WorldWideScience

Sample records for ce levels populated

  1. What was the population of Great Zimbabwe (CE1000 - 1800?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadreck Chirikure

    Full Text Available The World Heritage Site of Great Zimbabwe is one of the most iconic and largest archaeological settlements in Africa. It was the hub of direct and indirect trade which internally connected various areas of southern Africa, and externally linked them with East Africa and the Near and Far East. Archaeologists believe that at its peak, Great Zimbabwe had a fully urban population of 20,000 people concentrated in approximately 2.9 square kilometres (40 percent of 720 ha. This translates to a population density of 6,897, which is comparable with that of some of the most populous regions of the world in the 21st century. Here, we combine archaeological, ethnographic and historical evidence with ecological and statistical modelling to demonstrate that the total population estimate for the site's nearly 800-year occupational duration (CE1000-1800, after factoring in generational succession, is unlikely to have exceeded 10,000 people. This conclusion is strongly firmed up by the absence of megamiddens at the site, the chronological differences between several key areas of the settlement traditionally assumed to be coeval, and the historically documented low populations recorded for the sub-continent between CE1600 and 1950.

  2. Manganese/cerium clusters spanning a range of oxidation levels and CeMn(8), Ce(2)Mn(4), and Ce(6)Mn(4) nuclearities: structural, magnetic, and EPR properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampropoulos, Christos; Thuijs, Annaliese E; Mitchell, Kylie J; Abboud, Khalil A; Christou, George

    2014-07-07

    The syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties are reported for three new Ce/Mn clusters with different Ce/Mn ratios: [Ce6Mn4O12(O2CMe)10(NO3)4(py)4] (py = pyridine) (1), [CeMn8O8(O2CCH2(t)Bu)12(DMF)14] (DMF = dimethylformamide) (2), and [Ce2Mn4O2(O2CMe)6(NO3)4(hmp)4] (3; hmp(-) is the anion of 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine). 1 and 2 were obtained from the reaction of Ce(IV) with [Mn12O12(O2CMe)16(H2O)4] (Mn(III)8Mn(IV)4) and [Mn8O2(O2CCH2(t)Bu)14((t)BuCH2CO2H)4] (Mn(II)6Mn(III)2), respectively, whereas 3 resulted from the oxidation of Mn(II) acetate with Ce(IV) in the presence of hmpH. Cluster 1 possesses an unusual [Ce6Mn4O12](14+) core topology consisting of a [Ce6O8] face-capped octahedron, which is face-fused at each end to a [Ce(IV)2Mn(III)Mn(IV)O4] cubane. Cluster 2 possesses a nonplanar, saddlelike loop of eight Mn(III) atoms bridged by eight μ3-O(2-) ions to a central Ce(IV) atom. Cluster 3 is similar to 1 in possessing an octahedral core, but this is now a [Ce2Mn4] octahedron consisting of a Ce(III) atom on either side of a Mn4 parallelogram, with the metal atoms bridged by two μ4-O(2-) ions, the alkoxide arms of four hmp(-) groups, and six acetates. Clusters 1, 2, and 3 are thus at the Ce(IV)6Mn(III)2Mn(IV)2, Ce(IV)Mn(III)8, and Ce(III)2Mn(III)4 oxidation levels, respectively. Variable-temperature, solid-state direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) magnetization studies on 1-3 in the 5.0-300 K range revealed predominantly antiferromagnetic exchange interactions within the complexes. For 1, fitting of the DC data to the theoretical expression for a dinuclear Mn(III)Mn(IV) complex derived using the Van Vleck equation and an isotropic spin Hamiltonian (ℋ = -2JŜi·Ŝj convention) gave a value for the exchange coupling parameter (J) of -60.4(7) cm(-1) and a Landé factor g = 2.00(1), indicating an S = 1/2 ground state. For 2, both DC and AC data indicate an S = 0 ground state, which is unprecedented for a member of the CeMn8 family and now

  3. 10-year prevalence of contact allergy in the general population in Denmark estimated through the CE-DUR method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Uter, Wolfgang; Schnuch, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of contact allergy in the general population has traditionally been investigated through population-based epidemiological studies. A different approach is the combination of clinical epidemiological (CE) data and the World Health Organization-defined drug utilization research (DUR)...

  4. Level-Set Based Artery-Vein Separation in Blood Pool Agent CE-MR Angiograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bemmel, C.M.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Viergever, M.A.; Niessen, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    Blood pool agents (BPAs) for contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic-resonance angiography (MRA) allow prolonged imaging times for higher contrast and resolution. Imaging is performed during the steady state when the contrast agent is distributed through the complete vascular system. However, simultaneous

  5. Quantitative study of the f-occupation in CeMIn{sub 5} and other cerium compounds with hard X-ray core level photo emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundermann, Martin; Strigari, Fabio; Willers, Thomas; Severing, Andrea [University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Weinen, Jonas; Tjeng, Liu Hao [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany); Liao, Yen-Fa; Tsuei, Ku-Ding [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu (China); Bauer, Eric D.; Sarrao, John L.; Thompson, Joe D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States); Lejay, Pascal [Institut NEEL, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Tanaka, Arata [Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Bulk-sensitive hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) data of the Ce3d core levels of the CeMIn{sub 5} family with M = Co, Rh, and Ir will be presented. The data analysis combines a full multiplet and configuration interaction model so that the strong plasmons intensities can be corrected for. This way spectral f{sup n} weights can be extracted and the configuration interaction model yields quantitative values for the initial state f-occupation of the CeMIn{sub 5}. The results are compared with HAXPES data of other heavy Ce compounds of very different hybridization strength. A systematic decrease of the hybridization strength V{sub eff} from CePd{sub 3} to CeRh{sub 3}B{sub 2} to CeRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is observed, and it is smallest for the three CeMIn{sub 5} compounds. The f-occupation increases in the same sequence and is close to one for the CeMIn{sub 5} family.

  6. Acceptable risk of contact allergy in the general population assessed by CE-DUR--a method to detect and categorize contact allergy epidemics based on patient data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil; Schnuch, Axel

    2009-01-01

    population by using a new epidemiological tool. The clinical epidemiology (CE) and drug utilization research (DUR) method recently estimated the 10-year contact allergy prevalence in the general population in Germany and Denmark based on patch test reading data in combination with an estimate of the number...

  7. Broadband Luminescence in Rare Earth Doped Sr2SiS4: Relating Energy Levels of Ce3+ and Eu2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony B. Parmentier

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sr2SiS4:Ce3+ is an efficient blue-emitting (460 nm phosphor, excitable with light of wavelengths up to 420 nm. From the excitation spectrum, we construct the energy level scheme and use it to check the predictive power of the Dorenbos model, relating the positions of the Ce3+ energy levels with those of Eu2+ in the same host. For strontium thiosilicate, this method gives excellent results and allows us to determine which of two available crystallographic sites is occupied by cerium. We use the Dorenbos method for extracting information on the coordination of Ce3+ from the observed crystal field splitting.

  8. Salt reduction strategy at population level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi Bhargava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available World is facing a huge burden of noncommunicable diseases such as hypertension, ischemic health diseases, and stroke. Moreover, the developing countries have had a relatively speedy rise of the problem, with noncommunicable diseases occurring at much lower age as compared to the developed world. The World Health Organization, therefore, recommends reduction in salt intake at population level to <5 g/day. Not all researchers and public health physicians agree to it, leading to conflicting information for a primary care physician. This evidence based summary documents this polarization of the recommendations regarding salt reduction and acknowledges the ongoing challenge primary care physicians face when following such evidence based guidelines.

  9. Toxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles at different trophic levels--effects on diatoms, chironomids and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Agathe; Mouchet, Florence; Verneuil, Laurent; Evariste, Lauris; Silvestre, Jérôme; Pinelli, Eric; Gauthier, Laury

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to provide wider information on the toxicity of cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) in aquatic environments, by studying the toxicity of two types of CeO2 NPs for four species (diatoms Nitzschia palea, the sediment-dwelling invertebrate Chironomus riparius, and the amphibian larvae Xenopus laevis and Pleurodeles waltl.). The two types of CeO2 NPs have different intrinsic properties: some of them are small citrate-coated spheres (2-5 nm), and the others are larger uncoated plates (20-60 nm). Acute toxicity (mortality at 48 or 96 h, depending on the test-organism) was assessed for the four species, from 0.1 to 100 mg L(-1) of NPs. Sub-lethal effects were assessed on chironomids exposed between 0.01 and 1 mg L(-1) of NPs. Mortality, growth inhibition and genotoxic effects were evaluated on amphibian larvae from 0.1 to 10 mg L(-1). Results reveal that no acute toxicity occurs on any species after short exposures, even at the highest concentrations. Mortality (35%) is observed on Xenopus larvae after 12d of exposure at the highest concentration of one type of NPs. No significant effects were observed on chironomids during chronic exposure. Xenopus larvae growth was inhibited from 1 mg L(-1) of both NPs while growth inhibition is observed on Pleurodeles only at the highest concentration of one type of NPs. No genotoxicity was observed on Xenopus but Pleurodeles exhibited dose-dependent genotoxic effects when exposed to one type of NPs. Observed differences in toxicity are discussed focusing on the studied compartment, routes of exposure, species and NPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Démographie médicale et vieillissement de la population en Grèce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriopoulos, J; Andrioti, Despena; Georgoussi, E

    2000-01-01

    In 1996, there were 41,511 medical doctors in Greece i.e. 340 doctors per 100,000 population. Recent forecasts showed that in 2001, there would be 46,558 doctors in the country i.e. 422 doctors per 100,000 population. There is currently no numerous clauses at the start of medical training. Medica...

  11. State population as a predictor of radiation therapy staffing levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, John; Carbonneau, Kira; Kudlas, Myke

    2012-05-01

    Considering the cyclical nature of shortages and oversupplies of staffing levels in the labor force, an accurate prediction of future demand for personnel is of great importance. Historically, the profession of radiation therapy has been plagued with these cycles. This study establishes state population as a strong predictor of radiation therapy staffing levels. A linear regression analysis was performed to determine the association between state population and radiation therapy staffing levels from 2002 to 2010. State population is a significant and substantial predictor variable for the number of actively employed and registered radiation therapists, with 89.5% to 91.4% of the variance accounted for from 2002 to 2010. Additional research in estimating future demand in radiation therapy is possible. By monitoring change in state population, health care professionals can proactively address cycles of shortages and oversupplies in staffing levels. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Vestibular schwannoma and hearing preservation: Usefulness of level specific CE-Chirp ABR monitoring. A retrospective study on 25 cases with preoperative socially useful hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronardi, Luciano; Di Scipio, Ettore; Cacciotti, Guglielmo; Roperto, Raffaelino

    2018-02-01

    Decision-making regarding the therapy of vestibular schwannoma (VS) changed over the last decades, during which curative microsurgery has been promoted. Goals of VS microsurgery are: extensive resection, facial nerve (FN) preservation and, in selected cases, hearing preservation (HP). The aim of this study is to evaluate postoperative HP with reference to tumor size in patients operated on with Level Specific (LS)-CE-Chirp® ABR monitoring. Twentyfive consecutive patients with socially useful hearing (SUH) underwent VS microneurosurgery by retrosigmoid (RS) approach. Selection criteria were: pure tone audiogram 50% (50/50 criterion; AAO-HNS class A-B). In relation to maximum diameter, we identified 2 size-groups: A) ≤2cm (13 cases); B) >2cm (12 cases). HP attempt was assisted by intraoperative ABR evoked by LS CE-Chirp® acoustic stimuli. Mean age was 44,3 years (20-64); average maximum diameter 2,04cm (8 40mm). Total and nearly-total (>95%) resection was possible in all. Mortality and major morbidity were zero. In all, FN was anatomically and functionally preserved; in 10 an incomplete FN deficit (House-Brackmann II and III) was followed by complete recovery (House-Brackmann I). SUH preservation rate was 52%, with significant differences in relation to size: 61,5% group A and 41,7% group B (p = 0,014). Postoperative AAO-HNS C (serviceable) hearing was observed in 36%, deafness in 12%. Microsurgery represents a valid therapeutic option for small growing VS with SUH. Our data confirm that RS removal of VS with intraoperative ABR monitoring allows good rate of SUH preservation, especially if maximum diameter does not exceed 2cm. LS-CE-Chirp ABR represent a safe and effective method for monitoring cochlear nerve, with fast and clear intraoperative neurophysiological feedback. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Photoemission spectroscopy of Ce-filled skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunami, M. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Hyogo 679 5148 (Japan)]. E-mail: matunami@spring8.or.jp; Horiba, K. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Hyogo 679 5148 (Japan); Taguchi, M. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Hyogo 679 5148 (Japan); Yamamoto, K. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Hyogo 679 5148 (Japan); Chainani, A. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Hyogo 679 5148 (Japan); Takata, Y. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Hyogo 679 5148 (Japan); Senba, Y. [JASRI/SPring-8, Hyogo 679 5148 (Japan); Ohashi, H. [JASRI/SPring-8, Hyogo 679 5148 (Japan); Sugawara, H. [Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770 8502 (Japan); Sato, H. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo 192 0397 (Japan); Harima, H. [Department of Physics, Kobe University, Kobe 657 8501 (Japan); Shin, S. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Hyogo 679 5148 (Japan); Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277 85817 (Japan)

    2006-05-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of filled skutterudites CeFe{sub 4}P{sub 12} and CeOs{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} by means of Ce 3d-4f resonant photoemission spectroscopy. The difference in the spectral property of on-resonant photoemission spectra can be explained by the degree of hybridization between conduction band states and Ce 4f states. In addition, the spectral intensity at the Fermi level for CeFe{sub 4}P{sub 12} is significantly lower than that for CeOs{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}. The results indicate that a Kondo resonance exists in CeOs{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} while Kondo resonance is suppressed in CeFe{sub 4}P{sub 12}.

  14. Can Knowledge Improve Population Forecasts at Subcounty Levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHI, GUANGQING

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in urban and regional planning require more accurate population forecasts at subcounty levels, as well as a consideration of interactions among population growth, traffic flow, land use, and environmental impacts. However, the extrapolation methods, currently the most often used demographic forecasting techniques for subcounty areas, cannot meet the demand. This study tests a knowledge-based regression approach, which has been successfully used for forecasts at the national level, for subcounty population forecasting. In particular, this study applies four regression models that incorporate demographic characteristics, socioeconomic conditions, transportation accessibility, natural amenities, and land development to examine the population change since 1970 and to prepare the 1990-based forecast of year 2000 population at the minor civil division level in Wisconsin. The findings indicate that this approach does not outperform the extrapolation projections. Although the regression methods produce more precise projections, the least biased projections are often generated by one of the extrapolation techniques. The performance of the knowledge-based regression methods is discounted at subcounty levels by temporal instability and the scale effect. The regression coefficients exhibit a statistically significant level of temporal instability across the estimation and projection periods and tend to change more rapidly at finer geographic scales. PMID:21305400

  15. Individual and population-level responses to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ben P; McKeown, Niall J; Rastrick, Samuel P S; Bertolini, Camilla; Foggo, Andy; Graham, Helen; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Milazzo, Marco; Shaw, Paul W; Small, Daniel P; Moore, Pippa J

    2016-01-29

    Ocean acidification is predicted to have detrimental effects on many marine organisms and ecological processes. Despite growing evidence for direct impacts on specific species, few studies have simultaneously considered the effects of ocean acidification on individuals (e.g. consequences for energy budgets and resource partitioning) and population level demographic processes. Here we show that ocean acidification increases energetic demands on gastropods resulting in altered energy allocation, i.e. reduced shell size but increased body mass. When scaled up to the population level, long-term exposure to ocean acidification altered population demography, with evidence of a reduction in the proportion of females in the population and genetic signatures of increased variance in reproductive success among individuals. Such increased variance enhances levels of short-term genetic drift which is predicted to inhibit adaptation. Our study indicates that even against a background of high gene flow, ocean acidification is driving individual- and population-level changes that will impact eco-evolutionary trajectories.

  16. Energy levels in YPO{sub 4}:Ce{sup 3+},Sm{sup 3+} studied by thermally and optically stimulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bos, Adrie J.J., E-mail: a.j.j.bos@tudelft.n [Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, NL 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Poolton, Nigel R.J. [Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, NL 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Institute of Maths and Physics, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom); Wallinga, Jakob [Netherlands Centre for Luminescence Dating, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, NL 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Bessiere, Aurelie [Ecole Nat. Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11 Rue P et M Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Dorenbos, Pieter [Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, NL 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2010-03-15

    Energy-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) spectra and thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of a powder sample of YPO{sub 4}:Ce{sup 3+},Sm{sup 3+} were measured to investigate the nature of the trapping centre and to locate its energy level relative to the valence and conduction bands of the YPO{sub 4} host. The high-temperature glow peak could unequivocally be assigned to Sm{sup 2+} (thus Sm{sup 3+} acts as an electron trap). The trap depth of this centre, as derived from the OSL excitation spectra, is in good agreement with the Dorenbos model prediction. The OSL excitation spectra also reveal excited states of Sm{sup 2+} well below the conduction band. These excited states produce a broadening of the high-temperature TL glow peak and also cause the activation energy determined by the Hoogenstraten method to underestimate the trap depth.

  17. Sensitivity of MSE measurements on the beam atomic level population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, C; Kumar, S T A; Anderson, F S B; Anderson, D T

    2016-11-01

    The effect of variation in atomic level population of a neutral beam on the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) measurements is investigated in the low density plasmas of HSX stellarator. A 30 KeV, 4 A, 3 ms hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam is injected into HSX plasmas of line averaged electron density ranging from 2 to 4 ⋅ 1018 m-3 at a magnetic field of 1 T. For this density range, the excited level population of the hydrogen neutral beam is expected to undergo variations. Doppler shifted and Stark split Hα and Hβ emissions from the beam are simultaneously measured using two cross-calibrated spectrometers. The emission spectrum is simulated and fit to the experimental measurements and the deviation from a statistically populated beam is investigated.

  18. Sensitivity of MSE measurements on the beam atomic level population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, C., E-mail: carlos.ruiz@wisc.edu; Kumar, S. T. A.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Anderson, D. T. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The effect of variation in atomic level population of a neutral beam on the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) measurements is investigated in the low density plasmas of HSX stellarator. A 30 KeV, 4 A, 3 ms hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam is injected into HSX plasmas of line averaged electron density ranging from 2 to 4 ⋅ 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} at a magnetic field of 1 T. For this density range, the excited level population of the hydrogen neutral beam is expected to undergo variations. Doppler shifted and Stark split H{sub α} and H{sub β} emissions from the beam are simultaneously measured using two cross-calibrated spectrometers. The emission spectrum is simulated and fit to the experimental measurements and the deviation from a statistically populated beam is investigated.

  19. Effect of population and level of industrialization on underground ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physico-chemical properties of underground waters in Abia State, Nigeria were determined with a view to ascertaining the effect of population density and level of industrialization on the water quality parameters using Aba (a relatively industrialized city) and Umuahia (a city with very few industries) as a case study.

  20. Electrophysiological Techniques for Sea Lion Population-Level Audiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    Audiometry James J. Finneran Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, Biosciences Division, Code 71510, 53560 Hull Street, San Diego, CA...DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electrophysiological Techniques For Sea Lion Population-Level Audiometry 5a

  1. Physical activity level in pediatric population: A comprehensive review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical activity level in pediatric population: A comprehensive review. KD Monyeki, HCG Kemper, L Scott. Abstract. Physical activity (PA) is a key component in the maintenance and attainment of healthy, active, well-nourished and psycho-social well-being of a society. Hence, the reduction of sedentary lifestyle has ...

  2. Population-level changes to promote cardiovascular health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Jorgensen (Torben); S. Capewell (S.); E. Prescott (E.); S. Allender (S.); S. Sans (Susana); T. Zdrojewski (T.); D. de Bacquer (Dirk); J. de Sutter (Johan); O.H. Franco (Oscar); S. Løgstrup (S.); G. Volpe (Giampiero); S. Malyutina; W.M.M. Verschuren (W. M. Monique); D. Vanuzzo (Diego)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) cause 1.8 million premature (<75 years) death annually in Europe. The majority of these deaths are preventable with the most efficient and cost-effective approach being on the population level. The aim of this position paper is to assist

  3. Similar levels of diversity and population Structure in superflock and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We use DNA microsatellite loci to estimate neutral genetic diversity and the level of gene flow among populations of two cichlid species from southern Lake Victoria, Africa: the endemic and stenotopic superflock species Pundamilia nyererei and the non-endemic, widespread species Astatoreochromis alluaudi. The two ...

  4. Estimation of Potential Population Level Effects of Contaminants on Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loar, J.M.

    2001-06-11

    The objective of this project is to provide DOE with improved methods to assess risks from contaminants to wildlife populations. The current approach for wildlife risk assessment consists of comparison of contaminant exposure estimates for individual animals to literature-derived toxicity test endpoints. These test endpoints are assumed to estimate thresholds for population-level effects. Moreover, species sensitivities to contaminants is one of several criteria to be considered when selecting assessment endpoints (EPA 1997 and 1998), yet data on the sensitivities of many birds and mammals are lacking. The uncertainties associated with this approach are considerable. First, because toxicity data are not available for most potential wildlife endpoint species, extrapolation of toxicity data from test species to the species of interest is required. There is no consensus on the most appropriate extrapolation method. Second, toxicity data are represented as statistical measures (e.g., NOAEL s or LOAELs) that provide no information on the nature or magnitude of effects. The level of effect is an artifact of the replication and dosing regime employed, and does not indicate how effects might increase with increasing exposure. Consequently, slight exceedance of a LOAEL is not distinguished from greatly exceeding it. Third, the relationship of toxic effects on individuals to effects on populations is poorly estimated by existing methods. It is assumed that if the exposure of individuals exceeds levels associated with impaired reproduction, then population level effects are likely. Uncertainty associated with this assumption is large because depending on the reproductive strategy of a given species, comparable levels of reproductive impairment may result in dramatically different population-level responses. This project included several tasks to address these problems: (1) investigation of the validity of the current allometric scaling approach for interspecies extrapolation

  5. Population characteristics may reduce the levels of individual call identity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Mar Delgado

    Full Text Available Individual variability influences the demographic and evolutionary dynamics of spatially structured populations, and conversely ecological and evolutionary dynamics provide the context under which variations at the individual level occur. Therefore, it is essential to identify and characterize the importance of the different factors that may promote or hinder individual variability. Animal signaling is a prime example of a type of behavior that is largely dependent on both the features of individuals and the characteristics of the population to which they belong. After 10 years studying the dynamics of a population of a long-lived species, the eagle owl (Bubo bubo, we investigated the emergence and maintenance of traits that reveal individual identity by focusing on vocal features. We found that individuals inhabiting a high density population characterized by a relative lack of heterogeneity (in terms of prey availability and breeding success among breeding sites might be selected for reducing the levels of identity. Two non-mutually exclusive hypotheses may explain the structural call patterns we detected: (1 similarity in calls may be principally a consequence of the particular characteristics of the population; and (2 high density may encourage individuals to mimic each other's vocalizations in a cascade effect, leading to a widespread and unique communication network.

  6. Trait level analysis of multitrait population projection matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Christophe F D; Austerlitz, Frédéric; Pavard, Samuel

    2017-08-01

    In most matrix population projection models, individuals are characterized according to, usually, one or two traits such as age, stage, size or location. A broad theory of multitrait population projection matrices (MPPMs) incorporating larger number of traits was long held back by time and space computational complexity issues. As a consequence, no study has yet focused on the influence of the structure of traits describing a life-cycle on population dynamics and life-history evolution. We present here a novel vector-based MPPM building methodology that allows to computationally-efficiently model populations characterized by numerous traits with large distributions, and extend sensitivity analyses for these models. We then present a new method, the trait level analysis consisting in folding an MPPM on any of its traits to create a matrix with alternative trait structure (the number of traits and their characteristics) but similar asymptotic properties. Adding or removing one or several traits to/from the MPPM and analyzing the resulting changes in spectral properties, allows investigating the influence of the trait structure on the evolution of traits. We illustrate this by modeling a 3-trait (age, parity and fecundity) population designed to investigate the implications of parity-fertilitytrade-offs in a context of fecundity heterogeneity in humans. The trait level analysis, comparing models of the same population differing in trait structures, demonstrates that fertility selection gradients differ between cases with or without parity-fertility trade-offs. Moreover it shows that age-specific fertility has seemingly very different evolutionary significance depending on whether heterogeneity is accounted for. This is because trade-offs can vary strongly in strength and even direction depending on the trait structure used to model the population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Population Engagement and Consultation at the Local Level: Thailand Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putthasri, Weerasak; Mathurapote, Nanoot; Srisookwattana, Orapan

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization handbook on Strategizing National Health in the 21st Century has emphasized the importance of the process of population consultation on needs and expectations. According to Thailand National Health Act 2007, three innovative social tools for participatory healthy public policy process were proposed, i.e., health assembly, health impact assessment and health system statute (charter). In practice, population consultation process is required in the process of the tools implementation. Therefore, this paper aims to illustrate how local health statute implementation supports population participation and consultation at the local level. The first local health statute owned by Cha-lae sub-district in Songkla Province had been introduced in 2009. So far, there are above 500 sub-districts or "Tambon" having their own health system statutes. Tambon Administrative Organization (TAO), health and non-health sectors, community leaders and civil society seemed to be key actors or a mechanism for the local health statute. This demonstrated three crucial elements or sectors for policy development, i.e., policy maker, evidence support and society. Contents of the local health statute are wide ranged, including social determinants, risks and diseases, life style, health services, health fund, to mental and social health in regard to the local problem and context. Therefore, it needs the process of discussion and consultation to seek their common interest and expectation. Local health statute in Thailand is an example of engagement and consultation of the population for health policy. This confirmed the process of population consultation on their needs and expectation that can be implemented both at national and local levels. This is also the strategy to improve the accountability of policy makers for health impacts at all levels of policy making. The challenges of local health statute include the mechanism to maintain and ensure the engagement and

  8. Hair mercury levels in Amazonian populations: spatial distribution and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Flavia L; Gardon, Jacques

    2009-12-21

    Mercury is present in the Amazonian aquatic environments from both natural and anthropogenic sources. As a consequence, many riverside populations are exposed to methylmercury, a highly toxic organic form of mercury, because of their intense fish consumption. Many studies have analysed this exposure from different approaches since the early nineties. This review aims to systematize the information in spatial distribution, comparing hair mercury levels by studied population and Amazonian river basin, looking for exposure trends. The reviewed papers were selected from scientific databases and online libraries. We included studies with a direct measure of hair mercury concentrations in a sample size larger than 10 people, without considering the objectives, approach of the study or mercury speciation. The results are presented in tables and maps by river basin, displaying hair mercury levels and specifying the studied population and health impact, if any. The majority of the studies have been carried out in communities from the central Amazonian regions, particularly on the Tapajós River basin. The results seem quite variable; hair mercury means range from 1.1 to 34.2 microg/g. Most studies did not show any significant difference in hair mercury levels by gender or age. Overall, authors emphasized fish consumption frequency as the main risk factor of exposure. The most studied adverse health effect is by far the neurological performance, especially motricity. However, it is not possible to conclude on the relation between hair mercury levels and health impact in the Amazonian situation because of the relatively small number of studies. Hair mercury levels in the Amazonian regions seem to be very heterogenic, depending on several factors. There is no obvious spatial trend and there are many areas that have never been studied. Taking into account the low mercury levels currently handled as acceptable, the majority of the Amazonian populations can be considered exposed

  9. Hair mercury levels in Amazonian populations: spatial distribution and trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri Flavia L

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is present in the Amazonian aquatic environments from both natural and anthropogenic sources. As a consequence, many riverside populations are exposed to methylmercury, a highly toxic organic form of mercury, because of their intense fish consumption. Many studies have analysed this exposure from different approaches since the early nineties. This review aims to systematize the information in spatial distribution, comparing hair mercury levels by studied population and Amazonian river basin, looking for exposure trends. Methods The reviewed papers were selected from scientific databases and online libraries. We included studies with a direct measure of hair mercury concentrations in a sample size larger than 10 people, without considering the objectives, approach of the study or mercury speciation. The results are presented in tables and maps by river basin, displaying hair mercury levels and specifying the studied population and health impact, if any. Results The majority of the studies have been carried out in communities from the central Amazonian regions, particularly on the Tapajós River basin. The results seem quite variable; hair mercury means range from 1.1 to 34.2 μg/g. Most studies did not show any significant difference in hair mercury levels by gender or age. Overall, authors emphasized fish consumption frequency as the main risk factor of exposure. The most studied adverse health effect is by far the neurological performance, especially motricity. However, it is not possible to conclude on the relation between hair mercury levels and health impact in the Amazonian situation because of the relatively small number of studies. Conclusions Hair mercury levels in the Amazonian regions seem to be very heterogenic, depending on several factors. There is no obvious spatial trend and there are many areas that have never been studied. Taking into account the low mercury levels currently handled as acceptable, the

  10. Level of emotional awareness in the general French population: effects of gender, age, and education level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandrino, Jean-Louis; Baracca, Margaret; Antoine, Pascal; Paget, Virginie; Bydlowski, Sarah; Carton, Solange

    2013-01-01

    The Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (LEAS) developed by Lane et al. (1990) measures the ability of a subject to discriminate his or her own emotional state and that of others. The scale is based on a cognitive-developmental model in which emotional awareness increases in a similar fashion to intellectual functions. Because studies performed using North American and German populations have demonstrated an effect of age, gender, and level of education on the ability to differentiate emotional states, our study attempts to evaluate whether these factors have the same effects in a general French population. 750 volunteers (506 female, 244 male), who were recruited from three regions of France (Lille, Montpellier, Paris), completed the LEAS. The sample was divided into five age groups and three education levels. The results of the LEAS scores for self and others and the total score showed a difference in the level of emotional awareness for different age groups, by gender and education level. A higher emotional level was observed for younger age groups, suggesting that emotional awareness depends on the cultural context and generational societal teachings. Additionally, the level of emotional awareness was higher in women than in men and lower in individuals with less education. This result might be explained by an educational bias linked to gender and higher education whereby expressive ability is reinforced. In addition, given the high degree of variability in previously observed scores in the French population, we propose a standard based on our French sample.

  11. Monitoring low density populations: a perspective on what level of population decline we can truly detect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lurz, P. W. W.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of mammal species is an important part in detecting changes in their status. Efforts are based on a variety of direct and indirect methods and many low density populations are monitored through field signs. We present data on the endangered European red squirrel from Kidland Forest in the UK. We used cone transects to both record changes in seed availability and to monitor population trends. We examined the difficulty of accurately detecting population change when populations are low and field signs are patchily distributed. Current efforts would be sufficient to detect significant population declines of 50-75% in years with a modest squirrel population but not when they fall below one squirrel for every 20 ha of forest. The findings emphasise that monitoring aims have to be clearly defined with an awareness and understanding of what level of change the adopted methodological approach can reliably detect. We propose that mammal monitoring schemes need to be based on a pilot scheme to determine effect size and planned accordingly.

  12. YKL-40 levels and atrial fibrillation in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marott, Sarah C W; Benn, Marianne; Johansen, Julia S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is associated with inflammation. In contrast to inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen produced in the liver, YKL-40 is produced at the site of inflammation including in the myocardium. We hypothesized that elevated plasma YKL-40 levels a...... individuals from the cross-sectional Copenhagen General Population Study including 337 cases with atrial fibrillation. A YKL-40 level >95% percentile (>204μg/L) versus 95% percentile versus...... associate with increased risk of atrial fibrillation. METHOD AND RESULTS: We measured plasma YKL-40 in 8731 participants from the prospective Copenhagen City Heart Study including 896 individuals who developed atrial fibrillation during up to 18years of follow-up. Additionally, we measured YKL-40 in 6621...

  13. The level of health education in the Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, Magdalena; Chudek, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    The study assessed factors influencing awareness of Poles concerning lifestyle factors that affect development of obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). A questionnaire survey covering awareness of lifestyle factors performed by general practitioners in 37,557 unselected patients. 96.1% of respondents believed that lifestyle has an impact on the occurrence of CVDs, especially: tobacco smoking (91.4%), excessive intake of fat (81.3%), alcohol (67.5%), salt (64.9%), and stress (64.9%). 79.0% respondents believed the smoking cessation, 77.5% weight loss and 66.8% healthy diet are most important to prevent diseases. Additionally, the belief in the need for an early weight reduction decreased with increasing BMI (82.9% with normal weight vs. 77.5% overweight and 70.4% obese). The most common source of health education was a physician (75.8%), the mass media, such as television and the press (62.0% and 64.8%, respectively), less often were educational materials (37.8%) and books (20.3 %), the Internet (3.8%) and radio (0.8%). Younger respondents presented a higher level of awareness about all analysed aspects of healthy lifestyle. The multiple regression analysis revealed that low education level and rural residence are the most important factors decreasing awareness of the lifestyle effect on health. 1. The level of knowledge about non-pharmacological methods of preventing lifestyle diseases in the Polish population is high except of the role of physical activity and daily vegetables consumption. This, however, has no impact on reducing the percentage of overweight and obese people and on increasing the tendency to pursue lifestyle changes. 2. Frustrating is the fact that more than one fifth of the study population is unaware that excessive weight reduction prevents development of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, the convince to early weight decreases with increasing BMI. 3. The highest level of the knowledge among younger subjects reflect

  14. High dietary fiber intake prevents stroke at a population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiglia, Edoardo; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Caffi, Sandro; Boschetti, Giovanni; Grasselli, Carla; Saugo, Mario; Giordano, Nunzia; Rapisarda, Valentina; Spinella, Paolo; Palatini, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    This research was aimed at clarifying whether high dietary fiber intake has an impact on incidence and risk of stroke at a population level. In 1647 unselected subjects, dietary fiber intake (DFI) was detected in a 12-year population-based study, using other dietary variables, anagraphics, biometrics, blood pressure, heart rate, blood lipids, glucose, insulin, uricaemia, fibrinogenaemia, erytrosedimentation rate, diabetes, insulin resistance, smoking, pulmonary disease and left ventricular hypertrophy as covariables. In adjusted Cox models, high DFI reduced the risk of stroke. In analysis based on quintiles of fiber intake adjusted for confounders, HR for incidence of stroke was lower when the daily intake of soluble fiber was >25 g or that of insoluble fiber was >47 g. In multivariate analyses, using these values as cut-off of DFI, the risk of stroke was lower in those intaking more that the cut-off of soluble (HR 0.31, 0.17-0.55) or insoluble (HR 0.35, 0.19-0.63) fiber. Incidence of stroke was also lower (-50%, p dietary DFI is inversely and independently associated to incidence and risk of stroke in general population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  15. Dental lead levels in the Galician population, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, F; Pérez, M L; Facio, A; Villanueva, E; Tojo, R; Gil, A

    1994-11-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate tooth lead concentrations in a Spanish population living in Coruña, Spain. A total of 220 teeth were analysed using a microwave oven digestion procedure and lead content was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Samples were classified according to age, sex, type of tooth, cause of extraction and place of residence. Tooth lead levels followed a logarithmic-normal distribution. The general geometric mean was 10.36 micrograms/g of tooth. There was a significant increase in teeth lead levels with advancing age. Permanent teeth showed higher values (13.09 +/- 1.07 micrograms/g, mean +/- S.E.M.) than deciduous teeth (3.96 +/- 1.07 micrograms/g). However, no differences were found between sexes. High lead concentrations were detected in pathological teeth, particularly in those with periodontal pathology, suggesting a relation between lead levels and dental disease. Nevertheless, teeth with caries did not show any significant lead increase. People living in urban areas of the coast had the highest lead teeth contamination. This is the first study in Spain which describes the tooth lead levels as a marker of lead exposure.

  16. Increased copeptin levels in metabolic syndrome from a Romanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vintilă, M; Gheorghiu, M L; Caragheorgheopol, A; Baculescu, N; Lichiardopol, C; Badiu, C; Coculescu, M; Grigorescu, F; Poiană, C

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is secreted under conditions of water deprivation. Since AVP has a low half-life in the plasma, the C-terminal fragment of AVP-precursor (copeptin) was used to estimate the AVP levels. High copeptin levels increase the risk for the development of diabetes mellitus. Aim: This study was aimed to measure copeptin levels in the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Romanians using a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Methods and results: Patients prone to present MetS (n = 63) were compared to controls (n = 42). In the MetS group, the syndrome was confirmed in 93.6%. Affected patients displayed 85.7% obesity and insulin resistance (HOMAIR of 4.9 ± 0.4 versus 1.1 ± 0.8 in controls). Low HDL-cholesterol was less represented (47.5%). Copeptin levels were 0.6 ± 0.0 in MetS versus 0.42 ± 0.0 ng/ mL in controls (P copeptin (0.79 to 1.83 ng/ mL) was associated with MetS, P copeptin was equally explained by MetS or obesity (P copeptin and MetS or its components. In the light of epidemiological data, indicating that more than 50% of the European population has a lower daily water intake and a fraction of 25% displaying high copeptin, our data further sustained that copeptin may be a good biomarker for MetS and/ or obesity, which should be further investigated with other members of the osmoregulation pathway at both pathogenesis and genetic levels.

  17. Population levels of wellbeing and the association with social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A W; Kelly, G; Dal Grande, E; Kelly, D; Marin, T; Hey, N; Burke, K J; Licinio, J

    2017-07-03

    This research investigates wellbeing at the population level across demographic, social and health indicators and assesses the association between wellbeing and social capital. Data from a South Australian monthly chronic disease/risk factor surveillance system of randomly selected adults (mean age 48.7 years; range 16-99) from 2014/5 (n = 5551) were used. Univariable analyses compared wellbeing/social capital indicators, socio-demographic, risk factors and chronic conditions. Multi-nominal logistic regression modelling, adjusting for multiple covariates was used to simultaneously estimate odds ratios for good wellbeing (reference category) versus neither good nor poor, and good wellbeing versus poor wellbeing. 48.6% were male, mean age 48.7 (sd 18.3), 54.3% scored well on all four of the wellbeing indicators, and positive social capital indicators ranged from 93.1% for safety to 50.8% for control over decisions. The higher level of social capital corresponded with the good wellbeing category. Modeling showed higher odds ratios for all social capital variables for the lowest level of wellbeing. These higher odds ratios remained after adjusting for confounders. The relationship between wellbeing, resilience and social capital highlights areas for increased policy focus.

  18. Association of homocysteine levels with blood lead levels and micronutrients in the US general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Mi; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Bae, Sang-Geun; Lee, Seon-Hwa; Kim, Sun-Young; Lee, Duk-Hee

    2012-11-01

    Even though several epidemiological studies have observed positive associations between blood lead levels and homocysteine, no study has examined whether this association differs by the levels of micronutrients, such as folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12, which are involved in the metabolism of homocysteine. In this study, we examined the interactions between micronutrients and blood lead on homocysteine levels. This study was performed with 4089 adults aged ≥20 years old in the US general population using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004. There were significant or marginally significant interactions between micronutrients and blood lead levels on mean homocysteine levels. Positive associations between blood lead and homocysteine were clearly observed among subjects with low levels of folate or low vitamin B6 (p-trend 15 µmol/L) as the outcome, there were similar patterns of interaction, though p-values for each interaction failed to reach statistical significance. In the current study, the association between blood lead and homocysteine differed based on the levels of folate, vitamin B6, or vitamin B12 present in the blood. It may be important to keep sufficient levels of these micronutrients to prevent the possible harmful effects of lead exposure on homocysteine levels.

  19. Social learning may lead to population level conformity without individual level frequency bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Kimmo; Cownden, Daniel; Strimling, Pontus

    2017-12-11

    A requirement of culture, whether animal or human, is some degree of conformity of behavior within populations. Researchers of gene-culture coevolution have suggested that population level conformity may result from frequency-biased social learning: individuals sampling multiple role models and preferentially adopting the majority behavior in the sample. When learning from a single role model, frequency-bias is not possible. We show why a population-level trend, either conformist or anticonformist, may nonetheless be almost inevitable in a population of individuals that learn through social enhancement, that is, using observations of others' behavior to update their own probability of using a behavior in the future. The exact specification of individuals' updating rule determines the direction of the trend. These results offer a new interpretation of previous findings from simulations of social enhancement in combination with reinforcement learning, and demonstrate how results of dynamical models may strongly depend on seemingly innocuous choices of model specifications, and how important it is to obtain empirical data on which to base such choices.

  20. Recommended vitamin D levels in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsavsky, Mariela; Rozas Moreno, Pedro; Becerra Fernández, Antonio; Luque Fernández, Inés; Quesada Gómez, José Manuel; Ávila Rubio, Verónica; García Martín, Antonia; Cortés Berdonces, María; Naf Cortés, Silvia; Romero Muñoz, Manuel; Reyes García, Rebeca; Jódar Gimeno, Esteban; Muñoz Torres, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    To provide recommendations based on evidence on the management of vitaminD deficiency in the general population. Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. Recommendations were formulated using the GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to describe both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (Pubmed) using the term VitaminD and the name of each issue. Papers in English and Spanish with publication date before 17 March 2016 were included. Recommendations were jointly discussed by the Working Group. This document summarizes the data about vitaminD deficiency in terms of prevalence, etiology, screening indications, adequate levels and effects of supplementation on bone and non-skeletal health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Response of marine viral populations to a nutrient induced phytoplankton bloom at different pCO2 levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-A. Sandaa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available During the PeECE III mesocosm experiment in 2005 we investigated how the virioplankton community responded to increased levels of nutrients (N and P and CO2. We applied a combination of flow cytometry, Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and degenerate PCR primers to categorize and quantify individual viral populations, and to investigate their temporal dynamics. Species specific and degenerate primers enabled us to identify two specific large dsDNA viruses, EhV and CeV, infecting the haptophytes Emiliania huxleyi and Crysochromulina ericina, respectively. Some of the viral populations detected and enumerated by flow cytometry did not respond to altered CO2-levels, but the abundance of EhV and an unidentified dsDNA virus decreased with increasing CO2 levels. Our results thus indicate that CO2 conditions, or the related change in pH, may affect the marine pelagic food web at the viral level. Our results also demonstrate that in order to unravel ecological problems as how CO2 and nutrient levels affect the relationship between marine algal viruses and their hosts, we need to continue the effort to develop molecular markers used to identify both hosts and viruses.

  2. Response of marine viral populations to a nutrient induced phytoplankton bloom at different pCO2 levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, J. B.; Larsen, A.; Thyrhaug, R.; Bratbak, G.; Sandaa, R.-A.

    2008-04-01

    During the PeECE III mesocosm experiment in 2005 we investigated how the virioplankton community responded to increased levels of nutrients (N and P) and CO2. We applied a combination of flow cytometry, Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and degenerate PCR primers to categorize and quantify individual viral populations, and to investigate their temporal dynamics. Species specific and degenerate primers enabled us to identify two specific large dsDNA viruses, EhV and CeV, infecting the haptophytes Emiliania huxleyi and Crysochromulina ericina, respectively. Some of the viral populations detected and enumerated by flow cytometry did not respond to altered CO2-levels, but the abundance of EhV and an unidentified dsDNA virus decreased with increasing CO2 levels. Our results thus indicate that CO2 conditions, or the related change in pH, may affect the marine pelagic food web at the viral level. Our results also demonstrate that in order to unravel ecological problems as how CO2 and nutrient levels affect the relationship between marine algal viruses and their hosts, we need to continue the effort to develop molecular markers used to identify both hosts and viruses.

  3. Level Specific CE-Chirp® BAEP's: A new faster technique in neuromonitoring cochlear nerve during cerebello-pontine angle tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Di Scipio, MD

    2018-03-01

    Conclusions: We herein confirm that LS CE-Chirp® BAEP's provide a fast feedback to surgeons regarding acoustic pathways function, helping them during skull base tumor removal in the attempt to hearing preservation when it is socially useful in the preoperative evaluation.

  4. Perfil dos níveis pressóricos e glicêmicos de funcionários de instituições públicas hospitalares de Fortaleza-Ceará: profile of the public hospitals' staff in the city of Fortaleza-CE Perfil de los niveles de glucosa e de tensión arterial de trabajadores de hospitales públicos de Fortaleza-CE Glucose and blood pressure level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Maria Coelho Damasceno

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se identificar o perfil dos níveis pressóricos e glicêmicos de funcionários de dois hospitais públicos de Fortaleza-CE. Aferiram-se os valores em 506 sujeitos utilizando glicosímetro e esfigmomanômetro aneróide, de setembro de 2003 a abril de 2004. As idades variaram entre 18 e 71 anos; 79,6% eram mulheres; 49,3% pré-hipertensos; 19,5% hipertensos; 7,9% com glicemia > 140 mg/dl; 38,5% com alto risco para DM2. A PA foi mais elevada nos homens (pEl objetivo fué identificar el perfil de los niveles de glucosa y de tensión arterial de trabajadores de dos hospitales públicos de Fortaleza-CE. Se tomarón los valores en 506 personas con el Sistema de Medición de Glucosa en sangre y esfigmomanómetro aneroide, de septiembre de 2003 a abril de 2004. Las edades cambiaron entre 18 a 71 años; 79,6% mujeres; 49,3% tenian prehipertensión arterial; 19,5% hipertensión arterial; 7,9% con glucosa mas de 140 mg/dl; 38,5% con alto riesgo para DM2. La tensión arterial fue más elevada en hombres (pIt was objectified to identify the profile of the glucose and blood pressure in two public hospitals' staff in Fortaleza - CE . From September 2003 to April 2004, were checked 506 individuals with Blood Glucose Monitoring System and aneroid sphygmomanometer. The results showed that the individuals were between 18 and 71 years old; 79,6% were women; 49,3 were classified as prehypertensive; 19.5% as hypertensive; 7.9% had glucose level above 140mg/dl and 38.5% had high chances of developing DM2. High blood pressure was higher in men (p<0.001; the illiterates/literates ( p=0.031 and the married and widowed (p=0.029. This high blood pressure was associated with age (p<0.001; As to the glucose levels, a statistically meaningful association with age and high glucose (p=0.006 was verified. It follows that the studied population, especially the elderly and low educated, need educational actions which help to change their life habits and prevent illnesses

  5. Improving CE with PDM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wognum, P.M.; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Weber, F; Pawar, K.S.; Thoben, K.D.

    2003-01-01

    The concept of Concurrent Engineering (CE) centers around the management of information so that the right information will be at the right place at the right time and in the right format. Product Data Management (PDM) aims to support a CE way of working in product development processes. In specific

  6. Population levels of sport participation: implications for sport policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eime, R M; Harvey, J T; Charity, M J; Payne, W R

    2016-08-09

    Participation in sport can contribute to health-enhancing levels of leisure-time physical activity. There are recent reports that participation in sport in Australia is decreasing. However, these studies are limited to ages 15 years and over. This study integrates sports club membership data from five popular team sports and investigates sport participation across the lifespan (4-100 years) by sex and region (metropolitan/non-metropolitan). Overall participant numbers per annum increased from 414,167 in 2010 to 465,403 in 2012 corresponding to a rise in the proportion of Victorian's participating in these sports from 7.5 % in 2010 to 8.3 % in 2012. The highest proportion of participants was in the 10-14 year age range, with participation rates of 36 % in 2010 and 40 % in 2012. There was a considerably lower participation rate in the 15-19 year age group compared to the 10-14 age group, in all three years studied, and the decline continued progressively with increasing age. Male and female age profiles of participation were generally similar in shape, but the female peak at age 10-14 was sharper than for the males, and conversely there were very few 4 year old female participants. Participation rates were generally higher in non-metropolitan than metropolitan areas; the difference increased with increasing age from 4 to 34 years, then steadily declined, reaching parity at around 60 years of age. It is a positive sign that participation in these popular sports increased by over 50,000 participants from 2010 to 2012. Large proportions of the population aged 5-14 participate in club based sport. Participation rates decline sharply in late adolescence, particularly for females, and while this may not be a concern from a broad health perspective so long as they transition into other forms of physical activity, it is certainly a matter of concern for the sport sector. It is recommended that sport policy places a higher priority on grass-roots participation and

  7. Organism and population-level ecological models for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological risk assessment typically focuses on animal populations as endpoints for regulatory ecotoxicology. Scientists at USEPA are developing models for animal populations exposed to a wide range of chemicals from pesticides to emerging contaminants. Modeled taxa include aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates, fish, amphibians, and birds, and employ a wide range of methods, from matrix-based projection models to mechanistic bioenergetics models and spatially explicit population models. not applicable

  8. Towards population-level conservation in the critically endangered Antarctic blue whale: the number and distribution of their populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Catherine R. M.; Beheregaray, Luciano B.; Möller, Luciana M.

    2016-03-01

    Population-level conservation is required to prevent biodiversity loss within a species, but it first necessitates determining the number and distribution of populations. Many whale populations are still depleted due to 20th century whaling. Whales are one of the most logistically difficult and expensive animals to study because of their mobility, pelagic lifestyle and often remote habitat. We tackle the question of population structure in the Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) - a critically endangered subspecies and the largest extant animal - by capitalizing on the largest genetic dataset to date for Antarctic blue whales. We found evidence of three populations that are sympatric in the Antarctic feeding grounds and likely occupy separate breeding grounds. Our study adds to knowledge of population structure in the Antarctic blue whale. Future research should invest in locating the breeding grounds and migratory routes of Antarctic blue whales through satellite telemetry to confirm their population structure and allow population-level conservation.

  9. Expanding the Cultural Adaptation Framework for Population-Level Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Nancy A

    2017-08-01

    Attention to cultural diversity and cultural adaptation of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) has been a longstanding priority in prevention science. However, EBIs for diverse populations present several challenges for broad dissemination and population impact. The five papers in this special issue underscore some of these challenges and offer new ways of thinking and recommendations for the next generation of type 2 translation research. This commentary underscores three broad recommendations, including the need for a more expanded conceptualization and empirical understanding of the core tension between fidelity and adaptation; greater focus on the systems of care that deliver EBIs to culturally diverse populations, including increased attention to such issues as access and engagement; and greater flexibility in strategies to adapt and evaluate interventions within and across communities and settings that serve diverse populations. By offering exemplars and suggestions to address these challenges, these papers collectively help to realign research on cultural adaptation with its ultimate goal of reducing health disparities by ensuring greater access, impact, and equity of prevention services in a dynamic, multicultural society. However, other fundamental challenges remain unaddressed, including the need to reduce inequalities that exist in the health, education, social service, and justice systems that will ultimately support broad diffusion of EBIs for diverse populations.

  10. Population-level analysis of gut microbiome variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falony, Gwen; Joossens, Marie; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Wang, Jun; Darzi, Youssef; Faust, Karoline; Kurilshchikov, Aleksandr; Bonder, Marc Jan; Valles-Colomer, Mireia; Vandeputte, Doris; Tito, Raul Y.; Chaffron, Samuel; Rymenans, Leen; Verspecht, Chlo; De Sutter, Lise; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; D'hoe, Kevin; Jonckheere, Karl; Homola, Daniel; Garcia, Roberto; Tigchelaar, Ettje F.; Eeckhaudt, Linda; Fu, Jingyuan; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Wijmenga, Cisca; Raes, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Fecal microbiome variation in the average, healthy population has remained under-investigated. Here, we analyzed two independent, extensively phenotyped cohorts: the Belgian Flemish Gut Flora Project (FGFP; discovery cohort; N = 1106) and the Dutch LifeLines-DEEP study (LLDeep; replication; N =

  11. Multiple Stressor Differential Tolerances: Possible Implications at the Population Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venâncio, Cátia; Ribeiro, Rui; Soares, Amadeu; Lopes, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The probability of the most sensitive genotypes being eliminated from a population due to a contaminant pulse--genetic erosion--is negatively associated to the within-genotype variation. A sensitive genotype with a small phenotypic variation would be more prone to be lost-a critically sensitive genotype. Furthermore, natural populations inhabiting contaminated sites are usually exposed to several pollutants. Such co- or sequential exposure can have severe effects if at least some tolerant clonal lineages surviving one contaminant are sensitive to the others. Such an inverse relationship coupled with a low within-genotype variation potentially enhances genetic erosion. Accordingly, this study evaluated co-tolerance and the occurrence of clonal lineages critically sensitive to 48-hours lethal exposures of copper, zinc, cobalt, and chromium among eight clonal lineages of the cladocerans Daphnia longispina. Median lethal concentrations (LC50) of each metal were found to have the potential to provoke genetic erosion. Pairwise comparisons of LC50, from the eight clonal lineages, revealed neither negative nor positive correlations (r ≤ |0.56|; p ≥ 0.18), but inversely sensitive clonal lineages were found for all pairs of metals. Therefore, besides having the potential to eliminate critically sensitive clonal lineages in a first intermediately lethal pulse, all tested metals may provoke further losses of clonal lineages in an already genetically eroded population.

  12. Systematics and Population Level Analysis of Anopheles darlingi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conn JE

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A new phylogenetic analysis of the Nyssorhynchus subgenus (Danoff-Burg and Conn, unpub. data using six data sets {morphological (all life stages; scanning electron micrographs of eggs; nuclear ITS2 sequences; mitochondrial COII, ND2 and ND6 sequences} revealed different topologies when each data set was analyzed separately but no heterogeneity between the data sets using the arn test. Consequently, the most accurate estimate of the phylogeny was obtained when all the data were combined. This new phylogeny supports a monophyletic Nyssorhynchus subgenus but both previously recognized sections in the subgenus (Albimanus and Argyritarsis were demonstrated to be paraphyletic relative to each other and four of the seven clades included species previously placed in both sections. One of these clades includes both Anopheles darlingi and An. albimanus, suggesting that the ability to vector malaria effectively may have originated once in this subgenus. Both a conserved (315 bp and a variable (425 bp region of the mitochondrial COI gene from 15 populations of An. darlingi from Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, French Guiana, Peru and Venezuela were used to examine the evolutionary history of this species and to test several analytical assumptions. Results demonstrated (1 parsimony analysis is equally informative compared to distance analysis using NJ; (2 clades or clusters are more strongly supported when these two regions are combined compared to either region separately; (3 evidence (in the form of remnants of older haplotype lineages for two colonization events; and (4 significant genetic divergence within the population from Peixoto de Azevedo (State of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The oldest lineage includes populations from Peixoto, Boa Vista (State of Roraima and Dourado (State of São Paulo.

  13. Levels of Yb174 populated in average resonance neutron capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granja, C. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz; Pospisil, S. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Chrien, R.E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 119 73 (United States); Telezhnikov, S.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141-980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2005-08-22

    The primary {gamma} rays and energy levels in Yb174 were investigated in average resonance neutron capture using tailored neutron beams at 2 and 24 keV and a pair spectrometer at the High Flux Reactor at Brookhaven. A thermal neutron beam was also used. Nearly 300 levels with spin up to J=4 are reported below 4 MeV. The distribution of radiative strength in this nucleus was derived and is analyzed with a giant dipole resonance and single-particle strength models. The neutron binding energy in Yb174 was determined at 7464.4(3) keV.

  14. Distribution of level populations for a three-level system in resonance interaction with three strong fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanov, Victor P.; Maltseva, Julia V.

    2000-01-01

    A stationary distribution of populations in a three-level quantum system interacting with three intense monochromatic fields resonant to two allowed and one forbidden transition is determined for three possible configurations of the considered system. The obtained algebraic expressions for populations of levels are exact within the frameworks of RWA and dependent on the phases of fields even in the limit of strong field intensities. The latter circumstance causes the absorption line profile to be noisy due to random phase modulation of fields. The sets of parameters of the system and field are founded at which the populations of all the levels are equal to 1/3 also with the regions where a resonance-like dependence of level populations on the difference of field phases takes place.

  15. Low-level waste disposal in highly populated areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, E.; McCombie, C.; Issler, H. [NAGRA-Swiss National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste, Baden (Switzerland)

    1989-11-01

    Nuclear-generated electricity supplies almost 40% of the demand in Switzerland (the rest being hydro-power). Allowing for a certain reserve and assuming an operational life-time of 40 years for each reactor, and taking into account wastes from decommissioning and from medicine, industry and research, the total amount of low-level radioactive waste to be disposed of is about 175,000 m{sup 3}. Since there are no unpopulated areas in Switzerland, and since Swiss Federal Law specifies that the safety of disposal may not depend upon supervision of the repository, no shallow-land burial has been foreseen, even for short-lived low-level waste. Instead, geological disposal in a mined cavern system with access through a horizontal tunnel was selected as the best way of meeting the requirements and ensuring the necessary public acceptance.

  16. Summary Report: Risk Assessment Forum Technical Workshop on Population-level Ecological Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008 technical workshop regarding development of additional guidelines or best practices for planning, implementing and interpreting ecological risk assessments that involve population-level assessment endpoints.

  17. [Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on the Growth and Ce Uptake of Maize Grown in Ce-contaminated Soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Guo, Weil; Ma, Peng-kun; Pan, Liang; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-15

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus aggregatum (GA) and Funneliformis mosseae (FM) on AM colonization rate, biomass, nutrient uptake, C: N: P stoichiometric and Ce uptake and transport by maize (Zea mays L.) grown in soils with different levels of Ce-contaminated (100, 500 and 1000 mg x kg(-1)). The aim was to provide basic data and technical support for the treatment of soils contaminated by rare earth elements. The results indicated that symbiotic associations were successfully established between the two isolates and maize, and the average AM colonization rate ranged from 7. 12% to 74.47%. The increasing concentration of Ce in soils significantly decreased the mycorrhizal colonization rate, biomass, nutrition contents and transport rate of Ce from root to shoot of maize, and significantly increased C: P and N: P ratios and Ce contents in shoot and root of maize. Both AM fungi inoculations promoted the growth of maize, but the promoting role of FM was more significant than that of GA in severe Ce-contaminated soils. There were no significant differences in the growth of maize between two AM fungi in mild and moderate Ce-contaminated soils. Inoculation with AM fungi significantly improved nutritional status of maize by increasing nutrient uptake and decreasing C: N: P ratios. GA was more efficient than FM in enhancing nutrient uptake in mild and moderate Ce-contaminated soils, while FM was more efficient in severe Ce-contaminated soils. Moreover, inoculation with AM fungi significantly increased Ce contents of shoot and root in mild Ce-contaminated soils, but had no significant effect on Ce contents of maize in moderate and severe Ce-contaminated soils, and promoted the transport of Ce from root to shoot. The experiment demonstrates that AM fungi can alleviate toxic effects of Ce on plants and have a potential role in the phytoremediation of soils contaminated by rare earth elements.

  18. Population Exposure Estimates in Proximity to Nuclear Power Plants, Country-Level Aggregates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Population Exposure Estimates in Proximity to Nuclear Power Plants, Country-Level Aggregates data set consists of country-level estimates of total, urban, and...

  19. Aggression levels in treatment seeking inpatients with alcohol-related problems compared to levels in the general population in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerevich, József; Bácskai, Erika; Czobor, Pál

    2007-08-01

    Association between aggression and heavy alcohol use is documented in the literature in various disparate samples and settings. Comparison of trait aggression levels using a uniform methodology across different samples is almost entirely lacking. This study compared trait aggression levels of treated inpatients with severe alcohol-related problems with those of a nationally representative sample of the general adult population using the same methodology. Results indicated that in the patient population the trait aggression levels were substantially higher than in the general population. Because several studies have demonstrated that aggressive personality traits are closely linked with violence after drinking alcohol, our results further highlight the importance of treatment programs in this at-risk population. From a methodological perspective, the higher trait aggression level of inpatients with alcohol-related problems compared with the general population supports the assumption that the underrepresentation of alcoholics in the population surveys may restrict the range in the severity of alcohol use and dependence, and may therefore produce severely biased results in such studies.

  20. Emergence of cytotoxic resistance in cancer cell populations: Single-cell mechanisms and population-level consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzi, Tommaso [Centre de Mathématiques et de Leurs Applications, ENS Cachan, CNRS, Cachan 94230 Cedex, France & INRIA-Paris-Rocquencourt, MAMBA Team, Domaine de Voluceau, BP105, 78153 Le Chesnay Cedex (France); Chisholm, Rebecca H. [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Lorz, Alexander; Neves de Almeida, Luís; Clairambault, Jean [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); INRIA-Paris-Rocquencourt, MAMBA Team, Domaine de Voluceau, BP105, 78153 Le Chesnay Cedex (France); Larsen, Annette K.; Escargueil, Alexandre [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, F-75005, Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 938, Laboratory of “Cancer Biology and Therapeutics”, F-75012, Paris (France)

    2016-06-08

    We formulate an individual-based model and a population model of phenotypic evolution, under cytotoxic drugs, in a cancer cell population structured by the expression levels of survival-potential and proliferation-potential. We apply these models to a recently studied experimental system. Our results suggest that mechanisms based on fundamental laws of biology can reversibly push an actively-proliferating, and drug-sensitive, cell population to transition into a weakly-proliferative and drug-tolerant state, which will eventually facilitate the emergence of more potent, proliferating and drug-tolerant cells.

  1. Ecological interactions affecting population-level responses to chemical stress in Mesocyclops leuckarti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Devdutt; Hommen, Udo; Schäffer, Andreas; Preuss, Thomas G

    2014-10-01

    Higher tiers of ecological risk assessment (ERA) consider population and community-level endpoints. At the population level, the phenomenon of density dependence is one of the most important ecological processes that influence population dynamics. In this study, we investigated how different mechanisms of density dependence would influence population-level ERA of the cyclopoid copepod Mesocyclops leuckarti under toxicant exposure. We used a combined approach of laboratory experiments and individual-based modelling. An individual-based model was developed for M. leuckarti to simulate population dynamics under triphenyltin exposure based on individual-level ecological and toxicological data from laboratory experiments. The study primarily aimed to-(1) determine which life-cycle processes, based on feeding strategies, are most significant in determining density dependence (2) explore how these mechanisms of density dependence affect extrapolation from individual-level effects to the population level under toxicant exposure. Model simulations showed that cannibalism of nauplii that were already stressed by TPT exposure contributed to synergistic effects of biotic and abiotic factors and led to a twofold stress being exerted on the nauplii, thereby resulting in a higher population vulnerability compared to the scenario without cannibalism. Our results suggest that in population-level risk assessment, it is easy to underestimate toxicity unless underlying ecological interactions including mechanisms of population-level density regulation are considered. This study is an example of how a combined approach of experiments and mechanistic modelling can lead to a thorough understanding of ecological processes in ecotoxicology and enable a more realistic ERA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene flow among populations of two rare co-occurring fern species differing in ploidy level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bucharová

    Full Text Available Differences in ploidy levels among different fern species have a vast influence on their mating system, their colonization ability and on the gene flow among populations. Differences in the colonization abilities of species with different ploidy levels are well known: tetraploids, in contrast to diploids, are able to undergo intra-gametophytic selfing. Because fertilization is a post-dispersal process in ferns, selfing results in better colonization abilities in tetraploids because of single spore colonization. Considerably less is known about the gene flow among populations of different ploidy levels. The present study examines two rare fern species that differ in ploidy. While it has already been confirmed that tetraploid species are better at colonizing, the present study focuses on the gene flow among existing populations. We analyzed the genetic structure of a set of populations in a 10×10 km study region using isoenzymes. Genetic variation in tetraploid species is distributed mainly among populations; the genetic distance between populations is correlated with the geographical distance, and larger populations host more genetic diversity than smaller populations. In the diploid species, most variability is partitioned within populations; the genetic distance is not related to geographic distance, and the genetic diversity of populations is not related to the population size. This suggests that in tetraploid species, which undergo selfing, gene flow is limited. In contrast, in the diploid species, which experience outcrossing, gene flow is extensive and the whole system behaves as one large population. Our results suggest that in ferns, the ability to colonize new habitats and the gene flow among existing populations are affected by the mating system.

  3. Gene flow among populations of two rare co-occurring fern species differing in ploidy level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharová, Anna; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Differences in ploidy levels among different fern species have a vast influence on their mating system, their colonization ability and on the gene flow among populations. Differences in the colonization abilities of species with different ploidy levels are well known: tetraploids, in contrast to diploids, are able to undergo intra-gametophytic selfing. Because fertilization is a post-dispersal process in ferns, selfing results in better colonization abilities in tetraploids because of single spore colonization. Considerably less is known about the gene flow among populations of different ploidy levels. The present study examines two rare fern species that differ in ploidy. While it has already been confirmed that tetraploid species are better at colonizing, the present study focuses on the gene flow among existing populations. We analyzed the genetic structure of a set of populations in a 10×10 km study region using isoenzymes. Genetic variation in tetraploid species is distributed mainly among populations; the genetic distance between populations is correlated with the geographical distance, and larger populations host more genetic diversity than smaller populations. In the diploid species, most variability is partitioned within populations; the genetic distance is not related to geographic distance, and the genetic diversity of populations is not related to the population size. This suggests that in tetraploid species, which undergo selfing, gene flow is limited. In contrast, in the diploid species, which experience outcrossing, gene flow is extensive and the whole system behaves as one large population. Our results suggest that in ferns, the ability to colonize new habitats and the gene flow among existing populations are affected by the mating system.

  4. Unmet Health Care Needs of People with Disabilities: Population Level Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Mary Ann; Jarzynowska, Anna; Shortt, S. E. D.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined population level data on unmet needs for adults with physical, sensory and cognitive disabilities, using the National Population Health Survey. The study revealed that disabled adults (aged 20-64) reported more than three times as many unmet health care needs as their non-disabled counterparts. Even after controlling for…

  5. Strength training, level of muscular strength and functional autonomy in a population of elderly women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    da Silva, José Guilherme Fernandes Bertoni; Cader, Samária Ali; Dopico, Xurxo; Iglesias Soler, Eliseo; Martin Dantas, Estélio Henrique

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of muscular strengthening on the level of muscular strength in the neurogenic and myogenic phases and functional autonomy in a population of healthy, sedentary, elderly women...

  6. Extreme lipoprotein(a) levels and risk of myocardial infarction in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Pia R; Benn, Marianne; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) levels are associated with myocardial infarction (MI) in some but not all studies. Limitations of previous studies include lack of risk estimates for extreme lipoprotein(a) levels, measurements in long-term frozen samples, no correction for regression dilution bias, and lack...... of absolute risk estimates in the general population. We tested the hypothesis that extreme lipoprotein(a) levels predict MI in the general population, measuring levels shortly after sampling, correcting for regression dilution bias, and calculating hazard ratios and absolute risk estimates....

  7. CE-BEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Nader; Lazarova-Molnar, Sanja; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela

    2016-01-01

    and costs savings in smart buildings significantly depend on the monitoring and control methods used in the installed BEMS. This paper proposes a Cloud-Enabled BEMS (CE-BEMS) for Smart Buildings. This system can utilize cloud computing to provide enhanced management mechanisms and features for energy...... savings in smart buildings. This system is connected to the cloud to have access to a number of advanced cloud-based services to enhance energy management in smart buildings. In this paper, we discuss the current limitations of BEMS, the conceptual design of the proposed system, and the advantages...

  8. Using the Concept of "Population Dose" in Planning and Evaluating Community-Level Obesity Prevention Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, Allen; Schwartz, Pamela M.; Rauzon, Suzanne; Bourcier, Emily; Senter, Sandra; Spring, Rebecca; Beery, William L.

    2013-01-01

    When planning and evaluating community-level initiatives focused on policy and environment change, it is useful to have estimates of the impact on behavioral outcomes of particular strategies (e.g., building a new walking trail to promote physical activity). We have created a measure of estimated strategy-level impact--"population dose"--based on…

  9. Determinants of temporal changes in galectin-3 level in the general population : Data of PREVEND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, A. Rogier; Meijers, Wouter C.; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Bakker, Stephan J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van der Harst, Pim; Hillege, Hans; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: High baseline galectin-3 levels are associated with increased risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes in the general population, but determinants of changes in galectin-3 levels over time have not been established. Therefore, we aimed to identify determinants of (temporal) change in

  10. FROM ORGANISMS TO POPULATIONS: MODELING AQUATIC TOXICITY DATA ACROSS TWO LEVELS OF BIOLOGICAL ORGANIZATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A critical step in estimating the ecological effects of a toxicant is extrapolating organism-level response data across higher levels of biological organization. In the present study, the organism-to-population link is made for the mysid, Americamysis bahia, exposed to a range of...

  11. Assessing Awareness Level about Warning Signs of Cancer and its Determinants in an Iranian General Population

    OpenAIRE

    Feizi, Awat; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Hosseini, Mohsen; Parsa-yekta, Zohreh; Jamali, Jamshid

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the awareness level about warning signs of cancer and its determinants in an Iranian general population. This cross-sectional interview-based survey investigated 2,500 people aged 18 years and over, as a representative sample of Tehran population. Latent class regression was applied for analyzing data. A small (18.8%) proportion of the respondents had high level of knowledge, and 54.5% had moderate awareness, and 26.7% had low level of awareness. M...

  12. Assessing awareness level about warning signs of cancer and its determinants in an Iranian general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Awat; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Hosseini, Mohsen; Parsa-Yekta, Zohreh; Jamali, Jamshid

    2011-12-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the awareness level about warning signs of cancer and its determinants in an Iranian general population. This cross-sectional interview-based survey investigated 2,500 people aged 18 years and over, as a representative sample of Tehran population. Latent class regression was applied for analyzing data. A small (18.8%) proportion of the respondents had high level of knowledge, and 54.5% had moderate awareness, and 26.7% had low level of awareness. Most effective predictors for awareness were educational attainment, sex, and marital status. The findings suggest that the overall level of knowledge about warning signs of cancer among the public is low, particularly about some specific signs. Accordingly, educational and intervention programmes, with special attention placed on particular at-risk populations, to increase awareness about the disease leading to its early diagnosis are needed.

  13. Salivary cortisol and DHEA levels in the Korean population: age-related differences, diurnal rhythm, and correlations with serum levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Lee, Young-Jin; Choi, Jun-Young; Kwon, Hyuk-Bang; Chun, Sae-Il

    2007-06-30

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the changes of basal cortisol and DHEA levels present in saliva and serum with age, and to determine the correlation coefficients of steroid concentrations between saliva and serum. The secondary objective was to obtain a standard diurnal rhythm of salivary cortisol and DHEA in the Korean population. For the first objective, saliva and blood samples were collected between 10 and 11 AM from 359 volunteers ranging from 21 to 69 years old (167 men and 192 women). For the second objective, four saliva samples (post-awakening, 11 AM, 4 PM, and bedtime) were collected throughout a day from 78 volunteers (42 women and 36 men) ranging from 20 to 40 years old. Cortisol and DHEA levels were measured using a radioimmunoassay (RIA). The morning cortisol and DHEA levels, and the age- related steroid decline patterns were similar in both genders. Serum cortisol levels significantly decreased around forty years of age (p cortisol levels did not change significantly with age, but showed a tendency towards decline (slope=-0.0078, t=-0.389, p=0.697). The relative cortisol ratio of serum to saliva was 3.4-4.5% and the ratio increased with age (slope=0.051, t=3.61, p DHEA levels also declined with age in saliva (slope=-0.007, t=-3.76, p DHEA levels in saliva and serum did not start to significantly decrease until ages in the 40s, but then decreased significantly further at ages in the 50s (p DHEA ratio of serum to saliva was similar throughout the ages examined (slop=0.0016, t=0.344, p=0.73). On the other hand, cortisol and DHEA levels in saliva reflected well those in serum (r=0.59 and 0.86, respectively, p cortisol levels appeared just after awakening (about two fold higher than the 11 AM level), decreased throughout the day, and reached the lowest levels at bedtime (p cortisol levels). The highest salivary DHEA levels also appeared after awakening (about 1.5 fold higher than the 11 AM level) and decreased by 11 AM (p DHEA levels

  14. [The quality of population from viewpoints of the level of education and changes in social demands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, K

    1980-04-01

    Educational level as an attribute of population quality is significant from the socioeconomic point of view. Knowledge and skills acquired through education affect productivity, standard of living, and social activities of the population. Education as a form of investment is well illustrated by man power policy adopted in connection with economic growth policy. Since 1955 the focus of the Japanese population policy shifted from the question of quantity to that of quality. Education was expected to meet the needs of the society characterized by accelerated socioeconomic growth and technological developments. The great emphasis was placed on the education, training, and supply of scientific and technological professionals. Science curriculum, vocational training programs, career counseling, and guidance programs were expanded and improved. The percentage of population with higher education has rapidly increased since 1955 and is rising. High educational level of the population has greatly contributed to modernization and socioeconomic growth of Japan, but it also changed the composition of population in terms of education and employment. The importance of having an appropriate balance between economic growth and social development which concerns health and welfare of the population has been also noted. Since 1970 with longer life expectancy and prospective aging population the need for life long integrated education has come into focus.

  15. Relative and absolute level populations in beam-foil-excited neutral helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, J.

    1975-01-01

    Relative and absolute populations of 19 levels in beam-foil-excited neutral helium at 0.275 MeV have been measured. The singlet angular-momentum sequences show dependences on principal quantum number consistent with n to the -3rd power, but the triplet sequences do not. Singlet and triplet angular-momentum sequences show similar dependences on level excitation energy. Excitation functions for six representative levels were measured in the range from 0.160 to 0.500 MeV. The absolute level populations increase with energy, whereas the neutral fraction of the beam decreases with energy. Further, the P angular-momentum levels are found to be overpopulated with respect to the S and D levels. The overpopulation decreases with increasing principal quantum number.

  16. Population dynamics of Hawaiian seabird colonies vulnerable to sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Jeff S.; Reynolds, Michelle H.; Seavy, Nathaniel E.; Krause, Crystal M.

    2012-01-01

    Globally, seabirds are vulnerable to anthropogenic threats both at sea and on land. Seabirds typically nest colonially and show strong fidelity to natal colonies, and such colonies on low-lying islands may be threatened by sea-level rise. We used French Frigate Shoals, the largest atoll in the Hawaiian Archipelago, as a case study to explore the population dynamics of seabird colonies and the potential effects sea-level rise may have on these rookeries. We compiled historic observations, a 30-year time series of seabird population abundance, lidar-derived elevations, and aerial imagery of all the islands of French Frigate Shoals. To estimate the population dynamics of 8 species of breeding seabirds on Tern Island from 1980 to 2009, we used a Gompertz model with a Bayesian approach to infer population growth rates, density dependence, process variation, and observation error. All species increased in abundance, in a pattern that provided evidence of density dependence. Great Frigatebirds (Fregata minor), Masked Boobies (Sula dactylatra), Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda), Spectacled Terns (Onychoprion lunatus), and White Terns (Gygis alba) are likely at carrying capacity. Density dependence may exacerbate the effects of sea-level rise on seabirds because populations near carrying capacity on an island will be more negatively affected than populations with room for growth. We projected 12% of French Frigate Shoals will be inundated if sea level rises 1 m and 28% if sea level rises 2 m. Spectacled Terns and shrub-nesting species are especially vulnerable to sea-level rise, but seawalls and habitat restoration may mitigate the effects of sea-level rise. Losses of seabird nesting habitat may be substantial in the Hawaiian Islands by 2100 if sea levels rise 2 m. Restoration of higher-elevation seabird colonies represent a more enduring conservation solution for Pacific seabirds.

  17. Multi-level sexual selection: individual and family-level selection for mating success in a historical human population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorad, Jacob A

    2013-06-01

    Precopulatory sexual selection is the association between fitness and traits associated with mate acquisition. Although sexual selection is generally recognized to be a powerful evolutionary force, most investigations are limited to characters belonging to individuals. A broader multilevel perspective acknowledges that individual fitness can be affected by aspects of mating success that are characters of groups, such as families. Parental mating success in polygynous or polyandrous human societies may exemplify traits under group-level sexual selection. Using fitness measures that account for age-structure, I measure multilevel selection for mate number over 55 years in a human population with declining rates of polygyny. Sexual selection had three components: individual-level selection for ever-mating (whether an individual mated) and individual- and family-level selection for polyandry and polygyny. Family- and individual-level selection for polygyny was equally strong, three times stronger than family-level selection for polyandry and more than an order of magnitude stronger than individual-level selection for polyandry. However, individual-level selection for polyandry and polygyny was more effective at explaining relative fitness variance than family-level selection. Selection for ever-mating was the most important source of sexual selection for fitness; variation for ever-mating explained 23% of relative fitness variance. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Ethical issues in using Twitter for population-level depression monitoring: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikal, Jude; Hurst, Samantha; Conway, Mike

    2016-04-14

    Recently, significant research effort has focused on using Twitter (and other social media) to investigate mental health at the population-level. While there has been influential work in developing ethical guidelines for Internet discussion forum-based research in public health, there is currently limited work focused on addressing ethical problems in Twitter-based public health research, and less still that considers these issues from users' own perspectives. In this work, we aim to investigate public attitudes towards utilizing public domain Twitter data for population-level mental health monitoring using a qualitative methodology. The study explores user perspectives in a series of five, 2-h focus group interviews. Following a semi-structured protocol, 26 Twitter users with and without a diagnosed history of depression discussed general Twitter use, along with privacy expectations, and ethical issues in using social media for health monitoring, with a particular focus on mental health monitoring. Transcripts were then transcribed, redacted, and coded using a constant comparative approach. While participants expressed a wide range of opinions, there was an overall trend towards a relatively positive view of using public domain Twitter data as a resource for population level mental health monitoring, provided that results are appropriately aggregated. Results are divided into five sections: (1) a profile of respondents' Twitter use patterns and use variability; (2) users' privacy expectations, including expectations regarding data reach and permanence; (3) attitudes towards social media based population-level health monitoring in general, and attitudes towards mental health monitoring in particular; (4) attitudes towards individual versus population-level health monitoring; and (5) users' own recommendations for the appropriate regulation of population-level mental health monitoring. Focus group data reveal a wide range of attitudes towards the use of public

  19. Genetic approaches to understanding the population-level impact of wind energy development on migratory bats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonhof, Maarten J. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Russell, Amy L. [Grand Valley State Univ. Allendale, MI (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Documented fatalities of bats at wind turbines have raised serious concerns about the future impacts of increased wind power development on populations of migratory bat species. Yet there is little data on bat population sizes and trends to provide context for understanding the consequences of mortality due to wind power development. Using a large dataset of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation for eastern red bats, we demonstrated that: 1) this species forms a single, panmictic population across their range with no evidence for the historical use of divergent migratory pathways by any portion of the population; 2) the effective size of this population is in the hundreds of thousands to millions; and 3) for large populations, genetic diversity measures and at least one coalescent method are insensitive to even very high rates of population decline over long time scales and until population size has become very small. Our data provide important context for understanding the population-level impacts of wind power development on affected bat species.

  20. A genome wide association study identifies common variants associated with lipid levels in the Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    Full Text Available Plasma lipid levels are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease and are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Recent genome wide association studies (GWAS have identified several lipid-associated loci, but these loci have been identified primarily in European populations. In order to identify genetic markers for lipid levels in a Chinese population and analyze the heterogeneity between Europeans and Asians, especially Chinese, we performed a meta-analysis of two genome wide association studies on four common lipid traits including total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL in a Han Chinese population totaling 3,451 healthy subjects. Replication was performed in an additional 8,830 subjects of Han Chinese ethnicity. We replicated eight loci associated with lipid levels previously reported in a European population. The loci genome wide significantly associated with TC were near DOCK7, HMGCR and ABO; those genome wide significantly associated with TG were near APOA1/C3/A4/A5 and LPL; those genome wide significantly associated with LDL were near HMGCR, ABO and TOMM40; and those genome wide significantly associated with HDL were near LPL, LIPC and CETP. In addition, an additive genotype score of eight SNPs representing the eight loci that were found to be associated with lipid levels was associated with higher TC, TG and LDL levels (P = 5.52 × 10(-16, 1.38 × 10(-6 and 5.59 × 10(-9, respectively. These findings suggest the cumulative effects of multiple genetic loci on plasma lipid levels. Comparisons with previous GWAS of lipids highlight heterogeneity in allele frequency and in effect size for some loci between Chinese and European populations. The results from our GWAS provided comprehensive and convincing evidence of the genetic determinants of plasma lipid levels in a Chinese population.

  1. The population genetics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different patient populations exhibits high-level host specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa van Mansfeld

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether highly prevalent P. aeruginosa sequence types (ST in Dutch cystic fibrosis (CF patients are specifically linked to CF patients we investigated the population structure of P. aeruginosa from different clinical backgrounds. We first selected the optimal genotyping method by comparing pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, multilocus sequence typing (MLST and multilocus variable number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA. METHODS: Selected P. aeruginosa isolates (n = 60 were genotyped with PFGE, MLST and MLVA to determine the diversity index (DI and congruence (adjusted Rand and Wallace coefficients. Subsequently, isolates from patients admitted to two different ICUs (n = 205, from CF patients (n = 100 and from non-ICU, non-CF patients (n = 58, of which 19 were community acquired were genotyped with MLVA to determine distribution of genotypes and genetic diversity. RESULTS: Congruence between the typing methods was >79% and DIs were similar and all >0.963. Based on costs, ease, speed and possibilities to compare results between labs an adapted MLVA scheme called MLVA9-Utrecht was selected as the preferred typing method. In 363 clinical isolates 252 different MLVA types (MTs were identified, indicating a highly diverse population (DI  = 0.995; CI  = 0.993-0.997. DI levels were similarly high in the diverse clinical sources (all >0.981 and only eight genotypes were shared. MTs were highly specific (>80% for the different patient populations, even for similar patient groups (ICU patients in two distinct geographic regions, with only three of 142 ICU genotypes detected in both ICUs. The two major CF clones were unique to CF patients. CONCLUSION: The population structure of P. aeruginosa isolates is highly diverse and population specific without evidence for a core lineage in which major CF, hospital or community clones co-cluster. The two genotypes highly prevalent among Dutch CF patients appeared unique to CF patients

  2. Ecological feedbacks can reduce population-level efficacy of wildlife fertility control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Jason I.; Powers, Jenny G.; Hobbs, N. Thompson; Baker, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    1. Anthropogenic stress on natural systems, particularly the fragmentation of landscapes and the extirpation of predators from food webs, has intensified the need to regulate abundance of wildlife populations with management. Controlling population growth using fertility control has been considered for almost four decades, but nearly all research has focused on understanding effects of fertility control agents on individual animals. Questions about the efficacy of fertility control as a way to control populations remain largely unanswered. 2. Collateral consequences of contraception can produce unexpected changes in birth rates, survival, immigration and emigration that may reduce the effectiveness of regulating animal abundance. The magnitude and frequency of such effects vary with species-specific social and reproductive systems, as well as connectivity of populations. Developing models that incorporate static demographic parameters from populations not controlled by contraception may bias predictions of fertility control efficacy. 3. Many population-level studies demonstrate that changes in survival and immigration induced by fertility control can compensate for the reduction in births caused by contraception. The most successful cases of regulating populations using fertility control come from applications of contraceptives to small, closed populations of gregarious and easily accessed species. 4. Fertility control can result in artificial selection pressures on the population and may lead to long-term unintentional genetic consequences. The magnitude of such selection is dependent on individual heritability and behavioural traits, as well as environmental variation. 5. Synthesis and applications. Understanding species' life-history strategies, biology, behavioural ecology and ecological context is critical to developing realistic expectations of regulating populations using fertility control. Before time, effort and funding are invested in wildlife

  3. Population level of main microbiota and yeast-like Candida fungi in women with vulvovaginal candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Yakovychuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim - to determine population levels of main microbiota and yeast-like fungi of the genus Candida in healthy women and in women with vulvovaginal candidiasis. Materials and methods. For 10 years we have been surveyed 270 women in reproductive age from 19 to 34 years old with vulvovaginal candidiasis and 73 healthy women. In all patients population level of main microflora and yeast-like fungi of the genus Candida in vulvovaginal content has been determined. The isolation of yeast-like fungi of the genus Candida has been performed by seeding of vulvovaginal content on a solid Saboaraud nutrient medium and on Saboaraud medium with the addition of cycloheximide, relatively with pure culture. "Seedlings test" and identification by species with establishment of population level had been performed in each individual case. Results. Coexistence of representatives of the ecosystem "microorganism - microbiota" and compared the changes of microecology of vulvovaginal content in healthy women and women with vulvovaginal candidiasis were defined. In the study of population level of yeast-like fungi of the genus Candida in vulvovaginal content in women with vulvovaginal candidiasis it was found that the dominant species was C. albicans, of population level of which were different from other species, such as C. guillіermondii by 1.77 %, C. krusei - by 4.82 %, C. glabrata - by 5.78 %, C. kefyr – by 8.19 %, C. tropicalis – by 8,35 %, C. inconspicua and C. zeylanoides by 15.08 %. Thus, in the vulvovaginal content of women with vulvovaginal candidiasis yeast-like fungi of the genus Candida of 8 different taxons were at the population level over 5,00 lg CFU/ml, which can not only persist but they were suspected to be agents of inflammation. The results of the study of population levels of autochtonous obligate and facultative bacteria of vulvovaginal content of women with vulvovaginal candidiasis indicated that the level of Lactobacteria decreased by 67

  4. Circumpolar contaminant concentrations in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and potential population-level effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuijten, R J M; Hendriks, A J; Jenssen, B M; Schipper, A M

    2016-11-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) currently receive much attention in the context of global climate change. However, there are other stressors that might threaten the viability of polar bear populations as well, such as exposure to anthropogenic pollutants. Lipophilic organic compounds bio-accumulate and bio-magnify in the food chain, leading to high concentrations at the level of top-predators. In Arctic wildlife, including the polar bear, various adverse health effects have been related to internal concentrations of commercially used anthropogenic chemicals like PCB and DDT. The extent to which these individual health effects are associated to population-level effects is, however, unknown. In this study we assembled data on adipose tissue concentrations of ∑PCB, ∑DDT, dieldrin and ∑PBDE in individual polar bears from peer-reviewed scientific literature. Data were available for 14 out of the 19 subpopulations. We found that internal concentrations of these contaminants exceed threshold values for adverse individual health effects in several subpopulations. In an exploratory regression analysis we identified a clear negative correlation between polar bear population density and sub-population specific contaminant concentrations in adipose tissue. The results suggest that adverse health effects of contaminants in individual polar bears may scale up to population-level consequences. Our study highlights the need to consider contaminant exposure along with other threats in polar bear population viability analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Plasma levels of apolipoprotein E and risk of ischemic heart disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Katrine L.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with high risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD), and apolipoprotein E (apoE) has a central role in their plasma clearance. While both quantitative and qualitative changes of apoE are established causes of rare dyslipidemia...... syndromes, it remains unclear whether plasma levels of apoE are associated with risk of IHD in the general population. METHODS: We tested whether plasma levels of apoE at enrollment were associated with future risk of IHD and myocardial infarction (MI) in 91,695 individuals from the general population...

  6. Population-level impact of white-nose syndrome on the endangered Indiana bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thogmartin, Wayne E.; King, R. Andrew; McKann, Patrick C.; Szymanski, Jennifer A.; Pruitt, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Establishing status and trend for an endangered species is critical to recovery, especially when it is faced with a nascent extinction agent. We calculated, with hierarchical log-linear change-point models, hibernaculum-level population trends between 1983 and 2009 for the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) now subjected to the fast-spreading fungal disease white-nose syndrome. We combined trends from 222 wintering populations before and after onset of the disease to determine trend for clusters of interacting wintering populations, recovery units, and the species. Before onset of the disease, a west-to-east gradient in trends existed, with westernmost populations declining and easternmost populations increasing in abundance. The species as a whole, however, was stationary between 1983 and 2005 (-0.5% mean annual change; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.8, +1.8%). Estimated mean population size in 2009 was 377,124 bats (195,398-957,348), with large variance apparently caused by white-nose syndrome. With the onset of white-nose syndrome (2006-2009), the species exhibited a 10.3% annual decline (95% CI = -21.1, +2.0%). White-nose syndrome is having an appreciable influence on the status and trends of Indiana bat populations, stalling and in some cases reversing population gains made in recent years.

  7. Population genetic divergence corresponds with species-level biodiversity patterns in the large genus Begonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, M; Hollingsworth, P M

    2008-06-01

    Begonia is one of the largest angiosperm genera, containing over 1500 species. Some aspects of the distribution of biodiversity in the genus, such as the geographical restrictions of monophyletic groups, the rarity and morphological variability of widespread species, and a preponderance of narrow endemics, suggest that restricted gene flow may have been a factor in the formation of so many species. In order to investigate whether this inference based on large-scale patterns is supported by data at the population level, we examined the distribution of genetic variation within Begonia sutherlandii in the indigenous forests of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa, using microsatellite markers. Despite the species being predominantly outbreeding, we found high and significant levels of population structure (standardized =F'ST= 0.896). Even within individual populations, there was evidence for clear differentiation of subpopulations. There is thus congruence in evolutionary patterns ranging from interspecific phylogeny, the distribution of individual species, to the levels of population differentiation. Despite this species-rich genus showing a pan-tropical distribution, these combined observations suggest that differentiation occurs over very local scales. Although strongly selected allelic variants can maintain species cohesion with only low levels of gene flow, we hypothesize that in Begonia, gene flow levels are often so low, that divergence in allopatry is likely to be a frequent occurrence, and the lack of widespread species may in part be attributable to a lack of a mechanism for holding them together.

  8. Health effects in the Flemish population in relation to low levels of mercury exposure: from organ to transcriptome level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croes, Kim; De Coster, Sam; De Galan, Sandra; Morrens, Bert; Loots, Ilse; Van de Mieroop, Els; Nelen, Vera; Sioen, Isabelle; Bruckers, Liesbeth; Nawrot, Tim; Colles, Ann; Den Hond, Elly; Schoeters, Greet; van Larebeke, Nicolas; Baeyens, Willy; Gao, Yue

    2014-03-01

    Due to possible health risks, quantification of mercury accumulation in humans was included in the Flemish biomonitoring programmes FLEHS I (2002-2006) and FLEHS II (2007-2011). The general objective of FLEHS I was to assess regional exposure levels in order to link possible differences in these internal exposure levels to different types of local environmental pressure. Therefore, Hg and MMHg (methylmercury) were only measured in pooled blood samples per region and per age class. In FLEHS II, mercury concentrations were measured in hair of each participant. About 200 adolescents and 250 mothers (reference group) and two times 200 adolescents (2 hotspots) were screened. The main objectives of the FLEHS II study were: (1) to determine reference levels of mercury in hair for Flanders; (2) to assess relations between mercury exposure and possible sources like fish consumption; (3) to assess dose-effect relations between mercury exposure and health effect markers. The results showed that mercury concentrations in the Flemish population were rather low compared to other studies. Mercury levels in the Flemish populations were strongly related to the age of the participants and consumption of fish. Significant negative associations were observed between mercury in hair and asthma, having received breast feeding as a newborn, age at menarche in girls, allergy for animals and free testosterone levels. Significant correlations were also observed between mercury in hair and genes JAK2, ARID4A, Hist1HA4L (boys) and HLAdrb5, PIAS2, MANN1B1, GIT and ABCA1 (girls). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential population-level effects of increased haulout-related mortality of Pacific walrus calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udevitz, Mark S.; Taylor, Rebecca L.; Garlich-Miller, Joel L.; Quakenbush, Lori T.; Snyder, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Availability of summer sea ice has been decreasing in the Chukchi Sea during recent decades, and increasing numbers of Pacific walruses have begun using coastal haulouts in late summer during years when sea ice retreats beyond the continental shelf. Calves and yearlings are particularly susceptible to being crushed during disturbance events that cause the herd to panic and stampede at these large haulouts, but the potential population-level effects of this mortality are unknown. We used recent harvest data, along with previous assumptions about demographic parameters for this population, to estimate female population size and structure in 2009 and project these numbers forward using a range of assumptions about future harvests and haulout-related mortality that might result from increased use of coastal haulouts during late summer. We found that if demographic parameters were held constant, the levels of harvest that occurred during 1990–2008 would have allowed the population to grow during that period. Our projections indicate, however, that an increase in haulout-related mortality affecting only calves has a greater effect on the population than an equivalent increase in harvest-related mortality distributed among all age classes. Therefore, disturbance-related mortality of calves at coastal haulouts may have relatively important population consequences.

  10. Vitamin D serum levels in allergic rhinitis: any difference from normal population?

    OpenAIRE

    Arshi, Saba; Ghalehbaghi, Babak; Kamrava, Seyyed-Kamran; Aminlou, Mina

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently it has been suggested that, the worldwide increase in allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy is associated with low vitamin D intake. Objective This study measured the vitamin D levels in patients with allergic rhinitis and compared the results with the general population. Methods Vitamin D levels were assessed in 50 patients with allergic rhinitis diagnosed clinically by Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma 2008 criteria and the result ...

  11. Electronic and magnetic states of Ce 4f electrons in CeRh{sub 3}B{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imada, S. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan)], E-mail: imada@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Yamasaki, A. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Tsunekawa, M. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Higashiya, A. [SPring-8/RIKEN 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Sekiyama, A. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Sugawara, H. [Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Tokushima University, Tokushima 770-8502 (Japan); Sato, H. [Graduate School of Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Suga, S. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    CeRh{sub 3}B{sub 2} is a ferromagnet with exceptionally high Curie temperature (T{sub C}=115 K) among the Ce compounds with no transition metal magnetic element. Magnetic circular dichroism of soft X-ray photoabsorption (XMCD) has revealed that the orbital angular momentum of Ce 4f electron is quenched to some extent. In addition, preferential occupation of the Ce 4f orbital pointing to the c-axis has been confirmed by the soft X-ray photoabsorption measurements with different geometries. On the other hand, resonant photoemission around the Ce 3d {yields} 4f photoabsorption edge has been adopted in order to disentangle the Ce 4f and Rh 4d components in the valence band. The Rh 4d spectrum is qualitatively consistent with the band structure calculation. Although the Ce 4f spectrum has a peak near the Fermi level, the spectral shape is qualitatively different from that of the typical Kondo materials and is rather similar to that of itinerant Ce 4f systems.

  12. The mixed-valence state of Ce in the hexagonal CeNi sub 4 B compound

    CERN Document Server

    Tolinski, T; Pugaczowa-Michalska, M; Chelkowska, G

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic susceptibility chi, x-ray photoemission spectra (XPS), electrical resistivity rho and electronic structure calculations for CeNi sub 4 B are reported. In the paramagnetic region, CeNi sub 4 B follows the Curie-Weiss law with mu sub e sub f sub f = 0.52 mu sub B /fu and theta -10.7 K. The effective magnetic moment is lower than the free Ce sup 3 sup + -ion value. The Ce(3d) XPS spectra have confirmed the mixed-valence state of Ce ions in CeNi sub 4 B. The f occupancy, n sub f , and the coupling DELTA between the f level and the conduction states were derived to be about 0.83 and 85 meV, respectively. Both susceptibility data and XPS spectra show that Ce ions in CeNi sub 4 B are in the intermediate-valence state. At low temperatures (below 12 K), the magnetic contribution to the electrical resistivity reveals a logarithmic slope characteristic of Kondo-like systems.

  13. Personality and the emergence of the pace-of-life syndrome concept at the population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réale, Denis; Garant, Dany; Humphries, Murray M; Bergeron, Patrick; Careau, Vincent; Montiglio, Pierre-Olivier

    2010-12-27

    The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis specifies that closely related species or populations experiencing different ecological conditions should differ in a suite of metabolic, hormonal and immunity traits that have coevolved with the life-history particularities related to these conditions. Surprisingly, two important dimensions of the POLS concept have been neglected: (i) despite increasing evidence for numerous connections between behavioural, physiological and life-history traits, behaviours have rarely been considered in the POLS yet; (ii) the POLS could easily be applied to the study of covariation among traits between individuals within a population. In this paper, we propose that consistent behavioural differences among individuals, or personality, covary with life history and physiological differences at the within-population, interpopulation and interspecific levels. We discuss how the POLS provides a heuristic framework in which personality studies can be integrated to address how variation in personality traits is maintained within populations.

  14. Population of vibrational levels of carbon dioxide by cylindrical fast ionization wave

    KAUST Repository

    Levko, Dmitry

    2017-09-08

    The population of vibrational levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) by a cylindrical fast ionization wave is analyzed using a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo collisions model. The model takes into account the inelastic electron-neutral collisions as well as the super-elastic collisions between electrons and excited species. We observe an efficient population of only the first two levels of the symmetric and asymmetric vibrational modes of CO2 by means of a fast ionization wave. The excitation of other higher vibrational modes by the fast ionization wave is inefficient. Additionally, we observe a strong influence of the secondary electron emission on the population of vibrational states of CO2. This effect is associated with the kinetics of high energy electrons generated in the cathode sheath.

  15. Population-level associations between preschool vulnerability and grade-four basic skills.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo D'Angiulli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a predictive validity study examining the extent to which developmental vulnerability at kindergarten entry (as measured by the Early Development Instrument, EDI is associated with children's basic skills in 4th grade (as measured by the Foundation Skills Assessment, FSA.Relative risk analysis was performed on a large database linking individual-level EDI ratings to the scores the same children obtained on a provincial assessment of academic skills (FSA--Foundation Skills Assessment four years later. We found that early vulnerability in kindergarten is associated with the basic skills that underlie populations of children's academic achievement in reading, writing and math, indicating that the Early Development Instrument permits to predict achievement-related skills four years in advance.The EDI can be used to predict children's educational trends at the population level and can help select early prevention and intervention programs targeting pre-school populations at minimum cost.

  16. Population-Level Associations between Preschool Vulnerability and Grade-Four Basic Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Warburton, William; Dahinten, Susan; Hertzman, Clyde

    2009-01-01

    Background This is a predictive validity study examining the extent to which developmental vulnerability at kindergarten entry (as measured by the Early Development Instrument, EDI) is associated with children's basic skills in 4th grade (as measured by the Foundation Skills Assessment, FSA). Methodology/Principal Findings Relative risk analysis was performed on a large database linking individual-level EDI ratings to the scores the same children obtained on a provincial assessment of academic skills (FSA – Foundation Skills Assessment) four years later. We found that early vulnerability in kindergarten is associated with the basic skills that underlie populations of children's academic achievement in reading, writing and math, indicating that the Early Development Instrument permits to predict achievement-related skills four years in advance. Conclusions/Significance The EDI can be used to predict children's educational trends at the population level and can help select early prevention and intervention programs targeting pre-school populations at minimum cost. PMID:19946366

  17. Population-level impact, herd immunity, and elimination after human papillomavirus vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brisson, Marc; Bénard, Élodie; Drolet, Mélanie

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundModelling studies have been widely used to inform human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination policy decisions; however, many models exist and it is not known whether they produce consistent predictions of population-level effectiveness and herd effects. We did a systematic review and meta-a...

  18. Physical activity and dietary fiber determine population body fat levels : The Seven Countries Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.; Bloemberg, B; Seidell, J. C.; Nissinen, A.; Menotti, A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A global epidemic of obesity is developing. Current prevalence rates are about 20-25% in American adults and 15-20% in Europeans. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between population levels of physical activity, dietary fat, dietary fiber and indicators of body fat. DESIGN:

  19. Physical activity and dietary fiber determine population body fat levels : the Seven Countries Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.; Bloemberg, B; Seidell, J C; Nissinen, A.; Menotti, A.

    BACKGROUND: A global epidemic of obesity is developing. Current prevalence rates are about 20-25% in American adults and 15-20% in Europeans. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between population levels of physical activity, dietary fat, dietary fiber and indicators of body fat. DESIGN:

  20. Individual and population level effects of partner notification for Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L Althaus

    Full Text Available Partner notification (PN or contact tracing is an important aspect of treating bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs, such as Chlamydia trachomatis. It facilitates the identification of new infected cases that can be treated through individual case management. PN also acts indirectly by limiting onward transmission in the general population. However, the impact of PN, both at the level of individuals and the population, remains unclear. Since it is difficult to study the effects of PN empirically, mathematical and computational models are useful tools for investigating its potential as a public health intervention. To this end, we developed an individual-based modeling framework called Rstisim. It allows the implementation of different models of STI transmission with various levels of complexity and the reconstruction of the complete dynamic sexual partnership network over any time period. A key feature of this framework is that we can trace an individual's partnership history in detail and investigate the outcome of different PN strategies for C. trachomatis. For individual case management, the results suggest that notifying three or more partners from the preceding 18 months yields substantial numbers of new cases. In contrast, the successful treatment of current partners is most important for preventing re-infection of index cases and reducing further transmission of C. trachomatis at the population level. The findings of this study demonstrate the difference between individual and population level outcomes of public health interventions for STIs.

  1. Bioecological Theory, Early Child Development and the Validation of the Population-Level Early Development Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhn, Martin; Goelman, Hillel

    2011-01-01

    The Early Development Instrument (EDI; Janus and Offord in "Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science" 39:1-22, 2007) project is a Canadian population-level, longitudinal research project, in which teacher ratings of Kindergarten children's early development and wellbeing are linked to health and academic achievement variables at the…

  2. Facultative anadromy in salmonids: linking habitat, individual life history decisions, and population-level consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven F. Railsback; Bret C. Harvey; Jason L. White

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and management of facultative anadromous salmonids is complicated by their ability to select anadromous or resident life histories. Conventional theory for this behavior assumes individuals select the strategy offering highest expected reproductive success but does not predict how population-level consequences such as a stream’s smolt production emerge from...

  3. Determinants of occupational diseases in the netherlands: risks at the individual and the population level: abstract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, R.; Dam, L. van; Vroome, E. de

    2017-01-01

    Oral presentation Eliminating Occupational Disease: Translating Research into Action, EPICOH 2017, EPICOH 2017, 28–31 August 2017, Edinburgh, UK. Objective To identify the main determinants of occupational diseases at both the individual and the population level. Methods This study used data from

  4. Evaluation of population-level ecological risks of fish-eating birds to dioxinlike PCBs exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Wataru; Yoshida, Kikuo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Research Center for Chemical Risk Management, Tsukuba (Japan); Murata, Mariko [National Institute of Technology and Evaluation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/DFs) and some non- and monoortho- polychlorinated biphenyl congeners that can attain planar configuration (dioxinlike PCBs), which are chemically stable and persistent, are thought to be biomagnified via foodchain. Many studies have revealed that higher levels of these compounds have been observed in fish-eating birds, a top consumer in aquatic biota. Among these compounds, Dioxinlike PCBs has contributed more than 80% of the total TEQs found in eggs of fish-eating birds. In order to evaluate the effects of these compounds on fish-eating birds, therefore, it is important to elucidate exposure pathways and characteristics of dioxinlike PCBs. The conventional ecological risk assessment method of chemicals entails comparing the predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) determined from laboratory toxicity tests with the predicted or observed concentration in a target organism or a surrounding environmental media. Utilizing such a result of simplistic individual-level effect to draw conclusions regarding chemical effects on population is, however, questionable. Since risk management decisions should be based on protecting populations, the methods for population-level ecological risk assessment of chemicals have been of increasing interest for risk assessors and managers. In this study, a population-level ecological risk assessment of dioxinlike PCBs on fish-eating birds was performed to judge the need for risk management measures to protect aquatic wildlife from dioxinlike PCBs contamination in Japan. Egg mortality risk and the changes in population growth rate, {lambda}, in relation to the contamination levels of dioxinlike PCBs in eggs of four different types of fish-eating birds were determined by integrating the results from both bioaccumulation and life-history models.

  5. The effects of country-level population policy for enhancing adaptation to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekara, N. K.; Kazama, S.; Yamazaki, D.; Oki, T.

    2013-11-01

    The effectiveness of population policy in reducing the combined impacts of population change and climate change on water resources is explored. One no-policy scenario and two scenarios with population policy assumptions are employed in combination with water availability under the SRES scenarios A1b, B1 and A2 for the impact analysis. The population data used are from the World Bank. The river discharges per grid of horizontal resolution 0.5° are obtained from the Total Runoff Integrating Pathways (TRIP) of the University of Tokyo, Japan. Unlike the population scenarios utilized in the SRES emission scenarios and the newest representative concentration pathways, the scenarios employed in this research are based, even after 2050, on country-level rather than regional-level growth assumptions. Our analysis implies that the heterogeneous pattern of population changes across the world is the dominant driver of water stress, irrespective of future greenhouse gas emissions, with highest impacts occurring in the already water-stressed low latitudes. In 2100, Africa, Middle East and parts of Asia are under extreme water stress under all scenarios. The sensitivity analysis reveals that a small reduction in populations over the region could relieve a large number of people from high water stress, while a further increase in population from the assumed levels (SC1) might not increase the number of people under high water stress considerably. Most of the population increase towards 2100 occurs in the already water-stressed lower latitudes. Therefore, population reduction policies are recommended for this region as a method of adaptation to the future water stress conditions. Population reduction policies will facilitate more control over their future development pathways, even if these countries were not able to contribute significantly to greenhouse gas (GHG) emission cuts due to economic constraints. However, for the European region, the population living in water

  6. Integrating Traditional and Evolutionary Knowledge in Biodiversity Conservation: a Population Level Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan J. Fraser

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite their dual importance in the assessment of endangered/threatened species, there have been few attempts to integrate traditional ecological knowledge (TEK and evolutionary biology knowledge (EBK at the population level. We contrasted long-term aboriginal TEK with previously obtained EBK in the context of seasonal migratory habits and population biology of a salmonid fish, brook charr, (Salvelinus fontinalis inhabiting a large, remote postglacial lake. Compilation of TEK spanning four decades involved analytical workshops, semidirective interviews, and collaborative fieldwork with local aboriginal informants and fishing guides. We found that TEK complemented EBK of brook charr by providing concordant and additional information about (1 population viability; (2 breeding areas and migration patterns of divergent populations; and (3 the behavioral ecology of populations within feeding areas; all of which may ultimately affect the maintenance of population diversity. Aboriginal concerns related to human pressures on this species, not revealed by EBK, also help to focus future conservation initiatives for divergent populations and to encourage restoration of traditional fishing practices. However, relative to EBK, the relevance of TEK to salmonid biodiversity conservation was evident mainly at a smaller spatial scale, for example, that of individual rivers occupied by populations or certain lake sectors. Nevertheless, EBK was only collected over a 4-yr period, so TEK provided an essential long-term temporal window to evaluate population differences and persistence. We concluded that, despite different conceptual underpinnings, spatially and temporally varying TEK and EBK both contribute to the knowledge base required to achieve sustainability and effective biodiversity conservation planning for a given species. Such integration may be particularly relevant in many isolated regions, where intraspecific diversity can go unrecognized due to sparse

  7. Stochastic sensitivity technique in a persistence analysis of randomly forced population systems with multiple trophic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkirtseva, Irina; Ryashko, Lev; Ryazanova, Tatyana

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by important ecological applications we study how noise can reduce a number of trophic levels in hierarchically related multidimensional population systems. A nonlinear model with three trophic levels under the influence of external stochastic forcing is considered as a basic conceptual example. We analyze a probabilistic mechanism of noise-induced extinction of separate populations in this "prey-predator-top predator" system. We propose a new general mathematical approach for the estimation of the proximity of equilibrium regimes of this stochastic model to hazardous borders where abrupt changes in dynamics of ecological systems can occur. Our method is based on the stochastic sensitivity function technique and visualization method of confidence domains. Constructive abilities of this mathematical approach are demonstrated in the analysis of different scenaria of noise-induced reducing of the number of trophic levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Deterministic and stochastic population-level simulations of an artificial lac operon genetic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygourakis Kyriacos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lac operon genetic switch is considered as a paradigm of genetic regulation. This system has a positive feedback loop due to the LacY permease boosting its own production by the facilitated transport of inducer into the cell and the subsequent de-repression of the lac operon genes. Previously, we have investigated the effect of stochasticity in an artificial lac operon network at the single cell level by comparing corresponding deterministic and stochastic kinetic models. Results This work focuses on the dynamics of cell populations by incorporating the above kinetic scheme into two Monte Carlo (MC simulation frameworks. The first MC framework assumes stochastic reaction occurrence, accounts for stochastic DNA duplication, division and partitioning and tracks all daughter cells to obtain the statistics of the entire cell population. In order to better understand how stochastic effects shape cell population distributions, we develop a second framework that assumes deterministic reaction dynamics. By comparing the predictions of the two frameworks, we conclude that stochasticity can create or destroy bimodality, and may enhance phenotypic heterogeneity. Conclusions Our results show how various sources of stochasticity act in synergy with the positive feedback architecture, thereby shaping the behavior at the cell population level. Further, the insights obtained from the present study allow us to construct simpler and less computationally intensive models that can closely approximate the dynamics of heterogeneous cell populations.

  9. Achieving population-level immunity to rabies in free-roaming dogs in Africa and Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle K Morters

    Full Text Available Canine rabies can be effectively controlled by vaccination with readily available, high-quality vaccines. These vaccines should provide protection from challenge in healthy dogs, for the claimed period, for duration of immunity, which is often two or three years. It has been suggested that, in free-roaming dog populations where rabies is endemic, vaccine-induced protection may be compromised by immuno-suppression through malnutrition, infection and other stressors. This may reduce the proportion of dogs that seroconvert to the vaccine during vaccination campaigns and the duration of immunity of those dogs that seroconvert. Vaccination coverage may also be limited through insufficient vaccine delivery during vaccination campaigns and the loss of vaccinated individuals from populations through demographic processes. This is the first longitudinal study to evaluate temporal variations in rabies vaccine-induced serological responses, and factors associated with these variations, at the individual level in previously unvaccinated free-roaming dog populations. Individual-level serological and health-based data were collected from three cohorts of dogs in regions where rabies is endemic, one in South Africa and two in Indonesia. We found that the vast majority of dogs seroconverted to the vaccine; however, there was considerable variation in titres, partly attributable to illness and lactation at the time of vaccination. Furthermore, >70% of the dogs were vaccinated through community engagement and door-to-door vaccine delivery, even in Indonesia where the majority of the dogs needed to be caught by net on successive occasions for repeat blood sampling and vaccination. This demonstrates the feasibility of achieving population-level immunity in free-roaming dog populations in rabies-endemic regions. However, attrition of immune individuals through demographic processes and waning immunity necessitates repeat vaccination of populations within at least

  10. Achieving Population-Level Immunity to Rabies in Free-Roaming Dogs in Africa and Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morters, Michelle K.; McKinley, Trevelyan J.; Horton, Daniel L.; Cleaveland, Sarah; Schoeman, Johan P.; Restif, Olivier; Whay, Helen R.; Goddard, Amelia; Fooks, Anthony R.; Damriyasa, I. Made; Wood, James L. N.

    2014-01-01

    Canine rabies can be effectively controlled by vaccination with readily available, high-quality vaccines. These vaccines should provide protection from challenge in healthy dogs, for the claimed period, for duration of immunity, which is often two or three years. It has been suggested that, in free-roaming dog populations where rabies is endemic, vaccine-induced protection may be compromised by immuno-suppression through malnutrition, infection and other stressors. This may reduce the proportion of dogs that seroconvert to the vaccine during vaccination campaigns and the duration of immunity of those dogs that seroconvert. Vaccination coverage may also be limited through insufficient vaccine delivery during vaccination campaigns and the loss of vaccinated individuals from populations through demographic processes. This is the first longitudinal study to evaluate temporal variations in rabies vaccine-induced serological responses, and factors associated with these variations, at the individual level in previously unvaccinated free-roaming dog populations. Individual-level serological and health-based data were collected from three cohorts of dogs in regions where rabies is endemic, one in South Africa and two in Indonesia. We found that the vast majority of dogs seroconverted to the vaccine; however, there was considerable variation in titres, partly attributable to illness and lactation at the time of vaccination. Furthermore, >70% of the dogs were vaccinated through community engagement and door-to-door vaccine delivery, even in Indonesia where the majority of the dogs needed to be caught by net on successive occasions for repeat blood sampling and vaccination. This demonstrates the feasibility of achieving population-level immunity in free-roaming dog populations in rabies-endemic regions. However, attrition of immune individuals through demographic processes and waning immunity necessitates repeat vaccination of populations within at least two years to ensure

  11. Monitoring serum PCB levels in the adult population of the Canary Islands (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Burillo-Putze

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are persistent organic chemicals that have been detected in human serum or tissues all over the world. These pollutants could exert a number of deleterious effects on humans and wildlife, including carcinogenic processes. The Spanish population of the Canary Islands was evaluated with respect to PCB levels more than ten years ago showing lower levels than other Western populations. The objective of our study was to assess the current level of contamination by PCBs showed by this population. We measured serum PCBs in a sample of healthy adult subjects (206 serum samples from subjects with an average age of 66 years old to evaluate the potential modification of PCB serum levels in this population during the last decade. PCB congeners (28, 52, 77, 81, 101, 105, 114, 118, 123, 126, 138, 153, 156, 157, 167, 169, 180, and 189 were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Our results showed that PCB residues were found in 84% of serum samples analyzed, the congeners 28, 153 and 180 being the most frequently detected and at the highest median values (0.1 ng/mL. In addition, the median concentration of the sum of those PCBs considered as markers of environmental contamination by these chemicals (Marker-PCBs was 0.6 ng/mL, reaching values as high as as 2.6 ng/mL in the 95th percentile. Levels of the sum of PCBs with toxic effects similar to dioxins (dioxin-like PCBs reached median values of 0.4 ng/mL in the 95th percentile. The reported levels are similar to those described previously in this population more than ten years ago, in the sense that the inhabitants of the Canary Archipelago show levels of PCB contamination lower than the majority of populations from developed countries. These findings suggest that currently there is not any active source of these chemicals in this archipelago. Nevertheless, as foods seem to be a relevant source for these compounds, Public Health authorities should monitor the

  12. L-type calcium channels refine the neural population code of sound level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Calum Alex; Green, David Brian; Sivaramakrishnan, Shobhana

    2016-12-01

    The coding of sound level by ensembles of neurons improves the accuracy with which listeners identify how loud a sound is. In the auditory system, the rate at which neurons fire in response to changes in sound level is shaped by local networks. Voltage-gated conductances alter local output by regulating neuronal firing, but their role in modulating responses to sound level is unclear. We tested the effects of L-type calcium channels (CaL: CaV1.1-1.4) on sound-level coding in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) in the auditory midbrain. We characterized the contribution of CaL to the total calcium current in brain slices and then examined its effects on rate-level functions (RLFs) in vivo using single-unit recordings in awake mice. CaL is a high-threshold current and comprises ∼50% of the total calcium current in ICC neurons. In vivo, CaL activates at sound levels that evoke high firing rates. In RLFs that increase monotonically with sound level, CaL boosts spike rates at high sound levels and increases the maximum firing rate achieved. In different populations of RLFs that change nonmonotonically with sound level, CaL either suppresses or enhances firing at sound levels that evoke maximum firing. CaL multiplies the gain of monotonic RLFs with dynamic range and divides the gain of nonmonotonic RLFs with the width of the RLF. These results suggest that a single broad class of calcium channels activates enhancing and suppressing local circuits to regulate the sensitivity of neuronal populations to sound level. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. The group-level consequences of sexual conflict in multigroup populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Tonsi Eldakar

    Full Text Available In typical sexual conflict scenarios, males best equipped to exploit females are favored locally over more prudent males, despite reducing female fitness. However, local advantage is not the only relevant form of selection. In multigroup populations, groups with less sexual conflict will contribute more offspring to the next generation than higher conflict groups, countering the local advantage of harmful males. Here, we varied male aggression within- and between-groups in a laboratory population of water striders and measured resulting differences in local population growth over a period of three weeks. The overall pool fitness (i.e., adults produced of less aggressive pools exceeded that of high aggression pools by a factor of three, with the high aggression pools essentially experiencing no population growth over the course of the study. When comparing the fitness of individuals across groups, aggression appeared to be under stabilizing selection in the multigroup population. The use of contextual analysis revealed that overall stabilizing selection was a product of selection favoring aggression within groups, but selected against it at the group-level. Therefore, this report provides further evidence to show that what evolves in the total population is not merely an extension of within-group dynamics.

  14. Dispersal variability and associated population-level consequences in tree-killing bark beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, Markus; Imron, Muhammad Ali; Dworschak, Kai; Schopf, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Dispersal is a key process in the response of insect populations to rapidly changing environmental conditions. Variability among individuals, regarding the timing of dispersal initiation and travelled distance from source, is assumed to contribute to increased population success through risk spreading. However, experiments are often limited in studying complex dispersal interactions over space and time. By applying a local-scaled individual-based simulation model we studied dispersal and emerging infestation patterns in a host - bark beetle system (Picea abies - Ips typgraphus). More specifically, we (i) investigated the effect of individual variability in beetle physiology (flight capacity) and environmental heterogeneity (host susceptibility level) on population-level dispersal success, and (ii) elucidated patterns of spatial and/or temporal variability in individual dispersal success, host selectivity, and the resulting beetle density within colonized hosts in differently susceptible environments. Individual variability in flight capacity of bark beetles causes predominantly positive effects on population-level dispersal success, yet these effects are strongly environment-dependent: Variability is most beneficial in purely resistant habitats, while positive effects are less pronounced in purely susceptible habitats, and largely absent in habitats where host susceptibility is spatially scattered. Despite success rates being highest in purely susceptible habitats, scattered host susceptibility appeared most suitable for dispersing bark beetle populations as it ensures population spread without drastically reducing success rates. At the individual level, dispersal success generally decreases with distance to source and is lowest in early flight cohorts, while host selectivity increased and colonization density decreased with increasing distance across all environments. Our modelling approach is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying movement ecology in

  15. Evaluating targeted interventions via meta-population models with multi-level mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhilan; Hill, Andrew N.; Curns, Aaron T.; Glasser, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Among the several means by which heterogeneity can be modeled, Levins’ (1969) meta-population approach preserves the most analytical tractability, a virtue to the extent that generality is desirable. When model populations are stratified, contacts among their respective sub-populations must be described. Using a simple meta-population model, Feng et al. (2015) showed that mixing among sub-populations, as well as heterogeneity in characteristics affecting sub-population reproduction numbers, must be considered when evaluating public health interventions to prevent or control infectious disease outbreaks. They employed the convex combination of preferential within- and proportional among-group contacts first described by Nold (1980) and subsequently generalized by Jacquez et al. (1988). As the utility of meta-population modeling depends on more realistic mixing functions, the authors added preferential contacts between parents and children and among co-workers (Glasser et al. 2012). Here they further generalize this function by including preferential contacts between grandparents and grandchildren, but omit workplace contacts. They also describe a general multi-level mixing scheme, provide three two-level examples, and apply two of them. In their first application, the authors describe age- and gender-specific patterns in face-to-face conversations (Mossong et al. 2008), proxies for contacts by which respiratory pathogens might be transmitted, that are consistent with everyday experience. This suggests that meta-population models with inter-generational mixing could be employed to evaluate prolonged school-closures, a proposed pandemic mitigation measure that could expose grandparents, and other elderly surrogate caregivers for working parents, to infectious children. In their second application, the authors use a meta-population SEIR model stratified by 7 age groups and 50 states plus the District of Columbia, to compare actual with optimal vaccination during the

  16. Evaluating targeted interventions via meta-population models with multi-level mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhilan; Hill, Andrew N; Curns, Aaron T; Glasser, John W

    2017-05-01

    Among the several means by which heterogeneity can be modeled, Levins' (1969) meta-population approach preserves the most analytical tractability, a virtue to the extent that generality is desirable. When model populations are stratified, contacts among their respective sub-populations must be described. Using a simple meta-population model, Feng et al. (2015) showed that mixing among sub-populations, as well as heterogeneity in characteristics affecting sub-population reproduction numbers, must be considered when evaluating public health interventions to prevent or control infectious disease outbreaks. They employed the convex combination of preferential within- and proportional among-group contacts first described by Nold (1980) and subsequently generalized by Jacquez et al. (1988). As the utility of meta-population modeling depends on more realistic mixing functions, the authors added preferential contacts between parents and children and among co-workers (Glasser et al., 2012). Here they further generalize this function by including preferential contacts between grandparents and grandchildren, but omit workplace contacts. They also describe a general multi-level mixing scheme, provide three two-level examples, and apply two of them. In their first application, the authors describe age- and gender-specific patterns in face-to-face conversations (Mossong et al., 2008), proxies for contacts by which respiratory pathogens might be transmitted, that are consistent with everyday experience. This suggests that meta-population models with inter-generational mixing could be employed to evaluate prolonged school-closures, a proposed pandemic mitigation measure that could expose grandparents, and other elderly surrogate caregivers for working parents, to infectious children. In their second application, the authors use a meta-population SEIR model stratified by 7 age groups and 50 states plus the District of Columbia, to compare actual with optimal vaccination during the

  17. Gender differences of cannabis smoking on serum leptin levels: population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda P. Moreira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the serum leptin levels in cannabis smokers. Methods: This was a cross-sectional population-based study of participants between the ages of 18 and 35 years. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire covering sociodemographic data and the use of psychoactive substances. Leptin levels were measured using a commercial ELISA kit. Results: Of the 911 participants, 6.7% were identified as cannabis smokers and had significantly lower leptin levels (p = 0.008. When stratified by gender, there was a significant decrease in leptin levels among male smokers (p = 0.039. Conclusion: Cannabis smoking was linked to leptin levels in men, suggesting that the response to biological signals may be different between men and women.

  18. Gender differences of cannabis smoking on serum leptin levels: population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Fernanda P; Wiener, Carolina D; Oliveira, Jacqueline F de; Souza, Luciano D M; da Silva, Ricardo A; Portela, Luis V; Lara, Diogo R; Jansen, Karen; Oses, Jean Pierre

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the serum leptin levels in cannabis smokers. This was a cross-sectional population-based study of participants between the ages of 18 and 35 years. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire covering sociodemographic data and the use of psychoactive substances. Leptin levels were measured using a commercial ELISA kit. Of the 911 participants, 6.7% were identified as cannabis smokers and had significantly lower leptin levels (p = 0.008). When stratified by gender, there was a significant decrease in leptin levels among male smokers (p = 0.039). Cannabis smoking was linked to leptin levels in men, suggesting that the response to biological signals may be different between men and women.

  19. Population-level interventions to reduce alcohol-related harm: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Fred; Tyner, Elizabeth; Lorenc, Theo; Petticrew, Mark; Lock, Karen

    2013-10-01

    To analyse available review-level evidence on the effectiveness of population-level interventions in non-clinical settings to reduce alcohol consumption or related health or social harm. Health, social policy and specialist review databases between 2002 and 2012 were searched for systematic reviews of the effectiveness of population-level alcohol interventions on consumption or alcohol-related health or social outcomes. Data were extracted on review research aim, inclusion criteria, outcome indicators, results, conclusions and limitations. Reviews were quality-assessed using AMSTAR criteria. A narrative synthesis was conducted overall and by policy area. Fifty-two reviews were included from ten policy areas. There is good evidence for policies and interventions to limit alcohol sale availability, to reduce drink-driving, to increase alcohol price or taxation. There is mixed evidence for family- and community-level interventions, school-based interventions, and interventions in the alcohol server setting and the mass media. There is weak evidence for workplace interventions and for interventions targeting illicit alcohol sales. There is evidence of the ineffectiveness of interventions in higher education settings. There is a pattern of support from the evidence base for regulatory or statutory enforcement interventions over local non-regulatory approaches targeting specific population groups. © 2013.

  20. Broadened population-level frequency tuning in the auditory cortex of tinnitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Kenichi; Takahashi, Mariko; Murakami, Shingo; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Okamoto, Hidehiko

    2017-03-01

    Tinnitus is a phantom auditory perception without an external sound source and is one of the most common public health concerns that impair the quality of life of many individuals. However, its neural mechanisms remain unclear. We herein examined population-level frequency tuning in the auditory cortex of unilateral tinnitus patients with similar hearing levels in both ears using magnetoencephalography. We compared auditory-evoked neural activities elicited by a stimulation to the tinnitus and nontinnitus ears. Objective magnetoencephalographic data suggested that population-level frequency tuning corresponding to the tinnitus ear was significantly broader than that corresponding to the nontinnitus ear in the human auditory cortex. The results obtained support the hypothesis that pathological alterations in inhibitory neural networks play an important role in the perception of subjective tinnitus.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Although subjective tinnitus is one of the most common public health concerns that impair the quality of life of many individuals, no standard treatment or objective diagnostic method currently exists. We herein revealed that population-level frequency tuning was significantly broader in the tinnitus ear than in the nontinnitus ear. The results of the present study provide an insight into the development of an objective diagnostic method for subjective tinnitus. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Increased iron levels and lipid peroxidation in a Mediterranean population of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Nuria; Fernandez-Cao, Jose Candido; Tous, Monica; Arija, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    Many chronic diseases are adversely affected by elevated iron levels. It has been speculated that this relationship is mediated by increased oxidative stress, due to the ability of iron to generate reactive oxygen species. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between elevated iron levels and lipid peroxidation in Caucasian adults residing in the north-eastern Mediterranean region of Spain. This cross-sectional case-control study included 300 subjects: 150 adults displaying elevated iron levels (cases) selected from a representative sample of our general population and 150 age- and sex-matched adults exhibiting normal iron levels (controls). Dietary assessment (3-day food records), iron biomarkers (serum iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation) and lipid profile were determined. Elevated iron levels were defined by high serum ferritin (SF>110 μg/L in women and>200 μg/L in men) and/or transferrin saturation (TS)>45%. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) plasma levels were measured, and oxLDL/LDL-cholesterol ratio was calculated to estimate lipid peroxidation. Multiple linear regression (MLR) models were applied. Individuals with elevated serum iron levels showed increased oxLDL/LDL ratio, but not oxLDL levels, compared to control subjects (20·92 ± 4·89 U/mmol vs. 19·72 ± 3·573 U/mmol, P = 0·028). These results were further confirmed by the regression models adjusted for demographic characteristics, diet, lipid profile and inflammation. Importantly, higher serum levels of triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and lower intake of Vitamin E increased lipid peroxidation. In our general population, we have observed that higher circulating levels of iron, measured by serum ferritin and/or TS, increased lipid peroxidation (measured by oxLDL/LDL ratio). © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  2. Fasting time and lipid levels in a community-based population: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Davinder; Naugler, Christopher

    2012-12-10

    Although current guidelines recommend measuring lipid levels in a fasting state, recent studies suggest that nonfasting lipid profiles change minimally in response to food intake and may be superior to fasting levels in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between fasting times and lipid levels. Cross-sectional examination of laboratory data, including fasting duration (in hours) and lipid results, was performed over a 6-month period in 2011 in a large community-based cohort. Data were obtained from Calgary Laboratory Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, the sole supplier of laboratory services for Calgary and surrounding areas (source population, 1.4 million persons). The main outcome measures were mean levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglycerides for fasting intervals from 1 hour to more than 16 hours. After differences in individual ages were controlled for, linear regression models were used to estimate the mean levels of cholesterol subclasses at different fasting times. A total of 209,180 individuals (111,048 females and 98,132 males) were included in the study. The mean levels of total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol differed little among individuals with various fasting times. The mean calculated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels showed slightly greater variations of up to 10% among groups of patients with different fasting intervals, and the mean triglyceride levels showed variations of up to 20%. Fasting times showed little association with lipid subclass levels in a community-based population, which suggests that fasting for routine lipid levels is largely unnecessary.

  3. Area-level poverty and preterm birth risk: A population-based multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muglia Louis A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is a complex disease with etiologic influences from a variety of social, environmental, hormonal, genetic, and other factors. The purpose of this study was to utilize a large population-based birth registry to estimate the independent effect of county-level poverty on preterm birth risk. To accomplish this, we used a multilevel logistic regression approach to account for multiple co-existent individual-level variables and county-level poverty rate. Methods Population-based study utilizing Missouri's birth certificate database (1989–1997. We conducted a multilevel logistic regression analysis to estimate the effect of county-level poverty on PTB risk. Of 634,994 births nested within 115 counties in Missouri, two levels were considered. Individual-level variables included demographics factors, prenatal care, health-related behavioral risk factors, and medical risk factors. The area-level variable included the percentage of the population within each county living below the poverty line (US census data, 1990. Counties were divided into quartiles of poverty; the first quartile (lowest rate of poverty was the reference group. Results PTB th quartile (4.9%, p adjOR 1.18 (95% CI 1.03, 1.35, with a similar effect at earlier gestational ages (adjOR 1.27 (95% CI 1.06, 1.52. Conclusion Women residing in socioeconomically deprived areas are at increased risk of preterm birth, above other underlying risk factors. Although the risk increase is modest, it affects a large number of pregnancies.

  4. Level of Immunological Protection against Diphtheria in the Population of Dnipropetrovsk Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.O. Revenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diphtheria — an infectious disease, the spread of which is limited by population post-vaccination immunity. In the system of epidemiological surveillance of diphtheria, for objective assessment and prediction of epidemic situation in low intensity of epidemic process of this infection, the serological control of immunity is crucial. The objective: prognosis of epidemic situation in terms of the risk of diphtheria outbreaks in Ukraine by the detection of population post-vaccination immunity against diphtheria in Dnipropetrovsk region and evaluation of the effectiveness of widespread vaccination. Materials and methods. 483 people aged 0 to 78 years were examined in total in 2015 (children — 234, adults — 249 persons. Evaluation of specific immunity against diphtheria was carried on with the following criteria: those with levels of antibodies 0.015–0.06 IU/mL should be considered as relatively protected; 0.1–0.5 IU/ml — with average level of protection; > 1.0 IU/ml — with high level of protection. Protective antibody titer should be considered the concentration of not less than 0.1 IU/ml. Results. It was established that the level of protective immunity against diphtheria was 69.5 %. Reliable level of immunological protection of children was 70.9 %, among adults — 68.3 %. None age group had sufficient threshold level of antitoxic immunity required to stop the transmission of diphtheria pathogen. Percentage of protected persons decreased with increasing age of people (both in children and adults. This situation may create conditions for outbreaks of diphtheria in Dnipropetrovsk region. Conclusions. The presented results indicate the importance of maintaining protective antibody levels through widespread immunization of children, as well as booster vaccination among adolescents and adults that will exclude the category of susceptible layer of the population.

  5. Wildlife ecotoxicology of pesticides: can we track effects to the population level and beyond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Heinz-R; Triebskorn, Rita

    2013-08-16

    During the past 50 years, the human population has more than doubled and global agricultural production has similarly risen. However, the productive arable area has increased by just 10%; thus the increased use of pesticides has been a consequence of the demands of human population growth, and its impact has reached global significance. Although we often know a pesticide's mode of action in the target species, we still largely do not understand the full impact of unintended side effects on wildlife, particularly at higher levels of biological organization: populations, communities, and ecosystems. In these times of regional and global species declines, we are challenged with the task of causally linking knowledge about the molecular actions of pesticides to their possible interference with biological processes, in order to develop reliable predictions about the consequences of pesticide use, and misuse, in a rapidly changing world.

  6. Population-level preferences for primary care physicians' characteristics in Japan: a structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Osamu; Ohde, Sachiko; Jacobs, Joshua L; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Yanai, Haruo; Okubo, Tomoya; Shimbo, Takuro; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Hinohara, Shigeaki; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2010-01-01

    Primary care has potential to play a role for improving the patient care in Japanese health care system; however, little information is available about how patients perceive the roles of primary care physicians (PCPs) within the Japanese health care system. We aimed to assess population-level preferences for PCPs and investigated the extent to which preferences vary in relation to different population groups in Japan. Data were extracted from a cross-sectional questionnaire survey in October 2003. An 18-item questionnaire was used to measure the preferences for PCPs. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to identify latent factors, while confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the fit of the structure using structural equation modeling (SEM). Nationally representative sample of the adult Japanese general population was chosen by controlling for age, sex, and the size of cities. A total of 2,453 adults>or=18-years-old were analyzed. SEM provided a 4-factor structural model of the population-level preference for PCPs, such as clinical competence (path coefficient (pc)=0.72), gate-keeping (pc=0.64), communication with patients or specialists (pc=0.49) and high education (pc=0.25) and demonstrated the best goodness-of-fit. Those who were middle aged, have a high family income, and a high level of education, placed more importance on gate-keeping characteristics, and the rural residents emphasized communication rather than clinical competence. Our results indicate that the preferences for PCPs are divided into four main factors and underscore the variation among preferences according to different population groups, such as age, socioeconomic and educational status, and places of living. These variations should be considered to improve the primary care system in Japan.

  7. Host Genotype and Hypersensitive Reaction Influence Population Levels of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians in Lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Carolee T; Gebben, Samantha J; Goldman, Polly H; Trent, Mark; Hayes, Ryan J

    2015-03-01

    Dynamics of population sizes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians inoculated onto or into lettuce leaves were monitored on susceptible and resistant cultivars. In general, population growth was greater for susceptible (Clemente, Salinas 88, Vista Verde) than resistant (Batavia Reine des Glaces, Iceberg, Little Gem) cultivars. When spray-inoculated or infiltrated, population levels of X. campestris pv. vitians were consistently significantly lower on Little Gem than on susceptible cultivars, while differences in the other resistant cultivars were not consistently statistically significant. Populations increased at an intermediate rate on cultivars Iceberg and Batavia Reine des Glaces. There were significant positive correlations between bacterial concentration applied and disease severity for all cultivars, but bacterial titer had a significantly greater influence on disease severity in the susceptible cultivars than in Little Gem and an intermediate influence in Iceberg and Batavia Reine des Glaces. Infiltration of X. campestris pv. vitians strains into leaves of Little Gem resulted in an incompatible reaction, whereas compatible reactions were observed in all other cultivars. It appears that the differences in the relationship between population dynamics for Little Gem and the other cultivars tested were due to the hypersensitive response in cultivar Little Gem. These findings have implications for disease management and lettuce breeding because X. campestris pv. vitians interacts differently with cultivars that differ for resistance mechanisms.

  8. Migration induced by sea-level rise could reshape the US population landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Mathew E.

    2017-04-01

    Many sea-level rise (SLR) assessments focus on populations presently inhabiting vulnerable coastal communities, but to date no studies have attempted to model the destinations of these potentially displaced persons. With millions of potential future migrants in heavily populated coastal communities, SLR scholarship focusing solely on coastal communities characterizes SLR as primarily a coastal issue, obscuring the potential impacts in landlocked communities created by SLR-induced displacement. Here I address this issue by merging projected populations at risk of SLR with migration systems simulations to project future destinations of SLR migrants in the United States. I find that unmitigated SLR is expected to reshape the US population distribution, potentially stressing landlocked areas unprepared to accommodate this wave of coastal migrants--even after accounting for potential adaptation. These results provide the first glimpse of how climate change will reshape future population distributions and establish a new foundation for modelling potential migration destinations from climate stressors in an era of global environmental change.

  9. Levels of seven urinary phthalate metabolites in a human reference population.

    OpenAIRE

    Blount, B.C.; Silva, M J; Caudill, S P; Needham, L L; Pirkle, J L; Sampson, E.J.; Lucier, G W; Jackson, R. J.; Brock, J W

    2000-01-01

    Using a novel and highly selective technique, we measured monoester metabolites of seven commonly used phthalates in urine samples from a reference population of 289 adult humans. This analytical approach allowed us to directly measure the individual phthalate metabolites responsible for the animal reproductive and developmental toxicity while avoiding contamination from the ubiquitous parent compounds. The monoesters with the highest urinary levels found were monoethyl phthalate (95th percen...

  10. A Micro-Level Event-Centered Approach to Investigating Armed Conflict and Population Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Nathalie E.; Ghimire, Dirgha J.; Axinn, William G.; Jennings, Elyse A.; Pradhan, Meeta S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we construct and test a micro-level event-centered approach to the study of armed conflict and behavioral responses in the general population. Event-centered approaches have been successfully used in the macro-political study of armed conflict but have not yet been adopted in micro-behavioral studies. The micro-level event-centered approach that we advocate here includes decomposition of a conflict into discrete political and violent events, examination of the mechanisms thro...

  11. Electronic structure of CeO studied by a four-component relativistic configuration interaction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Hiroko; Tatewaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi

    2013-06-01

    We studied the ground and excited states of CeO using the restricted active space CI method in the energy range below 25 000 cm-1. Energy levels are computed to within errors of 2700 cm-1. Electron correlation effects arising from the ionic core composed of Ce 5s, 5p, 4f*, 5d*, and O 2s, 2p spinors play crucial role to CeO spectra, as well as correlation effects of electrons distributed in the valence Ce 4f, 5d, 6s, and 6p spinors. Here, 4f* and 5d* denote spinors expanded to describe electron polarization between Ce and O. A bonding mechanism is proposed for CeO. As the two separate atoms in their ground states, Ce (4f 15d16s2) 1G4 and O (2s22p4) 3P2, approach each other, a CeO2+ core is formed by two-electron transfer from Ce 5d, 6s to O 2p. Inside this ellipsoidal ion, a valence bond between Ce 5p and O 2s and an ionic bond between O 2p and Ce 5p are formed with back-donation through Ce 4f* and 5d*.

  12. Redox enzyme-mimicking activities of CeO2nanostructures: Intrinsic influence of exposed facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yushi; Mao, Zhou; Huang, Wenjie; Liu, Lihua; Li, Junli; Li, Jialiang; Wu, Qingzhi

    2016-10-17

    CeO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) have been well demonstrated as an antioxidant in protecting against oxidative stress-induced cellular damages and a potential therapeutic agent for various diseases thanks to their redox enzyme-mimicking activities. The Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio and oxygen vacancies on the surface have been considered as the major originations responsible for the redox enzyme-mimicking activities of CeO 2 NPs. Herein, CeO 2 nanostructures (nanocubes and nanorods) exposed different facets were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method. The characterizations by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectroscopy show that the Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio and oxygen vacancy content on the surfaces of as-synthesized CeO 2 nanostructures are nearly at the same levels. Meanwhile, the enzymatic activity measurements indicate that the redox enzyme-mimicking activities of as-synthesized CeO 2 nanostructures are greatly dependent on their exposed facets. CeO 2 nanocubes with exposed {100} facets exhibit a higher peroxidase but lower superoxide dismutase activity than those of the CeO 2 nanorods with exposed {110} facets. Our results provide new insights into the redox enzyme-mimicking activities of CeO 2 nanostructures, as well as the design and synthesis of inorganic nanomaterials-based artificial enzymes.

  13. Relationship between body habitus and joint leptin levels in a knee osteoarthritis population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Takahashi, Mark; Syed, Khalid; Davey, J Rod; Mahomed, Nizar N

    2010-03-01

    Synovial fluid (SF) leptin has been shown to have an association with cartilage degeneration. Our objective was to examine the relationship between different measures of body habitus and SF leptin levels in an end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) population. Sixty consecutive patients with knee OA were surveyed prior to surgery for demographic data. Body habitus was assessed with the body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-hip ratio (WHR). SF and serum samples were analyzed for leptin and adiponectin using specific ELISA. Nonparametric correlations and linear regression modeling was used to identify the relationship between the measures of body habitus and SF leptin levels. Females had greater levels of leptin than males in both the serum and SF. Significant correlations were found between SF leptin levels and BMI and WC (R(2) 0.44 and 0.38, respectively; p habitus than BMI in the relationship between the metabolic effects of adipose tissue and OA.

  14. RESONAN--CE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    be posed as well as with regard to the methodology and rigourthat can be brought to bear on those problems. ... Empirical and theoretical research in evolutionary genetics esp. evolution oflife-histories, developmen- ... Empirical research in population genetics esp. patterns of distribution of genetic variation for morpho-.

  15. Level of knowledge among the population of radiation safety basic issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Zelencova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of research was to determine the level of knowledge among the population on issues like sources of ionising radiation, methods of ionising radiation measurement, measures of self-protection in case of threating or actual radioactive pollution in the district, and to study self-estimation by the population of their knowledge of radiation safety issues. Research was carried out using the method of questioning of population groups in three regions close to the places of previous peaceful nuclear explosions (Arkhangelsk, Murmansk and Tyumen regions, and in five Far East regions of the Russian Federation (Kamchatka, Khabarovsk, Primorsky, Magadan and South-Sakhalin regions after radiation accident in Japan at "Fukushima-1" NPP. This research included processing of 243 questionnaires from the regions close to places of previous peaceful nuclear explosions and 216 questionnaires from the Far East regions.The analysis of obtained questioning results enabled to make the following conclusions: the level of knowledge among the population about the basic concepts of radiation safety appeared to be generally low among respondents of all eight territories. Considerable number of respondents in seven groups correctly mentioned the x-ray device as a source of ionising radiation (from 71 to 88 % of answers. In Murmansk region – only 52 % of the answers. Respondents of the same seven groups often correctly answered the question on how to detect ionising radiation (only with devices – from 68 to 98 % in different groups. The smallest number of correct answers to this question (42 % is also noted among respondents from the Murmansk region.Level of knowledge on self-protection measures at threating or actual radioactive pollution of the places of residence appeared a little higher among the Far East region population, who had actual concerns regarding the threat of radioactive pollution at the present time. However, in all eight investigated groups

  16. Influences of APOA5 variants on plasma triglyceride levels in Uyghur population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyuan Li

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5 gene are associated with triglyceride (TG levels. However, the minor allele frequencies and linkage disequilibriums (LDs of the SNPs in addition to their effects on TG levels vary greatly between Caucasians and East Asians. The distributions of the SNPs/haplotypes and their associations with TG levels in Uyghur population, an admixture population of Caucasians and East Asians, have not been reported to date. Here, we performed a cross-sectional study to address these.Genotyping of four SNPs in APOA5 (rs662799, rs3135506, rs2075291, and rs2266788 was performed in 1174 unrelated Uyghur subjects. SNP/haplotype and TG association analyses were conducted.The frequencies of the SNPs in Uyghurs were in between those in Caucasians and East Asians. The LD between rs662799 and rs2266788 in Uyghurs was stronger than that in East Asians but weaker than that in Caucasians, and the four SNPs resulted in four haplotypes (TGGT, CGGC, TCGT, and CGTT arranged in the order of rs662799, rs3135506, rs2075291, and rs2266788 representing 99.2% of the population. All the four SNPs were significantly associated with TG levels. Compared with non-carriers, carriers of rs662799-C, rs3135506-C, rs2075291-T, and rs2266788-C alleles had 16.0%, 15.1%, 17.1%, and 12.4% higher TG levels, respectively. When haplotype TGGT was defined as the reference, the haplotypes CGGC, TCGT, and CGTT resulted in 16.1%, 19.0%, and 19.8% higher TG levels, respectively. The proportions of variance in TG explained by APOA5 locus were 2.5%, 0.3%, 0.4%, and 1.9% for single SNP rs662799, rs3135506, rs2075291, and rs2266788, respectively, and 3.0% for the haplotypes constructed by them.The association profiles between the SNPs and haplotypes at APOA5 locus and TG levels in this admixture population differed from those in Caucasians and East Asians. The functions of these SNPs and haplotypes need to be elucidated comprehensively.

  17. Circulating levels of fatty acid-binding protein family and metabolic phenotype in the general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutaro Ishimura

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are a family of 14-15-kDa proteins, and some FABPs have been to be used as biomarkers of tissue injury by leak from cells. However, recent studies have shown that FABPs can be secreted from cells into circulation. Here we examined determinants and roles of circulating FABPs in a general population. METHODS: From the database of the Tanno-Sobetsu Study, a study with a population-based cohort design, data in 2011 for 296 subjects on no medication were retrieved, and FABP1~5 in their serum samples were assayed. RESULTS: Level of FABP4, but not the other isoforms, showed a gender difference, being higher in females than in males. Levels of all FABPs were negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, but a distinct pattern of correlation with other clinical parameters was observed for each FABP isoform; significant correlates were alanine aminotransferase (ALT, blood pressure (BP, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP for FABP1, none besides eGFR for FABP2, age, BP, and BNP for FABP3, age, waist circumference (WC, BP, BNP, lipid variables, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, and HOMA-R for FABP4, and age, WC, BP, ALT, BNP, and HOMA-R for FABP5. FABP4 is the most strongly related to metabolic markers among FABPs. In a multivariate regression analysis, FABP4 level was an independent predictor of HOMA-R after adjustment of age, gender, WC, BP, HDL cholesterol, and hsCRP. CONCLUSIONS: Each FABP isoform level showed a distinct pattern of correlation with clinical parameters, although levels of all FABPs were negatively determined by renal function. Circulating FABP4 appears to be a useful biomarker for detecting pre-clinical stage of metabolic syndrome, especially insulin resistance, in the general population.

  18. The unrealised potential of bike share schemes to influence population physical activity levels - A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Adrian; Crane, Melanie; Drayton, Bradley Alan; Titze, Sylvia

    2017-02-20

    The recent proliferation of bike share schemes (BSS, also known as public bicycle use programs) in many cities has focused attention on their potential for reducing motorised traffic congestion, improving air quality and reducing car use. Since 2005, hundreds of bike share schemes have been implemented in many cities, with bike share usage patterns monitored in many of them. This paper assesses the development of BSS and provides a rationale for their potential health benefits. The key research question, as yet unanswered, is whether BSS themselves can contribute to improving population health, particularly through increasing population cycling, which would increase population levels of health-enhancing physical activity. This paper presents a framework for evaluating the contribution of BSS to population physical activity, and uses examples of new data analyses to indicate the challenges in answering this question. These illustrative analyses examine cycling in Australia, and [i] compares rates of cycling to work in BSS cities compared to the rest of Australia over time, and [ii] modelling trends in bike counts in Central Melbourne before and after introduction of the BSS in 2010, and compared to adjacent regions in nearby suburbs unexposed to a BSS. These indicative examples point to difficulties in attributing causal increases in cycling for transport to the introduction of a BSS alone. There is an evidence gap, and a need to identify opportunities to improve the health-related components of BSS evaluations, to answer the question whether they have any impact on population physical activity levels. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Plasma selenium levels and oxidative stress biomarkers: a gene-environment interaction population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan-Chilet, Inmaculada; Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Guallar, Eliseo; De Marco, Griselda; Lopez-Izquierdo, Raul; Gonzalez-Manzano, Isabel; Carmen Tormos, M; Martin-Nuñez, Gracia M; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Saez, Guillermo T; Martín-Escudero, Juan C; Redon, Josep; Javier Chaves, F

    2014-09-01

    The role of selenium exposure in preventing chronic disease is controversial, especially in selenium-repleted populations. At high concentrations, selenium exposure may increase oxidative stress. Studies evaluating the interaction of genetic variation in genes involved in oxidative stress pathways and selenium are scarce. We evaluated the cross-sectional association of plasma selenium concentrations with oxidative stress levels, measured as oxidized to reduced glutathione ratio (GSSG/GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxo-dG) in urine, and the interacting role of genetic variation in oxidative stress candidate genes, in a representative sample of 1445 men and women aged 18-85 years from Spain. The geometric mean of plasma selenium levels in the study sample was 84.76 µg/L. In fully adjusted models the geometric mean ratios for oxidative stress biomarker levels comparing the highest to the lowest quintiles of plasma selenium levels were 0.61 (0.50-0.76) for GSSG/GSH, 0.89 (0.79-1.00) for MDA, and 1.06 (0.96-1.18) for 8-oxo-dG. We observed nonlinear dose-responses of selenium exposure and oxidative stress biomarkers, with plasma selenium concentrations above ~110 μg/L being positively associated with 8-oxo-dG, but inversely associated with GSSG/GSH and MDA. In addition, we identified potential risk genotypes associated with increased levels of oxidative stress markers with high selenium levels. Our findings support that high selenium levels increase oxidative stress in some biological processes. More studies are needed to disentangle the complexity of selenium biology and the relevance of potential gene-selenium interactions in relation to health outcomes in human populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Solution of a set of population balance equations for atomic and molecular quantum levels in some particular cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovka, A. A.

    1995-06-01

    Recursion solutions of population balance equations for levels of a quantum system were obtained. The solutions generalize Seaton's ones for the case when there is an outward leak of populations and an influx of populations from outside, and populations of levels are affected by either an equilibrium field of external radiation or stimulated collisional transitions. A recursion solution was also obtained for populations of rotational levels of a diatomic molecule in a nonequilibrium radiation field with an account for populations' outward leak and influx from outside (in particular, by means of radiative association and dissociation). The solutions suggested are compact; they allow us to quickly and conveniently calculate populations of atomic and molecular quantum levels in various astrophysical problems.

  1. Vitamin D Status in Population of Bukovyna and Subcarpathia Depending on Residence above Sea Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Povoroznyuk

    2016-08-01

    ding on the residence above sea level. Objective: to determine the level of vitamin D in the blood serum of people, who live in different regions of the Subcarpathia and Bukovyna, depending on the location of the settlement above sea le-vel. Material and methods. In the cross-sectional study, we have examined 353 individuals, aged 18 to 86 years, permanently residing in different parts of the Subcarpathia (Kolomyia, Kosiv, Verhovyna districts and Bukovyna (Vyzhny-tsia district. Results. Only in 28 cases (7.9 %, the content of 25(OHD in the blood serum was in the normal range, and in other cases (92.1 %, there was a deficiency and a lack of vitamin D. The severe form of vitamin D deficiency has been detected in 7 (1.9 % patients. When comparing the performance of 25(OHD in the areas of inspection, it was found that the level of vitamin D in the blood serum was significantly higher in residents of Verkhovyna and Kosiv districts (located higher than 450 meters above sea level as compared with residents of Vyzhnytsia and Kolomyia. Conclusion. The average level of vitamin D in the blood serum of the adult population depends on residence and increases with height above sea level.

  2. Neonate Auditory Brainstem Responses to CE-Chirp and CE-Chirp Octave Band Stimuli I: Versus Click and Tone Burst Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Kensi M; Stuart, Andrew

    The purpose of the study was to generate normative auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave component peak latency and amplitude values for neonates with air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band stimuli (i.e., 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz). A second objective was to compare neonate ABRs to CE-Chirp stimuli with ABR responses to traditional click and tone burst stimuli with the same stimulus parameters. Participants were 168 healthy neonates. ABRs were obtained to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirp and click stimuli and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band and tone burst stimuli. The effects of stimulus level, rate, and polarity were examined with air-conducted CE-Chirps and clicks. The effect of stimulus level was also examined with bone-conducted CE-Chirps and clicks and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band stimuli. In general, ABR wave V amplitudes to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirp stimuli were significantly larger (p < 0.05) than those evoked to traditional click and tone burst stimuli. Systematic statistically significant (p < 0.05) wave V latency differences existed between the air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirp and CE-Chirp octave band stimuli relative to traditional click and tone burst stimuli. ABRs to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps and CE-Chirp octave band stimuli may be valuable in the assessment of newborn infants. However, the prognostic value of such stimuli needs to be validated.

  3. Association between blood lead levels and blood pressures in a non-smoking healthy Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Rae; Ko, Ki Dong; Hwang, In Cheol; Suh, Heuy Sun; Kim, Kyoung Kon

    2017-09-01

    The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) has been performed every 3 years in Korea to help prevent cardiovascular mortality in the general population. Previous studies showed an association between blood lead levels and cardiovascular mortality. In order to assess the relationship between blood lead concentration and blood pressure in the healthy general population, we investigated whether blood lead levels were related to blood pressure in a non-smoking healthy population without any known medical diseases in the 2013 KNHANES. 896 (mean age 40.55±13.83 years; body mass index 23.06±3.33 kg/m 2 ) subjects who had no known diseases were included among 8018 subjects. Exclusion criteria were: hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, cerebrovascular events, renal insufficiency, liver cirrhosis, thyroid dysfunction, any cardiovascular or renal disease, and any malignancy. Blood pressures were measured three times by sphygmomanometers, 5 min apart. Blood pressures were then expressed as the average between the second and third values. Height, weight, waist circumferences and blood pressure, as well as total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), white blood cell count and blood lead levels were measured. In addition, dietary components were analysed by 24 hour recall. The association between log blood lead levels and systolic/diastolic pressure was stronger after it was controlled for age, sex, education, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (p=0.048, 0.002). Furthermore, the association between log blood lead levels and systolic pressure (p=0.048) and diastolic pressure (p=0.002) was more evident when controlled for age, sex, education, BMI, waist circumference, FPG, AST and ALT. Blood lead levels are significant determinants of systolic and diastolic blood pressure

  4. Risk factors for human-directed canine aggression in a referral level clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, M; Casey, R A; Loftus, B A; Blackwell, E J

    2017-07-07

    Risk factors for human-directed aggression were investigated using retrospective analysis of data from a referral-level clinical behaviour population in the UK. A sample of 200 cases involving human-directed canine aggression and 200 control cases involving no instance of human-directed aggression were selected at random from a population of 746 cases. The final model suggested that clinical cases with human-directed aggression were significantly younger than those presenting with other undesired behaviours (P=0.008) and that male dogs were 1.4 times more likely to be aggressive towards human beings than female dogs (P=0.019). Dogs were 1.7 times more likely to be aggressive towards people if they had attended more than five puppy classes than if they had never attended puppy class (P=0.015) and that dogs were 2.8 times more likely to be aggressive towards human beings if there was another dog between 0 months and 24 months of age in the home (P=0.004). These factors only account for 7 per cent to 10 per cent of the variance between the human-directed aggression population and the control population, but factors such as attendance at puppy classes and numbers of dogs in the household suggest the need for longitudinal studies to investigate temporal relationships.

  5. [Vitamin B12levels in the patient population attending an urban health centre in Madrid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero-Shelly, M

    2017-04-27

    Vitamin B 12 levels are usually measured in Primary Care when the patients have symptoms or risk factors associated with its deficiency, mostly in the elderly. However, no evidence has been found to support the recommendation of screening in the general population. The aim of this study is to assess the relevance of having extended the screening of vitamin B 12 deficiency to a younger population, after observing an increase in the prescription of this injected vitamin in a population under 65 years, by analysing the vitamin B 12 values obtained. A descriptive, retrospective, observational study was conducted on a sample consisting of 5,531 patients from Barajas Health Primary Centre, Madrid, between 2008 and 2012, and on whom a blood test was performed for any reason, with values of vitamin B 12 . A deficiency was found in 9.1% (SD 2.3) of the patients, of whom 49.4% were less than 65 years. The deficiencies were associated (P<.001, 95% CI) with age, dementia, changes in blood red cell counts, memory, and with the taking of metformin and proton pump inhibitors (P=.007). The prevalence of vitamin B 12 deficiency in our served population is similar in patients older and younger than 65 years. The extended screening was relevant. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Current and future assays for identifying recent HIV infections at the population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoleń-Dzirba, Joanna; Wąsik, Tomasz J

    2011-05-01

    The precise diagnosis of recent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is crucial for estimating HIV incidence, defined as the number of new infections in a population, per person at risk, during a specified time period. Incidence assessment is considered to be a tool for surveillance, public health and research. Differentiating recent from long-term HIV infections is possible thanks to the evaluation of HIV-specific immune response development or viral markers measurement. Several methods that enable the recognition of recent HIV-1 infection with the use of a single blood specimen have been developed, and their value for use in population level studies has been demonstrated. However, they are still inadequate due to a variable window period and false recent rates among HIV clades and across populations. Application of these assays at an individual level is far more questionable because of person-to-person variability in the antibody response and the course of HIV infection, and because of the prospective regulatory approval requirements. In this article we review the principles and the limitations of the currently available major laboratory techniques that allow detection of recent HIV infection. The assays based on the alteration of serological parameters, as well as the newest method based on an increase of HIV genetic diversity with the progress of infection, are described.

  7. Developing methods to assess and predict the population level effects of environmental contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emlen, J.M.; Springman, K.R.

    2007-01-01

    The field of ecological toxicity seems largely to have drifted away from what its title implies--assessing and predicting the ecological consequences of environmental contaminants--moving instead toward an emphasis on individual effects and physiologic case studies. This paper elucidates how a relatively new ecological methodology, interaction assessment (INTASS), could be useful in addressing the field's initial goals. Specifically, INTASS is a model platform and methodology, applicable across a broad array of taxa and habitat types, that can be used to construct population dynamics models from field data. Information on environmental contaminants and multiple stressors can be incorporated into these models in a form that bypasses the problems inherent in assessing uptake, chemical interactions in the environment, and synergistic effects in the organism. INTASS can, therefore, be used to evaluate the effects of contaminants and other stressors at the population level and to predict how changes in stressor levels or composition of contaminant mixtures, as well as various mitigation measures, might affect population dynamics.

  8. Developing methods to assess and predict the population and community level effects of environmental contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emlen, John M.; Springman, Kathrine R.

    2007-01-01

    The field of ecological toxicity seems largely to have drifted away from what its title implies—assessing and predicting the ecological consequences of environmental contaminants—moving instead toward an emphasis on individual effects and physiologic case studies. This paper elucidates how a relatively new ecological methodology, interaction assessment (INTASS), could be useful in addressing the field's initial goals. Specifically, INTASS is a model platform and methodology, applicable across a broad array of taxa and habitat types, that can be used to construct population dynamics models from field data. Information on environmental contaminants and multiple stressors can be incorporated into these models in a form that bypasses the problems inherent in assessing uptake, chemical interactions in the environment, and synergistic effects in the organism. INTASS can, therefore, be used to evaluate the effects of contaminants and other stressors at the population level and to predict how changes in stressor levels or composition of contaminant mixtures, as well as various mitigation measures, might affect population dynamics.

  9. Serum uric acid levels and mortality in the Japanese population: the Yamagata (Takahata) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Keita; Konta, Tsuneo; Ichikawa, Kazunobu; Sato, Hiroko; Suzuki, Natsuko; Kabasawa, Asami; Suzuki, Kazuko; Hirayama, Atsushi; Shibata, Yoko; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kato, Takeo; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kayama, Takamasa; Kubota, Isao

    2016-12-01

    Serum uric acid level is regulated by gender, dietary habit, genetic predisposition, and renal function, and is associated with the development of renal and cardiovascular diseases. This study prospectively investigated the association between serum uric acid levels and mortality in a community-based population. Three thousand four hundred and eighty-seven subjects regardless of the antihyperuricemic medication (45 % male; mean age 62 years old) from the Takahata town in Japan participated in this study and were followed up for 8 years (median 7.5 years). We examined the association between serum uric acid levels at baseline and the all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively, in this population. One hundred seventy-nine subjects died during the follow-up period, with 49 deaths attributed to cardiovascular causes. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the all-cause mortality was significantly higher along with the increase in serum uric acid levels at baseline among female (Log-rank P uric acid ≥7.0 mg/dL) was an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively, in female [hazard ratio (HR) 5.92, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.10-14.6 for all-cause mortality, and HR 10.7, 95 % CI 1.76-50.2 for cardiovascular mortality], but not male subjects. Hyperuricemia was an independent risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in female, but not among the male subjects in a community-based population.

  10. Association between TPO gene polymorphisms and Anti-TPO level in Tehranian population: TLGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faam, Bita; Daneshpour, Maryam Sadat; Azizi, Fereidoun; Salehi, Marzieh; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2012-04-25

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) gene variations are one cause of thyroid autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the T1936C, T2229C and A2257C polymorphisms of the TPO gene and Anti-TPO level. In this case-control study, 188 individuals (86 males and 102 females), aged 20-80 years, were randomly selected from among the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS) population. A2257C and T2229C SNPs were detected with RFLP by use of BsrI and Eco57I as the restriction enzymes respectively, while the T1936C SNP was determined with ARMS-PCR. In the presence of the C allele of T1936C, Anti-TPO level was significantly increased (CC: 238±43.3, CT: 47.7±15.9, TT: 74.1±11.3 IU/L p=0.002); however, this association was attenuated after adjustment for sex and age (p=0.059). No significant difference, before and after adjustment, was found in Anti-TPO level in the presence of T2229C SNP (CC: 129.1±24.5, CT: 43.5±12.6, TT: 126.5±13.8 IU/L p=0.196). The association between A2257C and Anti-TPO level was only significant after adjustment for potential confounders (p=0.007). The association between ATC and CTT haplotypes and Anti-TPO level was significant (p=0.023, 0.021 respectively), the association between CTT and Anti-TPO concentration was also significant after adjustment for sex (p=0.014). The results of the present study confirmed the association between TPO gene polymorphisms and Anti-TPO level in the Tehranian population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quaternary germanides RE{sub 3}TRh{sub 4}Ge{sub 4} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd; T = Nb, Ta) - a new coloring variant of the aristotype AlB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Vosswinkel, Daniel; Poettgen, Rainer [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Matar, Samir F. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2016-09-15

    The quaternary germanides RE{sub 3}TRh{sub 4}Ge{sub 4} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd; T = Nb, Ta) were synthesized from the elements by arc-melting and subsequent annealing in a muffle furnace. The structure of Ce{sub 3}TaRh{sub 4}Ge{sub 4} was refined from single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data: new type, Pbam, a = 719.9(2), b = 1495.0(3), c = 431.61(8), wR{sub 2} = 0.0678, 1004 F{sup 2} values, and 40 variables. Isotypy of the remaining phases was evident from X-ray powder patterns. Ce{sub 3}TaRh{sub 4}Ge{sub 4} is a new superstructure variant of the aristotype AlB{sub 2} with an ordering of cerium and tantalum on the aluminum site, whereas the honey-comb network is built up by a 1:1 ordering of rhodium and germanium. This crystal-chemical relationship is discussed based on a group-subgroup scheme. The distinctly different size of tantalum and cerium leads to a pronounced puckering of the [Rh{sub 4}Ge{sub 4}] network, which shows the shortest interatomic distances (253-271 pm Rh-Ge) within the Ce{sub 3}TaRh{sub 4}Ge{sub 4} structure. Another remarkable structural feature concerns the tantalum coordination with six shorter Ta-Rh bonds (265-266 pm) and six longer Ta-Ge bonds (294-295 pm). The [Rh{sub 4}Ge{sub 4}] network fully separates the tantalum and cerium atoms (Ce-Ce > 387 pm, Ta-Ta > 431 pm, and Ce-Ta > 359 pm). The electronic density of states DOS from DFT calculations show metallic behavior with large contributions of localized Ce 4f as well as itinerant ones from all constituents at the Fermi level but no significant magnetic polarization on Ce could be identified. The bonding characteristics described based on overlap populations illustrate further the crystal chemistry observations of the different coordination of Ce1 and Ce2 in Ce{sub 3}TaRh{sub 4}Ge{sub 4}. The Rh-Ge interactions within the network are highlighted as dominant. The bonding magnitudes follow the interatomic distances and identify differences of Ta bonding vs. Ce1/Ce2 bonding with the Rh and Ge

  12. Does vaccination ensure protection? Assessing diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels in a population of healthy children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowin, Ewelina; Wysocki, Jacek; Kałużna, Ewelina; Świątek-Kościelna, Bogna; Wysocka-Leszczyńska, Joanna; Michalak, Michał; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vaccination effectiveness is proven when the disease does not develop after a patient is exposed to the pathogen. In the case of rare diseases, vaccination effectiveness is assessed by monitoring specific antibody levels in the population. Such recurrent analyses allow the evaluation of vaccination programs. The primary schedule of diphtheria and tetanus vaccinations is similar in various countries, with differences mainly in the number and timing of booster doses. The aim of the study was to assess diphtheria and tetanus antibody concentrations in a population of healthy children. Diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels were analyzed in a group of 324 children aged 18 to 180 months. All children were vaccinated in accordance with the Polish vaccination schedule. Specific antibody concentrations greater than 0.1 IU/mL were considered protective against tetanus or diphtheria. Levels above 1.0 were considered to ensure long-term protection. Protective levels of diphtheria antibodies were found in 229 patients (70.46%), and of tetanus in 306 patients (94.15%). Statistically significant differences were found in tetanus antibody levels in different age groups. Mean concentrations and the percentage of children with high tetanus antibody titers increased with age. No similar correlation was found for diphtheria antibodies. High diphtheria antibody levels co-occurred in 72% of the children with high tetanus antibody levels; 95% of the children with low tetanus antibody levels had low levels of diphtheria antibodies. The percentage of children with protective diphtheria antibody levels is lower than that in the case of tetanus antibodies, both in Poland and abroad, but the high proportion of children without diphtheria protection in Poland is an exception. This is all the more puzzling when taking into account that Polish children are administered a total of 5 doses containing a high concentration of diphtheria toxoid, at intervals shorter than 5 years. The

  13. Polymorphisms in MTHFR, MS and CBS genes and homocysteine levels in a Pakistani population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsin Yakub

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperhomocysteinemia (>15 µmol/L is highly prevalent in South Asian populations including Pakistan. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of this condition, we studied 6 polymorphisms in genes of 3 enzymes--methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR; C677T; A1298C, methionine synthase (MS; A2756G, cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS; T833C/844ins68, G919A involved in homocysteine metabolism and investigated their interactions with nutritional and environmental factors in a Pakistani population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cross-sectional survey, 872 healthy adults (355 males and 517 females; age 18-60 years were recruited from a low-income urban population in Karachi. Fasting venous blood was obtained and assessed for plasma/serum homocysteine; folate, vitamin B12, pyridoxal phosphate and blood lead. DNA was isolated and genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP (restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism based assays. The average changes in homocysteine levels for MTHFR 677CT and TT genotypes were positive [β(SE β, 2.01(0.63 and 16.19(1.8 µmol/L, respectively]. Contrary to MTHFR C677T polymorphism, the average changes in plasma homocysteine levels for MS 2756AG and GG variants were negative [β(SE β, -0.56(0.58 and -0.83(0.99 µmol/L, respectively]. The average change occurring for CBS 844ins68 heterozygous genotype (ancestral/insertion was -1.88(0.81 µmol/L. The combined effect of MTHFR C677T, MS A2756G and CBS 844ins68 genotypes for plasma homocysteine levels was additive (p value <0.001. Odds of having hyperhomocysteinemia with MTHFR 677TT genotype was 10-fold compared to MTHFR 677CC genotype [OR (95%CI; 10.17(3.6-28.67]. Protective effect towards hyperhomocysteinemia was observed with heterozygous (ancestral/insertion genotype of CBS 844ins68 compared to homozygous ancestral type [OR (95% CI; 0.58 (0.34-0.99]. Individuals with MTHFR 677CT or TT genotypes were at a greater risk of hyperhomocysteinemia in folate and

  14. Maternal and cord blood levels of aldrin and dieldrin in Delhi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Md; Pathak, Rahul; Tripathi, A K; Ahmed, Rafat S; Guleria, Kiran; Banerjee, B D

    2010-12-01

    Aldrin and dieldrin, structurally similar organochlorine pesticides belong to cyclodiene family and were widely used for agriculture and public health program in India. Although the manufacturing, use and import of aldrin and dieldrin have been banned in India since 2003, these pesticides are still persistent in environment and may be associated with adverse neurological and reproductive effects. The aim of this study is to assess the recent exposure level of aldrin and dieldrin and their placental transfer to fetus in normal healthy full-term pregnant women belonging to north Indian population undergoing normal delivery at Obstetrics and Gynecology department of UCMS and GTB hospital, Delhi. Quantitative analysis of aldrin and dieldrin residues in maternal and cord blood samples were carried out by gas chromatography system equipped with electron capture detector. The results of our study clearly revealed that maternal and cord blood levels of aldrin and dieldrin of pregnant women are age and dietary habit dependent. The aldrin level in maternal blood and dieldrin level in cord blood are higher in women in the age group 25-30 years than in women in age group of 19-24 years. Similarly, aldrin level in maternal blood is significantly higher in women with non-vegetarian dietary habit than in women with vegetarian dietary habit. No significant association is found for maternal and cord blood level. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate prenatal uptake of aldrin and dieldrin and provide recent information on the subsequent transplacental transfer.

  15. Experience of measuring the level of victimization of the population of Nizhniy Novgorod region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Glukhova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective basing on the data from empirical sociological study to identify the level of latency and victimization of the population of Nizhny Novgorod region. Methods general scientific analysis systemicstructural approach to the analysis of object of research comparativelegal as well as logical methods and specific scientific method survey ndash questionnaires and interviews. nbsp Results qualitative and quantitative analysis is performed of the overall situation referring to unrecorded crime latent crime committed on the territory of Nizhny Novgorod city and Nizhny Novgorod oblast as well as comparative analysis of the level of latent crime in the city and region by the types and trends of criminal activities the main reasons are identified for refusal the victims to appeal to police in Nizhny Novgorod and Nizhny Novgorod oblast recommendations and proposals are elaborated of the work of territorial bodies of the Ministry of Domestic Affairs to the aim of reducing the level of latent crime. Scientific novelty for the first time on the basis of data obtained during a sociological survey the crime situation on the territory of Nizhny Novgorod region is discussed revealing the actual level of latent delinquency and proposals and practical recommendations are formulated for the adjustment of the work of territorial bodies of the Ministry of Domestic Affairs to the aim of reducing the level of latent crime. Practical significance basing on the research the recommendations are to improve the work of territorial bodies of the Ministry of Domestic Affairs to the aim of reducing the level of latent crime.

  16. Pulse propagation, population transfer, and light storage in five-level media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, G.; Chaltykyan, V.; Gazazyan, E.; Tikhova, O.; Paturyan, V.

    2015-02-01

    We consider adiabatic interaction of five-level atomic systems and their media with four short laser pulses under the condition of all two-photon detunings being zero. We derive analytical expressions for eigenvalues of the system's Hamiltonian and determine conditions of adiabaticity for both the atom and the medium. We analyze, in detail, the system's behavior when the eigenvalue with nonvanishing energy is realized. As distinct from the usual dark state of a five-level system (corresponding to zero eigenvalue), which is a superposition of three states, in our case the superposition of four states does work. We demonstrate that this seemingly unfavorable case nevertheless completely imitates a three-level system not only for a single atom but also in the medium, since the propagation equations are also split into those for three- and two-level media separately. We show that, under certain conditions, all the coherent effects observed in three-level media, such as population transfer, light slowing, light storage, and so on, may efficiently be realized in five-level media. This has an important advantage that the light storage can be performed twice in the same medium; i.e., the second pulse can be stored without retrieving the first one, and then the two pulses can be retrieved in any desired sequence.

  17. Mood change tendency and fasting plasma glucose levels in a Japanese female population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Kazuhiko; Shimohiro, Hisashi; Sakane, Naoki

    2007-12-01

    Internal stress can modify values in blood examinations such as glucose. Mood change releases us from the stress state, and the mood change tendency (MCT) may show individual differences. However, little is known about whether individual mood change tendencies in daily life affect fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels. We investigated the effects of clinical characteristics including age, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol habits and self-reported MCT (an answer to the inquiry on their daily MCT: good, average, or poor) on FPG values among 272 Japanese females (mean age 48.4 +/- 9.3 years). Subjects with normal to impaired fasting glucose levels (less than 7.0 mmol/L) were included in this study. The mean FPG levels in subjects with good, average and poor MCT were 5.32 +/- 0.48, 5.36 +/- 0.50 and 5.58 +/- 0.69 mmol/L, respectively. A significant difference was noted between subjects with good and poor MCT (p = 0.02). There was no significant difference in BMI levels among MCT-based groups. Pearson's rank correlation and multiple regression analysis, using FPG levels and other variables, demonstrated a significant relationship between FPG levels and MCT (p population.

  18. Stairs instead of elevators at the workplace decreases PCSK9 levels in a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamani, Christel H; Gencer, Baris; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Courvoisier, Delphine; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Meyer, Philippe; Mach, François

    2015-10-01

    Regular physical activity is recommended to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in a healthy population. Inhibition of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) was shown to reduce (LDL-C) levels; however, the impact of physical exercise on PCSK9 levels remains unclear. We used data from 67 healthy hospital employees who participated in a 6-month intervention promoting active use of stairs instead of elevators during 3 months, followed by 3 months without recommendation. We confirmed the degree of physical activity with estimated aerobic capacity (VO2 max ) and measured serum PCSK9 levels at baseline, 3 and 6 month. Using a multilevel regression model, we analysed changes of PCSK9 levels over time adjusting for age, gender, aerobic capacity, baseline LDL-C, and LDL-C and body mass index (BMI) changes. At baseline, PCSK9 levels were associated with higher aerobic capacity (P-value = 0·024). At 3 months, we observed a significant decrease in mean PCSK9 levels from 403·6 to 324·3 ng/mL (P-value = 0·001), as well a significant decrease in mean LDL-C levels from 3·5 to 3·3 mM (P-value = 0·01). During this period, mean aerobic capacity (VO2 max ) increased from 37·0 to 40·4 mL/kg/min (P-value < 0·001). Physical activity was independently associated with a decrease in PCSK9 levels after adjustment for age, gender, baseline aerobic capacity, and LDL-C and BMI changes. Daily physical activity at the work place is independently associated with a decrease in PCSK9 levels over time. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  19. Enhancing the Value of Population-Based Risk Scores for Institutional-Level Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Sajjad; Sabik, Joseph F; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Idrees, Jay J; Trezzi, Matteo; Riaz, Haris; Javadikasgari, Hoda; Nowicki, Edward R; Svensson, Lars G; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2016-07-01

    We hypothesized that factors associated with an institution's residual risk unaccounted for by population-based models may be identifiable and used to enhance the value of population-based risk scores for quality improvement. From January 2000 to January 2010, 4,971 patients underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR), either isolated (n = 2,660) or with concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (AVR+CABG; n = 2,311). Operative mortality and major morbidity and mortality predicted by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) risk models were compared with observed values. After adjusting for patients' STS score, additional and refined risk factors were sought to explain residual risk. Differences between STS model coefficients (risk-factor strength) and those specific to our institution were calculated. Observed operative mortality was less than predicted for AVR (1.6% [42 of 2,660] vs 2.8%, p risk factors, and body surface area, creatinine, glomerular filtration rate, blood urea nitrogen, and heart failure across all levels of functional class were identified as refined risk-factor variables associated with residual risk. In many instances, risk-factor strength differed substantially from that of STS models. Scores derived from population-based models can be enhanced for institutional level use by adjusting for institution-specific additional and refined risk factors. Identifying these and measuring differences in institution-specific versus population-based risk-factor strength can identify areas to target for quality improvement initiatives. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Projecting county-level populations under three future scenarios: a technical document supporting the Forest Service 2010 RPA Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley J. Zarnoch; H. Ken Cordell; Carter J. Betz; Linda Langner

    2010-01-01

    County-level population projections from 2010 to 2060 are developed under three national population growth scenarios for reporting in the 2010 Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment. These population growth scenarios are tied to global futures scenarios defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a program within the United Nations...

  1. Impact of high-level sport practice on anal incontinence in a healthy young female population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitton, Véronique; Baumstarck-Barrau, Karine; Brardjanian, Sarah; Caballe, Isabelle; Bouvier, Michel; Grimaud, Jean-Charles

    2011-05-01

    Regular physical activity usually confers health benefits, but high-level sport may induce harmful outcomes, such as pelvic floor dysfunction. Urinary incontinence (UI) was previously documented, but few data are available about anal incontinence (AI) in female athletes. Our aim was to determine the role of high-level sport practice on AI in a young, healthy female population. In this cross-sectional study, we included women aged 18-40 years. Self-administered questionnaires were delivered to each female volunteer. Two groups were defined: (1) intensive sport (IS) group: high-level sport (>8 hours weekly), and (2) nonintensive sport (NIS) group: all other subjects. Of the 393 women enrolled, 169 were in the IS group and 224 were in the NIS group. Women of the IS group were significantly younger than the others (21.74±4.28 vs. 24.87±5.61 years, psport appears to be a significant independent risk factor for AI in healthy young women. These results suggest that preventive measures, such as pelvic floor muscle training, may be proposed for this young population.

  2. A micro-level event-centered approach to investigating armed conflict and population responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nathalie E; Ghimire, Dirgha J; Axinn, William G; Jennings, Elyse A; Pradhan, Meeta S

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we construct and test a micro-level event-centered approach to the study of armed conflict and behavioral responses in the general population. Event-centered approaches have been successfully used in the macro-political study of armed conflict but have not yet been adopted in micro-behavioral studies. The micro-level event-centered approach that we advocate here includes decomposition of a conflict into discrete political and violent events, examination of the mechanisms through which they affect behavior, and consideration of differential risks within the population. We focus on two mechanisms: instability and threat of harm. We test this approach empirically in the context of the recent decade-long armed conflict in Nepal, using detailed measurements of conflict-related events and a longitudinal study of first migration, first marriage, and first contraceptive use. Results demonstrate that different conflict-related events independently shaped migration, marriage, and childbearing and that they can simultaneously influence behaviors in opposing directions. We find that violent events increased migration, but political events slowed migration. Both violent and political events increased marriage and contraceptive use net of migration. Overall, this micro-level event-centered approach yields a significant advance for the study of how armed conflict affects civilian behavioral responses.

  3. High level of pyrethroid resistance in an Anopheles funestus population of the Chokwe District in Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Cuamba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although Anopheles funestus is difficult to rear, it is crucial to analyse field populations of this malaria vector in order to successfully characterise mechanisms of insecticide resistance observed in this species in Africa. In this study we carried out a large-scale field collection and rearing of An. funestus from Mozambique in order to analyse its susceptibility status to insecticides and to broadly characterise the main resistance mechanisms involved in natural populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 3,000 F(1 adults were obtained through larval rearing. WHO susceptibility assays indicated a very high resistance to pyrethroids with no mortality recorded after 1 h 30 min exposure and less than 50% mortality at 3 h 30 min. Resistance to the carbamate, bendiocarb was also noted, with 70% mortality after 1h exposure. In contrast, no DDT resistance was observed, indicating that no kdr-type resistance was involved. The sequencing of the acetylcholinesterase gene indicated the absence of the G119S and F455W mutations associated with carbamate and organophosphate resistance. This could explain the absence of malathion resistance in this population. Both biochemical assays and quantitative PCR implicated up-regulated P450 genes in pyrethroid resistance, with GSTs playing a secondary role. The carbamate resistance observed in this population is probably conferred by the observed altered AChE with esterases also involved. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The high level of pyrethroid resistance in this population despite the cessation of pyrethroid use for IRS in 1999 is a serious concern for resistance management strategies such as rotational use of insecticides. As DDT has now been re-introduced for IRS, susceptibility to DDT needs to be closely monitored to prevent the appearance and spread of resistance to this insecticide.

  4. High level of pyrethroid resistance in an Anopheles funestus population of the Chokwe District in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuamba, Nelson; Morgan, John C; Irving, Helen; Steven, Andrew; Wondji, Charles S

    2010-06-08

    Although Anopheles funestus is difficult to rear, it is crucial to analyse field populations of this malaria vector in order to successfully characterise mechanisms of insecticide resistance observed in this species in Africa. In this study we carried out a large-scale field collection and rearing of An. funestus from Mozambique in order to analyse its susceptibility status to insecticides and to broadly characterise the main resistance mechanisms involved in natural populations. 3,000 F(1) adults were obtained through larval rearing. WHO susceptibility assays indicated a very high resistance to pyrethroids with no mortality recorded after 1 h 30 min exposure and less than 50% mortality at 3 h 30 min. Resistance to the carbamate, bendiocarb was also noted, with 70% mortality after 1h exposure. In contrast, no DDT resistance was observed, indicating that no kdr-type resistance was involved. The sequencing of the acetylcholinesterase gene indicated the absence of the G119S and F455W mutations associated with carbamate and organophosphate resistance. This could explain the absence of malathion resistance in this population. Both biochemical assays and quantitative PCR implicated up-regulated P450 genes in pyrethroid resistance, with GSTs playing a secondary role. The carbamate resistance observed in this population is probably conferred by the observed altered AChE with esterases also involved. The high level of pyrethroid resistance in this population despite the cessation of pyrethroid use for IRS in 1999 is a serious concern for resistance management strategies such as rotational use of insecticides. As DDT has now been re-introduced for IRS, susceptibility to DDT needs to be closely monitored to prevent the appearance and spread of resistance to this insecticide.

  5. Population dynamics of dechlorinators and factors affecting the level and products of PCB dechlorination in sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.S.; Sokol, R.C.; Liu, X.; Bethoney, C.M.; Rhee, G.Y. [State Univ. of New York and New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Microbial dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) often stops although a significant number of removable chlorines remain. To determine the reason for the cessation, we investigated the limitation of organic carbon, PCB bioavailability, and inhibition by metabolic products. Enrichment with carbon sources did not induce additional chlorination, indicating the plateau was not due to depletion of organic carbon. The bioavailability was not limiting, since a subcritical micelle concentration of the surfactant, which enhanced desorption without inhibiting dechlorinating microorganisms, failed to lower the plateau. Neither was it due to accumulation of metabolites, since no additional dechlorination was detected when plateau sediments were incubated with fresh medium. Similarly, dechlorination was not inhibited in freshly spiked sediment slurries. Dechlorination ended up at the same level with nearly identical congener profiles, regardless of treatment. These results indicate that cessation of dechlorination was due to the accumulation of daughter congeners, which cannot be used as electron acceptors by microbes. To determine whether the decreasing availability affected the microorganisms, we determined the population dynamics of dechlorinators using the most probable number technique. The growth dynamics of the dechlorinators mirrored the time course of dechlorination. It started when the population increased by two orders of magnitude. Once dechlorination stopped the dechlorinating population also began to decrease. When dechlorinators were inoculated into PCB-free sediments, the population decreased over time. The decrease of the population as dechlorination ceased confirms that the diminishing availability of congeners was the reason for the incomplete dechlorination. Recent findings have shown that a second phase of dechlorination of certain congeners can occur after a long lag. 45 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Physical activity levels and health-related quality of life in young Italian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massidda, M; Cugusi, L; Mathieu, A

    2015-05-01

    Significant levels of physical activity (PA) have benefit in reducing chronic diseases in the general adults, but little is known on the association between health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and PA levels among young population. This study aims to investigate the association between different levels of PA and HRQoL in a random sample of 155 Italian University students (age range: 18-30 years old). We used the short version of IPAQ and SF-36 to assess PA levels and HRQoL, respectively. Differences in HRQoL scores between the three IPAQ categories (low, moderate and high) were evaluated by the analysis of covariance (with age and BMI as covariates). Forward stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to determine the most predictive variables for a good HRQoL. A significant relationship between PA (Kcal/week and METs/week) and Physical Functioning, Role Physical, General Health, and Physical Summary Component scores was observed in women, while the Role Physical, and the Vitality were associated with PA in men. The amount of PA (day/week, Kcal/week and METs/week) significantly predicted the HRQoL scores and the variance explained by the function ranged from 5.75% to 14.24% for women and from 5.41% to 10.95% for men. The regular frequency of PA during the week was the most important positive predictors for the highest scores in most of HRQoL domains. Our results confirm that the highest PA Levels were associated with more favorable scores in HRQoL dimensions, also among young Italian population.

  7. The impact of the genotype on the prevalence of classical scrapie at population level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortiz-Pelaez Angel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Total number and genotypes of animals in holdings selected for the genotype & cull option in the Compulsory Scrapie Flock Scheme (CSFS in Great Britain were extracted from the National Scrapie Plan data warehouse. The association between various genotype-related measures and scrapie prevalence infection was tested using zero-inflated negative binomial models with the counts of positive cases as dependent variable, and country, number of flocks in the scheme, flock size, surveillance source and the following genotype-related measurements: the centered-log ratios (clr oof the 15 genotypes, of the proportions of the 5 alleles at codons 136, 154 and 171, of the proportions of the 5 NSP types, and two flock-susceptibility risk indicators, as explanatory variables. A total of 319341 genotyped animals from 168 holdings were included in the analysis. An increased proportion of the ARR/ARR genotype corresponded to a decrease in the number of scrapie cases. ARR/AHQ, AHQ/VRQ, ARH/VRQ and ARQ/VRQ genotypes, NSP type V, ARH, ARQ, AHQ and VRQ alleles and the low and high-susceptibility risk indicators are all associated with an increase risk in the number of scrapie cases. Regardless the management practices; the increased susceptibility that the non-ARR alleles confer on an individual could be extrapolated at the population level. Increasing prevalence of ARR allele reduces the overall risk of scrapie at population level. At genotype level, the VRQ/VRQ genotype, present a very low frequency in the study population, seems to play a residual effect in the overall risk of scrapie in a flock.

  8. The role of ethnicity in predicting diabetes risk at the population level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosella, Laura C.; Mustard, Cameron A.; Stukel, Therese A.; Corey, Paul; Hux, Jan; Roos, Les; Manuel, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The current form of the Diabetes Population Risk Tool (DPoRT) includes a non-specific category of ethnicity in concordance with publicly data available. Given the importance of ethnicity in influencing diabetes risk and its significance in a multi-ethnic population, it is prudent to determine its influence on a population-based risk prediction tool. Objective. To apply and compare the DPoRT with a modified version that includes detailed ethnic information in Canada's largest and most ethnically diverse province. Methods. Two additional diabetes prediction models were created: a model that contained predictors specific to the following ethnic groups – White, Black, Asian, south Asian, and First Nation; and a reference model which did not include a term for ethnicity. In addition to discrimination and calibration, 10-year diabetes incidence was compared. The algorithms were developed in Ontario using the 1996–1997 National Population Health Survey (N = 19,861) and validated in the 2000/2001 Canadian Community Health Survey (N = 26,465). Results. All non-white ethnicities were associated with higher risk for developing diabetes with south Asians having the highest risk. Discrimination was similar (0.75–0.77) and sufficient calibration was maintained for all models except the detailed ethnicity models for males. DPoRT produced the lowest overall ratio between observed and predicted diabetes risk. DPoRT identified more high risk cases than the other algorithms in males, whereas in females both DPoRT and the full ethnicity model identified more high risk cases. Overall DPoRT and full ethnicity algorithms were very similar in terms of predictive accuracy and population risk. Conclusion. Although from the individual risk perspective, incorporating information on ethnicity is important, when predicting new cases of diabetes at the population level and accounting for other risk factors, detailed ethnic information did not improve the discrimination and

  9. Population-level Spatial Access to Prehospital Care by the National Ambulance Service in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansley, Gavin; Stewart, Barclay; Zakariah, Ahmed; Boateng, Edmund; Achena, Christiana; Lewis, Daniel; Mock, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Conditions requiring emergency treatment disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where there is often insufficient prehospital care capacity. To inform targeted prehospital care development in Ghana, we aimed to describe spatial access to formal prehospital care services and identify ambulance stations for capacity expansion. Cost distance methods were used to evaluate areal and population-level access to prehospital care within 30 and 60 minutes of each of the 128 ambulance stations in Ghana. With network analysis methods, a two-step floating catchment area model was created to identify district-level variability in access. Districts without NAS stations within their catchment areas were identified as candidates for an additional NAS station. Additionally, five candidate stations for capacity expansion (e.g., addition of an ambulance) were then identified through iterative simulations that were designed to identify the stations that had the greatest influence on the access scores of the ten lowest access districts. Following NAS inception, the proportion of Ghana's landmass serviceable within 60 minutes of a station increased from 8.7 to 59.4% from 2004 to 2014, respectively. Over the same time period, the proportion of the population with access to the NAS within 60-minutes increased from 48% to 79%. The two-step floating catchment area model identified considerable variation in district-level access scores, which ranged from 0.05 to 2.43 ambulances per 100,000 persons (median 0.45; interquartile range 0.23-0.63). Seven candidate districts for NAS station addition and five candidate NAS stations for capacity expansion were identified. The addition of one ambulance to each of the five candidate stations improved access scores in the ten lowest access districts by a total 0.22 ambulances per 100,000 persons. The NAS in Ghana has expanded its population-level spatial access to the majority of the population; however, access inequality

  10. Polymorphisms in MTHFR, MS and CBS Genes and Homocysteine Levels in a Pakistani Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakub, Mohsin; Moti, Naushad; Parveen, Siddiqa; Chaudhry, Bushra; Azam, Iqbal; Iqbal, Mohammad Perwaiz

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperhomocysteinemia (>15 µmol/L) is highly prevalent in South Asian populations including Pakistan. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of this condition, we studied 6 polymorphisms in genes of 3 enzymes - methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR; C677T; A1298C), methionine synthase (MS; A2756G), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS; T833C/844ins68, G919A) involved in homocysteine metabolism and investigated their interactions with nutritional and environmental factors in a Pakistani population. Methodology/Principal Findings In a cross-sectional survey, 872 healthy adults (355 males and 517 females; age 18–60 years) were recruited from a low-income urban population in Karachi. Fasting venous blood was obtained and assessed for plasma/serum homocysteine; folate, vitamin B12, pyridoxal phosphate and blood lead. DNA was isolated and genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP (restriction-fragment-length- polymorphism) based assays. The average changes in homocysteine levels for MTHFR 677CT and TT genotypes were positive [β(SE β), 2.01(0.63) and 16.19(1.8) µmol/L, respectively]. Contrary to MTHFR C677T polymorphism, the average changes in plasma homocysteine levels for MS 2756AG and GG variants were negative [β(SE β), −0.56(0.58) and −0.83(0.99) µmol/L, respectively]. The average change occurring for CBS 844ins68 heterozygous genotype (ancestral/insertion) was −1.88(0.81) µmol/L. The combined effect of MTHFR C677T, MS A2756G and CBS 844ins68 genotypes for plasma homocysteine levels was additive (p value MTHFR 677TT genotype was 10-fold compared to MTHFR 677CC genotype [OR (95%CI); 10.17(3.6–28.67)]. Protective effect towards hyperhomocysteinemia was observed with heterozygous (ancestral/insertion) genotype of CBS 844ins68 compared to homozygous ancestral type [OR (95% CI); 0.58 (0.34–0.99)]. Individuals with MTHFR 677CT or TT genotypes were at a greater risk of hyperhomocysteinemia in folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies and high

  11. Population level of microbiota in colon of brestfed infants with acute colienteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rotar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the undeniable successes in the study of etiology and pathogenesis of acute intestinal infections in children made in recent decades, unfortunately, its’ result does not guarantee clear determination of etiology and mechanisms of development of the disease. This makes impossible to conduct a successful therapy and prevention. Aim: To determine the quantitative changes of microbiome in colon cavity in breastfed infants suffering from colienteritis. Material and methods: Content of colon cavity of 48 children (one to six months old suffered from colienteritis, which was studied with microbiological examination (control group – 35 samples of colon content of practically healthy children. Results: It was revealed that population level of Bifidobacteria in colon cavity in breastfed infants suffering from colienteritis reaches 10.87±0.79 lg CFU/g, Lactobacilli is lower by 12.29 %, Bacteroides – 51.39 %, Escherichia - by 36.39 %. This leads to the contamination of colon with pathogenic E. coli Hly+ in 27.08 % (7.79±0.27 lg CFU/g. Smaller (6.50±0.22 lg CFU/g population level is found in enteropathogenic Escherichia that contaminate biotope in 29.17 % of patients. There is experiencing elevation of population level of Staphylococci by 2.10 times and colonization of the biotope by pathogenic Escherichia (E. coli Hly+, EPEC and conditionally pathogenic Enterobacteria (Proteus spp., C. diversus, Peptococus. The results demonstrated that in majority of sick children there is formation of dysbacteriosis of I stage, and in other one (35.41 % - II-III stages. Conclusions: Acute colienteritis in one to six months old children, who are bestfeded, develops on the background of prevailing colon dysbiosis of I – III stages. This disturbancy is formed by reducing the number of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli and the contamination of colon with E. coli Hly +, enteropathogenic Escherichia and C. diversus, Proteus spp., Peptococi

  12. Levels of imagery and personality dimensions in a female prison population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricklin, A B; Penk, M L

    1980-08-01

    Personality and mental imagery tests were administered to 62 female prisoners. The study replicates the finding concerning relationships between imagery types and two specific personality dimensions, and extends the findings across populations, personality inventories, and investigators. Control of visual imagery is linked negatively to a measure of neurosis (Scale 2 of the MMPI); and (if level of neurosis is controlled) EI is linked to vividness of imagery. That is, an anova interaction showed that, with high neurosis scores, extroverts report more vivid imagery than introverts, but with low neurosis scores, introverts report more vivid imagery than extroverts.

  13. Dispersion of CEF levels in Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and Pr{sub 0.86}Ce{sub 0.14}CuO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henggeler, W.; Furrer, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Chattopadyay, T.; Roessli, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-09-01

    We performed inelastic scattering experiments to determine the dispersion of the {Gamma}{sub 6}{sup (1)}-{Gamma}{sub 6}{sup (2)}-Nd crystal field excitation in Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and of the {Gamma}{sub 4}-{Gamma}{sub 5} Pr CEF excitation in Pr{sub 1.86}Ce{sub 0.14}CuO{sub 4}. Our results can be described within the random phase approximation model. (author) 4 figs.

  14. Physical, biochemical and genetic characterization of enterocin CE5-1 produced by Enterococcus faecium CE5-1 isolated from Thai indigenous chicken intestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraiyot Saelim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterocin CE5-1 produced by Enterococcus faecium CE5-1 isolated from the chicken gastrointestinal tract was active in the wide range of pH 2-10 and temperature 30-100°C and sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and -amylase. It remained active after storage at -20°C for 2 months. Moreover, enterocin CE5-1 showed antibacterial activity against lactobacilli, bacilli, listeria, staphylococci and enterococci, especially antibiotic-resistant enterococci. In vitro study of enterocin CE5-1 decreased the population of Ent. faecalis VanB from 6.03 to 4.03 log CFU/ml. The lethal mode of action of enterocin CE5-1 appeared to be pore and filament formation in the cell wall. PCR sequencing analysis revealed the presence of two open reading frames (ORFs, containing enterocin CE5-1 (entCE5-1 and enterocin immunity (entI gene. Therefore, enterocin CE5-1 from Ent. faecium CE5-1 could possibly be used as an antimicrobial agent to control foodborne pathogen, spoilage bacteria and antibiotic-resistant enterococci in foods, feeds and the environments.

  15. Population-level impacts of pesticide-induced chronic effects on individuals depend more on ecology than toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalkvist, Trine; Topping, Christopher John; Forbes, Valery E.

    2009-01-01

    at the population-level. Here we demonstrate how, using ABM modelling, assessments at the population-level can be obtained even for a pesticide with complex long-term effects such as epigenetic transmission of reproductive depression. By objectively fitting nonlinear models to the simulation outputs it was possible...

  16. [Blood lead levels during pregnancy in th the newborn period. Study of the population of Bari].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, R; Laforgia, N; Crollo, E; Mautone, A; Iolascon, A

    1998-01-01

    Blood lead levels during pregnancy and in neonates immediately after birth have been evaluated, showing higher values in mothers compared to neonates (5.81 +/- 3.05 vs 4.87 +/- 3.60 micrograms/100 ml) and a positive correlation between maternal and neonatal levels (r = 0.82). On the basis of the results derived from the population examined, it has been observed that 6% of newborns have blood lead levels higher than 10 micrograms/100 ml a value recently identified by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC, Atlanta, USA) as a limit for toxicity in children. Moreover, neonatal Pb levels were higher than those found in infants from 6 to 12 months (4.87 +/- 3.60 vs 2.24 +/- 0.54 micrograms/100 ml). During the first week of life there is a steady decrease of blood lead levels, together with increasing renal lead excretion. This study was carried out at the "Dipartimento di Biomedicina dell'Età Evolutiva" University of Bari, southern Italy.

  17. N-Terminal Pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide Levels in the Korean General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Kim, Jang-Young; Koh, Sang-Baek; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Junghan; Han, Sang-Woo; Park, Jong-Ku; Choe, Kyung-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-proBNP) levels may serve as a useful marker of cardiovascular risk for screening of the general population. We evaluated reference levels and distribution of NT-proBNP in the Korean general population based on a large cohort study. Subjects and Methods We included 1,518 adult subjects (ages 40-69) of a community-based cohort from the Korea Rural Genomic Cohort (KRGC) Study. Thorough biochemical and clinical data were recorded for all subjects. Levels of NT-proBNP from all participants were determined. In order to determine normal reference levels, subjects with factors known to influence NT-proBNP levels were excluded. Results The characteristics of the cohort are described below; subjects were 41.2% male, and the mean age was 54.8±8.4 years. The distribution of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the cohort included hypertension (25%), left ventricular hypertrophy by electrocardiography (ECG-LVH) (15%), hypercholestolemia (4.5%), smoking (32%), diabetes (10.9%), history of coronary heart disease (4.9%), history of heart failure (0.9%), symptoms of heart failure (6.1%), elevated serum creatinine (≥1.5, 3.7%), and severe obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m2, 4.6%). The levels of NT-proBNP of all subjects are shown below; the mean was 60.1±42.1, and the median was 36.5 pg/mL. In addition, the levels of NT-proBNP of normal subjects (which did not have any risk factors, n=224) are shown below; the mean was 40.8, and the median was 32.1 pg/mL. In normal subjects, the NT-proBNP level was slightly higher in females (25.7±24.8 vs. 46.9±35.4, pECG-LVH. However, in subjects with a history of congestive heart failure (CHF) (58.5±103.29 vs. 213.8±258.8, pCHF had higher BNP levels (risk 0: 40.8±34.0, 1-2: 57.4±93.2, ≥3: 85.0±152.9 pg/mL). NT-proBNP levels were also related with age, sex, urine albumin, serum Cr, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (p<0.05). Conclusion We

  18. Individual and population-level impacts of an emerging poxvirus disease in a wild population of great tits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Lachish

    Full Text Available Emerging infectious diseases of wildlife can have severe effects on host populations and constitute a pressing problem for biodiversity conservation. Paridae pox is an unusually severe form of avipoxvirus infection that has recently been identified as an emerging infectious disease particularly affecting an abundant songbird, the great tit (Parus major, in Great Britain. In this study, we study the invasion and establishment of Paridae pox in a long-term monitored population of wild great tits to (i quantify the impact of this novel pathogen on host fitness and (ii determine the potential threat it poses to population persistence. We show that Paridae pox significantly reduces the reproductive output of great tits by reducing the ability of parents to fledge young successfully and rear those young to independence. Our results also suggested that pathogen transmission from diseased parents to their offspring was possible, and that disease entails severe mortality costs for affected chicks. Application of multistate mark-recapture modelling showed that Paridae pox causes significant reductions to host survival, with particularly large effects observed for juvenile survival. Using an age-structured population model, we demonstrate that Paridae pox has the potential to reduce population growth rate, primarily through negative impacts on host survival rates. However, at currently observed prevalence, significant disease-induced population decline seems unlikely, although pox prevalence may be underestimated if capture probability of diseased individuals is low. Despite this, because pox-affected model populations exhibited lower average growth rates, this emerging infectious disease has the potential to reduce the resilience of populations to other environmental factors that reduce population size.

  19. Effect of moisture, organic matter, microbial population and fortification level on dissipation of pyraclostrobin in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Navakishore; Gupta, Suman; Gajbhiye, Vijay T

    2013-09-01

    The dissipation of pyraclostrobin, a strobilurin fungicide, in soil was found to be influenced by soil moisture, organic matter content and microbial population. Among the different moisture regimes, dissipation was faster under submerged condition (T1/2 10 days) followed by field capacity (T1/2 28.7 days) and in dry soil (T1/2 41.8 days). Use of sludge at 5 % level to Inceptisol favoured a faster dissipation of pyraclostrobin, whereas a slower rate of dissipation was observed in partial organic matter removed soil as compared to normal soil. Slower rate of dissipation was also observed in sterile soil (T1/2 47 days) compared to normal soil. Pyraclostrobin dissipated faster in Vertisol (T1/2 21.8 days) than in Inceptisol (T1/2 28.7 days). No significant difference in the dissipation rate was observed at 1 and 10 μg g(-1) fortification levels.

  20. [Polymorphism of placental alkaline phosphatase on the level of DNA and protein in the Mordovian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekman, G; Vennberg, K; Bekman, L; Spitsyn, V A; Novoradovskiĭ, A G

    1996-03-01

    Data on DNA and enzyme polymorphisms of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) in Mordvinian populations are presented. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was detected after the digestion of DNA samples with Rsa I and Pst I endounucleases. The frequencies of the second (2) allele for PLAP Pst I and Rsa I were 0.53 and 0.192, respectively. Comparative data suggest that there are no population differences between Mordvinians and Scandinavian ethnic groups. In Mordvinians gene frequencies measured at the level of gene products were PLAP*1(S) = 0.681, PLAP*2(F) = 0.244, PLAP*3(I) = 0.069, and PLAP*18(D) = 0.006, indicating the similarity of the corresponding values in Scandinavians. The observed RFLP and "protein" genotype frequencies were in good agreement with that expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equation. In the Mordvinian population, as in those, surveyed previously, a strong linkage disequilibrium between Pst I and Rsa I PLAP alleles was observed.

  1. Levels of perfluorooctanesulfonate and related fluorochemicals in human blood from the general population of Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Sun-Young; Shin, Im-Hee [Catholic Univ. of Daegu, School of Medicine, Dept. of Pharmacology/Toxicology, Daegu (Korea); Kannan, K. [Wardsworth Center, New York State Dept. of Health and Dept. of Env. Health and Tox., SUNY, Albany, NY (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was found to be widespread in human populations and wildlife Major applications of these POSF-based products have included surfactants in: specialty paper and packaging products, carpet, upholstery, and textile products and in certain insecticide formulation. Depending on the specific functional derivatization or the degree of polymerization, such POSF based products may degrade or metabolize to PFOS, a stable and persistent end product that has the potential to bioaccumulate in the food chain. The mechanisms and pathways leading to the presence of PFOS in human blood are not well characterized but likely involve environmental and dietary exposure to PFOS or to precursor molecules of PFOS. PFOS and related perfluorinated compounds have recently been detected at low parts per billion (nanogram per milliliter) concentrations in the general population from 10 different countries including Korea. In the present report, the levels of perfluoroalkylated compounds in the general population from Korea were analyzed with respect to occupation, smoking status, sex, age and socio-economic status. The degree of association between the four target fluorochemicals measured in this study (PFOS, PFHxS, PFOA, and PFOSA) were also analyzed by linear regression to determine the potential association between their sources of exposure.

  2. Mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate associated with insulin resistance and lower testosterone levels in a young population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Ying; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lin, Chien-Yu; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Chen, Pau-Chung; Su, Ta-Chen

    2017-06-01

    Phthalates are commonly used as plasticizers and are reported to associate with testicular dysfunction or insulin resistance in different studies, but the concurrent relationship between phthalate exposure, testosterone levels, and insulin resistance in the young population is not well understood. We recruited 786 subjects aged 12-30 years from a population-based sample of Taiwanese adolescents and young adults from 2006 to 2008. Generalized additive models were used to evaluate glucose homeostasis and testicular function in relation to seven urinary phthalate metabolites among adolescents (aged 12-20) and young adults (aged 20-30) in Taiwan. We observed a trend toward a decrease in male testosterone and an increase in urinary mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) levels across four quartiles of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). After adjusting for potential covariates, generalized additive models further showed that log-transformed insulin and HOMA-IR were raised by 0.055 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.027-0.082] and 0.056 (95% CI, 0.027-0.084), respectively, with a one-unit increase in log-transformed MEHP in young adults. In male adults (aged 22-30), the log-testosterone levels were reduced by 0.018 (95% CI, 0.001-0.036), with a one-unit of increase in log-transformed MEHP. Such relationships were not observed in adolescents. In conclusion, this study demonstrated age-related associations of urinary MEHP metabolites with impaired metabolic homeostasis of glucose that were only observed in young adults. In addition, MEHP exposure was concurrently associated with lower testosterone levels in young, male adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of the synthesis method on the properties of a Pb-bearing (Y-Gd-Ce) rare-earth phosphate used for the confinement of high-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamel, Nour-el-hayet, E-mail: benhabiles.kamel@yahoo.f [Algiers Nuclear Research Centre, Division of Nuclear Techniques, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon, P.O. Box 399, Algiers RP (Algeria); Remil, Khadoudja; Arabi, Malika; Kamel, Ziane; Zahri, Ahmed [Algiers Nuclear Research Centre, Division of Nuclear Techniques, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon, P.O. Box 399, Algiers RP (Algeria); Metahri, Samia [Algiers Nuclear Research Centre, Division of Environment, Radiological Safety and Radioactive Waste, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon, P.O. Box 399, Algiers RP (Algeria)

    2010-06-15

    In this study, a Pb-containing (Y-Gd-Ce) rare-earth phosphate with the general chemical formula of (Y{sub 0.1}Pb{sub 0.1}Ce{sub 0.4}Gd{sub 0.4})PO{sub 4} was synthesized by two methods, namely the sol-gel and the metallurgical method. The sol-gel route consists of an external gel precipitation method, followed by two calcinations at 873 and 1473 K; and the dry route was a natural sintering at 1473 K of a mixture of micropowders activated at 873 K. The sol-gel route of synthesis gives a stronger and harder monazite mineral than the one obtained by the dry route of synthesis, both of them have a very low porosity. The sintering densities are 4.70 and 4.55 g/cm{sup 3} for both the sol-gel and dry-route made monazites. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows a main monoclinic crystalline structure for the two ways of synthesis. However, a secondary anorthic phosphate phase appears for the dry-route made monazite. Three leaching tests simulating several radiological events were performed: an acidic static test at different pH, a static water leach test in an argilous media and a dynamic microwave leach test. For the whole of leaching processes, the kinetic of dissolution is fast. The acidic tests at pH 1, 4 and 7 gave few amounts of dissolved Ce in the leachates, about 5.668, 0.189 and 0.346 x 10{sup -2} g/m{sup 2} day at the steady-state, respectively. The Pb was totally dissolved at pH 1 and 3. The sol-gel made monazite has a weak chemical durability in acidic media. In neutral pH, both the sol-gel and the dry-route made monazites give comparable values of Ce normalized dissolution rates (0.346 x 10{sup -2} and 0.389 x 10{sup -2} g/m{sup 2} day, respectively). The leaching in kaolin media decreases with a ten factor the amounts of leached Ce. However, for the whole of the leaching tests performed in neutral pH conditions, the monazite materials have a good chemical durability. The dissolution of the minerals under the microwave leaching is partially achieved, with

  4. Effect of the synthesis method on the properties of a Pb-bearing (Y-Gd-Ce) rare-earth phosphate used for the confinement of high-level radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Nour-el-hayet; Remil, Khadoudja; Arabi, Malika; Kamel, Ziane; Zahri, Ahmed; Metahri, Samia

    2010-06-01

    In this study, a Pb-containing (Y-Gd-Ce) rare-earth phosphate with the general chemical formula of (Y 0.1Pb 0.1Ce 0.4Gd 0.4)PO 4 was synthesized by two methods, namely the sol-gel and the metallurgical method. The sol-gel route consists of an external gel precipitation method, followed by two calcinations at 873 and 1473 K; and the dry route was a natural sintering at 1473 K of a mixture of micropowders activated at 873 K. The sol-gel route of synthesis gives a stronger and harder monazite mineral than the one obtained by the dry route of synthesis, both of them have a very low porosity. The sintering densities are 4.70 and 4.55 g/cm 3 for both the sol-gel and dry-route made monazites. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows a main monoclinic crystalline structure for the two ways of synthesis. However, a secondary anorthic phosphate phase appears for the dry-route made monazite. Three leaching tests simulating several radiological events were performed: an acidic static test at different pH, a static water leach test in an argilous media and a dynamic microwave leach test. For the whole of leaching processes, the kinetic of dissolution is fast. The acidic tests at pH 1, 4 and 7 gave few amounts of dissolved Ce in the leachates, about 5.668, 0.189 and 0.346 × 10 -2 g/m 2 day at the steady-state, respectively. The Pb was totally dissolved at pH 1 and 3. The sol-gel made monazite has a weak chemical durability in acidic media. In neutral pH, both the sol-gel and the dry-route made monazites give comparable values of Ce normalized dissolution rates (0.346 × 10 -2 and 0.389 × 10 -2 g/m 2 day, respectively). The leaching in kaolin media decreases with a ten factor the amounts of leached Ce. However, for the whole of the leaching tests performed in neutral pH conditions, the monazite materials have a good chemical durability. The dissolution of the minerals under the microwave leaching is partially achieved, with only 3.5% and 4.0% of solubilised minerals, for both

  5. Influence of intermediate valence states of cerium on thermo-e. m. f. of Ce-Ni intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutsiv, R.V.; Koterlin, M.D.; Babich, O.I. (L' vovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (Ukrainian SSR))

    1984-06-01

    The temperature dependences of the thermo-e. m. f. coefficient of compounds of the Ce-Ni(CeNi, CeNi/sub 2/, CeNi,L3, Ce/sub 2/Ni/sub 7/ and CeNi/sub 5/) system in the intermediate valence state are investigated, as well as a series of analogous compounds with La. on the basis of estimates of splitting (..delta..) of the Ce/sup 3 +/ 4f-level in the crystal field it is shown that the abovesaid compounds realize condition ..delta.. approximately GITAHsub(f) (GITAsub(f)=hybride width of 4f-level), and thermo-e. m. f. anomalies are especially sensitive to parameters of the Ce valence instability. Possibilities of the existing theoretical models for describing thermo-e. m. f. in such systems are discussed.

  6. Population-level effects of risk factors for bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, K E; Morton, J M; Clements, A C A; Mahony, T J; Barnes, T S

    2017-05-01

    Results obtained from a nationwide longitudinal study were extended to estimate the population-level effects of selected risk factors on the incidence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) during the first 50days at risk in medium-sized to large Australian feedlots. Population attributable fractions (PAF) and population attributable risks (PAR) were used to rank selected risk factors in order of importance from the perspective of the Australian feedlot industry within two mutually exclusive categories: 'intervention' risk factors had practical strategies that feedlot managers could implement to avoid exposure of cattle to adverse levels of the risk factor and a precise estimate of the population-level effect while 'others' did not. An alternative method was also used to quantify the expected effects of simultaneously preventing exposure to multiple management-related factors whilst not changing exposure to factors that were more difficult to modify. The most important 'intervention' risk factors were shared pen water (PAF: 0.70, 95% credible interval: 0.45-0.83), breed (PAF: 0.67, 95% credible interval: 0.54-0.77), the animal's prior lifetime history of mixing with cattle from other herds (PAF: 0.53, 95% credible interval: 0.30-0.69), timing of the animal's move to the vicinity of the feedlot (PAF: 0.45, 95% credible interval: 0.17-0.68), the presence of Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1) in the animal's cohort (PAF: 0.30, 95% credible interval: 0.04-0.50), the number of study animals in the animal's group 13days before induction (PAF: 0.30, 95% credible interval: 0.10-0.44) and induction weight (PAF: 0.16, 95% credible interval: 0.09-0.23). Other important risk factors identified and prioritised for further research were feedlot region, season of induction and cohort formation patterns. An estimated 82% of BRD incidence was attributable to management-related risk factors, whereby the lowest risk category of a composite management-related variable comprised

  7. Different levels of shade on population of grasshoppers and its oviposition preference on heliconias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Bittar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Grasshoppers of the families Acrididae and Romaleidae (Orthoptera are among the insects that defoliate heliconias and have been gaining status as pests of commercial crops of these plants in Brazil. The objectives of the present study were to identify the grasshopper defoliating heliconias in the municipality of Santo Antônio de Pádua, RJ (Brazil, to evaluate the effect of different levels of shade on the population of this grasshopper and the production parameters of heliconias, and to determine if this grasshopper has an oviposition preference among the heliconias evaluated. The experiment was in a completely randomized block design, in subdivided plots (four levels of shade in the plot, 0%, 30%, 50% and 80%, and four species of Heliconia: H. psittacorum, H. stricta, H. wagneriana and H. psittacorum x H. spathocircinata ‘Golden Torch’ in the subplot, with four replications. The grasshopper was identified as Cornops frenatum frenatum (Acrididae. An increase in shade resulted in a decrease in the number of oviposition holes from the grasshopper and the number of lateral buds. Shade did not influence the number of C. f. frenatum nymphs and adults and the number of flower stems. H. wagneriana was the most preferred species for oviposition by C. f. frenatum. Results suggested using screens to shade heliconia plants can help control C. f. frenatum populations, however, the light requirements of the heliconias should be considered to guarantee productivity.

  8. Population-level effects and recovery of aquatic invertebrates after multiple applications of an insecticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmen, G Peter; Preuss, Thomas G; Hamer, Mick; Galic, Nika; Strauss, Tido; van den Brink, Paul J; De Laender, Frederik; Bopp, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Standard risk assessment of plant protection products (PPP) combines "worst-case" exposure scenarios with effect thresholds using assessment (safety) factors to account for uncertainties. If needed, risks can be addressed applying more realistic conditions at higher tiers, which refine exposure and/or effect assessments using additional data. However, it is not possible to investigate the wide range of potential scenarios experimentally. In contrast, ecotoxicological mechanistic effect models do allow for addressing a multitude of scenarios. Furthermore, they may aid the interpretation of experiments such as mesocosm studies, allowing extrapolation to conditions not covered in experiments. Here, we explore how to use mechanistic effect models in the aquatic risk assessment of a model insecticide (Modelmethrin), applied several times per season but rapidly dissipating between applications. The case study focuses on potential effects on aquatic arthropods, the most sensitive group for this substance. The models provide information on the impact of a number of short exposure pulses on sensitive and/or vulnerable populations and, when impacted, assess recovery. The species to model were selected based on their sensitivity in laboratory and field (mesocosm) studies. The general unified threshold model for survival (GUTS) model, which describes the toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of chemicals in individuals, was linked to 3 individual-based models (IBM), translating individual survival of sensitive organisms into population-level effects. The impact of pulsed insecticide exposures on populations were modeled using the spatially explicit IBM metapopulation model for assessing spatial and temporal effects of pesticides (MASTEP) for Gammarus pulex, the Chaoborus IBM for populations of Chaoborus crystallinus, and the "IdamP" model for populations of Daphnia magna. The different models were able to predict the potential effects of Modelmethrin applications to key arthropod

  9. Self-reported oral health of a metropolitan homeless population in Australia: comparisons with population-level data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E J; Jamieson, L M; Steffens, M A; Cathro, P; Logan, R M

    2011-09-01

    There is limited information on self-perceived oral health of homeless populations. This study quantified self-reported oral health among a metropolitan homeless adult population and compared against a representative sample of the metropolitan adult population obtained from the National Survey of Adult Oral Health. A total of 248 homeless participants (age range 17-78 years, 79% male) completed a self-report questionnaire. Data for an age-matched, representative sample of metropolitan-dwelling adults were obtained from Australia's second National Survey of Adult Oral Health. Percentage responses and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, with non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals used to identify statistically significant differences between the two groups. Homeless adults reported poorer oral health than their age-matched general population counterparts. Twice as many homeless adults reported visiting a dentist more than a year ago and that their usual reason for dental attendance was for a dental problem. The proportion of homeless adults with a perceived need for fillings or extractions was also twice that of their age-matched general population counterparts. Three times as many homeless adults rated their oral health as 'fair' or 'poor'. A significantly greater proportion of homeless adults in an Australian metropolitan location reported poorer oral health compared with the general metropolitan adult population. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  10. Genomic ancestry and education level independently influence abdominal fat distributions in a Brazilian admixed population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanny Vinícius Araújo de França

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify the independent associations of genomic ancestry and education level with abdominal fat distributions in the 1982 Pelotas birth cohort study, Brazil. In 2,890 participants (1,409 men and 1,481 women, genomic ancestry was assessed using genotype data on 370,539 genome-wide variants to quantify ancestral proportions in each individual. Years of completed education was used to indicate socio-economic position. Visceral fat depth and subcutaneous abdominal fat thickness were measured by ultrasound at age 29-31y; these measures were adjusted for BMI to indicate abdominal fat distributions. Linear regression models were performed, separately by sex. Admixture was observed between European (median proportion 85.3, African (6.6, and Native American (6.3 ancestries, with a strong inverse correlation between the African and European ancestry scores (ρ = -0.93; p<0.001. Independent of education level, African ancestry was inversely associated with both visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat distributions in men (both P = 0.001, and inversely associated with subcutaneous abdominal fat distribution in women (p = 0.009. Independent of genomic ancestry, higher education level was associated with lower visceral fat, but higher subcutaneous fat, in both men and women (all p<0.001. Our findings, from an admixed population, indicate that both genomic ancestry and education level were independently associated with abdominal fat distribution in adults. African ancestry appeared to lower abdominal fat distributions, particularly in men.

  11. Serum levels of copeptin are associated with type 2 diabetes and diabetic complications in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fu-Xiang; Wu, Heng-Lan; Tu, Kai-Sheng; Chen, Jian-Xiang; Zhang, Min; Shi, Chao

    The aim of this study was to investigate copeptin levels in serum, and assess their associations with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and diabetic complications. In this post hoc analysis, serum levels of copeptin were tested in 306 patients with T2DM. Clinical information including diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic nephropathy (DN) were collected. The relation of serum copeptin with DR and DN were investigated with the use of logistic regression models according to equal quartiles of the distributions of serum copeptin. We found that serum copeptin levels were significantly higher in diabetes as compared to normal controls [9.4(IQR, 7.4-12.5) pmol/L vs. 4.1(IQR, 2.5-6.2) pmol/L; Pcopeptin levels (OR 1.312, 95% CI: 1.204-1.403; Pcopeptin levels were positively associated with the DR (odds ratio [OR], 1.117; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.072-1.241; Pcopeptin levels, the ORs for DR and DN were as follows: second quartile, 1.19 (95% CI, 0.94-1.51, P=0.12) and 1.37 (95% CI, 0.78-2.37, P=0.28); third quartile, 1.61 (95% CI, 1.18-2.43, P=0.005) and 2.12 (95% CI, 1.32-3.27, P=0.003); fourth quartile, 2.83 (95% CI, 2.04-4.93; Pcopeptin are associated with type 2 diabetes and diabetic complications in Chinese population, suggesting a potential role of the AVP system (copeptin) in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Population stress: A spatiotemporal analysis of population change and land development at the county level in the contiguous United States, 2001-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Guangqing; Ho, Hung Chak

    2018-01-01

    The past century has witnessed rapidly increasing population-land conflicts due to exponential population growth and its many consequences. Although the measures of population-land conflicts are many, there lacks a model that appropriately considers both the social and physical contexts of population-land conflicts. In this study we introduce the concept of population stress, which identifies areas with populations growing faster than the lands available for sustainable development. Specifically, population stress areas are identified by comparing population growth and land development as measured by land developability in the contiguous United States from 2001 to 2011. Our approach is based on a combination of spatial multicriteria analysis, zonal statistics, and spatiotemporal modeling. We found that the population growth of a county is associated with the decrease of land developability, along with the spatial influences of surrounding counties. The Midwest and the traditional "Deep South" counties would have less population stress with future land development, whereas the Southeast Coast, Washington State, Northern Texas, and the Southwest would face more stress due to population growth that is faster than the loss of suitable lands for development. The factors contributing to population stress may differ from place to place. Our population stress concept is useful and innovative for understanding population stress due to land development and can be applied to other regions as well as global research. It can act as a basis towards developing coherent sustainable land use policies. Coordination among local governments and across different levels of governments in the twenty-first century is a must for effective land use planning.

  13. Broadened population-level frequency tuning in human auditory cortex of portable music player users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiko Okamoto

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many people use portable players to enrich their daily life with enjoyable music. However, in noisy environments, the player volume is often set to extremely high levels in order to drown out the intense ambient noise and satisfy the appetite for music. Extensive and inappropriate usage of portable music players might cause subtle damages in the auditory system, which are not behaviorally detectable in an early stage of the hearing impairment progress. Here, by means of magnetoencephalography, we objectively examined detrimental effects of portable music player misusage on the population-level frequency tuning in the human auditory cortex. We compared two groups of young people: one group had listened to music with portable music players intensively for a long period of time, while the other group had not. Both groups performed equally and normally in standard audiological examinations (pure tone audiogram, speech test, and hearing-in-noise test. However, the objective magnetoencephalographic data demonstrated that the population-level frequency tuning in the auditory cortex of the portable music player users was significantly broadened compared to the non-users, when attention was distracted from the auditory modality; this group difference vanished when attention was directed to the auditory modality. Our conclusion is that extensive and inadequate usage of portable music players could cause subtle damages, which standard behavioral audiometric measures fail to detect in an early stage. However, these damages could lead to future irreversible hearing disorders, which would have a huge negative impact on the quality of life of those affected, and the society as a whole.

  14. Populism

    OpenAIRE

    Abts, Koenraad; Van Kessel, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    Populism is a concept applied to a wide range of political movements and actors across the globe. There is, at the same time, considerable confusion about the attributes and manifestation of populism, as well as its impact on democracy. This contribution identifies the defining elements of the populist ideology and discusses the varieties in which populism manifests itself, for instance as a component of certain party families. We finally discuss various normative interpretations of populism,...

  15. Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism and total serum cholesterol level in Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazzaz J

    2010-01-01

    abnormal cholesterol (P=0.003 OR 2.4 95% CI; 1.3-4.6. Our data needs to be repeated in a larger population with more information for serum LDL and HDL levels and their subgroups.

  16. Population-level impacts of pesticide-induced chronic effects on individuals depend more on ecology than toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkvist, T; Topping, C J; Forbes, V E

    2009-09-01

    The current method for assessing long-term risk of pesticides to mammals in the EU is based on the individual rather than the population-level and lacks ecological realism. Hence there is little possibility for regulatory authorities to increase ecological realism and understanding of risks at the population-level. Here we demonstrate how, using ABM modelling, assessments at the population-level can be obtained even for a pesticide with complex long-term effects such as epigenetic transmission of reproductive depression. By objectively fitting nonlinear models to the simulation outputs it was possible to compare population depression and recovery rates for a range of scenarios in which toxicity and exposure factors were varied. The system was differentially sensitive to the various factors, but vole ecology and behaviour were at least as important predictors of population-level effects as toxicology. This emphasises the need for greater focus on animal ecology in risk assessments.

  17. Families First Home Visiting programme reduces population-level child health and social inequities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Mariette; Nickel, Nathan C; Chateau, Dan; Enns, Jennifer E; Isaac, Michael R; Katz, Alan; Sarkar, Joykrishna; Burland, Elaine; Taylor, Carole; Brownell, Marni

    2018-01-01

    Home visiting has been shown to reduce child maltreatment and improve child health outcomes. In this observational study, we explored whether Families First, a home visiting programme in Manitoba, Canada, decreased population-level inequities in children being taken into care of child welfare and receiving complete childhood immunisations. De-identified administrative health and social services data for children born 2003-2009 in Manitoba were linked to home visiting programme data. Programme eligibility was determined by screening for family risk factors. We compared probabilities of being taken into care and receiving immunisations among programme children (n=4575), eligible children who did not receive the programme (n=5186) and the general child population (n=87 897) and tested inequities using differences of risk differences (DRDs) and ratios of risk ratios (RRRs). Programme children were less likely to be taken into care (probability (95% CI) at age 1, programme 7.5 (7.0 to 8.0) vs non-programme 10.0 (10.0 to 10.1)) and more likely to receive complete immunisations (probability at age 1, programme 77.3 (76.5 to 78.0) vs non-programme 73.2 (72.1 to 74.3)). Inequities between programme children and the general population were reduced for both outcomes (being taken into care at age 1, DRD -2.5 (-3.7 to 1.2) and RRR 0.8 (0.7 to 0.9); complete immunisation at age 1, DRD 4.1 (2.2 to 6.0) and RRR 1.1 (1.0 to 1.1)); these inequities were also significantly reduced at age 2. Home visiting programmes should be recognised as effective strategies for improving child outcomes and reducing population-level health and social inequities. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Levels and predictors of persistent organic pollutants in an adult population from four Spanish regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, M., E-mail: mafero@ugr.es [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.Granada, University of Granada, San Cecilio University Hospital, Granada (Spain); Arrebola, J.P., E-mail: jparrebola@ugr.es [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.Granada, University of Granada, San Cecilio University Hospital, Granada (Spain); Oncology Unit, Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital, Granada (Spain); Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology & Public Health (CIBERESP), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Artacho-Cordón, F.; Amaya, E. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.Granada, University of Granada, San Cecilio University Hospital, Granada (Spain); Aragones, N. [Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology & Public Health (CIBERESP), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Cancer Epidemiology Unit, National Center for Epidemiology, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Cancer Epidemiology Research Group, Oncology and Hematology Area, IIS Puerta de Hierro (IDIPHIM), Majadahonda, Madrid (Spain); Llorca, J. [Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology & Public Health (CIBERESP), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Universidad de Cantabria-IDIVAL, Santander (Spain); Perez-Gomez, B. [Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology & Public Health (CIBERESP), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Cancer Epidemiology Unit, National Center for Epidemiology, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Cancer Epidemiology Research Group, Oncology and Hematology Area, IIS Puerta de Hierro (IDIPHIM), Majadahonda, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-12-15

    This research aimed to assess serum concentrations of a group of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in a sample of adults recruited in four different regions from Spain and to assess socio-demographic, dietary, and lifestyle predictors of the exposure. The study population comprised 312 healthy adults selected from among controls recruited in the MCC-Spain multicase-control study. Study variables were collected using standardized questionnaires, and pollutants were analyzed by means of gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Multivariable analyses were performed to identify predictors of log-transformed pollutant concentrations, using combined backward and forward stepwise multiple linear regression models. Detection rates ranged from 89.1% (hexachlorobenzene, HCB) to 93.6% (Polychlorinated biphenyl-153 [PCB-153]); p,p′-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p′-DDE) showed the highest median concentrations (1.04 ng/ml), while HCB showed the lowest (0.24 ng/ml). In the multivariable models, age was positively associated with HCB, p,p′-DDE, and PCB-180. BMI was associated positively with p,p′-DDE but negatively with PCB-138. Total accumulated time residing in an urban area was positively associated with PCB-153 concentrations. The women showed higher HCB and lower p,p′-DDE concentrations versus the men. Notably, POP exposure in our study population was inversely associated with the breastfeeding received by participants and with the number of pregnancies of their mothers but was not related to the participants' history of breastfeeding their children or parity. Smoking was negatively associated with HCB and PCB-153 concentrations. Consumption of fatty foods, including blue fish, was in general positively associated with POP levels. Although POP environmental levels are declining worldwide, there is a need for the continuous monitoring of human exposure in the general population. The results of the present study confirm previous findings and

  19. [Educational level and self-assessment of the health status by population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, V B

    2003-01-01

    The results of a study of the correlation between the level of education on the one hand and the level of health on the other hand conducted in a selected group of individuals (aged 30 to 49) under the conditions of the existing social differentiation of population are presented in the article. According to the above sample, more than one third of respondents graduated from higher and special-training educational institutions, however, the acquired special training does not guarantee, today, either material well-being or training-related job. Still, persons with higher education are in more demand in the labor market and they loose job seldom; they also stick to a higher assessment of their material well-being and of their state of health as compared to those belonging to a lower education level. The incidence rate of chronic diseases (within the analyzed age group of 30 to 49 years) was found to be less among the respondents with higher education as compared with respondents with secondary or special-training education.

  20. Determinants of fructosamine levels in a multi-ethnic Sub-Saharan African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouya, Audrey Yondjeu; Nansseu, Jobert Richie N; Moor, Vicky Joceline Ama; Pieme, Constant Anatole; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Tchoula, Corinne M; Mokette, Bruno M; Takam, Ruth Danielle M; Tankeu, Francine; Ngogang, Jeanne Yonkeu; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Fructosamine provides an estimate of diabetes control over a shorter period than HbA1c, and has been proposed as a suitable parameter to monitor glycemic control in low-income countries. The aim of this study was to investigate determinants of fructosamine levels in an urban non-diabetic population of Cameroon. This was a cross-sectional study including 437 healthy adults with no known history of diabetes mellitus, aged 40 years and above, recruited from the ten administrative regions, representing major ethnic groups in the country. Plasma glucose and fructosamine were measured after an overnight fasting. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to investigate the factors associated with fructosamine measurements. Fructosamine levels ranged from 68.2 to 940.8 μmol/l with a mean (standard deviation) of 294.4 (131.3) μmol/l. These levels varied significantly across regions and were higher in men than in women (p=0.001) and in those with screen-detected diabetes than in those with normoglycemia (pfasting plasma glucose (FPG) (r=0.37, ppopulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Properties of transparent (Gd,Lu)3(Al,Ga)5O12:Ce ceramic with Mg, Ca and Ce co-dopants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Baldoni, Gary; Brecher, Charles; Rhodes, William H.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; Glodo, Jarek; Shah, Ishaan; Ji, Chuncheng

    2015-08-01

    Cerium activated mixed lutetium/gadolinium- and aluminum/gallium-based garnets have great potential as host scintillators for medical imaging applications. (Gd,Lu)3(Al,Ga)5O12:Ce and denoted as GLuGAG feature high effective atomic number and good light yield, which make it particularly attractive for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and other γ-ray detection applications. For PET application, rapid decay and good timing resolution are extremely important. Most Ce-doped mixed garnet materials such as GLuGAG:Ce, have their main decay component at around 80 ns. However, it has been reported that the decays of some single crystal scintillators (e.g., LSO and GGAG) can be effectively accelerated by codoping with selected additives such as Ca, Mg and B. In this study, transparent polycrystalline (Gd,Lu)3(Al,Ga)5O12:Ce ceramics codoped with Ca or Mg or additional Ce, were fabricated by the sinter-HIP approach. It was found the transmission of the ceramics are closely related to the microstructure of the ceramics. As the co-dopant levels increase, 2nd phase occurs in the ceramic and thus transparency of the ceramic decreases. Ca and Mg co-doping in GLuGAG:Ce ceramic effectively accelerate decays of GLuGAG:Ce ceramics at a cost of light output. However, additional Ce doping in the GLuGAG:Ce has no benefit on improving decay time but, on the other hand, reduces transmission, light output. The mechanism under the different scintillation behaviors with Mg, Ca and Ce dopants are discussed. The results suggest that decay time of GLuGAG:Ce ceramics can be effectively tailored by co-doping GLuGAG:Ce ceramic with Mg and Ca for applications with optimal timing resolution.

  2. House Dust Endotoxin Levels Are Associated with Adult Asthma in a U.S. Farming Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Megan Ulmer; Hoppin, Jane A; Metwali, Nervana; Wyss, Annah B; Hankinson, John L; O'Connell, Elizabeth Long; Richards, Marie; Long, Stuart; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Sandler, Dale P; Henneberger, Paul K; Barker-Cummings, Christie; Umbach, David M; Thorne, Peter S; London, Stephanie J

    2017-03-01

    Endotoxin initiates a proinflammatory response from the innate immune system. Studies in children suggest that endotoxin exposure from house dust may be an important risk factor for asthma, but few studies have been conducted in adult populations. To investigate the association of house dust endotoxin levels with asthma and related phenotypes (wheeze, atopy, and pulmonary function) in a large U.S. farming population. Dust was collected from the bedrooms (n = 2,485) of participants enrolled in a case-control study of current asthma (927 cases) nested within the Agricultural Health Study. Dust endotoxin was measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Outcomes were measured by questionnaire, spirometry, and blood draw. We evaluated associations using linear and logistic regression. Endotoxin was significantly associated with current asthma (odds ratio [OR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-1.47), and this relationship was modified by early-life farm exposure (born on a farm: OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.02-1.37; not born on a farm: OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.26-2.20; Interaction P = 0.05). Significant positive associations were seen with both atopic and nonatopic asthma. Endotoxin was not related to either atopy or wheeze. Higher endotoxin was related to lower FEV1/FVC in asthma cases only (Interaction P = 0.01). For asthma, there was suggestive evidence of a gene-by-environment interaction for the CD14 variant rs2569190 (Interaction P = 0.16) but not for the TLR4 variants rs4986790 and rs4986791. House dust endotoxin was associated with current atopic and nonatopic asthma in a U.S. farming population. The degree of the association with asthma depended on early-life farm exposures. Furthermore, endotoxin was associated with lower pulmonary function in patients with asthma.

  3. The projected burden of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis in Australia: A population-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Ilana N; Pratt, Clare; Gorelik, Alexandra; Liew, Danny

    2017-09-12

    To forecast the prevalence and direct healthcare costs of osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Australia to the year 2030. An epidemiological model of the Australian population was developed. Data on the national prevalence of OA and RA were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2014-2015 National Health Survey. Future prevalence was estimated using ABS population projections for 2020, 2025 and 2030. Available government data on direct healthcare expenditure for OA and RA were modelled to forecast costs (in AUD) for the years 2020, 2025 and 2030, from the perspective of the Australian public healthcare system. The number of people with OA is expected to increase nationally from almost 2.2 million in 2015 to almost 3.1 million Australians in 2030. The number of people with RA is projected to increase from 422,309 in 2015 to 579,915 in 2030. Healthcare costs for OA were estimated to be over $2.1 billion in 2015; by the year 2030, these are forecast to exceed $2.9 billion ($970 for every person with the condition). Healthcare costs for RA were estimated to be over $550 million in 2015, including $273 million spent on biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Healthcare costs for RA are projected to rise to over $755 million by the year 2030. OA and RA are costly conditions that will impose an increasing healthcare burden at the population level. These projections provide tangible data that can be utilised to map future health service provision to expected need. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Present limits to heat-adaptability in corals and population-level responses to climate extremes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard M Riegl

    Full Text Available Climate change scenarios suggest an increase in tropical ocean temperature by 1-3°C by 2099, potentially killing many coral reefs. But Arabian/Persian Gulf corals already exist in this future thermal environment predicted for most tropical reefs and survived severe bleaching in 2010, one of the hottest years on record. Exposure to 33-35°C was on average twice as long as in non-bleaching years. Gulf corals bleached after exposure to temperatures above 34°C for a total of 8 weeks of which 3 weeks were above 35°C. This is more heat than any other corals can survive, providing an insight into the present limits of holobiont adaptation. We show that average temperatures as well as heat-waves in the Gulf have been increasing, that coral population levels will fluctuate strongly, and reef-building capability will be compromised. This, in combination with ocean acidification and significant local threats posed by rampant coastal development puts even these most heat-adapted corals at risk. WWF considers the Gulf ecoregion as "critically endangered". We argue here that Gulf corals should be considered for assisted migration to the tropical Indo-Pacific. This would have the double benefit of avoiding local extinction of the world's most heat-adapted holobionts while at the same time introducing their genetic information to populations naïve to such extremes, potentially assisting their survival. Thus, the heat-adaptation acquired by Gulf corals over 6 k, could benefit tropical Indo-Pacific corals who have <100 y until they will experience a similarly harsh climate. Population models suggest that the heat-adapted corals could become dominant on tropical reefs within ∼20 years.

  5. Seagrass Herbivory Levels Sustain Site-Fidelity in a Remnant Dugong Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elrika D'Souza

    Full Text Available Herds of dugong, a largely tropical marine megaherbivore, are known to undertake long-distance movements, sequentially overgrazing seagrass meadows in their path. Given their drastic declines in many regions, it is unclear whether at lower densities, their grazing is less intense, reducing their need to travel between meadows. We studied the effect of the feeding behaviour of a small dugong population in the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago, India to understand how small isolated populations graze seagrasses. In the seven years of our observation, all recorded dugongs travelled either solitarily or in pairs, and their use of seagrasses was limited to 8 meadows, some of which were persistently grazed. These meadows were relatively large, contiguous and dominated by short-lived seagrasses species. Dugongs consumed approximately 15% of meadow primary production, but there was a large variation (3-40% of total meadow production in consumption patterns between meadows. The impact of herbivory was relatively high, with shoot densities c. 50% higher inside herbivore exclosures than in areas exposed to repeated grazing. Our results indicate that dugongs in the study area repeatedly graze the same meadows probably because the proportion of primary production consumed reduces shoot density to levels that are still above values that can trigger meadow abandonment. This ability of seagrasses to cope perhaps explains the long-term site fidelity shown by individual dugongs in these meadows. The fact that seagrass meadows in the archipelago are able to support dugong foraging requirements allows us to clearly identify locations where this remnant population persists, and where urgent management efforts can be directed.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of population-level physical activity interventions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Johanna; Kuvaja-Köllner, Virpi; Pietilä, Eija; Koivuneva, Mikko; Valtonen, Hannu; Kankaanpää, Eila

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review synthesizes the evidence on the cost-effectiveness of population-level interventions to promote physical activity. A systematic literature search was conducted between May and August 2013 in four databases: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and SPORTDiscus. Only primary and preventive interventions aimed at promoting and maintaining physical activity in wide population groups were included. An economic evaluation of both effectiveness and cost was required. Secondary interventions and interventions targeting selected population groups or focusing on single individuals were excluded. Interventions were searched for in six different categories: (1) environment, (2) built environment, (3) sports clubs and enhanced access, (4) schools, (5) mass media and community-based, and (6) workplace. The systematic search yielded 2058 articles, of which 10 articles met the selection criteria. The costs of interventions were converted to costs per person per day in 2012 U.S. dollars. The physical activity results were calculated as metabolic equivalent of task hours (MET-hours, or MET-h) gained per person per day. Cost-effectiveness ratios were presented as dollars per MET-hours gained. The intervention scale and the budget impact of interventions were taken into account. The most efficient interventions to increase physical activity were community rail-trails ($.006/MET-h), pedometers ($.014/MET-h), and school health education programs ($.056/MET-h). Improving opportunities for walking and biking seems to increase physical activity cost-effectively. However, it is necessary to be careful in generalizing the results because of the small number of studies. This review provides important information for decision makers.

  7. Population-level impact and herd effects following human papillomavirus vaccination programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drolet, Mélanie; Bénard, Élodie; Boily, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    -vaccination and post-vaccination periods, in the incidence or prevalence of at least one HPV-related endpoint: HPV infection, anogenital warts, and high-grade cervical lesions. We used random-effects models to derive pooled relative risk (RR) estimates. We stratified all analyses by age and sex. We did subgroup......BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programmes were first implemented in several countries worldwide in 2007. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the population-level consequences and herd effects after female HPV vaccination programmes, to verify whether...... or not the high efficacy reported in randomised controlled clinical trials are materialising in real-world situations. METHODS: We searched the Medline and Embase databases (between Jan 1, 2007 and Feb 28, 2014) and conference abstracts for time-trend studies that analysed changes, between the pre...

  8. Self-perceived Income Sufficiency and Self-reported Income Level among a Health Inequity Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, Yelena N; Schoenberg, Nancy E

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a dynamic approach to collecting income information. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 2,022 residents of historically underserved Appalachian Kentucky, an ideal location due to pervasive low income and our ability to control for potential confounders such as race/ethnicity and residential heterogeneity. In unadjusted analyses, nearly half of the sample indicated they struggled to meet their needs; 43% said they made just enough to get by; and 10% indicated they had more than they needed to live well. Adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, proportionately more of those with lower self-rated health and a higher number of morbidities reported struggling to make ends meet. Less than 1% refused to respond to the question on self-perceived income sufficiency, compared with 20% who refused to report income levels. We conclude that self-perceived income sufficiency is a useful question to assess resources, both theoretically and practically, in an underserved population.

  9. Population-level impact of active tuberculosis case finding in an Asian megacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Dowdy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential population-level impact of private-sector initiatives for tuberculosis (TB case finding in Southeast Asia remains uncertain. In 2011, the Indus Hospital TB Control Program in Karachi, Pakistan, undertook an aggressive case-finding campaign that doubled notification rates, providing an opportunity to investigate potential population-level effects. METHODS: We constructed an age-structured compartmental model of TB in the intervention area. We fit the model using field and literature data, assuming that TB incidence equaled the estimated nationwide incidence in Pakistan (primary analysis, or 1.5 times greater (high-incidence scenario. We modeled the intervention as an increase in the rate of formal-sector TB diagnosis and evaluated the potential impact of sustaining this rate for five years. RESULTS: In the primary analysis, the five-year intervention averted 24% (95% uncertainty range, UR: 18-30% of five-year cumulative TB cases and 52% (95% UR: 45-57% of cumulative TB deaths. Corresponding reductions in the high-incidence scenario were 12% (95% UR: 8-17% and 27% (95% UR: 21-34%, although the absolute number of lives saved was higher. At the end of five years, TB notification rates in the primary analysis were below their 2010 baseline, incidence had dropped by 45%, and annual mortality had fallen by 72%. About half of the cumulative impact on incidence and mortality could be achieved with a one-year intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Sustained, multifaceted, and innovative approaches to TB case-finding in Asian megacities can have substantial community-wide epidemiological impact.

  10. Quantitative assessment of the role of male circumcision in HIV epidemiology at the population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsallaq, Ramzi A; Cash, Brianna; Weiss, Helen A; Longini, Ira M; Omer, Saad B; Wawer, Maria J; Gray, Ronald H; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2009-09-01

    Three recent randomized trials have shown that male circumcision (circumcision) reduces HIV incidence in heterosexual men by about 60%. Mathematical models are needed to assess the historical role of circumcision in the observed disparate levels of prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa and to translate these findings into estimates of the population-level impact of circumcision on HIV prevalence. A deterministic compartmental model of HIV dynamics with circumcision was parameterized by empirical data from the Rakai, Masaka, and Four-City studies. Circumcision was found to account for about two-thirds of the differential HIV prevalence between West Africa and East and Southern Africa. We found that in Kisumu, Kenya, and in Rakai, Uganda, universal circumcision implemented in 2008 would reduce HIV prevalence by 19% and 14%, respectively, by 2020. In Kisumu, a setting with high HIV prevalence, about 6 circumcisions would be needed for each infection averted while in Rakai, 11 circumcisions would be needed. Females will also benefit from circumcision with a substantial reduction in prevalence of about 8% in Kisumu and 4% in Rakai within a few years of universal circumcision. The beneficial impact of circumcision for both males and females will not be undermined by risk behavior compensation unless the increase in risk behavior is in excess of 30%. The effectiveness of circumcision as an intervention is maximized by universal circumcision within 2-3 years. In West Africa, circumcision may have "quarantined" the spread of HIV by limiting sustainable transmission to within high risk groups and bridge populations. Our findings indicate that circumcision is an effective intervention in both high and intermediate HIV prevalence settings. Circumcision coverage should be expanded as soon as possible to optimize the epidemiological impact.

  11. A population-level study of place of death and associated factors in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Öhlén, Joakim; Morin, Lucas; Cohen, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study were to examine, on a population level, where people die in Sweden, and to investigate associations between place of death and underlying cause of death, socioeconomic and environmental characteristics, with a particular interest in people dying from life-limiting conditions typically in need of palliative care. This population-level study is based on death certificate data for all deceased individuals in Sweden in 2012, with a registered place of death (n=83,712). Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate associations between place of death and individual, socioeconomic and environmental characteristics. The results show that, in 2012, 42.1% of all deaths occurred in hospitals, 17.8% occurred at home and 38.1% in nursing home facilities. Individuals dying of conditions indicative of potential palliative care needs were less likely to die in hospital than those dying of other conditions (OR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.70-0.77). Living at home in urban areas was associated with higher likelihood of dying in hospital or in a nursing home (OR = 1.04 and 1.09 respectively). Educational attainment and marital status were found to be somewhat associated with the place of death. The majority of deaths in Sweden occur in institutional settings, with comparatively larger proportions of nursing home deaths than most countries. Associations between place of death and other variables point to inequalities in availability and/or utilization of health services at the end of life. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  12. Effects of profession on urinary PAH metabolite levels in the US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bian; Jia, Chunrong

    2016-01-01

    Although exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is common in both environmental and occupational settings, few studies have compared PAH exposure among people with different professions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the variations in recent PAH exposure among different occupational groups over time using national representative samples. The study population consisted of 4162 participants from the 2001 to 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, who had both urinary PAH metabolites and occupational information. Four corresponding monohydroxy-PAH urine metabolites: naphthalene (NAP), fluorene (FLUO), phenanthrene (PHEN), and pyrene (PYR) among seven broad occupational groups were analyzed using weighted linear regression models, adjusting for creatinine levels, sociodemographic factors, smoking status, and sampling season. The overall geometric mean concentrations of NAP, FLUO, PHEN, and PYR were 6927, 477, 335, and 87 ng/L, respectively. All four PAH metabolites were elevated in the "extractive, construction, and repair (ECR)" group, with 21-42 % higher concentrations than those in the reference group of "management." Similar trends were seen in the "operators, fabricators, and laborers (OFL)" group for FLUO, PHEN, and PYR. In addition, both "service" and "support" groups had elevated FLUO. Significant (p < 0.001) upward temporal trends were seen in NAP and PYR, with an approximately 6-17 % annual increase, and FLUO and PHEN remained relatively stable. Race and socioeconomic status show independent effects on PAH exposure. Heterogeneous distributions of urinary PAH metabolites among people with different job categories exist at the population level. The upward temporal trends in NAP and PYR warrant reduction in PAH exposure, especially among those with OFL and ECR occupations.

  13. Tools for quantifying isotopic niche space and dietary variation at the individual and population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Seth D.; Yeakel, Justin D.; Wheatley, Patrick V.; Tinker, M. Tim

    2012-01-01

    Ecologists are increasingly using stable isotope analysis to inform questions about variation in resource and habitat use from the individual to community level. In this study we investigate data sets from 2 California sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) populations to illustrate the advantages and potential pitfalls of applying various statistical and quantitative approaches to isotopic data. We have subdivided these tools, or metrics, into 3 categories: IsoSpace metrics, stable isotope mixing models, and DietSpace metrics. IsoSpace metrics are used to quantify the spatial attributes of isotopic data that are typically presented in bivariate (e.g., δ13C versus δ15N) 2-dimensional space. We review IsoSpace metrics currently in use and present a technique by which uncertainty can be included to calculate the convex hull area of consumers or prey, or both. We then apply a Bayesian-based mixing model to quantify the proportion of potential dietary sources to the diet of each sea otter population and compare this to observational foraging data. Finally, we assess individual dietary specialization by comparing a previously published technique, variance components analysis, to 2 novel DietSpace metrics that are based on mixing model output. As the use of stable isotope analysis in ecology continues to grow, the field will need a set of quantitative tools for assessing isotopic variance at the individual to community level. Along with recent advances in Bayesian-based mixing models, we hope that the IsoSpace and DietSpace metrics described here will provide another set of interpretive tools for ecologists.

  14. Preconception healthcare delivery at a population level: construction of public health models of preconception care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Geordan D; Alberg, Corinna; Nacul, Luis; Pashayan, Nora

    2014-08-01

    A key challenge of preconception healthcare is identifying how it can best be delivered at a population level. To review current strategies of preconception healthcare, explore methods of preconception healthcare delivery, and develop public health models which reflect different preconception healthcare pathways. Preconception care strategies, programmes and evaluations were identified through a review of Medline and Embase databases. Search terms included: preconception, pre-pregnancy, intervention, primary care, healthcare, model, delivery, program, prevention, trial, effectiveness, congenital disorders OR abnormalities, evaluation, assessment, impact. Inclusion criteria for review articles were: (1) English, (2) human subjects, (3) women of childbearing age, (4) 1980–current data, (5) all countries, (6) both high risk and universal approaches, (7) guidelines or recommendations, (8) opinion articles, (9) experimental studies. Exclusion criteria were: (1) non-human subjects, (2) non-English, (3) outside of the specified timeframe, (4) articles on male healthcare. The results of the literature review were synthesised into public health models of care: (1) primary care; (2) hospital-based and inter-conception care; (3) specific preconception care clinics; and, (4) community outreach. Fifteen evaluations of preconception care were identified. Community programmes demonstrated a significant impact on substance use, folic acid supplementation, diabetes optimization, and hyperphenylalaninemia. An ideal preconception visits entail risk screening, education, and intervention if indicated. Subsequently, four public health models were developed synthesizing preconception care delivery at a population level. Heterogeneity of risk factors, health systems and strategies of care reflect the lack of consensus about the best way to deliver preconception care. The proposed models aim to reflect differing aspects of preconception healthcare delivery.

  15. Exposure to PM2.5 and Blood Lead Level in Two Populations in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhbat, Undarmaa; Rule, Ana M; Resnick, Carol; Ochir, Chimedsuren; Olkhanud, Purevdorj; Williams, D'Ann L

    2016-02-15

    Approximately 60% of the households in Ulaanbaatar live in gers (a traditional Mongolian dwelling) in districts outside the legal limits of the city, without access to basic infrastructure, such as water, sewage systems, central heating, and paved roads, in contrast to apartment residents. This stark difference in living conditions creates different public health challenges for Ulaanbaatar residents. Through this research study we aim to test our hypothesis that women living in gers burning coal in traditional stoves for cooking and heating during the winter are exposed to higher concentrations of airborne PM2.5 than women living in apartments in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, and this exposure may include exposures to lead in coal with effects on blood lead levels. This cross-sectional study recruited a total of 50 women, 40-60 years of age, from these two settings. Air sampling was carried out during peak cooking and heating times, 5:00 p.m.-11:00 p.m., using a direct-reading instrument (TSI SidePak™) and integrated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters using the SKC Personal Environmental Monitor. Blood lead level (BLL) was measured using a LeadCare II rapid field test method. In our study population, measured PM2.5 geometric mean (GM) concentrations using the SidePak™ in the apartment group was 31.5 (95% CI:17-99) μg/m³, and 100 (95% CI: 67-187) μg/m³ in ger households (p Lead Levels were not statistically significant different between apartment residents and ger residents (p = 0.15). The BLL is statistically significant different (p = 0.01) when stratified by length of exposures outside of the home. This statistically significant difference in increased BLL could be due to occupational or frequent exposure to other sources of indoor or outdoor air pollution that were not measured. Blood lead levels from our study population are the first study measurements published on women aged 40-60 years of age in Mongolia.

  16. Exposure to PM2.5 and Blood Lead Level in Two Populations in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Undarmaa Enkhbat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 60% of the households in Ulaanbaatar live in gers (a traditional Mongolian dwelling in districts outside the legal limits of the city, without access to basic infrastructure, such as water, sewage systems, central heating, and paved roads, in contrast to apartment residents. This stark difference in living conditions creates different public health challenges for Ulaanbaatar residents. Through this research study we aim to test our hypothesis that women living in gers burning coal in traditional stoves for cooking and heating during the winter are exposed to higher concentrations of airborne PM2.5 than women living in apartments in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, and this exposure may include exposures to lead in coal with effects on blood lead levels. This cross-sectional study recruited a total of 50 women, 40–60 years of age, from these two settings. Air sampling was carried out during peak cooking and heating times, 5:00 p.m.–11:00 p.m., using a direct-reading instrument (TSI SidePak™ and integrated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE filters using the SKC Personal Environmental Monitor. Blood lead level (BLL was measured using a LeadCare II rapid field test method. In our study population, measured PM2.5 geometric mean (GM concentrations using the SidePak™ in the apartment group was 31.5 (95% CI:17–99 μg/m3, and 100 (95% CI: 67–187 μg/m3 in ger households (p < 0.001. The GM integrated gravimetric PM2.5 concentrations in the apartment group were 52.8 (95% CI: 39–297 μg/m3 and 127.8 (95% CI: 86–190 μg/m3 in ger households (p = 0.004. The correlation coefficient for the SidePak™ PM2.5 concentrations and filter based PM2.5 concentrations was r = 0.72 (p < 0.001. Blood Lead Levels were not statistically significant different between apartment residents and ger residents (p = 0.15. The BLL is statistically significant different (p = 0.01 when stratified by length of exposures outside of the home. This statistically

  17. Hb Melusine and Hb Athens-Georgia: potentially underreported in the Belgian population? Four cases demonstrating the lack of detection using common CE-HPLC methods either for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) analysis or Hb variant screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Bart; Brandt, Inger; Desmet, Koenraad; Harteveld, Cornelis L; Kieffer, Davy

    2016-12-01

    Suspected hemoglobin (Hb) variants, detected during HbA1C measurements should be further investigated, determining the extent of the interference with each method. This is the first report of Hb Melusine and Hb Athens-Georgia in Caucasian Belgian patients. Intervention & Technique: Since common CE-HPLC methods for HbA1C analysis or Hb variant screening are apparently unable to detect these Hb variants, their presence might be underestimated. HbA1C analysis using CZE, however, alerted for their presence. Moreover, in case of Hb Melusine, even Hb variant screening using CZE was unsuccessful in its detection. Fortunately, carriage of Hb Melusine or Hb Athens-Georgia variants has no clinical implications and, as shown in this report, no apparent difference in HbA1C should be expected.

  18. The relationship between blood lead levels and occupational exposure in a pregnant population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmel La-Llave-León

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnant women exposed to lead are at risk of suffering reproductive damages, such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, premature delivery and low birth weight. Despite that the workplace offers the greatest potential for lead exposure, there is relatively little information about occupational exposure to lead during pregnancy. This study aims to assess the association between blood lead levels and occupational exposure in pregnant women from Durango, Mexico. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in a population of 299 pregnant women. Blood lead was measured in 31 women who worked in jobs where lead is used (exposed group and 268 who did not work in those places (control group. Chi-square test was applied to compare exposed and control groups with regard to blood lead levels. Odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. Multivariable regression analysis was applied to determine significant predictors of blood lead concentrations in the exposed group. Results Exposed women had higher blood lead levels than those in the control group (4.00 ± 4.08 μg/dL vs 2.65 ± 1.75 μg/dL, p = 0.002. Furthermore, women in the exposed group had 3.82 times higher probability of having blood lead levels ≥ 5 μg/dL than those in the control group. Wearing of special workwear, changing clothes after work, living near a painting store, printing office, junkyard or rubbish dump, and washing the workwear together with other clothes resulted as significant predictors of elevated blood lead levels in the exposed group. Conclusions Pregnant working women may be at risk of lead poisoning because of occupational and environmental exposure. The risk increases if they do not improve the use of protective equipment and their personal hygiene.

  19. Fasting time and vitamin B12 levels in a community-based population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Dennis J; Naugler, Christopher; Sadrzadeh, S M Hossein

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin (Cbl), is an essential vitamin that manifests with numerous severe but non-specific symptoms in cases of deficiency. Assessing Cbl status often requires fasting, although this requirement is not standard between institutions. This study evaluated the impact of fasting on Cbl levels in a large community-based cohort in an effort to promote standardization of Cbl testing between sites. Laboratory data for Cbl, fasting time, patient age and sex were obtained from laboratory information service from Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS) for the period of April 2011 to June 2015. CLS is the sole supplier of laboratory services in the Southern Alberta region in Canada (population, approximately 1.4 million). To investigate potential sex-specific effects of fasting on Cbl levels, males and females were analyzed separately using linear regression models. A total of 346,957 individual patient results (196,849 females, 146,085 males) were obtained. The mean plasma Cbl level was 386.5 (±195.6) pmol/L and 412.0 (±220.8) pmol/L for males and females, respectively. Linear regression analysis showed fasting had no significant association with Cbl levels in females; however a statistically significant decrease of 0.9pmol/L/hour fasting (pfasting has the potential to contribute to higher rates of Cbl deficiency in men. Together, these data suggest fasting should be excluded as a requirement for evaluating plasma Cbl. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High levels of genetic and genotypic diversity in field populations of the barley pathogen Ramularia collo-cygni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, R L; Ravnshøj, A R; Nyman, M

    2013-01-01

    Fragment Length Polymorphism) markers to investigate population genetic structure in two Northern European populations of R. collo-cygni. The distribution of AFLP alleles revealed low levels of population subdivision and high levels of genetic diversity at both locations. Our analyses included 87 isolates......The ascomycete pathogen Ramularia collo-cygni causes Ramularia leaf spot (RLS) on barley. Although R. collo-cygni is considerd an emerging disease of barley, little is known about genetic diversity or population genetic structure of this pathogen. We applied a set of polymorphic AFLP (Amplified...... and of these 84 showed a unique genotype pattern. The genetic structure of populations in Scotland and Denmark is highly similar and we find no evidence of population sub-division. An analysis of molecular variance was used to show that 86 % of the variance is attributable to within field genetic variance...

  1. Population-Level Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes From Claims Data and Analysis of Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavian, Narges; Blecker, Saul; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Nigam, Somesh; Sontag, David

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to population health, in which data-driven predictive models are learned for outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Our approach enables risk assessment from readily available electronic claims data on large populations, without additional screening cost. Proposed model uncovers early and late-stage risk factors. Using administrative claims, pharmacy records, healthcare utilization, and laboratory results of 4.1 million individuals between 2005 and 2009, an initial set of 42,000 variables were derived that together describe the full health status and history of every individual. Machine learning was then used to methodically enhance predictive variable set and fit models predicting onset of type 2 diabetes in 2009-2011, 2010-2012, and 2011-2013. We compared the enhanced model with a parsimonious model consisting of known diabetes risk factors in a real-world environment, where missing values are common and prevalent. Furthermore, we analyzed novel and known risk factors emerging from the model at different age groups at different stages before the onset. Parsimonious model using 21 classic diabetes risk factors resulted in area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.75 for diabetes prediction within a 2-year window following the baseline. The enhanced model increased the AUC to 0.80, with about 900 variables selected as predictive (p predicting diabetes onset 1-3 years and 2-4 years after baseline. The enhanced model improved positive predictive value by at least 50% and identified novel surrogate risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as chronic liver disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.71), high alanine aminotransferase (OR 2.26), esophageal reflux (OR 1.85), and history of acute bronchitis (OR 1.45). Liver risk factors emerge later in the process of diabetes development compared with obesity-related factors such as hypertension and high hemoglobin A1c. In conclusion, population-level risk prediction for type 2 diabetes using readily available administrative

  2. Microstructures and mechanical properties in B{sub 4}C-CeO{sub 2} ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Shuchen, E-mail: sunsc@smm.neu.edu.cn [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Sakamoto, Tatsuaki; Nakai, Kiyomichi [Department of Materials Science and Biotechnology, Ehime University, 3Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Kurishita, Hiroaki [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kobayashi, Sengo [Department of Materials Science and Biotechnology, Ehime University, 3Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Xu Jingyu; Cao Hui; Gao Bo; Bianxue; Wu Wenyuan; Tu Ganfeng [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Matsuda, Seiji [Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Ehime University, Shizugawa, Toon 791-0295 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    B{sub 4}C-CeO{sub 2} composite ceramics with various concentrations of CeO{sub 2} were fabricated by hot press. The effects of CeO{sub 2} on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the B{sub 4}C-CeO{sub 2} ceramics have been investigated. During hot press, CeB{sub 6} was formed by the reaction between CeO{sub 2} and B{sub 4}C. The B{sub 4}C-CeO{sub 2} ceramics had higher levels of density, fracture toughness, flexural strength and Vickers hardness than those in monolithic B{sub 4}C. The microstructures of the B{sub 4}C-CeO{sub 2} ceramics were observed and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. In-situ synthesized CeB{sub 6} indicated whisker-like shape and grew along the interface with B{sub 4}C, and different boron carbides with different content of C existed at/around the interface of CeB{sub 6} with B{sub 4}C in the composite ceramics. It made mechanical properties greatly improved.

  3. An example of population-level risk assessments for small mammals using individual-based population models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Walter; Auteri, Domenica; Bastiansen, Finn

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a case study demonstrating the application of 3 individual-based, spatially explicit population models (IBMs, also known as agent-based models) in ecological risk assessments to predict long-term effects of a pesticide to populations of small mammals. The 3 IBMs each used...... and structural complexity. The toxicological profile of FungicideX was defined so that the deterministic long-term first tier risk assessment would result in high risk to small mammals, thus providing the opportunity to use the IBMs for risk assessment refinement (i.e., higher tier risk assessment). Despite...... assessments for small mammals, including consistent and transparent direct links to specific protection goals, and the consideration of more realistic scenarios....

  4. High plasma IgE levels within the Scandinavian wolf population, and its implications for mammalian IgE homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledin, Anna; Arnemo, Jon M; Liberg, Olof; Hellman, Lars

    2008-04-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) serves as an important link between innate and adaptive immunity through its ability to bind high affinity receptors on mast cells and basophils. Large differences in IgE levels may here affect this important link, and IgE levels in natural non-domestic animal populations may therefore be very informative concerning the levels of IgE that this system have been balanced against during recent mammalian evolution. However, very few such studies have been performed. Here, we present an analysis of total IgE levels in 65 Scandinavian wolves: 57 free living (wild), and 8 wolves in captivity (Zoo). The 57 wild wolves correspond to approximately 30% of the entire wolf population in Sweden and Norway and thus represent a large fraction of the entire population, making this a unique sample from a wild canine population. The median IgE level in these wolves was 67 microg/ml, which is approximately twice the level seen in domestic dogs and more than 100 times the levels in non-atopic humans. The collected information from domestic and wild populations now indicate that the very low IgE levels observed in man and laboratory rodents are most likely an effect of a life in a relatively parasite free environment, and that total IgE levels under maximally stimulatory (normal) conditions may reach 100-200 microg/ml.

  5. What is the optimal level of vitamin D in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Pablo; Górriz, José L; Molina, Mariola D; Beltrán, Sandra; Vizcaíno, Belén; Escudero, Verónica; Kanter, Julia; Ávila, Ana I; Bover, Jordi; Fernández, Elvira; Nieto, Javier; Cigarrán, Secundino; Gruss, Enrique; Fernández-Juárez, Gema; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Navarro-González, Juan F; Romero, Ramón; Pallardó, Luis M

    2016-09-06

    To evaluate thresholds for serum 25(OH)D concentrations in relation to death, kidney progression and hospitalization in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. Four hundred and seventy non-dialysis 3-5 stage CKD patients participating in OSERCE-2 study, a prospective, multicenter, cohort study, were prospectively evaluated and categorized into 3 groups according to 25(OH)D levels at enrollment (less than 20 ng/mL, between 20 and 29 ng/mL, and at or above 30 ng/mL), considering 25(OH)D between 20 and 29 ng/mL as reference group. Association between 25(OH)D levels and death (primary outcome), and time to first hospitalization and renal progression (secondary outcomes) over a 3-year follow-up, were assessed by Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox-proportional hazard models. To identify 25(OH)D levels at highest risk for outcomes, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed. Over 29 ± 12 mo of follow-up, 46 (10%) patients dead, 156 (33%) showed kidney progression, and 126 (27%) were hospitalized. After multivariate adjustment, 25(OH)D < 20 ng/mL was an independent predictor of all-cause mortality (HR = 2.33; 95%CI: 1.10-4.91; P = 0.027) and kidney progression (HR = 2.46; 95%CI: 1.63-3.71; P < 0.001), whereas the group with 25(OH)D at or above 30 ng/mL did not have a different hazard for outcomes from the reference group. Hospitalization outcomes were predicted by 25(OH) levels (HR = 0.98; 95%CI: 0.96-1.00; P = 0.027) in the unadjusted Cox proportional hazards model, but not after multivariate adjusting. ROC curves identified 25(OH)D levels at highest risk for death, kidney progression, and hospitalization, at 17.4 ng/mL [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.60; 95%CI: 0.52-0.69; P = 0.027], 18.6 ng/mL (AUC = 0.65; 95%CI: 0.60-0.71; P < 0.001), and 19.0 ng/mL (AUC = 0.56; 95%CI: 0.50-0.62; P = 0.048), respectively. 25(OH)D < 20 ng/mL was an independent predictor of death and progression in patients with stage 3-5 CKD, with no additional

  6. A comprehensive assessment of mercury exposure in penguin populations throughout the Southern Hemisphere: Using trophic calculations to identify sources of population-level variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasso, Rebecka L; Chiaradia, André; Polito, Michael J; Raya Rey, Andrea; Emslie, Steven D

    2015-08-15

    The wide geographic distribution of penguins (Order Sphenisciformes) throughout the Southern Hemisphere provided a unique opportunity to use a single taxonomic group as biomonitors of mercury among geographically distinct marine ecosystems. Mercury concentrations were compared among ten species of penguins representing 26 geographically distinct breeding populations. Mercury concentrations were relatively low (⩽2.00ppm) in feathers from 18/26 populations considered. Population-level differences in trophic level explained variation in mercury concentrations among Little, King, and Gentoo penguin populations. However, Southern Rockhopper and Magellanic penguins breeding on Staten Island, Tierra del Fuego, had the highest mercury concentrations relative to their conspecifics despite foraging at a lower trophic level. The concurrent use of stable isotope and mercury data allowed us to document penguin populations at the greatest risk of exposure to harmful concentrations of mercury as a result of foraging at a high trophic level or in geographic 'hot spots' of mercury availability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasma levels of apolipoprotein E and risk of dementia in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Katrine L.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele is a major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease and dementia. However, it remains unclear whether plasma levels of apoE confer additional risk. We tested this hypothesis. METHODS: Using 75,708 participants from the general population, we tested...... whether low plasma levels of apoE at study enrollment were associated with increased risk of future Alzheimer disease and all dementia, and whether this association was independent of ε2/ε3/ε4 APOE genotype. RESULTS: Multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for Alzheimer disease and all dementia...... adjustment for ε2/ε3/ε4 APOE genotype, plasma apoE tertiles remained associated with Alzheimer disease (p for trend = 0.007) and all dementia (p for trend = 0.04). Plasma apoE tertiles did not interact with ε2/ε3/ε4 APOE genotype on risk of Alzheimer disease (p = 0.53) or all dementia (p = 0...

  8. Food frequency consumption and lipoproteins serum levels in the population of an urban area, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fornés Nélida Schmid

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the association between food group consumption frequency and serum lipoprotein levels among adults. METHODS: The observations were made during a cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of men and women over 20 years old living in Cotia county, S. Paulo, Brazil. Data on food frequency consumption, serum lipids, and other covariates were available for 1,045 adults. Multivariate analyses adjusted by age, gender, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, educational level, family income, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption were performed. RESULTS: Consumption of processed meat, chicken, red meat, eggs and dairy foods were each positively and significantly correlated with LDL-C, whereas the intake of vegetables and fruits showed an inverse correlation. Daily consumption of processed meat, chicken, red meat, eggs, and dairy foods were associated with 16.6 mg/dl, 14.5 mg/dl, 11.1 mg/dl, 5.8 mg/dl, and 4.6 mg/dl increase in blood LDL-C, respectively. Increases of daily consumption of fruit and vegetables were associated with 5.2 mg/dl and 5.5 mg/dl decreases in LDL-C, respectively. Alcohol beverage consumption showed a significant positive correlation with HDL-C. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary habits in the study population seem to contribute substantially to the variation in blood LDL and HDL concentrations. Substantially CHD risk reduction could be achieved with dietary changes.

  9. Modeling the Population-Level Processes of Biodiversity Gain and Loss at Geological Timescales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortelius, Mikael; Geritz, Stefan; Gyllenberg, Mats; Raia, Pasquale; Toivonen, Jaakko

    2015-12-01

    The path of species diversification is commonly observed by inspecting the fossil record. Yet, how species diversity changes at geological timescales relate to lower-level processes remains poorly understood. Here we use mathematical models of spatially structured populations to show that natural selection and gradual environmental change give rise to discontinuous phenotype changes that can be connected to speciation and extinction at the macroevolutionary level. In our model, new phenotypes arise in the middle of the environmental gradient, while newly appearing environments are filled by existing phenotypes shifting their adaptive optima. Slow environmental change leads to loss of phenotypes in the middle of the extant environmental range, whereas fast change causes extinction at one extreme of the environmental range. We compared our model predictions against a well-known yet partially unexplained pattern of intense hoofed mammal diversification associated with grassland expansion during the Late Miocene. We additionally used the model outcomes to cast new insight into Cope's law of the unspecialized. Our general finding is that the rate of environmental change determines where generation and loss of diversity occur in the phenotypic and physical spaces.

  10. Microsatellites: Evolutionary and methodological background and empirical applications at individual, population, and phylogenetic levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Kim T.; Pearce, John M.; Baker, Allan J.

    2000-01-01

    The recent proliferation and greater accessibility of molecular genetic markers has led to a growing appreciation of the ecological and evolutionary inferences that can be drawn from molecular characterizations of individuals and populations (Burke et al. 1992, Avise 1994). Different techniques have the ability to target DNA sequences which have different patterns of inheritance, different modes and rates of evolution and, concomitantly, different levels of variation. In the quest for 'the right marker for the right job', microsatellites have been widely embraced as the marker of choice for many empirical genetic studies. The proliferation of microsatellite loci for various species and the voluminous literature compiled in very few years associated with their evolution and use in various research applications, exemplifies their growing importance as a research tool in the biological sciences.The ability to define allelic states based on variation at the nucleotide level has afforded unparalleled opportunities to document the actual mutational process and rates of evolution at individual microsatellite loci. The scrutiny to which these loci have been subjected has resulted in data that raise issues pertaining to assumptions formerly stated, but largely untestable for other marker classes. Indeed this is an active arena for theoretical and empirical work. Given the extensive and ever-increasing literature on various statistical methodologies and cautionary notes regarding the uses of microsatellites, some consideration should be given to the unique characteristics of these loci when determining how and under what conditions they can be employed.

  11. PROJECTING POPULATION-LEVEL RESPONSE OF PURPLE SEA URCHINS TO LEAD CONTAMINATION FOR AN ESTUARINE ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of an ecological risk assessment case study at the Portsmouth naval Shipyard (PNS), Kittery, Maine, USA, the population level effects of lead exposure to purple sea urchin, Arbacia punctulata, were investigated using a stage-classified matrix population model. The model d...

  12. Country-Level Population and Downscaled Projections Based on the SRES B2 Scenario, 1990-2100

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Country-Level Population and Downscaled Projections Based on Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) B2 Scenario, 1990-2100, were based on the UN 1998...

  13. Launching a salt substitute to reduce blood pressure at the population level: a cluster randomized stepped wedge trial in Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Gilman, Robert H; Cárdenas, María K; Sacksteder, Katherine A; Miranda, J Jaime

    2014-01-01

    .... This study aims to estimate the impact of a population-level intervention based on sodium reduction and potassium increase - in practice, introducing a low-sodium, high-potassium salt substitute...

  14. TRIB1 and GCKR polymorphisms, lipid levels, and risk of ischemic heart disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Grande, Peer

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to test whether TRIB1-rs2954029 and GCKR-rs1260326 associate with lipid levels and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI) in the general population....

  15. Avaliação do nível de atividade física e fatores associados em estudantes de medicina de Fortaleza-CE Evaluación del nivel de actividad física y factores asociados en estudiantes de medicina de Fortaleza - CE Evaluation of the level of physical activity and associated factors in medical students from Fortaleza - CE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euton Freitas de Castro Júnior

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o Nível de Atividade Física em acadêmicos de Medicina. Estudo transversal, descritivo e analítico, realizado em escolas médicas públicas e privadas e em hospitais- escola de Fortaleza. Amostra de 840 alunos, 409 do sexo masculino e 431 do feminino, na faixa etária de 17 a 33 anos, escolhidos de forma aleatória. Utilizou-se o Questionário Internacional de Atividade Física na versão curta. A maioria dos estudantes (72,6% foi classificada como sedentária ou insuficientemente ativa. Falta de tempo e estética configuram, respectivamente, a principal desmotivação e motivação para a prática de atividade física. Necessita-se de mais estudos abordando essa população, com vistas a estabelecer um delineamento mais acurado dos fatores que induzem à inatividade física.El objetivo era principalmente para evaluar el nivel de actividad física en estudiantes de medicina. Un corte transversal, descriptivo y analítico, que se celebró en las escuelas de medicina públicas y privadas y los hospitales de enseñanza de Fortaleza. Muestra de 840 estudiantes, hombres 409 y 431 mujeres, con edades entre 17-33 años, seleccionados al azar. Se utilizó el Cuestionario Internacional de Actividad Física en su versión corta. La mayoría de los estudiantes (72,6% fueron clasificados como sedentarios o activos ins uficientemente. Falta de tiempo y estética, respectivamente, la desAmotivación y la motivación principal para la actividad física. Es necesario realizar más estudios frente a esta población, con el fin de establecer una delimitación más precisa de los factores que conducen a la inactividad física.The objective was mainly to evaluate the Physical Activity Level in medical students. A cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical questionnaire was held in public and private medical schools and teaching hospitals of Fortaleza. A sample of 840 students, 409 males and 431 females, aged 17-33 years, was selected

  16. TRIB1 and GCKR polymorphisms, lipid levels, and risk of ischemic heart disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to test whether TRIB1-rs2954029 and GCKR-rs1260326 associate with lipid levels and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI) in the general population.......The goal of this study was to test whether TRIB1-rs2954029 and GCKR-rs1260326 associate with lipid levels and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI) in the general population....

  17. Effect of socioeconomic level on knowledge of stroke in the general population: A social inequality gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Moreno, J M; Alonso-González, R; Peral Pacheco, D; Millán-Nuñez, M V; Roa-Montero, A; Constantino-Silva, A B; Aguirre-Sánchez, J J

    2016-01-01

    Socioeconomic status is a factor that influences health-related behaviour in individuals as well as health conditions in entire populations. The objective of the present study was to analyse the sociodemographic factors that may influence knowledge of stroke. Cross-sectional study. A representative sample was selected by double randomisation. Face-to-face interviews were carried out by previously trained medical students using a structured questionnaire with open- and closed-ended questions. Adequate knowledge was previously defined. The Mantel-Haenszel test and adjusted logistic regression analysis were used to assess the association between knowledge of stroke and the study variables. 2411 subjects were interviewed (59.9% women; mean age 49.0 [SD 17.3] years) Seventy-three per cent were residents of urban areas, 24.7% had a university education, and 15.2% had a low level of schooling. Only 2.1% reported earning more than 40 000 euros/year, with 29.9% earning less than 10 000. Nearly 74% reported having an excellent or good state of health. The unemployment rate was 17.0%. Prevalence of "adequate knowledge" was 39.7% (95% CI: 37.7%-41.6%). Trend analysis showed an association between knowledge of stroke and income (z=10.14, P<0.0001); educational level (z=15.95, P<0.0001); state of health (z=7.92, P<0.0001); and employment status (z=8.98, P<0.0001). Educational level, income, employment status, and state of health are independent factors for adequate knowledge of stroke. Public awareness campaigns should present material using simple language and efforts should be directed toward the most disadvantaged social strata in particular. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Detectability index measures of binaural masking level difference across populations of inferior colliculus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, D; McAlpine, D; Palmer, A R

    1997-12-01

    In everyday life we continually need to detect signals against a background of interfering noise (the "cocktail party effect"): a task that is much easier to accomplish using two ears. The binaural masking level difference (BMLD) measures the ability of listeners to use a difference in binaural attributes to segregate sound sources and thus improve their discriminability against interfering noises. By computing the detectability of tones from rate-versus-level functions in the presence of a suprathreshold noise, we previously demonstrated that individual low-frequency delay-sensitive neurons in the inferior colliculus are able to show BMLDs. Here we consider the responses of a population of such neurons when the noise level is held constant (as conventionally in psychophysical paradigms). We have sampled the responses of 121 units in the inferior colliculi of five guinea pigs to identical noise and 500 Hz tones at both ears (NoSo) and to identical noise but with the 500 Hz tone at one ear inverted (NoSpi). The result suggests that the neurons subserving detection of So tones in No (identical noise at the two ears) noise are those neurons with best frequencies (BFs) close to 500 Hz that respond to So tones with an increase in their discharge rate from that attributable to the noise. The detection of the inverted (Spi) signal is also attributable to neurons with BFs close to 500 Hz. However, among these neurons, the presence of the Spi tone was indicated by an increased discharge rate in some neurons and by a decreased discharge rate in others.

  19. Education level and survival after oesophageal cancer surgery: a prospective population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusselaers, Nele; Ljung, Rickard; Mattsson, Fredrik; Johar, Asif; Wikman, Anna; Lagergren, Pernilla; Lagergren, Jesper

    2013-12-03

    This study aimed to investigate whether a higher education level is associated with an improved long-term survival after oesophagectomy for cancer. A prospective, population-based cohort study. Sweden-nationwide. 90% of all patients with oesophageal and cardia cancer who underwent a resection in Sweden in 2001-2005 were enrolled in this study (N=600; 80.3% male) and followed up until death or the end of the study period (2012). The study exposure was level of education, defined as compulsory (≤9 years), moderate (10-12 years) or high (≥13 years). The main outcome measure was overall 5-year survival after oesophagectomy. Cox regression was used to estimate the associations between education level and mortality, expressed as HRs with 95% CIs, with adjustment for sex, age, tumour stage, histological type, complications, comorbidities and annual surgeon volume. The patient group with highest education was used as the reference category. Among the 600 included patients, 281 (46.8%) had compulsory education, 238 (39.7%) had moderate education and 81 (13.5%) had high education. The overall 5-year survival rate was 23.1%, 24.4% and 32.1% among patients with compulsory, moderate and high education, respectively. After adjustment for confounders, a slightly higher, yet not statistically significantly increased point HR was found among the compulsory educated patients (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.47). In patients with tumour stage IV, increased adjusted HRs were found for compulsory (HR 2.88, 95% CI 1.07 to 7.73) and moderately (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.15 to 6.95) educated patients. No statistically significant associations were found for the other tumour stages. This study provides limited evidence of an association between lower education and worse long-term survival after oesophagectomy for cancer.

  20. Population dynamics and growth of the bivalve Choromytilus meridionalis (Kr.) at different tidal levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Roberta J.

    1981-01-01

    Settlement, growth and reproductive output of a population of Choromytilus meridionalis have been monitored at different shore levels at Bailey's Cottage, False Bay, South Africa. Settlement was irregular, occurring at 4- to 6-year intervals, and confined to the sublittoral and lower littoral of rocky areas. Spat settled on the existing mussel bed and adjacent clean rock surfaces. Continual migration of young mussels up the shore took place during the first 1 to 1·5 years of growth until an even distribution up to 0·5 m above L.W.S. was achieved. Juveniles displaced older individuals by moving between them and forcing them off the rocks so that the majority of the adult population were eliminated from the bed within the first year after spat settlement. Mortality in individual cohorts was largely caused by strong wave action and competition for space. The density of individuals within the mussel bed was closely related to mean shell length. Growth rates varied with habitat and declined markedly with increasing height above L.W.S. Sexual maturity was attained at approximately 20 mm and reproductive output rose from 5 kJ year -1 at this length to 80 kJ year -1 at 100 mm shell length. Since packing densities were much higher in smaller individuals the annual gamete output assessed on an area basis, remained fairly constant as the mussels grew, and averaged 1392 g m -2 year -1 dry weight (31 320 kJ m -2 year -1). Energy expended as gonad output exceeded that due to mortality by a factor of 10.

  1. Association of RGS4 variants with schizotypy and cognitive endophenotypes at the population level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyrnis Nikos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While association studies on schizophrenia show conflicting results regarding the importance of the regulator of the G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4 gene, recent work suggests that RGS4 may impact on the structural and functional integrity of the prefrontal cortex. We aimed to study associations of common RGS4 variants with prefrontal dependent cognitive performance and schizotypy endophenotypes at the population level. Methods Four RGS4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP1 [rs10917670], SNP4 [rs951436], SNP7 [rs951439], and SNP18 [rs2661319] and their haplotypes were selected. Their associations with self-rated schizotypy (SPQ, vigilance, verbal, spatial working memory and antisaccade eye performance were tested with regressions in a representative population of 2,243 young male military conscripts. Results SNP4 was associated with negative schizotypy (higher SPQ negative factor for common T allele, p = 0.009; p = 0.031 for differences across genotypes and a similar trend was seen also for common A allele of SNP18 (p = 0.039 for allele-load model; but p = 0.12 for genotype differences. Haplotype analyses showed a similar pattern with a dose-response for the most common haplotype (GGGG on the negative schizotypy score with or without adjustment for age, IQ and their interaction (p = 0.011 and p = 0.024, respectively. There was no clear evidence for any association of the RGS4 variants with cognitive endophenotypes, except for an isolated effect of SNP18 on antisaccade error rate (p = 0.028 for allele-load model. Conclusion Common RGS4 variants were associated with negative schizotypal personality traits amongst a large cohort of young healthy individuals. In accordance with recent findings, this may suggest that RGS4 variants impact on the functional integrity of the prefrontal cortex, thus increasing susceptibility for psychotic spectrum disorders.

  2. Population-level differences in revascularization treatment and outcomes among various United States subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Garth; Xiao, Yang-Yu Karen; Rappoport, Dan; Siddiqi, Saima

    2016-01-26

    Despite recent general improvements in health care, significant disparities persist in the cardiovascular care of women and racial/ethnic minorities. This is true even when income, education level, and site of care are taken into consideration. Possible explanations for these disparities include socioeconomic considerations, elements of discrimination and racism that affect socioeconomic status, and access to adequate medical care. Coronary revascularization has become the accepted and recommended treatment for myocardial infarction (MI) today and is one of the most common major medical interventions in the United States, with more than 1 million procedures each year. This review discusses recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms, care and access to medical resources, and outcomes in revascularization as treatment for acute coronary syndrome, looking especially at women and minority populations in the United States. The data show that revascularization is used less in both female and minority patients. We summarize recent data on disparities in co-morbidities and presentation symptoms related to MI; access to care, medical resources, and treatments; and outcomes in women, blacks, and Hispanics. The picture is complicated among the last group by the many Hispanic/Latino subgroups in the United States. Some differences in outcomes are partially explained by presentation symptoms and co-morbidities and external conditions such as local hospital capacity. Of particular note is the striking differential in both presentation co-morbidities and mortality rates seen in women, compared to men, especially in women ≤ 55 years of age. Surveillance data on other groups in the United States such as American Indians/Alaska Natives and the many Asian subpopulations show disparities in risk factors and co-morbidities, but revascularization as treatment for MI in these populations has not been adequately studied. Significant research is required to

  3. Levels and Patterns of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Domestic Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Sandra; Lopes, Susana; Garreau, Hervé; Boucher, Samuel; Allain, Daniel; Queney, Guillaume; Esteves, Pedro J.; Bolet, Gerard; Ferrand, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Over thousands of years humans changed the genetic and phenotypic composition of several organisms and in the process transformed wild species into domesticated forms. From this close association, domestic animals emerged as important models in biomedical and fundamental research, in addition to their intrinsic economical and cultural value. The domestic rabbit is no exception but few studies have investigated the impact of domestication on its genetic variability. In order to study patterns of genetic structure in domestic rabbits and to quantify the genetic diversity lost with the domestication process, we genotyped 45 microsatellites for 471 individuals belonging to 16 breeds and 13 wild localities. We found that both the initial domestication and the subsequent process of breed formation, when averaged across breeds, culminated in losses of ~20% of genetic diversity present in the ancestral wild population and domestic rabbits as a whole, respectively. Despite the short time elapsed since breed diversification we uncovered a well-defined structure in domestic rabbits where the FST between breeds was 22%. However, we failed to detect deeper levels of structure, probably consequence of a recent and single geographic origin of domestication together with a non-bifurcating process of breed formation, which were often derived from crosses between two or more breeds. Finally, we found evidence for intrabreed stratification that is associated with demographic and selective causes such as formation of strains, colour morphs within the same breed, or country/breeder of origin. These additional layers of population structure within breeds should be taken into account in future mapping studies. PMID:26689909

  4. Mortality level and predictors in a rural Ethiopian population: community based longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhe Weldearegawi

    Full Text Available Over the last fifty years the world has seen enormous decline in mortality rates. However, in low-income countries, where vital registration systems are absent, mortality statistics are not easily available. The recent economic growth of Ethiopia and the parallel large scale healthcare investments make investigating mortality figures worthwhile.Longitudinal health and demographic surveillance data collected from September 11, 2009 to September 10, 2012 were analysed. We computed incidence of mortality, overall and stratified by background variables. Poisson regression was used to test for a linear trend in the standardized mortality rates. Cox-regression analysis was used to identify predictors of mortality. Households located at <2300 meter and ≥ 2300 meter altitude were defined to be midland and highland, respectively.An open cohort, with a baseline population of 66,438 individuals, was followed for three years to generate 194,083 person-years of observation. The crude mortality rate was 4.04 (95% CI: 3.77, 4.34 per 1,000 person-years. During the follow-up period, incidence of mortality significantly declined among under five (P<0.001 and 5-14 years old (P<0.001, whereas it increased among 65 years and above (P<0.001. Adjusted for other covariates, mortality was higher in males (hazard ratio (HR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.22, 1.66, rural population (HR = 1.74, 95% CI: 1.32, 2.31, highland (HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.40 and among those widowed (HR = 2.25, 95% CI: 1.81, 2.80 and divorced (HR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.30, 2.48.Overall mortality rate was low. The level and patterns of mortality indicate changes in the epidemiology of major causes of death. Certain population groups had significantly higher mortality rates and further research is warranted to identify causes of higher mortality in those groups.

  5. 5C.09: HERITABILITY OF RENAL FUNCTION PARAMETERS AND ELECTROLYTE LEVELS IN THE SWISS POPULATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, F; Ponte, B; Pruijm, M; Ackermann, D; Guessous, I; Ehret, G; Bonny, O; Pechere-Bertschi, A; Staessen, J A; Paccaud, F; Mohaupt, M; Martin, P Y; Burnier, M; Vogt, B; Devuyst, O; Bochud, M

    2015-06-01

    Electrolytes handling by the kidney is essential for volume and blood pressure (BP) homeostasis but their distribution and heritability are not well described. We estimated the heritability of kidney function as well as of serum and urine concentrations, renal clearances and fractional excretions for sodium, chloride, potassium, calcium, phosphate and magnesium in a Swiss population-based study. Nuclear families were randomly selected from the general population in Switzerland. We estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the CKD-EPI and MDRD equations. Urine was collected separately during day and night over 24-hour. We used the ASSOC program (S.A.G.E.) to estimate narrow sense heritability, including as covariates in the model: age, sex, body mass index and study center. The 1128 participants (537 men and 591 women from 273 families), had mean (sd) age of 47.4(17.5) years, body mass index of 25.0 (4.5) kg/m2 and CKD-EPI of 98.0(18.5) mL/min/1.73 m2. Heritability estimates (SE) were 46.0% (0.06), 48.0% (0.06) and 18.0% (0.06) for CKD-EPI, MDRD and 24-hour creatinine clearance (P < 0.05), respectively. Heritability [SE] of serum concentration was highest for calcium (37%[0.06]) and lowest for sodium (13%[0.05]). Heritabilities [SE] of 24-h urine concentrations and excretions, and of fractional excretions were highest for calcium (51%[0.06], 44%[0.06] and 51%[0.06], respectively) and lowest for potassium (11%[0.05], 10%[0.05] and 16%[0.06], respectively). All results were statistically different from zero.(Figure is included in full-text article.) : Serum and urine levels, urinary excretions and renal handling of electrolytes, particularly calcium, are heritable in the general adult population. Identifying genetic variants involved in electrolytes homeostasis may provide useful insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in common chronic diseases such as kidney diseases, hypertension and diabetes.

  6. Incipient sexual isolation in Laupala cerasina: Females discriminate population-level divergence in acoustic characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime L. GRACE, Kerry L. SHAW

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sexual selection by female choice can shape the evolution of male traits within populations, since the most attractive males experience an increase in fitness through elevated mating success. Speciation by sexual selection occurs when evolution in traits and preferences within populations causes differentiation among populations, such that females in alternative populations prefer sexual signals of their own population relative to others. Differentiated traits and preferences thereby play an active role in limiting gene flow between divergent populations. The effectiveness of differentiated preferences in maintaining differentiated male signals against the homogenizing effects of gene flow across populations will be limited by both the degree to which females can discriminate against non-local males, and the breeding values of traits and preferences. Populations of the Hawaiian cricket Laupala cerasina have diverged in pulse rate, a sexually selected male signal, and female acoustic preference for pulse rate. Gene flow between neighboring populations may be reduced if migrants from sexually diverged populations experience reduced mating success. We show that females discriminate among divergent songs characteristic of neighboring populations, that diffe­rences among populations in song and preference breed true in a common environment, and that mean preferences for each population closely match the mean pulse rates. Divergence in preference was observed only between populations that also differed in song. Along with a striking ability to discriminate slight differences in song, correlated evolution of song and preference within populations could be a mechanism that promotes assortative mating among populations, thereby reducing gene flow, and leading to speciation in Laupala [Current Zoology 58 (3: 416-425, 2012].

  7. The Cool Little Kids randomised controlled trial: Population-level early prevention for anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiscock Harriet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization predicts that by 2030 internalising problems (e.g. depression and anxiety will be second only to HIV/AIDS in international burden of disease. Internalising problems affect 1 in 7 school aged children, impacting on peer relations, school engagement, and later mental health, relationships and employment. The development of early childhood prevention for internalising problems is in its infancy. The current study follows two successful 'efficacy' trials of a parenting group intervention to reduce internalising disorders in temperamentally inhibited preschool children. Cool Little Kids is a population-level randomised trial to determine the impacts of systematically screening preschoolers for inhibition then offering a parenting group intervention, on child internalising problems and economic costs at school entry. Methods/Design This randomised trial will be conducted within the preschool service system, attended by more than 95% of Australian children in the year before starting school. In early 2011, preschool services in four local government areas in Melbourne, Australia, will distribute the screening tool. The ≈16% (n≈500 with temperamental inhibition will enter the trial. Intervention parents will be offered Cool Little Kids, a 6-session group program in the local community, focusing on ways to develop their child's bravery skills by reducing overprotective parenting interactions. Outcomes one and two years post-baseline will comprise child internalising diagnoses and symptoms, parenting interactions, and parent wellbeing. An economic evaluation (cost-consequences framework will compare incremental differences in costs of the intervention versus control children to incremental differences in outcomes, from a societal perspective. Analyses will use the intention-to-treat principle, using logistic and linear regression models (binary and continuous outcomes respectively to compare outcomes

  8. Population-level intervention to promote chlamydia screening. Moving toward implementation of chlamydia hedis 2000 measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh; Grimley; Heudebert

    2000-05-01

    Background: HEDIS 2000 measure includes chlamydia screening in women which is designed to assess the percentage of sexually active women 15 to 25 years who have received at least one screening test for chlamydia during the reporting year. This study is being undertaken to determine feasibility of implementing a population-level intervention within HMOs to promote chlamydia screening. This abstract presents preliminary findings from the Birmingham project of this multicenter study.Methods: In partnerships with two HMOs, series of outreach methods were used in a stepwise fashion to determine potential barriers and enabling factors for the implementation of chlamydia HEDIS measure in a conservative social environment. Mail outreach was sequentially combined with newspaper, TV, radio advertisements and poster displays. Both qualitative and quantitative impact of the outreach efforts were measured across the timeline. The measures included reporting for chlamydia screening (urine LCR) and infection rate, monitoring chlamydia hotline and staffed phoneline use, and assessment of untoward effects and cost-analysis of the chlamydia outreach campaign.Results: The key findings are: the benefit of chlamydia screening is not understood by general public, letters send by Health Plans to their members are not read by many subscribers, and there are wide gaps between adolescents and their parents, in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs in regard to obtaining information and accessing the screening services (teens prefer hotline, brochure in an envelop addressed to teens, incentives for reporting to the clinic for screening, vs. parents prefer staffed phone consults, "exposed" brochure addressed to parents, and no incentives). A month of sustained and repeat multi-media campaign resulted in 330 hotline calls, 83 phone calls and only 17 subjects being tested (3 were positive) though many more intended to come. Cumulative effects and cost of various outreach efforts are being monitored

  9. Lifetime measurements in {sup 133}Ce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emediato, L.G.; Rao, M.N.; Medina, N.H.; Seale, W.A.; Botelho, S.; Ribas, R.V.; Oliveira, J.R.; Cybulska, E.W.; Espinoza-Quinones, F.R.; Guimaraes, V.; Rizzutto, M.A.; Acquadro, J.C. [Laboratorio Pelletron, Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1997-04-01

    Lifetimes of low-lying levels in the one- and three-quasiparticle bands in {sup 133}Ce have been measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift technique. The E2 transition strengths extracted for the negative parity yrast states are well described by the triaxial-rotor-plus-quasiparticle and the geometrical models, but the interacting-boson-plus-fermion predictions are too small by about a factor of 3. The B(M1) values extracted for the levels in the positive parity three-quasiparticle band are consistent with the previous {nu}h{sub 11/2}{circle_times}{pi}h{sub 11/2}{circle_times}{pi}g{sub 7/2} configuration assignment to this band. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. New yrast excited states of the N=84 nucleus {sup 142}Ce observed in deep inelastic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z.; Zhang, Y.H.; Zhou, X.H.; Liu, M.L.; Luo, W.J.; Pan, Q.Y.; Gan, Z.G. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Hayakawa, T.; Oshima, M.; Toh, Y.; Shizima, T.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ishii, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugawara, M. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    Excited states of {sup 142}Ce, populated in deep inelastic reactions of {sup 82}Se projectiles bombarding {sup 139}La target, have been studied up to medium spins using in-beam {gamma} spectroscopy techniques. Three new levels have been identified at 2625, 2995, 3834 keV, and assigned as 8{sup +}, 9{sup (-)} and 11{sup (-)}, respectively. These new yrast states follow closely the level systematics of the even mass N=84 isotones. Their structures have been discussed with the help of empirical shell model calculations. (orig.)

  11. Context-dependent survival, fecundity and predicted population-level consequences of brucellosis in African buffalo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsich, Erin E.; Ezenwa, Vanessa O.; Cross, Paul C.; Bengis, Roy G.; Jolles, Anna E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infections may have negative impacts on wildlife populations, yet their effects are difficult to detect in the absence of long-term population monitoring. Brucella abortus, the bacteria responsible for bovine brucellosis, causes chronic infections and abortions in wild and domestic ungulates, but its impact on population dynamics is not well understood.

  12. Survey: Knowledge level of the population about radon in Switzerland; Enquete: niveau de connaissance de la population au sujet du radon en Suisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruson, M.; Murith, C. [Office Federal de la Sante Publique, Section Risques Radiologiques, Berne (Switzerland); Rumo, S. [CBC Marketing Research, Berne (Switzerland)

    2010-01-15

    In 1995, a survey was conducted in order to investigate levels of knowledge about radon among the Swiss population. In 2008, a second survey, using a similar methodology, was carried out by the F.O.P.H.. The new study showed that about 40% of the Swiss population has heard of radon, which represents an increase of 8% over the 1995 survey. Most of the respondents knew that radon causes lung cancer, but believed that the gas also produces other health effects (in particular, migraine and skin conditions). In addition, older people, those with a high level of education and property owners tended to be more familiar with the radon issue than the public at large. The inhabitants of high-risk regions achieved markedly better results, which demonstrate that information campaigns in these regions have been successful. At the same time, additional communication efforts are required in low- and medium-risk municipalities, where the majority of the population lives. (authors)

  13. The effect of spinal cord level on sexual function in the spina bifida population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, N G; Andrews, E; Rosoklija, I; Logvinenko, T; Johnson, E K; Oates, R D; Estrada, C R

    2015-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction and infertility are prevalent in the spina bifida (SB) population; however, the mechanism of how they affect a person with spina bifida is poorly understood. Additionally, the management of children with spina bifida becomes more difficult as they exit from pediatric institutes. The present study sought to evaluate sexual health (using validated questionnaires) and fertility in adults with spina bifida and to correlate spinal cord level and ambulatory status with degree of sexual function. After institutional board review approval, 199 adult patients with SB, aged 18 and older and who were followed in one pediatric institution, were identified. Patients who were non-English speaking, cognitively and/or developmentally delayed, or unable to be contacted were excluded. Surveys regarding demographics, sexual health and infertility were mailed to the patients and administered in the clinic with the option to opt-out of the survey. Survey questions regarding sexual health were constructed using validated questionnaires: Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) for females, and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) for males. Sexual dysfunction scores were correlated to the patients' spinal level and ambulatory status. Of the 121 eligible patients, 45 replied, with a response rate of 39%. For females, using a cut-off value of 26.5 for FSFI scoring, 25 out of 28 (89%) had sexual dysfunction. No association was seen between spinal level or ambulatory status and overall FSFI, satisfaction, or desire scores. For males, 10 out of 17 (59%) had severe erectile dysfunction (ED), and one out of 17 (6%) had no ED. No association was seen between ambulatory status and sexual function scores for the males. However, SHIM, satisfaction, and ED scores were higher in males with lower spinal lesions. People with spina bifida of both genders tended to have more severe dysfunction compared to those with sexual dysfunction

  14. Recovery based on plot experiments is a poor predictor of landscape-level population impacts of agricultural pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topping, Christopher John; Kjær, Lene; Hommen, Udo

    2014-01-01

    are restricted to plot-scale experiments. Here, we use agent-based modelling of 2 contrasting invertebrates, a spider and a beetle, to assess how area of pesticide application and environmental half-life (DT50) affect the assessment of recovery at the plot scale and impact the population at the landscape scale....... Small-scale plot experiments were simulated for pesticides with different application rates and DT50s. The same pesticides were then evaluated at the landscape scale (10 x 10 km) assuming continuous year-on-year usage. Our results show that recovery time estimated from plot experiments is a poor...... indicator of long-term population impact at the landscape level and that the spatial scale of pesticide application strongly determines population-level impact. This raises serious doubts as to the utility of plot-recovery experiments in pesticide regulatory risk assessment for population-level protection...

  15. Low-level exposure to lead, blood pressure, and hypertension in a population-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambelunghe, Angela; Sallsten, Gerd; Borné, Yan; Forsgard, Niklas; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Fagerberg, Björn; Engström, Gunnar; Barregard, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Environmental lead exposure is a possible causative factor for increased blood pressure and hypertension, but large studies at low-level exposure are scarce, and results inconsistent. We aimed to examine the effects of environmental exposure to lead in a large population-based sample. We assessed associations between blood lead and systolic/diastolic blood pressure and hypertension in 4452 individuals (46-67 years) living in Malmö, Sweden, in 1991-1994. Blood pressure was measured using a mercury sphygmomanometer after 10min supine rest. Hypertension was defined as high systolic (≥140mmHg) or diastolic (≥90mmHg) blood pressure and/or current use of antihypertensive medication. Blood lead was calculated from lead in erythrocytes and haematocrit. Multivariable associations between blood lead and blood pressure or hypertension were assessed by linear and logistic regression. Two-thirds of the cohort was re-examined 16 years later. At baseline, mean blood pressure was 141/87mmHg, 16% used antihypertensive medication, 63% had hypertension, and mean blood lead was 28µg/L. Blood lead in the fourth quartile was associated with significantly higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure (point estimates: 1-2mmHg) and increased prevalence of hypertension (odds ratio: 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-1.5) versus the other quartiles after adjustment for sex, age, smoking, alcohol, waist circumference, and education. Associations were also significant with blood lead as a continuous variable. Blood lead at baseline, having a half-life of about one month, was not associated with antihypertensive treatment at the 16-year follow-up. Low-level lead exposure increases blood pressure and may increase the risk of hypertension. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Apolipoprotein CIII polymorphism and triglyceride levels of a Japanese population living in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Parzianello

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein CIII (apo-CIII participates in the regulation of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism. Several polymorphic sites have been detected within and around the apo-CIII gene. Here, we examined the relationship between apo-CIII SstI polymorphism (CC, CG, GG genotypes and plasma triglyceride (TG levels in a group of 159 Japanese individuals living in Southern Brazil. The sample was divided into a group of Japanese descendants (N = 51 with high TG (HTG; >200 mg/dL and a group of Japanese descendants (N = 108 with normal TG (NTG; <200 mg/dL. TG and total cholesterol levels were analyzed by an enzymatic method using the Labtest-Diagnostic kit and high- and low-density lipoproteins by a direct method using the Labtest-Diagnostic kit and DiaSys Diagnostic System International kit, respectively. A 428-bp sequence of apo-CIII gene was amplified using oligonucleotide primers 5' GGT GAC CGA TGG CTT CAG TTC CCT GA 3' and 5' CAG AAG GTG GAT AGA GCG CTG GCC T 3'. The PCR products were digested with a restriction endonuclease SstI. Rare G allele was highly prevalent in our study population (0.416 compared to Caucasians (0.00-0.11. G allele was almost two times more prevalent in the HTG group compared to the NTG group (P < 0.001. The genotype distribution was consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was a significant association between rare G allele and HTG in Japanese individuals living in Southern Brazil as indicated by one-way ANOVA, P < 0.05.

  17. Levels of disability in the older population of England: Comparing binary and ordinal classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongiglione, Benedetta; Ploubidis, George B; De Stavola, Bianca L

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies suggest the importance of distinguishing severity levels of disability. Nevertheless, there is not yet a consensus with regards to an optimal classification. Our study seeks to advance the existing binary definitions towards categorical/ordinal manifestations of disability. We define disability according to the WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) using data collected at the baseline wave of the English Longitudinal Study of Aging, a longitudinal study of the non-institutionalized population, living in England. First, we identify cut-off points in the continuous disability score derived from ICF to distinguish disabled from no-disabled participants. Then, we fit latent class models to the same data to find the optimal number of disability classes according to: (i) model fit indicators; (ii) estimated probabilities of each disability item; (iii) association of the predicted disability classes with observed health and mortality. According to the binary classification criteria, about 32% of both men and women are classified disabled. No optimal number of classes emerged from the latent class models according to model fit indicators. However, the other two criteria suggest that the best-fitting model of disability severity has four classes. Our findings contribute to the debate on the usefulness and relevance of adopting a finer categorization of disability, by showing that binary indicators of disability averaged the burden of disability and masked the very strong effect experienced by individuals having severe disability, and were not informative for low levels of disability. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Loci influencing lipid levels and coronary heart disease risk in 16 European population cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulchenko, Yurii S; Ripatti, Samuli; Lindqvist, Ida; Boomsma, Dorret; Heid, Iris M; Pramstaller, Peter P; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Wilson, James F; Spector, Tim; Martin, Nicholas G; Pedersen, Nancy L; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Kaprio, Jaakko; Hofman, Albert; Freimer, Nelson B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Johansson, Asa; Marroni, Fabio; Hayward, Caroline; Vitart, Veronique; Jonasson, Inger; Pattaro, Cristian; Wright, Alan; Hastie, Nick; Pichler, Irene; Hicks, Andrew A; Falchi, Mario; Willemsen, Gonneke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Geus, Eco J C; Montgomery, Grant W; Whitfield, John; Magnusson, Patrik; Saharinen, Juha; Perola, Markus; Silander, Kaisa; Isaacs, Aaron; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Oostra, Ben A; Elliott, Paul; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sabatti, Chiara; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Kronenberg, Florian; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Smit, Johannes H; McCarthy, Mark I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Peltonen, Leena

    2009-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies of lipids have been conducted in samples ascertained for other phenotypes, particularly diabetes. Here we report the first GWA analysis of loci affecting total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides sampled randomly from 16 population-based cohorts and genotyped using mainly the Illumina HumanHap300-Duo platform. Our study included a total of 17,797-22,562 persons, aged 18-104 years and from geographic regions spanning from the Nordic countries to Southern Europe. We established 22 loci associated with serum lipid levels at a genome-wide significance level (P < 5 x 10(-8)), including 16 loci that were identified by previous GWA studies. The six newly identified loci in our cohort samples are ABCG5 (TC, P = 1.5 x 10(-11); LDL, P = 2.6 x 10(-10)), TMEM57 (TC, P = 5.4 x 10(-10)), CTCF-PRMT8 region (HDL, P = 8.3 x 10(-16)), DNAH11 (LDL, P = 6.1 x 10(-9)), FADS3-FADS2 (TC, P = 1.5 x 10(-10); LDL, P = 4.4 x 10(-13)) and MADD-FOLH1 region (HDL, P = 6 x 10(-11)). For three loci, effect sizes differed significantly by sex. Genetic risk scores based on lipid loci explain up to 4.8% of variation in lipids and were also associated with increased intima media thickness (P = 0.001) and coronary heart disease incidence (P = 0.04). The genetic risk score improves the screening of high-risk groups of dyslipidemia over classical risk factors.

  19. Kondo scaling of the pseudogap in CeOs{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and CeFe{sub 4}P{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayjada, P A; Matsunami, M; Tsuda, S; Yokoya, T; Shin, S [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Chainani, A [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India); Taguchi, M [RIKEN Harima Institute, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Sugawara, H [Faculty of the Integrated Arts and Sciences, University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8502 (Japan); Sato, H, E-mail: pratipal@ipr.res.i [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2010-03-10

    CeOs{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and CeFe{sub 4}P{sub 12} are classified as Kondo semiconductors, which show coupled changes in electrical transport, thermodynamic and magnetic properties with a low-temperature semiconductor-like electrical resistivity. We have carried out core level and valence band photoemission spectroscopy on single crystal CeOs{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and CeFe{sub 4}P{sub 12} to study their electronic structure and the evolution of states at the Fermi level as a function of temperature (approx10-300 K). The Ce 3d core level spectra show the presence of f{sup 0}, f{sup 1} and f{sup 2} final states with very different relative intensities in the two compounds. Single-impurity Anderson model calculations provide f electron counts of n{sub f} = 0.97 and 0.86 per Ce atom, suggestive of a low- and high-T{sub K} (= single ion Kondo temperature) for CeOs{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and CeFe{sub 4}P{sub 12}, respectively. The high-resolution temperature-dependent near-Fermi level spectra show pseudogaps of energy approx 50 meV and approx 110 meV in the valence band density of states (DOS) of CeOs{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and CeFe{sub 4}P{sub 12}, respectively. The temperature dependence of the DOS at the Fermi level follows the change in effective magnetic moment estimated from magnetic susceptibility for both materials, confirming the Kondo nature of the pseudogap in CeOs{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and CeFe{sub 4}P{sub 12}. A compilation of measured pseudogaps using photoemission and optical spectroscopy identifies the charge gaps DELTA{sub C} for Ce-based Kondo semiconductors and provides a direct relation with T{sub K} given by DELTA{sub C} approx 2k{sub B}T{sub K}. In conjunction with the known behaviour of the spin gaps DELTA{sub S} approx k{sub B}T{sub K}, the results establish the coupled energy scaling of the spin and charge gaps in Kondo semiconductors.

  20. Elevated Plasma YKL-40 Levels and Ischemic Stroke in the General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, A.D.; Bojesen, S.E.; Johansen, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that elevated plasma YKL-40 levels are associated with increased risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease in the general population. In contrast to C-reactive protein (CRP) produced in the liver in response to inflammation, YKL-40 is produced by lipid-laden macrophages......, whereas corresponding hazard ratios for ischemic heart disease were 1.0 (0.8-1.2), 1.2 (1.0-1.5), and 1.3 (1.0-1.6) (p-trend = 0.01). Stratifying for CRP or other risk factors gave similar results. A doubling in plasma YKL-40 was associated with multifactorially and CRP-adjusted increased risk of 20% (95...... inside the vessel wall. Methods: We measured plasma YKL-40 in 8,899 21- to 93-year-old participants of the Copenhagen City Heart Study 1991-1994 examination, and followed them for up to 18 years. Endpoints were ischemic stroke, ischemic cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, and ischemic heart...

  1. Determinants of blood lead levels in an adult population from a mining area in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos Paoliello, M. M.; Mello de Capitani, E.; Gonçalves da Cunha, F.; Carvalho, M. De Fatima; Matsuo, T.; Sakuma, A.; Ribeiro Figueiredo, B.

    2003-05-01

    During the last fifty year the Ribeira river valley, Brazil, had been under the influence of the full activity of a huge lead refinery and mining along the riverside. The plant completely stopped all kind of industrial activities at the end of 1995, and part of the worker population and their families still remain living nearby in smal communities. The objective of the present study was to assess the deterninants of blood lead levels (BLL) in these nining areas, where residual environmental contamination from the past industrial activity still remains. Blood samples of 350 adults aged 15 to 70, residing in areas around the mine and the refinery were collected. A questionnaire was given in order to gather information on food habits, current and former residential places occupationnal activities, among other variables. Blood lead concentrations were analysed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using Zeeman background correction. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the independent contribution of selected variables in predicting BLL in those subjects. The following variables showed significant association with high BLL: residential area close to the lead refinery, former dwelling at the refinery village, male gender, smoking habits, and consume of fruits from home back yard.

  2. Population Well-Being Measures Help Explain Geographic Disparities In Life Expectancy At The County Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Anita; Spatz, Erica; Herrin, Jeph; Riley, Carley; Roy, Brita; Kell, Kenneth; Coberley, Carter; Rula, Elizabeth; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2016-01-01

    Geographic disparities in life expectancy are substantial and not fully explained by differences in race and socioeconomic status. To develop policies that address these inequalities, it is essential to identify other factors that account for this variation. In this study we investigated whether population well-being—a comprehensive measure of physical, mental, and social health—helps explain geographic variation in life expectancy. At the county level, we found that for every 1-standarddeviation (4.2-point) increase in the well-being score, life expectancy was 1.9 years higher for females and 2.6 years higher for males. Life expectancy and well-being remained positively associated, even after race, poverty, and education were controlled for. In addition, well-being partially mediated the established associations of race, poverty, and education with life expectancy. These findings highlight well-being as an important metric of a population’s health and longevity and as a promising focus for intervention. PMID:27834249

  3. Radon levels and the expected population mortality in dwellings of Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Alzimami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Internal exposure from inhalation of radon and its progeny is one of the most significant sources of natural radiation exposure of the population. Radon levels and radon equilibrium factor were measured in the dwellings of Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia using passive technique. Calibrated CR-39 diffusion type radon detectors were used for radon measurements and the method of can and bare is adapted for the measurement of radon equilibrium factor. Passive measurements enable the accumulation of the result over a long period and cover a wide area. The probability of cancer induction and then the expected mortality was calculated based on different approaches. The results show that the overall weighted mean of annual effective dose for Al-Kharj resident is equal to 1.51 ± 0.8 mSv and The average expected mortality for residents in dwellings of Al-Kharj city is ranged from 0.596 ± 0.25 to 0.369 ± 0.15 death per 10,000 persons of ages from 40 to 70 years respectively. Also, the lifetime excess absolute risk (LEAR of the residents of the Al-Kharj city is equal to (2.06 ± 0.8 × 10−4. The effect of dwelling types, ventilation and construction materials on the expected mortality is discussed.

  4. Frequency-specific modulation of population-level frequency tuning in human auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Larry E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under natural circumstances, attention plays an important role in extracting relevant auditory signals from simultaneously present, irrelevant noises. Excitatory and inhibitory neural activity, enhanced by attentional processes, seems to sharpen frequency tuning, contributing to improved auditory performance especially in noisy environments. In the present study, we investigated auditory magnetic fields in humans that were evoked by pure tones embedded in band-eliminated noises during two different stimulus sequencing conditions (constant vs. random under auditory focused attention by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. Results In total, we used identical auditory stimuli between conditions, but presented them in a different order, thereby manipulating the neural processing and the auditory performance of the listeners. Constant stimulus sequencing blocks were characterized by the simultaneous presentation of pure tones of identical frequency with band-eliminated noises, whereas random sequencing blocks were characterized by the simultaneous presentation of pure tones of random frequencies and band-eliminated noises. We demonstrated that auditory evoked neural responses were larger in the constant sequencing compared to the random sequencing condition, particularly when the simultaneously presented noises contained narrow stop-bands. Conclusion The present study confirmed that population-level frequency tuning in human auditory cortex can be sharpened in a frequency-specific manner. This frequency-specific sharpening may contribute to improved auditory performance during detection and processing of relevant sound inputs characterized by specific frequency distributions in noisy environments.

  5. What Is the Most Bothersome Lower Urinary Tract Symptom? Individual- and Population-level Perspectives for Both Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Arnav; Eryuzlu, Leyla N.; Cartwright, Rufus; Thorlund, Kristian; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Auvinen, Anssi; Tikkinen, Kari A.O.

    2014-01-01

    Background No study has compared the bothersomeness of all lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) using a population-based sample of adults. Despite this lack of evidence, investigators have often cited their LUTS of interest as the “most bothersome” or “one of the most bothersome.” Objective To compare the population- and individual-level burden of LUTS in men and women. Design, setting, and participants In this population-based cross-sectional study, questionnaires were mailed to 6000 individuals (18–79 yr of age) randomly identified from the Finnish Population Register. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis The validated Danish Prostatic Symptom Score questionnaire was used for assessment of bother of 12 different LUTS. The age-standardized prevalence of at least moderate bother was calculated for each symptom (population-level burden). Among symptomatic individuals, the proportion of affected individuals with at least moderate bother was calculated for each symptom (individual-level bother). Results and limitations A total of 3727 individuals (62.4%) participated (53.7% female). The LUTS with the greatest population-level burden were urgency (7.9% with at least moderate bother), stress urinary incontinence (SUI) (6.5%), nocturia (6.0%), postmicturition dribble (5.8%), and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) (5.0%). Burden from incontinence symptoms was higher in women than men, and the opposite was true for voiding and postmicturition symptoms. At the individual level, UUI was the most bothersome for both genders. Although the response proportion was high, approximately a third did not participate. Conclusions Both men and women with UUI report moderate or major bother more frequently than individuals with other LUTS. At the population level, the most prevalent bothersome symptoms are urgency, SUI, and nocturia. Patient summary Urinary urgency was the most common troubling symptom in a large population-based study; however, for individuals

  6. How BenMAP-CE Estimates the Health and Economic Effects of Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The BenMAP-CE tool estimates the number and economic value of health impacts resulting from changes in air quality - specifically, ground-level ozone and fine particles. Learn what data BenMAP-CE uses and how the estimates are calculated.

  7. Scintillating screens based on the LPE grown Tb3Al5O12:Ce single crystalline films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorenko, Yuriy; Douissard, Paul-Antoine; Martin, Thierry; Riva, Federica; Gorbenko, Vitaliy; Zorenko, Tetiana; Paprocki, Kazimierz; Iskalieva, Aizhan; Witkiewicz, Sandra; Fedorov, Alexander; Bilski, Paweł; Twardak, Anna

    2017-03-01

    We report in this work the creation of new heavy and efficient Tb3Al5O12:Ce (TbAG:Ce) single crystalline film (SCF) scintillators, grown by LPE method from PbO-B2O3 based flux onto Y3Al5O12 (YAG) and Gd3Ga2.5Al2.5O12 (GAGG) substrates, for different optoelectronic applications. The luminescent and scintillation properties of the TbAG:Ce SCF screens, grown onto different types of substrates, are studied and compared with the properties of the Lu3Al5O12:Ce (LuAG:Ce) and YAG:Ce SCF counterparts. TbAG:Ce SCFs show very high scintillation light yield (LY) under α-particles excitation, which overcomes by 30% the LY of high-quality LuAG:Ce SCF samples. In comparison with YAG:Ce and LuAG:Ce SCFs, TbAG:Ce SCF screens show also significantly lower afterglow (up to 10-4 level at X-ray burst duration of 0.1 s), which is comparable with the afterglow level of the best samples of LSO:Ce, Tb SCFs typically being used now for microimaging. Together with a high light output of X-ray excited luminescence, such extremely low afterglow of TbAG:Ce SCF is a very good reason for future development of scintillating screens based on the mentioned garnet. We also introduce the possibility to create new types of ;film-substrate; hybrid scintillators using the LPE method for simultaneous registration of different components of ionizing radiation and microimaging based on the TbAG:Ce SCF and GAGG:Ce substrates.

  8. Tackling causes and costs of ED presentation for American football injuries: a population-level study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Blair J; Haring, R Sterling; Asemota, Anthony O; Scott, John W; Canner, Joseph K; Nejim, Besma J; George, Benjamin P; Alsulaim, Hatim; Kirsch, Thomas D; Schneider, Eric B

    2016-07-01

    injury type-specific variability. Overall, at the US population, estimated total charges of $771299862 were incurred over the 2-year period. In this nationally representative sample, most ED-treated injuries associated with football were not acutely life threatening and very few required major therapeutic intervention. This study provides a cross-sectional overview of ED presentation for acute football-related injury across age groups at the population level in recent years. Longitudinal studies may be warranted to examine associations between the patterns of injury observed in this study and long-term outcomes among American tackle football players. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Population level determinants of acute mountain sickness among young men: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Haiyan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many visitors, including military troops, who enter highland regions from low altitude areas may suffer from acute mountain sickness (AMS, which negatively impacts workable man-hours and increases healthcare costs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the population level risk factors and build a multivariate model, which might be applicable to reduce the effects of AMS on Chinese young men traveling to this region. Methods Chinese highland military medical records were used to obtain data of young men (n = 3727 who entered the Tibet plateau between the years of 2006-2009. The relationship between AMS and travel profile, demographic characteristics, and health behaviors were evaluated by logistic regression. Univariate logistic models estimated the crude odds ratio. The variables that showed significance in the univariate model were included in a multivariate model to derive adjusted odds ratios and build the final model. Data corresponding to odd and even years (2 subsets were analyzed separately and used in a simple cross-validation. Results Univariate analysis indicated that travel profile, prophylactic use, ethnicity, and province of birth were all associated with AMS in both subsets. In multivariate analysis, young men who traveled from lower altitude (600-800 m vs. 1300-1500 m, adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 1.32-1.44 to higher altitudes (4100-4300 m vs. 2900-3100 m, AOR = 3.94-4.12; 3600-3700 m vs. 2900-3100 m, AOR = 2.71-2.74 by air or rapid land transport for emergency mission deployment (emergency land deployment vs. normal land deployment, AOR = 2.08-2.11; normal air deployment vs. normal land deployment, AOR = 2.00-2.20; emergency air deployment vs. normal land deployment, AOR = 2.40-3.34 during the cold season (cold vs. warm, AOR = 1.25-1.28 are at great risk for developing AMS. Non-Tibetan male soldiers (Tibetan vs. Han, AOR = 0.03-0.08, born and raised in lower provinces (eastern vs. northwestern, AOR = 1

  10. EPR study of concentration dependence in Ce, Ce : La and Ce:Y doped SrF2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankert, O.; Vainchtein, David; Datema, H.C.; den Hartog, Hendrik

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results of an EPR-study of the concentration dependence of the doubly integrated intensity and linewidth of the signals associated with tetragonal Ce3+-F--dipoles in Sr1-xCexF2+x, Sr-1-0.005-x Ce0.005LaxF2+0.005+x and Sr-1-0.005-x Ce0.005YxF2+0.005+x are presented. Both show a nonlinear

  11. Neonate Auditory Brainstem Responses to CE-Chirp and CE-Chirp Octave Band Stimuli II: Versus Adult Auditory Brainstem Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Kensi M; Stuart, Andrew

    The purpose of the study was to examine the differences in auditory brainstem response (ABR) latency and amplitude indices to the CE-Chirp stimuli in neonates versus young adults as a function of stimulus level, rate, polarity, frequency and gender. Participants were 168 healthy neonates and 20 normal-hearing young adults. ABRs were obtained to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band stimuli. The effects of stimulus level, rate, and polarity were examined with air-conducted CE-Chirps. The effect of stimulus level was also examined with bone-conducted CE-Chirps and CE-Chirp octave band stimuli. The effect of gender was examined across all stimulus manipulations. In general, ABR wave V amplitudes were significantly larger (p 0.05). Significant differences in ABR latencies and amplitudes exist between newborns and young adults using CE-Chirp stimuli. These differences are consistent with differences to traditional click and tone burst stimuli and reflect maturational differences as a function of age. These findings continue to emphasize the importance of interpreting ABR results using age-based normative data.

  12. Serum Zinc Levels Amongst Tribal Population in a District of Jharkhand State, India: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    KAPİL, UMESH; SİNGH, PREETİ; PATHAK, PRİYALİ

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Nutritional deficiency of zinc is widespreadin developing countries. India has the second largestconcentration of tribal population after that of Africancontinent. Limited data is available on the serum zinclevels amongst tribal population in India.The objective of this study is to assess the status ofserum zinc amongst tribal population in a district ofJharkhand State, India.Method: The study was conducted amongst tribals inthe age group of 18-75 years residing in districtSahibgan...

  13. Heterosis among populations of maize (Zea mays L.) with different levels of exotic germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossa, J; Gardner, C O; Mumm, R F

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen maize (Zea mays L.) populations including five adapted, five adapted x exotic, two composites of adapted and exotic, and one exotic selected for adaptability were crossed in a diallel mating system. The parents and 78 crosses and nine check hybrids were evaluated for grain yield and plant height in five environments. The Gardner-Eberhart model Analysis II indicated that additive and nonadditive gene effects accounted for 60 and 40% of the total variation among populations, respectively, for grain yield and 86% and 14% of the total variation, respectively, for plant height. Components of heterosis were significant in the combined analysis for both traits. Adapted Corn Belt populations tended to have higher performance in crosses and greater values of variety heterosis than 50% adapted populations. 'Nebraska Elite Composite', 'Corn Belt' x 'Mexican', and 'Corn Belt' x 'Brazilian' showed high mean yields in crosses, however, they were not among those with high estimates of variety heterosis. One exotic population ('Tuxpeno' x 'Antigua Grupo 2') and three adapted populations ['307 Composite', 'NB(S1)C-3', and 'NK(S1)C-3'] might be combined together to form a high-yielding population. It may be possible to synthesize two useful populations for reciprocal recurrent selection by grouping 'Tuxpeno' x 'Antiqua Grupo 2', 'NB(S1)C-3', and 'NS(FS)LFW-8' into one population and 'NK(S1)C-3', 'Krug'x'Tabloncillo', and '307 Composite' in the other one.

  14. Do current levels of air pollution kill?:The impact of air pollution on population mortality in England

    OpenAIRE

    Janke, KM; Propper, C.; Henderson, J.

    2009-01-01

    The current air quality limit values for airborne pollutants in the UK are low by historical standards and are at levels that are believed not to harm health. We assess whether this view is correct. We examine the relationship between common sources of airborne pollution and population mortality for England. We use data at local authority level for 1998–2005 to examine whether current levels of airborne pollution, as measured by annual mean concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide,...

  15. The prevalence of HIV among adults with pulmonary TB at a population level in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Kapata, Nathan; Klinkenberg, Eveline; Grobusch, Martin P; Cobelens, Frank

    2017-03-29

    .9%) had a previous history of TB treatment. The proportion of TB/HIV was higher in urban than in the rural clusters. The HIV status was unknown for 114/265 (43.0%) of the TB cases. The TB/HIV prevalence in the general population was found to be lower than what is routinely reported as incident TB/HIV cases at facility level. However; the TB/HIV co-infection was higher in areas with higher TB prevalence. Innovative and effective strategies for ensuring TB/HIV co-infected individuals are detected and treated early are required.

  16. Molecular-level variation affects population growth in a butterfly metapopulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilkka Hanski

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of natural populations are thought to be dominated by demographic and environmental processes with little influence of intraspecific genetic variation and natural selection, apart from inbreeding depression possibly reducing population growth in small populations. Here we analyse hundreds of well-characterised local populations in a large metapopulation of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia, which persists in a balance between stochastic local extinctions and recolonisations in a network of 4,000 discrete habitat patches. We show that the allelic composition of the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi has a significant effect on the growth of local populations, consistent with previously reported effects of allelic variation on flight metabolic performance and fecundity in the Glanville fritillary and Colias butterflies. The strength and the sign of the molecular effect on population growth are sensitive to the ecological context (the area and spatial connectivity of the habitat patches, which affects genotype-specific gene flow and the influence of migration on the dynamics of local populations. The biological significance of the results for Pgi is underscored by lack of any association between population growth and allelic variation at six other loci typed in the same material. In demonstrating, to our knowledge for the first time, that molecular variation in a candidate gene affects population growth, this study challenges the perception that differential performance of individual genotypes, leading to differential fitness, is irrelevant to population dynamics. These results also demonstrate that the spatial configuration of habitat and spatial dynamics of populations contribute to maintenance of Pgi polymorphism in this species.

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyl serum levels in subjects with hepatocellular carcinoma as compared with the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Zani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs have been recognized as human carcinogens and cause liver cancer in animal experimental studies. However, no study investigated their association with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC so far.  This study aimed to evaluate the serum PCB concentration in HCC patients and in healthy subjects of the general population living in Brescia, North Italy, a highly industrialized area with heavy PCB environmental pollution due to the presence of a PCB producing factory. Methods. Lipid-adjusted PCB concentrations, computed as the sum of 24 congeners, were measured in the serum of 101 HCC patients and in 101 healthy subjects of the same age and gender.Results. Hepatitis B and C virus infection and history of heavy alcohol intake were found, alone and combined, in 87% of HCC patients. No difference was found in PCB serum concentration of HCC patients with and without, and according to, the major risk factors for liver disease. No significant difference was observed in serum total PCB concentration between HCC patients (median: 1081; range: 287.0-3182.0 ng/g lipid and healthy subjects (median: 1199.3; range: 225.7-22825 ng/g lipid. PCB congeners 118, 138, 153, 156, 180 and 194 were the only ones found over the detection limit in at least 30% of HCC patients. The serum level of PCB 118, but not that of other congeners, was higher in HCC patients than in healthy subjects.Conclusion. These findings  do not support the hypothesis that PCBs play an important role in HCC development, although a contribution by some specific congeners cannot be ruled out. 

  18. Population-level effects of automated smoking cessation help programs: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Ron; Balmford, James; Benda, Peter

    2013-03-01

    To test the population impact of offering automated smoking cessation interventions via the internet and/or by mobile phone. Pragmatic randomized controlled trial with five conditions: offer of (i) minimal intervention control; (ii) QuitCoach personalized tailored internet-delivered advice program; (iii) onQ, an interactive automated text-messaging program; (iv) an integration of both QuitCoach and onQ; and (v) a choice of either alone or the combined program. Australia, via a mix of internet and telephone contacts. A total of 3530 smokers or recent quitters recruited from those interested in quitting, and seeking self-help resources (n = 1335) or cold-contacted from internet panels (n = 2195). The primary outcome was self-report of 6 months sustained abstinence at 7 months post-recruitment. Only 42.5% of those offered one of the interventions took it up to a minimal level. The intervention groups combined had a non-significantly higher 6-month sustained abstinence rate than the control [odds ratio (OR) = 1.48; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98-2.24] (missing cases treated as smokers), with no differences between the interventions. Among those who used an intervention, there was a significant overall increase in abstinence (OR = 1.95; CI: 1.04-3.67), but not clearly so when analysing only cases with reported outcomes. Success rates were greater among those recruited after seeking information compared to those cold-contacted. Smokers interested in quitting who were assigned randomly to an offer of either the QuitCoach internet-based support program and/or the interactive automated text-messaging program had non-significantly greater odds of quitting for at least 6 months than those randomized to an offer of a simple information website. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. Levels of taurine introgression in the current Brazilian Nelore and Gir indicine cattle populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    A high density panel of more than 777000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to investigate the population structure of Nelore and Gir, compared to seven other populations worldwide. Principal Component Analysis and model-based ancestry estimation clearly separate the indici...

  20. Landscape-level analysis of mountain goat population connectivity in Washington and southern British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie C. Parks; David O. Wallin; Samuel A. Cushman; Brad H. McRae

    2015-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and habitat loss diminish population connectivity, reducing genetic diversity and increasing extinction risk over time. Improving connectivity is widely recommended to preserve the long-term viability of populations, but this requires accurate knowledge of how landscapes influence connectivity. Detectability of landscape effects on gene...

  1. Sign Language Users' Education and Employment Levels: Keeping Pace with Changes in the General Australian Population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Louisa

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on data from the 2006 Australian census to explore the education and employment outcomes of sign languages users living in Victoria, Australia, and to compare them with outcomes reported in the general population. Census data have the advantage of sampling the entire population on the one night, avoiding problems of population…

  2. Host genotype and hypersensitive reaction influence population levels of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians in lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Population dynamics of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians spray inoculated on or infiltrated into lettuce leaves were monitored on cultivars that were well characterized for resistance or susceptibility to the pathogen. In general, population growth was greater for susceptible (Clemente, Salinas 88,...

  3. Association Between Educational Level and Risk of Cancer in HIV-infected Individuals and the Background Population: Population-based Cohort Study 1995-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarth, Rebecca; Omland, Lars H; Dalton, Susanne O; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, Carsten S; Pedersen, Court; Pedersen, Gitte; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels

    2015-11-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals have increased risk of cancer. To our knowledge, no previous study has examined the impact of socioeconomic position on risk and prognosis of cancer in HIV infection. Population-based cohort-study, including HIV-infected individuals diagnosed (without intravenous drug abuse or hepatitis C infection) (n = 3205), and a background population cohort matched by age, gender, and country of birth (n = 22 435) were analyzed. Educational level (low or high) and cancer events were identified in Danish national registers. Cumulative incidences, incidence rate ratios (IRRs), and survival using Kaplan-Meier methods were estimated. Low educational level was associated with increased risk of cancer among HIV-infected individuals compared to population controls: all (adjusted-IRRs: 1.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.1-1.7] vs 1.1 [95% CI, .9-1.2]), tobacco- and alcohol-related (2.1 [95% CI, 1.3-3.4] vs 1.3 [95% CI, 1.1-1.6]), and other (1.7 [95% CI, 1.1-2.8] vs 0.9 [95% CI, .7-1.0]). Educational level was not associated with infection-related or ill-defined cancers. One-year-survival was not associated with educational level, but HIV-infected individuals with low educational level had lower 5-year-survival following infection-related and ill-defined cancers. Education is associated with risk and prognosis of some cancers in HIV infection, and diverges from what is observed in the background population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. County-level analysis of the impact of temperature and population increases on California wildfire data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltar, M.; Keeley, Jon E.; Schoenberg, F.P.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which the apparent increase in wildfire incidence and burn area in California from 1990 to 2006 is affected by population and temperature increases is examined. Using generalized linear models with random effects, we focus on the estimated impacts of increases in mean daily temperatures and populations in different counties on wildfire in those counties, after essentially controlling for the overall differences between counties in their overall mean temperatures and populations. We find that temperature increase appears to have a significant positive impact on both total burn area and number of observed wildfires. Population growth appears to have a much less pronounced impact on total burn area than do annual temperature increases, and population growth appears to be negatively correlated with the total number of observed wildfires. These effects are especially pronounced in the winter season and in Southern California counties.

  5. The effects of stochasticity at the single-cell level and cell size control on the population growth

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jie; Amir, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a quantitative connection between the population growth rate and the generation times of single cells is a prerequisite for understanding evolutionary dynamics of microbes. However, existing theories fail to account for the experimentally observed correlations between mother-daughter generation times that are unavoidable when cell size is controlled for - which is essentially always the case. Here, we study population-level growth in the presence of cell size control and corrobor...

  6. Magnetic domains and frustration in metallic CePdAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Stefan; Huesges, Zita; Huang, Chien-Lung; Stockert, Oliver [Max Planck Institute CPfS, Dresden (Germany); Fritsch, Veronika; Sakai, Akito [EP 6, Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, University of Augsburg (Germany); Grube, Kai; Taubenheim, Christian; Loehneysen, Hilbert von [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic frustration is an exciting topic in condensed matter physics, since it can lead to new ground states of materials, e.g. a spin liquid or spin glass state. Effects of magnetic frustration have been investigated intensively for insulating materials. However, the existence of magnetic frustration in metallic systems is still under debate. CePdAl is a metallic Kondo system, where geometric magnetic frustration arises from the formation of Ce ions on a distorted Kagome lattice. Neutron scattering experiments revealed, that only two thirds of the magnetic Ce moments order antiferromagnetically below T{sub N}=2.7 K, whereas the other third remains mainly disordered. Thermodynamic as well as neutron scattering measurements are presented to verify the existence of partial magnetic frustration in CePdAl. Recently neutron diffraction experiments under magnetic fields applied along two orthogonal directions in the magnetically hard basal plane were performed. They show opposite effects on the magnetic intensity of a selected magnetic domain depending on the field direction with respect to the propagation vector. If this is only an effect of different domain population or also due to a change in magnetic frustration shall be discussed.

  7. Population level differences in thermal sensitivity of energy assimilation in terrestrial salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Timothy A; Gifford, Matthew E

    2017-02-01

    Thermal adaptation predicts that thermal sensitivity of physiological traits should be optimized to thermal conditions most frequently experienced. Furthermore, thermodynamic constraints predict that species with higher thermal optima should have higher performance maxima and narrower performance breadths. We tested these predictions by examining the thermal sensitivity of energy assimilation between populations within two species of terrestrial-lungless salamanders, Plethodon albagula and P. montanus. Within P. albagula, we examined populations that were latitudinally separated by >450km. Within P. montanus, we examined populations that were elevationally separated by >900m. Thermal sensitivity of energy assimilation varied substantially between populations of P. albagula separated latitudinally, but did not vary between populations of P. montanus separated elevationally. Specifically, in P. albagula, the lower latitude population had a higher thermal optimum, higher maximal performance, and narrower performance breadth compared to the higher latitude population. Furthermore, across all individuals as thermal optima increased, performance maxima also increased, providing support for the theory that "hotter is better". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Screening and treating Helicobacter pylori infection for gastric cancer prevention on the population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Chia; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of gastric cancer, and removal of H. pylori infection from a population could theoretically decrease the number of cases by about 89%. However, in real-life settings, few studies have reported the effect of screening and treating this pathogen in population-based programs. This is mainly because of the lack of an adequate infrastructure for delivery of systematic screening services to asymptomatic individuals, the lack of standardization to ensure that each subject receives the correct diagnostic testing and antibiotic treatment, and limited resources. We illustrate our method of implementing two population-based screen-and-treat programs in Taiwan, where the epidemiological characteristics of disease burden have changed from the traditionally Eastern pattern towards that of the Western countries. Our first example is a high-risk population that resides on an offshore island, in which a strategy of mass eradication of H. pylori was applied. The other example is an intermediate-risk population, which is representative of the general average-risk population, in which there is integration of the screen-and-treat method with the established framework of colorectal cancer screening using the fecal-occult blood test. The information provided here may be useful for integration of gastric cancer prevention measures into the healthcare priorities of populations with different gastric cancer risks, such as those with limited resources. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Autosomal admixture levels are informative about sex bias in admixed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Amy; Verdu, Paul; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2014-11-01

    Sex-biased admixture has been observed in a wide variety of admixed populations. Genetic variation in sex chromosomes and functions of quantities computed from sex chromosomes and autosomes have often been examined to infer patterns of sex-biased admixture, typically using statistical approaches that do not mechanistically model the complexity of a sex-specific history of admixture. Here, expanding on a model of Verdu and Rosenberg (2011) that did not include sex specificity, we develop a model that mechanistically examines sex-specific admixture histories. Under the model, multiple source populations contribute to an admixed population, potentially with their male and female contributions varying over time. In an admixed population descended from two source groups, we derive the moments of the distribution of the autosomal admixture fraction from a specific source population as a function of sex-specific introgression parameters and time. Considering admixture processes that are constant in time, we demonstrate that surprisingly, although the mean autosomal admixture fraction from a specific source population does not reveal a sex bias in the admixture history, the variance of autosomal admixture is informative about sex bias. Specifically, the long-term variance decreases as the sex bias from a contributing source population increases. This result can be viewed as analogous to the reduction in effective population size for populations with an unequal number of breeding males and females. Our approach suggests that it may be possible to use the effect of sex-biased admixture on autosomal DNA to assist with methods for inference of the history of complex sex-biased admixture processes. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Achieving population-level immunity to rabies in free-roaming dogs in Africa and Asia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morters, Michelle K; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Horton, Daniel L; Cleaveland, Sarah; Schoeman, Johan P; Restif, Olivier; Whay, Helen R; Goddard, Amelia; Fooks, Anthony R; Damriyasa, I Made; Wood, James L N

    2014-01-01

    .... It has been suggested that, in free-roaming dog populations where rabies is endemic, vaccine-induced protection may be compromised by immuno-suppression through malnutrition, infection and other stressors...

  11. Remarks on a population-level model of chemotaxis: advection-diffusion approximation and simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Aminzare, Zahra; Sontag, Eduardo D.

    2013-01-01

    This note works out an advection-diffusion approximation to the density of a population of E. coli bacteria undergoing chemotaxis in a one-dimensional space. Simulations show the high quality of predictions under a shallow-gradient regime.

  12. SWFSC/MMTD/AK: Structure of Populations, Level of Abundance, and Status of Humpbacks (SPLASH) 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project was part of a larger international project (SPLASH) designed to estimate the abundance and determine the population structure for humpback whales...

  13. Male Kirtland's Warblers' patch-level response to landscape structure during periods of varying population size and habitat amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, D.M.; Ribic, C.A.; Probst, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Forest planners must evaluate how spatiotemporal changes in habitat amount and configuration across the landscape as a result of timber management will affect species' persistence. However, there are few long-term programs available for evaluation. We investigated the response of male Kirtland's Warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii) to 26 years of changing patch and landscape structure during a large, 26-year forestry-habitat restoration program within the warbler's primary breeding range. We found that the average density of male Kirtland's Warblers was related to a different combination of patch and landscape attributes depending on the species' regional population level and habitat amounts on the landscape (early succession jack pine (Pinus banksiana) forests; 15-42% habitat cover). Specifically, patch age and habitat regeneration type were important at low male population and total habitat amounts, while patch age and distance to an occupied patch were important at relatively high population and habitat amounts. Patch age and size were more important at increasing population levels and an intermediate amount of habitat. The importance of patch age to average male density during all periods reflects the temporal buildup and decline of male numbers as habitat suitability within the patch changed with succession. Habitat selection (i.e., preference for wildfire-regenerated habitat) and availability may explain the importance of habitat type and patch size during lower population and habitat levels. The relationship between male density and distance when there was the most habitat on the landscape and the male population was large and still increasing may be explained by the widening spatial dispersion of the increasing male population at the regional scale. Because creating or preserving habitat is not a random process, management efforts would benefit from more investigations of managed population responses to changes in spatial structure that occur through habitat gain

  14. A survey of Lolium rigidum populations in citrus orchards: Factors explaining infestation levels

    OpenAIRE

    Atanackovic, Valentina; Juárez Escario, Alejandro; Recasens i Guinjuan, Jordi; Torra Farré, Joel

    2015-01-01

    The presence of herbicide-resistant Lolium rigidum in Mediterranean (Spanish) citrus orchards was reported in 2005 and it poses a serious threat to crop management. The main objective of this research was to investigate which components could be responsible for the persistence of annual ryegrass populations in Mediterranean mandarin and orange orchards. This is the first study regarding L. rigidum populations in Mediterranean citrus orchards. Surveys were con- ducted in 55 comme...

  15. Plasma surfactant protein D levels and the relation to body mass index in a chinese population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, X M; Wu, Y P; Wei, R

    2007-01-01

    in a Chinese population from the Tai An region comprising 268 individuals. We found that (i) plasma SP-D in the Chinese population was distributed with a median value of 380.2 ng/ml (324.9; 418.7) and a range from 79.4 to 3965.3 ng/ml, (ii) significantly higher plasma SP-D in men than in women...

  16. Taxonomic structure and population level of colon microbial contents in white rats with experimental thyrotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Sydorchuk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Production of numerous biologically active compounds and their metabolites by intestinal microflora, interaction with the immune and other systems is of great importance while studying its changes in various diseases, one of which is thyrotoxicosis. So, the purpose of this study was to determine the severity of intestine microbioma disorder in white rats with experimental thyrotoxicosis (ET. Materials and methods. Studies were carried out on 25 mature male white rats (15 — control group, 10 — research group. ET was simulated by intragastric administration of L-thyroxine for 14 days. Under sterile conditions a laparotomy was performed, a section (2–3 cm of the large intestine with its contents was taken. Sterile 0.9% NaCl solution was added to the content. Series of ten-fold dilutions with a concentration of the initial mixture of 10–2 to 10–11 was prepared. From each test tube 0.01 ml was seeded on solid nutrient media with subsequent isolation and identification of microbes according to morphological, tinctorial, cultural and biochemical properties. Results. The results of the study demonstrated that in ET animals the main microbioma is represented by bacteria Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and also opportunistic enterobacteria (Escherichia, Proteus, Klebsiella, peptococcus, staphylococci and clostridia. This is accompanied by the elimination of Peptostreptococcus, Enterococcus from bacterial biotope and the contamination of K. oxytoca and staphylococci. There was a pronounced deficit of bifidobacteria by 42.81 %, lactobacillus by 22.57 %, normal intestinal bacillus by 16.48 %. By the population level, the coefficient of quantitative dominance and the significance factor, the leading place is occupied by bacteroids, role of which is increased by 21.72 %, and lactobacillus role decreases by 39.31 %, bifidobacteria decreases by 51.48 % and E. coli decreases by 57.49 %. In this case, the role of peptococcus 3

  17. Population density and phenotypic attributes influence the level of nematode parasitism in roe deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Body, Guillaume; Ferté, Hubert; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Delorme, Daniel; Klein, François; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle

    2011-11-01

    The impact of parasites on population dynamics is well documented, but less is known on how host population density affects parasite spread. This relationship is difficult to assess because of confounding effects of social structure, population density, and environmental conditions that lead to biased among-population comparisons. Here, we analyzed the infestation by two groups of nematodes (gastro-intestinal (GI) strongyles and Trichuris) in the roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) population of Trois Fontaines (France) between 1997 and 2007. During this period, we experimentally manipulated population density through changes in removals. Using measures collected on 297 individuals, we quantified the impact of density on parasite spread after taking into account possible influences of date, age, sex, body mass, and weather conditions. The prevalence and abundance of eggs of both parasites in females were positively related to roe deer density, except Trichuris in adult females. We also found a negative relationship between parasitism and body mass, and strong age and sex-dependent patterns of parasitism. Prime-age adults were less often parasitized and had lower fecal egg counts than fawns or old individuals, and males were more heavily and more often infected than females. Trichuris parasites were not affected by weather, whereas GI strongyles were less present after dry and hot summers. In the range of observed densities, the observed effect of density likely involves a variation of the exposure rate, as opposed to variation in host susceptibility.

  18. Community-based population-level interventions for promoting child oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Andrea M; Hegde, Shalika; Akudo Nwagbara, Bridget; Calache, Hanny; Gussy, Mark G; Nasser, Mona; Morrice, Hannah R; Riggs, Elisha; Leong, Pamela M; Meyenn, Lisa K; Yousefi-Nooraie, Reza

    2016-09-15

    Dental caries and gingival and periodontal disease are commonly occurring, preventable chronic conditions. Even though much is known about how to treat oral disease, currently we do not know which community-based population-level interventions are most effective and equitable in preventing poor oral health. Primary • To determine the effectiveness of community-based population-level oral health promotion interventions in preventing dental caries and gingival and periodontal disease among children from birth to 18 years of age. Secondary • To determine the most effective types of interventions (environmental, social, community and multi-component) and guiding theoretical frameworks.• To identify interventions that reduce inequality in oral health outcomes.• To examine the influence of context in the design, delivery and outcomes of interventions. We searched the following databases from January 1996 to April 2014: MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Education Resource Information Center (ERIC), BIOSIS Previews, Web of Science, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), ScienceDirect, Sociological Abstracts, Social Science Citation Index, PsycINFO, SCOPUS, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses and Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science. Included studies were individual- and cluster-randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled before-and-after studies and quasi-experimental and interrupted time series. To be included, interventions had to target the primary outcomes: dental caries (measured as decayed, missing and filled deciduous teeth/surfaces, dmft/s; Decayed, Missing and Filled permanent teeth/surfaces, DMFT/S) and gingival or periodontal disease among children from birth to 18 years of age. Studies had to report on one or more of the primary outcomes at baseline and post intervention, or had to provide change scores for

  19. WITHDRAWN: Community-based population-level interventions for promoting child oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Andrea M; Hegde, Shalika; Akudo Nwagbara, Bridget; Calache, Hanny; Gussy, Mark G; Nasser, Mona; Morrice, Hannah R; Riggs, Elisha; Leong, Pamela M; Meyenn, Lisa K; Yousefi-Nooraie, Reza

    2016-12-22

    Dental caries and gingival and periodontal disease are commonly occurring, preventable chronic conditions. Even though much is known about how to treat oral disease, currently we do not know which community-based population-level interventions are most effective and equitable in preventing poor oral health. Primary • To determine the effectiveness of community-based population-level oral health promotion interventions in preventing dental caries and gingival and periodontal disease among children from birth to 18 years of age. Secondary • To determine the most effective types of interventions (environmental, social, community and multi-component) and guiding theoretical frameworks.• To identify interventions that reduce inequality in oral health outcomes.• To examine the influence of context in the design, delivery and outcomes of interventions. We searched the following databases from January 1996 to April 2014: MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Education Resource Information Center (ERIC), BIOSIS Previews, Web of Science, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), ScienceDirect, Sociological Abstracts, Social Science Citation Index, PsycINFO, SCOPUS, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses and Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science. Included studies were individual- and cluster-randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled before-and-after studies and quasi-experimental and interrupted time series. To be included, interventions had to target the primary outcomes: dental caries (measured as decayed, missing and filled deciduous teeth/surfaces, dmft/s; Decayed, Missing and Filled permanent teeth/surfaces, DMFT/S) and gingival or periodontal disease among children from birth to 18 years of age. Studies had to report on one or more of the primary outcomes at baseline and post intervention, or had to provide change scores for

  20. Prioritizing Avian Species for Their Risk of Population-Level Consequences from Wind Energy Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beston, Julie A; Diffendorfer, Jay E; Loss, Scott R; Johnson, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Recent growth in the wind energy industry has increased concerns about its impacts on wildlife populations. Direct impacts of wind energy include bird and bat collisions with turbines whereas indirect impacts include changes in wildlife habitat and behavior. Although many species may withstand these effects, species that are long-lived with low rates of reproduction, have specialized habitat preferences, or are attracted to turbines may be more prone to declines in population abundance. We developed a prioritization system to identify the avian species most likely to experience population declines from wind facilities based on their current conservation status and their expected risk from turbines. We developed 3 metrics of turbine risk that incorporate data on collision fatalities at wind facilities, population size, life history, species' distributions relative to turbine locations, number of suitable habitat types, and species' conservation status. We calculated at least 1 measure of turbine risk for 428 avian species that breed in the United States. We then simulated 100,000 random sets of cutoff criteria (i.e., the metric values used to assign species to different priority categories) for each turbine risk metric and for conservation status. For each set of criteria, we assigned each species a priority score and calculated the average priority score across all sets of criteria. Our prioritization system highlights both species that could potentially experience population decline caused by wind energy and species at low risk of population decline. For instance, several birds of prey, such as the long-eared owl, ferruginous hawk, Swainson's hawk, and golden eagle, were at relatively high risk of population decline across a wide variety of cutoff values, whereas many passerines were at relatively low risk of decline. This prioritization system is a first step that will help researchers, conservationists, managers, and industry target future study and management

  1. CALCIUM AND IRON INTAKE BY OLD PEOPLE LIVING IN GERIATRIC INSTITUTIONS IN FORTALEZA, CE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarciana Nobre de Menezes

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium and iron intake by 152 old people living in geriatric institutions in Fortaleza, CE was analyzed. The methodology used consisted of weighing food first and then its remainder after meals in order to calculate food consumption. The results showed that 93% of the old people studied presented inadequate intake of calcium. Regarding iron, 72% of men and 41% of women presented intakes above the recommended levels. However, 12% of women presented iron intakes below the recommended levels. According to such results, it is concluded that this population is under a nutritional risk of osteoporosis (considering the large proportion of individuals with inadequate intake of calcium as well as ferroprivous anaemia, especially concerning women. Thus, interventions to prevent and correct such deficiencies are necessary. Key words: old people in geriatric institutions, food intake, food direct weighing.

  2. Exposure of agricultural crops to nanoparticle CeO2 in biochar-amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, Alia D; De la Torre-Roche, Roberto; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Pagano, Luca; Hawthorne, Joseph; Musante, Craig; Pignatello, Joseph; Uchimiya, Minori; White, Jason C

    2017-01-01

    Biochar is seeing increased usage as an amendment in agricultural soils but the significance of nanoscale interactions between this additive and engineered nanoparticles (ENP) remains unknown. Corn, lettuce, soybean and zucchini were grown for 28 d in two different soils (agricultural, residential) amended with 0-2000 mg engineered nanoparticle (ENP) CeO2 kg(-1) and biochar (350 °C or 600 °C) at application rates of 0-5% (w/w). At harvest, plants were analyzed for biomass, Ce content, chlorophyll and lipid peroxidation. Biomass from the four species grown in residential soil varied with species and biochar type. However, biomass in the agricultural soil amended with biochar 600 °C was largely unaffected. Biochar co-exposure had minimal impact on Ce accumulation, with reduced or increased Ce content occurring at the highest (5%) biochar level. Soil-specific and biochar-specific effects on Ce accumulation were observed in the four species. For example, zucchini grown in agricultural soil with 2000 mg CeO2 kg(-1) and 350 °C biochar (0.5-5%) accumulated greater Ce than the control. However, for the 600 °C biochar, the opposite effect was evident, with decreased Ce content as biochar increased. A principal component analysis showed that biochar type accounted for 56-99% of the variance in chlorophyll and lipid peroxidation across the plants. SEM and μ-XRF showed Ce association with specific biochar and soil components, while μ-XANES analysis confirmed that after 28 d in soil, the Ce remained largely as CeO2. The current study demonstrates that biochar synthesis conditions significantly impact interactions with ENP, with subsequent effects on particle fate and effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol in a middle-aged Danish population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten T Eriksen

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS are used in a variety of consumer products and have been detected worldwide in human blood. Recent studies mainly of highly exposed populations have indicated that PFOA and PFOS may affect serum cholesterol levels, but the magnitude of the effect may be inconsistent across exposure levels. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between plasma PFOA and PFOS and total cholesterol in a general, middle-aged Danish population. The study population comprised 753 individuals (663 men and 90 women, 50-65 years of age, nested within a Danish cohort of 57,053 participants. Blood samples were taken from all cohort members at enrolment (1993-1997 and stored in a biobank at -150°C. Plasma levels of PFOA and PFOS and serum levels of total cholesterol were measured. The associations between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol levels were analysed by generalized linear models, both crude and adjusted for potential confounders. We observed statistically significant positive associations between both perfluorinated compounds and total cholesterol, e.g. a 4.4 [95% CI  =  1.1-7.8] higher concentration of total cholesterol (mg/dL per interquartile range of PFOA plasma level. Sex and prevalent diabetes appeared to modify the association between PFOA and PFOS, respectively, and cholesterol. In conclusion, this study indicated positive associations between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol in a middle-aged Danish population, although whether the observed pattern of results reflects a causal association is unclear.

  4. Plasma homocysteine levels in patients with multiple sclerosis in the Greek population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Kararizou

    2013-11-01

    Conclusion: The preliminary data suggest that Hcy levels were not elevated in our sample of Greek MS patients, which does not support previous findings of a significant correlation between elevated serum Hcy levels and MS. Further studies to establish a possible association between MS and Hcy levels in the context of different ethnic groups with different habits are needed.

  5. Predicting the population-level impact of mitigating harbor porpoise bycatch with pingers and time-area fishing closures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Beest, Floris; Kindt-Larsen, Lotte; Bastardie, Francois

    2017-01-01

    and protected marine top predator, involves the use of pingers (acoustic alarms that emit underwater noise) and time-area fishing closures. Although these mitigation measures can reduce harbor porpoise bycatch in gillnet fisheries considerably, inference about the long-term population-level consequences...... noise avoidance behavior in high-quality foraging habitat negatively affected individual survival and the total population size. When both bycatch mitigation measures were implemented simultaneously, the negative impact of pinger noise-induced sub-lethal behavioral effects on the population was largely...... before enforcing their widespread implementation. Individual-based simulation models, such as the one presented here, offer an efficient and dynamic framework to evaluate the impact of human activities on the long-term survival of marine populations and can serve as a basis to design adaptive management...

  6. Association Between Educational Level and Risk of Cancer in HIV-infected Individuals and the Background Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Rebecca; Omland, Lars H; Dalton, Susanne O

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals have increased risk of cancer. To our knowledge, no previous study has examined the impact of socioeconomic position on risk and prognosis of cancer in HIV infection. METHODS: Population-based cohort-study, including HIV......-infected individuals diagnosed (without intravenous drug abuse or hepatitis C infection) (n = 3205), and a background population cohort matched by age, gender, and country of birth (n = 22 435) were analyzed. Educational level (low or high) and cancer events were identified in Danish national registers. Cumulative...... incidences, incidence rate ratios (IRRs), and survival using Kaplan-Meier methods were estimated. RESULTS: Low educational level was associated with increased risk of cancer among HIV-infected individuals compared to population controls: all (adjusted-IRRs: 1.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.1-1.7] vs 1...

  7. Genome of the Netherlands population-specific imputations identify an ABCA6 variant associated with cholesterol levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Karssen, Lennart C.; Deelen, Joris; Isaacs, Aaron; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Mbarek, Hamdi; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Trompet, Stella; Postmus, Iris; Verweij, Niek; van Enckevort, David J.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; White, Charles C.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Bartz, Traci M.; Manichaikul, Ani; Joshi, Peter K.; Peloso, Gina M.; Deelen, Patrick; van Dijk, Freerk; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Francioli, Laurent C.; Menelaou, Androniki; Pulit, Sara L.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A.; Franco, Oscar H.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Beekman, Marian; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Uh, Hae-Won; Trochet, Holly; Hocking, Lynne J.; Porteous, David J.; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Bis, Joshua C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Campbell, Harry; Duan, Qing; Lange, Leslie A.; Wilson, James F.; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F.; Rich, Stephen S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Kearney, Patricia M.; Stott, David J.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Neerincx, Pieter B.T.; Elbers, Clara C.; Francesco Palamara, Pier; Pe'er, Itsik; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; van Oven, Mannis; Vermaat, Martijn; Li, Mingkun; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; Stoneking, Mark; de Knijff, Peter; Kayser, Manfred; Veldink, Jan H.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Byelas, Heorhiy; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Dijkstra, Martijn; Amin, Najaf; Joeri van der Velde, K.; van Setten, Jessica; Kattenberg, Mathijs; van Schaik, Barbera D.C.; Bot, Jan; Nijman, Isaäc J.; Mei, Hailiang; Koval, Vyacheslav; Ye, Kai; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; Moed, Matthijs H.; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Sohail, Mashaal; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Marschall, Tobias; Schönhuth, Alexander; Guryev, Victor; Suchiman, H. Eka D.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.; Platteel, Mathieu; Pitts, Steven J.; Potluri, Shobha; Cox, David R.; Li, Qibin; Li, Yingrui; Du, Yuanping; Chen, Ruoyan; Cao, Hongzhi; Li, Ning; Cao, Sujie; Wang, Jun; Bovenberg, Jasper A.; Jukema, J. Wouter; van der Harst, Pim; Sijbrands, Eric J.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Swertz, Morris A.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Eline Slagboom, P.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants associated with blood lipid levels may be population-specific. To identify low-frequency variants associated with this phenotype, population-specific reference panels may be used. Here we impute nine large Dutch biobanks (~35,000 samples) with the population-specific reference panel created by the Genome of the Netherlands Project and perform association testing with blood lipid levels. We report the discovery of five novel associations at four loci (P value <6.61 × 10−4), including a rare missense variant in ABCA6 (rs77542162, p.Cys1359Arg, frequency 0.034), which is predicted to be deleterious. The frequency of this ABCA6 variant is 3.65-fold increased in the Dutch and its effect (βLDL-C=0.135, βTC=0.140) is estimated to be very similar to those observed for single variants in well-known lipid genes, such as LDLR. PMID:25751400

  8. Effects of freshwater pollution on the genetics of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) at the molecular and population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Emilia G; Srut, Maja; Stambuk, Anamaria; Klobučar, Göran I V; Seitz, Alfred; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2014-01-01

    Revealing long-term effects of contaminants on the genetic structure of organisms inhabiting polluted environments should encompass analyses at the population, molecular, and cellular level. Following this concept, we studied the genetic constitution of zebra mussel populations from a polluted (Dp) and reference sites (Cl) at the river Drava, Croatia, and applied microsatellite and DNA damage analyses (Comet assay, micronucleus test (MNT)). Additionally, mussels from both populations were exposed to polluted wastewater in the laboratory for three days, and DNA damage was analyzed to evaluate acclimatization and genetic adaptation of the investigated populations to the polluted environment. The two populations differed in their genetic constitution. Microsatellite analysis suggested that Dp had undergone a genetic bottleneck. Comet assay did not indicate any difference in DNA damage between the two populations, but MNT revealed that Dp had an increased percentage of micronuclei in hemocytes in comparison to Cl. The laboratory experiment revealed that Dp had a lower percentage of tail DNA and a higher percentage of micronuclei than Cl. These differences between populations were possibly caused by an overall decreased fitness of Dp due to genetic drift and by an enhanced DNA repair mechanism due to acclimatization to pollution in the source habitat.

  9. Sociological analysis of the efficiency of social interaction between law enforcement agencies, civil society and population at the regional level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Vasil’evich Egoryshev

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the capabilities of sociological analysis of condition and results of social interaction between law enforcement bodies, population, and civil society institutions; it also sets out the tasks to be solved in the course of such analysis at the regional level (case study of the Republic of Bashkortostan

  10. C-reactive protein levels and treatment resistance in schizophrenia - A Danish population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsdal, Henriette Thisted; Wimberley, Theresa; Benros, Michael Eriksen

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia is associated with increased levels of inflammatory markers. However, it remains unclear whether inflammatory markers are associated with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. METHODS: We conducted a population-based follow-up study among individuals with a first-time schizo...

  11. Relationship between Urinary Level of Phytate and Valvular Calcification in an Elderly Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Palomeque, Carlos; Grau, Andres; Perelló, Joan; Sanchis, Pilar; Isern, Bernat; Prieto, Rafel M.; Costa-Bauzá, Antonia; Caldés, Onofre J.; Bonnin, Oriol; Garcia-Raja, Ana; Bethencourt, Armando; Grases, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Pathological calcification generally consists of the formation of solid deposits of hydroxyapatite (calcium phosphate) in soft tissues. Supersaturation is the thermodynamic driving force for crystallization, so it is believed that higher blood levels of calcium and phosphate increase the risk of cardiovascular calcification. However several factors can promote or inhibit the natural process of pathological calcification. This cross-sectional study evaluated the relationship between physiological levels of urinary phytate and heart valve calcification in a population of elderly out subjects. A population of 188 elderly subjects (mean age: 68 years) was studied. Valve calcification was measured by echocardiography. Phytate determination was performed from a urine sample and data on blood chemistry, end-systolic volume, concomitant diseases, cardiovascular risk factors, medication usage and food were obtained. The study population was classified in three tertiles according to level of urinary phytate: low (1.21 μM). Subjects with higher levels of urinary phytate had less mitral annulus calcification and were less likely to have diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. In the multivariate analysis, age, serum phosphorous, leukocytes total count and urinary phytate excretion appeared as independent factors predictive of presence of mitral annulus calcification. There was an inverse correlation between urinary phytate content and mitral annulus calcification in our population of elderly out subjects. These results suggest that consumption of phytate-rich foods may help to prevent cardiovascular calcification evolution. PMID:26322979

  12. Relationship between Urinary Level of Phytate and Valvular Calcification in an Elderly Population: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernández-Palomeque

    Full Text Available Pathological calcification generally consists of the formation of solid deposits of hydroxyapatite (calcium phosphate in soft tissues. Supersaturation is the thermodynamic driving force for crystallization, so it is believed that higher blood levels of calcium and phosphate increase the risk of cardiovascular calcification. However several factors can promote or inhibit the natural process of pathological calcification. This cross-sectional study evaluated the relationship between physiological levels of urinary phytate and heart valve calcification in a population of elderly out subjects. A population of 188 elderly subjects (mean age: 68 years was studied. Valve calcification was measured by echocardiography. Phytate determination was performed from a urine sample and data on blood chemistry, end-systolic volume, concomitant diseases, cardiovascular risk factors, medication usage and food were obtained. The study population was classified in three tertiles according to level of urinary phytate: low (1.21 μM. Subjects with higher levels of urinary phytate had less mitral annulus calcification and were less likely to have diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. In the multivariate analysis, age, serum phosphorous, leukocytes total count and urinary phytate excretion appeared as independent factors predictive of presence of mitral annulus calcification. There was an inverse correlation between urinary phytate content and mitral annulus calcification in our population of elderly out subjects. These results suggest that consumption of phytate-rich foods may help to prevent cardiovascular calcification evolution.

  13. GENETIC POPULATION STRUCTURE AND LEVELS OF GENE FLOW IN THE STREAM DWELLING WATERSTRIDER, AQUARIUS (=GERRIS) REMIGIS (HEMIPTERA: GERRIDAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preziosi, Richard F; Fairbairn, Daphne J

    1992-04-01

    Gene flow, in combination with selection and drift, determines levels of differentiation among local populations. In this study we estimate gene flow in a stream dwelling, flightless waterstrider, Aquarius remigis. Twenty-eight Aquarius remigis populations from Quebec, Ontario, New Brunswick, Iowa, North Carolina, and California were genetically characterized at 15 loci using starch gel electrophoresis. Sampling over two years was designed for a hierarchical analysis of population structure incorporating variation among sites within streams, streams within watersheds, watersheds within regions, and regions within North America. Hierarchical F statistics indicated that only sites within streams maintained enough gene flow to prevent differentiation through drift (Nm = 27.5). Above the level of sites within streams gene flow is highly restricted (Nm ≤ 0.5) and no correlation is found between genetic and geographic distances. This agrees well with direct estimates of gene flow based on mark and recapture data, yielding an N e of approximately 170 individuals. Previous assignment of subspecific status to Californian A. remigis is not supported by genetic distances between those populations and other populations in North America. Previous suggestion of specific status for south-eastern A. remigis is supported by genetic distances between North Carolina populations and other populations in North America, and a high proportion of region specific alleles in the North Carolina populations. However, because of the high degree of morphological and genetic variability throughout the range of this species, the assignment of specific or subspecific status to parts of the range may be premature. © 1992 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. New experimental constraints for Hadean zircon source melts from Ce and Eu anomalies in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trail, D.; Watson, E. B.; Tailby, N.

    2010-12-01

    , even at oxygen fugacities as high as HM+1. However, the magnitude of Ce anomalies in Hadean zircons is within the range of predicted anomalies of our experiments for peraluminous melts, implying that a significant portion of the Hadean zircon population may be derived from peraluminous melts. This result is consistent with muscovite inclusion mineralogy in Hadean zircons (e.g., Hopkins et al., 2008), but does not preclude the possibility of other, less evolved peraluminous source rocks, or some process which leads to significant Ce enrichment (relative to La and/or Pr) in the melt at the time of zircon crystallization.

  15. Circumpolar contaminant concentrations in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and potential population-level effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuijten, R.J.M.; Hendriks, A.J.; Jenssen, B.M.; Schipper, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) currently receive much attention in the context of global climate change. However, there are other stressors that might threaten the viability of polar bear populations as well, such as exposure to anthropogenic pollutants. Lipophilic organic compounds

  16. Dissecting components of population-level variation in seed production and the evolution of masting behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. D. Koenig; D. Kelly; V. L. Sork; R. P. Duncan; J. S. Elkinton; M.S. Peltonen; R. D. Westfall

    2003-01-01

    Mast-fruiting or masting behavior is the cumulative result of the reproductive patterns of individuals within a population and thus involves components of individual variability, between-individual synchrony, and endogenous cycles of temporal autocorrelation. Extending prior work by Herrera, we explore the interrelationships of these components using data on individual...

  17. A Bioassay for Determining Resistance Levels in Tarnished Plant Bug Populations to Neonicotinoid Insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory bioassay was developed and used to test field populations of the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), for resistance development to the neonicitinoid insecticides imidacloprid (Trimax®) and thiamethoxam (Centric®). The bioassay determined LC50 values by feeding...

  18. Extrapolating toxic effects on individuals to the population level: the role of dynamic energy budgets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, T.; Klok, T.C.

    2010-01-01

    The interest of environmental management is in the long-term health of populations and ecosystems. However, toxicity is usually assessed in short-term experiments with individuals. Modelling based on dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory aids the extraction of mechanistic information from the data,

  19. Single-cell analysis of population context advances RNAi screening at multiple levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Berend; Sacher, Raphael; Rämö, Pauli; Liberali, Prisca; Mench, Karin; Wolfrum, Nina; Burleigh, Laura; Scott, Cameron C; Verheije, Monique H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239420640; Mercer, Jason; Moese, Stefan; Heger, Thomas; Theusner, Kristina; Jurgeit, Andreas; Lamparter, David; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Schelhaas, Mario; De Haan, Cornelis A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194204510; Marjomäki, Varpu; Hyypiä, Timo; Rottier, Peter J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068451954; Sodeik, Beate; Marsh, Mark; Gruenberg, Jean; Amara, Ali; Greber, Urs; Helenius, Ari; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Isogenic cells in culture show strong variability, which arises from dynamic adaptations to the microenvironment of individual cells. Here we study the influence of the cell population context, which determines a single cell's microenvironment, in image-based RNAi screens. We developed a

  20. Asymmetric Damage Segregation Constitutes an Emergent Population-Level Stress Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Nunns, Harry; Košmrlj, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    , we introduce a cell-lineage-based framework that quantifies the population-wide effects of ADS and then verify our results experimentally in E. coli under heat and antibiotic stress. Using an experimentally validated mathematical model, we find that the beneficial effect of ADS increases with stress...

  1. Facile synthesis of ferromagnetic Ni doped CeO2 nanoparticles with enhanced anticancer activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Fazal; Jan, Tariq; Iqbal, Javed; Ahmad, Ishaq; Naqvi, M. Sajjad H.; Malik, Maaza

    2015-12-01

    NixCe1-xO2 (where x = 0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.07) nanoparticles were synthesized by soft chemical method and were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). XRD and Raman results indicated the formation of single phase cubic fluorite structure for the synthesized nanoparticles. Ni dopant induced excessive structural changes such as decrease in crystallite size as well as lattice constants and enhancement in oxygen vacancies in CeO2 crystal structure. These structural variations significantly influenced the optical and magnetic properties of CeO2 nanoparticles. The synthesized NixCe1-xO2 nanoparticles exhibited room temperature ferromagnetic behavior. Ni doping induced effects on the cytotoxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles were examined against HEK-293 healthy cell line and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cancer cell line. The prepared NixCe1-xO2 nanoparticles demonstrated differential cytotoxicity. Furthermore, anticancer activity of CeO2 nanoparticles observed to be significantly enhanced with Ni doping which was found to be strongly correlated with the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The prepared ferromagnetic NixCe1-xO2 nanoparticles with differential cytotoxic nature may be potential for future targeted cancer therapy.

  2. HumanViCe: Host ceRNA network in virus infected cells in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman eGhosal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Host-virus interaction via host cellular components has been an important field of research in recent times. RNA interference mediated by short interfering RNAs and microRNAs (miRNA, is a widespread anti-viral defence strategy. Importantly, viruses also encode their own miRNAs. In recent times miRNAs were identified as key players in host-virus interaction. Furthermore, viruses were shown to exploit the host miRNA networks to suite their own need. The complex cross-talk between host and viral miRNAs and their cellular and viral targets forms the environment for viral pathogenesis. Apart from protein-coding mRNAs, non-coding RNAs may also be targeted by host or viral miRNAs in virus infected cells, and viruses can exploit the host miRNA mediated gene regulatory network via the competing endogenous RNA effect. A recent report showed that viral U-rich non-coding RNAs called HSUR, expressed in primate virus herpesvirus saimiri (HVS infected T cells, were able to bind to three host miRNAs, causing significant alteration in cellular level for one of the miRNAs. We have predicted protein coding and non protein-coding targets for viral and human miRNAs in virus infected cells. We identified viral miRNA targets within host non-coding RNA loci from AGO interacting regions in three different virus infected cells. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the genes comprising the ceRNA networks in the virus infected cells revealed enrichment of key cellular signalling pathways related to cell fate decisions and gene transcription, like Notch and Wnt signalling pathways, as well as pathways related to viral entry, replication and virulence. We identified a vast number of non-coding transcripts playing as potential ceRNAs to the immune response associated genes; e.g. APOBEC family genes, in some virus infected cells. All these information are compiled in HumanViCe, a comprehensive database that provides the potential ceRNA networks in virus

  3. High levels of diversity and population structure in the potato late blight pathogen at the Mexico centre of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianan; Fernández-Pavía, Sylvia P; Larsen, Meredith M; Garay-Serrano, Edith; Gregorio-Cipriano, Rosario; Rodríguez-Alvarado, Gerardo; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Goss, Erica M

    2017-02-01

    Globally destructive crop pathogens often emerge by migrating out of their native ranges. These pathogens are often diverse at their centre of origin and may exhibit adaptive variation in the invaded range via multiple introductions from different source populations. However, source populations are generally unidentified or poorly studied compared to invasive populations. Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight, is one of the most costly pathogens of potato and tomato worldwide. Mexico is the centre of origin and diversity of P. infestans and migration events out of Mexico have enormously impacted disease dynamics in North America and Europe. The debate over the origin of the pathogen, and population studies of P. infestans in Mexico, has focused on the Toluca Valley, whereas neighbouring regions have been little studied. We examined the population structure of P. infestans across central Mexico, including samples from Michoacán, Tlaxcala and Toluca. We found high levels of diversity consistent with sexual reproduction in Michoacán and Tlaxcala and population subdivision that was strongly associated with geographic region. We determined that population structure in central Mexico has contributed to diversity in introduced populations based on relatedness of U.S. clonal lineages to Mexican isolates from different regions. Our results suggest that P. infestans exists as a metapopulation in central Mexico, and this population structure could be contributing to the repeated re-emergence of P. infestans in the United States and elsewhere. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. What is the optimal level of population alcohol consumption for chronic disease prevention in England? Modelling the impact of changes in average consumption levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Melanie; Scarborough, Peter; Allender, Steven; Rayner, Mike

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the impact of achieving alternative average population alcohol consumption levels on chronic disease mortality in England. A macro-simulation model was built to simultaneously estimate the number of deaths from coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertensive disease, diabetes, liver cirrhosis, epilepsy and five cancers that would be averted or delayed annually as a result of changes in alcohol consumption among English adults. Counterfactual scenarios assessed the impact on alcohol-related mortalities of changing (1) the median alcohol consumption of drinkers and (2) the percentage of non-drinkers. Risk relationships were drawn from published meta-analyses. Age- and sex-specific distributions of alcohol consumption (grams per day) for the English population in 2006 were drawn from the General Household Survey 2006, and age-, sex- and cause-specific mortality data for 2006 were provided by the Office for National Statistics. The optimum median consumption level for drinkers in the model was 5 g/day (about half a unit), which would avert or delay 4579 (2544 to 6590) deaths per year. Approximately equal numbers of deaths from cancers and liver disease would be delayed or averted (∼2800 for each), while there was a small increase in cardiovascular mortality. The model showed no benefit in terms of reduced mortality when the proportion of non-drinkers in the population was increased. Current government recommendations for alcohol consumption are well above the level likely to minimise chronic disease. Public health targets should aim for a reduction in population alcohol consumption in order to reduce chronic disease mortality.

  5. Elevated Lipoprotein(a) Levels, LPA Risk Genotypes, and Increased Risk of Heart Failure in the General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Pia R; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sough to test whether elevated lipoprotein(a) levels and corresponding LPA risk genotypes (low number of kringle IV type 2 repeats, rs3798220 and rs10455872, minor allele carriers) are associated with an increased risk of heart failure (HF). BACKGROUND: Elevated lipoprotein......(a) levels represent a genetically determined risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI) and aortic valve stenosis (AVS). It is presently unknown whether elevated lipoprotein(a) levels also cause heart failure (HF). METHODS: We combined 2 general population studies, the Copenhagen City Heart Study (n = 10......,855) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (n = 87,242), which totaled 98,097 Danish participants, of whom 4,122 were diagnosed with HF (1976 to 2013). We conducted observational and genetic instrumental variable analyses in a Mendelian randomization study design, assessing evidence of causality, and we performed...

  6. Does breast cancer screening level health inequalities out? A population-based study in an Italian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacelli, Barbara; Carretta, Elisa; Spadea, Teresa; Caranci, Nicola; Di Felice, Enza; Stivanello, Elisa; Cavuto, Silvio; Cisbani, Luca; Candela, Silvia; De Palma, Rossana; Fantini, Maria P

    2014-04-01

    Although population-based screening has the potential to reduce inequalities in breast cancer survival, evidence on this topic is controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the full implementation of a mammography screening programme in Emilia-Romagna in Italy had an impact on variations in breast cancer survival by educational level. A cohort study was performed, including all women breast cancer registered in 1997-2000 (transitional screening period) or 2001-03 (consolidation screening period). Cancer cases were retrieved from the regional Breast Cancer Registry and followed up for 5 years. Educational level was determined from census data and allocated to cancer cases by individual record linkage. Age at diagnosis was classified into two groups (30-49, 50-69: screening target population). A total of 9639 cases were analyzed. In the 1997-2000 period, low-educated women had significantly lower survival compared with high-educated women, both in the younger and in the older age-groups. After the full implementation of the screening programme, these differences decreased in both age-groups, until disappearing completely among women in the age-group invited to screening. Our findings suggest that a fee-free population-based organized mammography screening programme with active invitation of the whole target population could be effective in reducing differences in survival in the population targeted by the screening.

  7. The bivalve Thyasira cf. gouldi hosts chemoautotrophic symbiont populations with strain level diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonita McCuaig

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Invertebrates from various marine habitats form nutritional symbioses with chemosynthetic bacteria. In chemosynthetic symbioses, both the mode of symbiont transmission and the site of bacterial housing can affect the composition of the symbiont population. Vertically transmitted symbionts, as well as those hosted intracellularly, are more likely to form clonal populations within their host. Conversely, symbiont populations that are environmentally acquired and extracellular may be more likely to be heterogeneous/mixed within host individuals, as observed in some mytilid bivalves. The symbionts of thyasirid bivalves are also extracellular, but limited 16S rRNA sequencing data suggest that thyasirid individuals contain uniform symbiont populations. In a recent study, Thyasira cf. gouldi individuals from Bonne Bay, Newfoundland, Canada were found to host one of three 16S rRNA phylotypes of sulfur-oxidizing gammaproteobacteria, suggesting environmental acquisition of symbionts and some degree of site-specificity. Here, we use Sanger sequencing of both 16S RNA and the more variable ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO PCR products to further examine Thyasira cf. gouldi symbiont diversity at the scale of host individuals, as well as to elucidate any temporal or spatial patterns in symbiont diversity within Bonne Bay, and relationships with host OTU or size. We obtained symbiont 16S rRNA and RuBisCO Form II sequences from 54 and 50 host individuals, respectively, during nine sampling trips to three locations over four years. Analyses uncovered the same three closely related 16S rRNA phylotypes obtained previously, as well as three divergent RuBisCO phylotypes; these were found in various pair combinations within host individuals, suggesting incidents of horizontal gene transfer during symbiont evolution. While we found no temporal patterns in phylotype distribution or relationships with host OTU or size, some spatial effects were noted, with

  8. The association of common SNPs and haplotypes in CETP gene with HDL cholesterol levels in Latvian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze Radovica

    Full Text Available The heritability of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C level is estimated at approximately 50%. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified genes involved in regulation of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels. The precise genetic profile determining heritability of HDL-C however are far from complete and there is substantial room for further characterization of genetic profiles influencing blood lipid levels. Here we report an association study comparing the distribution of 139 SNPs from more than 30 genes between groups that represent extreme ends of HDL-C distribution. We genotyped 704 individuals that were selected from Genome Database of Latvian Population. 10 SNPs from CETP gene showed convincing association with low HDL-C levels (rs1800775, rs3764261, rs173539, rs9939224, rs711752, rs708272, rs7203984, rs7205804, rs11076175 and rs9929488 while 34 SNPs from 10 genes were nominally associated (p<0.05 with HDL-C levels. We have also identified haplotypes from CETP with distinct effects on determination of HDL-C levels. Our conclusion: So far the SNPs in CETP gene are identified as the most common genetic factor influencing HDL-C levels in the representative sample from Latvian population.

  9. [Lipoprotein (a) in an urban population of Venezuela: Evidence that estrogenic deprivation increase in lipoprotein (a) levels is transitory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez Pirela, V; Cabrera de Bravo, M; Mengual Moreno, E; Cano Ponce, C; Leal González, E; Lemus Antepaz, M; Amell de Díaz, A; Sorell Gómez, L

    2007-07-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)] is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease and normal serum levels of this particle is not known in our country. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine plasma Lp (a) concentration in a population sample of Maracaibo. Fifth hundred out-patients, consulting at Centro de Investigaciones Endocrino-Metabólicas "Dr. Félix Gómez" were randomly underwent to venipunction to obtain a fasting blood simple to assess Lp (a) by a ELISA assay. No significantly differences were found when compared by sex or age separately, higher levels in Lp (a) was found in female 40-44 year group (median: 20,9 mg/dl). Thus, female population was divided in two sub-groups: < 40 years (median: 13 mg/dl) 40 yr and more (median: 16 mg/dl), finding higher Lp (a) levels in the second group (p < 0,02). Hormonal replace therapy was assessed by age, resulting that women subjected this approach shows lower levels of Lp (a) (p < 0,01), except in 60-64 year group. Lp (a) in a Maracaibo was within normal levels. Hormonal replace therapy diminishes Lp (a) concentration in menopausal women, but in menopausal women without hormonal therapy Lp (a) levels experienced a sustained decrease to normal levels in a age-depended manner.

  10. Reproductive factors and serum uric acid levels in females from the general population: the KORA F4 study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Stöckl

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hyperuricemia is associated with an increased risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. There are pronounced sex differences in the levels of uric acid. It is largely unknown whether or not reproductive parameters which induce hormonal changes are responsible for this. We examined if there are associations between reproductive parameters and uric acid levels in a female population-based sample. METHODS: In this cross-sectional analysis, data of 1530 women aged 32 to 81 years participating in the KORA F4 study, conducted between 2006 and 2008 in Southern Germany were used. Reproductive parameters were obtained by standardized interviews. Uric acid levels were tested by the uricase method. The whole study sample and stratified in pre- and postmenopausal women was analyzed. RESULTS: Menopausal status and earlier age at menarche were associated with higher serum uric acid levels (age-adjusted: p-values 0.003, <0.001 respectively; after multivariable adjustment, including BMI: p-values 0.002, 0.036. A history of oral contraceptive use showed an association with uric acid levels only after multivariable adjustment (p-value 0.009. Hot flushes showed an association with uric acid levels only after age-adjustment (p-value 0.038, but lost significance after adding other confounders. Other reproductive factors, including parity, current or ever use of hormone replacement therapy, current use of oral contraceptives, hysterectomy, bilateral oophorectomy, or depressive mood related to menopausal transition were not associated with uric acid levels. CONCLUSIONS: Postmenopausal status, earlier age at menarche and a history of oral contraceptive use were independently associated with higher serum uric acid concentrations in women from the general population. Further studies, especially longitudinal population-based studies investigating the relationship of female reproductive parameters with uric acid levels are necessary to confirm our findings.

  11. Suwannee River flow variability 1550-2005 CE reconstructed from a multispecies tree-ring network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Grant L.; Maxwell, Justin T.; Larson, Evan; Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.; Henderson, Joseph; Huffman, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the long-term natural flow regime of rivers enables resource managers to more accurately model water level variability. Models for managing water resources are important in Florida where population increase is escalating demand on water resources and infrastructure. The Suwannee River is the second largest river system in Florida and the least impacted by anthropogenic disturbance. We used new and existing tree-ring chronologies from multiple species to reconstruct mean March-October discharge for the Suwannee River during the period 1550-2005 CE and place the short period of instrumental flows (since 1927 CE) into historical context. We used a nested principal components regression method to maximize the use of chronologies with varying time coverage in the network. Modeled streamflow estimates indicated that instrumental period flow conditions do not adequately capture the full range of Suwannee River flow variability beyond the observational period. Although extreme dry and wet events occurred in the gage record, pluvials and droughts that eclipse the intensity and duration of instrumental events occurred during the 16-19th centuries. The most prolonged and severe dry conditions during the past 450 years occurred during the 1560s CE. In this prolonged drought period mean flow was estimated at 17% of the mean instrumental period flow. Significant peaks in spectral density at 2-7, 10, 45, and 85-year periodicities indicated the important influence of coupled oceanic-atmospheric processes on Suwannee River streamflow over the past four centuries, though the strength of these periodicities varied over time. Future water planning based on current flow expectations could prove devastating to natural and human systems if a prolonged and severe drought mirroring the 16th and 18th century events occurred. Future work in the region will focus on updating existing tree-ring chronologies and developing new collections from moisture-sensitive sites to improve

  12. Monitoring of Creatine Kinase Levels in Specific Military Populations for Early Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CrossFit style approach to exercise. CrossFit , as an exercise construct, has numerous cases of rhabdomyolysis associated with it and is a known risk...among the CrossFit community. The increase prevalence of this style of exercise could be contributing to the uptrend within the military as both...functional fitness” and CrossFit often attract the military and law enforcement populations. This statistical data shows that there is a relevant

  13. Lifestyle and genetic determinants of folate and vitamin B12 levels in a general adult population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Betina H; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Ovesen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    12 in the general population. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the folate and vitamin B12 status of Danish adults and to investigate associations between vitamin status and distinct lifestyle and genetic factors. The study included a random sample of 6784 individuals aged 30-60 years....... Information on lifestyle factors was obtained by questionnaires and blood samples were analysed for serum folate and vitamin B12 concentrations and several genetic polymorphisms. The overall prevalence of low serum folate (

  14. Future coastal population growth and exposure to sea-level rise and coastal flooding--a global assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Neumann

    Full Text Available Coastal zones are exposed to a range of coastal hazards including sea-level rise with its related effects. At the same time, they are more densely populated than the hinterland and exhibit higher rates of population growth and urbanisation. As this trend is expected to continue into the future, we investigate how coastal populations will be affected by such impacts at global and regional scales by the years 2030 and 2060. Starting from baseline population estimates for the year 2000, we assess future population change in the low-elevation coastal zone and trends in exposure to 100-year coastal floods based on four different sea-level and socio-economic scenarios. Our method accounts for differential growth of coastal areas against the land-locked hinterland and for trends of urbanisation and expansive urban growth, as currently observed, but does not explicitly consider possible displacement or out-migration due to factors such as sea-level rise. We combine spatially explicit estimates of the baseline population with demographic data in order to derive scenario-driven projections of coastal population development. Our scenarios show that the number of people living in the low-elevation coastal zone, as well as the number of people exposed to flooding from 1-in-100 year storm surge events, is highest in Asia. China, India, Bangladesh, Indonesia and Viet Nam are estimated to have the highest total coastal population exposure in the baseline year and this ranking is expected to remain largely unchanged in the future. However, Africa is expected to experience the highest rates of population growth and urbanisation in the coastal zone, particularly in Egypt and sub-Saharan countries in Western and Eastern Africa. The results highlight countries and regions with a high degree of exposure to coastal flooding and help identifying regions where policies and adaptive planning for building resilient coastal communities are not only desirable but essential

  15. Spectral reflectance variations in stay-green and conventional maize hybrids as response to population level stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C.; Acciaresi, H. A.; Rodríguez, E. J.; Antonietta, M.; Guiamet, J. J.; Tocho, J. O.

    2011-05-01

    Stress caused by increase population density in maize produce significant yield loss. To remedy it, photosynthetic activity maintenance even under unfavorable conditions is required. Senescence delay induced by stress in stay-green genotypes (SG) could contribute to maintaining photosynthetic capacity. In this work we observed differences in reflectance curves of two hybrids (SG and no SG) when population level increased. Significant differences in chlorophyll absorption spectral region were observed. Therefore spectral signatures studies maize could help to understanding of the physiological basis of SG character to predict the growing conditions in which these hybrids would express their production potential.

  16. Changes in population HIV RNA levels in Mbarara, Uganda, during scale-up of HIV antiretroviral therapy access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vivek; Byonanebye, Dathan M; Liegler, Teri; Kwarisiima, Dalsone; Chamie, Gabriel; Kabami, Jane; Petersen, Maya L; Balzer, Laura B; Clark, Tamara D; Black, Douglas; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Geng, Elvin H; Charlebois, Edwin D; Amanyire, Gideon; Kamya, Moses R; Havlir, Diane V

    2014-03-01

    In a rural Ugandan community scaling up antiretroviral therapy (ART), we sought to determine if population-based HIV RNA levels [population viral load (VL)] decreased from 2011 to 2012. Serial cross-sectional analyses (May 2011 and May 2012) of a defined study community of 6300 persons in a district with HIV prevalence of 8%. We measured HIV-1 RNA (VL) levels on all individuals testing positive for HIV during a 5-day high-throughput multidisease community health campaign in May 2012 that recruited two-thirds of the population. We aggregated individual-level VL results into population VL metrics including the proportion of individuals with an undetectable VL and compared these VL metrics to those we previously reported for this geographic region in 2011. In 2012, 223 of 2179 adults were HIV-seropositive adults (10%). Overall, among 208 of 223 HIV-seropositive adults in whom VL was tested, 53% had an undetectable VL [95% confidence interval (CI): 46 to 60], up from 37% (95% CI: 30 to 45; P = 0.02) in 2011. Seven (3%) individuals had a VL of >100,000 copies/mL in 2012, down from 21 (13%) in 2011 (P = 0.0007). Mean log (VL) (geometric mean) was 3.18 log (95% CI: 3.06 to 3.29 log) in 2012, down from 3.62 log (95% CI: 3.46 to 3.78 log) in 2011 (P ART scale-up may reflect a population-level effectiveness of expanding ART access.

  17. Genetic factors exist behind the high prevalence of reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the Roma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikó, Péter; Fiatal, Szilvia; Kósa, Zsigmond; Sándor, János; Ádány, Róza

    2017-08-01

    Previous findings showed that reduced plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are more frequent in all age groups of the Hungarian Roma compared to the general population. It suggests that genetic factors may exist behind this phenomenon. Our present study was designed to test this hypothesis, i.e., to define whether genetic factors contribute to the higher prevalence of reduced HDL-C among Roma. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (N = 21) contributing to the variation in plasma HDL-C concentrations were analysed in the Hungarian Roma (N = 646) and general (N = 1542) populations. Genetic risk scores, unweighted (GRS) and weighted (wGRS), were computed and compared. Associations between the GRSs and the prevalence of reduced HDL-C levels were analysed. The GRS and wGRS were significantly higher in the Roma compared to the general population (GRS: 22.2 ± 3.2 vs. 21.5 ± 3.3; wGRS: 0.57 ± 0.1 vs. 0.53 ± 0.1; ppopulation (p=0.025), while 5% of the Roma subjects were in the top fifth of the wGRS (wGRS≥ 0.75) compared with 2.6% of those in the general population (p=0.004). The GRS showed similar correlation with reduced plasma HDL-C levels in the two populations, whilst the wGRS showed stronger correlation with the trait among Roma after controlling for confounders. These results strongly suggest that genetic factors contribute to the higher prevalence of reduced HDL-C levels among Roma, so interventions aiming to improve Roma health status need to consider their increased genetic susceptibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Importance of ethnic foods as predictors of and contributors to nutrient intake levels in a minority population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saad, K; Shahar, D R; Vardi, H; Fraser, D

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the role of ethnic foods as predictors of intake levels of selected nutrients that are important during pregnancy among the Bedouin Arab minority population in southern Israel, and to compare the main food predictors for Bedouin intakes of the selected nutrients with those for the region's Jewish majority population. Ethnic foods/recipes (n=122) reported in the Bedouin Nutrition Study (BNS) were added to a preexisting, validated Israeli food composition table using European Food Information Resource standard criteria. Food items reported by the 519 BNS participants were combined into 146 food groups that distinguished between existing foods and new ethnic recipes and were entered into a stepwise multiple regression model to identify the main predictors of intake levels of the selected nutrients. The results were compared with those of an identical analysis for the selected nutrients using 24 h recall data from the majority Jewish population. Over 80% of the BNS between-person variability in the intake of all selected nutrients was explained by 34 food groups, of which 13 (38.2%) were ethnic foods. Homemade whole wheat bread was a main predictor of intake levels for five of the eight selected nutrients, and other ethnic foods/recipes (for example, za'atar, leafy dark green vegetables and camel milk) emerged as predictors of iron, folate, calcium and ω-3 fatty acid intakes. Breads explained 60 and 44% of the between-person variation, and 38 and 36% of the total intakes of iron and zinc intakes in the BNS sample, respectively, whereas for the Jewish population, animal sources and fortified foods predominated as main predictors and contributors of these nutrients. The addition of ethnic foods to food composition databases is important, as some of these foods are main predictors of nutrient intake levels in ethnic minority populations. In turn, this should facilitate the development of more sensitive dietary assessment tools and more effective diet

  19. Overall multi-media persistence as an indicator of potential for population-level intake of environmental contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, Matthew; McKone, Thomas E.

    2003-06-01

    Although it is intuitively apparent that population-level exposure to contaminants dispersed in the environment must related to the persistence of the contaminant, there has been little effort to formally quantify this link. In this paper we investigate the relationship between overall persistence in a multimedia environment and the population-level exposure as expressed by intake fraction (iF), which is the cumulative fraction of chemical emitted to the environment that is taken up by members of the population. We first confirm that for any given chemical contaminant and emission scenario the definition of iF implies that it is directly proportional to the overall multi-media persistence, P{sub OV}. We show that the proportionality constant has dimensions of time and represents the characteristic time for population intake (CTI) of the chemical from the environment. We then apply the CalTOX fate and exposure model to explore how P{sub OV} and CTI combine to determine the magnitude of iF. We find that CTI has a narrow range of possible values relative to P{sub OV} across multiple chemicals and emissions scenarios. We use data from the Canadian Environmental Protection Act Priority Substance List (PSL1) Assessments to show that exposure assessments based on empirical observation are consistent with interpretations from the model. The characteristic time for intake along different dominant exposure pathways is discussed. Results indicate that P{sub OV} derived from screening-level assessments of persistence, bioaccumulation potential, and toxicity (PBT) is a useful indicator of the potential for population-level exposure.

  20. [Traumatic experiences in elderly Germans. Importance for mental and physical health at a population level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaesmer, H

    2014-04-01

    World War II (WWII) is probably the most distressing and fatal historical event in Europe's recent past. Research on mental and physical health sequelae of these traumatic experiences from WWII has only started recently. An overview on the findings from several population-based studies investigating the mental and physical health outcomes of traumatic experiences in the German elderly (born prior to 1946), especially from WWII, is given. The results presented here are based on several population-based representative studies regarding several aspects of mental and physical health in the elderly. About 40-50 % of the elderly German population report at least one traumatic event, mostly from WWII. Traumatic experiences are related to higher rates of depressive and somatoform disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and physical morbidity, which are associated with increased health care utilization. The findings underline that the negative effects on health are long-term, manifold, and serious. Some of the elderly need psychotherapeutic interventions. Thus, a specific internet-based psychotherapeutic approach (ITT) is briefly presented. However, the majority of the elderly generally use other kinds of medical care, such as primary care, inpatient care, and geriatric care. It seems useful and necessary to pay more attention to the historical and biographical backgrounds of the patients to see and understand the current symptoms from this aspect.

  1. Effect of winter cover crops on nematode population levels in north Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K-H; McSorley, R; Gallaher, R N

    2004-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted in north-central Florida to examine the effects of various winter cover crops on plant-parasitic nematode populations through time. In the first experiment, six winter cover crops were rotated with summer corn (Zea mays), arranged in a randomized complete block design. The cover crops evaluated were wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), oat (Avena sativa), lupine (Lupinus angustifolius), hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum). At the end of the corn crop in year 1, population densities of Meloidogyne incognita were lowest on corn following rye or oat (P Crotalaria juncea), and corn. Population densities of M. incognita and Helicotylenchus dihystera were affected by previous tropical cover crops (P

  2. Methanogenic Population and CH4 Production in Swedish Dairy Cows Fed Different Levels of Forage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnürer, A.; Arthurson, V.; Bertilsson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Methanogenic community structure, methane production (CH4), and volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles were investigated in Swedish dairy cows fed a diet with a forage/concentrate ratio of 500/500 or 900/100 g/kg of dry matter (DM) of total DM intake (DMI). The rumen methanogenic population was evaluated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, 16S rRNA gene libraries, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Mean CH4 yields did not differ (P > 0.05) between diets, being 16.9 and 20.2 g/kg DMI for the 500/500 and 900/100 diets, respectively. The T-RFLP analysis revealed that populations differed between individual cows and that each individual population responded differently to the diets. The 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed that Methanobrevibacter spp. dominated for both diets. CH4 production was positively correlated with a dominance of sequences representing T-RFs related to Methanobrevibacter thaueri, Methanobrevibacter millerae, and Methanobrevibacter smithii relative to Methanobrevibacter ruminantium and Methanobrevibacter olleyae. Total numbers of methanogens and total numbers of Methanobacteriales were significantly higher with the 500/500 diet (P cows. PMID:22752163

  3. Cost objective PLM and CE

    CERN Document Server

    Perry, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Concurrent engineering taking into account product life-cycle factors seems to be one of the industrial challenges of the next years. Cost estimation and management are two main strategic tasks that imply the possibility of managing costs at the earliest stages of product development. This is why it is indispensable to let people from economics and from industrial engineering collaborates in order to find the best solution for enterprise progress for economical factors mastering. The objective of this paper is to present who we try to adapt costing methods in a PLM and CE point of view to the new industrial context and configuration in order to give pertinent decision aid for product and process choices. A very important factor is related to cost management problems when developing new products. A case study is introduced that presents how product development actors have referenced elements to product life-cycle costs and impacts, how they have an idea bout economical indicators when taking decisions during t...

  4. A population study of fasting time and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cheryl K; Guo, Maggie; Viczko, Jeannine A; Naugler, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. Traditional screening and diagnostic methods include digital rectal examinations (DREs), biopsies and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, with the latter being the more popular. PSA is a biomarker for prostate cancer; however, it is highly sensitive to external factors as well as other prostate diseases. As such, the reliability of of the serum PSA level as a sole screening and diagnostic tool for prostate cancer is controversial. Recently, it has been shown that fasting extremes can affect concentrations of serum chemistry analytes, thus raising the question of whether or not fasting has an effect on the highly sensitive PSA biomarker. Patients testing for serum PSA levels are often concomitantly submitting to other tests that require fasting, subjecting certain patients to a fasting PSA level while others not. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this discrepancy in fasting state translates into an effect on serum PSA levels. Serum PSA levels and fasting time records for 157 276 men who underwent testing at Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS; Calgary, Alberta, Canada) between 01 January 2010 and 31 March 2013 were accessed. Linear regression models of mean PSA levels and fasting times revealed a statistically important relationship at certain fasting times. Applying a dynamic mathematical model to explore the clinical effect of fasting suggests minimal impact on serum PSA result interpretation. Thus, patients can be tested for serum PSA levels regardless of their fasting state. PMID:24994780

  5. A population study of fasting time and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cheryl K; Guo, Maggie; Viczko, Jeannine A; Naugler, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. Traditional screening and diagnostic methods include digital rectal examinations (DREs), biopsies and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, with the latter being the more popular. PSA is a biomarker for prostate cancer; however, it is highly sensitive to external factors as well as other prostate diseases. As such, the reliability of of the serum PSA level as a sole screening and diagnostic tool for prostate cancer is controversial. Recently, it has been shown that fasting extremes can affect concentrations of serum chemistry analytes, thus raising the question of whether or not fasting has an effect on the highly sensitive PSA biomarker. Patients testing for serum PSA levels are often concomitantly submitting to other tests that require fasting, subjecting certain patients to a fasting PSA level while others not. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this discrepancy in fasting state translates into an effect on serum PSA levels. Serum PSA levels and fasting time records for 157 276 men who underwent testing at Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS; Calgary, Alberta, Canada) between 01 January 2010 and 31 March 2013 were accessed. Linear regression models of mean PSA levels and fasting times revealed a statistically important relationship at certain fasting times. Applying a dynamic mathematical model to explore the clinical effect of fasting suggests minimal impact on serum PSA result interpretation. Thus, patients can be tested for serum PSA levels regardless of their fasting state.

  6. Evolution of cadmium tolerance and associated costs in a Gammarus fossarum population inhabiting a low-level contaminated stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, A; Geffard, O; Coquery, M; François, A; Quéau, H; Chaumot, A

    2015-08-01

    Deciphering evolutionary processes occurring within long-term contaminated wild populations is essential for the ecological risk assessment of persistent chemical contaminations. Using field populations of Gammarus, a commonly-used genus in aquatic ecotoxicology, the present study sought to gain insights into the extent to which long-term exposure to metals in the field could effectively lead to shifts in toxicological sensitivities. For this, we identified a Gammarus population inhabiting a stream contaminated by cadmium (Cd). We compared the Cd-exposure and Cd-sensitivity of this population to those of five reference populations. Active biomonitoring determined in different years and seasons that significant levels of Cd were bioavailable in the contaminated site. Laboratory sensitivity tests under common garden conditions established that this long-term field exposure led to the development of a moderate Cd tolerance, which was maintained after a 3-week acclimatization in the laboratory, and transmitted to offspring produced under clean conditions. The potential physiological costs of tolerance were assessed by means of feeding rate measurements (in the laboratory and in situ). They revealed that, unlike for reference populations, the feeding activity of organisms from the tolerant population was greatly decreased when they were maintained under laboratory conditions, potentially indicating a high population vulnerability to environmental perturbations. Because dissolved Cd concentrations in water from the contaminated site were low (averaging 0.045 µg L(-1)) and below the current European environmental quality standard for Cd for inland surface waters (fixed at 0.08 µg L(-1) in soft water environments), this case study sheds light onto the extent to which current environmental quality standards are protective against potential adverse outcomes of adaptive and micro-evolutionary processes occurring in contaminated environments.

  7. Inbreeding Affects Gene Expression Differently in Two Self-Incompatible Arabidopsis lyrata Populations with Similar Levels of Inbreeding Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Mandy; Sletvold, Nina; Ågren, Jon; Hansson, Bengt

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of which genes and pathways are affected by inbreeding may help understanding the genetic basis of inbreeding depression, the potential for purging (selection against deleterious recessive alleles), and the transition from outcrossing to selfing. Arabidopsis lyrata is a predominantly self-incompatible perennial plant, closely related to the selfing model species A. thaliana. To examine how inbreeding affects gene expression, we compared the transcriptome of experimentally selfed and outcrossed A. lyrata originating from two Scandinavian populations that express similar inbreeding depression for fitness (∂ ≈ 0.80). The number of genes significantly differentially expressed between selfed and outcrossed individuals were 2.5 times higher in the Norwegian population (≈ 500 genes) than in the Swedish population (≈ 200 genes). In both populations, a majority of genes were upregulated on selfing (≈ 80%). Functional annotation analysis of the differentially expressed genes showed that selfed offspring were characterized by 1) upregulation of stress-related genes in both populations and 2) upregulation of photosynthesis-related genes in Sweden but downregulation in Norway. Moreover, we found that reproduction- and pollination-related genes were affected by inbreeding only in Norway. We conclude that inbreeding causes both general and population-specific effects. The observed common effects suggest that inbreeding generally upregulates rather than downregulates gene expression and affects genes associated with stress response and general metabolic activity. Population differences in the number of affected genes and in effects on the expression of photosynthesis-related genes show that the genetic basis of inbreeding depression can differ between populations with very similar levels of inbreeding depression. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For

  8. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE GEOGRAPHICAL DISPARITIES REGARDING THE LEVEL OF EDUCATION OF THE POPULATION AND THE LEVEL OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN ROMANIA AND IN THE REGIONAL PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Valentin HAPENCIUC

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Throughout this paper we undertook a research which goal is presented by the title, namely to elaborate a comparative analysis of the geographical disparities regarding the level of education of the population and the level of economic development in Romania and in the regional profile. Within the first sections of the paper we present the general coordinates of the framework components: regional economic and education level disparities. The problem of regional disparities has managed to become the most important economic policy in different regions of the EU, in the last two decades. Carrying out these general analyses of the territories in this geographical zone began, especially, after Greece, Spain, Portugal and then Romania joined the EU, states marked by significant regional imbalances, characterized by a low level of development in comparison with the other countries of the EU. Because in the developed countries, the structure of the economy is considered to be a basic condition, which must be taken into account in the process of economic development, we used these variables in order to evaluate the level of regional development and to understand the differences regarding the development between regions. The third section of the paper is presenting the comparative analyses of disparities regarding education in regional context in Romania. The analysis at the regional level of the employment of less educated people compresses important aspects  regarding the regional discrepancies in the economic welfare. Concretely, the analysis of the education in Romania comprises aspects, on the regional plan on the basis of the most representative indicators: the level of education of the population, the participation of adult population in lifelong learning, and the Gross Domestic Product per inhabitant, on a time horizon of 14 years, 2000-2014, by achieving correlations and statistical interpretations. The conclusions reflect that there are very

  9. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of the nucleus {sup 139}Ce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Ivascu, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihailescu, L.C.; Rusu, C.; Suliman, G. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest (Romania)

    2006-03-15

    Gamma-ray coincidence techniques are used to determine new level structures in the N=81 nucleus {sup 139}Ce, at low spins and excitation energies with the {sup 139}La(p,n{gamma}) reaction at 5.0 and 6.0 MeV incident energy, and at high spins with the {sup 130}Te({sup 12}C,3n{gamma}) reaction at 50.5 MeV, respectively. Lifetime determinations are also made in the (p,n{gamma}) reaction with the centroid DSA method. The observed level structures are discussed by comparison with existing calculations and with those in the neighbouring nucleus {sup 140}Ce. (orig.)

  10. THE LEVEL OF INTENSITY OF IMMUNITY TO DIPHTHERIA AND TETANUS AMONG THE POPULATION OF THE REPUBLIC OF CRIMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskander Z. Karimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of state and assessment of population immunity to diphtheria and tetanus play important role in the study of the existing epidemic situation, development of preventive measures and the prognosis of tendencies of development of epidemic process. The aim of this work was the studying of level and estimation of intensity of immunity to diphtheria and tetanus in the population of the Crimean Republic. The concentration of antibodies measured in IU/ml was accepted to the main indicator of antidiphtherial and antitetanic immunity. In 2013, in total, there were observed 525 persons, 239 of them — city dwellers and 286 — from the rural area. Indicators of concentration of anti-toxin in examined serums were determined by the RPHA method with using of the standardized erythrocyte diphtheritic and tetanic diagnosticums. The assessment of immunity level was performed according to WHO recommendations on following criterias: concentration of antibodies within 0,015–0,06 IU/ml — conditional protection, 0,1–0,5 IU/ml — moderate protection; more than 1,0 IU/ml — high immunity. Antibodies concentration 0,1 IU/ml was taken as minimal protective level for both antidiphtherial and antitetanic antibodies. Research of intensity of antidiphtherial and antitetanic immunity in the population of Crimea allowed to reveal some decrease in level of immune protection in 2013 in comparison with 2012. The highest number of the seronegative and conditionally protected persons against tetanus in 2013 were noted among pregnant women and newborns — 31,8% and 27,8% respectively. The quantity of unprotected and conditionally protected population among children is 11,1%, among teenagers — 10,5%. The greatest layer of the seronegative persons among adults revealed in age group from 58 and older (15%, and conditionally protected — in the 48 to 57 age group (19,2%. The total number of the seronegative population in relation to diphtheria increased for 5

  11. Population-Level Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution during Active Travel: Planning for Low-Exposure, Health-Promoting Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Steve; Lindsey, Greg; Marshall, Julian D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Providing infrastructure and land uses to encourage active travel (i.e., bicycling and walking) are promising strategies for designing health-promoting cities. Population-level exposure to air pollution during active travel is understudied. Objectives: Our goals were a) to investigate population-level patterns in exposure during active travel, based on spatial estimates of bicycle traffic, pedestrian traffic, and particulate concentrations; and b) to assess how those exposure patterns are associated with the built environment. Methods: We employed facility–demand models (active travel) and land use regression models (particulate concentrations) to estimate block-level (n = 13,604) exposure during rush-hour (1600–1800 hours) in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We used the model-derived estimates to identify land use patterns and characteristics of the street network that are health promoting. We also assessed how exposure is correlated with indicators of health disparities (e.g., household income, proportion of nonwhite residents). Our work uses population-level rates of active travel (i.e., traffic flows) rather than the probability of walking or biking (i.e., “walkability” or “bikeability”) to assess exposure. Results: Active travel often occurs on high-traffic streets or near activity centers where particulate concentrations are highest (i.e., 20–42% of active travel occurs on blocks with high population-level exposure). Only 2–3% of blocks (3–8% of total active travel) are “sweet spots” (i.e., high active travel, low particulate concentrations); sweet spots are located a) near but slightly removed from the city-center or b) on off-street trails. We identified 1,721 blocks (~ 20% of local roads) where shifting active travel from high-traffic roads to adjacent low-traffic roads would reduce exposure by ~ 15%. Active travel is correlated with population density, land use mix, open space, and retail area; particulate concentrations were

  12. Coastal Wetland Dynamics and Wildlife Populations: Modeling the Effects of Sea Level Rise and Landscape Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Assess the potential impacts of sea level rise on coastal ecosystems and related wildlife resources. Develop a Bayesian Belief network that projects the impact of...

  13. Population-level scaling of avian migration speed with body size and migration distance for powered fliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Sorte, Frank A; Fink, Daniel; Hochachka, Wesley M; DeLong, John P; Kelling, Steve

    2013-08-01

    Optimal migration theory suggests specific scaling relationships between body size and migration speed for individual birds based on the minimization of time, energy, and risk. Here we test if the quantitative predictions originating from this theory can be detected when migration decisions are integrated across individuals. We estimated population-level migration trajectories and daily migration speeds for the combined period 2007-2011 using the eBird data set. We considered 102 North American bird species that use flapping or powered flight during migration. Many species, especially in eastern North America, had looped migration trajectories that traced a clockwise path with an eastward shift during autumn migration. Population-level migration speeds decelerated rapidly going into the breeding season, and accelerated more slowly during the transition to autumn migration. In accordance with time minimization predictions, spring migration speeds were faster than autumn migration speeds. In agreement with optimality predictions, migration speeds of powered flyers scaled negatively with body mass similarly during spring and autumn migration. Powered fliers with longer migration journeys also had faster migration speeds, a relationship that was more pronounced during spring migration. Our findings indicate that powered fliers employed a migration strategy that, when examined at the population level, was in compliance with optimality predictions. These results suggest that the integration of migration decisions across individuals does result in population-level patterns that agree with theoretical expectations developed at the individual level, indicating a role for optimal migration theory in describing the mechanisms underlying broadscale patterns of avian migration for species that use powered flight.

  14. Pulse propagation, population transfer and light storage in five-level media

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoryan, G.; Chaltykyan, V.; Gazazyan, E.; Tikhova, O.; Paturyan, V.

    2014-01-01

    We consider adiabatic interaction of five-level atomic systems and their media with four short laser pulses under the condition of all two-photon detunings being zero. We derive analytical expressions for eigenvalues of the system's Hamiltonian and determine conditions of adiabaticity for both the atom and the medium. We analyse, in detail, the system's behaviour when the eigenvalue with non-vanishing energy is realized. As distinct from the usual dark state of a five-level system (correspond...

  15. New limits on 2ε, εβ{sup +} and 2β{sup +} decay of {sup 136}Ce and {sup 138}Ce with deeply purified cerium sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, P.; Bernabei, R. [INFN Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Boiko, R.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Cappella, F. [INFN Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Cerulli, R.; Laubenstein, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Danevich, F.A.; Kropivyansky, B.N.; Polischuk, O.G.; Tretyak, V.I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Incicchitti, A. [INFN Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Mokina, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); INFN Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2017-08-15

    A search for double electron capture (2ε), electron capture with positron emission (εβ{sup +}), and double positron emission (2β{sup +}) in {sup 136}Ce and {sup 138}Ce was realized with a 465 cm{sup 3} ultra-low background HP Ge γ spectrometer over 2299 h at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. A 627 g sample of cerium oxide deeply purified by liquid-liquid extraction method was used as a source of γ quanta expected in double β decay of the cerium isotopes. New improved half-life limits were set on different modes and channels of double β decay of {sup 136}Ce and {sup 138}Ce at the level of T{sub 1/2} > 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} yr. (orig.)

  16. Analysis on Population Level Reveals Trappability of Wild Rodents Is Determined by Previous Trap Occupant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J Brouard

    Full Text Available Live trapping is central to the study of small mammals. Thus, any bias needs to be understood and accounted for in subsequent analyses to ensure accurate population estimates. One rarely considered bias is the behavioural response of individuals to the trap, in particular the olfactory cues left behind by previous occupants (PO. We used a data set of 8,115 trap nights spanning 17 separate trapping sessions between August 2002 and November 2013 in Wytham Woods, Oxfordshire, UK to examine if the decision to enter a trap was affected by the PO, if this was detectable in traditional Capture-Mark-Recapture trapping data (i.e., individuals not uniquely marked, and if it was possible for this effect to bias the population estimates obtained. Data were collected on Apodemus sylvaticus, Myodes glareolus, and Microtus agrestis. Three Generalised Linear Models revealed a significant tendency for the three species to enter traps with same-species PO. With, for example, A. sylvaticus 9.1 times more likely to enter a same species PO trap compared to one that contained a M. agrestis in the grassland during the nocturnal period. Simulation highlighted that, when all other factors are equal, the species with the highest PO effect will have the highest capture rate and therefore return more accurate population estimates. Despite the large dataset, certain species-, sex-, and/ or age-combinations were under-represented, and thus no effects of any additional individual-specific characteristics could be evaluated. Uniquely marking individuals would allow for the PO effect to be disentangled from other biases such as trap-shyness and spatial heterogeneity, but may not be possible in all cases and will depend on the aims of the study and the resources available.

  17. Costs analysis of a population level rabies control programme in Tamil Nadu, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shahid Abbas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine costs to the state government of implementing different interventions for controlling rabies among the entire human and animal populations of Tamil Nadu. This built upon an earlier assessment of Tamil Nadu's efforts to control rabies. Anti-rabies vaccines were made available at all health facilities. Costs were estimated for five different combinations of animal and human interventions using an activity-based costing approach from the provider perspective. Disease and population data were sourced from the state surveillance data, human census and livestock census. Program costs were extrapolated from official documents. All capital costs were depreciated to estimate annualized costs. All costs were inflated to 2012 Rupees. Sensitivity analysis was conducted across all major cost centres to assess their relative impact on program costs. It was found that the annual costs of providing Anti-rabies vaccine alone and in combination with Immunoglobulins was $0.7 million (Rs 36 million and $2.2 million (Rs 119 million, respectively. For animal sector interventions, the annualised costs of rolling out surgical sterilisation-immunization, injectable immunization and oral immunizations were estimated to be $ 44 million (Rs 2,350 million, $23 million (Rs 1,230 million and $ 11 million (Rs 590 million, respectively. Dog bite incidence, health systems coverage and cost of rabies biologicals were found to be important drivers of costs for human interventions. For the animal sector interventions, the size of dog catching team, dog population and vaccine costs were found to be driving the costs. Rabies control in Tamil Nadu seems a costly proposition the way it is currently structured. Policy makers in Tamil Nadu and other similar settings should consider the long-term financial sustainability before embarking upon a state or nation-wide rabies control programme.

  18. Facile synthesis of ferromagnetic Ni doped CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles with enhanced anticancer activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Fazal; Jan, Tariq [Laboratory of Nanoscience and Technology, Department of Physics, International Islamic University Islamabad (Pakistan); Iqbal, Javed, E-mail: javed.saggu@iiu.edu.pk [Laboratory of Nanoscience and Technology, Department of Physics, International Islamic University Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, Ishaq [Experimental Physics Labs, National Center for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan); Naqvi, M. Sajjad H. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi (Pakistan); Malik, Maaza [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The synthesized undoped and Ni doped CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibited RTFM. • Oxygen vacancies and magnetic ions both were believed to be responsible for RTFM. • The prepared nanoparticles exhibited selective cytotoxicity. • Ni doping enhanced the anticancer activity of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. • Differential ROS generation was observed to control their cytotoxicity. - Abstract: Ni{sub x}Ce{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} (where x = 0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.07) nanoparticles were synthesized by soft chemical method and were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman, UV–vis absorption spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). XRD and Raman results indicated the formation of single phase cubic fluorite structure for the synthesized nanoparticles. Ni dopant induced excessive structural changes such as decrease in crystallite size as well as lattice constants and enhancement in oxygen vacancies in CeO{sub 2} crystal structure. These structural variations significantly influenced the optical and magnetic properties of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. The synthesized Ni{sub x}Ce{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibited room temperature ferromagnetic behavior. Ni doping induced effects on the cytotoxicity of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles were examined against HEK-293 healthy cell line and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cancer cell line. The prepared Ni{sub x}Ce{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles demonstrated differential cytotoxicity. Furthermore, anticancer activity of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles observed to be significantly enhanced with Ni doping which was found to be strongly correlated with the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The prepared ferromagnetic Ni{sub x}Ce{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles with differential cytotoxic nature may be potential for future targeted cancer therapy.

  19. Piloting a Non-Invasive Genetic Sampling Method for Evaluating Population-Level Benefits of Wildlife Crossing Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony P. Clevenger

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Intuitively, wildlife crossing structures should enhance the viability of wildlife populations. Previous research has demonstrated that a broad range of species will use crossing structures, however, questions remain as to whether these measures actually provide benefits to populations. To assess this, studies will need to determine the number of individuals using crossings, their sex, and their genetic relationships. Obtaining empirical data demonstrating population-level benefits for some species can be problematic and challenging at best. Molecular techniques now make it possible to identify species, individuals, their sex, and their genetic relatedness from hair samples collected through non-invasive genetic sampling (NGS. We describe efforts to pilot a method to assess potential population-level benefits of wildlife crossing structures. We tested the feasibility of a prototype NGS system designed to sample hair from black bears (Ursus americanus and grizzly bears (U. arctos at two wildlife underpasses. The piloted hair-sampling method did not deter animal use of the trial underpasses and was effective at sampling hair from more than 90% of the bear crossing events at the underpasses. Hair samples were also obtained from non-target carnivore species, including three out of five (60% cougar (Puma concolor crossing events. Individual identification analysis revealed that three female and two male grizzly bears used one wildlife underpass, whereas two female and three male black bears were identified as using the other underpass. Of the 36 hair samples from bears analyzed, five failed, resulting in an 87% extraction success rate, and six more were only identified to species. Overall, 70% of the hair samples from bears collected in the field had sufficient DNA for extraction purposes. Preliminary data from our NGS suggest the technique can be a reliable method to assess the population-level benefits of Banff wildlife crossings. Furthermore, NGS

  20. Elevated plasma vitamin B12 levels and cancer prognosis: A population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Johan Frederik Håkonsen; Farkas, Dora Kormendine; Pedersen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    cohort: 72.6%]. Thirty-day mortality was elevated for patients with Cbl levels of 601-800pmol/L or >800pmol/L, compared to patients with levels of 200-600pmol/L [(MRR (95% confidence interval): 601-800pmol/L vs. 200-600pmol/L: 1.9 (1.6-2.2); >800pmol/L vs. 200-600pmol/L: 2.7 (2.4-3.1)]. This association...... study using data from Danish medical registries during 1998-2014. The study included 25,017 patients with a cancer diagnosis and Cbl levels of 200-600pmol/L (reference/normal range), 601-800pmol/L and >800pmol/L measured up to one year prior to diagnosis, and a comparison cohort of 61,988 cancer...... using the Charlson comorbidity index. RESULTS: Survival probabilities were lower among patients with elevated Cbl levels than among patients with normal levels and among members of the comparison cohort [(1-year survival,%) Cbl: 200-600pmol/L: 69.3%; 601-800pmol/L: 49.6%; >800pmol/L: 35.8%; comparison...

  1. TSH levels associated with slimming pill use in a population-based study of Brazilian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichieri, Rosely; Andrade, Roseli; Baima, Jader; Henriques, Jodelia; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-12-01

    To determine the consumption of slimming pills (SP) and its association with TSH levels. A survey was carried out in Rio de Janeiro (about 5 million inhabitants), Brazil, from June 2004 to April 2005. Households (1,500) were selected using three-stage probability sampling. Women were asked about use of SP, and blood sample was collected. Women were classified as users of SP any time in life, but not in previous two months (n = 293), current users (n = 150), and never users (n = 853). Weighted multivariate regression analyses compared TSH levels among these groups of users. The frequency of use of SP any time in life was 34% and the use in the previous two months was 11%. Both frequencies were greater among younger and obese women, and among those of high socioeconomic level (p-value < 0.001). TSH level was statistically lower among current users of SP (1.96 mUI/ml; 95%CI = 1.93-1.98) compared to previous users 2.83 mUI/ml (95%CI = 2.13-3.02) and never users 2.59 mUI/ml (95%CI = 2.20-3.21). These differences were still statistically significant after adjusting for age and body mass index. Use of SP decreased TSH levels among Brazilian women.

  2. Impact of Nodal Level Distribution on Survival in Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiano, Emily; Patel, Tapan D; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Baredes, Soly; Park, Richard Chan Woo

    2016-07-01

    Regional lymph node metastasis is an important prognostic factor in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, decreasing survival by up to 50%. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OC-SCCa) most commonly spreads to levels I, II, and III. Retrospective analysis of a population-based tumor registry. Academic medical center. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was queried for cases of OC-SCCa from 2004 to 2011 (22,973 cases). Resulting data including patient demographics, clinicopathological features, topographical distribution of nodal metastasis, and survival based on lymph node level involvement were analyzed. In total, 8281 patients were identified with OC-SCCa who underwent neck dissection. Level I, closely followed by levels II and III, represented the most commonly involved nodal basins. The 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) for patients with only level I, II, or III was 42.0% compared with 30.6% for the level IV group (P Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma most commonly involves nodal levels I, II, and III. Involvement of nodal level IV or V portends a worse prognosis than patients with only level I to III disease, and multimodality therapy should be considered for these patients. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  3. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-12-19

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4(+)SNS-Cre/TdTomato(+), 2) IB4(-)SNS-Cre/TdTomato(+), and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato(+) cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation.

  4. Population-level consequences of spatially heterogeneous exposure to heavy metals in soil: An individual-based model of springtails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meli, Mattia; Auclerc, Apolline; Palmqvist, Annemette

    2013-01-01

    Contamination of soil with toxic heavy metals poses a major threat to the environment and human health. Anthropogenic sources include smelting of ores, municipal wastes, fertilizers, and pesticides. In assessing soil quality and the environmental and ecological risk of contamination with heavy...... showed that the ability of the individuals to detect and avoid the toxicant, combined with the presence of clean habitat patches which act as “refuges”, made equilibrium population size due to toxic effects less sensitive to increases in toxicant concentration. Additionally, the level of heterogeneity...... among patches of soil (i.e. the difference in concentration) was important: at the same average concentration, a homogeneously contaminated scenario was the least favourable habitat, while higher levels of heterogeneity corresponded to higher population growth rate and equilibrium size. Our model can...

  5. Maternal low thyroxin levels are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    Full Text Available Although thyroid dysfunction in early pregnancy may have adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes, few studies have examined the relationship between maternal low free thyroxin (FT4 levels in both first and third trimesters of pregnancy and the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes. We hypothesized that low FT4 levels in either first or third trimesters of pregnancy may have different effects on pregnancy outcomes. The study included 6,031 mothers who provided both first and third pregnancy serum samples for analyses of thyroid function. Adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia, were diagnosed using the oral glucose tolerance test, blood pressure and urine protein test. Serum metabolites like adenosine and its analogues were identified using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS. The incidence of hypothyroidism in pregnant women tended to increase with age and pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI. The incidence of GDM was negatively correlated with maternal FT4 levels during early pregnancy while the incidence of preeclampsia was negatively correlated with maternal FT4 levels during late pregnancy. The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension was not significantly correlated with maternal FT4 levels. The women who had isolated maternal hypothyroxemia (IMH in the third trimester of pregnancy had an increased risk of developing preeclampsia. Some metabolites like adenosine and its analogues in the serum were significantly changed in pregnant mothers with IMH. In conclusion, low FT4 levels during pregnancy are a risk factor for GDM and preeclampsia. Adenosine and its analogues may be important bridges between IMH and preeclampsia.

  6. Household and area income levels are associated with smoking status in the Korean adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Woo-Jun; Rhee, Jung-Ae; Kim, Sun A; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Lee, Young-Hoon; Ryu, So-Yeon; Park, Soon-Woo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Shin, Min-Ho

    2015-01-31

    Some previous studies have suggested that area-level characteristics have effects on smoking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between household income and area income on smoking in Korean adults. This study was based on the Korean Community Health Survey (KCHS) performed in South Korea, between September and November 2009. In total, 222,242 subjects (103,124 men and 119,118 women) were included in the analysis. Information on smoking status was collected using a standardized questionnaire. Income status was determined by monthly household income. Household income was categorized as: smoking than the highest household income group in both urban and rural areas for both men and women after adjusting for individual characteristics (urban men: odds ration [OR], 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-1.53; rural men: OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.25-1.42; urban women: OR, 2.38; 95% CI, 2.06-2.76; rural women: OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.25-1.83). In men, the lowest area-level income group had a higher risk for smoking than the highest area-level income group in urban areas after adjusting for individual characteristics and household income (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.02-1.33). In women, the lowest area-level income group had a lower risk for smoking than the highest area-level income group in rural areas after adjusting for individual characteristics and household income (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.39-0.70). However, no association was observed between area-level income and smoking in rural areas for men or in urban areas for women. The results showed that smoking is strongly associated with household income status in both men and women, and area-level income is partly associated with smoking. Effects of area-level income on smoking differed by sex and region. These findings suggest that area characteristics have contextual effects on health related behavior independent of individual characteristics.

  7. Positive mental health and well-being among a third level student population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davoren, Martin P

    2013-01-01

    Much research on the health and well-being of third level students is focused on poor mental health leading to a dearth of information on positive mental health and well-being. Recently, the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Well-being scale (WEMWBS) was developed as a measurement of positive mental health and well-being. The aim of this research is to investigate the distribution and determinants of positive mental health and well-being in a large, broadly representative sample of third level students using WEMWBS.

  8. Stigma-related stress, shame and avoidant coping reactions among members of the general population with elevated symptom levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibalski, J V; Müller, M; Ajdacic-Gross, V; Vetter, S; Rodgers, S; Oexle, N; Corrigan, P W; Rössler, W; Rüsch, N

    2017-04-01

    It is unclear whether mental illness stigma affects individuals with subthreshold syndromes outside clinical settings. We therefore investigated the role of different stigma variables, including stigma-related stress and shame reactions, for avoidant stigma coping among members of the general population with elevated symptom levels. Based on a representative population survey, general stress resilience, stigma variables, shame about having a mental illness as well as avoidant stigma coping (secrecy and social withdrawal) were assessed by self-report among 676 participants with elevated symptom levels. Stigma variables and resilience were examined as predictors of avoidant stigma coping in a path model. Increased stigma stress was predicted by lower general stress resilience as well as by higher levels of perceived stigma, group identification and perceived legitimacy of discrimination. More shame was associated with higher perceived legitimacy. Lower resilience as well as more perceived stigma, group identification and perceived legitimacy predicted avoidant coping. Stigma stress partly mediated effects of resilience, perceived stigma and group identification on avoidant coping; shame partly mediated effects of perceived legitimacy on coping. Stigma stress and shame were also directly and positively related to avoidant stigma coping. Analyses were adjusted for symptoms, neuroticism and sociodemographic variables. Stigma may affect a larger proportion of the population than previously thought because stigma variables predicted secrecy and withdrawal among members of the general population with elevated, but overall mild symptom levels. Avoidant stigma coping likely has harmful effects, potentially exacerbating pre-existing psychological distress and undermining social networks. This highlights the need to reduce public stigma as well as to support individuals with subthreshold syndromes in their coping with stigma stress and shame reactions. Copyright © 2017

  9. Evolutionary history shapes the association between developmental instability and population-level genetic variation in three-spined sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dongen, S; Lens, L; Pape, E; Volckaert, F A M; Raeymaekers, J A M

    2009-08-01

    Developmental instability (DI) is the sensitivity of a developing trait to random noise and can be measured by degrees of directionally random asymmetry [fluctuating asymmetry (FA)]. FA has been shown to increase with loss of genetic variation and inbreeding as measures of genetic stress, but associations vary among studies. Directional selection and evolutionary change of traits have been hypothesized to increase the average levels of FA of these traits and to increase the association strength between FA and population-level genetic variation. We test these two hypotheses in three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.) populations that recently colonized the freshwater habitat. Some traits, like lateral bone plates, length of the pelvic spine, frontal gill rakers and eye size, evolved in response to selection regimes during colonization. Other traits, like distal gill rakers and number of pelvic fin rays, did not show such phenotypic shifts. Contrary to a priori predictions, average FA did not systematically increase in traits that were under presumed directional selection, and the increases observed in a few traits were likely to be attributable to other factors. However, traits under directional selection did show a weak but significantly stronger negative association between FA and selectively neutral genetic variation at the population level compared with the traits that did not show an evolutionary change during colonization. These results support our second prediction, providing evidence that selection history can shape associations between DI and population-level genetic variation at neutral markers, which potentially reflect genetic stress. We argue that this might explain at least some of the observed heterogeneities in the patterns of asymmetry.

  10. Subluminal and superluminal propagation in a three-level atom in the radiative limit based on coherent population oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalo, Isabel [Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: igonzalo@fis.ucm.es; Anton, M.A.; Carreno, F.; Calderon, Oscar G. [Escuela Universitaria de Optica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalon, 28037 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-10-13

    We investigate a three-level atomic system in the radiative limit to control the light propagation from the subluminal regime to the superluminal one. Here the three levels are connected between them by radiative transitions. We show that depending on the decay rates, this scheme, which is based on coherent population oscillations, allows to switch from one regime to the other by changing the Rabi frequencies of the driving fields. We also show that this scheme is also capable of producing absorptionless self-phase modulation.

  11. Population-level transcriptome sequencing of nonmodel organisms Erynnis propertius and Papilio zelicaon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrich Scott J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several recent studies have demonstrated the use of Roche 454 sequencing technology for de novo transcriptome analysis. Low error rates and high coverage also allow for effective SNP discovery and genetic diversity estimates. However, genetically diverse datasets, such as those sourced from natural populations, pose challenges for assembly programs and subsequent analysis. Further, estimating the effectiveness of transcript discovery using Roche 454 transcriptome data is still a difficult task. Results Using the Roche 454 FLX Titanium platform, we sequenced and assembled larval transcriptomes for two butterfly species: the Propertius duskywing, Erynnis propertius (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae and the Anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae. The Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs generated represent a diverse sample drawn from multiple populations, developmental stages, and stress treatments. Despite this diversity, > 95% of the ESTs assembled into long (> 714 bp on average and highly covered (> 9.6× on average contigs. To estimate the effectiveness of transcript discovery, we compared the number of bases in the hit region of unigenes (contigs and singletons to the length of the best match silkworm (Bombyx mori protein--this "ortholog hit ratio" gives a close estimate on the amount of the transcript discovered relative to a model lepidopteran genome. For each species, we tested two assembly programs and two parameter sets; although CAP3 is commonly used for such data, the assemblies produced by Celera Assembler with modified parameters were chosen over those produced by CAP3 based on contig and singleton counts as well as ortholog hit ratio analysis. In the final assemblies, 1,413 E. propertius and 1,940 P. zelicaon unigenes had a ratio > 0.8; 2,866 E. propertius and 4,015 P. zelicaon unigenes had a ratio > 0.5. Conclusions Ultimately, these assemblies and SNP data will be used to generate microarrays for

  12. Population-level transcriptome sequencing of nonmodel organisms Erynnis propertius and Papilio zelicaon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Several recent studies have demonstrated the use of Roche 454 sequencing technology for de novo transcriptome analysis. Low error rates and high coverage also allow for effective SNP discovery and genetic diversity estimates. However, genetically diverse datasets, such as those sourced from natural populations, pose challenges for assembly programs and subsequent analysis. Further, estimating the effectiveness of transcript discovery using Roche 454 transcriptome data is still a difficult task. Results Using the Roche 454 FLX Titanium platform, we sequenced and assembled larval transcriptomes for two butterfly species: the Propertius duskywing, Erynnis propertius (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) and the Anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae). The Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) generated represent a diverse sample drawn from multiple populations, developmental stages, and stress treatments. Despite this diversity, > 95% of the ESTs assembled into long (> 714 bp on average) and highly covered (> 9.6× on average) contigs. To estimate the effectiveness of transcript discovery, we compared the number of bases in the hit region of unigenes (contigs and singletons) to the length of the best match silkworm (Bombyx mori) protein--this "ortholog hit ratio" gives a close estimate on the amount of the transcript discovered relative to a model lepidopteran genome. For each species, we tested two assembly programs and two parameter sets; although CAP3 is commonly used for such data, the assemblies produced by Celera Assembler with modified parameters were chosen over those produced by CAP3 based on contig and singleton counts as well as ortholog hit ratio analysis. In the final assemblies, 1,413 E. propertius and 1,940 P. zelicaon unigenes had a ratio > 0.8; 2,866 E. propertius and 4,015 P. zelicaon unigenes had a ratio > 0.5. Conclusions Ultimately, these assemblies and SNP data will be used to generate microarrays for ecoinformatics examining

  13. Population-level incidence and risk factors for pulmonary toxicity associated with amiodarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackevicius, Cynthia Anne; Tom, Albert; Essebag, Vidal; Eisenberg, Mark J; Rahme, Elham; Tu, Jack Ven; Humphries, Karin; Behlouli, Hassan; Pilote, Louise

    2011-09-01

    Estimates from clinical trials and small observational studies of the incidence of pulmonary toxicity (PT) associated with amiodarone range from 1% to 10%. We report a unique study of the population-based incidence and potential predictors of PT in a real-world atrial fibrillation (AF) population. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients ≥65 years old discharged with AF using linked administrative databases from Quebec, Canada from 1999 to 2007. "Users" and "nonusers" of amiodarone were identified by prescriptions dispensed within 7 days after hospital discharge. PT was defined through International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision and Tenth Revision codes for pulmonary fibrosis, alveolar/interstitial lung disease, and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Potential risk factors for PT were identified using multivariable Cox regression. PT occurred in 250 of 6,460 amiodarone users (3.87%) and 676 of 50,993 nonusers (1.33%). Age-standardized PT incidences were 28.30 and 16.02 per 1,000 person-years in men and women users, respectively, and 14.05 and 8.82 per 1,000 person-years in nonusers, respectively. It was associated with amiodarone exposure at all doses (≤200 mg/day, hazard ratio 1.62, 1.35 to 1.96; >200 mg/day, 1.46, 1.22 to 1.75). Other predictors of PT included increasing age (1.01 per year, 1.00 to 1.02), male gender (1.37, 1.19 to 1.57), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (2.53, 2.21 to 2.89), and renal disease (1.26, 1.06 to 1.50). In conclusion, the population-based incidence of amiodarone PT is in the lower range of what has been previously reported. However, patients with AF who use amiodarone have an approximately 50% higher risk of PT than nonusers. Clinicians may be able to use the present results to identify patients at higher risk for PT and implement strategies to increase monitoring or select alternative therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Apolipoprotein B levels, APOB alleles, and risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease in the general population, a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    . The present review examines, with focus on general population studies, apolipoprotein B levels as a predictor of ischemic cardiovascular disease, as well as the association of mutations and polymorphisms in APOB with plasma apolipoprotein B levels, and risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease. The studies can...... be summarized as follows: (1) apolipoprotein B predicts ischemic cardiovascular events in both genders, and is better than LDL cholesterol in this respect; (2) linkage disequilibrium structure in APOB is more complex than expected from HapMap data, because a minimal set of tag single nucleotide polymorphisms......Apolipoprotein B is a key component in lipid metabolism. Subendothelial retention of apolipoprotein B containing lipoproteins is a necessary initiating event in atherogenesis, and high plasma levels of apolipoprotein B is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, whereas low levels may provide protection...

  15. Does educational level influence the effects of smoking, alcohol, physical activity, and obesity on mortality? A prospective population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Christina; Højbjerre, Lise; Riegels, Mette

    2004-01-01

    strata. Further, subjects who were either very lean or obese had increased risks of death compared with those of normal weight at all educational levels in both genders. CONCLUSIONS: The difference in distribution of the main known risk factors may be part of the explanation for the differences......OBJECTIVES: This study aims at examining whether the relation between established risk factors and mortality differs with socioeconomic status as measured by level of education. METHODS: A population-based sample of 14,399 women and 16,236 men aged 20-93 years from Copenhagen was stratified...... into three educational levels measured as basic schooling, and the effect of smoking habits, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and body mass index, respectively, on mortality was assessed. RESULTS: Those with the lowest level of education were most frequently heavy smokers, heavy drinkers, physically...

  16. Predicting glycated hemoglobin levels in the non-diabetic general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauh, Simone P; Heymans, Martijn W; Koopman, Anitra D M

    2017-01-01

    , Inter99, KORA S4/F4) were combined to predict HbA1c levels at six year follow-up. Using backward selection, age, BMI, waist circumference, use of anti-hypertensive medication, current smoking and parental history of diabetes remained in sex-specific linear regression models. To minimize overfitting...

  17. Differences in atherosclerosis according to area level socioeconomic deprivation: cross sectional, population based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deans, Kevin A.; Bezlyak, Vladimir; Ford, Ian; Batty, G. David; Burns, Harry; Cavanagh, Jonathan; de Groot, Eric; McGinty, Agnes; Millar, Keith; Shiels, Paul G.; Tannahill, Carol; Velupillai, Yoga N.; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J.

    2009-01-01

    To examine the relation between area level social deprivation and ultrasound markers of atherosclerosis (common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque score), and to determine whether any differences can be explained by "classic" (currently recognised) or "emerging" (novel) cardiovascular risk

  18. Dispersal, dormancy and life-history tradeoffs at the individual, population and species levels in southern African Asteraceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Caroli; Anderson, Bruce; Ellis, Allan G

    2016-04-01

    Dispersal and dormancy are important risk-reducing strategies in unpredictable environments. Negative covariation between these strategies is theoretically expected, but empirical evidence is limited and inconsistent. Moreover, covariation may be affected by other life-history traits and may vary across levels of biological organization. We assessed dispersal (vertical fall time of fruits, a proxy for wind dispersal ability) and dormancy (germination fractions measured during germination trials) in populations of 15 annual and 12 perennial wind-dispersed species in six Asteraceae genera from South Africa. Dormancy was higher in annuals than in perennials, whereas fall time was largely determined by evolutionary history. Controlling for phylogeny, dispersal and dormancy was negatively associated across species and life-history categories. Negative covariation between dispersal and dormancy was not evident at either the individual level (except for seed heteromorphic species) or the population level. Our study provides rare empirical support for the theoretical expectation of tradeoffs between dormancy and the alternative risk-reducing strategies, perenniality and dispersal, but refutes the expectation of increased dispersability in perennials. Although negative covariation between dispersal and dormancy at the species level appears not to be a simple consequence of upscaling individual-level mechanistic tradeoffs, our findings suggest that selection for one strategy may constrain evolution of the other. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Variation in Hsp70 levels after cold shock: signs of evolutionary responses to thermal selection among Leptinotarsa decemlineata populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Lyytinen

    Full Text Available Individuals of widely spread species are expected to show local adaption in temperature tolerance as they encounter a range of thermal conditions. We tracked thermal adaptations of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata that invaded Europe within the last 100 years. It has occupied various conditions although, like the majority of invasive species, it lost a measurable amount of neutral genetic variation due to bottleneck effect when it invaded Europe. We exposed diapausing beetles originated from three different latitudes (54°N, 59°N, 60°N to cold shock (-5°C, 1.5 hrs in order to test if beetles from the northern populations express differential levels of cold-induced and constitutive Hsp70 compared to the beetles from milder temperature regime. The level of cold-induced Hsp70 was lowest in the northernmost beetle populations while the level of constitutive Hsp70 did not differ with the population. Moreover, the southernmost beetles were more plastic in their response to cold shock than the northernmost beetles. These results suggest that physiological adaptation, like the synthesis of Hsp70, can evolve very quickly.

  20. Comparison of Serum Vit D Level Between Psoriasis Patients and Normal Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Darjani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disorder with humeral and cellular immune system involvement. On the other hands، Vitamin D has important immunomodulatory effects and its relations with many autoimmune diseases were shown. The relation between Serum Vit D Level and Psoriasis disease remained controversial issue that this study was done to show this relationship. Methods and Materials: In this comparative cross sectional study، 30 psoriatic patients who attended to Razi dermatology clinic in Rasht، by sequential sampling underwent study as case group. 30 healthy people from hospital at the same age، gender and skin-colored also were selected as control group. Inclusion criteria were patients and people without Ca or Vit D supplements usage or underground diseases in relation to hypovitaminosis D. Demographical data were gathered by interviewing and then blood samples from all participants were sent for analysis of serum Ca، P، Vit D and parathormone level. Data analysis was done by SPSS ver. 18 using T-test and Chi 2 test. Result: Mean and SD serum level of Vit D in case and control groups were 25.8± 12.6 ng/ mL and  23.7± 8.9 ng/ mL، respectively (ρ>0.05. Out of all، 24 participants (40% suffered from Vit D Deficiency and 20 people (33.3% from Vit D insufficiency ، only 26.7% study subjects had acceptable serum Vit D level. There were not any significant difference between Vit D deficiency rates and other measured biochemical indices in two groups (36.7% vs. 43.3%. Conclusion: This study showed high level of Vit D deficiency in both psoriatic and normal people that must be notice.

  1. The invisibility of public health: population-level measures in a politics of market individualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, S

    1997-01-01

    This paper models the prevailing political attack on government as a heuristic, a judgmental strategy that simplifies complex phenomena by applying simple tests to a limited set of relevant data. The heuristic of market individualism offers three tools for analyzing the problems of governing: the supremacy of the free market as a regulatory device, a belief in individual freedom of choice and personal responsibility, and the elevation of individual satisfaction as the chief goal of society. Because public health is inherently concerned with the health of the population rather than individual health, because the market itself is a major source of ill health, and because individual choice is socially mediated, use of the heuristic precludes the recognition of the value of public health work. Although some degree of accommodation to current political realities is a practical necessity, public health advocates must not neglect the task of fashioning radically different alternative visions over the long term. PMID:9357340

  2. Suicide risk in relation to level of urbanicity - a population-based linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ping

    2005-01-01

    when adjusted for personal marital, income, and ethnic differences; it is even reversed when further adjusted for psychiatric status. Moreover, the impact of urbanicity on suicide risk differs significantly by sex and across age. Urban living reduces suicide risk significantly among men, especially...... part of this period. CONCLUSIONS: Suicide risk associated with urbanicity varies significantly by sex and age groups and recent years have seen a decline in the urban-rural disparities among men. The increased risk in urban areas can largely be explained by the effects of marital status, ethnics......, and to study the risk variation in a sex, age, and calendar year perspective. METHODS: The study is a nested case-control study comprising 21 169 suicides and 423 128 population controls matched for age and sex. Personal data on place of residence, socioeconomic status and psychiatric history were retrieved...

  3. Orthostatic hypotension does not increase cardiovascular risk in the elderly at a population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiglia, Edoardo; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Caffi, Sandro; Boschetti, Giovanni; Giordano, Nunzia; Guidotti, Federica; Segato, Federico; Mazza, Alberto; Grasselli, Carla; Saugo, Mario; Rigoni, Giulio; Guglielmi, Francesco; Martini, Bortolo; Palatini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The general belief that orthostatic hypotension (OH) predisposes to cardiovascular events is based on sparse and contradictory data, rarely derived from population studies. A total of 1,016 men and women aged ≥65 years was studied in a 12-year epidemiological population-based study. Cardiovascular events were detected in subjects with and without OH (blood pressure (BP) decrease ≥20mm Hg for systolic or ≥10mm Hg for diastolic), and Cox analysis was performed including OH as an independent variable. In univariate analysis, coronary (20.2% vs. 13.1%, P = 0.05), cerebrovascular (13.1% vs. 8.4%, P = 0.05), and heart failure (HF) events (20.2% vs. 13.8%, P = 0.03) were apparently more incidental in subjects with OH than in those without OH. Nevertheless, after adjusting for age, gender, and systolic BP as confounders, OH did not act as a cardiovascular predictor (relative risk for cerebrovascular events 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.78-2.2, for coronary events 1.25, CI 0.82-1.88, for HF 1.07, CI 0.71-1.62, for arrhythmias 0.82, CI 0.40-1.37, and for syncope 0.58, CI 0.13-2.71). Although OH seems to be a predictor of coronary, cerebrovascular, and HF events, no predictive role was found in models that include biological confounders. Independent of the cause of OH, age and systolic BP, which are positively associated with OH, fully explain the greater incidence of cardiovascular events and the greater cardiovascular risk observed in subjects with OH.

  4. Population-Level Impact of Ontario's Infant Rotavirus Immunization Program: Evidence of Direct and Indirect Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Wilson

    Full Text Available To evaluate the direct and indirect population impact of rotavirus (RV immunization on hospitalizations and emergency department (ED visits for acute gastroenteritis (AGE in Ontario before and after the publicly-funded RV immunization program.Administrative data was used to identify ED visits and hospitalizations for all Ontarians using ICD-10 codes. We used two outcome definitions: RV-specific AGE (RV-AGE and codes representing RV-, other viral and cause unspecified AGE ("overall AGE". The pre-program and public program periods were August 1, 2005 to July 31, 2011; and August 1, 2011 to March 31, 2013, respectively. A negative binominal regression model that included the effect of time was used to calculate rates and rate ratios (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for RV-AGE and overall AGE between periods, after adjusting for age, seasonality and secular trends. Analyses were conducted for all ages combined and age stratified.Relative to the pre-program period, the adjusted RRs for RV-AGE and overall AGE hospitalizations in the public program period were 0.29 (95%CI: 0.22-0.39 and 0.68 (95%CI: 0.62-0.75, respectively. Significant reductions in RV-AGE hospitalizations were noted overall and for the following age bands: = 65 years (RR 0.80, 95%CI: 0.72-0.90. The program was associated with adjusted RRs of 0.32 (95% CI: 0.20-0.52 for RV-AGE ED visits and 0.90 (95% CI: 0.85-0.96 for overall AGE ED visits.This large, population-based study provides evidence of the impact of RV vaccine in preventing hospitalizations and ED visits for RV-AGE and overall AGE, including herd effects.

  5. How do protected landscapes associated with high biodiversity and population levels change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Cuenca

    Full Text Available Most protected areas (PA try to limit logging of forests by means of restrictions on access and use, especially in areas where local communities coexist with the forests and depend on resources derived from PAs. In such contexts, achieving full or effective protection of the forests is almost impossible. This fact has led to researching beyond PAs boundaries in order to examine large surrounding landscapes with multiple forms of properties and restriction on forests use. The present study assessed the change in forest cover and fragmentation between 1990 and 2014, in addition to the drivers that explain such changes in a landscape with the presence of PAs and high-density population belonging to the Chocó-Darien biodiversity hotspot. Results indicated differences in the extent and spatial patterns of change in forest cover of PAs and their surrounding landscapes. Two PAs exhibited a tendency to increase fragmentation and lose their forests in comparison with the stable protection of the forests in other PAs during this period. However, the greatest change in forest cover and fragmentation was observed in the surrounding landscapes, where the best connection to markets and transport networks were the dominating deforestation drivers. Our findings corroborated that the PAs were a shield against the deforestation of the tropical Andean forest, especially in landscapes with high-density population. However, the fragmentation of the forest cannot be avoided around the PAs limits. It is expected that, if this tendency continues in the future, the biodiversity in the Chocó-Darien hotspot will be seriously affected.

  6. BIGSdb: Scalable analysis of bacterial genome variation at the population level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiden Martin CJ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The opportunities for bacterial population genomics that are being realised by the application of parallel nucleotide sequencing require novel bioinformatics platforms. These must be capable of the storage, retrieval, and analysis of linked phenotypic and genotypic information in an accessible, scalable and computationally efficient manner. Results The Bacterial Isolate Genome Sequence Database (BIGSDB is a scalable, open source, web-accessible database system that meets these needs, enabling phenotype and sequence data, which can range from a single sequence read to whole genome data, to be efficiently linked for a limitless number of bacterial specimens. The system builds on the widely used mlstdbNet software, developed for the storage and distribution of multilocus sequence typing (MLST data, and incorporates the capacity to define and identify any number of loci and genetic variants at those loci within the stored nucleotide sequences. These loci can be further organised into 'schemes' for isolate characterisation or for evolutionary or functional analyses. Isolates and loci can be indexed by multiple names and any number of alternative schemes can be accommodated, enabling cross-referencing of different studies and approaches. LIMS functionality of the software enables linkage to and organisation of laboratory samples. The data are easily linked to external databases and fine-grained authentication of access permits multiple users to participate in community annotation by setting up or contributing to different schemes within the database. Some of the applications of BIGSDB are illustrated with the genera Neisseria and Streptococcus. The BIGSDB source code and documentation are available at http://pubmlst.org/software/database/bigsdb/. Conclusions Genomic data can be used to characterise bacterial isolates in many different ways but it can also be efficiently exploited for evolutionary or functional studies. BIGSDB

  7. Strong positive associations between seafood, vegetables, and alcohol with blood mercury and urinary arsenic levels in the Korean adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Lee, Byung-Kook

    2013-01-01

    Blood mercury and urinary arsenic levels are more than fivefold greater in the Korean population compared with those of the United States. This may be related to the foods people consumed. Therefore, we examined the associations between food categories and mercury and arsenic exposure in the Korean adult population. Data regarding nutritional, biochemical, and health-related parameters were obtained from a cross-sectional study, the 2008-2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (3,404 men and women age ≥ 20 years). The log-transformed blood mercury and urinary arsenic levels were regressed against the frequency tertiles of each food group after covariate adjustment for sex, age, residence area, education level, smoking status, and drinking status using food-frequency data. Blood mercury levels in the high consumption groups compared to the low consumption groups were elevated by about 20 percents with salted fish, shellfish, whitefish, bluefish, and alcohol, and by about 9-14 percents with seaweeds, green vegetables, fruits and tea, whereas rice did not affect blood mercury levels. Urinary arsenic levels were markedly increased with consumption of rice, bluefish, salted fish, shellfish, whitefish, and seaweed, whereas they were moderately increased with consumption of grains, green and white vegetables, fruits, coffee, and alcohol. The remaining food categories tended to lower these levels only minimally. In conclusion, the typical Asian diet, which is high in rice, salted fish, shellfish, vegetables, alcoholic beverages, and tea, may be associated with greater blood mercury and urinary arsenic levels. This study suggests that mercury and arsenic contents should be monitored and controlled in soil and water used for agriculture to decrease health risks from heavy-metal contamination.

  8. Managing dyslipidemia in Turkey: suggested guidelines for a population characterized by low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersot, Thomas P; Palaoğlu, K Erhan; Mahley, Robert W

    2002-12-01

    Based on data from the Turkish Society of Cardiology and others, it is established that Turks have a high prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD). Several risk factors are prominent in Turks: dyslipidemia, cigarette smoking, and hypertension. The dyslipidemia is unique in that very low levels of HDL-C and typically "normal" LDL-C levels characterize the Turkish population. The low HDL-C levels appear to be genetic in origin and are largely independent of high triglyceride levels (73% of Turkish men and 94% of women with HDL-C 200 mg/dl). HDL-C levels are 10-15% mg/dl lower in Turks than seen in the United States or western Europe. Low HDL-C is a major risk factor; CHD risk increases 2-4% for every 1 mg/dl decrease in HDL-C levels. Existing treatment guidelines focus on plasma LDL-C levels and fail to take into account the continuous increase in CHD risk that occurs as HDL-C levels decrease. However, several studies show that patients with CHD or free of CHD but with multiple risk factors, who have low HDL-C and near optimal LDL-C, benefit very significantly from lipid-lowering therapy. Many of these patients with low HDL-C levels do not qualify for drug therapy based on existing guidelines. Therefore, we believe that unique guidelines must be developed to guide the treatment of low HDL-C Turkish patients. We suggest that treatment based on both the LDL-C level and the total cholesterol/HDL-C (TC/HDL-C) ratio is the best way to address treatment of patients with low HDL-C levels. The most effective drug treatment available presently in Turkey relies on lowering LDL-C levels to optimize the TC/HDL-C ratio.

  9. Condurango (Gonolobus condurango Extract Activates Fas Receptor and Depolarizes Mitochondrial Membrane Potential to Induce ROS-dependent Apoptosis in Cancer Cells in vitro CE-treatment on HeLa: a ROS-dependent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kausik Bishayee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Condurango (Gonolobus condurango extract is used by complementary and alternative medicine (CAM practitioners as a traditional medicine, including homeopathy, mainly for the treatment of syphilis. Condurango bark extract is also known to reduce tumor volume, but the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Methods: Using a cervical cancer cell line (HeLa as our model, the molecular events behind condurango extract’s (CE’s anticancer effect were investigated by using flow cytometry, immunoblotting and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Other included cell types were prostate cancer cells (PC3, transformed liver cells (WRL-68, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Results: Condurango extract (CE was found to be cytotoxic against target cells, and this was significantly deactivated in the presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS, suggesting that its action could be mediated through ROS generation. CE caused an increase in the HeLa cell population containing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA damage at the G zero/Growth 1 (G0/G1 stage. Further, CE increased the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and the fas receptor (FasR levels both at the ribonucleic acid (RNA and the protein levels, indicating that CE might have a cytotoxic mechanism of action. CE also triggered a sharp decrease in the expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB both at the RNA and the protein levels, a possible route to attenuation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, and caused an opening of the mitochondrial membrane’s permeability transition (MPT pores, thus enhancing caspase activities. Conclusion: Overall, our results suggest possible pathways for CE mediated cytotoxicity in model cancer cells.

  10. Positive mental health and well-being among a third level student population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P Davoren

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Much research on the health and well-being of third level students is focused on poor mental health leading to a dearth of information on positive mental health and well-being. Recently, the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Well-being scale (WEMWBS was developed as a measurement of positive mental health and well-being. The aim of this research is to investigate the distribution and determinants of positive mental health and well-being in a large, broadly representative sample of third level students using WEMWBS. METHODS: Undergraduate students from one large third level institution were sampled using probability proportional to size sampling. Questionnaires were distributed to students attending lectures in the randomly selected degrees. A total of 2,332 self-completed questionnaires were obtained, yielding a response rate of 51% based on students registered to relevant modules and 84% based on attendance. One-way ANOVAs and multivariate logistic regression were utilised to investigate factors associated with positive mental health and well-being. RESULTS: The sample was predominantly female (62.66%, in first year (46.9% and living in their parents' house (42.4% or in a rented house or flat (40.8%. In multivariate analysis adjusted for age and stratified by gender, no significant differences in WEMWBS score were observed by area of study, alcohol, smoking or drug use. WEMWBS scores were higher among male students with low levels of physical activity (p=0.04. Men and women reporting one or more sexual partners (p<0.001 were also more likely to report above average mental health and well-being. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to examine positive mental health and well-being scores in a third level student sample using WEMWBS. The findings suggest that students with a relatively adverse health and lifestyle profile have higher than average mental health and well-being. To confirm these results, this work needs to be replicated across

  11. Correlates of NNAL levels among nondaily and daily smokers in the college student population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Carla J; Schauer, Gillian L; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Benowitz, Neal L

    2012-10-15

    Recent simultaneous increases in nondaily smoking and decreases in daily smoking make the identification of nondaily smokers through biomarker measures as well as the relationship of biomarker levels to smoking behaviors important topics. However, little is known about biochemical identification and carcinogen exposure of nondaily smokers. One tobacco-specific nitrosamine, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), has a long half-life, making it a useful marker for long-term and intermittent tobacco exposure. Thus, we examined correlates of urine NNAL levels among nondaily and daily smokers. In 2011, we obtained urine samples from 64 current cigarette smokers (37 nondaily; 27 daily) in the Southeastern US and assessed participants' sociodemographics, smoking-related information, and other tobacco use. Our sample included 14 participants concurrently using other combustible tobacco products and eight concurrently using smokeless tobacco. Of six participants smoking for only one day in the past 30, four had detectable NNAL levels; thus, two nondaily smokers were excluded from the remainder of the analyses. In multivariate analysis, average cigarettes per day on smoking days (B = 23.00, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 13.81, 32.20, P < 0.001) and number of days of smokeless tobacco use (B = 17.11, CI 13.53, 20.70, P < 0.001) were associated with NNAL levels among nondaily smokers (R(2) = 0.234). Multivariate analysis indicated that average cigarettes per day (B = 15.83, CI 2.89, 28.76, P = 0.02) was the only significant correlate of NNAL levels among daily smokers. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses to identify a potential urinary NNAL (normalized for creatinine) cutoff point of 81.6 pg/mL/g creatinine (88.9% sensitivity, 80.0% specificity) to discriminate nondaily from daily smokers. Excluding polytobacco-product users from these analyses provided similar results. Different correlates of NNAL levels exist among nondaily and daily

  12. If the Dark Ages solar peak c.525CE caused a c.5m sea-level rise 50-100y later ("ocean memory"), the stronger 1958 solar "Grand maximum" presages a >5m rise by 2058: literature review by an impartial geologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Roger

    2017-04-01

    The 255 authors of IPCC's "Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis" include no sedimentary geologists, specialists in ever-changing sea level (SL). According to IPCC the 0.3m SL rise(1) since tide-gauge records began (c.1700CE, Little Ice Age[LIA] acme) is unprecedented in >2ky, implicating mankind's CO2 emissions. On the contrary, a c.5m SL rise and fall between c.400CE and 1700 are indicated independently by three lines of evidence: British archaeology(2,3); worldwide raised-shoreline benchmarks(4); and Red Sea foraminifera O18 fluctuations(5). The c.5m fall is attributable to 590-1640CE cooling (ice growth) shown by a global proxy temperature graph(6; cf.7). This 1ky-long cooling and ensuing 1850-2017 warming, both sawtooth-style, in turn mimic a 1ky solar decline then rise(8), moreso after aligning the 590CE peak temperature(6) with the c.525CE solar "Grand maximum" (GM) or near-GM(8). This 65y lag reflects hitherto-neglected ocean-conveyor-belt circulation, i.e. downwelling Atlantic surface water, variably solar-warmed (depending on solar-governed cloudiness[9]), upwells decades later beside Antarctica, returning northward to affect continental air temperatures. The conveyor slowed in the LIA (c.150y offset between 1280-1700CE cluster of solar Grand minima[8] and 1430-1850 cool phase[6]). Lately the lag, obvious from visual cross-matching of 1850-2012 instrumental-temperature peaks and troughs(10) versus the 1700-2016 sunspot chart (Google images), is c.85y (1890 solar trough matches 1975 temperature trough). Similarly, SL(1) clearly lags temperature(10) by 15y (1964 and 1976 temperature troughs match 1979 and 1991 SL troughs). Thus the total SL-solar lag is 100y (85+15). Appreciating the 85y and 100y lags enables vital predictions: sunspots increased (sawtooth-style) from c.1890 until the 1958 GM (the only definite GM in >2ky[8]), therefore ongoing warming will peak c.2043 (1958+85), and SL c.2058. How high will SL rise? The 1958 solar GM exceeded (95

  13. Polydopamine coated capillaries for CE separations

    OpenAIRE

    Partyka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We have tested CE separation of selected samples in capillaries with polydopamine modified surface. The capillaries were modified by polydopamine or polydopamine with an additive. The polydopamine coating with additive represents a simple and effective procedure for capillary alteration by another modificator such as hydroxyethyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl cellulose etc. In this work, we represent separation data from PrinCE system with UV detection for peptides, proteins and oligosaccha...

  14. Relationships between dominance, testosterone level and scent marking of males in a free-living root vole (Microtus oeconomus) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Zbigniew; Malinowska, Aleksandra; Książek, Aneta

    2014-04-10

    In many species, dominance increases a male's mating success via intrasexual competition and/or female choice. The level of androgen hormones, mainly testosterone (T), the intensity of scent marking and body mass are traits that are known to be linked to mammalian male social rank. Recently, however, it has been noted that this link between male dominance and the aforementioned traits in natural free-living populations is not universal and does not exist in some species. That is why we tested the hypothesis of whether a male's social rank is related to the expression of T, scent-marking and his body mass. We conducted the study on the promiscuous rodent species, root voles (Microtus oeconomus), which originated from a natural population (wild-born). These tests provided support for the following conclusions: (1) the social status of a male root vole is partly related to his level of testosterone; (2) the highest T level was observed in subdominant males; (3) T levels proved to be independent of male body mass; (4) marking frequency was not dependent on a male's social status nor their body mass; and (5) the mean body mass of dominant, subdominant and subordinate individuals was similar. Our results indicate that in natural free-living populations, the link between the T levels and dominance behaviour of root vole males is ambiguous. Moreover, there is no link between the social status and the intensity of scent-marking. We therefore conclude that in this species, male marking intensity cannot be used as an indicator of social rank. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A population study of fasting time and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Cheryl K; Maggie Guo; Viczko, Jeannine A; Naugler, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. Traditional screening and diagnostic methods include digital rectal examinations (DREs), biopsies and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, with the latter being the more popular. PSA is a biomarker for prostate cancer; however, it is highly sensitive to external factors as well as other prostate diseases. As such, the reliability of of the serum PSA level as a sole screening and diagnostic tool for prostate cancer is controvers...

  16. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Risk of Incident Hypertriglyceridemia: A Longitudinal Population-based Epidemiological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rongjiong; Ren, Ping; Chen, Qingmei; Yang, Tianmeng; Chen, Changxi; Mao, Yushan

    2017-09-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is one of lipid metabolism abnormalities; however, it is still debatable whether serum uric acid is a cause or a consequence of hypertriglyceridemia. We performed the study to investigate the longitudinal association between serum uric acid levels and hypertriglyceridemia. The study included 4190 subjects without hypertriglyceridemia. The subjects had annual health examinations for 8 years to assess incident hyperglyceridemia, and the subjects were divided into groups based on the serum uric acid quartile. Cox regression models were used to analyze the risk factors of development hypertriglyceridemia. During follow-up, 1461 (34.9%) subjects developed hypertriglyceridemia over 8 years of follow-up. The cumulative incidence of hypertriglyceridemia was 28.2%, 29.1%, 36.9%, and 45.6% in quartile 1,2,3 and 4, respectively ( P for trend uric acid levels were independently and positively associated with the risk of incident hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia has become a serious public health problem. This longitudinal study demonstrates that high serum uric acid levels increase the risk of hypertriglyceridemia. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  17. Coronary disease risk and fasting glucose levels in a non-diabetic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onat, Altan; Can, Günay; Ciçek, Gökhan; Doğan, Yüksel; Yüksel, Hüsniye

    2011-02-01

    We addressed whether or not the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in non-diabetic persons is linear at the lower end of fasting glucose levels. Middle-aged Turkish adults (n=2893) free from diabetes and CHD at baseline were studied prospectively over a 7.6-year follow-up. Participants with fasting glucose measurements were analyzed in 3 groups separated by 90 mg/dl and 110 mg/dl limits. Outcomes were analyzed by Cox regression. Cox regression for CHD incidence (n=374) showed an increased age-adjusted risk in the fasting glucose group (n=788) [HR 1.32 (1.03; 1.68)], compared with the 90-110 mg/dl group after adjustment for sex, age and the glucose groups. Further adjustment for waist circumference, C-reactive protein and conventional risk factors attenuated the HR to 1.27 (p=0.077). The risk profile in the low-glucose group could not be accounted for by age, smoking status, systolic blood pressure or fasting insulin levels but tended to show higher levels of circulating C-reactive protein. The increased CHD risk observed in individuals with lower compared with higher normal glucose concentrations is likely to be related to an associated pro-inflammatory state. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of Breastfeeding Time on Levels of Organochlorine Pesticides in Human Milk of a Mexican Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Almazán, Luis A; Diaz-Ortiz, Jesús; Alarcón-Romero, Mario; Davila-Vazquez, Gustavo; Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Sampedro-Rosas, Laura; López-Silva, Saúl; Santiago-Moreno, Agustín; Rosas-Acevedo, José L; Waliszewski, Stefan M

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted with the objective of determining whether there is a depuration of organochlorine pesticides in breast milk according to breastfeeding time. In total, 171 samples from mothers that lived in the State of Guerrero, Mexico were analyzed. There was a weak negative relationship between pp'DDE (r = -0.216) and Σ-DDT (r = -0.222) concentrations with the days of lactation. In a comparison analysis, a statistically significant decrease of pp'DDT and pp'DDE levels was observed, as well as the Σ-DDT from the first to the fifth week of lactation. A reduction of 0.188 mg/kg lipid of pp'DDE and 0.181 mg/kg lipid of Σ-DDT per week was obtained. HCB, β-HCH and op'DDT concentrations were low and had no major fluctuations between subgroups. The low levels found and the observed reduction in time involve less exposure to the infant to these pollutants. Through this methodology changes in levels of certain organochlorine pesticides in various stages of human milk production may be shown.

  19. Mobile Phone Surveys for Collecting Population-Level Estimates in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Dustin G; Pereira, Amanda; Farrenkopf, Brooke A; Labrique, Alain B; Pariyo, George W; Hyder, Adnan A

    2017-05-05

    National and subnational level surveys are important for monitoring disease burden, prioritizing resource allocation, and evaluating public health policies. As mobile phone access and ownership become more common globally, mobile phone surveys (MPSs) offer an opportunity to supplement traditional public health household surveys. The objective of this study was to systematically review the current landscape of MPSs to collect population-level estimates in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Primary and gray literature from 7 online databases were systematically searched for studies that deployed MPSs to collect population-level estimates. Titles and abstracts were screened on primary inclusion and exclusion criteria by two research assistants. Articles that met primary screening requirements were read in full and screened for secondary eligibility criteria. Articles included in review were grouped into the following three categories by their survey modality: (1) interactive voice response (IVR), (2) short message service (SMS), and (3) human operator or computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATI). Data were abstracted by two research assistants. The conduct and reporting of the review conformed to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. A total of 6625 articles were identified through the literature review. Overall, 11 articles were identified that contained 19 MPS (CATI, IVR, or SMS) surveys to collect population-level estimates across a range of topics. MPSs were used in Latin America (n=8), the Middle East (n=1), South Asia (n=2), and sub-Saharan Africa (n=8). Nine articles presented results for 10 CATI surveys (10/19, 53%). Two articles discussed the findings of 6 IVR surveys (6/19, 32%). Three SMS surveys were identified from 2 articles (3/19, 16%). Approximately 63% (12/19) of MPS were delivered to mobile phone numbers collected from previously administered household surveys. The majority of MPS (11

  20. Population-Level Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution during Active Travel: Planning for Low-Exposure, Health-Promoting Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Steve; Lindsey, Greg; Marshall, Julian D

    2017-04-01

    Providing infrastructure and land uses to encourage active travel (i.e., bicycling and walking) are promising strategies for designing health-promoting cities. Population-level exposure to air pollution during active travel is understudied. Our goals were a ) to investigate population-level patterns in exposure during active travel, based on spatial estimates of bicycle traffic, pedestrian traffic, and particulate concentrations; and b ) to assess how those exposure patterns are associated with the built environment. We employed facility-demand models (active travel) and land use regression models (particulate concentrations) to estimate block-level ( n = 13,604) exposure during rush-hour (1600-1800 hours) in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We used the model-derived estimates to identify land use patterns and characteristics of the street network that are health promoting. We also assessed how exposure is correlated with indicators of health disparities (e.g., household income, proportion of nonwhite residents). Our work uses population-level rates of active travel (i.e., traffic flows) rather than the probability of walking or biking (i.e., "walkability" or "bikeability") to assess exposure. Active travel often occurs on high-traffic streets or near activity centers where particulate concentrations are highest (i.e., 20-42% of active travel occurs on blocks with high population-level exposure). Only 2-3% of blocks (3-8% of total active travel) are "sweet spots" (i.e., high active travel, low particulate concentrations); sweet spots are located a ) near but slightly removed from the city-center or b ) on off-street trails. We identified 1,721 blocks (~ 20% of local roads) where shifting active travel from high-traffic roads to adjacent low-traffic roads would reduce exposure by ~ 15%. Active travel is correlated with population density, land use mix, open space, and retail area; particulate concentrations were mostly unchanged with land use. Public health officials and

  1. Association between serum β2-microglobulin levels and frailty in an elderly Chinese population: results from RuLAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zu-Yun; Shen, Yan-Yu; Ji, Li-Juan; Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Shi, Yan

    2017-01-01

    To examine the association between serum β2-microglobulin (B2M) levels and frailty in an elderly Chinese population. A population-based cohort study. We used data on 1,663 elderly participants (aged 70-84 years) from the aging arm of the Rugao Longevity and Ageing study, a population-based observational two-arm cohort study conducted in Rugao, China. The serum B2M was measured with chemiluminescence immunoassay by a technician in the biochemistry laboratory of the Rugao People's Hospital. Information on the frailty index and phenotype was collected. The mean B2M levels and frailty index were 1.8 mg/L and 0.16, respectively; 188 (11.3%) participants were classified as frail (frailty phenotype). For a standard deviation increase in B2M, the adjusted odds ratio for frailty phenotype was 1.20 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.39; P=0.009) and the standardized coefficient for frailty index was 0.07 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.11; P=0.004). Relative to the lowest quartile, the highest B2M quartile had a greater risk of prevalent frailty with adjusted odds ratios of 1.68 (95% CI: 1.04, 2.71; P=0.034) for frailty phenotype and 1.51 (95% CI: 1.01, 2.27; P=0.044) for frailty index (≥0.25). In addition, estimated glomerular filtration rate (based on B2M) or chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate frailty phenotype and index. B2M was significantly associated with both frailty phenotype and index in elderly Chinese population. The findings underscore the promising kidney relevant biomarkers for identifying vulnerable elderly Chinese population.

  2. Determining the level of sleepiness in the American population and its correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohayon, Maurice M

    2012-04-01

    To assess the prevalence, to determine the risk factors and to evaluate the impacts of excessive sleepiness in the general population. It is a cross-sectional telephone study using a representative sample consisting of 8937 non-institutionalized individuals aged 18 or over living in Texas, New York and California. They represented a total of 62.8 million inhabitants. The participation rate was 85.6% in California, 81.3% in New York and 83.2% in Texas. Interviews were managed by the Sleep-EVAL expert system. The questionnaire included questions on sleeping habits, life habits, health, DSM-IV mental disorders, DSM-IV and ICSD sleep disorders. As many as 19.5% of the sample reported having moderate excessive sleepiness and 11.0% reported severe excessive sleepiness. Moderate excessive sleepiness was comparable between men and women but severe excessive sleepiness was higher in women (8.6% vs. 13.0%). Factors associated with moderate excessive sleepiness were sleeping 6 h or less per main sleep episode (OR:2.0); OSAS (OR:2.0); insomnia disorder (OR:2.4); Restless Legs Syndrome (OR: 1.8) major depressive disorder (OR: 1.7); anxiety disorder (OR:1.5) and use of tricyclic antidepressant (OR: 2.1) presence of heart disease (OR: 1.5), cancer (1.8) and chronic pain (1.3). Factors associated with severe excessive sleepiness were similar with the addition of being a woman (OR:1.5), alcohol dependence (OR: 1.4), bipolar disorder (OR: 2.1), use of over-the-counter sleeping pills (OR: 2.5), narcotic analgesics (OR: 3.4), Antidepressants (other than SSRI or tricyclic) and presence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (OR:1.6). Sleepy individuals were twice as likely than non-sleepy participants to have had accidents while they were at the wheel of a vehicle during the previous year. Excessive sleepiness is highly prevalent in the American population. It was strongly associated with insufficient sleep and various sleep disorders as well as mental and organic diseases. Copyright

  3. Characterizing Fractures Across the Astronaut Corps: Preliminary Findings from Population-Level Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Meredith M.; Charvat, Jacqueline; Sibonga, Jean; Sieker, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Despite evidence of bone loss during spaceflight and operational countermeasures to mitigate this loss, the subsequent risk of fracture among astronauts is not known. The physiologic process of diminished bone density and bone recovery during or following spaceflight is multifactorial. Such factors as age, sex, fracture history, and others may combine to increase fracture risk among astronauts. As part of the 2016 Bone Research and Clinical Advisory Panel (RCAP), the authors analyzed data collected on 338 NASA astronauts to describe the demographics, bone-relevant characteristics, and fracture history of the astronaut population. The majority of the population are male (n=286, 84.6%), have flown at least one mission (n=306, 90.5%), and were between the ages of 30 and 49 at first mission (n=296, 96.7% of those with at least one mission). Of the 338 astronauts, 241 (71.3%) experienced a fracture over the course of their lifetime. One hundred and five (43.5%) of these 241 astronauts only experienced a fracture prior to being selected into the Astronaut Corps, whereas 53 (22.0%) only experienced a fracture after selection as an astronaut. An additional 80 astronauts (33.2%) had both pre- and post-selection fractures. The remaining 3 astronauts had a fracture of unknown date, which could not be categorized as pre- or post-selection. Among the 133 astronauts with at least one post-selection fracture, males comprised 90.2% (n=120) compared to 84.5% of the entire Corps, and females accounted for 9.8% (n=13) compared to 15.4% of the Corps. Ninety-seven of the 133 astronauts with post-selection fractures (72.9%) had one fracture event, 22 (16.5%) had two fractures, and 14 (10.5%) had three or more fractures. Some astronauts with multiple fractures suffered these in a single event, such as an automobile accident. The 133 astronauts with a post-selection fracture accounted for a total of 188 fracture events. One hundred and four (78.2%) of astronauts with post

  4. Community-Level Social Capital and Psychological Distress among the Elderly in Japan: A Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Despite accumulating evidence, previous studies have not clearly separated the contribution of community-level social capital on mental health from that of individual-level social support. We examined the association between community-level social capital and psychological distress in a sample of older Japanese individuals, taking into account the effects of individual-level social capital and social support. We collected data via a cross-sectional survey among all residents aged ≥65 in three rural municipalities in Okayama Prefecture. We measured two components of social capital in the questionnaire: perceptions of trust and reciprocity in the community. Community-level social capital was obtained by aggregating individual responses and calculating the proportion of subjects reporting mistrust and lack of reciprocity. Psychological distress was assessed by the Kessler Psychological Distress scale. We calculated rate ratios [corrected] (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for psychological distress using two-level Poisson regression models (9,761 individuals nested within 35 communities. The prevalence of psychological distress was 39.8%. Low community-level social capital was associated with psychological distress, even after controlling for individual-level social support, age, sex, educational attainment, frequency of alcohol consumption, smoking status, body mass index, marital status, socioeconomic status, and number of cohabiters. The adjusted RRs per 10% increase of the proportion of mistrust and lack of reciprocity in the communities were 1.23 (95% CI: 1.01-1.51 and 1.12 (95% CI: 1.02-1.24, respectively. Lower levels of community-level social capital are associated with psychological distress among the Japanese elderly population, even after adjusting for individual-level perceptions of social capital and social support.

  5. Observation and empirical shell-model study of new yrast excited states in the nucleus sup 1 sup 4 sup 2 Ce

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Zhong; Guo Ying Xiang; Zhou Xiao Hong; Lei Xiang Guo; LiuMinLiang; Luo Wan Ju; He Jian Jun; Zheng Yong; Pan Qiang Yan; Gan Zai Guo; Luo Yi Xiao; Hayakawa, T; Oshima, M; Toh, Y; Shizima, T; Hatsukawa, Y; Osa, A; Ishii, T; Sugawara, M

    2002-01-01

    Excited states of sup 1 sup 4 sup 2 Ce, populated in deep inelastic reactions of sup 8 sup 2 Se projectiles bombarding sup 1 sup 3 sup 9 La target, have been studied to medium spins using in-beam gamma spectroscopy techniques. Three new levels have been identified at 2625, 2995 and 3834 keV, and assigned as 8 sup + , 9 sup ( sup - sup ) and 11 sup ( sup - sup ) , respectively, based on the analysis of the properties of gamma transitions. These new yrast states follow well the level systematics of N 84 isotones. Their structures have been discussed with the help of empirical shell-model calculations

  6. Changes in size of populations and level of conflict since World War II: implications for health and health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Richard M; Polonsky, Jonathan; Burkle, Frederick M

    2012-10-01

    Armed conflicts include declared cross-border and internal wars and political, ethnic, and religious hostilities. The number of conflicts worldwide and their level of intensity have varied widely during the last 5 decades. Tracking conflicts throughout this period has focused predominantly on the number of individuals killed or displaced from these hostilities through count-based estimation systems, or establishing rates of excess mortality from demographic surveys. This report focuses on people living in areas with conflict by applying an estimated level of conflict intensity to data on the population of each territory with hostilities during 1946 to 2007. Data from the Uppsala Conflict Data Program/Peace Research Institute Oslo (UCDP/PRIO) Armed Conflict project database on 324 conflicts of any type in countries with populations greater than 500 000 were combined with conflict-intensity estimates from the Center for Systemic Peace and population data from the US Census Bureau International Data Base. More than half a billion people lived in conflict-affected areas in 2007. An increasing proportion of those affected by conflict lived in early postconflict areas, where hostilities were judged or declared during the last 5 years. In the past 2 decades, the average intensity of conflict among those living in areas with a current conflict has gradually declined. A burgeoning population lives in areas where conflict has recently ended, yet most of the world's large-scale medical responses to emergencies focus on high-intensity conflicts. Effective emergency and reconstruction activities in the health sector will depend on reorganizing services to increasingly focus on and transition to low-level and postconflict environments.

  7. Association of KIF6 Variant with Lipid Level and Angiographic Coronary Artery Disease Events Risk in the Han Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Wu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available KIF6 is a class of molecular motor from the kinesin superfamily. Recently, multiple large studies consisting mainly of Europeans have shown that KIF6 Trp719Arg SNP may be a new predictive factor for coronary artery disease (CAD event risk. The allelic frequency distribution of rs20455 is different in various populations, yet studies among the Han population, one of the largest ethnic groups in the World, have not been conducted. This study is aimed to evaluate the association of KIF6 Trp719Arg variant with angiographic CAD and serum lipid levels in the Han population from northern China. In this case-controlled study, peripheral blood samples were collected from 356 patients and 568 controls of Han Chinese origin. Genotyping was performed by a high-resolution melting curve. The impact of rs20455 on CAD and non-fatal MI was evaluated in a dominant genetic model with stepwise multiple regression analysis. There were no significant differences of genotypes and allele frequency between angiographic CAD and control groups (p > 0.05; however, that of MI and non-MI subgroups were significant differences (p < 0.05. After adjusting for significant risk factors, angiographic CAD risk was not significantly increased in 719Arg allele carriers compared with non-carriers. Further analysis revealed that the non-fatal MI risk and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in 719Arg allele carriers than non-carriers. In conclusion, KIF6 719Arg allele was not an independent risk factor for angiographic CAD susceptibility in Han populations from northern China. However, it was associated with a significantly higher TG level, which may indicate an increased myocardial infarction risk in angiographic CAD patients.

  8. Structural and magnetic properties of Ce/Fe and Ce/FeCoV multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tixier, S.; Boeni, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Mannix, D.; Stirling, W.G. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom); Lander, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    Ce/Fe and Ce/FeCoV multilayers have been grown by magnetron sputtering. The interfaces are well defined and the layers are crystalline down to an individual layer thickness of 20 A. Ce/FeCoV multilayers show sharper interfaces than Ce/Fe but some loss of crystallinity is observed. Hysteresis loops obtained by SQUID show different behaviour of the bulk magnetisation as a function of the layer thickness. Fe moments are found by Moessbauer spectroscopy to be perpendicular to the interfaces for multilayers with small periodicity. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  9. Population-level effects of egg predation on a native planktivore in a large freshwater lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, David B.; Mychek-Londer, Justin G.; Madenjian, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    Using a 37-year recruitment time series, we uncovered a field pattern revealing a strong, inverse relationship between bloater Coregonus hoyi recruitment success and slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus biomass in Lake Michigan (United States), one of the largest freshwater lakes of the world. Given that slimy sculpins (and deepwater sculpin Myoxocephalus thompsonii) are known egg predators that spatiotemporally overlap with incubating bloater eggs, we used recently published data on sculpin diets and daily ration to model annual bloater egg consumption by sculpins for the 1973–2010 year-classes. Although several strong year-classes were produced in the late 1980s when the proportion of eggs consumed by slimy sculpins was extremely low (i.e., 0.10–1.0), egg predation failed to explain why recruitment was weak for the 1995–2005 year-classes when the proportion consumed was also low (i.e., important in many other years. Given that slimy sculpin densities are influenced by piscivorous lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, the restoration of which in Lake Michigan has lagged behind those in lakes Superior and Huron, our study highlights the importance of an ecosystem perspective when considering population dynamics of fishes.

  10. Level of neurotoxic metals in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocca, Beatrice; Forte, Giovanni; Oggiano, Riccardo; Clemente, Simonetta; Asara, Yolande; Peruzzu, Angela; Farace, Cristiano; Pala, Salvatore; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Pirina, Pietro; Madeddu, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    The association between exposure to toxic metals and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was explored in a population-based case-control study in the Sardinia island (Italy), a region characterized by elevated rates of ALS cases. In 34 patients with ALS (mean age, 62 ± 10 years) and 30 controls (mean age, 65 ± 11 years), Al, Cd, Hg, Mn and Pb were determined in blood, hair and urine by sector field inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Results indicated that, in blood, concentrations of Al (p=0.045) and Pb were higher (p=0.026) in ALS patients than in control subjects. In hair, a depletion of Al (p=0.006) and Mn (p=0.032) concentrations in ALS subjects respect to controls was found. In urine, no significant differences between cases and controls were observed. Thus, some metals seemed to be associated with ALS degeneration, but a definitive conclusion is still far considering the multiple risk factors (genetic mutations, environmental toxicants and stressors) involved in the disease. Finally, the interpretation that deregulated metal concentrations can be a consequence of the degenerative process, rather than a cause, is also valid. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of sodium intake on renin level: Analysis of general population and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, O J; Rhee, M Y; Oh, S W; Shin, S J; Gu, N; Nah, D Y; Kim, S W; Lee, J H

    2016-07-15

    We evaluated the association between sodium intake and plasma renin levels in the cross sectional study and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, whether there is a persistent elevation of plasma renin by longer-term sodium intake restriction. Plasma renin activity (PRA) and 24-h urine sodium (24HUNa) excretion were measured from individuals randomly selected from a community. Simple and multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for age, 24-h systolic blood pressure, 24-h average heart rate, fasting blood glucose and gender were performed. For meta-analysis, 74 studies published from 1975 to mid-2014 were identified in a systematic literature search using EMBASE, CINAHL, and MEDLINE. Random effects meta-analyses and a meta-regression analysis were performed. Among the 496 participants recruited, 210 normotensive and 87 untreated hypertensive subjects were included in the analysis. There was no significant association between PRA and 24HUNa in the total population, or hypertensive and normotensive individuals. In the meta-analysis, the standard mean difference (SMD) of renin level by sodium intake reduction was 1.26 (95% CI: 1.08 to 1.44, Z=12.80, Prenin level. The present population based cross-sectional study and meta-analysis suggests that prolonged reduction in sodium intake is very unlikely associated with elevation of plasma renin levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Strong positive association of traditional Asian-style diets with blood cadmium and lead levels in the Korean adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Lee, Byung-Kook

    2013-12-01

    Blood lead and cadmium levels are more than twofold to fivefold higher in the Korean population compared to that of the USA. This may be related to the foods consumed. We examined which food categories are related to blood lead and cadmium levels in the Korean adult population using the 2008-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 5504). High and moderate consumption of bread and crackers, potatoes, meat and meat products, milk and dairy products, and pizza and hamburger resulted in significantly lower odds ratios for blood lead levels than their low consumption. However, consumption of salted fish, white fish, green vegetables, white and yellow vegetables, coffee, and alcohol resulted in significantly higher odds ratios of blood lead and cadmium. In conclusion, the typical Asian diet based on rice, fish, vegetables, regular coffee, and alcoholic drinks may be associated with higher blood cadmium and lead levels. This study suggests that lead and cadmium contents should be monitored and controlled in agricultural products to reduce health risks from heavy metals.

  13. Risk factors and consequences of maternal anaemia and elevated haemoglobin levels during pregnancy: a population-based prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Romy; Eilers, Paul H C; Yassine, Siham; Hofman, Albert; Steegers, Eric A P; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2014-05-01

    To determine sociodemographic and life style-related risk factors and trimester specific maternal, placental, and fetal consequences of maternal anaemia and elevated haemoglobin levels in pregnancy. In a population-based prospective cohort study of 7317 mothers, we measured haemoglobin levels in early pregnancy [gestational age median 14.4 weeks (inter-quartile-range 12.5-17.5)]. Anaemia (haemoglobin ≤11 g/dl) and elevated haemoglobin levels (haemoglobin ≥13.2 g/dl) were defined according to the WHO criteria. Maternal blood pressure, placental function and fetal growth were measured in each trimester. Data on gestational hypertensive disorders and birth outcomes was collected from hospitals. Older maternal age, higher body mass index, primiparity and European descent were associated with higher haemoglobin levels (P pregnancy (mean differences 5.1 mmHg, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.8, 6.5 and 4.1 mmHg, 95% CI 3.0, 5.2, respectively) and with a higher risk of third trimester uterine artery notching (RR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0, 1.7). As compared with maternal normal haemoglobin levels, not anaemia, but elevated haemoglobin levels were associated with fetal head circumference, length, and weight growth restriction from third trimester onwards (P pregnancy. Elevated haemoglobin levels are associated with increased risks of maternal, placental, and fetal complications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Water Level Flux in Household Containers in Vietnam - A Key Determinant of Aedes aegypti Population Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Jason A. L.; Clements, Archie C. A.; Nguyen, Yen Thi; Nguyen, Le Hoang; Tran, Son Hai; Le, Nghia Trung; Vu, Nam Sinh; Ryan, Peter A.; Kay, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    We examined changes in the abundance of immature Aedes aegypti at the household and water storage container level during the dry-season (June-July, 2008) in Tri Nguyen village, central Vietnam. We conducted quantitative immature mosquito surveys of 171 containers in the same 41 households, with replacement of samples, every two days during a 29-day period. We developed multi-level mixed effects regression models to investigate container and household variability in pupal abundance. The percentage of houses that were positive for I/II instars, III/IV instars and pupae during any one survey ranged from 19.5–43.9%, 48.8–75.6% and 17.1–53.7%, respectively. The mean numbers of Ae. aegypti pupae per house ranged between 1.9–12.6 over the study period. Estimates of absolute pupal abundance were highly variable over the 29-day period despite relatively stable weather conditions. Most variability in pupal abundance occurred at the container rather than the household level. A key determinant of Ae. aegypti production was the frequent filling of the containers with water, which caused asynchronous hatching of Ae. aegypti eggs and development of cohorts of immatures. We calculated the probability of the water volume of a large container (>500L) increasing or decreasing by ≥20% to be 0.05 and 0.07 per day, respectively, and for small containers (<500L) to be 0.11 and 0.13 per day, respectively. These human water-management behaviors are important determinants of Ae. aegypti production during the dry season. This has implications for choosing a suitable Wolbachia strain for release as it appears that prolonged egg desiccation does not occur in this village. PMID:22911683

  15. Population-Level Measures to Predict Obesity Burden in Public Schools: Looking Upstream for Midstream Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardene, Wasantha P; Lohrmann, David K; Dickinson, Stephanie; Torabi, Mohammad R

    2016-10-05

    To estimate school-level obesity burden, as reflected in prevalence of obesity, based on the characteristics of students' socioeconomic and geographic environments. Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data. Public schools (N = 504) from 43 of 67 counties in Pennsylvania. Kindergarten through grade 12 students (N = 255 949). School-level obesity prevalence for the year 2014 was calculated from state-mandated student body mass index (BMI) measurements. Eighteen aggregate variables, characterizing schools and counties, were retrieved from federal data sources. Three classification variables-excess weight (BMI ≥ 85th percentile), obesity (BMI ≥ 95th percentile), and severe obesity (BMI > 35% or 120% of 95th percentile)-each with 3 groups of schools (low-, average-, and high-prevalence) were created for discriminant function analysis, based on state mean and standard deviation of school distribution. Analysis tested each classification model to reveal school- and county-level dimensions on which school groups differed from each other. Discriminant functions for obesity, which contained school enrollment, percentage of students receiving free/reduced-price lunch, percentage of black/Hispanic students, school location (suburban/other), percentage of county adults with postsecondary education, and percentage of county adults with obesity, yielded 67.86% correct classification (highest accuracy), compared to 34.23% schools classified by chance alone. In the absence of mandated student BMI screenings, the model developed in this study can be used to identify schools most likely to have high obesity burden and, thereafter, determine dissemination of enhanced resources for the implementation of proven prevention policies and programs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Serum nerve growth factor levels in autistic children in Turkish population: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinçel, Nida; Ünalp, Aycan; Kutlu, Ayşe; Öztürk, Aysel; Uran, Nedret; Ulusoy, Sadık

    2013-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that abnormal levels of serum nerve growth factor (NGF) may represent a serological marker for autistic children who may develop cognitive impairment, regression and finally epilepsy. The objective of this preliminary study was to measure serum NGF concentrations of autistic children and compare these levels with those of healthy children. Consecutive children who were referred to the Paediatric Neurology and Child Psychiatry Policlinics of Dr. Behçet Uz Child Disease and Pediatric Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Turkey between February and September 2008 were included in the study. Serum samples were analyzed for NGF levels using ChemiKine NGF Sandwich ELISA Kit. Comparisons between the study and the control groups were made using student's t test and Chi-square test. Forty-nine autistic children and an equal number of healthy children (control group) were included in the study. No significant difference was found between the study and the control groups in terms of children's age, while number of boys was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the study group. Average serum NGF concentrations were 46.94 ± 51.40 and 32.94 ± 12.48 pg/ml in the study and control group, respectively. Serum NGF concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the study group compared with the control group. Our preliminary findings show that enhanced serum NGF concentration may be used as a potential diagnostic tool in autism, however, further studies including a large number of patients are required to confirm the findings.

  17. Changes of overweight and obesity in the adult Swiss population according to educational level, from 1992 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Bovet, Pascal; Paccaud, Fred; Chiolero, Arnaud

    2010-02-22

    In many high income developed countries, obesity is inversely associated with educational level. In some countries, a widening gap of obesity between educational groups has been reported. The aim of this study was to assess trends in body mass index (BMI) and in prevalence of overweight and obesity and their association with educational level in the adult Swiss population. Four cross-sectional National health interview surveys conducted in 1992/93 (n = 14,521), 1997 (n = 12,474), 2002 (n = 18,908) and 2007 (n = 17,879) using representative samples of the Swiss population (age range 18-102 years). BMI was derived from self-reported data. Overweight was defined as BMI > or = 25 and or = 30 kg/m(2). Mean (+/- standard deviation) BMI increased from 24.7 +/- 3.6 in 1992/3 to 25.4 +/- 3.6 kg/m2 in 2007 in men and 22.8 +/- 3.8 to 23.7 +/- 4.3 kg/m(2) in women. Between 1992/3 and 2007, the prevalence of overweight + obesity increased from 40.4% to 49.5% in men and from 22.3% to 31.3% in women, while the prevalence of obesity increased from 6.3% to 9.4% in men and from 4.9% to 8.5% in women. The rate of increase in the prevalence of obesity was greater between 1992/3 and 2002 (men: +0.26%/year; women: +0.31%/year) than between 2002 and 2007 (men: +0.10%/year; women: +0.10%/year). A sizable fraction (approximately 25%) of the increasing mean BMI was due to increasing age of the participants over time. The increase was larger in low than high education strata of the population. BMI was strongly associated with low educational level among women and this gradient remained fairly constant over time. A weaker similar gradient by educational level was apparent in men, but it tended to increase over time. In Switzerland, overweight and obesity increased between 1992 and 2007 and was associated with low education status in both men and women. A trend towards a stabilization of mean BMI levels was noted in most age categories since 2002. The increase in the prevalence of obesity was

  18. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: II. Organism and population-level endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Filipe O; Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to test the performance of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in chronic sediment toxicity tests. It constitutes part of a multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments, integrating organism and population-level endpoints with biochemical markers responses. Here we account for organism and population-level effects, while biomarker responses were reported in a companion article. Five moderately contaminated sediments from Sado and Tagus estuaries were tested, comprising 3 muddy and 2 sandy sediments. These sediments either did not show acute toxicity or were diluted with control sediment as much as required to remove acute toxicity. Subsequent chronic tests consisted of 28-day exposures with survival, individual growth and reproductive traits as endpoints. Two of the muddy sediments induced higher growth rates in the amphipods, and improved reproductive traits. This was understood to be a consequence of the amount of organic matter in the sediment, which was nutritionally beneficial to the amphipods, while concurrently decreasing contaminant bioavailability. Biomarker responses did not reveal toxicant-induced stress in amphipods exposed to these sediments. One of the sandy sediments was acutely toxic at 50% dilution, but in contrast stimulated amphipod growth when diluted 75%. This was presumed to be an indication of a hormetic response. Finally the two remaining contaminated sediments showed pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting survival and reproduction. The sex ratio of survivors was highly biased towards females, and offspring production was severely impaired. The particulars of the responses of this amphipod were examined, as well as strengths versus limitations of the sediment test. This study illustrates the utility of this chronic test for toxicity assessment of contaminated estuarine sediments, with potential application all along Atlantic Europe.

  19. Effect of La substitution on thermopower in Kondo lattice CeNiAl{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, A., E-mail: ankow@ifmpan.poznan.pl; Falkowski, M.; Toliński, T.

    2015-11-01

    The temperature dependence of the thermopower S(T) for Ce{sub 1−x}La{sub x}NiAl{sub 4} alloys have been studied. Thermopower of CeNiAl{sub 4} Kondo lattice system has larger value than for usual metals, reflecting enhanced electronic density of states near the Fermi level. In comparison to CeNiAl{sub 4}, the substitution of Ce by La drastically reduces the S(T) values. The S(T) dependence of Ce{sub 1−x}La{sub x}NiAl{sub 4} exhibits positive or negative peaks around 30–40 K. The peak position and its absolute value depend on the La content. The S(T) shows a strong temperature dependence at low temperatures, which is consistent with the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity. Additionally, it is observed that the applied magnetic field slightly reduces the S(T) values. - Highlights: • Negative thermopower for CeNiAl{sub 4} after substituting Ce with La. • Heavy fermion behaviour at low temperatures. • Magnetic field reduces the thermopower values. • Predomination of the energy scale determined by the Kondo temperature.

  20. Liverpool Active City 2005-2010: Increasing Population Physical Activity Levels Through Intersectoral Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jon; Huikuri, Suvi; Armada, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    The process of working together across sectors to improve health and to influence its determinants is often referred to as intersectoral action for health. The Liverpool Active City strategy and action plan were launched in 2005, bringing together partners from diverse sectors such as education, transport, and civil society to boost levels of physical activity among the city's residents. The research material was based on semistructured interviews with key stakeholders and on review and analysis of gray literature and media reports. A case-study method was used to analyze the experience. The results show that Liverpool Active City succeeded in boosting levels of physical activity among the city's residents and demonstrate how intersectoral action benefited the goals of the program and promoted common aims. Important lessons can be drawn from the experience of Liverpool Active City for public health professionals and policy makers. Success factors include the involvement of a broad range of agencies from a variety of sectors, which reinforced the sense of partnership in the physical activity agenda and supported the implementation of activities. The experience also demonstrated how intersectoral action brought benefits to the physical activity goals of Liverpool Active City.

  1. Systems science and obesity policy: a novel framework for analyzing and rethinking population-level planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lee M; Matteson, Carrie L; Finegood, Diane T

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate the use of a systems-based framework to assess solutions to complex health problems such as obesity. We coded 12 documents published between 2004 and 2013 aimed at influencing obesity planning for complex systems design (9 reports from US and Canadian governmental or health authorities, 1 Cochrane review, and 2 Institute of Medicine reports). We sorted data using the intervention-level framework (ILF), a novel solutions-oriented approach to complex problems. An in-depth comparison of 3 documents provides further insight into complexity and systems design in obesity policy. The majority of strategies focused mainly on changing the determinants of energy imbalance (food intake and physical activity). ILF analysis brings to the surface actions aimed at higher levels of system function and points to a need for more innovative policy design. Although many policymakers acknowledge obesity as a complex problem, many strategies stem from the paradigm of individual choice and are limited in scope. The ILF provides a template to encourage natural systems thinking and more strategic policy design grounded in complexity science.

  2. The Relationship Between Structural Game Characteristics and Gambling Behavior: A Population-Level Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leino, Tony; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Blaszczynski, Alex; Griffiths, Mark; Mentzoni, Rune; Pallesen, Ståle; Molde, Helge

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the structural characteristics and gambling behavior among video lottery terminal (VLT) gamblers. The study was ecological valid, because the data consisted of actual gambling behavior registered in the participants natural gambling environment without intrusion by researchers. Online behavioral tracking data from Multix, an eight game video lottery terminal, were supplied by Norsk-Tipping (the state owned gambling company in Norway). The sample comprised the entire population of Multix gamblers (N = 31,109) who had gambled in January 2010. The individual number of bets made across games was defined as the dependent variable, reward characteristics of a game (i.e., payback percentage, hit frequency, size of winnings and size of jackpot) and bet characteristics of a game (i.e., range of betting options and availability of advanced betting options) served as the independent variables. Control variables were age and gender. Two separate cross-classified multilevel random intercepts models were used to analyze the relationship between bets made, reward characteristics and bet characteristics, where the number of bets was nested within both individuals and within games. The results show that the number of bets is positively associated with payback percentage, hit frequency, being female and age, and negatively associated with size of wins and range of available betting options. In summary, the results show that the reward characteristics and betting options explained 27% and 15% of the variance in the number of bets made, respectively. It is concluded that structural game characteristics affect gambling behavior. Implications of responsible gambling are discussed.

  3. Associations and dynamics of Vibrionaceae in the environment, from the genus to the population level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison F Takemura

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Vibrionaceae, which encompasses several potential pathogens, including V. cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, and V. vulnificus, the deadliest seafood-borne pathogen, are a well-studied family of marine bacteria that thrive in a diverse habitats. To elucidate the environmental conditions under which vibrios proliferate, numerous studies have examined correlations with bulk environmental variables – e.g., temperature, salinity, nitrogen and phosphate – and association with potential host organisms. However, how meaningful these environmental associations are remains unclear because data are fragmented across studies with variable sampling and analysis methods. Here, we synthesize findings about Vibrio correlations and physical associations using a framework of increasingly fine environmental and taxonomic scales, to better understand their dynamics in the wild. We first conduct a meta-analysis to determine trends with respect to bulk water environmental variables, and find that while temperature and salinity are generally strongly predictive correlates, other parameters are inconsistent and overall patterns depend on taxonomic resolution. Based on the hypothesis that dynamics may better correlate with more narrowly defined niches, we review evidence for specific association with plants, algae, zooplankton, and animals. We find that Vibrio are attached to many organisms, though evidence for enrichment compared to the water column is often lacking. Additionally, contrary to the notion that they flourish predominantly while attached, Vibrio can have, at least temporarily, a free-living lifestyle and even engage in massive blooms. Fine-scale sampling from the water column has enabled identification of such lifestyle preferences for ecologically cohesive populations, and future efforts will benefit from similar analysis at fine genetic and environmental sampling scales to describe the conditions, habitats, and resources shaping Vibrio

  4. Awareness and perceived fairness of Option B+ in Malawi: A population-level perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeatman, Sara; Trinitapoli, Jenny

    2017-03-08

    Policies for rationing antiretroviral therapy (ART) have been subject to on-going ethical debates. Introduced in Malawi in 2011, Option B+ prioritized HIV-positive pregnant women for lifelong ART regardless of the underlying state of their immune system, shifting the logic of allocation away from medical eligibility. Despite the rapid expansion of this policy, we know little about how it has been understood and interpreted by the people it affects. We assessed awareness and perceived fairness of the prioritization system for ART among a population-based sample of young women (n = 1440) and their partners (n = 574) in southern Malawi. We use a card-sort technique to elicit understandings of who gets ART under Option B+ and who should be prioritized, and we compare perceptions to actual ART policy using sequence analysis and optimal matching. We then use ordered logistic regression to identify the factors associated with policy awareness. In 2015, only 30.7% of women and 21.1% of male partners understood how ART was being distributed. There was widespread confusion around whether otherwise healthy HIV-positive pregnant women could access ART under Option B + . Nonetheless, more young adults thought that the fairest policy should prioritize such women than believed the actual policy did. Women who were older, more educated or had recently engaged with the health system through antenatal care or ART had more accurate understandings of Option B + . Among men, policy awareness was lower, and was patterned only by education. Although most respondents were unaware that Option B+ afforded ART access to healthy-pregnant women, Malawians support the prioritization of pregnant women. Countries adopting Option B+ or other new ART policies such as universal test-and-treat should communicate the policies and their rationales to the public - such transparency would be more consistent with a fair and ethical process and could additionally serve to clarify confusion and

  5. Econometric Modelling of Influence of Level of the Social and Economic Infrastructure On Quality of Life of the Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Ilchenko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the index approach to an estimation of situational multifactor economic categories is considered: a level of development of a social and economic infrastructure of region and population living conditions. Author’s mathematical models of formation of the integrated estimated indexes formulated on principles of the factorial analysis of hierarchies are used. The constructed estimated integrated indexes form a basis of ranging of territories, both in an annual cut and in dynamics on years that, in turn, allows to analyse the change in ratings of territories (during 5-10 years: on a level of development of an infrastructure and quality of life of the population. Authors give results of computer modelling of an index of development of a social and economic infrastructure. Here authors use additional parameters for the measurement of an index of capital investments in an infrastructure. Further, authors model an index of quality of life of the population. Here the methods used are the analysis of hierarchies, the factorial analysis and a method of the main things a component. Then the interrelation analysis between tendencies of change of indexes through comparison of ranks of territories is made. Theoretical offers of authors are accompanied by quantitative results of modelling experiments on materials of 30 Chinese provinces for the period of 10 years period.

  6. Elevated levels of selenium in the typical diet of Amazonian riverside populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemire, Melanie, E-mail: lemire.melanie@courrier.uqam.ca [Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire sur la biologie, la sante, la societe et l' environnement (CINBIOSE), Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Fillion, Myriam [Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire sur la biologie, la sante, la societe et l' environnement (CINBIOSE), Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Barbosa, Fernando [Depto. de Analises Clinicas, Toxicologicas e Bromatologicas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Guimaraes, Jean Remy Davee [Instituto de Biofisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Mergler, Donna [Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire sur la biologie, la sante, la societe et l' environnement (CINBIOSE), Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal (Canada)

    2010-09-01

    Selenium (Se) intake is generally from food, whose Se content depends on soil Se and plant accumulation. For humans, adequate Se intake is essential for several selenoenzymes. In the Lower Tapajos region of the Brazilian Amazon, Se status is elevated with large inter-community variability. Se intake in this region, where Hg exposure is among the highest in the world, may be important to counteract mercury (Hg) toxicity. The present study was conducted in 2006 with 155 persons from four communities of the Lower Tapajos. The objectives were: i) to evaluate Se content in their typical diet and drinking water; ii) to compare food Se concentrations with respect to geographic location; and iii) to examine the contribution of consumption of different food items to blood Se. More than 400 local foods and 40 drinking water samples were collected. Participants responded to an interview-administered food frequency questionnaire and provided blood samples. Food, water and blood Se levels were assessed by ICP-MS. Since Brazil nuts may also contain significant levels of barium (Ba) and strontium (Sr), these elements were likewise analyzed in nuts. The highest Se concentrations were found in Brazil nuts, but concentrations were highly variable (median: 13.9 {mu}g/g; range: 0.4-158.4 {mu}g/g). Chicken, game meat, eggs and beef also contained considerable levels of Se, with median concentrations from 0.3 to 1.4 {mu}g/g. There was no particular geographic distribution of food Se. Se concentration in drinking water was very low (< 1.4 {mu}g/L). Blood Se covered a (103-1500 {mu}g/L), and was positively related to regular consumption of Brazil nuts, domestic chicken and game meat. Brazil nuts were found to contain highly variable and often very high concentrations of Ba (88.0 {mu}g/g, 1.9-1437 {mu}g/g) and Sr (38.7 {mu}g/g, 3.3-173 {mu}g/g). Further studies should address multiple nutrient/toxic interactions in the diet and related effects on health.

  7. Public health economic evaluation of different European Union-level policy options aimed at reducing population dietary trans fat intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Saborido, Carlos; Mouratidou, Theodora; Livaniou, Anastasia; Caldeira, Sandra; Wollgast, Jan

    2016-11-01

    The adverse relation between dietary trans fatty acid (TFA) intake and coronary artery disease risk is well established. Many countries in the European Union (EU) and worldwide have implemented different policies to reduce the TFA intake of their populations. The aim of this study was to assess the added value of EU-level action by estimating the cost-effectiveness of 3 possible EU-level policy measures to reduce population dietary TFA intake. This was calculated against a reference situation of not implementing any EU-level policy (i.e., by assuming only national or self-regulatory measures). We developed a mathematical model to compare different policy options at the EU level: 1) to do nothing beyond the current state (reference situation), 2) to impose mandatory TFA labeling of prepackaged foods, 3) to seek voluntary agreements toward further reducing industrially produced TFA (iTFA) content in foods, and 4) to impose a legislative limit for iTFA content in foods. The model indicated that to impose an EU-level legal limit or to make voluntary agreements may, over the course of a lifetime (85 y), avoid the loss of 3.73 and 2.19 million disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), respectively, and save >51 and 23 billion euros when compared with the reference situation. Implementing mandatory TFA labeling can also avoid the loss of 0.98 million DALYs, but this option incurs more costs than it saves compared with the reference option. The model indicates that there is added value of an EU-level action, either via a legal limit or through voluntary agreements, with the legal limit option producing the highest additional health benefits. Introducing mandatory TFA labeling for the EU common market may provide some additional health benefits; however, this would likely not be a cost-effective strategy.

  8. Elevated plasma vitamin B12 levels and risk of venous thromboembolism among cancer patients: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Johan Frederik Håkonsen; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Pedersen, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2017-08-01

    Both venous thromboembolism (VTE) and high plasma vitamin B12 levels (cobalamin, Cbl) are markers of occult cancer and aggressive cancer with a poor prognosis. In this population-based cohort study, we assessed VTE risk among cancer patients with high plasma Cbl levels. We used Danish health registries to identify a Cb1 cohort of 25,310 cancer patients with a plasma Cbl measurement prior to cancer diagnosis. The cohort was subdivided according to Cbl levels (pmol/L): 200-600 (population reference range), 601-800 and >800. All VTE events were considered provoked and categorised as either cancer-associated if no other provoking factors were present before VTE or provoked by other risk factors (surgery, trauma, or pregnancy). We calculated cumulative incidence proportions and adjusted hazard ratios computed from Cox regression analysis (reference: plasma Cbl of 200-600pmol/L) for the risk of VTE before and after the cancer diagnosis date (index date). The risk of cancer-associated VTE 30days after index date increased with higher Cbl levels. The cumulative incidence (95% CI) by Cbl levels was: 200-600pmol/L: 0.24 (0.18-0.31); 601-800pmol/L: 0.63 (0.34-1.09); >800pmol/L: 0.86 (0.49-1.40). Adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) were: 601-800 vs. 200-600: 2.55 (1.32-4.92); >800 vs. 200-600: 2.36 (1.19-4.71). We found similar results for VTE provoked by other risk factors and for VTE occurring before index date, but scarcity of events produced uncertain risk estimates. We demonstrated an association between high plasma Cbl levels and risk of VTE in cancer patients. Any clinical implications warrant further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnosing dental caries in populations with different levels of dental fluorosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvad, Bente; Machiulskiene, Vita; Fejerskov, Ole

    2009-01-01

    concentrations of 0.3 and 1.1 ppm (0.3 and 1.1 mg/l) fluoride, respectively, 150 children were clinically examined twice, 2 wk apart, for dental fluorosis, using the Thylstrup-Fejerskov index (TF index), and for dental caries using the Nyvad visual-tactile caries criteria. The prevalence of dental fluorosis......, a pronounced dental fluorosis background did not reduce the reliability of the caries recordings, which appeared to be slightly less reliable at very low levels of dental fluorosis.......The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of the Nyvad visual-tactile caries-diagnostic criteria when used among children who have been lifelong residents in areas with 'optimal' or low concentrations of fluoride in the drinking water. In each of two areas with drinking water fluoride...

  10. Nutrient Patterns Associated with Fasting Glucose and Glycated Haemoglobin Levels in a Black South African Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikowore, Tinashe; Pisa, Pedro T.; van Zyl, Tertia; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Wentzel-Viljoen, Edelweiss; Conradie, Karin R.

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) burden is increasing globally. However, evidence regarding nutrient patterns associated with the biomarkers of T2D is limited. This study set out to determine the nutrient patterns associated with fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin the biomarkers of T2D. Factor analysis was used to derive nutrient patterns of 2010 participants stratified by urban/rural status and gender. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to 25 nutrients, computed from the quantified food frequency questionnaires (QFFQ). Three nutrient patterns per stratum, which accounted for 73% of the variation of the selected nutrients, were identified. Multivariate linear regression models adjusted for age, BMI, smoking, physical activity, education attained, alcohol intake, seasonality and total energy intake were computed. Starch, dietary fibre and B vitamins driven nutrient pattern was significantly associated with fasting glucose (β = −0.236 (−0.458; −0.014); p = 0.037) and glycated haemoglobin levels (β = −0.175 (−0.303; −0.047); p = 0.007) in rural women. Thiamine, zinc and plant protein driven nutrient pattern was associated with significant reductions in glycated haemoglobin and fasting glucose ((β = −0.288 (−0.543; −0.033); p = 0.027) and (β = −0.382 (−0.752; −0.012); p = 0.043), respectively) in rural men. Our results indicate that plant driven nutrient patterns are associated with low fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin levels. PMID:28106816

  11. Nutrient Patterns Associated with Fasting Glucose and Glycated Haemoglobin Levels in a Black South African Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinashe Chikowore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D burden is increasing globally. However, evidence regarding nutrient patterns associated with the biomarkers of T2D is limited. This study set out to determine the nutrient patterns associated with fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin the biomarkers of T2D. Factor analysis was used to derive nutrient patterns of 2010 participants stratified by urban/rural status and gender. Principal Component Analysis (PCA was applied to 25 nutrients, computed from the quantified food frequency questionnaires (QFFQ. Three nutrient patterns per stratum, which accounted for 73% of the variation of the selected nutrients, were identified. Multivariate linear regression models adjusted for age, BMI, smoking, physical activity, education attained, alcohol intake, seasonality and total energy intake were computed. Starch, dietary fibre and B vitamins driven nutrient pattern was significantly associated with fasting glucose (β = −0.236 (−0.458; −0.014; p = 0.037 and glycated haemoglobin levels (β = −0.175 (−0.303; −0.047; p = 0.007 in rural women. Thiamine, zinc and plant protein driven nutrient pattern was associated with significant reductions in glycated haemoglobin and fasting glucose ((β = −0.288 (−0.543; −0.033; p = 0.027 and (β = −0.382 (−0.752; −0.012; p = 0.043, respectively in rural men. Our results indicate that plant driven nutrient patterns are associated with low fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin levels.

  12. CE--Isep-fe-mber

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    appearing to bring adequate information or expertise to bear on it. Consider, for example, the proposal that we obtain in- formation about the distribution of the population from which a sample was drawn, by sampling from the sam- ple. On the surface, this appears to be a pointless exer- cise; we can't get any more statistical ...

  13. Genetic structure of different cat populations in Europe and South America at a microgeographic level: importance of the choice of an adequate sampling level in the accuracy of population genetics interpretations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ruiz-Garcia

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic markers, coat color, pattern and hair length, of natural domestic cat populations observed in four cities (Barcelona, Catalonia; Palma Majorca, Balearic Islands; Rimini, Italy and Buenos Aires, Argentina were studied at a microgeographical level. Various population genetics techniques revealed that the degree of genetic differentiation between populations of Felis catus within these cities is relatively low, when compared with that found between populations of other mammals. Two different levels of sampling were used. One was that of "natural" colonies of cat families living together in specific points within the cities, and the other referred to "artificial" subpopulations, or groups of colonies, inhabiting the same district within a city. For the two sampling levels, some of the results were identical: 1 little genic heterogeneity, 2 existence of panmixia, 3 similar levels of expected heterozygosity in all populations analyzed, 4 no spatial autocorrelation, with certain differentiation in the Buenos Aires population compared to the others, and 5 very high correlations between colonies and subpopulations with the first factors from a Q factor analysis. Nevertheless, other population genetic statistics were greatly affected by the differential choice of sampling level. This was the case for: 1 the amount of heterogeneity of the FST and GST statistics between the cities, which was greater at the subpopulation level than at colony level, 2 the existence of correlations between genic differentiation statistics and size variables at subpopulation level, but not at the colony level, and 3 the relationships between the genetic variables and the principal factors of the R factorial analysis. This suggests that care should be taken in the choice of the sampling unit, for inferences on population genetics to be valid at the microgeographical level.Os marcadores fenotípicos cor da pelagem, padrão e comprimento dos pelos de popula

  14. CE: Triglycerides: Do They Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordo, Kristine; Pickett, Kim Anne

    2017-01-01

    : Since the introduction of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, also known as statins, as an adjunct to diet in the treatment of hyperlipidemia and the greater emphasis placed on reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in the prevention of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), there has been less focus on the value of lowering serum triglyceride levels. Many patients are aware of their "good" and "bad" cholesterol levels, but they may not be aware of their triglyceride level or of the association between high triglycerides and the development of CVD. In recent years, however, in light of the increasing incidences of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, lowering triglyceride levels has gained renewed interest. In addition to the focus on lowering LDL cholesterol levels in CVD prevention, clinicians need to be aware of the role of triglycerides-their contribution to CVD, and the causes and treatment of hypertriglyceridemia.

  15. Complex charge ordering in CeRuSn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feyerherm, R.; Dudzik, E.; Valencia, S.; Mydosh, J.A.; Huang, Y.K.; Hermes, W.; Pöttgen, R.

    2012-01-01

    At ambient temperatures, CeRuSn exhibits an extraordinary structure with a coexistence of two types of Ce ions in a metallic environment, namely trivalent Ce3+ and intermediate valent Ce(4−δ)+. Charge ordering produces a doubling of the unit cell along the c axis with respect to the basic monoclinic

  16. Genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, W-M; Zhang, H-F; Zhu, Z-Y; Zhou, Y-L; Liang, N-X; Xu, D-J; Zhou, F; Sheng, Y-H; Yang, R; Gong, L; Yin, Z-J; Chen, F-K; Cao, K-J; Li, X-L

    2013-04-01

    Elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and increased arterial stiffness are associated with cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have reported an association between levels of circulating triglycerides and arterial stiffness. We used Mendelian randomization to test whether this association is causal. We investigated the association between circulating triglyceride levels, the apolipoprotein A-V (ApoA5) -1131T>C single nucleotide polymorphism and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) by examining data from 4421 subjects aged 18-74 years who were recruited from the Chinese population. baPWV was significantly associated with the levels of circulating triglycerides after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure, heart rate, waist-to-hip ratio, antihypertensive treatment and diabetes mellitus status. The -1131C allele was associated with a 5% (95% confidence interval 3-8%) increase in circulating triglycerides (adjusted for age, sex, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, diabetes mellitus and antihypertensive treatment). Instrumental variable analysis showed that genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides were not associated with increased baPWV. These results do not support the hypothesis that levels of circulating triglycerides have a causal role in the development of arterial stiffness.

  17. Predicting the population-level impact of mitigating harbor porpoise bycatch with pingers and time-area fishing closures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Beest, Floris; Kindt-Larsen, Lotte; Bastardie, Francois

    2017-01-01

    efficiency) on the population size using the inner Danish waters as a biological system. The model incorporated empirical data on gillnet fishing effort and noise avoidance behavior by free-ranging harbor porpoises exposed to randomized high-frequency (20- to 160-kHz) pinger signals. The IBM simulations...... and protected marine top predator, involves the use of pingers (acoustic alarms that emit underwater noise) and time-area fishing closures. Although these mitigation measures can reduce harbor porpoise bycatch in gillnet fisheries considerably, inference about the long-term population-level consequences...... revealed a synergistic relationship between the implementation of time-area fishing closures and pinger deployment. Time-area fishing closures reduced bycatch rates substantially but not completely. In contrast, widespread pinger deployment resulted in total mitigation of bycatch but frequent and recurrent...

  18. Demographic and spatial disparity in HIV prevalence among incarcerated population in the US: A state-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Srimoyee

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore empirically the presence of any spatial and demographic disparity in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection rate among the prison inmates across 48 states in the US and compare the results for 2000 and 2010. HIV infection is a severe health issue for incarcerated populations in the US. In 2010, the rate of diagnosed HIV infection among inmates in state and federal prisons was five times more than the nonincarcerated population. The National Prisoner Statistics database was used to find the demographic disparities in HIV prevalence rate based on incarceration rate, gender, race/ethnicity, the proportion of non-US citizens, and proportion of population below 18 years. State-level spatial mapping, Pearson correlation coefficient, and Moran's I statistic (univariate and bivariate) were computed based on these demographic characteristics using QGIS and Geoda software. There was a statistically significant pattern of spatial disparity in overall, male and female HIV infection rates across the state prisoners, with South and South-Eastern states facing a higher risk of infection. There was also statistically significant bivariate spatial association of HIV infection rate with the covariates: whites (negative), blacks (positive), non-US citizen (positive), and prisoners under age 18 years (positive) for both 2000 and 2010. There was a statistically significant higher HIV infection rate among the female prisoners in comparison to the male prisoners. It is of prime importance to examine the state-level disparities in HIV infection rate based on place and demographics. This is because evaluating the spatial pattern will help in accessing the relevant local information and provide federal agencies with better knowledge to target interventions and prevention programs toward the subgroup of the population at higher risk and help in controlling and reducing HIV infection prevalence.

  19. Prevalence and costs of multimorbidity by deprivation levels in the basque country: a population based study using health administrative databases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Orueta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity is a major challenge for healthcare systems. However, currently, its magnitude and impact in healthcare expenditures is still mostly unknown. OBJECTIVE: To present an overview of the prevalence and costs of multimorbidity by socioeconomic levels in the whole Basque population. METHODS: We develop a cross-sectional analysis that includes all the inhabitants of the Basque Country (N=2,262,698. We utilize data from primary health care electronic medical records, hospital admissions, and outpatient care databases, corresponding to a 4 year period. Multimorbidity was defined as the presence of two or more chronic diseases out of a list of 52 of the most important and common chronic conditions given in the literature. We also use socioeconomic and demographic variables such as age, sex, individual healthcare cost, and deprivation level. Predicted adjusted costs were obtained by log-gamma regression models. RESULTS: Multimorbidity of chronic diseases was found among 23.61% of the total Basque population and among 66.13% of those older than 65 years. Multimorbid patients account for 63.55% of total healthcare expenditures. Prevalence of multimorbidity is higher in the most deprived areas for all age and sex groups. The annual cost of healthcare per patient generated for any chronic disease depends on the number of coexisting comorbidities, and varies from 637 € for the first pathology in average to 1,657 € for the ninth one. CONCLUSION: Multimorbidity is very common for the Basque population and its prevalence rises in age, and unfavourable socioeconomic environment. The costs of care for chronic patients with several conditions cannot be described as the sum of their individual pathologies in average. They usually increase dramatically according to the number of comorbidities. Given the ageing population, multimorbidity and its consequences should be taken into account in healthcare policy, the organization of care and

  20. Type 1 diabetes, quality of life, occupational status and education level - A comparative population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Helena B; Ovesen, Louise L; Mortensen, Laust H; Lau, Cathrine J; Joensen, Lene E

    2016-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes requires extensive self-management to avoid complications and may have negative effects on the everyday life of people with the disease. The aim of this study was to compare adults with type 1 diabetes to the general population in terms of health-related quality of life, occupational status (level of employment, working hours and sick leave) and education level. 2415 adults (aged 18-98years) with type 1 diabetes were compared to 48,511 adults (aged 18-103years) from the general population. Data were obtained from two cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2010 and 2011 of adults living or treated in the Capital Region in Denmark. Differences between adults with type 1 diabetes and the general population were standardised for age and sex and analyzed using linear probability models and negative binomial regression. Differences were further analyzed in subgroups. Compared to the general population, adults with type 1 diabetes experienced lower health-related quality of life, were more frequently unemployed, had more sick leave per year and were slightly better educated. Differences in health-related quality of life and employment increased with age and were larger among women, as compared to men. No significant differences were found with regard to working hours. Our findings suggest that type 1 diabetes is associated with lower health-related quality of life, higher unemployment and additional sick leave. The negative association with type 1 diabetes is more pronounced in women and older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic association of ADIPOQ gene variants with type 2 diabetes, obesity and serum adiponectin levels in south Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, Kandaswamy; Ayyappa, Kuppuswamy Ashok; Ghosh, Saurabh; Mohan, Viswanathan; Radha, Venkatesan

    2013-12-15

    To investigate the genetic association of eight variants of the adiponectin gene with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity and serum adiponectin level in the south Indian population. The study comprised of 1100 normal glucose tolerant (NGT) and 1100 type 2 diabetic, unrelated subjects randomly selected from the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES), in southern India. Fasting serum adiponectin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The variants were screened by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Linkage disequilibrium was estimated from the estimates of haplotype frequencies. Of the 8 variants, four SNPs namely, +276 G/T (rs1501299), -4522 C/T (rs822393), -11365 C/G (rs266729), and +712 G/A (rs3774261) were significantly associated with T2DM in our study population. The -3971 A/G (rs822396) and -11391 G/A (rs17300539) SNPs' association with T2DM diabetes was mediated through obesity (where the association with type 2 diabetes was lost after adjusting for BMI). There was an independent association of +276 G/T (rs1501299) and -3971 A/G (rs822396) SNPs with generalized obesity and +349 A/G (rs2241767) with central obesity. Four SNPs, -3971 A/G (rs822396), +276 G/T (rs1501299), -4522 C/T (rs822393) and Y111H T/C (rs17366743) were significantly associated with hypoadiponectinemia. The haplotypes GCCATGAAT and AGCGTGGGT conferred lower risk of T2DM in this south Indian population. The adiponectin gene variants and haplotype contribute to the genetic risk towards the development of type 2 diabetes, obesity and hypoadiponectinemia in the south Indian population. © 2013.

  2. Genome of the Netherlands population-specific imputations identify an ABCA6 variant associated with cholesterol levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Karssen, Lennart C.; Deelen, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Variants associated with blood lipid levels may be population-specific. To identify low-frequency variants associated with this phenotype, population-specific reference panels may be used. Here we impute nine large Dutch biobanks (∼35,000 samples) with the population-specific reference panel crea...

  3. Organ-level quorum sensing directs regeneration in hair stem cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Lei; Plikus, Maksim V.; Jiang, Ting Xin; Murray, Philip J.; Ramos, Raul; Guerrero-Juarez, Christian F.; Hughes, Michael W; Lee, Oscar K.; Shi, Songtao; Widelitz, Randall B.; Lander, Arthur D.; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Coordinated organ behavior is crucial for an effective response to environmental stimuli. By studying regeneration of hair follicles in response to patterned hair removal, we demonstrate that organ-level quorum sensing allows coordinated responses to skin injury. Removing hair at different densities leads to a regeneration of up to 5 times more neighboring, unplucked resting hairs, indicating activation of a collective decision-making process. Through data modeling, the range of the quorum signal was estimated to be on the order of 1 mm, greater than expected for a diffusible molecular cue. Molecular and genetic analysis uncovered a two-step mechanism, where release of CCL2 from injured hairs leads to recruitment of TNF-α secreting macrophages, which accumulate and signal to both plucked and unplucked follicles. By coupling immune response with regeneration, this mechanism allows skin to respond predictively to distress, disregarding mild injury, while meeting stronger injury with full-scale cooperative activation of stem cells. PMID:25860610

  4. Launching a salt substitute to reduce blood pressure at the population level: a cluster randomized stepped wedge trial in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Gilman, Robert H; Cárdenas, María K; Sacksteder, Katherine A; Miranda, J Jaime

    2014-03-25

    Controlling hypertension rates and maintaining normal blood pressure, particularly in resource-constrained settings, represent ongoing challenges of effective and affordable implementation in health care. One of the strategies being largely advocated to improve high blood pressure calls for salt reduction strategies. This study aims to estimate the impact of a population-level intervention based on sodium reduction and potassium increase - in practice, introducing a low-sodium, high-potassium salt substitute - on adult blood pressure levels. The proposed implementation research study includes two components: Phase 1, an exploratory component, and Phase 2, an intervention component. The exploratory component involves a triangle taste test and a formative research study designed to gain an understanding of the best implementation methods. Phase 2 involves a pragmatic stepped wedge trial design where the intervention will be progressively implemented in several clusters starting the intervention randomly at different times. In addition, we will evaluate the implementation strategy using a cost-effectiveness analysis. This is the first project in a Latin-American setting to implement a salt substitution intervention at the population level to tackle high blood pressure. Data generated and lessons learnt from this study will provide a strong platform to address potential interventions applicable to other similar low- and middle-income settings. This study is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01960972.

  5. Role of Assay Type in Determining Free 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels in Diverse Populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Carrie M.; Jones, Kerry S.; Chun, Rene F.; Jacobs, Jon; Wang, Ying; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.; Swanson, Christine M.; Lee, Christine G.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Pauwels, Steven; Prentice, Ann; Smith, Richard D.; Shi, Tujin; Gao, Yuqian; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Lapidus, Jodi; Cauley, Jane A.; Bouillon, Roger; Schoenmakers, Inez; Orwoll, Eric S.

    2016-04-28

    Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) is the most frequently used marker of vitamin D status. Low 25OHD is associated with bone loss, fractures {Cauley, 2010 #1516;Ensrud, 2009 #1517}, and other adverse health outcomes {Theodoratou, 2014 #1518}. Most extra renal tissues only have access to free 25OHD, and free 25OHD concentration is thus a plausible biomarker of 25OHD availability and function {Johnsen, 2014 #1443;Chun, 2014 #1343}. Stronger associations with free or bioavailable 25OHD than with total 25OHD were reported for serum calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH) {Bhan, 2012 #1124} and bone mineral density (BMD) {Powe, 2011 #1129}. These findings have led to the suggestion that free or bioavailable 25OHD may provide a more clinically relevant measure of tissue 25OHD availability and vitamin D status {Powe, 2013 #1369; Holick NEJM 2013 editorial}. The US Preventive Services Task Force (LeFevre 2015) recently pointed to the gap in research regarding bioavailable and free 25OHD and noted the possibility that these may be better markers of tissue 25OHD availability. Free 25OHD is conventionally calculated from the concentrations of total 25OHD, vitamin D binding protein (DBP) and albumin, with or without a factor accounting for DBP genotype-specific binding affinities {Bouillon, 1981 #1207;Chun, 2012 #1143; Powe, 2011 #1129;Johnsen, 2014 #1443}. DBP—or Group specific component (GC) {Hirschfeld, 1959 #1468}—polymorphisms (rs4588 and rs7041) give rise to three major polymorphic isoforms of DBP, GC-1F, GC-1S and GC-2, the frequencies of which differ globally, with GC-1F alleles more common in populations of African descent {Kambou, 1986 #1122}. Although DBP is a primary component of free and bioavailable 25OHD calculations, substantial variation in DBP between assays has been noted (Powe suggest to cite here previous publications as in previous version of this Ms). Using DBP measured by a monoclonal antibody Powe et al. {Powe, 2013 #1369} concluded that calculated free

  6. A population level atlas of Mus musculus craniofacial skeleton and automated image-based shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, A Murat; Tustison, Nicholas J; Avants, Brian B

    2017-09-01

    few cervical vertebrae. We have been using this template in our lab to segment and isolate cranial structures in an automated fashion from a mixed population of mice, including craniofacial mutants, aged 4-12.5 weeks. As a secondary contribution, we demonstrate an application of nearly automated shape analysis, using symmetric diffeomorphic image registration. This approach, which we call diGPA, closely approximates the popular generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA) but negates the collection of anatomical landmarks. We achieve our goals by using the open-source advanced normalization tools (ANT) image quantification library, as well as its associated R library (ANTsR) for statistical image analysis. Finally, we make a plea to investigators to commit to using open imaging standards and software in their labs to the extent possible to increase the potential for data exchange and improve the reproducibility of findings. Future work will incorporate more anatomical detail (such as individual cranial bones, turbinals, dentition, middle ear ossicles) and more diversity into the template. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  7. Species-level view of population structure and gene flow for a critically endangered primate (Varecia variegata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Andrea L; Holmes, Sheila M; Johnson, Steig E; Engberg, Shannon E; Louis, Edward E; Bradley, Brenda J

    2014-01-01

    Lemurs are among the world's most threatened mammals. The critically endangered black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata), in particular, has recently experienced rapid population declines due to habitat loss, ecological sensitivities to habitat degradation, and extensive human hunting pressure. Despite this, a recent study indicates that ruffed lemurs retain among the highest levels of genetic diversity for primates. Identifying how this diversity is apportioned and whether gene flow is maintained among remnant populations will help to diagnose and target conservation priorities. We sampled 209 individuals from 19 sites throughout the remaining V. variegata range. We used 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci and ∼550 bp of mtDNA sequence data to evaluate genetic structure and population dynamics, including dispersal patterns and recent population declines. Bayesian cluster analyses identified two distinct genetic clusters, which optimally partitioned data into populations occurring on either side of the Mangoro River. Localities north of the Mangoro were characterized by greater genetic diversity, greater gene flow (lower genetic differentiation) and higher mtDNA haplotype and nucleotide diversity than those in the south. Despite this, genetic differentiation across all sites was high, as indicated by high average FST (0.247) and ΦST (0.544), and followed a pattern of isolation-by-distance. We use these results to suggest future conservation strategies that include an effort to maintain genetic diversity in the north and restore connectivity in the south. We also note the discordance between patterns of genetic differentiation and current subspecies taxonomy, and encourage a re-evaluation of conservation management units moving forward. PMID:25077019

  8. Influence of Plant Population and Nitrogen-Fertilizer at Various Levels on Growth and Growth Efficiency of Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Tajul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted to evaluate plant population and N-fertilizer effects on yield and yield components of maize (Zea mays L.. Three levels of plant populations (53000, 66000, and 800000 plants ha−1 corresponding to spacings of 75 × 25, 60 × 25, and 50 × 25 cm and 4 doses of N (100, 140, 180, and 220 kg ha−1 were the treatment variables. Results revealed that plant growth, light interception (LI, yield attributes, and grain yield varied significantly due to the variations in population density and N-rates. Crop growth rate (CGR was the highest with the population of 80,000 ha−1 receiving 220 kg N ha−1, while relative growth rate (RGR showed an opposite trend of CGR. Light absorption was maximum when most of densely populated plant received the highest amount of N (220 kg N ha−1. Response of soil-plant-analysis development (SPAD value as well as N-content to N-rates was found significant. Plant height was the maximum at the lowest plant density with the highest amount of N. Plants that received 180 kg N ha−1 with 80,000 plants ha−1 had larger foliage, greater SPAD value, and higher amount of grains cob−1 that contributed to the maximum yield (5.03 t ha−1 and the maximum harvest index (HI compared to the plants in other treatments.

  9. Disease, predation and demography: Assessing the impacts of bovine tuberculosis on African buffalo by monitoring at individual and population levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, P.C.; Heisey, D.M.; Bowers, J.A.; Hay, C.T.; Wolhuter, J.; Buss, P.; Hofmeyr, M.; Michel, A.L.; Bengis, Roy G.; Bird, T.L.F.; du Toit, Johan T.; Getz, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    1. Understanding the effects of disease is critical to determining appropriate management responses, but estimating those effects in wildlife species is challenging. We used bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in the African buffalo Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, South Africa, as a case study to highlight the issues associated with estimating chronic disease effects in a long-lived host. 2. We used known and radiocollared buffalo, aerial census data, and a natural gradient in pathogen prevalence to investigate if: (i) at the individual level, BTB infection reduces reproduction; (ii) BTB infection increases vulnerability to predation; and (iii) at the population level, increased BTB prevalence causes reduced population growth. 3. There was only a marginal reduction in calving success associated with BTB infection, as indexed by the probability of sighting a known adult female with or without a calf (P = 0??065). 4. Since 1991, BTB prevalence increased from 27 to 45% in the southern region and from 4 to 28% in the central region of Kruger National Park. The prevalence in the northern regions was only 1??5% in 1998. Buffalo population growth rates, however, were neither statistically different among regions nor declining over time. 5. Lions Panthera leo did not appear to preferentially kill test-positive buffalo. The best (Akaike's Information Criterion corrected for small sample size) AICc model with BTB as a covariate [exp(??) = 0??49; 95% CI = (0??24-1??02)] suggested that the mortality hazard for positive individuals was no greater than for test-negative individuals. 6. Synthesis and applications. Test accuracy, time-varying disease status, and movement among populations are some of the issues that make the detection of chronic disease impacts challenging. For these reasons, the demographic impacts of bovine tuberculosis in the Kruger National Park remain undetectable despite 6 years of study on known individuals and 40 years of population counts

  10. Comparison of exhaled carbon monoxide levels among commuters and roadside vendors in an urban and a suburban population in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzwari, Saniya R; Fatmi, Zafar

    2011-09-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the six criteria air pollutants related to urbanization and has a wide range of health effects. The study measured and compared the exhaled CO levels among commuters and roadside vendors in potentially heavy and low traffic volume areas of Karachi, a megacity in Pakistan. Saddar town [areas of M. A. Jinnah Road (Tibet Center, Denso Hall) and Empress Market] was selected to represent an area of high traffic volume and the suburban town of Gadap (Gadap and Gulshan-e-Maymar) was selected to represent an area of no or low traffic volume. The study compared the CO exposure of commuters and roadside vendors in high and low traffic volume in Karachi. CO exposure was measured in expired air using the breath analyzer module of Bacharach Monoxor-II, USA. A total of 326 individuals (115 commuters and 211 stationary roadside vendors) from Saddar town (n = 193) and Gadap town (n = 133) were selected. In addition, CO levels in ambient air in the same areas, using portable CO analyzer (Bacharach, Monoxor-II, USA), were measured. The mean ambient CO level at Saddar town was 15.6 (SE ± 2.6) ppm compared to 3.3 (SE ± 0.3) ppm at Gadap town. The mean CO level in expired air was significantly higher among nonsmokers at Saddar town (12.8 ± 0.5 ppm) compared to the nonsmokers at Gadap town (7.8 ± 0.4 ppm). The mean CO level in expired air among smokers was twice that of nonsmokers (21.6 vs. 10.6 ppm). CO in expired air was greater among high traffic volume commuters and roadside stationary population in Karachi, Pakistan. The population in Karachi is exposed to high concentration of air pollutants. These pollutants need to be characterized for health effects and interventions needs to be developed.

  11. A population-based tissue probability map-driven level set method for fully automated mammographic density estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngwoo; Hong, Byung Woo; Kim, Seung Ja; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-07-01

    A major challenge when distinguishing glandular tissues on mammograms, especially for area-based estimations, lies in determining a boundary on a hazy transition zone from adipose to glandular tissues. This stems from the nature of mammography, which is a projection of superimposed tissues consisting of different structures. In this paper, the authors present a novel segmentation scheme which incorporates the learned prior knowledge of experts into a level set framework for fully automated mammographic density estimations. The authors modeled the learned knowledge as a population-based tissue probability map (PTPM) that was designed to capture the classification of experts' visual systems. The PTPM was constructed using an image database of a selected population consisting of 297 cases. Three mammogram experts extracted regions for dense and fatty tissues on digital mammograms, which was an independent subset used to create a tissue probability map for each ROI based on its local statistics. This tissue class probability was taken as a prior in the Bayesian formulation and was incorporated into a level set framework as an additional term to control the evolution and followed the energy surface designed to reflect experts' knowledge as well as the regional statistics inside and outside of the evolving contour. A subset of 100 digital mammograms, which was not used in constructing the PTPM, was used to validate the performance. The energy was minimized when the initial contour reached the boundary of the dense and fatty tissues, as defined by experts. The correlation coefficient between mammographic density measurements made by experts and measurements by the proposed method was 0.93, while that with the conventional level set was 0.47. The proposed method showed a marked improvement over the conventional level set method in terms of accuracy and reliability. This result suggests that the proposed method successfully incorporated the learned knowledge of the experts

  12. Serological markers to measure recent changes in malaria at population level in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhof, Karen; Sluydts, Vincent; Willen, Laura; Kim, Saorin; Canier, Lydie; Heng, Somony; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Sochantha, Tho; Sovannaroth, Siv; Ménard, Didier; Coosemans, Marc; Durnez, Lies

    2016-11-04

    Serological markers for exposure to different Plasmodium species have recently been used in multiplex immunoassays based on the Luminex technology. However, interpretation of the assay results requires consideration of the half-life of specific antibodies against these markers. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to document the half-life of malaria specific serological makers, as well as assessing the sensitivity of these markers to pick up recent changes in malaria exposure. A recently developed multiplex immunoassay was used to measure the intensity of antibody (Ab) responses against 19 different Plasmodium specific antigens, covering different human malaria parasites and two vector saliva antigens. Therefore, 8439 blood samples from five cross-sectional surveys in Ratanakiri, Cambodia, were analysed. These involve a random selection from two selected surveys, and an additional set of blood samples of individuals that were randomly re-sampled three, four or five times. A generalized estimating equation model and linear regression models were fitted on log transformed antibody intensity data. Results showed that most (17/21) Ab-responses are higher in PCR positive than PCR negative individuals. Furthermore, these antibody-responses follow the same upward trend within each age group. Estimation of the half-lives showed differences between serological markers that reflect short- (seasonal) and long-term (year round) transmission trends. Ab levels declined significantly together with a decrease of PCR prevalence in a group of malaria endemic villages. For Plasmodium falciparum, antibodies against LSA3.RE, GLURP and Pf.GLURP.R2 are most likely to be a reflexion of recent (range from 6 to 8 months) exposure in the Mekong Subregion. PvEBP is the only Plasmodium vivax Ag responding reasonably well, in spite of an estimated Ab half-life of more than 1 year. The use of Ab intensity data rather dichotomizing the continuous Ab-titre data (positive vs negative

  13. Drawing ecological inferences from coincident patterns of population- and community-level biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellend, Mark; Lajoie, Geneviève; Bourret, Audrey; Múrria, Cesc; Kembel, Steven W; Garant, Dany

    2014-06-01

    Biodiversity is comprised of genetic and phenotypic variation among individual organisms, which might belong to the same species or to different species. Spatial patterns of biodiversity are of central interest in ecology and evolution for several reasons: to identify general patterns in nature (e.g. species-area relationships, latitudinal gradients), to inform conservation priorities (e.g. identifying hotspots, prioritizing management efforts) and to draw inferences about processes, historical or otherwise (e.g. adaptation, the centre of origin of particular clades). There are long traditions in ecology and evolutionary biology of examining spatial patterns of biodiversity among species (i.e. in multispecies communities) and within species, respectively, and there has been a recent surge of interest in studying these two types of pattern simultaneously. The idea is that examining both levels of diversity can materially advance the above-stated goals and perhaps lead to entirely novel lines of inquiry. Here, we review two broad categories of approach to merging studies of inter- and intraspecific variation: (i) the study of phenotypic trait variation along environmental gradients and (ii) the study of relationships between patterns of molecular genetic variation within species and patterns of distribution and diversity across species. For the latter, we report a new meta-analysis in which we find that correlations between species diversity and genetic diversity are generally positive and significantly stronger in studies with discrete sampling units (e.g. islands, lakes, forest fragments) than in studies with nondiscrete sampling units (e.g. equal-area study plots). For each topic, we summarize the current state of knowledge and key future directions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. African Ancestry is a Risk Factor for Asthma and High Total IgE Levels in African Admixed Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Candelaria; Murray, Tanda; Rafaels, Nicholas; Lewis, Rachel; Campbell, Monica; Foster, Cassandra; Gao, Li; Faruque, Mezbah; Oliveira, Ricardo Riccio; Carvalho, Edgar; Araujo, Maria Ilma; Cruz, Alvaro A.; Watson, Harold; Mercado, Dilia; Knight-Madden, Jennifer; Ruczinski, Ingo; Dunston, Georgia; Ford, Jean; Caraballo, Luis; Beaty, Terri H.; Mathias, Rasika A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of genetic admixture of populations in the Americas and the Caribbean is of interest for anthropological, epidemiological, and historical reasons. Asthma has a higher prevalence and is more severe in populations with a high African component. Association of African ancestry with asthma has been demonstrated. We estimated admixture proportions of samples from six trihybrid populations of African descent and determined the relationship between African ancestry and asthma and total serum IgE levels (tIgE). We genotyped 237 ancestry informative markers in asthmatics and nonasthmatic controls from Barbados (190/277), Jamaica (177/529), Brazil (40/220), Colombia (508/625), African Americans from New York (207/171), and African Americans from Baltimore/Washington, D.C. (625/757). We estimated individual ancestries and evaluated genetic stratification using Structure and principal component analysis. Association of African anc