressed by metastatic melanoma and colon and lung carcinomas. Furthermore, its small molecular size should provide for efficient tissue penetration, yet give rapid plasma clearance.

  19. A decision-making process on cleanup of contaminated surface soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    This study presents principles for determining derived intervention levels (DILs) for surface soil cleanup. The people concerned were divided into major three groups: residents, responsible parties, and cleanup workers; it was considered that each group has different interests. The DILs for soil cleanup were determined from the viewpoints of these three groups: safety of residence, advantages of the countermeasures, and safety of cleanup activities, respectively. An example process for determination of the DILs in accordance with the principles was also presented for a site contaminated by 137 Cs. This decision-making frame is expected to be applicable to other contaminants. (author)

  20. Improving Sampling, Analysis, and Data Management for Site Investigation and Cleanup

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) supports the adoption of streamlined approaches to sampling, analysis, and data management activities conducted during site assessment, characterization, and cleanup.

  1. NRC plan for cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, R.; Snyder, B.J.

    1980-07-01

    The NRC plan defines the functional role of the NRC in cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2 to assure that agency regulatory responsibilities and objectives will be fulfilled. The plan outlines NRC functions in TMI-2 cleanup operations in the following areas: (1) the functional relationship of NRC to other government agencies, the public, and the licensee to coordinate activities, (2) the functional roles of these organizations in cleanup operations, (3) the NRC review and decision-making procedure for the licensee's proposed cleanup operation, (4) the NRC/licensee estimated schedule of major actions, and (5) NRC's functional role in overseeing implementation of approved licensee activities

  2. Clinical significance of determination of serum SA, CEA and CRP levels in patients with colo-rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jie; Hu Junyan; Sun Shuming; Cheng Benkun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical usefulness of determination of serum SA, CEA and CRP levels in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: Serum SA (with colorimetry), CEA (with CLIA) and CRP (with ILIA) levels were measured in 120 patients with colo-rectal cancer. Results: (1) Serum SA, CEA and CRP levels increased significantly as the disease stage advanced from Duke A through Duke D. (2) As the malignancy of the growth advanced from well-differentiated to anaplastic, the serum SA and CRP levels increased significantly while the reverse was true for serum CEA levels. (3) In 68 post-operative patients followed 1-5 years, the serum levels of SA, CEA and CRP were significantly higher in the patients with recurrence (n=29) than those in patients without recurrence (n=39) (P<0.01). Conclusion: Serum SA CEA and CRP levels were closely related to the disease process in patients with colo-rectal cancer. (authors)

  3. Induction Heating on Dynamic Tensile Tests in CEA Saclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averty, X.; Yvon, P.; Duguay, C.; Pizzanelli, J. P.; Basini, V.

    2001-01-01

    The LCMI (Laboratory for characterization of irradiated materials), located in CEA from Saclay, is in charge of the mechanical tests on irradiated materials. The dynamic tensile testing machine, in a hot cell equipped with two remote handling, has been first improved in 1995, to fulfill the French safety programs on Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA). One objective of this machine is to obtain mechanical property data on current Zircaloy cladding types needed to quality the cladding's response under RIA or LOCA transient loading and thermal conditions. For the RIA, this means testing at strain rates up to 5 s' and heating rates up to 200 degree centigree-s''-1, while for Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) testing at strain rates of 10''-3 s''-1 and heating rates of 20 degree centigree s''-1 would be appropriate. The tensile samples are machined with a spark erosion machine, directly from pieces of cladding previously de fueled. Two kinds of samples can be machined in the cladding. Axial samples in order to test axial mechanical characteristics Ring samples in order to test transverse mechanical characteristics, more representative of RIA conditions. On one hand, the axial tensile tests were performed using the Joule effect, and heating rates up to about 500 degree centigree .s''-1 were obtained. This enabled us to perform the axial tests in a satisfactory manner. On the other hand, the tensile ring were first performed in a vertical furnace with a heating rate about 0.2 degree centigree.s''-1 and a thermal stability about 1 degree centigree. For temperatures above 480 degree centigree, the mechanical characteristics showed a sharp drop which could be attributed to irradiation defect annealing. Therefore we have recently developed an induction heating system to reach heating rates high enough (200 degree centigree.s''-1) to prevent any significant annealing before performing the ring tensile tests. To apply a uniaxial tangential tension, two matching half

  4. Fitoplancton del Parque Nacional Las Tablas de Daimiel. II. Las cianofíceas, los dinoflagelados, las criptofíceas, las crisofíceas y las xantofíceas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojo, Carmen

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Las Tablas de Daimiel National Park is a semiarid wetland that exhibits a high biodiversity but is suffering an inexorable eutrophication process. The study of the phytoplankton in this wetland is interesting because of its hydrological fluctuations (drought period until 1996 and its trophic condition. This papers shows the taxonomy, dynamic, and ecology of microalgae in five áreas of the Park from 1996 to 1998, which allow comparisons to be made between the present state and the 1992-1993 period. Twelve taxa of Cyanophyta, 4 of Dynophyceae, 8 of Cryptophyceae, 5 of Chrysophyceae and one of Xanthophyceae were found. Almost all species have been already cited in Spain and are typical for eutrophic environments. Cyanophyceae and Cryptophyceae were the most important groups (Planktothrix agardhii, Anabaenopsis elenkinii, Cryptomonas erosa as the most common algae. Moreover, oscillatorial Cyanophyceae (in 1992 have been replaced by N-fixing nostocal ones, related to the high level of pollution found in recent years.El Parque Nacional Las Tablas de Daimiel es un humedal semiárido, importante reserva de biodiversidad que, sin embargo, está sufriendo un inexorable proceso de eutrofización. Su estado trófico, así como los cambios hidrológicos (sequía hasta 1996, hacen especialmente interesante el estudio de su microflora. Por ello, se ha llevado a cabo este trabajo sobre las poblaciones fitoplanctónicas en cinco puntos del Parque desde 1996 a 1998, que permite además la comparación con su estado en 1992-1993. Se encontraron 12 táxones de Cyanophyta, 4 de Dynophyceae, 8 de Cryptophyceae, 5 de Chrysophyceae y uno de Xanthophyceae. Casi todas las especies están citadas en España y son propias de ambientes eutróficos. Los grupos mejor representados fueron las cianobacterias y criptofíceas (Planktothrix agardhii, Anabaenopsis elenkinii y Cryptomonas erosa fueron las especies más conspicuas. Además, se observa un cambio de cianobacterias

  5. Hanford: A Conversation About Nuclear Waste and Cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gephart, Roy E.

    2003-01-01

    The author takes us on a journey through a world of facts, values, conflicts, and choices facing the most complex environmental cleanup project in the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Starting with the top-secret Manhattan Project, Hanford was used to create tons of plutonium for nuclear weapons. Hundreds of tons of waste remain. In an easy-to-read, illustrated text, Gephart crafts the story of Hanford becoming the world's first nuclear weapons site to release large amounts of contaminants into the environment. This was at a time when radiation biology was in its infancy, industry practiced unbridled waste dumping, and the public trusted what it was told. The plutonium market stalled with the end of the Cold War. Public accountability and environmental compliance ushered in a new cleanup mission. Today, Hanford is driven by remediation choices whose outcomes remain uncertain. It's a story whose epilogue will be written by future generations. This book is an information resource, written for the general reader as well as the technically trained person wanting an overview of Hanford and cleanup issues facing the nuclear weapons complex. Each chapter is a topical mini-series. It's an idea guide that encourages readers to be informed consumers of Hanford news, to recognize that knowledge, high ethical standards, and social values are at the heart of coping with Hanford's past and charting its future. Hanford history is a window into many environmental conflicts facing our nation; it's about building upon success and learning from failure. And therein lies a key lesson, when powerful interests are involved, no generation is above pretense. Roy E. Gephart is a geohydrologist and senior program manager at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. He has 30 years experience in environmental studies and the nuclear waste industry

  6. Reagan's TMI cleanup: a smoke and mirror trick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Little federal money will actually be sent to help relieve the cleanup burden of General Public Utilities despite the administration's public support of a cost/share plan. The $100 million was not new money, but existing DOE research and development money already in hand and earmarked for Three Mile Island-related research. Pennsylvania congressmen and officials were quick to point out the deceptive nature of Reagan's approval of the plan to share the costs. The administration feels that federal participation should not be open-ended, but should be limited to research on safe nuclear waste disposal of general benefit

  7. NHC's contribution to cleanup of the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauve, H.D.

    1998-01-01

    The one billion dollars per year Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC), managed by Fluor Daniel Hanford, calls for cleanup of the Hanford Site for the Department of Energy. Project Hanford comprises four major subprojects, each managed by a different major contractor. Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) is a fifth major subcontractor which provides energy and technology to each of the Hanford projects. NHC draws on the experience and capabilities of its parent companies, COGEMA and SGN, and relies on local support from its sister Company in Richland, COGEMA Engineering Corporation, to bring the best commercial practices and new technology to the Project

  8. Union job fight boiling at DOE cleanup sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setzer, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    The US DOE is facing a growing jurisdictional dispute over which unions will perform the majority of clean-up work at its facilities. Unions affiliated with the AFL-CIO Metal Trades Council representing operations employees at the sites believe they have a fundamental right to work. Unions in the AFL-CIO's Building and Construction Trades Dept. insist that they have a clear mandate under federal labor law and the Davis-Bacon Act. The issue has heated up in recent weeks at the policy level and is boiling in a contentious dispute at DOE's Fernald site in Ohio

  9. Risky business: Assessing cleanup plans for waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.

    1995-01-01

    ORNL was chosen to perform human health and ecological risk assessments for DOE because of its risk assessment expertise. The U.S. Department of Energy's many production and research sites contain radioactive and hazardous wastes. These waste sites pose potential risks to the health and safety of remediation and waste management workers and the public. The risks, however, vary from site to site. Some sites undoubtedly present larger risks than others and should be cleaned up first. However, before the cleanup begins, DOE is required by law to prepare an environmental impact statement on any actions that may significantly affect the environment-even actions that would clean it up

  10. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. J. Farris and H. M. Sulloway

    2008-01-10

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.

  11. Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capron, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities

  12. Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Capron

    2006-04-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

  13. CUM AFECTEAZĂ CONDUCEREA CENTRALĂ POLITICA EXTERNĂ ȘI CEA DECIZIONALĂ ÎN CHINA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aureliu SINDILA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available HOW DOES LEADERSHIP AFFECT FOREIGN POLICY DECISION-MAKING IN CHINA?Chinese New Diplomacy has emerged as a vector in the Asian region first, where it has achieved a considerable visibility. This paper aims to describe the model of the Chinese New Diplomacy, while analyzing its elements and profiles. Taking into account the remarkable influence and the newly centered desires, a fresh era in the Chinese foreign policy has stepped out. This work assembles some views from inside ofChina, making it more valuable for foreigners, who, in my opinion might be very easily biased by different state and non-state actors from abroad.CUM AFECTEAZĂ CONDUCEREA CENTRALĂ POLITICA EXTERNĂ ȘI CEA DECIZIONALĂ ÎN CHINA?Noua Diplomație Chineză a apărut ca vector relativ recent în regiunea asiatică, reușind să atingă o vizibilitate consi­derabilă. În această lucrare ne-am propus să descriem modelul Noii Diplomații Chineze, contextual analizând elementele și profilurile sale. Luând în considerare influența mondială remarcabilă și noile dorințe geopolitice, China a generat o eră nouă în politica externă. Sunt asamblate câteva puncte de vedere din interiorul Chinei, ceea ce face lucrarea valoroasă pentru străini, care, în opinia noastră, ar putea fi foarte ușor influențați de diferiți actori de stat atât din interior, cât și din exterior.

  14. How to Add Value to your Business with CEA: A Practical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cardenas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Companies are always trying to differentiate themselves from the rest of the pack by applying different strategies such as improving customer service, increasing the efficiency of their operations, or reducing their costs. Most of the time, however, these goals are competing against each other for scarce resources, and managers often need to decide to concentrate on one. A small company can effectively and simultaneously accomplish these goals for a fraction of the cost by implementing communications-enabled business processes or solutions, which are a set of technology components that add real-time networking functionality to applications. One particular implementation of this framework is the one provided by Coral CEA. Coral CEA is a business ecosystem anchored around CEA functionalities that are offered as building blocks, out-of-the-box components that link the capabilities and intelligence of networks platforms with the power of current applications to provide a new set of features and functionalities. In this article, we show how a small company called Rezact, located in the ski resort town of Mont-Tremblant, Quebec, successfully implemented CEA capabilities within its own operations using Coral CEA services.

  15. CEA in activated macrophages. New diagnostic possibilities for tumor markers in early colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japink, Dennis; Leers, Mathie P G; Sosef, Meindert N; Nap, Marius

    2009-08-01

    Serum tumor markers show low sensitivity, making them unsuitable for early detection of cancer. Activated macrophages (AM) from peripheral blood can accumulate tumor marker substances and facilitate early detection in prostate cancer. Here it was investigated whether carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-containing macrophages (CEACM) can be used to detect colorectal cancer (CRC) at earlier stages than can serum CEA. Peripheral blood was collected from patients with CRC (n=48), inflammatory colorectal disease (n=5) and from healthy controls (n=18). After separating and labeling AM with CD14-APC/CD16-FITC, AM were intracellularly labeled with anti-CEA antibody and flow cytometrically analyzed. Serum CEA and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. The fraction-size of CEACM discriminated between controls and CRC patients, irrespective of AJCC stage (AJCC stage I-IV, pCEA values were significantly elevated in AJCC stage II, III and IV (p=0.02, 0.006 and <0.0001, respectively). Combining CEACM with CRP levels separated CRC from inflammatory colorectal disease. CEACM combined with CRP appears to have diagnostic potential in early CRC.

  16. Public involvement in cleanup - the Rocky Flats experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paukert, J.; Pennock, S.; Schassburger, R.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant recently completed and implemented the Rocky Flats Plant Community Relations Plan for public involvement in environmental restoration of the site. The plan was developed in cooperation with the plant's regulators, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Colorado Department of Health. In addition, citizens near the plant played a significant role in shaping the document through extensive community interviews and public comment. The result of these cooperative efforts is a plan that meets and exceeds the applicable federal and state community relations requirements for a cleanup program. In fact, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has used the Rocky Flats Plant Community Relations Plants a model for similar plans at other federal facilities. Plan development, however, is only the starting point for an effective community relations effort. The Rocky Flats Plant and the public will face many challenges together as we implement the plan and build a partnership for addressing environmental cleanup issues. (author)

  17. Use of decision analysis techniques to determine Hanford cleanup priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassbender, L.; Gregory, R.; Winterfeldt, D. von; John, R.

    1992-01-01

    In January 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office, Westinghouse Hanford Company, and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated the Hanford Integrated Planning Process (HIPP) to ensure that technically sound and publicly acceptable decisions are made that support the environmental cleanup mission at Hanford. One of the HIPP's key roles is to develop an understanding of the science and technology (S and T) requirements to support the cleanup mission. This includes conducting an annual systematic assessment of the S and T needs at Hanford to support a comprehensive technology development program and a complementary scientific research program. Basic to success is a planning and assessment methodology that is defensible from a technical perspective and acceptable to the various Hanford stakeholders. Decision analysis techniques were used to help identify and prioritize problems and S and T needs at Hanford. The approach used structured elicitations to bring many Hanford stakeholders into the process. Decision analysis, which is based on the axioms and methods of utility and probability theory, is especially useful in problems characterized by uncertainties and multiple objectives. Decision analysis addresses uncertainties by laying out a logical sequence of decisions, events, and consequences and by quantifying event and consequence probabilities on the basis of expert judgments

  18. New arrangement for the air cleanup system to recover tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Masabumi; Takahashi, Kohsaku; Munakata, Kenzo; Fukada, Satoshi; Kotoh, Kenji; Takeishi, Toshiharu

    1997-01-01

    At present, the standard arrangement of the air cleanup system responsible for emergency tritium recovery from room air is a catalytic oxidation bed with a heater followed by an adsorption bed with a cooler. One disadvantage of this arrangement is that trouble with the heater or the cooler could result in a loss of capacity to recover tritium. Another disadvantage of the catalyst-adsorption-bed arrangement is that tritiated water must be recovered with a high decontamination factor after dilution with a large amount of water vapor in the working atmosphere. The performance of a new arrangement for the air cleanup system, which consists of a precious metal catalyst bed preceded by an adsorption bed without heating equipment, is discussed. According to calculations, most of the tritium released to the room air is recovered in the catalyst bed through oxidation, adsorption, and isotope exchange reaction when the new arrangement is applied. The adsorption bed placed before the catalyst bed dehumidifies the process gas to such a degree that the oxidation reaction of tritium in the catalyst bed is not hindered by water vapor. 15 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  19. A software tool for soil clean-up technology selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranes, S.; Gonzalez-Valencia, E.; Lodolo, A.; Miertus, S.

    2002-01-01

    Soil remediation is a difficult, time-consuming and expensive operation. A variety of mature and emerging soil remediation technologies is available and future trends in remediation will include continued competition among environmental service companies and technology developers, which will definitely result in further increase in the clean-up options. Consequently, the demand has enhanced developing decision support tools that could help the decision makers to select the most appropriate technology for the specific contaminated site, before the costly remedial actions are taken. Therefore, a software tool for soil clean-up technology selection is currently being developed with the aim of closely working with human decision makers (site owners, local community representatives, environmentalists, regulators, etc.) to assess the available technologies and preliminarily select the preferred remedial options. The analysis for the identification of the best remedial options is based on technical, financial, environmental, and social criteria. These criteria are ranked by all involved parties to determine their relative importance for a particular project. (author)

  20. Anti-CEA labelling kit BW 431/26. Results of the European multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsträsser, A; Oberhausen, E

    1995-12-01

    In seven European countries a multicenter trial with the 99mTc-labelled monoclonal anti-CEA antibody BW 431/26 was conducted in 730 patients. The antibody is used for the immunoscintigraphic visualisation of CEA-expressing tumours. Investigated were in particular colorectal tumours, bladder and breast carcinoma, medullary thyroid carcinoma, adenocarcinoma of the lung and gastric carcinoma. The main area of use is the detection of recurrences and screening for foci in patients with rising serum CEA. The sensitivity amounts to at least 80% in case of primary colorectal tumours (n = 129) and their abdominal or pelvic metastases (n = 33) and to 90% for their recurrences (n = 107). HAMAs were detectable in less than 15% of patients investigated for the first time. In 17% of the patients examined, immunoscintigraphy was the only technique to visualize the lesion whereas all other diagnostic methods had failed. The procedure yielded additional information in 24-51% of cases.

  1. Chemistry of complexing molecules and environment. Report of the working group of the Cea ''mission environment''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Working group 'Chemistry of Complexing Molecules and Environment' of the Mission Environment (AG/ENV) identified themes for an original positioning of CEA on important issues of environmental research if a sufficiently strong demand appears. The research of CEA on the environment should be complementary to actions undertaken by other partners (official institutions, research organizations and industrial firms). The themes suggested are: the synthesis of new chelating molecules and new materials having specific properties, with the support of theoretical chemistry and modeling, analytical physical chemistry and speciation of species in relation to their eco-toxicity and their biogeochemical mobility in the natural environment. These themes, illustrated by examples of actions in progress at CEA or likely to be launched quickly, draw largely from recognized competences of the teams, generally developed for finalized nuclear applications: experimental, theoretical and instrumental competences. (author)

  2. Anti-CEA labelling kit BW431/26. Results of the European multicenter trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinstraesser, A. [Hoechst AG, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Radiochemical Lab.; Oberhausen, E. [Radiological Univ. Clinics, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1995-12-01

    In seven European countries a multicenter trial with the {sup 99m}Tc-labelled monoclonal anti-CEA antibody BW 431/26 was conducted in 730 patients. The antibody is used for the immunoscintigraphic visualisation of CEA-expressing tumours. Investigated were in particular colorectal tumours, bladder and breast carcinoma, medullary thyroid carcinoma, adenocarcinoma of the lung and gastric carcinoma. The main area of use is the detection of recurrences and screening for foci in patients with rising serum CEA. The sensitivity amounts to at least 80% in case of primary colorectal tumours (n=129) and their abdominal or pelvic metastases (n=33) and to 90% for their recurrences (n=107). HAMAs were detectable in less than 15% of patients investigated for the first time. In 17% of the patients examined, immunoscintigraphy was the only technique to visualize the lesion whereas all other diagnostic methods had failed. The procedure yielded additional information in 24-51% of cases. (orig.) [Deutsch] In sieben europaeischen Laendern wurde mit dem {sup 99m}Tc-markierten monoklonalen Anti-CEA-Antikoerper BW 431/26 eine Multizenterstudie an 730 Patienten durchgefuehrt. Der Antikoerper wird fuer die immunoszintigraphische Darstellung von CEA-exprimierenden Tumoren eingesetzt. Insbesondere wurde neben kolorektalen Tumoren das Blasen- und Mamma-Ca sowie das medullaere Schilddruesen-Ca, das Adeno-Ca der Lunge und das Magen-Ca untersucht. Das Hauptanwendungsgebiet liegt beim Rezidivnachweis und bei Patienten mit CEA-Anstieg im Serum. Die Sensitivitaet betraegt beim Nachweis des Primaertumors (n=129) oder abdominaler bzw. pelviner Metastasen (n=33) des kolorektalen Karzinoms mindestens 80% und betraegt 90% im Falle von Rezidiven (n=107). HAMAs traten nach weniger als 15% der Erstuntersuchungen auf. Bei 17% der untersuchten Patienten konnte ausschliesslich die Immuniszintigraphie die Laesion darstellen, alle anderen diagnostischen Moeglichkeiten hatten versagt. Zusaetzliche Informationen

  3. Uropathogenic E. coli Exploit CEA to Promote Colonization of the Urogenital Tract Mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Muenzner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Attachment to the host mucosa is a key step in bacterial pathogenesis. On the apical surface of epithelial cells, members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA family are abundant glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion and modulation of cell signaling. Interestingly, several gram-negative bacterial pathogens target these receptors by specialized adhesins. The prototype of a CEACAM-binding pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, utilizes colony opacity associated (Opa proteins to engage CEA, as well as the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 on human epithelial cells. By heterologous expression of neisserial Opa proteins in non-pathogenic E. coli we find that the Opa protein-CEA interaction is sufficient to alter gene expression, to increase integrin activity and to promote matrix adhesion of infected cervical carcinoma cells and immortalized vaginal epithelial cells in vitro. These CEA-triggered events translate in suppression of exfoliation and improved colonization of the urogenital tract by Opa protein-expressing E. coli in CEA-transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Interestingly, uropathogenic E. coli expressing an unrelated CEACAM-binding protein of the Afa/Dr adhesin family recapitulate the in vitro and in vivo phenotype. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking the CEACAM-binding adhesin shows reduced colonization and does not suppress epithelial exfoliation. These results demonstrate that engagement of human CEACAMs by distinct bacterial adhesins is sufficient to blunt exfoliation and to promote host infection. Our findings provide novel insight into mucosal colonization by a common UPEC pathotype and help to explain why human CEACAMs are a preferred epithelial target structure for diverse gram-negative bacteria to establish a foothold on the human mucosa.

  4. Uropathogenic E. coli Exploit CEA to Promote Colonization of the Urogenital Tract Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenzner, Petra; Kengmo Tchoupa, Arnaud; Klauser, Benedikt; Brunner, Thomas; Putze, Johannes; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hauck, Christof R

    2016-05-01

    Attachment to the host mucosa is a key step in bacterial pathogenesis. On the apical surface of epithelial cells, members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family are abundant glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion and modulation of cell signaling. Interestingly, several gram-negative bacterial pathogens target these receptors by specialized adhesins. The prototype of a CEACAM-binding pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, utilizes colony opacity associated (Opa) proteins to engage CEA, as well as the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 on human epithelial cells. By heterologous expression of neisserial Opa proteins in non-pathogenic E. coli we find that the Opa protein-CEA interaction is sufficient to alter gene expression, to increase integrin activity and to promote matrix adhesion of infected cervical carcinoma cells and immortalized vaginal epithelial cells in vitro. These CEA-triggered events translate in suppression of exfoliation and improved colonization of the urogenital tract by Opa protein-expressing E. coli in CEA-transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Interestingly, uropathogenic E. coli expressing an unrelated CEACAM-binding protein of the Afa/Dr adhesin family recapitulate the in vitro and in vivo phenotype. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking the CEACAM-binding adhesin shows reduced colonization and does not suppress epithelial exfoliation. These results demonstrate that engagement of human CEACAMs by distinct bacterial adhesins is sufficient to blunt exfoliation and to promote host infection. Our findings provide novel insight into mucosal colonization by a common UPEC pathotype and help to explain why human CEACAMs are a preferred epithelial target structure for diverse gram-negative bacteria to establish a foothold on the human mucosa.

  5. Development of radiopharmaceuticals based on aptamers: selection and characterization of DNA aptamers for CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, C.R.; Andrade, A.S.R.; Augusto-Pinto, L.; Goes, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the top four causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex intracellular glycoprotein produced by about 90% of colorectal cancers. CEA has been identified as an attractive target for cancer research because of its pattern of expression in the surface cell and its likely functional role in tumorigenesis. Research on the rapid selection of ligands based on the SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) forms the basis for the development of high affinity and high specificity molecules, which can bind to surface determinants of tumour cells, like CEA. The oligonucleotides ligands generated in this technique are called aptamers. Aptamers can potentially find applications as therapeutic or diagnostic tools for many kind of diseases, like a tumor. Aptamers offer low immunogenicity, good tumour penetration, rapid uptake and fast systemic clearance, which favour their application as effective vehicles for radiotherapy. In addition aptamers can be labeled with different radioactive isotopes. The aim of this work was select aptamers binding to the CEA tumor marker. The aptamers are obtained through by SELEX, in which aptamers are selected from a library of random sequences of synthetic DNA by repetitive binding of the oligonucleotides to target molecule (CEA). Analyses of the secondary structure of the aptamers were determined using the m fold toll. Three aptamers were selected to binding assay with target cells. These aptamers were confirmed to have affinity and specific binding for T84 cell line (target cell), showed by confocal imaging. We are currently studying the potential efficacy of these aptamers as targeted radiopharmaceuticals, for use as imaging agents or therapeutic applications. The development of aptamers specific to CEA open new perspectives for colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment. Acknowledgments: This investigation was supported by the Centro de Desenvolvimento da

  6. Development of radiopharmaceuticals based on aptamers: selection and characterization of DNA aptamers for CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, C.R.; Andrade, A.S.R., E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Augusto-Pinto, L. [BioAptus, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Goes, A.M., E-mail: goes@icb.ufmg.br [Departamento de Imunologia e Bioquimica. Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the top four causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex intracellular glycoprotein produced by about 90% of colorectal cancers. CEA has been identified as an attractive target for cancer research because of its pattern of expression in the surface cell and its likely functional role in tumorigenesis. Research on the rapid selection of ligands based on the SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) forms the basis for the development of high affinity and high specificity molecules, which can bind to surface determinants of tumour cells, like CEA. The oligonucleotides ligands generated in this technique are called aptamers. Aptamers can potentially find applications as therapeutic or diagnostic tools for many kind of diseases, like a tumor. Aptamers offer low immunogenicity, good tumour penetration, rapid uptake and fast systemic clearance, which favour their application as effective vehicles for radiotherapy. In addition aptamers can be labeled with different radioactive isotopes. The aim of this work was select aptamers binding to the CEA tumor marker. The aptamers are obtained through by SELEX, in which aptamers are selected from a library of random sequences of synthetic DNA by repetitive binding of the oligonucleotides to target molecule (CEA). Analyses of the secondary structure of the aptamers were determined using the m fold toll. Three aptamers were selected to binding assay with target cells. These aptamers were confirmed to have affinity and specific binding for T84 cell line (target cell), showed by confocal imaging. We are currently studying the potential efficacy of these aptamers as targeted radiopharmaceuticals, for use as imaging agents or therapeutic applications. The development of aptamers specific to CEA open new perspectives for colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment. Acknowledgments: This investigation was supported by the Centro de Desenvolvimento da

  7. The evaluation of diagnostic value of the tumor markers: CCSA-2 and CEA in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knychalski, Bartłomiej; Lukieńczuk, Tadeusz

    2012-02-01

    Finding the biomarker or biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity in colorectal cancer, and thus a high diagnostic value will determine their clinical usefulness in clinical practice. An effective noninvasive blood test would be an ideal method to detect colorectal cancer. Discovered in 2007 a novel tumor marker CCSA-2 showes a promising results in patients with colorectal cancer. THE AIM OF THE STUDY was the evaluation of diagnostic and clinical value of a novel marker - colon cancer specific antigen-2 (CCSA-2) in colorectal adenocarcinoma in comparison to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in patients operated during the years 2008 to 2010 at Wrocław Medical University 1st Department and Clinic of General, Gastroenterological and Endocrinologic Surgery. The study was performed on 40 patients with colorectal cancer and 40 patients in control group consisted of healthy subjects who had colonoscopy examinations with negative results (no pathology in the colon was found). The obtained results were statistically analyzed using nonparametric tests - Mann Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. To determine the clinical value of CCSA-2 and CEA in those groups, their sensitivity and specifity was evaluated using ROC analysis. This analysis determines the accuracy and diagnostic value of both tests. There was a positive correlation between markers in patients with colorectal cancer and a statistically significant relationship according to which respondents with higher concentrations of CCSA-2 also have higher concentrations of CEA (R=0.754, ptumor markers increase and correlate with the clinical progression of the disease. Accuracy of CCSA-2 test using ROC analysis showed a slightly lower measurement of antigen CCSA-2 as diagnostic value in colorectal cancer in comparison to measurement of antigen CEA (accuracy of tests: CCSA-2 - 52%, CEA - 60%). CCSA-2 as a single tumor marker has a low diagnostic value in colorectal cancer because

  8. Uropathogenic E. coli Exploit CEA to Promote Colonization of the Urogenital Tract Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenzner, Petra; Kengmo Tchoupa, Arnaud; Klauser, Benedikt; Brunner, Thomas; Putze, Johannes; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hauck, Christof R.

    2016-01-01

    Attachment to the host mucosa is a key step in bacterial pathogenesis. On the apical surface of epithelial cells, members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family are abundant glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion and modulation of cell signaling. Interestingly, several gram-negative bacterial pathogens target these receptors by specialized adhesins. The prototype of a CEACAM-binding pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, utilizes colony opacity associated (Opa) proteins to engage CEA, as well as the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 on human epithelial cells. By heterologous expression of neisserial Opa proteins in non-pathogenic E. coli we find that the Opa protein-CEA interaction is sufficient to alter gene expression, to increase integrin activity and to promote matrix adhesion of infected cervical carcinoma cells and immortalized vaginal epithelial cells in vitro. These CEA-triggered events translate in suppression of exfoliation and improved colonization of the urogenital tract by Opa protein-expressing E. coli in CEA-transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Interestingly, uropathogenic E. coli expressing an unrelated CEACAM-binding protein of the Afa/Dr adhesin family recapitulate the in vitro and in vivo phenotype. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking the CEACAM-binding adhesin shows reduced colonization and does not suppress epithelial exfoliation. These results demonstrate that engagement of human CEACAMs by distinct bacterial adhesins is sufficient to blunt exfoliation and to promote host infection. Our findings provide novel insight into mucosal colonization by a common UPEC pathotype and help to explain why human CEACAMs are a preferred epithelial target structure for diverse gram-negative bacteria to establish a foothold on the human mucosa. PMID:27171273

  9. Overview of CEA research in the field of radionuclides migration; Syntheses des recherches menees par le CEA sur la migration des radionucleides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Trotignon, L.; Tevissen, E

    2006-07-01

    This report presents a synthetic status of the researches conducted within the Nuclear Energy Division (CEA/DEN) in the field of radionuclides migration in three specific areas which have been chosen for their representativeness and potential impact: the migration of RN in PWR reactors, the migration of RN from a deep geological repository and the migration processes in the surface environments. In addition, some status is given about more generic research which is conducted in the field of RN speciation in the aqueous phase and at the interfaces and regarding chemistry / transport couplings. Additional information about the human and technical means involved in these fields of research in CEA/DEN is finally given in the Appendix. (authors)

  10. Status of Pesticides and Degradation Products in Soil After Clean-up ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The status of pesticide residues in soil samples collected from a former storage site one year after clean-up of stockpiles and treatment with NaOH was investigated. The analytes were extracted from samples by pressurized fluid extraction using n-hexane:acetone (75:25) mixture. Clean-up of extracts was conducted by ...

  11. Development of a risk-based approach to Hanford Site cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesser, W.A.; Daling, P.M.; Baynes, P.A.

    1995-06-01

    In response to a request from Mr. Thomas Grumbly, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management, the Hanford Site contractors developed a conceptual set of risk-based cleanup strategies that (1) protect the public, workers, and environment from unacceptable risks; (2) are executable technically; and (3) fit within an expected annual funding profile of 1.05 billion dollars. These strategies were developed because (1) the US Department of Energy and Hanford Site budgets are being reduced, (2) stakeholders are dissatisfied with the perceived rate of cleanup, (3) the US Congress and the US Department of Energy are increasingly focusing on risk and riskreduction activities, (4) the present strategy is not integrated across the Site and is inconsistent in its treatment of similar hazards, (5) the present cleanup strategy is not cost-effective from a risk-reduction or future land use perspective, and (6) the milestones and activities in the Tri-Party Agreement cannot be achieved with an anticipated funding of 1.05 billion dollars annually. The risk-based strategies described herein were developed through a systems analysis approach that (1) analyzed the cleanup mission; (2) identified cleanup objectives, including risk reduction, land use, and mortgage reduction; (3) analyzed the existing baseline cleanup strategy from a cost and risk perspective; (4) developed alternatives for accomplishing the cleanup mission; (5) compared those alternatives against cleanup objectives; and (6) produced conclusions and recommendations regarding the current strategy and potential risk-based strategies

  12. Development of a risk-based approach to Hanford Site cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesser, W.A.; Daling, P.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Baynes, P.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    In response to a request from Mr. Thomas Grumbly, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management, the Hanford Site contractors developed a conceptual set of risk-based cleanup strategies that (1) protect the public, workers, and environment from unacceptable risks; (2) are executable technically; and (3) fit within an expected annual funding profile of 1.05 billion dollars. These strategies were developed because (1) the US Department of Energy and Hanford Site budgets are being reduced, (2) stakeholders are dissatisfied with the perceived rate of cleanup, (3) the US Congress and the US Department of Energy are increasingly focusing on risk and riskreduction activities, (4) the present strategy is not integrated across the Site and is inconsistent in its treatment of similar hazards, (5) the present cleanup strategy is not cost-effective from a risk-reduction or future land use perspective, and (6) the milestones and activities in the Tri-Party Agreement cannot be achieved with an anticipated funding of 1.05 billion dollars annually. The risk-based strategies described herein were developed through a systems analysis approach that (1) analyzed the cleanup mission; (2) identified cleanup objectives, including risk reduction, land use, and mortgage reduction; (3) analyzed the existing baseline cleanup strategy from a cost and risk perspective; (4) developed alternatives for accomplishing the cleanup mission; (5) compared those alternatives against cleanup objectives; and (6) produced conclusions and recommendations regarding the current strategy and potential risk-based strategies.

  13. General review of multispectral cooled IR development at CEA-Leti, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulard, F.; Marmonier, F.; Grangier, C.; Adelmini, L.; Gravrand, O.; Ballet, P.; Baudry, X.; Baylet, J.; Badano, G.; Espiau de Lamaestre, R.; Bisotto, S.

    2017-02-01

    Multicolor detection capabilities, which bring information on the thermal and chemical composition of the scene, are desirable for advanced infrared (IR) imaging systems. This communication reviews intra and multiband solutions developed at CEA-Leti, from dual-band molecular beam epitaxy grown Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) photodiodes to plasmon-enhanced multicolor IR detectors and backside pixelated filters. Spectral responses, quantum efficiency and detector noise performances, pros and cons regarding global system are discussed in regards to technology maturity, pixel pitch reduction, and affordability. From MWIR-LWIR large band to intra MWIR or LWIR bands peaked detection, results underline the full possibility developed at CEA-Leti.

  14. Changes in the legal status of the Commissariat a l'energie atomique (Cea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grammatico-Vidal, L.

    2009-01-01

    The Cea a public research institution was re-classified among the energy research establishments (11 december 2008). The Cea, as the result of exceptional circumstances and complex activities, is today entering into a new era and must confront many national and supranational challenges. It is preparing, in effect, for a future nuclear industry (safer, less polluting, non-proliferating and more economical) and is conducting research into other energy solutions within the framework of sustainable development and limited greenhouse gas effects (hydrogen technology, fusion, alternative energy technologies). It also has another goal, to make technological research available to industry, not only by developing micro and nano-technologies or even to contribute technology for the benefit of scientific knowledge of living creatures, matter, climate and the environment. The new classification of the Cea as a research establishment in the field of energy, a heading which includes three other entities (A.N.D.R.A., A.D.E.M.E. and I.F.P.), raises questions about its specialization and diversification. However, no substantive change was made to the drafting of the legislative provisions so it is possible to imagine that the Cea takes initiatives in other fields, at the instigation or with the approval of the government, a matter which is facilitated by its classification in the E.P.I.C. category (public establishment at industrial and commercial character). The Cea also represents France in international organisations in the nuclear sector, such as the OECD Nuclear energy agency (Nea), the International atomic energy agency (IAEA) and the European communities. It also participates in intergovernmental negotiations in the nuclear field and ensures any follow-up required with regard to any resulting agreements. today, the Cea plays a major role in the implementation of French nuclear policy with the aim of making available to countries wishing to develop nuclear energy, a framework

  15. 188Re-iorCEA1 as radioimmunotherapeutical agent: Preparation and evaluation. Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, Gilmara

    2000-01-01

    Effective immunotherapy of human malignancies requires the selective delivery of these agents to relevant antigen-expressing tumour cells. A variety of strategies have been investigated to achieve this objective. It has been very clearly established that ior-CEA1 monoclonal antibody is an extremely good agent for immunoscintigraphy with a high sensitivity (94%) and specificity (87%). Ior-CEA1 is hence a good candidate for development as a therapeutic agent. Moreover, it is an attractive novel protein, which conserves its biological properties, despite chemical treatment

  16. Values of serum TSGF, CA125 and CEA determination in early diagnosis of ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jiang; Zhou Yu; Yu Wuzhong; Chou Donghui; Zhou Ying; Zhang Yang; Guo Yong; Wang Yongsheng

    2005-01-01

    To investigate levels of TSGF,CA125 and CEA as a panel for early diagnosis of overian cancer, the levels of three tumor markers(TSGF,CA125 and CEA) in serum were determined in 85 patients with ovarian cancer, 54 patients with benign tumor and 76 healthy control. The results showed that the levels of three tumor markers in ovarian cancer patients were significantly higher than those in benign tumor patients and controls(P<0.05). Combined detection of the three markers may greatly improve the diagnostic accuracy of overian cancer. (authors)

  17. Diagnostic value of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 tumor markers in primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Kyoko; Takayama, Koichi; Izumi, Miiru; Harada, Taishi; Furuyama, Kazuto; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is sometimes difficult to differentiate from benign lung diseases expressing nodular shadow in imaging study. We assessed the diagnostic value of two commonly used tumor markers in distinguishing primary lung cancer from benign lung disease. The serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin 19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1) were retrospectively analyzed in 655 lung cancer patients and 237 patients with benign lung disease. The standard cut-off levels of 3.2 ng/mL CEA and 3.5 ng/mL CYFRA 21-1 and twice these respective levels (6.4 ng/mL and 7.0 ng/mL) were used. CEA and CYFRA 21-1 levels were elevated in 32% and 11% of benign lung disease patients, respectively. CEA sensitivity and specificity for lung cancer diagnosis was 69% and 68% respectively, while that for CYFRA 21-1 was 43% and 89%, respectively. Thus, the combined value for the specificity of the two tumor markers was greater than either alone. Patients were grouped depending on their hospital status, and prevalence rates were determined. The prevalence rate of lung cancer in admitted patients was 51%, the prevalence rate of lung cancer in outpatients was 12%, and the prevalence rate of lung cancer identified during health check-ups was 0.1%. Positive predictive values (PPVs) were calculated using Bayes' theorem, and varied with the serum tumor marker and prevalence rate: PPVs of CEA [prevalence rate] were 69.2% [51%], 22.7% [12%], and 0.22% [0.1%], while PPVs of CYFRA 21-1 were 80.3% [51%], 34.8% [12%], and 0.39% [0.1%]. However, PPVs for lung cancer diagnosis at a prevalence rate of 51% were 87.3% or higher when the patient exhibited positive CEA and CYFRA 21-1, or CEA or CYFRA 21-1 levels twice the standard cut-off. Our results indicate that CEA and CYFRA 21-1 are reliable serum tumor markers for the diagnosis of lung cancer in addition to CT scans when combined or used individually at twice the standard cut-off level in high prevalence rate groups. The prevalence rate should

  18. Protocolo de actuación ante la rosácea en la farmacia comunitaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinosa Suances A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available La rosácea es una dermatosis facial inflamatoria, recidivante y crónica, que con frecuencia demanda consulta en la farmacia comunitaria. Orientado hacia la práctica clínica del farmacéutico comunitario, este artículo revisa y sintetiza los conceptos clásicos y los avances más recientes en la comprensión y el tratamiento de esta enfermedad cutánea. Finalmente, propone un protocolo para la asistencia de pacientes con rosácea en la farmacia comunitaria.

  19. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) measurement during follow-up for rectal carcinoma is useful even if normal levels exist before surgery. A retrospective study of CEA values in the TME trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossmann, I.; de Bock, G. H.; Kranenbarg, W. M. Meershoek-Klein; de Velde, C. J. H. van; Wiggers, T.

    Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a marker in the follow-up after curative resection of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is often omitted from follow-up despite guideline recommendations. One reason is the assumption that when a normal CEA value exists before curative resection of CRC, it will

  20. Evaluation of secondary-system layup and cleanup practices and processes. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, W.F.

    1983-04-01

    The study of PWR secondary system layup and cleanup practices was undertaken to evaluate current and proposed methods of corrosion product control associated with extended plant outages. The overall goal was to evaluate means for significantly minimizing the steam generator sludge burden. The study included a field survey of 14 representative PWR plants, an extensive literature search and an evaluation of corrosion product transport data. Recommendations for layup and cleanup system processes were derived from these practices and related information. Estimates of the potential benefits to be expected in the control of corrosion products by controlled layup environments during extended outages and by cleanup following such outages are provided. Cleanup during all, or most, phases of operation is indicated as being most beneficial. Layup and cleanup system process design information is also provided

  1. Evaluation of gasification and gas cleanup processes for use in molten carbonate fuel cell power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, G.; Hamm, J. R.; Alvin, M. A.; Wenglarz, R. A.; Patel, P.

    1982-10-01

    Coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants are listed. Those coal gas cleanup systems rejected by DOE's MCFC contractors for their power plant systems by virtue of the resources required for those systems to be commercially developed are characterized. An analytical model to predict MCFC tolerance for particulates on the anode (fuel gas) side of the MCFC was developed. An analytical model to predict MCFC anode side tolerance for chemical species, including sulfides, halogens, and trace heavy metals was developed. The candidate gasifier/cleanup systems those most suitable for MCFC-based power plants are discussed. A reference wet cleanup system, parametric analyses of the coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems, efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effect rankings, and a final report are discussed.

  2. Economic Consequences of a Rad/Nuc Attack: Cleanup Standards Significantly Affect Cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Short, Steven M.; Wood, Thomas W.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Schwartz, Deborah S.

    2005-04-27

    These economic consequences are highly dependant on the magnitude of the weapon event. The cost to cleanup/remediate an area will depend on the cleanup standard applied to the event. Cleanup costs are highly sensitive to specific standards and need policy level attention. There are currently no cleanup standards for RDD events so the EPA standards would apply defacto. This paper offers an economic perspective on the magnitude of the economic consequences for a potential target in New York City with an emphasis on cost sensitivity as the cleanup standard changes. A comparison is made of the cost to remediate the area to the current standards under CERCLA and the EPA Protective action guidelines.

  3. Elaboration of an alpha-numeric classification for file of matters of the documentation service of the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braffort, P.

    1953-01-01

    We give the principles of a classification of matters to square basis, suiting the needs of the Service, of Documentation of the C.E.A. We present the detail of the categories in the order of the 'columns', likewise the big scientific subdivisions at the CEA. (authors) [fr

  4. Use of a combination of CEA and tumor budding to identify high-risk patients with stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changzheng; Xue, Weicheng; Dou, Fangyuan; Peng, Yifan; Yao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Jun; Gu, Jin

    2017-07-24

    High-risk patients with stage II colon cancer may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, but identifying this patient population can be difficult. We assessed the prognosis value for predicting tumor progression in patients with stage II colon cancer, of a panel of 2 biomarkers for colon cancer: tumor budding and preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Consecutive patients (N = 134) with stage II colon cancer who underwent curative surgery from 2000 to 2007 were included. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the association of CEA and tumor budding grade with 5-year disease-free survival (DFS). The prognostic accuracy of CEA, tumor budding grade and the combination of both (CEA-budding panel) was determined. The study found that both CEA and tumor budding grade were associated with 5-year DFS. The prognostic accuracy for disease progression was higher for the CEA-budding panel (82.1%) than either CEA (70.9%) or tumor budding grade (72.4%) alone. The findings indicate that the combination of CEA levels and tumor budding grade has greater prognostic value for identifying patients with stage II colon cancer who are at high-risk for disease progression, than either marker alone.

  5. Sensitivity of CA 15-3, CEA and serum HER2 in the early detection of recurrence of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Ann Christina; Sørensen, Patricia Diana; Jacobsen, Erik Hugger

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate the sensitivity of CA 15-3, CEA and HER2 in the early diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer.......The aim of this project was to investigate the sensitivity of CA 15-3, CEA and HER2 in the early diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer....

  6. Statistical methods for evaluating the attainment of cleanup standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, R.O.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    This document is the third volume in a series of volumes sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Statistical Policy Branch, that provide statistical methods for evaluating the attainment of cleanup Standards at Superfund sites. Volume 1 (USEPA 1989a) provides sampling designs and tests for evaluating attainment of risk-based standards for soils and solid media. Volume 2 (USEPA 1992) provides designs and tests for evaluating attainment of risk-based standards for groundwater. The purpose of this third volume is to provide statistical procedures for designing sampling programs and conducting statistical tests to determine whether pollution parameters in remediated soils and solid media at Superfund sites attain site-specific reference-based standards. This.document is written for individuals who may not have extensive training or experience with statistical methods. The intended audience includes EPA regional remedial project managers, Superfund-site potentially responsible parties, state environmental protection agencies, and contractors for these groups.

  7. Enhancement of mercury control in flue-gas cleanup systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livengood, C.D.; Huang, Hann S.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, Jiann M.

    1996-07-01

    This paper summarizes research at Argonne National Laboratory which is focused on techniques to enhance the capture of elemental mercury and integrate its control into existing flue-gas cleanup (FGC) systems. Both laboratory and field tests have shown that very little elemental mercury is captured in a wet scrubber system due to the low solubility of that species. To enhance the ability of wet scrubbers to capture mercury, Argonne has studied improved mass transfer through both mechanical and chemical means, as well as the conversion of elemental mercury into a more soluble species that can be easily absorbed. Current research is investigating the roles of several halogen species either alone or in combination with typical flue-gas components such as sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide in the oxidation of mercury to form compounds that are easily scrubbed from the flue gas.

  8. Williston Reservoir: Site preparation and post-flood cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loose, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Williston Reservoir is the second largest in Canada and ranks ninth on the world scale. It was formed by the construction of the W.A.C. Bennet Dam and is the most important hydroelectric storage reservoir and largest body of fresh water in British Columbia. Site preparation for the reservoir began in 1962, with pre-flood clearing involving salvage of merchantable timber, handfalling, machine downing, burning of slash and burial. Post-flood cleanup included timber salvage, bailing and burning debris, tractor piling and burning, crane piling in shallows, underwater cutting, and hand cutting during low drawdown. Various types of floating debris have presented problems for recreational use, log booming and transport, waterways and aviation. Protection of the spillway is accomplished with a floating boom upstream of the channel. Administration, funding, forest clearance, salvage methods, clearing standards, wood volumes, project costs, environmental concerns, and future priorities are discussed. 5 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragaini, R.C.

    1993-12-01

    This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ''Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.'' To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste

  10. Oil spill cleanup in severe weather and open ocean conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, T.

    1993-01-01

    Most serious oil spills occur in open water under severe weather conditions. At first the oil stays on the surface, where it is spread by winds and water currents. The action of the waves then mixes the oil into the water column. With time the light elements of crude oil evaporate. The remaining residue is of very low commercial value, but of significant environmental impact. The oil spill can move either out to sea or inshore, where it ends up on the beaches. Normal procedures are to let outbound oil disperse by evaporation and mixing into the water column, and to let the inbound oil collect on the beaches, where the cleanup operations are concentrated. The reason for this is that there is no capability to clean the surface of the water in wave conditions-present-day oil skimmers are ineffective in waves approaching 4 ft in height. It would be simpler, more effective and environmentally more beneficial to skim the oil right at the spill location. This paper describes a method to do this. In the case of an oil spill in open water and high wave conditions, it is proposed to reduce the height of the ocean waves by the use of floating breakwaters to provide a relatively calm area. In such protected areas existing oil skimmers can be used to recover valuable oil and clean up the spill long before it hits the beaches. A floating breakwater developed at the University of Rhode Island by the author can be of great benefit in oil spill cleanup for open ocean conditions. This breakwater is constructed from scrap automobile tires. It is built in units of 20 tires each, which are easily transportable and can be connected together at the spill site to form any desired configuration

  11. Mutational Profiles Reveal an Aberrant TGF-β-CEA Regulated Pathway in Colon Adenomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    Full Text Available Mutational processes and signatures that drive early tumorigenesis are centrally important for early cancer prevention. Yet, to date, biomarkers and risk factors for polyps (adenomas that inordinately and rapidly develop into colon cancer remain poorly defined. Here, we describe surprisingly high mutational profiles through whole-genome sequence (WGS analysis in 2 of 4 pairs of benign colorectal adenoma tissue samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustered transcriptomic analysis of a further 7 pairs of adenomas reveals distinct mutational signatures regardless of adenoma size. Transitional single nucleotide substitutions of C:G>T:A predominate in the adenoma mutational spectrum. Strikingly, we observe mutations in the TGF-β pathway and CEA-associated genes in 4 out of 11 adenomas, overlapping with the Wnt pathway. Immunohistochemical labeling reveals a nearly 5-fold increase in CEA levels in 23% of adenoma samples with a concomitant loss of TGF-β signaling. We also define a functional role by which the CEA B3 domain interacts with TGFBR1, potentially inactivating the tumor suppressor function of TGF-β signaling. Our study uncovers diverse mutational processes underlying the transition from early adenoma to cancer. This has broad implications for biomarker-driven targeting of CEA/TGF-β in high-risk adenomas and may lead to early detection of aggressive adenoma to CRC progression.

  12. Iodine-131 labeled anti-CEA polyclonal antibody detection of gastrointestinal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabi, H.A.; Hinkle, G.H.; Olsen, J.O.; Haagensen, D.A.; Thurston, M.O.; Mojzisik, C.; Houchens, D.; Martin, E.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To localize gastrointestinal tumor, 31 patients were injected with 1.7-2.1 mCi I-131 anti-CEA baboon polyclonal antibody. Whole body imaging at 48, 72, and occasionally 96 hrs was performed with a Signa Camera (Technicare) peaked at 364 keV with 20% window. Additional spot views were usually obtained. No subtraction methods were used. All patients had surgical and pathological confirmation of the nuclear medicine studies. Labeled antibody images were positive in 15 (8 recurrent or metastatic colorectal, 2 gastric, 1 pancreatic, 1 primary colon, and 1 breast metastatic to chest wall). In 1, antibody images were positive for metastatic deposits in para-aortic lymph nodes, but negative for primary rectal tumor. True negative images were observed in 6; false negative images in 9 (4 liver metastases, 2 rectal, 1 pancreatic, 1 mesenteric lymph node metastasis, 1 bone metastasis). In all cases, no correlation existed between preoperative CEA serum levels and imaging. I-131 labeled anti-CEA polyclonal antibody imaging proved highly efficient in detecting gastric cancer (2/2) and moderately efficient in detecting recurrent colorectal cancer (8/15). On the other hand, the I-131 labeled polyclonal anti-CEA antibody imaging was of limited value in detecting colon cancer (1/9), pancreatic cancer (1/4) and metastatic liver disease

  13. The US and the EU in CEA: Relations With Regional Powers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amineh, M.P.; Houweling, H.

    2003-01-01

    The US and the EU are important external actors in the post-Soviet CEA region. One challenge confronting US policymakers is balancing commercial interests in the region with security interests and foreign policy goals. These include a desire to contain Iran, partly because of its support for radical

  14. Diagnostic significance of tumor markers CEA, CA50 and CA19-9 for colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yumei; Huang Gang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression and diagnostic significance of three serum tumor markers (CEA, CA50, CA19-9) in patients with colorectal cancer, with special emphasis on their combined assay. Methods: Serum CEA, CA19-9 levels (with chemiluminescence immunoassay) and CA50 levels (with immunoradiometric assay) were determined in 94 patients with colorectal cancer, 20 patients with benign colorectal disorders and 37 controls. Results: The expressions of the serum tumor markers were significantly higher in patients with colorectal cancer than those in patients with benign colorectal disorders and controls (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the levels in the latter two groups. CEA assay had the highest sensitivity (57.4%) and specificity (85.9%). Combined assay of the three could enhance both the sensitivity (62.7%) and specificity (96.5%). The serum levels of the markers were significantly higher in patients with colonic cancer than those in patients with rectal cancer (P<0.05). The levels were positively correlated with the size of the growth and stage of the disease. Serum tumor marker levels were also significantly higher in patients with metastasis (regional/distant) than those in patients without metastasis (P<0.05). Conclusion: Determination of serum CEA, CA50 and CA19-9 levels had definite value for the diagnosis and assessment of the pathology as well as biologic behavior colorectal cancer. Combined assay of the three could enhance the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. (authors)

  15. Prognostic significance of preoperative serum CA125, CA19-9 and CEA in gastric carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Shen-Yu; Xu, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Wei-Han; Liu, Kai; Chen, Xin-Zu; Yang, Kun; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic significance of preoperative serum CA125, CA19-9 and CEA in gastric carcinoma (GC) has been widely reported and is still under debate. Here, we evaluated the prognostic significance of preoperative serum CA125, CA19-9 and CEA in patients with GC. 1692 patients with GC who underwent gastrectomy were divided into the training (from January 2005 to December 2011, n = 1024) and the validation (from January 2012 to December 2013, n = 668) cohorts. Positive groups of CA125 (> 13.72 U/ml), CA19-9 (> 23.36 U/ml) and CEA (> 4.28 ng/ml) were significantly associated with more advanced clinicopathological traits and worse outcomes than that of negative groups (all P tumor size (P tumor markers (NPTM) were more accurate in prognostic prediction than TNM stage alone. Our findings suggested that elevated preoperative serum CA125, CA19-9 and CEA were associated with more advanced clinicopathological traits and less favorable outcomes. In addition, CA125 as an independent prognostic factor should be further investigated. Nomogram based on NPTM could accurately predict the prognosis of GC patients. PMID:27097114

  16. Metastatic prostate cancer with elevated serum levels of CEA and CA19-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Dar Juang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is well known as a specific tumor marker for prostate cancer, but carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA- and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9-elevating adenocarcinomas originating in the prostate gland are rare. We report a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland with a high serum level of CEA and CA19-9 in a 78-year-old man in whom prostate cancer (T3N1M1 had been diagnosed 2 years ago and who was treated with androgen deprivation therapy. He visited the emergency department because of a loss of appetite and abdominal pain. The serum CEA and CA19-9 levels were increased to 218.9 ng/mL (normal, <5 ng/mL and 212 ng/mL (normal, <27 ng/mL, respectively. The serum PSA level was slightly elevated (4.41 ng/mL. Computed tomography demonstrated multiple liver metastases, para-aortic lymph node enlargement, and lung metastases. A liver biopsy was performed and the specimen showed high-grade adenocarcinoma with focal positive staining for PSA. Despite chemotherapy with docetaxel, the patient died 3 months after treatment. Based on this case and a review of the literature, an aggressive variant of prostatic carcinoma with a high serum level of CEA and CA19-9 and a low PSA level was shown to progress rapidly with a poor prognosis.

  17. Usefulness of analytical CEA doubling time and half-life time for overlooked synchronous metastases in colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Katsuki; Hibi, Kenji; Ando, Hideyuki; Hidemura, Kazuhiko; Yamazaki, Taiji; Akiyama, Seiji; Nakao, Akimasa

    2002-02-01

    Measurement of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been widely applied to detect recurrence, especially of colorectal carcinoma. The validity however, is still controversial. We investigated serial changes in CEA values to calculate whether the CEA doubling time and half-life time could predict metastatic progression or prognosis in colorectal carcinoma. Pre- and post-operative serial serum CEA contents were determined in 22 cases of colorectal cancer with or without metastasis. CEA values were determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Patients were assigned depending upon survival time (within vs. more than 18 months after primary resection) for assessment of CEA doubling time. From the gradient of the semi-logarithmic CEA graph, the preoperative doubling time was calculated and the postoperative half-life time was estimated according to the diagnosis of metastases within 2 years after primary resection [metastasis (+) or (-)]. In spite of the effect of curative re-operation of metastatic lesions or of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, the CEA doubling time of the groups showed a relation with prognosis (p = 0.045, Student's t-test) when the patients were divided into >18 and time. The CEA half-life time of the groups without overlooked metastases was statistically longer than those with (mean +/- SD 8.01 +/- 2.07 and 4.33 +/- 1.11, respectively, p Clearance (k) showed a significant difference between the groups (p time appeared to be a less independent prognostic factor, whereas prolongation of the CEA half-life time might potentially suggest the existence of overlooked synchronous metastases from colorectal carcinoma.

  18. CEA and CA 19-9 are still valuable markers for the prognosis of colorectal and gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisik, Abdullah; Kaya, Mustafa; Bas, Gurhan; Basak, Fatih; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the predictive effect of preoperative CEA and CA 19-9 levels on the prognosis of colorectal and gastric cancer patients. CEA and CA 19-9 were evaluated preoperatively in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer (n=116) and gastric cancer (n=49). Patients with CEA levels CEA Group 1, 5-30 ng/mL as CEA Group 2 and >30 ng/ mL were classified as CEA Group 3. Similarly the patients with a CA 19-9 level 100 U/mL as Group and 3. TNM stages and histologic grades were noted according to histopathological reports. Patients with a TNM grade 0 or 1 were classified as Group A, TNM grade 2 patients constituted Group B and TNM grade 3 and 4 patients constituted Group C. Demographic characteristics, tumor locations and blood types of the patients were all recorded and these data were compared with the preoperative CEA and CA19-9 values. A significant correlation between CA 19-9 levels (>100 U/mL) and TNM stage (in advanced stages) was determined. We also determined a significant correlation between TNM stages and positive vlaues for both CEA and CA 19-9 in colorectal and gastric cancer patients. In comparison between CEA and CA 19-9 levels and age, gender, tumor location, ABO blood group, and tumor histologic grade, no significant correlation was found. Positive levels of both CEA and CA 19-9 can be considered to indicate an advanced stage in colorectal and gastric cancer patients.

  19. Mental health and alcohol problems among Estonian cleanup workers 24 years after the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidra, Kaia; Rahu, Kaja; Tekkel, Mare; Aluoja, Anu; Leinsalu, Mall

    2015-11-01

    To study the long-term mental health consequences of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident among cleanup workers from Estonia. In 2010, 614 Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers and 706 geographically and age-matched population-based controls completed a mail survey that included self-rated health, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL), alcohol symptoms (AUDIT), and scales measuring depressive, anxiety, agoraphobia, fatigue, insomnia, and somatization symptoms. Respondents were dichotomized into high (top quartile) and low symptom groups on each measure. Logistic regression analysis detected significant differences between cleanup workers and controls on all measures even after adjustment for ethnicity, education, marital status, and employment status. The strongest difference was found for somatization, with cleanup workers being three times more likely than controls to score in the top quartile (OR = 3.28, 95% CI 2.39-4.52), whereas for alcohol problems the difference was half as large (OR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.16-1.99). Among cleanup workers, arrival at Chernobyl in 1986 (vs. later) was associated with sleep problems, somatization, and symptoms of agoraphobia. The toll of cleanup work was evident 24 years after the Chernobyl accident among Estonian cleanup workers indicating the need for focused mental health interventions.

  20. Application of tumor markers SCC-Ag, CEA, and TPA in patients with cervical precancerous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzaneh, Farah; Shahghassempour, Shapour; Noshine, Bahram; Arab, Maliheh; Yaseri, Mehdi; Rafizadeh, Mitra; Alizadeh, Kamyab

    2014-01-01

    To determine the potential clinical utility of tumor markers CEA, TPA, and SCC-Ag for early detection of cervical precancerous lesions. A case-control study was carried out on 120 women (46 patients with histologically confirmed cervical precancerous lesions and 74 healthy controls). The significance of serum selected tumor markers in early detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) were assessed. Of the case group, the rates of CIN I, II, III, was 69.6%, 23.9%, and 6.5%, respectively. According to the manufacturer's cut-off values of 2 ng/ml, 5 ng/ml, and 70 U/ml for SCC-Ag, CEA and TPA tests, in that order, SCC-Ag test had a sensitivity of 13%, but CEA and TPA tests could not distinguish between case and control groups. The diagnostic sensitivities were highest at cut-off values of 0.55 ng/ml for SCC-Ag, 2.6 ng/ ml for CEA, and 25.5 U/ml for TPA which were 93%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. However, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was the largest for SCC-Ag (0.95 vs. 0.61 and 0.60 for CEA and TPA, respectively). Moreover, there was a highly significant direct correlation between SCC-Ag concentration and the degree of cervical precancerous lesions (r=0.847, ptumor marker in Iranian patients with CIN and it needs to be more evaluated by studies with larger populationa.

  1. A systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, M.T.; Reed, B.E.; Gabr, M.

    1993-07-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ''Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.'' Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Report for Year 1 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the following nine technical projects encompassed by the Year 1 Agreement for the period of April 1 through June 30, 1993: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies -- drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; site remediation technologies -- in situ bioremediation of organic contaminants; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors -- monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessments of Technologies for hazardous waste site remediation -- non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; and remediation of hazardous sites with stream reforming

  2. Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaven, S.J.

    1994-12-01

    Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region's existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs

  3. Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaven, S.J. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region`s existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs.

  4. Differential diagnostic value of combined detection of serum CA153, CEA and TPA levels in patients with breast tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Wei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the differential diagnostic value of combined detection of serum CA153, CEA and TPA levels in patients with breast tumor. Methods: Serum levels of CA153, CEA and TPA were measured with RIA in 269 patients with breast tumor and 150 controls. Results: The serum levels of CA153, CEA and TPA in patients with breast cancer were significantly higher than those in the patients with benign breast tumor and controls. The positive rate of CA153 was 63.8% in the patients with breast cancer and that of CEA and TPA was 22.4% and 62.1% respectively, with combined detection of CA153 and CEA, the positive rate was 69.8%, with CA153 and TPA combined, the positive rate was 87.1%, with the three marker combined, the positive rate was 90.5%. The specificity was 77.9% with CA153, 77.9% with CA153 and CEA, 71.9% with CA153 and TPA, and 73.4% with all the three markers combined. Conclusion: The positive rate was increased remarkably with combined detection of CA153, CEA and TPA, however the specificity was not much changed, so the combined detection was valuable for differential diagnosis. (authors)

  5. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-based cancer vaccines: recent patents and antitumor effects from experimental models to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turriziani, Mario; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Izzi, Valerio; Masuelli, Laura; Sacchetti, Pamela; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a glycosylated protein of MW 180 kDa, is overexpressed in a wide range of human carcinomas, including colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, non-small cell lung and breast carcinomas. Accordingly, CEA is one of several oncofetal antigens that may serve as a target for active anti-cancer specific immunotherapy. Experimental results obtained by employing animal models have supported the design of clinical trials using a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of different types of human cancers. This review reports findings from experimental models and clinical evidence on the use of a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of cancer patients. Among the diverse CEA-based cancer vaccines, DCs- and recombinant viruses-based vaccines seem the most valid. However, although vaccination was shown to induce a strong immune response to CEA, resulting in a delay in tumor progression and prolonged survival in some cancer patients, it failed to eradicate the tumor in most cases, owing partly to the negative effect exerted by the tumor microenvironment on immune response. Thus, in order to develop more efficient and effective cancer vaccines, it is necessary to design new clinical trials combining cancer vaccines with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and drugs which target those factors responsible for immunosuppression of immune cells. This review also discusses relevant patents relating to the use of CEA as a cancer vaccine.

  6. The evaluation of the nuclear facilities safety at the CEA from 1999 to 2001; Le bilan de la surete des installations nucleaires du CEA du 1999 a 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this document is the presentation of an evaluation of the problems and the safety methods in the concerned period. The first chapter presents the nuclear safety in the CEA. The second chapter is devoted to the organization and the quality for the safety: liabilities, audits, relations with the safety authorities and with the public. The chapters three and four deal respectively with the methodological and technical abilities supporting the exploitation teams and with the nuclear safety projects. The last chapter presents the experiments and events from 1999 to 2001. (A.L.B.)

  7. Producing energy without greenhouse effect gases: the CEA action; Produire de l'energie sans gaz a effet de serre: l'action du CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Major actor in the domain of new energy technologies, the CEA manages the french research on the hydrogen and the fuel cells. It is also implied with INES (National Institute for the Solar Energy) in the photovoltaic and thermal solar. With the IFP (French Petroleum Institute), it manages research on biofuels. Of course the thermonuclear fusion, for the development of the energy of the future, is in its research program too. This information document presents the possibilities of these energies and the associated research programs. (A.L.B.)

  8. Progress of the BT-EdF-CEA project. The lithium polymer battery; Avancees du projet BT-EdF-CEA. Batterie lithium polymere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marginedes, D.; Majastre, H. [Bollore Technologies, 29 - Quimper (France); Baudry, P.; Lascaud, S. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Bloch, D.; Lebrun, N. [CEA Grenoble, CEREM, 38 (France)

    1996-12-31

    The lithium-polymer energy storage technology requires the production of thin films of huge surface. The BT-EdF-CEA consortium has studied the various manufacturing techniques of these films and their assembly. The process was chosen according to its productivity, low expensiveness, ecological impact and energy performances with capacities reaching 40 Ah. This paper explains: the objectives and specifications of the project, the advantage of the consortium and the role of the different partners, the results (coating, dry extrusion and battery element manufacturing techniques), and the electrochemical performances of the elements. (J.S.)

  9. Application of EnviroTRADE information system for the cleanup of the former Soviet Union (FSU) site at Komarom Base, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matalucci, R.V.; Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P.; Kuperberg, J.M.; Biczo, I.L.

    1994-01-01

    During a NATO Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) held in Visegrad, Hungary, June 21-23, 1994, portions of contamination data from the Former Soviet Union (FSU) site at Komarom, Hungary were used to demonstrate the international EnviroTRADE Information System as a tool to assist with the identification of alternative cleanup measures for contaminated sites. The NATO ARW was organized and conducted by the joint Florida State University and the Technical University of Budapest, Center for Hungarian-American Environmental Research, Studies, and Exchanges (CHAERSE). The purpose of the workshop was to develop a strategy for the identification and selection of appropriate low-cost and innovative site remediation technologies and approaches for a typical abandoned FSU site. The EnviroTRADE information system is a graphical, photographical, and textual environmental management tool under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a part of the cleanup program of the nuclear weapons complex. EnviroTRADE provides a single, powerful, multi-purpose, multi-user, multi-media, and interactive computer information system for worldwide environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM). Graphical, photographic, and textual data from the Komarom FSU site were entered into EnviroTRADE. These data were used to make comparative evaluations of site characterization and remediation technologies that might be used to clean up primarily hydrocarbon contamination in the groundwater and soil. Available Hydrogeological and geological features, contaminated soil profiles, and topographical maps were included in the information profiles. Although EnviroTRADE is currently only partially populated (approximately 350 technologies for cleanup are included in the database), the utility of the information system to evaluate possible options for cleanup of the Komarom site has been demonstrated

  10. Application of EnviroTRADE information system for the cleanup of the former Soviet Union (FSU) site at Komarom Base, Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matalucci, R.V.; Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuperberg, J.M. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Biczo, I.L. [Technical Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    1994-10-01

    During a NATO Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) held in Visegrad, Hungary, June 21-23, 1994, portions of contamination data from the Former Soviet Union (FSU) site at Komarom, Hungary were used to demonstrate the international EnviroTRADE Information System as a tool to assist with the identification of alternative cleanup measures for contaminated sites. The NATO ARW was organized and conducted by the joint Florida State University and the Technical University of Budapest, Center for Hungarian-American Environmental Research, Studies, and Exchanges (CHAERSE). The purpose of the workshop was to develop a strategy for the identification and selection of appropriate low-cost and innovative site remediation technologies and approaches for a typical abandoned FSU site. The EnviroTRADE information system is a graphical, photographical, and textual environmental management tool under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a part of the cleanup program of the nuclear weapons complex. EnviroTRADE provides a single, powerful, multi-purpose, multi-user, multi-media, and interactive computer information system for worldwide environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM). Graphical, photographic, and textual data from the Komarom FSU site were entered into EnviroTRADE. These data were used to make comparative evaluations of site characterization and remediation technologies that might be used to clean up primarily hydrocarbon contamination in the groundwater and soil. Available Hydrogeological and geological features, contaminated soil profiles, and topographical maps were included in the information profiles. Although EnviroTRADE is currently only partially populated (approximately 350 technologies for cleanup are included in the database), the utility of the information system to evaluate possible options for cleanup of the Komarom site has been demonstrated.

  11. Impact properties of electron beam welds of V–4Ti–4Cr alloys NIFS-HEAT-2 and CEA-J57

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsisar, Valentyn, E-mail: valentyn_tsisar@ipm.lviv.ua [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Physical–Mechanical Institute of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (PhMI NASU), 5 Naukova Street, 79601 Lviv (Ukraine); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials – Material Process Technology (IAM-WPT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz, 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Nagasaka, Takuya [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Le Flem, Marion [CEA, DEN, DMN, SRMA, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Yeliseyeva, Olga [Physical–Mechanical Institute of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (PhMI NASU), 5 Naukova Street, 79601 Lviv (Ukraine); Konys, Jürgen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials – Material Process Technology (IAM-WPT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz, 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Electron beam welding was applied for V–4Ti–4Cr alloys NIFS-HEAT-2 and CEA-J57. • Weld metal showed superior impact properties in comparison with base metal. • Expected shift in DBTT to higher temperatures does not take place. - Abstract: The Charpy impact properties and microstructure of bead-on-plate electron beam welds of V–4Ti–4Cr alloys NIFS-HEAT-2 (NH-2) and CEA-J57 (J57) were investigated. Weld metal of both grades demonstrated increase in hardness (HV{sub 100} ∼ 180) in comparison with base metal (HV{sub 100} ∼ 135) due to decomposition of Ti–C,O,N precipitates followed by the solid-solution hardening of V-matrix with oxygen. Hardness decreases gradually from the weld metal through the heat affected zone toward the base metal indicating partial decomposition of precipitation bands from the side of heat affected zone directly adjoining weld metal. The latter consists of columnar crystallites (grains) possessing with inner dendritic structure and elongated from the center of weld belt in the direction of heat removal. Thickness of weld metal does not exceed 1 mm while heat affected zone is about 3 mm thick. Absorbed energies of weld metal are superior in comparison with base metal for both grades (NH-2 and J57) while the fracture mode is mainly ductile in the temperature range of impact test from 17 to −196 °C.

  12. Combined Evaluation of AFP, CA15-3, CA125, CA19-9, and CEA Tumor Markers in Patients with Hepatitis B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmar, Mehdi; Yeganeh, Sara; Mansourghanaei, Fariborz; Amirmozafari, Nour

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the role of tumor markers AFP, CA15-3, CA125, CA19-9 and CEA in patients with hepatitis B and C. This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed from Oct 2012 to Oct 2014. Serum samples of 129 patients with hepatitis B and C referred to Guilan Liver and Digestive Disease Research Center in Rasht, Iran were collected and checked for the existence of the listed tumor markers by ELISA. No increase in serum levels of tumor marker CA19-9, CEA and CA15-3 were seen in patients with hepatitis ( P >0.05). In patients with hepatitis B, increase in CA125 were observed ( P =0.03). In hepatitis C patients, there was an increase in AFP levels ( P =0.03). The levels of AFP and CA125 markers were high in hepatitis C and hepatitis B, respectively. However, the increased levels were not seen is malignancy. Due to the small sample size, further study is necessary to find the reasons of the increase.

  13. From Cleanup to Stewardship. A companion report to Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure and background information to support the scoping process required for the 1998 PEIS Settlement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-10-01

    Long-term stewardship is expected to be needed at more than 100 DOE sites after DOE's Environmental Management program completes disposal, stabilization, and restoration operations to address waste and contamination resulting from nuclear research and nuclear weapons production conducted over the past 50 years. From Cleanup to stewardship provides background information on the Department of Energy (DOE) long-term stewardship obligations and activities. This document begins to examine the transition from cleanup to long-term stewardship, and it fulfills the Secretary's commitment to the President in the 1999 Performance Agreement to provide a companion report to the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure report. It also provides background information to support the scoping process required for a study on long-term stewardship required by a 1998 Settlement Agreement.

  14. Green Remediation Best Management Practices: Integrating Renewable Energy into Site Cleanup

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Principles for Greener Cleanups outline the Agency's policy for evaluating and minimizing the environmental 'footprint' of activities undertaken when cleaning up a contaminated site.

  15. Estimating Differences in the Cost of Groundwater Treatment of Trichioroethylene Based on Different Cleanup Goals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atchue, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    ...) to develop a health-based groundwater (GW) cleanup standard for trichloroethylene (TCE). Reevaluation of the health risk of TCE exposure may provide sufficient evidence for EPA program offices...

  16. Effort to earn public support and confidence in Hanford Site cleanup work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.C.; Edwards, C.; Beers, A.A.

    1991-09-01

    Public involvement is needed for Hanford Site cleanup to succeed. If people do not know about, understand, and support cleanup, it will be more difficult and expensive. The Tri-Party Agreement calls for public involvement in decisions about cleanup options and schedules. This paper defines what public involvement means and how the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and US Department of Energy (DOE) have conducted it. Experience and survey research have shown ways to improve our performance. While we have improved our conduct of public meetings, we must identify other ways to involve the public. Efforts continue to open decision making earlier in the decision process, to share information that is clear and understandable, and to open the channels of communication. We have made good progress. We have many opportunities to continue to improve. This paper describes some of the highlights and lessons learned in public involvement in Hanford Site cleanup. 4 refs

  17. Effectiveness of clean-up procedures on stain susceptibility of different orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Pundlik Mane

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Chemical-cure adhesive showed higher stain susceptibility than light-cure adhesive in all clean-up procedures. Both adhesives would show less stain susceptibility with polishing step with rubber cup and pumice.

  18. Cleanup and treatment of radioactively contaminated land including areas near nuclear facilities. A selected bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fore, C.S.; Faust, R.A.; Brewster, R.H.

    1982-09-01

    This annotated bibliography of 337 references summarizes the literature published on the cleanup and treatment of radioactively contaminated land. Specifically, this bibliography focuses on literature concerned with the methods of cleanup and treatment being applied - chemical, physical, or vegetative stabilization; the types of equipment being used; and the influence of climatic conditions on the method selected for use. The emphasis in such literature is placed on hazardous site cleanup efforts that have been completed as well as those that are in progress and are being planned. Appendix A includes 135 additional references to literature identified but not included in the bibliography because of time and funding constraints. Appendix B consists of a table that identifies the cleanup and treatment research conducted at specific sites. All of the information included in this bibliography is stored in a computerized form that is readily available upon request

  19. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This question-and-answer report provides answers in nontechnical language to frequently asked questions about the status of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The answers update information first prepared in 1981, shortly after the cleanup got under way. Since then, a variety of important developments in the cleanup has occurred. The information in the report should be read in conjunction with NUREG 1060, a discussion of increased occupational exposure estimates for the cleanup. The questions and answers in this report cover purpose and community involvement, decontamination of water and reactor, fuel removal, radwaste transport, environmental impact, social and economic effects, worker exposures and safety, radiation monitoring, potential for accidents, and schedule and funding

  20. Spreading, retention and clean-up of oil spills. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Jr, M P

    1976-05-01

    This study reviews and assesses the technology of oil spill spreading, retention and cleanup and proposes research needs in these areas. Sources of oil spills are analyzed and the difficulty of gathering meaningful statistics is discussed. Barrier technology is reviewed and problem areas analyzed. Natural and forced biodegradation and natural and chemical dispersion of oil spills are considered. Research recommendations are categorized under the following two headings (1) Preventive techniques and (2) Containment, Cleanup and Dispersion.

  1. Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Exposure and Subjective Symptoms in Residents Participating in Clean-Up Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Ha, Mina; Lee, Jong Seong; Kwon, Hojang; Ha, Eun-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul; Choi, Yeyong; Jeong, Woo-Chul; Hur, Jongil; Lee, Seung-Min; Kim, Eun-Jung; Im, Hosub

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to examine the relationship between crude oil exposure and physical symptoms among residents participating in clean-up work associated with the Hebei Spirit oil spill, 2007 in Korea. Methods A total of 288 residents responded to a questionnaire regarding subjective physical symptoms, sociodemographic characteristics and clean-up activities that occurred between two and eight weeks after the accident. Additionally, the urine of 154 of the respondents was ana...

  2. Potential impact of licensee default on cleanup of TMI-2. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.O.; Saltzman, J.

    1980-11-01

    Financial repercussions of the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 on the ability of the Licensee, Metropolitan Edison Co., to complete cleanup of the facility are examined. Potential impacts of licensee default on cleanup and alternatives to minimize the potential of bankruptcy are discussed. Specific recommendations are made regarding steps the Nuclear Regulatory Commission might take in keeping with its regulatory functions and its mission to protect the public health and safety

  3. Statistical evaluation of cleanup: How should it be done?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, R.O.

    1993-02-01

    This paper discusses statistical issues that must be addressed when conducting statistical tests for the purpose of evaluating if a site has been remediated to guideline values or standards. The importance of using the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process to plan and design the sampling plan is emphasized. Other topics discussed are: (1) accounting for the uncertainty of cleanup standards when conducting statistical tests, (2) determining the number of samples and measurements needed to attain specified DQOs, (3) considering whether the appropriate testing philosophy in a given situation is ''guilty until proven innocent'' or ''innocent until proven guilty'' when selecting a statistical test for evaluating the attainment of standards, (4) conducting tests using data sets that contain measurements that have been reported by the laboratory as less than the minimum detectable activity, and (5) selecting statistical tests that are appropriate for risk-based or background-based standards. A recent draft report by Berger that provides guidance on sampling plans and data analyses for final status surveys at US Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensed facilities serves as a focal point for discussion

  4. Improving conduct of operations in nuclear waste cleanup projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeazel, J.A.; Rowland, T.J.; Gessner, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is a cleanup effort which is actively removing liquid high-level waste from an underground storage tank, extracting radioactive cesium from the liquid using an iron-exchange system, and stabilizing the resulting low-level waste in an NRC-endorsed cement waste form. Additional activities involve:Volume reduction of low-level waste, Low-level waste treatment, Spent-fuel management, Hazardous waste management, Facility and equipment decontaminating and decommissioning, Vitrification facility construction and testing, Analytical and environmental chemistry, Engineering, construction, and quality-related activities. This project involves managing nuclear and hazardous wastes, with utmost attention to safety of the workforce, public, and environment. An aggressive program in under way to improve conduct of operations in all areas. Implementation of DOE Order 5480.19, open-quotes Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilitiesclose quotes, is proceeding on schedule. The effective use of champions among first-line supervisors, application of ownership, and effective interaction among the facilities and technological expertise at other Westinghouse divisions has resulted in value added to the Department of Energy at this facility

  5. How the K(d) Approach Undermines Groundwater Cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, Craig M.; Brady, Patrick V.

    1999-07-19

    Environmental scientists have long appreciated that the distribution coefficient (the ''K{sub d}'' or ''constant K{sub d}'') approach predicts the partitioning of heavy metals between sediment and groundwater inaccurately; nonetheless, transport models applied to problems of environmental protection and groundwater remediation almost invariably employ this technique. To examine the consequences of this practice, we consider transport in one dimension of Pb and other heavy metals through an aquifer containing hydrous ferric oxide, onto which heavy metals sorb strongly. We compare the predictions of models calculated using the K{sub d} approach to those given by surface complexation theory, which is more realistic physically and chemically. The two modeling techniques give qualitatively differing results that lead to divergent cleanup strategies. The results for surface complexation theory show that water flushing is ineffective at displacing significant amounts of Pb from the sorbing surface. The effluent from such treatment contains a ''tail'' of small but significant levels of contamination that persists indefinitely. Subsurface zones of Pb contamination, furthermore, are largely immobile in flowing groundwater. These results stand in sharp contrast to the predictions of models constructed using the k{sub d} approach, yet are consistent with experience in the laboratory and field.

  6. Experimental Tritium Cleanup System availability analysis from 1984 to 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Taylor, G.L.

    1993-05-01

    This report gives the availability percentage of the Experimental Tritium Cleanup System (ETC) at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA), which is a fusion research and technology facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The component failure reports, the numbers of components, and operating times or demands are all given in this report. Sample calculations of the failure rates obtained from these data are given in the appendices. While future fusion experiments might use different or more advanced means to detritiate room air, the analysis of this system gives a data point for an actual detritiation system. Such a data point can be extrapolated for comparison with fault tree results on system designs, or can be used in a Bayesian failure rate analysis for estimating reliability of a new type of system. The nine years of testing operations on TSTA's ETC result in a reasonable average availability value of 92% for the maximal tritium release event. The failure rates for new systems are expected to be lower than for the TSTA ETC, since improvements will be made in the design of the room air detritiation system based on the TSTA system experiences. Nonetheless, these TSTA data should be useful for future fusion reactor design work and safety assessment tasks

  7. Rapid cleanup of bacterial DNA from samples containing aerosol contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menking, Darrell E.; Kracke, Suzanne K.; Emanuel, Peter A.; Valdes, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is an in vitro enzymatic, synthetic method used to amplify specific DNA sequences from organisms. Detection of DNA using gene probes allows for absolute identification not only of specific organisms, but also of genetic material in recombinant organisms. PCR is an exquisite biological method for detecting bacteria in aerosol samples. A major challenge facing detection of DNA from field samples is that they are almost sure to contain impurities, especially impurities that inhibit amplification through PCR. DNA is being extracted from air, sewage/stool samples, food, sputum, a water and sediment; however, multi- step, time consuming methods are required to isolate the DNA from the surrounding contamination. This research focuses on developing a method for rapid cleanup of DNA which combines extraction and purification of DNA while, at the same time, removing inhibitors from 'dirty samples' to produce purified, PCR-ready DNA. GeneReleaser produces PCR-ready DNA in a rapid five-minute protocol. GeneReleaser resin was able to clean up sample contain micrograms of typical aerosol and water contaminants. The advantages of using GR are that it is rapid, inexpensive, requires one-step, uses no hazardous material and produces PCR-ready DNA.

  8. Canadian coastal environments, shoreline processes, and oil spill cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, E.H.

    1994-03-01

    The coastal zone is a dynamic environment, so that in developing practical and effective oil spill response strategies it is necessary to understand the forces that contribute to shore-zone processs. The coasts of Canada encompass a wide range of environments and are characterized by a variety of shoreline types that include the exposed, resistant cliffs of eastern Newfoundland and the sheltered marshes of the Beaufort Sea. A report is presented to provide an understanding of the dynamics and physical processes as they vary on the different coasts of Canada, including the Great Lakes. An outline of the general character and processes on a regional basis describes the coastal environments and introduces the literature that can be consulted for more specific information. The likely fate and persistence of oil that reaches the shoreline is discussed to provide the framework for development of spill response strategies and for the selection of appropriate shoreline cleanup or treatment countermeasures. Lessons learned from recent experience with major oil spills and field experiments are integrated into the discussion. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each of the four sections of this report. 502 refs., 5 figs

  9. Major clean-up effort in the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Marzio Nessi

    On Tuesday 10 October, 58 ATLAS collaborators volunteered to give a hand for a major clean-up of the ATLAS detector prior to the toroid magnet ramp-up. This special task monopolised all of the technical coordination team and eight supervisors to oversee the volunteers who were assigned to two separate five-hour shifts. The volunteers removed all sorts of loose material inside and outside the detector, focusing mainly on potentially magnetic material lost inside the detector and dirt accumulated over several months, not to mention zillions of clipped cable ties! The technical crew provided 120 garbage bags and all were used. All sorts of material that had been lost inside the detector by various people was retrieved, in particular small tools which could potentially damage the detector, as well as metallic fillings hazardous for the electronics once the magnet will be ramped up. A more detailed inspection followed for all the inside of the detector, making sure the current on the magnet could be raised to 5KA ...

  10. Simulation of the cleanup of the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludowise, J.D.; Allen, G.K.

    1992-12-01

    The Hanford Site is a 1,450-km 2 (560-mi 2 ) tract of semiarid land in southeastern Washington State. Nuclear materials for the nation's defense programs were manufactured at the Hanford Site for more than 40 years. The waste generated by these activities has been treated, stored, or disposed of in a variety of ways. The Hanford Site strategic analysis provides a general comparison analysis tool to guide selection and future modification of the integrated Site cleanup plan. A key element of the Hanford strategic analysis is a material flow model that tracks 80 individual feed elements containing 60 componentsof interest through 50 functional processing blocks in 12 different configurations. The material flow model was developed for parametric analyses using separation factors and parameters specific to individual feeds. The model was constructed so that the effects of individual feed streams can be traced through a flowsheet, and the performance parameters of each functional block can be varied independently. The material flow model has five major elements: input database, process flow diagrams, sequential modular process simulation, output database, and output summing program

  11. Some statistical aspects of the cleanup of Enewetak Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.G.; Giacomini, J.J.; Friesen, H.N.

    1979-01-01

    Cleaning up the radionuclide contamination at Enewetak Atoll has involved a number of statistical design problems. Theoretical considerations led to choosing a grid sampling pattern; practical problems sometimes lead to resampling on a finer grid. Other problems associated with using grids have been both physical and statistical. The standard sampling system is an in situ intrinsic gamma detector which measures americium concentration. The cleanup guidelines include plutonium concentration, so additional sampling of soil is required to establish Pu/Am ratios. The soil sampling design included both guidelines for location of the samples and also a special pattern of subsamples making up composite samples. The large variance of the soil, sample results makes comparison between the two types difficult anyway, but this is compounded by vegetation attenuation of the in situ readings, soil disturbance influences, and differences in devegetation methods. The constraints inherent in doing what amounts to a research and development project, on a limited budget of time and money, in a field engineering environment are also considered

  12. Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

  13. R and D developments on the disposal of radioactive wastes recently carried out at CEA (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Since the law of december 31, 1991 voted by the French Parliament, disposal in geological formations is not the sole option considered for the management of radioactive wastes. Scientists and engineers, notably within the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' (CEA), must investigate in parallel two other options, namely i. advanced separation of long-lived radioisotopes and transmutation, and ii. improvement of radioactive waste matrices and long-term storage. Still, the geological disposal of radioactive wastes, which has generated within the last decade an immense amount of Research and Development, remains a major proposed solution to the long-term management of transuranic and high-level wastes. In this paper, we will describe some of the Research and Development carried out within CEA, avoiding the industrial and engineering aspects of the issues dealt with. Rather, we will illustrate major points of our basic research, underlining in particular methodological considerations

  14. Fusion technology. Annual report of the Association CEA/EURATOM 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magaud, P.; Le Vagueres, F.

    1998-01-01

    The research and development work performed by the French EURATOM-CEA Association for fusion technology is part of the Fusion Programme of the European Community. This report compiles the work carried out during the year 1997 as follows: The ITER CEA activities and related developments are described in the first section (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); The second part is dedicated to the Long Term activities as Blankets and material developments, long term safety, socio-economic problem; The Underlying Technology activities are compiled in the third part of this report (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); And the fourth part describes the inertial confinement studies. (K.A.)

  15. New tests on the 40 kA Nb3Sn CEA conductor for ITER applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Bessette, D.; Katheder, H.

    1994-01-01

    New tests have been performed on the 40 kA CEA Nb 3 Sn conductor in the Sultan III facility. The aim of these tests is to obtain key experimental data on the behaviour of Nb 3 Sn conductors for fusion applications under high field and large transport current. The 40 kA Nb 3 Sn CEA conductor has a shape and an internal arrangement of the superconducting wires which is very similar to the ITER conductors. The level of the ac losses experienced by these conductors under varying fields influences deeply their design. The basic experiment consists of producing field pulses on the conductor by means of a coil installed in the bore of the Sultan magnet and recording the integrated voltage obtained on pick-up coils placed on the conductor as a function of time. (author) 4 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Salivary Levels of ErbB2 and CEA in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarmand, Marieh Honarmand; Farhad-Mollashahi, Leila; Nakhaee, Alireza; Nehi, Masoume

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the ten most common causes of cancer death worldwide. Assessment of molecular changes can help detect and control lesions. The aim of this study was evaluation of salivary levels of ErbB2 and CEA in OSCC patients. In this case-control study, 27 OSCC patients and 26 healthy controls participated. After obtaining consent and filling out a questionnaire, unstimulated saliva samples were collected from people in the morning for measurement of the two markers using ELISA. Data were analyzed using Mann Whitney U test in SPSS 19 software with Ptumor marker in patients with OSCC must still be regarded as controversial and needs further studies to clarify any significance for early detection or screening. In contrast the salivary level of CEA may find application for early detection of patients.

  17. Fusion technology. Annual report of the Association CEA/EURATOM 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaud, P.; Le Vagueres, F

    1998-12-31

    The research and development work performed by the French EURATOM-CEA Association for fusion technology is part of the Fusion Programme of the European Community. This report compiles the work carried out during the year 1997 as follows: The ITER CEA activities and related developments are described in the first section (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); The second part is dedicated to the Long Term activities as Blankets and material developments, long term safety, socio-economic problem; The Underlying Technology activities are compiled in the third part of this report (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); And the fourth part describes the inertial confinement studies. (K.A.)

  18. Plasma TIMP-1 and CEA as Markers for Detection of Primary Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ib Jarle; Brünner, Nils; Dowell, Barry

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: The combination of plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (1) and CEA has been shown to have utility in early detection of colorectal cancer (2). A prospective study was performed to validate previous findings. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Individuals undergoing large bowel...... was detected in 32 individuals, 24 with colonic cancer (CC) and 8 with rectal cancer (RC). Other findings were 265 with adenomas and 889 with non-neoplastic pathology. The biomarker levels were elevated in plasma from patients with CRC, but also from patients with various co-morbidities compared to individuals...... endoscopy were prospectively included (N=1965). Baseline data and co-morbidity were recorded. The primary end-point was the detection of CRC. Plasma was obtained before endoscopy and TIMP-1 and CEA levels were determined using an automated analysis platform when all samples were collected. RESULTS: CRC...

  19. Assessment of CA 15.3, CEA and TPA concentrations during monitoring of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Petersen, P H; Dombernowsky, P

    2000-01-01

    The variability of the tumor markers cancer antigen (CA) 15.3, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) during steady state concentrations and the rate of increase during progression is described. One hundred and ninety-two patients were monitored during first...... with above cutoff level values. Clinical and marker progression was registered for 75 (CA 15.3), 62 (CEA), and 57 (TPA) patients. The coefficients of total variation of steady state concentrations (comprising the intra- and interassay analytical imprecision and the within subject biological variation) were...... for TPA (0.0346). Our data indicate that criteria for assessment of sequential tumor marker concentrations should consider the marker in question, the steady state variability, the cutoff value, and the rate of increase during disease progression....

  20. The 1987-1988 progress report of the CEA-Euratom Association Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The progress report of the CEA-Euratom Association Research Group, concerning 1987 and 1988 activities, is presented. The report involves the work carried out for assembling the Tore Supra system. The different components and the operating modes are described. The report includes: the Tore Supra construction and running, theoretical work, numerical calculations and results, the tritium technology, safety studies, supraconductors and bobbins. The Tore Supra contributions to the JET program are given [fr

  1. Radioimmunoassay of ferritin, CEA and prolactin for assessment of prognosis and efficacy of breast cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklyar, S.Yu.; Chebotareva, Eh.D.; Ganul, V.L.; Korolev, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    The levels of tumor markers - CEA, deritin and prolactin (the hormone of the anterior pituitary gland) were studied in the blood serum of 178 breast cancer patients in the menopause during combined therapy using a radioimmunoassay. This combination was shown to be informative for assessment of prognosis of disease and efficacy of antitumor therapy which was confirmed by clinical and x-ray findings and observation of a tumor process in breast cancer patients over a 5-year period

  2. Pyrochemical separation at CEA: Current results and future R and D program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacquement, J.; Bourg, S.; Boussier, H.; Conocar, O.; Hamel, C.; Laplace, A.; Maillard, C; Donnet, L.; Duhamet, J.

    2004-01-01

    R and D studies are conducted at CEA/DEN to assess the potentialities of the pyrochemical processes which could be an advantageous alternative to hydrometallurgy for the reprocessing of: (i) targets as well as dedicated fuels for M.A transmutation if multiple recycling is considered, (ii) Generation IV gas cooled reactors. This paper gives an overview of the major experiments performed either in molten fluorides or chlorides. (authors)

  3. EURATOM-CEA association contributions to the 21st symposium on fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garin, P.; Grosman, A.; Beaumont, B. [and others

    2000-11-01

    The 27 contributions of EURATOM-Cea association have been gathered with 6 additional papers and 1 invited paper in this document. Most papers concern Tore-Supra and deal with the ergodic divertor, particle injection, impedance concept for ICRF antennas, low hybrid current drive, RF systems, the 118 GHz ECRH experiment, the inner first wall, improved vacuum vessel protection, pellet injection, material activation, and the CIEL project. 3 of the additional papers concern the model coil of ITER.

  4. EURATOM-CEA association contributions to the 21st symposium on fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, P.; Grosman, A.; Beaumont, B.

    2000-11-01

    The 27 contributions of EURATOM-Cea association have been gathered with 6 additional papers and 1 invited paper in this document. Most papers concern Tore-Supra and deal with the ergodic divertor, particle injection, impedance concept for ICRF antennas, low hybrid current drive, RF systems, the 118 GHz ECRH experiment, the inner first wall, improved vacuum vessel protection, pellet injection, material activation, and the CIEL project. 3 of the additional papers concern the model coil of ITER

  5. Phase I Escalating-Dose Trial of CAR-T Therapy Targeting CEA+ Metastatic Colorectal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengcheng; Wang, Zhe; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Meiling; Li, Shiqi; Li, Yunyan; Zhang, Rui; Xiong, Zhouxing; Wei, Zhihao; Shen, Junjie; Luo, Yongli; Zhang, Qianzhen; Liu, Limei; Qin, Hong; Liu, Wei; Wu, Feng; Chen, Wei; Pan, Feng; Zhang, Xianquan; Bie, Ping; Liang, Houjie; Pecher, Gabriele; Qian, Cheng

    2017-05-03

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells have shown promising efficacy in treatment of hematological malignancies, but its applications in solid tumors need further exploration. In this study, we investigated CAR-T therapy targeting carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA)-positive colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with metastases to evaluate its safety and efficacy. Five escalating dose levels (DLs) (1 × 10 5 to 1 × 10 8 /CAR + /kg cells) of CAR-T were applied in 10 CRC patients. Our data showed that severe adverse events related to CAR-T therapy were not observed. Of the 10 patients, 7 patients who experienced progressive disease (PD) in previous treatments had stable disease after CAR-T therapy. Two patients remained with stable disease for more than 30 weeks, and two patients showed tumor shrinkage by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and MRI analysis, respectively. Decline of serum CEA level was apparent in most patients even in long-term observation. Furthermore, we observed persistence of CAR-T cells in peripheral blood of patients receiving high doses of CAR-T therapy. Importantly, we observed CAR-T cell proliferation especially in patients after a second CAR-T therapy. Taken together, we demonstrated that CEA CAR-T cell therapy was well tolerated in CEA + CRC patients even in high doses, and some efficacy was observed in most of the treated patients. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Experience gained at the CEA by thermal effluent utilization for agriculture and fish-breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balligand.

    1976-01-01

    Results obtained at the CEA for waste heat utilization are examined. Water at T+10 0 C is used for open air soil heating (forest, agriculture), eel breeding and greenhouse, heating (with the help of heat pumps). Water at T+23 0 C or 30 0 C is used for greenhouses. Facilities are described experience gained and results of the different exploitations are given [fr

  7. Anti-CEA monoclonal antibody in the diagnosis of colorectal, lung and ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, N.; Lu, B.; Lu, X.; Sha, X.; Yue, D.

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the diagnostic value of radioimmnoimaging (RII) with 99 Tc labeled monoclonal antibody C50, raised originally against carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) in various tumors. 152 pathologically confirmed patients with a tumor were imaged prior to surgery with an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody labeled with 99 Tc. There were 115 patients with ovarian carcinoma, 26 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 11 patients with lung carcinoma. Images were acquired at 3-6 h post injection and were analyzed by the double blind method. Images of patients with ovarian cancer were compared with B-ultrasound images. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on all cases of colorectal cancer. All RII images demonstrated excellent contrast, clear lesions, and no serious toxic or other side reactions occurred. Transient chills and fever were observed in 3 cases. This study showed a sensitivity=88.2%, specificity=83.2%, and an accuracy=4.0%. The smallest lesion size detected was 2 x 2 cm. The total combined lesion detection rate for primary, metastatic, and recurrence lesions was 84.4%. We conclude that 99 Tc labeled anti-CEA MoAb C50 can be used in the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, and lung carcinoma

  8. Detailed design studies at CEA for JT-60SA TF coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decool, P., E-mail: patrick.decool@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Marechal, J.L.; Portafaix, C.; Lacroix, B.; Gros, G.; Verger, J.M. [CEA, IRFM F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    Following a first conceptual design activity in which the general design of the JT-60SA TF system was defined and frozen in agreement with all the participants in the project (CEA, ENEA, F4E), a second phase had to be launched to deal with the detailed design. In this paper, we present the work performed at CEA on the TF coil design during this second phase. Part of this work, concerns the determination of conductor hydraulic performances during operation as well as in factory. The thermohydraulic of the conductor was also assessed to confirm the need of helium inlets and a specific design was developed and qualified to be compatible with the available hydraulic performance of the cryoplant. The mechanical behavior is still to be assessed and qualified. Last but not least, the inner electrical joints of the coil have been modified with respect to the original twin-box design developed by CEA for the ITER coils in order to simplify the fabrication process. A dedicated qualification program for their manufacture is ongoing.

  9. Use of integral experiments for the assessment of a new 235U IRSN-CEA evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichou Raphaëlle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC subgroup 29 (SG 29 was established to investigate an issue with the 235U capture cross-section in the energy range from 0.1 to 2.25 keV, due to a possible overestimation of 10% or more. To improve the 235U capture crosssection, a new 235U evaluation has been proposed by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN and the CEA, mainly based on new time-of-flight 235U capture cross-section measurements and recent fission cross-section measurements performed at the n_TOF facility from CERN. IRSN and CEA Cadarache were in charge of the thermal to 2.25 keV energy range, whereas the CEA DIF was responsible of the high energy region. Integral experiments showing a strong 235U sensitivity are used to assess the new evaluation, using Monte-Carlo methods. The keff calculations were performed with the 5.D.1 beta version of the MORET 5 code, using the JEFF-3.2 library and the new 235U evaluation, as well as the JEFF-3.3T1 library in which the new 235U has been included. The benchmark selection allowed highlighting a significant improvement on keff due to the new 235U evaluation. The results of this data testing are presented here.

  10. Clinical experience of the radioimmunoscintigraphy with the 123-I-anti-CEA-Fab(No. 35)-fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meili, A.; Bekier, A.; Schulthess, G.K. von; Mach, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Purified monoclonal murine 123-I-Fab-anti-CEA(Nr.35) were applied to 7 patients in a prospective study. Compared with the previous tested intact 131-I-labelled antibody (Nr. 202) the new preparation had many advantages for imaging: 2.7 times more counting efficiency of the gamma camera, higher activity utilizable and better accumulation in the tumor with sufficient image contrast in the ECT. Fifteen until sixteen hours after administration of 20 mCi 123-I the countrate in the pelvis was 130000/20 sec. In all patients the primary tumor was visualized, two patients demonstrated regional lymph node involvement and one patient liver metastasis in the left lobe. All findings were confirmed by surgery and histopathology. The average tumor/mucosa ratio was 3.5:1. The activity in the tumor 15 h after application was 0.015 per cent/g tumor/mCi 123-I used. 4/7 patients with colorectal cancer over 3.5 cm in diameter demonstrated normal plasma values of CEA < 3 microg/l. One patient with rising CEA plasma level was suspected of relapse, the focal accumulation corresponded with a mass lesion in the right sacrum in CT-scan. After the preliminary results the further applicability is recognizable: staging and screening before and after therapy, handicapped by high costs at time. A good advantage is the possibility of specific and organ independent diagnosis of tumor, which contents the corresponding surface antigen. (author)

  11. Advances in non-proliferation and nuclear forensics analysis at CEA/DIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, A.; Pointurier, F.; Faure, A.L.; Pottin, A.C.; Marie, O.; Salaun, A.; Mendes, M.; Aupiais, J.

    2013-01-01

    Analytical laboratories at CEA/DAM are part of the NWAL (Network of Analytical Laboratories of the International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA) for the analysis of environmental samples since 2001 for both bulk and particle analysis. Bulk analysis gives an average composition of the samples. Uranium and plutonium are separated on ion exchange resins and isotopic analyses are performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). For particle analysis the isotopic composition of individual particle is determined in order to check consistency of declaration and to identify possible undeclared activity inside inspected nuclear facility. Isotopic composition of particles can either be measured with Fission Tracks Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (FTTIMS) or Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) techniques. Analytical laboratories at CEA/DIF are specialised in the isotopic analysis of trace quantities of uranium (typically nanograms) and plutonium (at femto-gram level). The developments carried out at CEA for Safeguards are focused on the reliability and the precision of the measurements. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  12. Use of integral experiments for the assessment of a new 235U IRSN-CEA evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichou, Raphaëlle; Leclaire, Nicolas; Leal, Luiz; Haeck, Wim; Morillon, Benjamin; Romain, Pascal; Duarte, Helder

    2017-09-01

    The Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) subgroup 29 (SG 29) was established to investigate an issue with the 235U capture cross-section in the energy range from 0.1 to 2.25 keV, due to a possible overestimation of 10% or more. To improve the 235U capture crosssection, a new 235U evaluation has been proposed by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) and the CEA, mainly based on new time-of-flight 235U capture cross-section measurements and recent fission cross-section measurements performed at the n_TOF facility from CERN. IRSN and CEA Cadarache were in charge of the thermal to 2.25 keV energy range, whereas the CEA DIF was responsible of the high energy region. Integral experiments showing a strong 235U sensitivity are used to assess the new evaluation, using Monte-Carlo methods. The keff calculations were performed with the 5.D.1 beta version of the MORET 5 code, using the JEFF-3.2 library and the new 235U evaluation, as well as the JEFF-3.3T1 library in which the new 235U has been included. The benchmark selection allowed highlighting a significant improvement on keff due to the new 235U evaluation. The results of this data testing are presented here.

  13. 188Re-IorCEA1 as radioimmunotherapeutical agent: Preparation and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimental, G.

    2000-01-01

    Effective immunotherapy of human malignancies requires the selective delivery of these agents to relevant antigen-expressing tumour cells. A variety of strategies have been investigated to achieve this objective. It has very clearly established that ior-CEA1 monoclonal antibody is an extremely good agent for immunoscintigraphy with a high sensitivity (94%) and specificity (87%) (OLIVA 94, OLIVA 95). Ior-CEA1 is hence a good candidate for development as a therapeutic agent. Moreover, it is an attractive novel protein, which conserves its biological properties, despite chemical treatment. Radiolabelling of ior-CEA1 is accomplished by a direct method using 2-mercaptoethanol as the reducing agent. Two different weak chelating agents were employed, which had been reported in other published works before. All experiments carried out with MDP showed low labelling yields and high precipitate formation, even while SnF 2 , which has better redox properties. The best labelling yields were attained with low citric acid concentration, as well as with 400 μg of SnF 2 at pH 3. The optimised method gave high labelling yields (∼ 95 %). The best labelling yields were attained with low citric acid concentration, which was used as a weak transchelation ligand. Ascorbic acid and Albumin could be used as the stabilising agents in order to achieve less than 3,5% dissociation

  14. The role of tumor markers (CEA, TPA, CA 19-9) in colon and rectum carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cangemi, V.; Volpino, P.; Fiori, E.; Giammarco, A.; Piat, G.

    1987-01-01

    We have evaluated the diagnostic efficacy (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, predictive malignancy index) of CEA, TPA, CA 19-9 in colon and rectum tumors (56 cases), the difference in behaviour of these markers in relation to the stage and grading of the cancer, their reliability regarding postsurgical relapses and/or metastases. The sensitivity of CEA (>10 ng/ml), TPA (>130 U/L), CA 19-9 (>37 u/ml) for diagnostic purpose was rather limited (28.6% - 30% - 18.5%) with a malignancy prediction value of 100% - 81.8% - 62.5%. With regard to relapses and/or metastases, the diagnostic efficacy of the marker proved to be evident only for CEA, TPA, CA 19-9 value greater than 25 ng/ml, 250 U/L and 100 u/ml. The use of thethree markers together was certainly an advantage both for primitive tumors (sensitivity: 52.8%) and relapses and/or metastases after surgery (sensitivity: 66.7%)

  15. NSE, CEA and SCC - a useful combination of tumor markers in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischbach, W.; Jany, B.

    1988-01-01

    The usefulness of neuronspecific enolase (NSE), CEA, and of the tumor associated antigen SSC was investigated in 61 patients with histologically proven lung cancer (small cell lung cancer n=25, adenocarcinoma n=14, squamous cell carcinoma n=18 and large cell carcinoma n=4). The sensitivity of NSE was 93.3% in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), whereas in adeno- and squamous cell carcinoma only 8 or 13%, resp., elevated serum NSE were found. CEA was the most sensitive marker for adenocarcinoma (58.3%). Contrary to NSE, however, CEA does not allow any conclusions concerning differential diagnosis as pathological serum concentrations were also observed in 46.6% both in small cell lung cancer and in squamous cell carcinoma. SCC demonstrated a sensitivity of 53% in squamous cell carcinoma. Elevated serum levels were also found in adenocarcinoma (41.6%), but never in small lung cancer. For all three markers tested, high serum concentrations were predominantly present in patients with advanced disease state. (orig.) [de

  16. CEA-producing urothelial cell carcinoma with metastasis presenting as a rectal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsin Yang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a case study of a 61-year-old male who presented with difficult defecation for 1 month. A circumferential submucosal rectal tumor was noted on a digital rectal examination and colonoscopy. Laboratory examination revealed high serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; 43.75 ng/mL and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9; 11,790 U/mL. In addition, tumor biopsies revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the rectum with intact mucosa. The patient had history of advanced stage-T2 urothelial cell carcinoma of bladder, which had been downstaged to T0 by neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy 1 year prior. After investigating the initial bladder tumor specimens, a small portion of the tumor with high CEA expression comparable to the submucosal rectal tumor was found. The size of the tumor was reduced and the levels of the tumor markers decreased after administering FOLFIRI chemotherapy targeted at the adenocarcinoma. Although neoadjuvant chemotherapy may have a selective pressure to eliminate most urothelial cell carcinoma, physicians should be aware that it can lead to rectal metastasis via CEA-producing components.

  17. The dismantling of nuclear installations in the Grenoble CEA centre - Press book 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laveissiere, Stephane; Coronini, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    After having outlined the importance of the project for the Grenoble CEA centre, this document presents the objectives, issues and challenges of dismantling activities performed on various nuclear installations located in the CEA centre of Grenoble. Objectives are presented in terms of agenda, predicted production of radioactive wastes, budget, personnel and steering committee. The various nuclear installations are presented: experimental reactors (Melusine, Siloe, Siloette), LAMA (laboratory of analysis of active materials), STED (station for the treatment of effluents and wastes). The safety and protection of workers is addressed in terms of protection and monitoring measures, and of exposure to radiations. The next part deals with the monitoring of the environment (actors, history of control of the centre's releases, control points, releases, atmosphere monitoring, and hydrological monitoring). A second part presents the global strategy of the CEA for its activities of sanitation and nuclear dismantling: present operations, dismantling activities in Fontenay-aux-Roses and in Marcoule, economic organization, contribution of advanced technology in radiological measurement and control, simulation and modelling, decontamination techniques, cutting operations, and remotely controlled operations

  18. Detailed design studies at CEA for JT-60SA TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decool, P.; Marechal, J.L.; Portafaix, C.; Lacroix, B.; Gros, G.; Verger, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Following a first conceptual design activity in which the general design of the JT-60SA TF system was defined and frozen in agreement with all the participants in the project (CEA, ENEA, F4E), a second phase had to be launched to deal with the detailed design. In this paper, we present the work performed at CEA on the TF coil design during this second phase. Part of this work, concerns the determination of conductor hydraulic performances during operation as well as in factory. The thermohydraulic of the conductor was also assessed to confirm the need of helium inlets and a specific design was developed and qualified to be compatible with the available hydraulic performance of the cryoplant. The mechanical behavior is still to be assessed and qualified. Last but not least, the inner electrical joints of the coil have been modified with respect to the original twin-box design developed by CEA for the ITER coils in order to simplify the fabrication process. A dedicated qualification program for their manufacture is ongoing.

  19. Annual report of the Association EURATOM-Cea 2005 (full report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, Th.; Le Vagueres, F.

    2005-01-01

    This annual report summarizes activities performed by the EURATOM-Cea association in 2005. The activities carried out in the field 'physics integration' are mainly linked to the ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna development and to the development of diagnostic components. The vacuum vessel studies have mainly focused at welding techniques and at qualification of inspection methods along the vacuum vessel inter-sector weld. On the plasma facing component side investigations have been performed on material knowledge (CuCrZr creep-fatigue studies, neutron effects on material properties of CFC, development and optimisation of Be/CuCrZr joining techniques and studies dedicated to the divertor. In the field 'magnets', EURATOM-Cea association has devoted a major part of its effort to the studies of advanced Nb 3 Sn strands for the toroidal field coil, and the first full size conductor sample was manufactured. Within the frame of Test Blanket Module (TBM), activities mainly concerned the improvement and completion of the TBM engineering design. Within the frame of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed concept programmes, studies about the development of Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles are on going. The main objective of 2005 which was to improve the shape of Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles has been successfully achieved. EURATOM-Cea maintained significant involvement in the development of structural materials for a fusion reactor. A strong effort has been made on a program of laser detritiation associated with remote handling. (A.C.)

  20. Radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies (19-9/anti-CEA and OC 125)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Maul, F.D.; Senekowitsch, R.

    1986-01-01

    131 I labelled F (ab') 2 fragments of monoclonal antibodies to tumor-associated antigens (Ca 19-9/DEA and CA 125; specific activity: 55-111 MBq, mean injected activity 61 MBq) were administered to 116 patients for the radioimmunodetection of different malignant tumors (mainly colorectal (19-9/anti-CEA) and ovarian carcinomas (OC 125). Using planar scintigraphy and the second tracer isocontour technique (STIT) sensitivity was 83% and specificity 90% (n = 92 pts.) for the radioimmuno-cocktail 19-9/anti-CEA. In all patients examined with OC 125 retrospectively (n = 17 pts.) immunoscintigraphy was found to be positive. Up to now we have performed three radioimmunotherapies (once with 131 I-19-9/anti-CEA, 2.33 GBq (63mCi); twice with 131 I-OC 125, 3.70 GBq (100 mCi) and 4.63GBq (125 mCi) resulting in radiation doses to the tumor of about 20 Gy. Diagnostic application of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies is encouraging. For therapeutic use many problems remain to be solved. (Author)

  1. Reference Intervals for Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in Guangxi Zhuang Ethnic Males from the FAMHES Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Xianjun; Yang, Dongmei; Mo, Zengnan; Gao, Yong; Deng, Yan; Qin, Xue; Li, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported the reference intervals of serum AFP and CEA levels in ethnically diverse populations, but there is a lack of such reference data among Zhuang ethnic males. The aim of this study was to establish the locally validated reference intervals for AFP and CEA in the male population of the Guangxi Zhuang ethnic group. A total of 283 Zhuang ethnic males, aged 22 to 69 years, were included from the Fangchenggang Area Male Health and Examination Survey (FAMHES) project database. The one-sided upper 95th-percentile limit was used to estimate the reference intervals for serum AFP and CEA. The total non-parametric reference intervals for Zhuang ethnic males were reference intervals for serum AFP and CEA values deviated from that reported in previous studies. Age-specific reference intervals should be performed in clinical laboratories to obtain more precise estimations for the clinical conditions of young adults and elderly people.

  2. Protein expression levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in Danish ovarian cancer patients: from the Danish 'MALOVA'ovarian cancer study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogdall, E.V.; Christensen, L.; Blaakaer, J.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the variation in expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in 760 epithelial ovarian tumours from Denmark, and to correlate expression with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis for the disease. METHODS: Using tissue arrays (TA), we analysed CEA expression in tissues...... from 189 women diagnosed with low malignant potential ovarian tumours (LMP, borderline ovarian tumours) and 571 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer (OC). RESULTS: Using 30% as the cut-off level for CEA over-expression, 18% of LMPs and 4% of OCs were positive. A higher proportion of mucinous tumours...... were positive compared with other histological subtypes (pCEA expression in the tumour tissue (p = 0.004). In a Cox survival analysis, which included 569 OC cases subgrouped by stage...

  3. Diagnostic value of combined determination of serum CEA, CA72-4 and TSGF levels in patients with gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuyi; Gu Yan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of combined determination of serum CEA, CA72-4 and TSGF levels for gastric cancer. Methods: Serum CEA, CA72-4(with RIA) and TSGF (with biochemistry)levels were measured in 31 patients with gastric cancer and 35 controls. Results: As a single tumor marker for diagnosis, the sensitivity of CEA, CA72-4 and TSGF was 23. 0%, 38.0%, 48.0% respectively and the specificity was 23.0%, 38.0%, 48.0% respectively with combined detection of the three markers and assuming two or more markers positive as diagnostic, the sensitivity would be 67.0% and specificity would be 88.0%. Conclusion: Combined determination of serum CEA, CA72-4 and TSGF levels could promote the clinical usefulness for diagnosis of gastric cancer. (authors)

  4. Clinical significance of changes of serum levels of SIL-2R and CEA in patients with lung cancer after chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui Zhilian

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum levels of SIL-2R and CEA after chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer. Methods: Serum levels of SIL-2R (with ELISA) and CEA (with RIA) were measured in 31 patients with lung cancer both before and after chemotherapy as well as in 35 cantrols. Results: Before chemotherapy, both serum SIL-2R and CEA levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P 0.05), but the serum SIL-2R levels in the patients remained significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.05). Conclusion: Determination of changes of serum SIL-2R and CEA levels after chemotherapy might be helpful for predicting the treatment outcomes in patients with lung cancer. (author)

  5. Serum CEA as a prognostic factor in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasumi, Katsuhiko; Kobayashi, Takuro; Matsuzawa, Masumi; Takahashi, Michiko.

    1984-01-01

    Serum CEA levels were serially examined during radiation therapy in 38 patients with stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Eighteen patients showed abnormal serum CEA levels and 20 showed normal serum CEA levels before therapy. The recurrence rate was independent of whether the patients showed normal or abnormal levels before radiation therapy. When pretreatment abnormal serum CEA levels remained unchanged at the termination of radiation therapy, the recurrence rate was high. Recurrence developed in many of the patients outside the irradiated field early after therapy, suggesting that distant metastasis had already existed at the termination of therapy. Even when pretreatment abnormal serum CEA levels turned to normal until the termination of therapy, approximately one third of the patients developed recurrence. However, the recurrence rate was lower in those patients, as compared with that in the former type of patients (p < 0.04). In determining the prognosis of cancer patients treated by radiation therapy, it is of great value to know whether pretreatment abnormal serum CEA levels remains unchanged or becomes normal until the termination of radiation therapy. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. PROGRESS & CHALLENGES IN CLEANUP OF HANFORDS TANK WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEWITT, W.M.; SCHEPENS, R.

    2006-01-23

    The River Protection Project (RPP), which is managed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP), is highly complex from technical, regulatory, legal, political, and logistical perspectives and is the largest ongoing environmental cleanup project in the world. Over the past three years, ORP has made significant advances in its planning and execution of the cleanup of the Hartford tank wastes. The 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs), 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), and 60 miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs) at Hanford contain approximately 200,000 m{sup 3} (53 million gallons) of mixed radioactive wastes, some of which dates back to the first days of the Manhattan Project. The plan for treating and disposing of the waste stored in large underground tanks is to: (1) retrieve the waste, (2) treat the waste to separate it into high-level (sludge) and low-activity (supernatant) fractions, (3) remove key radionuclides (e.g., Cs-137, Sr-90, actinides) from the low-activity fraction to the maximum extent technically and economically practical, (4) immobilize both the high-level and low-activity waste fractions by vitrification, (5) interim store the high-level waste fraction for ultimate disposal off-site at the federal HLW repository, (6) dispose the low-activity fraction on-site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF), and (7) close the waste management areas consisting of tanks, ancillary equipment, soils, and facilities. Design and construction of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the cornerstone of the RPP, has progressed substantially despite challenges arising from new seismic information for the WTP site. We have looked closely at the waste and aligned our treatment and disposal approaches with the waste characteristics. For example, approximately 11,000 m{sup 3} (2-3 million gallons) of metal sludges in twenty tanks were not created during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and have low fission product concentrations. We

  7. Conceptual design of an emergency tritium clean-up system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been selected to design, build, and operate a facility to demonstrate the operability of the tritium-related subsystems that would be required to successfully develop fusion reactor systems. Basically, these subsystems would consist of the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle and associated environmental control systems. An emergency tritium clean-up subsystem (ETC) for this facility will be designed to remove tritium from the cell atmosphere if an accident causes the primary and secondary tritium containment to be breached. Conceptually, the ETC will process cell air at the rate of 0.65 actual m 3 /s (1385 ACFM) and will achieve an overall decontamination factor of 10 6 for tritium oxide (T 2 O). Following the maximum credible release of 100 g of tritium, the ETC will restore the cell to operational status within 24 h without a significant release of tritium to the environment. The basic process will include compression of the air to 0.35 MPa (3.5 atm) in a reciprocating compressor followed by oxidation of the tritium to T 2 O in a catalytic reactor. The air will be cooled to 275 K (350 0 F) to remove most of the moisture, including T 2 O, as a condensate. The remaining moisture will be removed by molecular sieve dryer beds that incorporate a water-swamping step between beds, allowing greater T 2 O removal. A portion of the detritiated air will be recirculated to the cell; the remainder will be exhausted to the building ventilation stack to maintain a slight negative pressure in the cell. The ETC will be designed for maximum flexibility so that studies can be performed that involve various aspects of room air detritiation

  8. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi 2 (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives

  9. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  10. Development and characterisation of MCT detectors for space astrophysics at CEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulade, O.; Baier, N.; Castelein, P.; Cervera, C.; Chorier, P.; Destefanis, G.; Fièque, B.; Gravrand, O.; Guellec, F.; Moreau, V.; Mulet, P.; Pinsard, F.; Zanatta, J.-P.

    2017-11-01

    The Laboratoire Electronique et Traitement de l'Information (LETI) of the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA, Grenoble, France) has been involved in the development of infrared detectors based on HgCdTe (MCT) material for over 30 years, mainly for defence and security programs [1]. Once the building blocks are developed at LETI (MCT material process, diode technology, hybridization, …), the industrialization is performed at SOFRADIR (also in Grenoble, France) which also has its own R&D program [2]. In past years, LETI also developed infrared detectors for space astrophysics in the mid infrared range - the long wave detector of the ISOCAM camera onboard ISO - as well as in the far infrared range - the bolometer arrays of the Herschel/PACS photometer unit -, both instruments which were under the responsibility of the Astrophysics department of CEA (IRFU/SAp, Saclay, France). Nowadays, the infrared detectors used in space and ground based astronomical instruments all come from vendors in the US. For programmatic reasons - increase the number of available vendors, decrease the cost, mitigate possible export regulations, …- as well as political ones - spend european money in Europe -, the European Space Agency (ESA) defined two roadmaps (one in the NIR-SWIR range, one in the MWIR-LWIR range) that will eventually allow for the procurement of infrared detectors for space astrophysics within Europe. The French Space Agency (CNES) also started the same sort of roadmaps, as part of its contribution to the different space missions which involve delivery of instruments by French laboratories. It is important to note that some of the developments foreseen in these roadmaps also apply to Earth Observations. One of the main goal of the ESA and CNES roadmaps is to reduce the level of dark current in MCT devices at all wavelengths. The objective is to use the detectors at the highest temperature where the noise induced by the dark current stays compatible with the photon

  11. Technical approach to finalizing sensible soil cleanup levels at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, D.; Hertel, B.; Jewett, M.; Janke, R.; Conner, B.

    1996-01-01

    The remedial strategy for addressing contaminated environmental media was recently finalized for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) following almost 10 years of detailed technical analysis. The FEMP represents one of the first major nuclear facilities to successfully complete the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) phase of the environmental restoration process. A critical element of this success was the establishment of sensible cleanup levels for contaminated soil and groundwater both on and off the FEMP property. These cleanup levels were derived based upon a strict application of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) regulations and guidance, coupled with positive input from the regulatory agencies and the local community regarding projected future land uses for the site. The approach for establishing the cleanup levels was based upon a Feasibility Study (FS) strategy that examined a bounding range of viable future land uses for the site. Within each land use, the cost and technical implications of a range of health-protective cleanup levels for the environmental media were analyzed. Technical considerations in driving these cleanup levels included: direct exposure routes to viable human receptors; cross- media impacts to air, surface water, and groundwater; technical practicality of attaining the levels; volume of affected media; impact to sensitive environmental receptors or ecosystems; and cost. This paper will discuss the technical approach used to support the finalization of the cleanup levels for the site. The final cleanup levels provide the last remaining significant piece to the puzzle of establishing a final site-wide remedial strategy for the FEMP, and positions the facility for the expedient completion of site-wide remedial activities

  12. Lithium/polymer batteries. Safety approach of the BT-EDF-CEA project; Accumulateurs lithium/polymere. Demarche securite du projet BT-EDF-CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascaud, S.; Baudry, P. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Majastre, H. [Bollore Technologies, 29 - Quimper (France); Bloch, D. [CEAGrenoble, CEREM, 38 (France)

    1996-12-31

    The BT-EdF-CEA consortium for the development and the performance improvement of lithium/polymer batteries has carried out a safety analysis of the industrial risk and the risk for users linked with this new technology. The process chosen for the manufacturing of lithium/polymer batteries does not generate any particular risk of personnel or environmental contamination. Security tests have permitted to observe and analyze the behaviour of 4 Ah elements during thermal shocks, perforation and crushing, and during external short-circuit on 20 Ah elements. These tests demonstrate the great thermal stability and the excellent behaviour of batteries in the case of partial destruction. (J.S.) 2 refs.

  13. Increased carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy predicts poor prognosis in patients that undergo hepatectomy for liver-only colorectal metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neofytou, Kyriakos; Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Neves, Mafalda Costa; Morrison, Dawn; Giakoustidis, Dimitris; Khan, Aamir Z; Stebbing, Justin; Mudan, Satvinder

    2017-06-01

    The importance of preoperative chemotherapy in a multimodality management of patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) has been demonstrated. We analyse the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) changes following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with CRLM who underwent liver resection. The final cohort included 107 eligible patients. Increased CEA levels following neoadjuvant chemotherapy were defined as the increase of baseline CEA level at diagnosis of CRLM compared with the CEA level after completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Disease-free survival (DFS), post-recurrence survival (PRS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using both Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox-regression methods. CEA increase was associated with decreased PRS and OS (HR 2.69; 95 % CI, 1.28-5.63; p = 0.009, and HR 2.50; 95 % CI, 1.12-5.56; p = 0.025, respectively) in multivariate analysis, but there was no association between CEA changes and DFS. CEA increase was only associated with disease progression during preoperative chemotherapy (p = 0.014). Interestingly, this association was not absolute, as only 5 of the 11 patients with disease progression demonstrated CEA increase. Regarding the remaining 12 patients with CEA increase, according to RECIST criteria, eight patients demonstrated partial response and four patients stable disease. In this study, we demonstrated the CEA increase following neoadjuvant chemotherapy as an adverse prognostic factor for PRS, and OS but not for DFS in patients undergoing liver resection for liver-only colorectal metastases.

  14. Assessment of diagnostic value of various tumors markers (CEA, CA199, CA50) for colorectal neoplasm with logistic regression and ROC curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Ping; Huang Gang; Han Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of CEA, CA199 and CA50 for colorectal neoplasm by logistic regression and ROC curve. Methods: Serum CEA (with CLIA), CA199 (with ECLIA) and CA50 (with IRMA) levels were measured in 75 patients with colorectal cancer, 35 patients with benign colorectal disorders and 49 controls. The area under the ROC curve (AUC)s of CEA, CA199, CA50 from logistic regression results were compared. Results: In the cancer-benign disorder group, the AUC of CA50 was larger than the AUC of CA199. AUC of combined CEA, CA50 was largest: not only larger than any AUC of CEA, CA50, CA199 alone but also larger than the AUC of the combined three markers (0.875 vs 0.604). In cancer-control group, the AUC of combination of CEA, CA199 and CA50 was larger than any AUC of CEA, CA199 or CA50 alone. Both in the cancer-benign disorder group or cancer-control group, the AUC of CEA was larger than the AUC of CA199 or CA50. Conclusion: CEA is of definite value in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. For differential diagnosis, the combination of CEA and CA50 can give more information, while the combination of three tumor markers is less helpful. As an advanced statistical method, logistic regression can improve the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. (authors)

  15. Carotid angioplasty and stenting vs carotid endarterectomy for treatment of asymptomatic disease: single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gale L; Matsumura, Jon S; Morasch, Mark D; Pearce, William H; Nguyen, Antoinette; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2008-07-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) with embolic protection is an acceptable alternative to carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in selected patients with symptomatic cervical carotid artery disease. Whether outcomes after CAS are comparable to those after CEA in the larger population of patients with asymptomatic disease is unclear. Carotid angioplasty and stenting performed in patients with asymptomatic disease will result in early outcomes equivalent to those with CEA performed in patients with asymptomatic disease at our center and in 2 landmark studies of CEA. Single-center retrospective review. Urban hospital. Three hundred twenty-six patients (202 men [62%] and 124 women [38%]; mean age, 71 years) with asymptomatic carotid artery stenoses treated with either CAS (n = 120) or CEA (n = 206) between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2006. Overall mean degree of stenosis was 81.2%. Carotid angioplasty and stenting was performed using self-expanding nitinol stents coupled with a mechanical embolic protection system. Carotid endarterectomy was performed using general anesthesia with selective shunting based on carotid stump pressure. Stroke, myocardial infarction, and death rates at 30 days after surgery. At 30 days after surgery, there was no statistical difference between outcomes after CAS (2 strokes [1.7%], 2 myocardial infarctions [1.7%], and 1 death [0.8%]) compared with CEA (2 strokes [1.0%], 3 myocardial infarctions [1.5%], and no deaths). Vascular surgeons who have advanced catheter-based skills can safely perform CAS in patients with asymptomatic disease with periprocedural results comparable to those with CEA.

  16. Correlation between Changes in Serum Level of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 and Objective Response of Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlin MU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Serum levels of tumor markers are associated with tumor metabolism or apoptosis, changes of which after chemotherapy may reflect tumor response to treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive role of changes in serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1 during chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Methods Changes in serum levels of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 were investigated retrospectively after one cycle of chemotherapy in 42 patients with advanced NSCLC. Correlations between the changes and radiological objective response were analyzed. Results After two cycles of chemotherapy, radiological objective response rate was 28.6%. At baseline, gender, age, clinical stage, serum levels of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 were not different between patients with objective response (OR and no response (NR. After one cycle of chemotherapy, compared to baseline level, declines in serum levels of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 were observed in patients with OR, but have no statistical significance. In contrast, reduction of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 over baseline after one cycle of chemotherapy showed statistically significant difference between OR and NR. When reduction percentages of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 were used to predict objective response of chemotherapy, the area under the ROC curve (AUC was 0.875 for CEA and 0.919 for CYFRA 21-1. According to the ROC curve, a 22% reduction of CEA yielded a sensitivity of 58.3% and a specificity of 97%, 51% reduction of CYFRA 21-1 with a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 93.3%. When above reduction percentages were used as cutoffs for prediction of radiological objective response, combination of the CEA and CYFRA 21-1 yielded a sensitivity of 91.7% and a specificity of 86.7%. Conclusion Reduction percentages of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 during chemotherapy could be used to evaluate chemotherapy efficacy in patients with advanced NSCLC. The

  17. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The SNRB{trademark} Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project was cooperatively funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B&W, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ohio Edison, Norton Chemical Process Products Company and the 3M Company. The SNRB{trademark} technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. Development of the SNRB{trademark} process at B&W began with pilot testing of high-temperature dry sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} removal in the 1960`s. Integration of NO{sub x} reduction was evaluated in the 1970`s. Pilot work in the 1980`s focused on evaluation of various NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, SO{sub 2} sorbents and integration of the catalyst with the baghouse. This early development work led to the issuance of two US process patents to B&W - No. 4,309,386 and No. 4,793,981. An additional patent application for improvements to the process is pending. The OCDO was instrumental in working with B&W to develop the process to the point where a larger scale demonstration of the technology was feasible. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B&W tested the SNRB{trademark} pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B&W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB{trademark} process. The SNRB{trademark} facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993.

  18. Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nacht, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The Sectored Clean-up Work Plan (SCWP) replaces the Housekeeping Category Corrective Action Unit Work Plan and provides a strategy to be used for conducting housekeeping activities using a sectored clean-up approach. This work plan provides a process by which one or more existing housekeeping category Corrective Action Sites (CASS) from the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order and/or non-FFACO designated waste site(s) are grouped into a sector for simultaneous remediation and cleanup. This increases effectiveness and efficiencies in labor, materials, equipment, cost, and time. This plan is an effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to expedite work in a more organized and efficient approach. The objectives of this plan are to: Group housekeeping FFACO CASS and non-FFACO housekeeping sites into sectors and remediate during the same field visit; Provide consistent documentation on FFACO CAS and non-FFACO clean-up activities; Perform similar activities under one approved document; Remediate areas inside the Deactivation and Decommissioning facilities and compounds in a campaign-style remediation; and Increase efficiencies and cost-effectiveness, accelerate cleanups, reduce mobilization, demobilization, and remediation costs

  19. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards.

  20. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m 2 grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards

  1. Evaluation of containment failure and cleanup time for Pu shots on the Z machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Between November 30 and December 11, 2009 an evaluation was performed of the probability of containment failure and the time for cleanup of contamination of the Z machine given failure, for plutonium (Pu) experiments on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Due to the unique nature of the problem, there is little quantitative information available for the likelihood of failure of containment components or for the time to cleanup. Information for the evaluation was obtained from Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) at the Z machine facility. The SMEs provided the State of Knowledge (SOK) for the evaluation. There is significant epistemic- or state of knowledge- uncertainty associated with the events that comprise both failure of containment and cleanup. To capture epistemic uncertainty and to allow the SMEs to reason at the fidelity of the SOK, we used the belief/plausibility measure of uncertainty for this evaluation. We quantified two variables: the probability that the Pu containment system fails given a shot on the Z machine, and the time to cleanup Pu contamination in the Z machine given failure of containment. We identified dominant contributors for both the time to cleanup and the probability of containment failure. These results will be used by SNL management to decide the course of action for conducting the Pu experiments on the Z machine.

  2. Evaluation of containment failure and cleanup time for Pu shots on the Z machine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01

    Between November 30 and December 11, 2009 an evaluation was performed of the probability of containment failure and the time for cleanup of contamination of the Z machine given failure, for plutonium (Pu) experiments on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Due to the unique nature of the problem, there is little quantitative information available for the likelihood of failure of containment components or for the time to cleanup. Information for the evaluation was obtained from Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) at the Z machine facility. The SMEs provided the State of Knowledge (SOK) for the evaluation. There is significant epistemic- or state of knowledge- uncertainty associated with the events that comprise both failure of containment and cleanup. To capture epistemic uncertainty and to allow the SMEs to reason at the fidelity of the SOK, we used the belief/plausibility measure of uncertainty for this evaluation. We quantified two variables: the probability that the Pu containment system fails given a shot on the Z machine, and the time to cleanup Pu contamination in the Z machine given failure of containment. We identified dominant contributors for both the time to cleanup and the probability of containment failure. These results will be used by SNL management to decide the course of action for conducting the Pu experiments on the Z machine.

  3. CA72-4 e CEA no soro e no lavado peritonial de doentes com câncer gástrico CA72-4 and CEA in serum and peritoneal washing in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra MANDORWSKI

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Racional - O tratamento e o prognóstico dos pacientes com câncer gástrico dependem, principalmente, do estádio clínico. Os marcadores tumorais séricos e do lavado peritonial podem auxiliar a avaliar o risco de recurrência da doença. Casuística e Métodos - Quarenta pacientes com câncer gástrico (11 estádio I ou II e 29 estádio III ou IV e 24 com doença benigna foram estudados prospectivamente. Todos os doentes foram submetidos a laparotomia. O sangue e o lavado peritonial foram colhidos durante o ato cirúrgico, antes da retirada do tumor, para determinação dos marcadores CEA e CA72-4. Resultados - Vinte e cinco por cento e 47,5% dos pacientes com câncer gástrico apresentam elevação dos níveis séricos de CEA e CA72-4. Através das curvas ROC definiram-se os valores de corte dos marcadores no lavado peritonial. Através destas curvas, observaram-se que 60% e 57,5% apresentavam CEA e CA72-4 elevado, respectivamente no grupo com câncer gástrico. Os valores de CEA e CA72-4 foram maiores nos pacientes estádios III e IV. No lavado peritonial, os níveis de CEA foram maiores nos doentes com tumores T3-4. Os valores de CA72-4 no lavado peritonial diferenciaram o grupo controle do grupo com câncer gástrico. Conclusão - O CA72-4 foi o marcador sérico mais sensível no diagnóstico de câncer gástrico. Entretanto, no lavado peritonial, o marcador mais sensível foi o CEA. Os valores de CEA foram superiores nos tumores que ultrapassam a serosa e inferiores nos tumores que se restringem a mucosa e muscular.Background - The treatment and the prognosis of gastric cancer patients depends mainly on clinical stage. Serum and peritoneal tumoral markers levels can be helpful to evaluate individual risk for recurrence. Aims - To evaluate the sensibility of the tumoral markers in the serum and in the peritoneal washing on diagnosis of gastric cancer. Patients and Methods - Forty patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach (11 stage I or

  4. AIRIX: an induction accelerator facility developed at CEA for flash radiography in detonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavailler, Claude

    1999-06-01

    AIRIX is an induction linear accelerator which will be used for flash radiography in CEA/DAM. Designed to produce an X-ray dose of more than 500 Rads at 1 meter with an X-ray focal spot size diameter of less than 2 mm (LANL-CEA DAM definition), this facility consists in a 4 MeV/3.5 kA pulsed electron injector and 16 MeV induction accelerator powered by 32 high voltage generators. A prototype of this accelerator, called PIVAIR, has been studied and realized in CEA CESTA near Bordeaux. PIVAIR is a validation step for AIRIX at 8 MeV. It includes an injector (4 MeV, 3.5 kA, 60 ns) and 16 inductor cells supplied by 8 high voltage generators (250 kV, 70 ns). Two different technologies of induction cells have been tested (rexolite insulator or ferrite under vacuum). We have chosen ferrite under vacuum cells technology after comparison of results on beam transport and reliability tests. A focusing experiment at 7.2 MeV of the electron beam as been achieved during summer 1997. We have begun to produce X-rays in October 1997. A dose level of 50 Rad at 1 meter has been achieved with an X-ray spot size diameter of 3.5 to 4 mm (LANL-CEA DAM definition). Static flash radiography of very dense object have been achieved from November 97 until February 98. We have been able to test in situ new kinds of very high sensitive X- ray detectors and to check they had reached our very ambitious goals: (1) quantum efficiency at 5 MeV greater than 50% instead of 1% for luminous screens and film; (2) sensitivity less than 10 (mu) Rad (100 time more sensitive than radiographic luminous screens and films); (3) dynamic range greater than 100; (4) resolution less than 2 mm. We will present in this communication brand new kinds of detection systems, called high stopping power detectors, such as: (1) (gamma) camera with segmented thick crystal of BGO and MCP image intensifier; (2) multistep parallel plate avalanche chamber; (3) pixellized CdTe MeV photoconductor matrix. AIRIX accelerator is being

  5. Clinical significance of changes of serum of P-selectin, CEA and TSGF levels after operation in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhizhong; Huang Jin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of postoperative changes of serum P-selectin, CEA and TSGF levels in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Serum CEA (with RIA), P-selectin (with ELISA), and TSGF (with biochemistry levels were determined) in 32 patients with rectal cancer both before and after operation as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before operation, the serum P-selectin, CEA and TSGF levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P < 0.01), Twenty -two of the 30 patients underwent operative therapy showed no sign of recurrence at one year and their serum P-selectin, CEA and TSGF levels dropped to within normal range. Hower in the 8 patients with recurrence, the serum levels of P-selectin, CEA and TSGF remained abnormally high. Conclusion: Serum P-selectin, CEA and TSGF levels were closely related to the diseases process of rectal cancer and were of prognostic values. (authors)

  6. Actinides exposure: review of Ca-DTPA injections inside Cea-Cogema plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grappin, L.; Berard, P.; Beau, P.; Carbone, L.; Castagnet, X.; Courtay, C.; Le Goff, J.P.; Menetrier, F.; Neron, M.; Piechowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    Ca-DTPA has been used for medical treatment of plutonium and americium contaminations in the CEA and COGEMA plants from 1970 to 2003. This report is a survey of the injections administered of Ca-DTPA as a chelating molecule. This report will be a part of the AMM process for Ca-DTPA by intravenous administration submitted by the Central Pharmacy of the french Army. Out of 1158 injections administered to 469 persons, 548 events of possible or confirmed contaminations were reported. These employees were followed by occupational physicians according to the current regulations. The first part of the report is a synthesis of the most recent findings. Due to its short biological period and its limited action in the blood, Ca-DTPA does not chelate with plutonium and americium as soon as these elements are deposited in the target organs. It justifies an early treatment, even in cases of suspected contamination followed by additional injections if necessary. The second part presents data concerning these 1158 injections (way of contamination, posology, adverse effects...). These incidents took place at work, were most often minor, not requiring follow-up treatment. A study concerning the effectiveness of the product was done on a group of people having received 5 or more injections. These results were compared with effectiveness estimated from theoretical basis. Posologies and therapeutic schemes were proposed based on these observations. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings. This document is the first synthesis in this field. It is the result of a collective work having mobilized the occupational medicine departments, the laboratories of CEA and COGEMA and a working group CEA-COGEMA-SPRA. (authors)

  7. Detection of CEA mRNA on non-small lung cancer and it's significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowen WANG

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective In recent years, many studies on micrometastasis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC have been reported, this study is to investigate the effect of operation on micrometastasis from NSCLC andevaluate the relation between micrometastasis and clincopathological parameters. Methods The blood samples were taken from 70 cases of NSCLC and 18 patients with benign diseases at 3 intervals during the operation from peripheral vein. The transcription of carcinoembryonic antigen messenger ribonucleic acid (CEA mRNA was assayed by means of nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and micro-fluid chip. Results The CEA mRNA positive rates of all 3 time spots were as follows: 50% at beginning of the operation (Time 1, 62.8% at ligating the pulmonary vein (Time 2 and 57.1% at 1 h after ligating pulmonary vein (Time 3. There is significant difference between Time 1 and Time 2 (χ2=7.114, P <0.05. The positive rates of well-differentiation and middle-differentiation, stage Ⅰ and state Ⅱ, Tis, T1 and T2, N0 were significant less than non-differentiation and low-differentiation, stage Ⅲ and state Ⅳ, T3 and T4, N1,N2 and N3, respectively. No negative control samples was found to be positive, and no positive control samples was found to be negative. The sensitivity of our test was 10 cells/mL. Conclusion The cancer cells dissemination during operation was demonstrated indirectly in our study, the time of pulmonary vein ligation (earlier or later may affect the quantity of tumor cells released into circulation; The patients with lower differentiation, advanced TNM stage, larger tumor size and metastasis of lymph node have higher rates of metastasis in peripheral, so the detection of CEA mRNA can guide the therapy of NSCLC to a certain extent.

  8. Prognostic value of monitoring tumour markers CA 15-3 and CEA during fulvestrant treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locker Gottfried J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At many centres tumour markers are used to detect disease recurrence and to monitor response to therapy in patients with advanced disease, although the real value of serial observation of marker levels remains disputed. In this study, we evaluated the prognostic value of tumour markers for predicting response (partial response [PR], stable disease [SD] ≥ 6 months, de novo disease progression (PD and secondary PD in patients receiving fulvestrant ('Faslodex' 250 mg/month for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC. Methods Changes in cancer antigen 15–3 (CA 15-3 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA were prospectively monitored (monthly and were also evaluated for the 3 months preceding secondary PD. Data from 67 patients with previously treated MBC participating in a Compassionate Use Programme were analysed. Results In patients with a PR (n = 7 [10.4%], a non-significant increase in CA 15-3 occurred during the first 6 months of treatment; CEA was significantly reduced (P = 0.0165. In patients with SD ≥ 6 months (n = 28 [41.8%], both CA 15-3 (P P = 0.0399 levels increased significantly after 6 months treatment. In those experiencing de novo PD (n = 32 [47.8%], CA 15-3 increased significantly (P P = 0.0002 during the same time period. Both CA 15-3 (P P Conclusion CA 15-3 increases in patients progressing on fulvestrant but may also increase in those experiencing clinical benefit; this should not be taken as a sign of PD without verification. Overall, both CA 15-3 and CEA appear to be poor prognostic markers for determining progression in patients receiving fulvestrant.

  9. Annual report of the Association EURATOM-Cea 2004 (full report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magaud, Ph.; Le Vagueres, F.

    2004-01-01

    This annual report summarizes activities performed by the EURATOM-Cea association in 2004. The activities carried out in the field 'physics integration' are mainly linked to neutral beam developments and to the development of diagnostic components. In particular, in-situ diagnostics of the plasma facing surface have been studied. Concerning 'vessel activities', the manufacturing of the ITER primary first wall panel by HIP forming has been investigated. A dummy mock-up was produced to validate the manufacturing feasibility. A new welding process able to improve welding productivity has been investigated, it is based on a hybrid laser/TIG process called Hybrid Laser Conduction Welding. A ITER first wall mock-up has been successfully manufactured using induction brazing. In the field 'magnets', EURATOM-Cea association was involved to provide input information for establishing the final dimension details of the ITER cryo-plant. EURATOM-Cea is also involved with the design of different parts of the ITER magnet system and the fabrication of mock-ups for some critical parts of the coils. In the field 'tritium breeding and materials', activities have mainly concerned the improvement and completion of the TBM (tritium breeding module) engineering design. A new batch of 1 kilogram of Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles with a size distribution in the range 0.6 to 0.8 mm was produced in 2004. Concerning materials, activities were focused on the EUROFER, a reduced activation martensitic steel. Activities performed in the field 'system studies' are dedicated to the power plant conceptual studies. In 2004, activities were focused on the reactor model AB, based on a helium-cooled lithium-lead blanket. (A.C.)

  10. Joint modelling of longitudinal CEA tumour marker progression and survival data on breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ana; Sousa, Inês; Castro, Luis

    2017-06-01

    This work proposes the use of Biostatistics methods to study breast cancer in patients of Braga's Hospital Senology Unit, located in Portugal. The primary motivation is to contribute to the understanding of the progression of breast cancer, within the Portuguese population, using a more complex statistical model assumptions than the traditional analysis that take into account a possible existence of a serial correlation structure within a same subject observations. We aim to infer which risk factors aect the survival of Braga's Hospital patients, diagnosed with breast tumour. Whilst analysing risk factors that aect a tumour markers used on the surveillance of disease progression the Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). As survival and longitudinal processes may be associated, it is important to model these two processes together. Hence, a joint modelling of these two processes to infer on the association of these was conducted. A data set of 540 patients, along with 50 variables, was collected from medical records of the Hospital. A joint model approach was used to analyse these data. Two dierent joint models were applied to the same data set, with dierent parameterizations which give dierent interpretations to model parameters. These were used by convenience as the ones implemented in R software. Results from the two models were compared. Results from joint models, showed that the longitudinal CEA values were signicantly associated with the survival probability of these patients. A comparison between parameter estimates obtained in this analysis and previous independent survival[4] and longitudinal analysis[5][6], lead us to conclude that independent analysis brings up bias parameter estimates. Hence, an assumption of association between the two processes in a joint model of breast cancer data is necessary. Results indicate that the longitudinal progression of CEA is signicantly associated with the probability of survival of these patients. Hence, an assumption of

  11. Summary of Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Potential Impacts Related to Hanford Cleanup and the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IWATATE, D.F.

    2000-07-14

    This white paper provides an initial assessment of the potential impacts of the Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) regulations (and proposed revisions) on the Hanford site cleanup and addresses concerns that MTCA might impose inappropriate or unachievable clean-up levels and drive clean-up costs higher. The white paper and supporting documentation (Appendices A and B) provide DOE with a concise and up-to-date review of potential MTCA impacts to cost and schedule for the Hanford site activities. MTCA, Chapter 70.105D RCW, is the State of Washington's risk based law governing clean-up of contaminated sites and is implemented by The Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) under the MTCA Clean-up Regulations, Chapter 173-340 WAC. Hanford cleanup is subject to the MTCA requirements as Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) for those areas of Hanford being managed under the authority of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the state Dangerous Waste Regulations. MTCA provides Ecology with authority to implement site clean-up actions under both the federal RCRA and CERCLA regulations as well as the state regulations. Most of the Hanford clean-up actions are being implemented under the CERCLA program, however, there is a trend is toward increased use of MTCA procedures and standards. The application of MTCA to the Hanford clean-up has been an evolving process with some of the Hanford clean-up actions considering MTCA standards as an ARAR and using MTCA procedures for remedy selection. The increased use and application of MTCA standards and procedures could potentially impact both cost and schedule for the Hanford cleanup.

  12. Thyroid cancers and benign thyroid pathologies among Chernobyl clean-up workers from Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurjane, N.; Orlikov, G.; Ritenberga, R.; Lemanis, N.; Lemane, R.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the work is to detect the frequency and the character of thyroid diseases manly with thyroid cancer diagnosed among Chernobyl clean-up workers from Latvia. Conclusions: Usually, in Latvia every year there are 2-3 thyroid cancer cases per 100 thousand inhabitants, but there are 3 cases per 5 thousands Chernobyl clean-up workers - that mean 20 times more than in general population. The first case of thyroid follicular and papillary carcinoma in the Chernobyl clean-up workers from Latvia was diagnosed after a latent period of 10 years. Among benign thyroid lesions, cystic colloid goiter and nodular colloid goiter seem to be commonly associated with radiation exposure to the thyroid gland

  13. Impact of Federal R and D funding on Three Mile Island cleanup costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The Chairman and the Ranking Minority Member of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs requested that GAO respond to several questions concerning the administration's proposed $123 million in Federal funding for data acquisition and research and development activities during the cleanup of the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor Unit 2. GAO found that: adequate legislative authority exists to support DOE's proposed data acquisition and research and development activities during the cleanup process; adherence to the estimated timetable for cleanup completion will allow DOE to meet its program objectives within the proposed budget, but slippages would probably make additional funding necessary; and the DOE program will reduce the utility company's financial needs by an estimated $66 to $69 million, about one-third of the Federal share proposed by the Governor of Pennsylvania on July 9, 1981

  14. Evaluation and categorization of secondary system layup and cleanup practices for PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, W.F.

    1982-12-01

    The EPRI Program S113-1, Evaluation of Secondary System Layup and Cleanup Proctices was established to study ways to minimize the transport of corrosion products into the secondary side PWR steam generators that occurs during plant startups following extended outages. As part of the EPRI Program, Task 200 objective was to identify and categorize the layup and cleanup practices now in use or proposed by utilities for PWR plants. The task study consisted of gathering information by conducting site visits to fourteen representative PWR plants in the USA, Europe and Japan, by conducting a search of the open literature, reviews of related EPRI Programs, and by evaluating the practices in terms of their potential effectiveness. The results show that about 30% of the plants attempt routine layup of secondary systems during outages and about 60% perform some form of system cleanup during the return to power following extended outages

  15. NRC's rulemaking to require materials licensees to be financially responsible for cleanup of accidental releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    On June 7, 1985, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) in the Federal Register to address funding for cleanup of accidents and unexpected decontamination by certain materials licensees. The NRC asked for public comment to help them determine whether to amend its regulations to require certain materials and fuel cycle licensees to demonstrate that they possess adequate financial means to pay for cleanup of accidental releases of radioactive materials. If licensees lack adequate financial resources and funds are to available for prompt cleanup, the consequences could be potentially significant for the public, the licencee and the federal government. The purpose of this paper is to explain the purpose and scope of the Commission's proposed regulatory action, as well as describing several accidents that made the Commission consider this action. Additionally, the paper will address other regulatory precedents. Finally, the paper will conclude by generally characterizing the public comments and items of concern raised by commenters

  16. Will TMI remain stable during funding debate: NRC issues policy statement on cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utroska, D.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear safety at the Three Mile Island (TMI) facility risks compromise unless the cleanup proceeds without delay. Concerns focus on the possibility of recriticality and instrument deterioration if the cleanup is delayed too long. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission will not accept the utility's funding difficulties as adequate reason for delay. A task force has set technical milestones for evaluating cleanup results in a sequential recovery program. The task force recommends tripling the funding level to keep the plants within a safe status. The first activity will involve the 700,000 gallons of radioactive water in the containment building, which was not designed as a swimming pool and could allow some migration of water into the surrounding soil and ground water. Leakage concerns outweigh those of recriticality, but extensive monitoring indicates that neither is an imminent danger

  17. The CEA/DRN innovative R and D programme: significant studies on passive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, G.L.; Magistris, F. de; Dumaz, P.; Gautier, G.M.; Pignatel, J.F.; Richard, P.

    1999-01-01

    The work on passive systems is an essential item of the R and D programme for future reactors; it is structured following four main guidelines: Research, and validation of innovative solutions for the safety functions achievement; An enlarged assessment of the performances of passive systems; Extension of the data base and of the tools qualification range; Assessment of new plant operation modes. After a recalling on the general framework, the paper describes, following these guidelines, the status of the art of the main corresponding programmes within CEA/DRN. (author)

  18. Selection of monoclonal anti-CEA antibody fragments for tumor detection by immunoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mach, J.P.; Buchegger, F.

    1986-01-01

    It is described how individual MAb directed against carcinoembryotic antigen (CEA) is selected which does not crossreact with granulocytes and gives the best tumor localization in the model of nude mice grafted with human colon carcinoma. Using this model, the superiority of F(ab')/sub 2/ and particularly Fab fragments from high affinity MAb for the localization of relatively small tumor nodules is demonstrated. These MAb fragments are also successfully used in an ongoing clinical trial for the detection of primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas

  19. Development of recycled plastic composites for structural applications from CEA plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Agrim

    Plastic waste from consumer electronic appliances (CEAs) such as computer and printer parts including Polystyrene (PS), Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS), Polystyrene (PS) and PC/ABS were collected using handheld FTIR Spectrophotometer. The blends of these plastics with High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) are manufactured under special processing conditions in a single screw compounding injection molding machine. The blends are thermoplastics have high stiffness and strength, which may enhance the mechanical properties of HDPE like tensile modulus, ultimate tensile strength, tensile break and tensile yield. These composites have a potential to be used for the future application of recycled plastic lumber, thus replacing the traditional wood lumber.

  20. Fungos associados a sementes e plantas ornamentais herbáceas no Distrito Federal

    OpenAIRE

    Barreto, Sarah da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Estudou-se a microflora fúngica de sementes de nove espécies de plantas ornamentais herbáceas (Dahlia pinnata, Petunia x hybrida, Phlox drummondii, Rudbeckia hirta, Salvia farinacea, Salvia splendens, Tagetes patula, Viola tricolor e Zinnia elegans). Foram analisadas 13 amostras de sementes, sendo 5 delas estavam com data de validade vencida (P. drummondii, R. hirta, T. patula lote nº1, T. patula lote nº 2 e Z. elegans). Além disso, realizou-se o levantamento de fungos em mudas e plantas em f...

  1. Silicon on insulator for ultra-hard applications assets, liabilities and endeavours for CEA technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leray, J.L.; Auberton-Herve, A.J.; Dupont-Nivet, E.; Garie, T.; Giffard, B.; Martin, J.L.; Montaron, J.; Pere, J.F.; Tissot, A.; Truche, R.

    1990-01-01

    Hardened Silicon On Insulator technologies have been initially developed for the space or military purposes only. As a result, a large stream of studies have been proceeded since the first radiation-induced failure in Telstar communication satellite (1962). A considerable knowledge and practice has been accumulated since then. Recently, the studies lead at CEA have exhibited an extra-high hardness behaviour in one of the most questionable variety of integrated technology: the CMOS on Insulator (S.I.M.O.X. type). Other studies are relevant to linear functions. Junction FET and Super-Beta transistors have been developed

  2. Plasma TIMP-1 and CEA as markers for detection of primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ib Jarle; Brünner, Nils; Dowell, Barry

    2015-01-01

    was detected in 32 individuals, 24 with colonic cancer (CC) and 8 with rectal cancer (RC). Other findings were 265 with adenomas and 889 with non-neoplastic pathology. The biomarker levels were elevated in plasma from patients with CRC, but also from patients with various co-morbidities compared to individuals......BACKGROUND/AIM: The combination of plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (1) and CEA has been shown to have utility in early detection of colorectal cancer (2). A prospective study was performed to validate previous findings. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Individuals undergoing large bowel...

  3. Morfogénesis in vitro de cactáceas.

    OpenAIRE

    Téllez Román, Janeth

    2012-01-01

    En esta investigación se estudiaron las condiciones de cultivo in vitro y las respuestas morfogénicas de tres especies de cactáceas: Echinopsis chamaecereus Friedrich & Glaetzle “aurea”, Gymnocalicium mihanovichii cv. Hibotan y Mammillaria plumosa Weber ornamentales de importancia económica y la última en peligro de extinción. Con la regeneración de brotes, se establecieron protocolos eficientes para la propagación masiva in vitro a partir de la vía organogénica directa e indirecta de E. cham...

  4. Annual report of the Association EURATOM-Cea 2005 (executive summary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Progress in fusion technology is constant over the years and this report once again highlights a number of important steps that have been accomplished in this domain. This document is the executive summary of the full annual report, summarizing activities performed by the EURATOM-Cea association. This report has been organized into 10 issues: 1) physics integration, 2) reactor vessel, 3) plasma facing components, 4) remote handling, 5) magnets structures, 6) tritium breeding blankets, 7) structural material, 8) safety and environment, 9) system study, and 10) ITER site preparation

  5. Annual report of the Association EURATOM-Cea 2004 (executive summary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Progress in fusion technology is constant over the years and this report once again highlights a number of important steps that have been accomplished in this domain. This document is the executive summary of the full annual report, summarizing activities performed by the EURATOM-Cea association. This report has been organized into 10 issues: 1) physics integration, 2) reactor vessel, 3) plasma facing components, 4) remote handling, 5) magnets structures, 6) tritium breeding blankets, 7) structural material, 8) safety and environment, 9) system study, and 10) ITER site preparation

  6. Changes in soluble CEA and TIMP-1 levels during adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Sölétormos, György

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antige...... (CEA) levels in patients with stage III colon cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen...

  7. Irradiation devices for experiences on power ramps and cyclings at the CEA/DERPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friboulet, C.; Roche, M.

    1987-05-01

    In this paper the authors describe briefly the irradiation devices used by the CEA/DERPE. These irradiation devices are of two types: irradiation specimen capsule (AQUILON, BOSS, GRIFFON), water loop (ISABELLE 1, JET-POMPE, ISABELLE 4, IRENE, OPERA) in which the conditions are those of PWR Reactor. They are implanted in the OSIRIS and SILOE reactors with a thermal neutron flux of 2.5 10 14 n/cm 2 .s. In the pool reactor non destructive tests can be made on pin fuels to give valuable informations on their behaviour under power ramps and cyclings [fr

  8. Elevated Levels of Serum Tumor Markers CEA and CA15-3 Are Prognostic Parameters for Different Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Yingbo; Sun, Xianfu; He, Yaning; Liu, Chaojun; Liu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The utility of measuring carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) levels in patients with breast cancer remains controversial. The present study aims to investigate the prognostic value of preoperative serum CEA and CA15-3 levels in breast cancer patients. Methods Serum preoperative CEA and CA 15-3 concentration levels were measured in a total of 432 breast cancer patients. The association of tumor markers levels with clinicopathological parameters and ...

  9. Prognostic value of CEA and CA 19-9 tumor markers combined with cytology from peritoneal fluid in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In Kyu; Kim, Do Hyoung; Gorden, D Lee; Lee, Yoon Suk; Sung, Na Young; Park, Gyeoung-Sin; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kang, Won Kyung; Park, Jong Kyung; Ahn, Chang Hyeok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Jeon, Hae Myung; Oh, Seong Taek

    2009-04-01

    Early diagnosis and management of peritoneal metastases from colorectal cancer patients are difficult clinical challenges. The aims of this study were to evaluate the clinical significance of tumor markers and cytology in peritoneal effusions (PE) and peritoneal irrigation fluid (PI) and to determine their value as prognostic indicators in this disease. Two hundred thirty-four consecutive patients who underwent abdominal surgery for colorectal cancer from January 2006 to December 2007 were included, and tumor markers and cytology in PE and PI were analyzed prospectively. The incidence of free cancer cells retrieved from peritoneal samples was 7.9%. Cytology was positive in 40.0% by Papanicolaou and Giemsa staining, 73.3% by hematoxylin and eosin staining of cell blocks, and 66.7% by carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and calretinin immunohistochemistry. Multivariate analysis revealed that peritoneal CEA and cancer antigen (CA) 19-9 in PI were correlated with peritoneal metastasis and cytology. Level of peritoneal fluid CEA was statistically significantly correlated with recurrence and peritoneal metastatic recurrence in patients with negative peritoneal cytology. Cytology, peritoneal CEA, and peritoneal CA 19-9 showed correlations with cancer-free survival and overall survival. These correlations demonstrate the importance of continuous follow-up of peritoneal metastasis if there is positive cytology or an increase in CEA and CA 19-9 in peritoneal fluid.

  10. Mechanism involved in trichloroethylene-induced liver cancer: Importance to environmental cleanup. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    'The Pacific Northwest National Lab. was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This section gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas-Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.'

  11. Oiling and cleanup issues in wetlands, M/T Julie N spill, Portland, Maine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, J.; Lehmann, S.M.; Henry, C.B.Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The clean up and environmental assessment techniques which were used following the September 1996 oil spill from the M/T Julie N in Portland Harbor, Maine were reviewed and documented. The spill resulted in heavy oiling of wetland. Aerial photography, ground-truth surveys, transects and chemical sampling were conducted to try to assess the impact to wetlands and to decide on appropriate cleanup options. A range of cleanup methods were attempted including low-pressure flushing, shoreline cleaning agents, vegetation cutting, and natural recovery. 9 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  12. Fixed-bed gasifier and cleanup system engineering summary report through Test Run No. 100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, K. Jr.; Headley, L.; Kovach, J.; Stopek, D.

    1984-06-01

    The state-of-the-art of high-pressure, fixed-bed gasification has been advanced by the many refinements developed over the last 5 years. A novel full-flow gas cleanup system has been installed and tested to clean coal-derived gases. This report summarizes the results of tests conducted on the gasifier and cleanup system from its inception through 1982. Selected process summary data are presented along with results from complementary programs in the areas of environmental research, process simulation, analytical methods development, and component testing. 20 references, 32 figures, 42 tables.

  13. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade process control system structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.; Staffon, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; describes the main control computer hardware and system software features in more detail; and, then, describes the real-time control tasks, and how they interact with each other, and how they interact with the operator interface task

  14. Systems engineering functions and requirements for the Hanford cleanup mission. First issue, Addendum 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    This addendum provides the technical detail of a systems engineering functional analysis for the Hanford cleanup mission. Details of the mission analysis including mission statement, scope, problem statement, initial state definition, and final state definition are provided in the parent document. The functional analysis consists of Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams an definitions, which will be understood by systems engineers, but which may be difficult for others to comprehend. For a more complete explanation of this work, refer to the parent document. The analysis covers the total Hanford cleanup mission including the decomposition levels at which the various Hanford programs or integrated activities are encountered.

  15. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade distributed control and front end computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; gives reasons behind the computer system structure; and then gives a detailed description of the distributed control computer, the front end computer, and how these computers interact with the main control computer. The descriptions cover both hardware and software

  16. ''How clean is clean'' in the United States federal and Washington State cleanup regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landau, H.G.

    1993-01-01

    The enactment of legislation and promulgation of implementing regulations generally involves the resolution of conflicting goals. Defining ''How Clean is Clean?'' in federal and state cleanup laws, regulations, and policies is no exception. Answering the ''How Clean is Clean?'' question has resulted in the identification of some important and sometimes conflicting goals. Continuing resolution of the following conflicting goals is the key to effect cleanup of hazardous waste sites: Expediency vs. Fairness; Flexibility vs. Consistency; Risk Reduction vs. Risk Causation; and Permanence vs. Cost Effectiveness

  17. Mechanism involved in trichloroethylene-induced liver cancer: Importance to environmental cleanup. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bull, R.J.

    1997-06-01

    'The Pacific Northwest National Lab. was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This section gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas-Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.'

  18. Glufosinate ammonium clean-up procedure from water samples using SPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayeb M., A.; Ismail B., S.; Mardiana-Jansar, K.; Ta, Goh Choo; Agustar, Hani Kartini

    2015-09-01

    For the determination of glufosinate ammonium residue in soil and water samples, different solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbent efficiency was studied. Four different SPE sorbents i.e.: CROMABOND PS-H+, CROMABOND PS-OH-, ISOLUTE ENV+, Water Sep-Pak and OASIS HLB were used. Sample clean-up performance was evaluated using high performance liquid chromatography (Agilent 1220 infinity LC) with fluorescence detector. Detection of FMO-derivatives was done at λ ex = 260 nm and λ em= 310 nm. OASIS HLB column was the most suitable for the clean-up in view of the overall feasibility of the analysis.

  19. Elevated Levels of Serum Tumor Markers CEA and CA15-3 Are Prognostic Parameters for Different Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yingbo; Sun, Xianfu; He, Yaning; Liu, Chaojun; Liu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The utility of measuring carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) levels in patients with breast cancer remains controversial. The present study aims to investigate the prognostic value of preoperative serum CEA and CA15-3 levels in breast cancer patients. Serum preoperative CEA and CA 15-3 concentration levels were measured in a total of 432 breast cancer patients. The association of tumor markers levels with clinicopathological parameters and outcomes were analyzed. Elevated serum levels of CEA and CA15-3 were identified in 47 (10.9%) and 60(13.9%) patients, respectively. Larger tumor size, advanced axillary lymph nodal and TNM stage exhibited higher proportion of elevated CEA and CA15-3 levels. The elevation of CEA levels was significantly greater in patients with HER2 positive tumors, and the elevation of CA15-3 levels was significantly greater in ER negative breast patients. Univariate and multivariate Cox's regression analysis revealed that elevated preoperative CEA and CA 15-3 levels were independent prognostic factors for DFS and OS. When considering the combination of both markers levels, patients with both elevated markers presented the worst survival. Independent prognostic significance of elevated preoperative serum CEA and CA15-3 levels were reconfirmed in Luminal B breast cancer. Preoperative serum levels of CEA and CA15-3 are independent prognostic parameters for breast cancer.

  20. Elevated Levels of Serum Tumor Markers CEA and CA15-3 Are Prognostic Parameters for Different Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingbo Shao

    Full Text Available The utility of measuring carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3 levels in patients with breast cancer remains controversial. The present study aims to investigate the prognostic value of preoperative serum CEA and CA15-3 levels in breast cancer patients.Serum preoperative CEA and CA 15-3 concentration levels were measured in a total of 432 breast cancer patients. The association of tumor markers levels with clinicopathological parameters and outcomes were analyzed.Elevated serum levels of CEA and CA15-3 were identified in 47 (10.9% and 60(13.9% patients, respectively. Larger tumor size, advanced axillary lymph nodal and TNM stage exhibited higher proportion of elevated CEA and CA15-3 levels. The elevation of CEA levels was significantly greater in patients with HER2 positive tumors, and the elevation of CA15-3 levels was significantly greater in ER negative breast patients. Univariate and multivariate Cox's regression analysis revealed that elevated preoperative CEA and CA 15-3 levels were independent prognostic factors for DFS and OS. When considering the combination of both markers levels, patients with both elevated markers presented the worst survival. Independent prognostic significance of elevated preoperative serum CEA and CA15-3 levels were reconfirmed in Luminal B breast cancer.Preoperative serum levels of CEA and CA15-3 are independent prognostic parameters for breast cancer.

  1. Intracellular Targeting of CEA Results in Th1-Type Antibody Responses Following Intradermal Genetic Vaccination by a Needle-Free Jet Injection Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Johansson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The route and method of immunization, as well as the cellular localization of the antigen, can influence the generation of an immune response. In general, intramuscular immunization results in Th1 responses, whereas intradermal delivery of DNA by gene gun immunization often results in more Th2 responses. Here we investigate how altering the cellular localization of the tumor antigen CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen affects the quality and amplitude of DNA vaccine-induced antibody responses in mice following intradermal delivery of DNA by a needle-free jet injection device (Biojector. CEA was expressed either in a membrane-bound form (wild-type CEA or in two truncated forms (CEA6 and CEA66 with cytoplasmic localization, where CEA66 was fused to a promiscuous T-helper epitope from tetanus toxin. Repeated intradermal immunization of BALB/c mice with DNA encoding wild-type CEA produced high antibody titers of a mixed IgG1/IgG2a ratio. In contrast, utilizing the DNA construct that resulted in intracellular targeting of CEA led to a reduced capacity to induce CEA-specific antibodies, but instead induced a Th1-biased immune response.

  2. Volume overload cleanup: An approach for on-line SPE-GC, GPC-GC, and GPC-SPE-GC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkdijk, H.; Mol, H.G.J.; Nagel, B. van der

    2007-01-01

    A new concept for cleanup, based on volume overloading of the cleanup column, has been developed for on-line coupling of gel permeation chromatography (GPC), solid-phase extraction (SPE), or both, to gas chromatography (GC). The principle is outlined and the applicability demonstrated by the

  3. DECOMMISSIONING AND ENVRIONMENTAL CLEANUP OF SMALL ARMS TRAINING FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetz, T.

    2012-12-04

    constituents posed a migration risk to groundwater. The NTCR action involved removal of approximately 12,092 m3 (15,816 yd3) of spent bullets and lead-impacted soil and off-site disposal. The removal action included soils from the berm area, a fill area that received scraped soils from the berm, and soil from a drainage ditch located on the edge of the berm area. Also included in the removal action was a mixture of soil, concrete, and asphalt from the other three range areas. Under this action, 11,796 m3 (15,429 yd3) of hazardous waste and impacted soil were removed from the SATA and transported to a permitted hazardous waste disposal facility (Lone Mountain Facility in Oklahoma) and 296 m3 (387 yd3) of nonhazardous waste (primarily concrete debris) were removed and transported to a local solid waste landfill for disposal. During the excavation process, the extent was continuously assessed through the use of a hand-held, field-portable X-ray fluorescence unit with results verified using confirmation sampling with certified laboratory analysis. Following the completion of the excavation and confirmation sampling, final contouring, grading, and establishment of vegetative cover was performed to stabilize the affected areas. The NTCR action began on August 17, 2010, and mechanical completion was achieved on April 27, 2011. The selected removal action met the removal action objectives (RAOs), is protective of human health and the environment both in the short- and long-term, was successful in removing potential ecological risks, and is protective of surface water and groundwater. Furthermore, the selected NTCR action met residential cleanup goals and resulted in the release of the SEA from restricted use contributing to the overall footprint reduction at SRS.

  4. Overview of the CEA R and D support to generation IV nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, Frank; Anzieu, Pascal; Billot, Philippe; Brossard, Philippe; Fiorini, Gian-Luigi

    2004-01-01

    As a result of an early technology road-map performed at the end of 2000, the CEA selected a sequenced development of advanced gas cooled high temperature nuclear systems as main focus for its R and D programme on future nuclear energy systems. The selection of this research objectives originates both from the significance of fast neutrons and high temperature for nuclear energy to meet the needs anticipated beyond 2020/2030, and from the significant common R and D pathway that supports both medium term industrial projects and more advanced versions of gas cooled reactors. The first step of the 'Gas Technology Path' aims to support the development of a modular HTR likely to meet international market needs around 2020. The second step is a Very High Temperature Reactor (> 950 deg. C) to efficiently produce, among others, hydrogen though thermo-chemical water splitting or to generate electricity with an efficiency above 50%. The third step of the Path is a Gas Fast Reactor that features a fast-spectrum helium-cooled reactor and closed fuel cycle, with a direct-cycle helium turbine for electricity production and full recycle of actinides. The paper succinctly presents the R and D program launched in 2001 by the CEA with industrial partners on the 'Gas Technology Path', which is destined to become the contribution of France to the development of the VHTR and the GFR within the next phase of the Generation IV Forum

  5. 2007-2008 activity report of the Association EURATOM-CEA (Full Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labasse, F.

    2009-01-01

    This document summarizes the activities performed by EURATOM-CEA association in 2007-2008. The activities are various and have involved different issues like the study of dust generation processes and measurement techniques, ICRH antenna design for heating, integration studies inside the port-plug for diagnostics and in-situ divertor thermography, or the helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL) breeding blanket concept. Activities have been made to study the properties of the line defects governing the plastic behavior of iron base materials. Different options have been investigated for the superconducting magnet system. The measurement of in-vessel tritium inventory by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been investigated. 2007-2008 were also dedicated to the manufacture and complete tests of the AIA (Articulated Inspection Arm). AIA is designed to inspect divertor cassettes and the vacuum vessel first wall. Activities based on safety analysis or tests of ITER safety open issues have been carried out using several CEA facilities and expertise. This document is divided into 5 sections: 1) physics integration, 2) in-vessel, 3) magnet system and cryogenics, 4) tritium breeding and materials, 5) safety and environment, 6) system studies, 7) design support and procurement, 8) JET technology

  6. Carcinoma de glándulas sebáceas limitado a conjuntiva bulbar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fernando Buitrago-Torrado

    Full Text Available El carcinoma de glándulas sebáceas es un tumor infrecuente que puede desarrollarse a partir de cualquier glándula sebácea en la piel. El 75 % de las veces es de origen ocular y afecta principalmente las glándulas de Zeiss, Meibomio y de la carúncula. Se caracteriza por un comportamiento agresivo, con alta probabilidad de invasión a piel, conjuntiva y córnea. Sin embargo, el compromiso de la conjuntiva como localización primaria es raro. Se presenta un caso con diagnóstico de carcinoma sebáceo de patrón nodular primario de la conjuntiva bulbar, atendido en el Hospital Universitario de Santander durante los años 2014-2016. El propósito del presente estudio es dar a conocer el caso de una patología infrecuente con pocos casos reportados en la literatura, enfatizar su importancia dentro de los diagnósticos diferenciales de masas en la conjuntiva y del estudio histopatológico como método para obtener un diagnóstico definitivo y realizar un abordaje temprano.

  7. CEA engineering studies and integration of the ITER diagnostic port plugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doceul, L. [Association Euratom-CEA sur la Fusion Controlee, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)], E-mail: louis.doceul@cea.fr; Walker, C. [ITER International Team, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Ingesson, C.; Ciattaglia, E. [EFDA CSU - Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Chappuis, P.; Portafaix, C.; Salasca, S.; Thomas, E.; Tremblay, G.; Bruyere, C. [Association Euratom-CEA sur la Fusion Controlee, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2007-10-15

    Most of the ITER diagnostic system is integrated in port plugs, which are water cooled stainless steel structures inserted into the vacuum-vessel ports. The port plug must perform basic functions such as providing neutron and gamma shielding, supporting the first wall armour and shielding blanket material, closing the vacuum vessel ports, while supporting the diagnostic equipment. CEA has contributed to the engineering activities on the port plugs and has more particularly focused on the design and diagnostic integration in the representative equatorial port plug Eq no. 01. The specific CEA contributions have been the engineering, structural and thermal analysis. These detailed analyses have highlighted some design issues which were worked out through different solutions. This paper contains a description of the engineering activities performed such as: the conceptual design of the Eq no. 01 port plug, the static mechanical calculations, the dynamic calculation to estimate the dynamic amplification factor due to the resonance phenomenon, the thermal assessment under the neutronic load and the seismic response of the port plug inside the vacuum vessel.

  8. CEA engineering studies and integration of the ITER diagnostic port plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doceul, L.; Walker, C.; Ingesson, C.; Ciattaglia, E.; Chappuis, P.; Portafaix, C.; Salasca, S.; Thomas, E.; Tremblay, G.; Bruyere, C.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the ITER diagnostic system is integrated in port plugs, which are water cooled stainless steel structures inserted into the vacuum-vessel ports. The port plug must perform basic functions such as providing neutron and gamma shielding, supporting the first wall armour and shielding blanket material, closing the vacuum vessel ports, while supporting the diagnostic equipment. CEA has contributed to the engineering activities on the port plugs and has more particularly focused on the design and diagnostic integration in the representative equatorial port plug Eq no. 01. The specific CEA contributions have been the engineering, structural and thermal analysis. These detailed analyses have highlighted some design issues which were worked out through different solutions. This paper contains a description of the engineering activities performed such as: the conceptual design of the Eq no. 01 port plug, the static mechanical calculations, the dynamic calculation to estimate the dynamic amplification factor due to the resonance phenomenon, the thermal assessment under the neutronic load and the seismic response of the port plug inside the vacuum vessel

  9. 2007-2008 activity report of the Association EURATOM-CEA (Executive summary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labasse, F.

    2008-01-01

    This document is the executive summary of the full report, summarizing activities performed by EURATOM-CEA association in 2007-2008. The activities are various and have involved different issues like the study of dust generation processes and measurement techniques, ICRH antenna design for heating, integration studies inside the port-plug for diagnostics and in-situ divertor thermography, or the helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL) breeding blanket concept. Activities have been made to study the properties of the line defects governing the plastic behavior of iron base materials. Different options have been investigated for the superconducting magnet system. The measurement of in-vessel tritium inventory by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been investigated. 2007-2008 were also dedicated to the manufacture and complete tests of the AIA (Articulated Inspection Arm). AIA is designed to inspect divertor cassettes and the vacuum vessel first wall. Activities based on safety analysis or tests of ITER safety open issues have been carried out using several CEA facilities and expertise

  10. Feasibility study of radioimmunoguided surgery of colorectal carcinomas using indium-111 CEA-specific monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtet, C.; Aillet, G.; Kremer, M.; Thedrez, P.; Chatal, J.F.; Vuillez, J.P.; Daniel, G.; Chetanneau, A.; Visset, J.

    1990-01-01

    The study was undertaken to define the potential use of 111 In carcinoembryonic antigen-specific antibody labelled [CEA F(ab')2] for the radioimmunodetection of colorectal carcinoma using an intraoperative hand-held gamma probe. The use of a linear radioactive source allowed optimization of physical characteristics. The best results regarding sensitivity and resolution were obtained using a 5-mm thick tungsten alloy collimator. A simulation study with a liver phantom (22 MBq or 0.6 mCi) was performed to determine the effect of side scatter as opposed to direct background and showed that it is possible to detect small radioactive targets (3.7 KBq or 0.1 μCi) 4 cm from the phantom. A clinical study performed with ten patients showed that tumours with good uptake of CEA-specific antibody could be detected with sufficient contrast in two patients when the probe was used. Results of a biodistribution study performed after tumour fragment or normal tissue countings in a well counter showed high tumour uptake (above 8x10 -3 injected dose/g) and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios (between 2.5 and 20) in five patients. Results with the probe showed markedly lower ratios. There was no correlation between absolute tumour uptake and the count rates of tumour measured intraoperatively. This can be attributed to the degradation of depth resolution resulting from the high energy photopeak of gamma-emitting indium 111. (orig.)

  11. Significance of the fuel cycle aspects in CEA studies on future nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Thomas, J.B.; Boidron, M.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear energy has unique assets to meet the requirements for a sustainable development in terms of economic competitiveness, environmental friendliness and natural resources saving. Future nuclear system studies conducted by the CEA aim at investigating and developing promising technologies for the medium and the long term for reactors, fuels and the fuel cycle to make nuclear power eligible as one of the major energy sources of the sustainable development. It also aims at maintaining at the best possible level the expertise and the technologies that the CEA will be able to bring to future national and international projects likely to meet market needs in the next decades, which are still uncertain both in terms of performances and time scale. Progress for future nuclear systems is principally sought in the following areas: reinforced economic competitiveness against other available electricity generation means, with a special emphasis put on reducing the investment cost; enhanced safety, especially through an increased resistance to core damages in case of severe accident, and whenever possible by dedicated strategies to exclude core melting; cleanliness through minimising the production of long lived radioactive waste; resource saving through an optimum utilisation of the available resources of fissile and fertile materials; enhanced resistance to proliferation risks; potentialities for other applications than electricity production. (author)

  12. Perfil de comercialização das Anonáceas nas Ceasas brasileiras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Satoshi Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantidade de anonáceas comercializadas nas principais centrais de abastecimento está crescendo e concentrada na CEAGESP - 61%. As informações coletadas pelo SIEM da CEAGESP mostram, entre 2011 e 2012, o grande crescimento da oferta de atemoia e de graviola, respectivamente, 35% e 32%, entre 2011 e 2012, e a queda do volume de pinha - 20%, entre 2011 e 2012. A atemoia (54%, a pinha (41% e a graviola (5% são as anonáceas mais importantes comercializadas na CEAGESP. A origem é concentrada nos Estados da Bahia - pinha e graviola, e em Minas Gerais e São Paulo - atemoia. O estudo das causas da diferenciação de valor, entre lotes de atemoia de valores máximo e mínimo, de mesma classificação de tamanho, no mesmo dia, mostrou que a homogeneidade visual de tamanho é a maior responsável pela diferenciação de valor. A melhoria da seleção por tamanho é a melhor estratégia de diferenciação de valor a ser adotada pelo produtor.

  13. Report of the CEA visiting committee on R and D for future nuclear energy systems, May 11-13, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechet, Y.; Ebbesen, T.; Fujiie, Y.; Richter, B.; Stormer, H.; Zinkle, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    This was the fifth meeting of the Visiting Committee of the CEA since its creation in year 2000. The first meeting gave members of the committee a broad overview of the entire spectrum of CEA research and subsequent meetings have focused on specific topics. These included the nuclear fuel cycle, biology, and micro and nano technologies. This meeting focused on research and development for future nuclear energy systems. The main division of CEA concerned with this topic is the Nuclear Energy Division. Some of the laboratories of the Technological Research and Matter Science Divisions are also involved in areas such as materials and basic nuclear data. The report deals with the fuels and waste, the SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) and GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) programs, the Very High temperature reactor (VHTR), the actinide separation, the materials, the irradiation tests facilities and the personnel for the future. (A.L.B.)

  14. The new technology in high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The fifth anniversary of CEA/INET cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Suyuan

    2006-11-01

    In 2001, CEA and INET signed the first agreement and a series of specific topics of cooperation (STC), which officially launched the cooperated program on HTGR technology between the two sides, Since 2002, INET has sent dozens of researchers to CEA on both short and long term basis to work with their French counterparts. Over the past five years, they have worked together in a variety of fields, such as materials, fuel, components and reactor physics. Besides, both sides sponsored workshops and technical visits to tackle the major problems. This volume with a collection of papers not only keeps a record of technical progress contributed by both sides, but also marks the fifth anniversary cooperation between CEA and INET. (authors)

  15. Comparison of Serum CA72-4 and CEA Levels in Patient with Endoscopically Suspected Gastric Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehena, Z; Ghosh, C K; Afroz, F; Alam, M B; Ferdousi, S; Mahmuduzzaman, M; Sultana, T; Ahmed, A N

    2015-07-01

    Several serum tumour markers have been described for gastric cancer. Preoperative level of tumor marker helps to predict the diagnosis of gastric carcinoma. CA72-4 as a serum tumour marker for gastric cancer is evaluated, and compared its utility in this regard with that of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Analysis of gastric carcinoma by serum levels of CEA and CA72-4 and their correlation with histopathology help the clinician to develop his management strategies for gastric carcinoma. A prospective observational study was carried out in the Department of Clinical Pathology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) in collaboration with Department of Surgery BSMMU, DMCH, Delta Hospital Limited, Dhaka, during the period of October 2010 to September 2011. Serum CA72-4 and CEA were analyzed in 71 endoscopically suspected patients for gastric carcinoma. Among them 58 cases were diagnosed as malignant gastric disease and 13 cases were nonmalignant gastric disease. Sensitivity of CA 72-4 and CEA were 48.3% and 31% respectively and specificity were 92.3% and 76.9% respectively. In poorly differentiated carcinoma, positivity for CA72-4 and CEA were 55.6% and 36.1% respectively. Because of the high positivity of CA72-4 in poorly differentiated carcinoma, CA72-4 is reliable tumour marker in advanced cases. As the sensitivity of CA72-4 was more than that of CEA in diagnosis of gastric cancer, CA72-4 can be used in conjunction with other diagnostic tests like endoscopy that would be more helpful for the patients.

  16. Evaluating the efficacy of tumor markers CA 19-9 and CEA to predict operability and survival in pancreatic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Jay; Prabhu, Ramkrishna; Eshpuniyani, Priya; Kantharia, Chetan; Supe, Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Using CA 19-9 and CEA (elevated > 2 times of normal) as predictors in determining operability and survival in pancreatic tumors. Levels of CA 19-9 and CEA were measured (pre and post operatively) in 49 patients of pancreatic malignancy. CECT was performed for diagnosis and staging. An experienced surgeon determined the operability. The levels of tumor markers were correlated with the operability and the survival based on CECT and intra-operative findings. 16/24 (67%) patients with CA 19-9 levels (CEA levels (CEA levels (p = 0.003) were found to be non-resectable. Of the 27 patients, found resectable on CECT, 5 were non-resectable intra-operatively. All of these had elevated levels of CA 19-9 and 4/5 (80%) had elevated levels of CEA. Only 5/21 (23%) non-resectable patients, with elevated levels of CA 19-9 reported at 1 year follow up. None of the non-resectable patients with CA 19-9 levels > 1000 U/ml reported at 6 month follow-up. None of the resectable patients pre-operatively showed evidence of recurrence. All achieved normal values post surgery. Elevated levels of CA 19-9 and CEA (> 2 times) predict increased chances of inoperability and poor survival in pancreatic tumors. Levels > 3 times had increased risk of inoperability even in patients deemed resectable on CT-Scan. Diagnostic laparoscopy would be beneficial in these patients. Levels of CA 19-9 (> 1000 U/ml) indicate a dismal survival in non-resectable group of patients.

  17. Efficacy of 18F-FDG PET/CT in investigation of elevated CEA without known primary malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Sin-man Wong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of 18flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT in investigating patients with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA and without known primary malignancy, and the impact of PET/CT findings on patient management. Setting and Design: PET/CT scans done in a tertiary hospital between December 2007 and February 2012 for elevated CEA in patients without known primary malignancy were retrospectively reviewed. Materials and Methods: The PET/CT findings, patients' clinical information, level of CEA, histological diagnosis, and subsequent management were retrieved by the electronic patient record for analysis. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using SPSS version 19. Results: One hundred and one PET/CT scans were performed for patients with elevated CEA. Fifty-eight of these were performed for patients with known primary malignancy and were excluded; 43 PET/CT scans were performed for patients without known primary malignancy and were included. Thirty-three (77% had a positive PET/CT. Among the 32 patients with malignancy, 15 (47% suffered from lung cancer and 8 (25% suffered from colorectal cancer. The sensitivity (97%, specificity (82%, positive predictive value (94%, negative predictive value (90%, and accuracy (93% were calculated. Thirty (91% patients had resultant change in management. The mean CEA level for patients with malignancy (46.1 ng/ml was significantly higher than those without malignancy (3.82 ng/ml (P < 0.05. In predicting the presence of malignancy, a CEA cutoff at 7.55 ng/ml will achieve a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 73%. Conclusion: PET/CT, in our study population, appears to be sensitive, specific, and accurate in investigating patients with elevated CEA and without known primary malignancy. In addition to diagnosis of underlying primary malignancy, PET/CT also reveals occult metastases which would affect patient treatment options.Its role in

  18. Efficacy of 18F-FDG PET/CT in investigation of elevated CEA without known primary malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Simon Sin-man; Yu, Wong L; Wang, Ki; Ahuja, Anil T

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of 18flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in investigating patients with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and without known primary malignancy, and the impact of PET/CT findings on patient management. Setting and Design: PET/CT scans done in a tertiary hospital between December 2007 and February 2012 for elevated CEA in patients without known primary malignancy were retrospectively reviewed. Materials and Methods: The PET/CT findings, patients' clinical information, level of CEA, histological diagnosis, and subsequent management were retrieved by the electronic patient record for analysis. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using SPSS version 19. Results: One hundred and one PET/CT scans were performed for patients with elevated CEA. Fifty-eight of these were performed for patients with known primary malignancy and were excluded; 43 PET/CT scans were performed for patients without known primary malignancy and were included. Thirty-three (77%) had a positive PET/CT. Among the 32 patients with malignancy, 15 (47%) suffered from lung cancer and 8 (25%) suffered from colorectal cancer. The sensitivity (97%), specificity (82%), positive predictive value (94%), negative predictive value (90%), and accuracy (93%) were calculated. Thirty (91%) patients had resultant change in management. The mean CEA level for patients with malignancy (46.1 ng/ml) was significantly higher than those without malignancy (3.82 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). In predicting the presence of malignancy, a CEA cutoff at 7.55 ng/ml will achieve a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 73%. Conclusion: PET/CT, in our study population, appears to be sensitive, specific, and accurate in investigating patients with elevated CEA and without known primary malignancy. In addition to diagnosis of underlying primary malignancy, PET/CT also reveals occult metastases which would affect patient treatment options. Its role in

  19. Novel carcinoembryonic-antigen-(CEA)-specific pretargeting system to assess tumor cell viability after irradiation of colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, Birgit [Univ. Medical Center, Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Halle Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Rave-Fraenck, Margarete [Univ. Medical Center, Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Breunig, Christian [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Schirmer, Markus [Univ. Medical Center, Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology; Baehre, Manfred [Halle Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Nadrowitz, Roger [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Liersch, Torsten [Univ. Medical Center, Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of General Surgery; Meller, Johannes [Univ. Medical Center, Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To date, no valid imaging modality exists for early response prediction to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy in carcinoembryonic-antigen-(CEA)-expressing rectal cancers (UICC stages II and III). It is hypothesized that the uptake of an anti-CEA antibody is directly related to the number of viable tumor cells and may be quantified by immuno-positron emission tomography (immuno-PET). Therefore, we evaluated a novel pretargeting system using TF2, a humanized bispecific trivalent monoclonal antibody (mAb), directed against CEA and the IMP-288-peptide, a hapten for binding radiometals for imaging. Uptake and kinetics of the pretargeting system were investigated in vitro prior to and after irradiation. Methods: TF2 was labeled with {sup 131}I and IMP-288 with {sup 111}InCl{sub 3}. The colorectal cancer cell lines HT29, SW480, and T84 with known varying CEA expression were incubated ({<=} 72 hours) with {sup 131}I-TF2 or the TF2-{sup 111}In-IMP-288 pretargeting system. Parallel cultures were irradiated with 2-10 Gy high-energy photons. Tracer uptake, proliferation, apoptosis, and CEA-RNA expression of cancer cells were investigated. Results: The uptake of tracers was dependent on CEA expression and cell count of the cell lines (uptake/106 cells: 0.3% in HT29, 1.5% in SW480, and 14% in T84, p < 0.001). The TF2-{sup 111}In-IMP-288 pretargeting system showed a higher uptake after 4 and 72 hours compared to {sup 131}I-TF2 in parallel cultures. Only in one cell line (SW480) an increased apoptosis after irradiation could be detected. Irradiation increased dose dependently both the specific uptake of {sup 131}I-TF2 and of the TF2-{sup 111}In-IMP-288 system (4-fold in HT29 and T84 after 10 Gy (72 hours), p < 0.001). These results were CEA-mRNA independent. Conclusion: This novel pretargeting system allows the quantitative analysis of CEA-expressing colorectal cancer cells and represents a promising tool for evaluation of tumor cell viability after irradiation. (orig.)

  20. The possible role of tumor antigen CA 15-3, CEA and ferritin in malignant and benign disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nafija Serdarević; Samira Mehanović

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Serum CA15-3 has been one of the most reliable tumor markers used in monitoring of breast cancer patients. To increase its sensitivity, the combined measurement of other tumor markers (CEA and ferritin) with CA15-3 was investigated. The aim of this study was determination of CA 15-3, CEA and ferritin in female patients with breast cancer, lung cancer and mastitisMethods: 300 patients with carcinoma, hospitalized at Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Department for Oncology a...

  1. 2015 annual report of the managing director of the CEA general and nuclear inspection for nuclear safety and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-08-01

    After an introduction by the managing director of the CEA general and nuclear inspection about activities and events of 2015, this report proposes some key figures and indicators to illustrate these activities and events. The next parts discuss, present and comment how a culture of safety is at the heart of the continuous progress approach by the CEA. The next chapters propose overviews and comments of lessons learned from nuclear inspections within the frame of audit programme or within the frame of centres' safety audits, and from reactive inspections. The last parts address the follow-up of recommendations, and progress orientations and perspectives

  2. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-B-6, 108-B Solid Waste Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-B-6, 108-B Solid Waste Burial Ground. The 118-B-6 site consisted of 2 concrete pipes buried vertically in the ground and capped by a concrete pad with steel lids. The site was used for the disposal of wastes from the 'metal line' of the P-10 Tritium Separation Project.

  3. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, M.J.; Capron, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes

  4. Latvian Chernobyl clean-up workers dynamics of morbidity 15 years of the post radiation period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvagule, T.; Eglite, M.; Bruvere, R.; Gabruseva, N.; Feldmane, G.

    2003-01-01

    Nearly 1.0% of the male population of Latvia were sent (1986-1991) to Chernobyl to assist in the clean-up activities after the nuclear power plant accident (1986). The prevalence of all types of diseases, dynamic of breaking out of the key symptoms and interferon status were evaluated in respect to date of work, duration of work and kind of work in the whole clean-up workers group and in the particular group with seizures of unconsciousness. The disease incidence in clean-up workers from Latvia exceeds that observed in age and sex matched male population. Most had several diseases each and their poly-symptomatic sicknesses exhibited tendency to progress even 10-14 years after the exposure (during 1996-2000). Diseases of nervous, digestive and circulatory system, mental disorders and diseases of muscles and connective tissue were the most frequent. The primary outset of symptoms being low in the first 2-3 years after the work gradually increased during the following 10 years. Leukopenia was predominant in 1990-1993 and leucocytosis in 1997-2000. Ability of leukocytes to produce interferons was significantly decreased. Since the external radiation doses did not exceed 50 centyGy (cGy) there is sufficient reasons to believe that the principal cause of the gradually increased frequency of health problems is the long-life radioisotopes incorporated in the clean-up workers bodies as permanent radiation and toxic compounds source. (authors)

  5. Applicability of the Clean Water Act to Indian tribes - may tribes stop or constrain a cleanup?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emge, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    Indian tribes retain their sovereign rights of self-government and self-determination unless it is specifically waived by the tribe or abrogated by the US Congress, through treaty or statute. The Clean Water Act does not specifically abrogate tribal sovereignty. This raises the issue of what would occur if an on-scene coordinator decides that cleanup of tribal lands is necessary to protect the public health and welfare, but the tribe does not want the cleanup activities to proceed? May a tribe impede cleanup efforts? During the cleanup of the barge Nestucca oil spill, this occurred when the Quinault Tribe did not allow the OSC to clean lands that the tribe holds sacred. This issue with the Clean Water Act has not been decided by Congress, nor by the courts. Recently, courts have applied at least three different approaches to determine if a statute of general application, such as the Clean Water Act, applies to Indian tribes. The different tests do not always yield the same result. An on-scene coordinator, when confronted with this scenario, might handle the situation in several different ways, or perhaps move to prevent such an occurrence. The different approaches used by the courts can be taken together to gain a sense of whether the Clean Water Act may preempt tribal sovereignty

  6. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. J. Appel and J. M. Capron

    2007-07-25

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes.

  7. Firms vie to offer DOE a prize-winning recipe for cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, M.B.

    1994-04-25

    Eager to get the most bang for its waste cleanup bucks, the US Department of Energy is conducting its own version of the Pillsbury bake-off. DOE is pitting two environmental contractors, Rust International Corp. and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Co., against each other to come up with the prize-winning recipe for cleaning up some nasty waste problems.

  8. Assessment and recommendations for the oil spill cleanup of Guanabara Bay, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Jacqueline

    2000-01-01

    The potential impact of an oil spill consisting of a blend of diesel and a heavy residual fuel oil on water column resources, benthic resources, intertidal habitats and communities, birds, and socio-economic resources was assessed and recommendations for clean-up given. The oil spill occurred in the bay on January 18, 2000

  9. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-B-6, 108-B Solid Waste Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. L. Proctor

    2006-06-13

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-B-6, 108-B Solid Waste Burial Ground. The 118-B-6 site consisted of 2 concrete pipes buried vertically in the ground and capped by a concrete pad with steel lids. The site was used for the disposal of wastes from the "metal line" of the P-10 Tritium Separation Project.

  10. Legal aspects of the clean-up and reclamation of the manufactured gas plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joldzic, V. [Belgrade University, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Inst. for Criminology and Sociological Research

    1995-12-31

    The laws associated with the cleanup of manufactured gas plants in Yugoslavia is described. These comprise the Environmental Protection Act; the Law about Space Planning and Organizing; Building Law; and Agricultural Land Use Law. Joint remedial action in the Danube Basin is discussed. 13 refs.

  11. Hebei spirit oil spill exposure and subjective symptoms in residents participating in clean-up activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Ha, Mina; Lee, Jong Seong; Kwon, Hojang; Ha, Eun-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul; Choi, Yeyong; Jeong, Woo-Chul; Hur, Jongil; Lee, Seung-Min; Kim, Eun-Jung; Im, Hosub

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the relationship between crude oil exposure and physical symptoms among residents participating in clean-up work associated with the Hebei Spirit oil spill, 2007 in Korea. A total of 288 residents responded to a questionnaire regarding subjective physical symptoms, sociodemographic characteristics and clean-up activities that occurred between two and eight weeks after the accident. Additionally, the urine of 154 of the respondents was analyzed for metabolites of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals. To compare the urinary levels of exposure biomarkers, the urine of 39 inland residents who were not directly exposed to the oil spill were analyzed. Residents exposed to oil remnants through clean-up work showed associations between physical symptoms and the exposure levels defined in various ways, including days of work, degree of skin contamination, and levels of some urinary exposure biomarkers of VOCs, metabolites and metals, although no major abnormalities in urinary exposure biomarkers were observed. This study provides evidence of a relationship between crude oil exposure and acute human health effects and suggests the need for follow-up to evaluate the exposure status and long-term health effects of clean-up participants.

  12. Methods for assessing environmental impacts of a FUSRAP property-cleanup/interim-storage remedial action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyman, D.J.

    1982-12-01

    This document provides a description of a property-cleanup/interim-storage action, explanation of how environmental impacts might occur, comprehensive treatment of most potential impacts that might occur as a result of this type of action, discussion of existing methodologies for estimating and assessing impacts, justification of the choice of specific methodologies for use in FUSRAP environmental reviews, assessments of representative impacts (or expected ranges of impacts where possible), suggested mitigation measures, and some key sources of information. The major topical areas covered are physical and biological impacts, radiological impacts, and socioeconomic impacts. Some project-related issues were beyond the scope of this document, including dollar costs, specific accident scenarios, project funding and changes in Congressional mandates, and project management (contracts, labor relations, quality assurance, liability, emergency preparedness, etc.). These issues will be covered in other documents supporting the decision-making process. Although the scope of this document covers property-cleanup and interim-storage actions, it is applicable to other similar remedial actions. For example, the analyses discussed herein for cleanup activities are applicable to any FUSRAP action that includes site cleanup

  13. Cancer incidence and thyroid disease among Estonian Chernobyl clean-up workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvinen, A.; Salomaa, S.; Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1998-09-01

    The report describes the development and summarizes the results of the project Cancer incidence and thyroid disease among Estonian Chernobyl clean-up workers. One of the goals of the report is to give research protocols and questionnaires for researchers involved in other studies. Eight previously published articles are also included summarizing the results. The development of the collaboration work of the project is described in the introduction of the report. Epidemiological methods are described in an article complemented by the protocol and English version of the questionnaire administered to all cleanup workers, as well as the data collection form of the thyroid study. The results from biological biodosimetry using both glycophorin A and FISH methods have shown that the radiation doses received by the Chernobyl cleanup workers were relatively low. Thyroid nodularity was not associated with any radiation exposure characteristic in the thyroid screening study. Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers were followed up for cancer incidence through the Estonian Cancer Registry. No cases of leukemia or thyroid cancer were observed by the end of 1993. It is too early to observe possible effect on other types of cancer. However, mortality from suicides was increased compared with general population. Further follow-up and the extension to other Baltic countries in the future will undoubtedly strengthen the study. There are also plans for future projects covering areas from psychosocial factors to radiation biology

  14. Mental disorders among Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia: A clinical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidra, Kaia; Rahu, Kaja; Kalaus, Katri-Evelin; Tekkel, Mare; Leinsalu, Mall

    2017-08-01

    To assess, at a clinical level, the mental health of former Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia by comparing them with same-age controls. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was administered during 2011-2012 to 99 cleanup workers and 100 population-based controls previously screened for mental health symptoms. Logistic regression analysis showed that cleanup workers had higher odds of current depressive disorder (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI: 1.34, 7.01]), alcohol dependence (OR = 3.47, 95% CI [1.29, 9.34]), and suicide ideation (OR = 3.44, 95% CI [1.28, 9.21]) than did controls. Except for suicide ideation, associations with Chernobyl exposure became statistically nonsignificant when adjusted for education and ethnicity. A quarter of a century after the Chernobyl accident, Estonian cleanup workers were still at increased risk of mental disorders, which was partly attributable to sociodemographic factors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-7, 100-F Miscellaneous Hardware Storage Vault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. J. Appel

    2006-11-02

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-7, 100-F Miscellaneous Hardware Storage Vault. The site consisted of an inactive solid waste storage vault used for temporary storage of slightly contaminated reactor parts that could be recovered and reused for the 100-F Area reactor operations.

  16. Restoration principles and criteria: superfund program policy for cleanup at radiation contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) is responsible for implementing the long-term (non-emergency) portion of a key U.S. law regulating cleanup: the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, CERCLA, nicknamed 'Superfund'. The purpose of the Superfund program is to protect human health and the environment over the long term from releases or potential releases of hazardous substances from abandoned or uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. The focus of this paper is on Superfund, including how radiation is addressed by the Superfund program. This paper provides a brief overview of the approach used by EPA to conduct Superfund cleanups at contaminated sites, including those that are contaminated with radionuclides, to ensure protection of human health and the environment. The paper addresses how EPA Superfund determines if a site poses a risk to human health and the framework used to determine cleanup levels. The theme emphasized throughout the paper is that within the Superfund remediation framework, radioactive contamination is dealt with in a consistent manner as with chemical contamination, except to account for the technical differences between radionuclides and chemicals. This consistency is important since at every radioactively contaminated site being addressed under Superfund's primary program for long-term cleanup, the National Priorities List (NPL), chemical contamination is also present. (author)

  17. Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Exposure and Subjective Symptoms in Residents Participating in Clean-Up Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Lee, Jong Seong; Kwon, Hojang; Ha, Eun-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul; Choi, Yeyong; Jeong, Woo-Chul; Hur, Jongil; Lee, Seung-Min; Kim, Eun-Jung; Im, Hosub

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to examine the relationship between crude oil exposure and physical symptoms among residents participating in clean-up work associated with the Hebei Spirit oil spill, 2007 in Korea. Methods A total of 288 residents responded to a questionnaire regarding subjective physical symptoms, sociodemographic characteristics and clean-up activities that occurred between two and eight weeks after the accident. Additionally, the urine of 154 of the respondents was analyzed for metabolites of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals. To compare the urinary levels of exposure biomarkers, the urine of 39 inland residents who were not directly exposed to the oil spill were analyzed. Results Residents exposed to oil remnants through clean-up work showed associations between physical symptoms and the exposure levels defined in various ways, including days of work, degree of skin contamination, and levels of some urinary exposure biomarkers of VOCs, metabolites and metals, although no major abnormalities in urinary exposure biomarkers were observed. Conclusions This study provides evidence of a relationship between crude oil exposure and acute human health effects and suggests the need for follow-up to evaluate the exposure status and long-term health effects of clean-up participants. PMID:22125768

  18. Chromosome aberrations and rogue cells in lymphocytes of Chernobyl clean-up workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazutka, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    A cytogenetic analysis was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from 183 Chernobyl clean-up workers and 27 control individuals. Increased frequencies of chromosome aberrations were associated with exposure to radiation at Chernobyl, alcohol abuse and a history of recent influenza infection. However, only approximately 20% of Chernobyl clean-up workers had an increased frequency of dicentric and ring chromosomes. At the same time, an increased frequency of acentric fragments in lymphocytes of clean-up workers was characteristic. The use of multivitamins as dietary supplement significantly decreased the frequency of chromosome aberrations, especially of chromatid breaks. Rogue cells were found in lymphocytes of 28 clean-up workers and 3 control individuals. The appearance of rogue cells was associated with a recent history of acute respiratory disease (presumably caused by adenoviral infection) and, probably, alcohol abuse. Dicentric chromosomes in rogue cells were distributed according to a negative binomial distribution. Occurrence of rogue cells due to a perturbation of cell cycle control and abnormal apoptosis is suggested

  19. The follow-up study of chromosomal aberrations in Chernobyl clean-up workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slozina, Natalia M.; Neronova, Elizaveta G.

    2016-01-01

    A cytogenetic study was carried out on 359 clean-up workers who worked at the Chernobyl station in 1986-1989. The investigation was performed 6-12 years after irradiation. Chromosome type damages, i.e. double fragments, dicentrics and rings were significantly increased in the clean-up workers compared to the control. Chromatid exchanges were found only in the clean-up workers. A temporal change of radiation makers was also investigated based on the data of 243 persons who worked at Chernobyl in 1986. The temporal variation of dicentric frequency shows an inexplicable tendency towards the increase of dicentrics rate for the period of 8-12 years after irradiation. The association between the frequency of different types of chromosomal aberrations and such variables as smoking habits, coffee, tea, alcohol consumption, etc. was also analysed using a stepwise multiple regression analysis. A statistically significant association was only observed between smoking and chromatid exchanges. This type of aberrations was significantly higher in the smoking subgroup than in the non-smoking subgroup of the clean-up workers. The fact of an increased level of unstable chromosomal aberrations in a remote period after irradiation allows us to suppose that other pathways of genomic burden may exist in addition to straight radiation action at the time of irradiation. (author)

  20. Determination of the viability of chicken feather as oil spill clean-up ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study a comparative assessment was conducted between chicken feather and a conventional synthetic sorbent mat used in the oil industry to clean-up oil spill. The result of the study shows that chicken feather has higher oil sorption capacity and sorbed oil recoverability than the standard (synthetic sorbent mat), and ...