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Sample records for cdv strains detected

  1. Heterogeneity within the hemagglutinin genes of canine distemper virus (CDV) strains detected in Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martella, V.; Cirone, F.; Elia, G.

    2006-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious viral pathogen causing lethal disease in dogs and other mammalians. A high degree of genetic variation is found between recent CDV strains and the old CDV isolates used in the vaccines and such genetic variation is regarded as a possible cause....... These results suggest that at least three different CDV lineages are present in Italy. Keywords: Canine distemper virus; Dogs; Lineages; H gene...

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin gene of canine distemper virus strains detected from breeding foxes, raccoon dogs and minks in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Jun; Yan, Xi-Jun; Chai, Xiu-Li; Martella, Vito; Luo, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Gao, Han; Liu, Ying-Xue; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Tao; Xu, Lei; Zhao, Chun-Fei; Wang, Feng-Xue; Shao, Xi-Qun; Wu, Wei; Cheng, Shi-Peng

    2010-01-06

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infects a variety of carnivores, including wild and domestic Canidae. Genetic/antigenic heterogeneity has been observed among the various CDV strains, notably in the haemagglutinin (H) gene, that appears as a good target to gather epidemiological information. Based on sequence analysis of the H gene, wild-type CDV strains cluster into distinct geographic lineages (genotypes), irrespective of the species of isolation. The sequence of the H gene of 28 CDV strains detected from both vaccinated and non-vaccinated breeding foxes, raccoon dogs and minks from different geographical areas of China during the years 2004-2008 was determined. All the CDV strains but two (strains HL and HLJ2) were characterized as Asia-1 genotype and were highly similar to each other (96.2-99.7% at the amino acid [aa] level) and to other Asia-1 strains (96.1-99.5% aa) previously detected in China. The CDV strains HL and HLJ2 were both collected from foxes in Heilongjiang province in 2005. Strain HL resembled CDVs of the Arctic genotype (GR88-like) and displayed high aa identity (98.0%) to the Chinese canine strain Liu. By converse, strain HLJ2 was barely related to CDVs of the Asia-2 genotype (88.7-90.3% aa identity), and could represent a novel CDV genotype, tentatively proposed as Asia-3. These results suggest that at least three different CDV genotypes, distantly related (81.8-91.6% aa identity) to the vaccine strains, Onderstepoort-like (America-1 genotype), are currently circulating in breeding foxes, raccoon dogs and minks in China, and that the genotype Asia-1 is predominant. Whether the diversity between wild-type CDVs and the vaccine strains may affect, to some extent, the efficacy of the vaccines deserves further investigations.

  3. Detection of intracellular canine distemper virus antigen in mink inoculated with an attenuated or a virulent strain of canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blixenkrone-Møller, M

    1989-09-01

    Using an indirect immunofluorescence technique, the distribution of viral antigen in various tissues and blood mononuclear leukocytes was studied in wild mink, either vaccinated with an attenuated vaccine strain of canine distemper virus (CDV) or experimentally inoculated with the virulent Snyder-Hill strain of CDV. Viral antigen was detected in cells of the lymphoid system 6 to 12 days after vaccination. From 2 to 3 days after inoculation with the virulent strain, CDV antigen was demonstrated in cells of the lymphoid system and, during the incubation period, the antigen had spread to the epithelia and brain at days 6 and 12, respectively. In clinical cases of acute fatal canine distemper, the viral antigen was detected in a wide variety of tissues, including the cells of the lymphoid system, epithelial cells of skin, mucous membranes, lung, kidney, and cells of the CNS. The diagnostic importance of CDV antigen detection is discussed on the basis of these findings.

  4. A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction for detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Shang-jin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV. A pair of primers (P1 and P4 specific for CDV corresponding to the highly conserved region of the CDV genome were used as a common primer pair in the first-round PCR of the nested PCR. Primers P2 specific for CDV wild-type strains, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4 in the second round of nested PCR. Primers P3, P5 specific for CDV wild-type strain or vaccine strain, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4+P6 in the second round of nested PCR. A fragment of 177 bp was amplified from vaccine strain genomic RNA, and a fragment of 247 bp from wild-type strain genomic RNA in the RT-nPCR, and two fragments of 247 bp and 177 bp were amplified from the mixed samples of vaccine and wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV, canine parvovirus (CPV, canine coronavirus (CCV, rabies virus (RV, or canine adenovirus (CAV. The RT-nPCR method was used to detect 30 field samples suspected of canine distemper from Heilongjiang and Jilin Provinces, and 51 samples in Shandong province. As a result of 30 samples, were found to be wild-type-like, and 5 to be vaccine-strain-like. The RT-nPCR method can be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type CDV-infected dogs from dogs vaccinated with CDV vaccine, and thus can be used in clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance.

  5. A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction for detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV). A pair of primers (P1 and P4) specific for CDV corresponding to the highly conserved region of the CDV genome were used as a common primer pair in the first-round PCR of the nested PCR. Primers P2 specific for CDV wild-type strains, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4 in the second round of nested PCR. Primers P3, P5 specific for CDV wild-type strain or vaccine strain, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4+P6 in the second round of nested PCR. A fragment of 177 bp was amplified from vaccine strain genomic RNA, and a fragment of 247 bp from wild-type strain genomic RNA in the RT-nPCR, and two fragments of 247 bp and 177 bp were amplified from the mixed samples of vaccine and wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), canine coronavirus (CCV), rabies virus (RV), or canine adenovirus (CAV). The RT-nPCR method was used to detect 30 field samples suspected of canine distemper from Heilongjiang and Jilin Provinces, and 51 samples in Shandong province. As a result of 30 samples, were found to be wild-type-like, and 5 to be vaccine-strain-like. The RT-nPCR method can be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type CDV-infected dogs from dogs vaccinated with CDV vaccine, and thus can be used in clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:20433759

  6. Detection and differentiation of field and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus using reverse transcription followed by nested real time PCR (RT-nqPCR) and RFLP analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Cristine Dossin Bastos; Ikuta, Nilo; Canal, Cláudio Wageck; Makiejczuk, Aline; Allgayer, Mariangela da Costa; Cardoso, Cristine Hoffmeister; Lehmann, Fernanda Kieling; Fonseca, André Salvador Kazantzi; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. Practical diagnosis of canine distemper based on clinical signs and laboratory tests are required to confirm CDV infection. The present study aimed to develop a molecular assay to detect and differentiate field and vaccine CDV strains. Reverse transcription followed by nested real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-nqPCR) was developed, which exhibited analytical specificity (all the samples from healthy dogs and other canine infectious agents were not incorrectly detected) and sensitivity (all replicates of a vaccine strain were positive up to the 3125-fold dilution - 10(0.7) TCID50). RT-nqPCR was validated for CDV detection on different clinical samples (blood, urine, rectal and conjunctival swabs) of 103 animals suspected to have distemper. A total of 53 animals were found to be positive based on RT-nqPCR in at least one clinical sample. Blood resulted in more positive samples (50 out of 53, 94.3%), followed by urine (44/53, 83.0%), rectal (38/53, 71%) and conjunctival (27/53, 50.9%) swabs. A commercial immunochromatography (IC) assay had detected CDV in only 30 conjunctival samples of these positive dogs. Nucleoprotein (NC) gene sequencing of 25 samples demonstrated that 23 of them were closer to other Brazilian field strains and the remaining two to vaccine strains. A single nucleotide sequences difference, which creates an Msp I restriction enzyme digestion, was used to differentiate between field and vaccine CDV strains by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The complete assay was more sensitive than was IC for the detection of CDV. Blood was the more frequently positive specimen and the addition of a restriction enzyme step allowed the differentiation of vaccine and Brazilian field strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Canine distemper virus (CDV) in another big cat: should CDV be renamed carnivore distemper virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terio, Karen A; Craft, Meggan E

    2013-09-17

    One of the greatest threats to the conservation of wild cat populations may be dogs or, at least, one of their viruses. Canine distemper virus (CDV), a single-stranded RNA virus in the Paramyxoviridae family and genus Morbillivirus, infects and causes disease in a variety of species, not just canids. An outbreak of CDV in wild lions in the Serengeti, Tanzania, in 1994 was a wake-up call for conservationists, as it demonstrated that an infectious disease could swiftly impact a previously healthy felid population. To understand how this virus causes disease in noncanid hosts, researchers have focused on specific mutations in the binding site of the CDV hemagglutinin gene. Now, Seimon et al. provide information on CDV in its latest feline victim, the endangered wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) [T. A. Seimon et al., mBio 4(4):e00410-13, 2013, doi:10.1128/mBio.00410-13]. Their findings of CDV strains infecting tigers, in combination with recent information from other felids, paints a different picture, one in which CDV strains from a variety of geographic lineages and with a variety of amino acid residues in the hemagglutinin gene binding site can infect cats and cause disease. Although CDV has been known as a multihost disease since its discovery in domestic dogs in 1905, perhaps it is time to reconsider whether these noncanid species are not just incidental or "spillover" hosts but, rather, a normal part of the complex ecology of this infectious disease.

  8. Influence of vaccine strains on the evolution of canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; Streck, André Felipe; Nunes Weber, Matheus; Maboni Siqueira, Franciele; Muniz Guedes, Rafael Lucas; Wageck Canal, Cláudio

    2016-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a major dog pathogen belonging to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. CDV causes disease and high mortality in dogs and wild carnivores. Although homologous recombination has been demonstrated in many members of Paramyxoviridae, these events have rarely been reported for CDV. To detect potential recombination events, the complete CDV genomes available in GenBank up to June 2015 were screened using distinct algorithms to detect genetic conversions and incongruent phylogenies. Eight putative recombinant viruses derived from different CDV genotypes and different hosts were detected. The breakpoints of the recombinant strains were primarily located on fusion and hemagglutinin glycoproteins. These results suggest that homologous recombination is a frequent phenomenon in morbillivirus populations under natural replication, and CDV vaccine strains might play an important role in shaping the evolution of this virus.

  9. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X Y; Li, W H; Zhu, J L; Liu, W J; Zhao, M Q; Luo, Y W; Chen, J D

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance.

  10. Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) in Another Big Cat: Should CDV Be Renamed Carnivore Distemper Virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terio, Karen A.; Craft, Meggan E.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the greatest threats to the conservation of wild cat populations may be dogs or, at least, one of their viruses. Canine distemper virus (CDV), a single-stranded RNA virus in the Paramyxoviridae family and genus Morbillivirus, infects and causes disease in a variety of species, not just canids. An outbreak of CDV in wild lions in the Serengeti, Tanzania, in 1994 was a wake-up call for conservationists, as it demonstrated that an infectious disease could swiftly impact a previously healthy felid population. To understand how this virus causes disease in noncanid hosts, researchers have focused on specific mutations in the binding site of the CDV hemagglutinin gene. Now, Seimon et al. provide information on CDV in its latest feline victim, the endangered wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) [T. A. Seimon et al., mBio 4(4):e00410-13, 2013, doi:10.1128/mBio.00410-13]. Their findings of CDV strains infecting tigers, in combination with recent information from other felids, paints a different picture, one in which CDV strains from a variety of geographic lineages and with a variety of amino acid residues in the hemagglutinin gene binding site can infect cats and cause disease. Although CDV has been known as a multihost disease since its discovery in domestic dogs in 1905, perhaps it is time to reconsider whether these noncanid species are not just incidental or “spillover” hosts but, rather, a normal part of the complex ecology of this infectious disease. PMID:24045642

  11. Detection by hemi-nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and genetic characterization of wild type strains of Canine distemper virus in suspected infected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Cristina E; Di Francesco, Daniela; Di Martino, Barbara; Speranza, Roberto; Santori, Domenico; Boari, Andrea; Marsilio, Fulvio

    2012-01-01

    A new highly sensitive and specific hemi-nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was applied to detect nucleoprotein (NP) gene of Canine distemper virus (CDV) in samples collected from dogs showing respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurological signs. Thirty-eight out of 86 samples were positive suggesting that despite the vaccination, canine distemper may still represent a high risk to the canine population. The 968 base pair (bp) fragments from the hemagglutinin (H) gene of 10 viral strains detected in positive samples were amplified and analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using AluI and PsiI enzymes in order to differentiate among vaccine and wild-type CDV strains and to characterize the field viral strains. The products of the both enzymatic digestions allowed identification all viruses as wild strains of CDV. In addition, the RFLP analysis with AluI provided additional information about the identity level among the strains analyzed on the basis of the positions of the cleavage site in the nucleotide sequences of the H gene. The method could be a more useful and simpler method for molecular studies of CDV strains.

  12. Emergence of canine distemper virus strains with two amino acid substitutions in the haemagglutinin protein, detected from vaccinated carnivores in North-Eastern China in 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianjun; Zhang, Hailing; Bai, Xue; Martella, Vito; Hu, Bo; Sun, Yangang; Zhu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Hao; Xu, Shujuan; Shao, Xiqun; Wu, Wei; Yan, Xijun

    2014-04-01

    A total of 16 strains of canine distemper virus (CDV) were detected from vaccinated minks, foxes, and raccoon dogs in four provinces in North-Eastern China between the end of 2011 and 2013. Upon sequence analysis of the haemagglutinin gene and comparison with wild-type CDV from different species in the same geographical areas, two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in 10 CDV strains, which led to amino acid changes at positions 542 (isoleucine to asparagine) and 549 (tyrosine to histidine) of the haemagglutinin protein coding sequence. The change at residue 542 generated a potentially novel N-glycosylation site. Masking of antigenic epitopes by sugar moieties might represent a mechanism for evasion of virus neutralising antibodies and reduced protection by vaccination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for detection of Canine distemper virus modified live vaccine shedding for differentiation from infection with wild-type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Sanchez, Elena; Riley, Matthew C; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains a common cause of infectious disease in dogs, particularly in high-density housing situations such as shelters. Vaccination of all dogs against CDV is recommended at the time of admission to animal shelters and many use a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine. From a diagnostic standpoint for dogs with suspected CDV infection, this is problematic because highly sensitive diagnostic real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests are able to detect MLV virus in clinical samples. Real-time PCR can be used to quantitate amount of virus shedding and can differentiate vaccine strains from wild-type strains when shedding is high. However, differentiation by quantitation is not possible in vaccinated animals during acute infection, when shedding is low and could be mistaken for low level vaccine virus shedding. While there are gel-based RT-PCR assays for differentiation of vaccine strains from field strains based on sequence differences, the sensitivity of these assays is unable to match that of the real-time RT-PCR assay currently used in the authors' laboratory. Therefore, a real-time RT-PCR assay was developed that detects CDV MLV vaccine strains and distinguishes them from wild-type strains based on nucleotide sequence differences, rather than the amount of viral RNA in the sample. The test is highly sensitive, with detection of as few as 5 virus genomic copies (corresponding to 10(-1) TCID(50)). Sequencing of the DNA real-time products also allows phylogenetic differentiation of the wild-type strains. This test will aid diagnosis during outbreaks of CDV in recently vaccinated animals.

  14. Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets as a model for testing Morbillivirus vaccine strategies: NYVAC- and ALVAC-based CDV recombinants protect against symptomatic infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephensen, C B; Welter, J; Thaker, S R; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E

    1997-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets causes an acute systemic disease involving multiple organ systems, including the respiratory tract, lymphoid system, and central nervous system (CNS). We have tested candidate CDV vaccines incorporating the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins in the highly attenuated NYVAC strain of vaccinia virus and in the ALVAC strain of canarypox virus, which does not productively replicate in mammalian hosts. Juvenile ferrets were vaccinated twice ...

  15. Detection of canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein gene in canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells by RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Y; Mori, T; Okita, M; Gemma, T; Kai, C; Mikami, T

    1995-06-01

    For a rapid diagnosis of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection, the reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was carried out to detect CDV nucleoprotein (NP) gene from canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Two sets of primers were targeted to two regions of NP gene of CDV Onderstepoort strain. The NP gene fragments were well amplified by the RT-PCR in each of the RNA extracts from Vero cells infected with 6 laboratory strains of CDV including Onderstepoort strain, and from PBMCs of a dog experimentally infected with CDV. The amplified NP gene was detected in 17 of 32 samples from dogs which were clinically suspected for CDV infection at veterinary hospitals. No RT-PCR product was found in 52 samples from healthy dogs including 40 specific pathogen free beagles vaccinated with an attenuated live virus-vaccine for CDV and 12 stray dogs. The RT-PCR provides a fast, sensitive, and supplementary method for the diagnosis of CDV infection in dogs.

  16. Propagation of Asian isolates of canine distemper virus (CDV in hamster cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi Ryoji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds The aim of this study was to confirm the propagation of various canine distemper viruses (CDV in hamster cell lines of HmLu and BHK, since only a little is known about the possibility of propagation of CDV in rodent cells irrespective of their epidemiological importance. Methods The growth of CDV in hamster cell lines was monitored by titration using Vero.dogSLAMtag (Vero-DST cells that had been proven to be susceptible to almost all field isolates of CDV, with the preparations of cell-free and cell-associated virus from the cultures infected with recent Asian isolates of CDV (13 strains and by observing the development of cytopathic effect (CPE in infected cultures of hamster cell lines. Results Eleven of 13 strains grew in HmLu cells, and 12 of 13 strains grew in BHK cells with apparent CPE of cell fusion in the late stage of infection. Two strains and a strain of Asia 1 group could not grow in HmLu cells and BHK cells, respectively. Conclusion The present study demonstrates at the first time that hamster cell lines can propagate the majority of Asian field isolates of CDV. The usage of two hamster cell lines suggested to be useful to characterize the field isolates biologically.

  17. Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets as a model for testing Morbillivirus vaccine strategies: NYVAC- and ALVAC-based CDV recombinants protect against symptomatic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephensen, C B; Welter, J; Thaker, S R; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E

    1997-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets causes an acute systemic disease involving multiple organ systems, including the respiratory tract, lymphoid system, and central nervous system (CNS). We have tested candidate CDV vaccines incorporating the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins in the highly attenuated NYVAC strain of vaccinia virus and in the ALVAC strain of canarypox virus, which does not productively replicate in mammalian hosts. Juvenile ferrets were vaccinated twice with these constructs, or with an attenuated live-virus vaccine, while controls received saline or the NYVAC and ALVAC vectors expressing rabies virus glycoprotein. Control animals did not develop neutralizing antibody and succumbed to distemper after developing fever, weight loss, leukocytopenia, decreased activity, conjunctivitis, an erythematous rash typical of distemper, CNS signs, and viremia in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (as measured by reverse transcription-PCR). All three CDV vaccines elicited neutralizing titers of at least 1:96. All vaccinated ferrets survived, and none developed viremia. Both recombinant vaccines also protected against the development of symptomatic distemper. However, ferrets receiving the live-virus vaccine lost weight, became lymphocytopenic, and developed the erythematous rash typical of CDV. These data show that ferrets are an excellent model for evaluating the ability of CDV vaccines to protect against symptomatic infection. Because the pathogenesis and clinical course of CDV infection of ferrets is quite similar to that of other Morbillivirus infections, including measles, this model will be useful in testing new candidate Morbillivirus vaccines.

  18. Development of a combined canine distemper virus specific RT-PCR protocol for the differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) and genetic characterization of the hemagglutinin gene of seven Chinese strains demonstrated in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Shipeng; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Jianke; Cheng, Yuening; Yang, Shen; Luo, Bin

    2012-01-01

    A combined reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of the canine distemper virus (CDV). A pair of primers (P1/P2) was used to detect both CDV wild-type strains and vaccines. Another pair (P3/P4) was used to detect only CDV wild-type strains. A 335bp fragment was amplified from the genomic RNA of the vaccine and wild-type strains. A 555bp fragment was amplified specifically from the genomic RNA of the wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for the uninfected cells, cells infected with canine parvovirus, canine coronavirus, or canine adenovirus. The combined RT-PCR method detected effectively and differentiated the CDV wild-type and vaccine strains by two separate RT-PCRs. The method can be used for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin gene of the local wild-type CDV strains revealed that the seven local isolates all belonged to the Asia-1 lineage, and were clustered closely with one another at the same location. These results suggested that the CDV genotype Asia-1 is circulating currently in domestic dogs in China. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Cellular Proteome Alterations in CDV-Infected Mink Lung Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingwei Tong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV, a paramyxovirus, causes a severe highly contagious lethal disease in carnivores, such as mink. Mink lung epithelial cells (Mv.1.Lu cells are sensitive to CDV infection and are homologous to the natural host system of mink. The current study analyzed the response of Mv.1.Lu cells to CDV infection by iTRAQ combined with LC–MS/MS. In total, 151 and 369 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs were markedly up-regulated or down-regulated, respectively. Thirteen DEPs were validated via real-time RT-PCR or western blot analysis. Network and KEGG pathway analyses revealed several regulated proteins associated with the NF-κB signaling pathway. Further validation was performed by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay, which demonstrated that different CDV strains induced NF-κB P65 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Moreover, the results provided interesting information that some identified DEPs possibly associated with the pathogenesis and the immune response upon CDV infection. This study is the first overview of the responses to CDV infection in Mv.1.Lu cells, and the findings will help to analyze further aspects of the molecular mechanisms involved in viral pathogenesis and the immune responses upon CDV infection.

  20. The recombinant EHV-1 vector producing CDV hemagglutinin as potential vaccine against canine distemper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zihao; Liu, Jin; Ma, Jiale; Jin, Qiuli; Yao, Huochun; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2017-10-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), is a pantropic agent of morbillivirus that causes fetal disease in dogs. Base on a broad host rang of CDV, the continued vaccines inoculation is unavoidable to pose gene recombination risk in vaccine virus and wild virus. The current study presents the construction of novel vectors, using equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) expressing the canine distemper virus (CDV). The recent field strain hemagglutinin protein and nucleoprotein were used for the construction of the viral vector vaccines. Based on the Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomes of EHV-1 RacH strain, the recombinant EHV-1 vaccine virus encoding CDV hemagglutinin protein (EHV-H) or CDV nucleoprotein (EHV-N) was constructed separately. The constructed BACs were rescued after 72 h post infection, and the expression of H or N in the recombinant viruses was confirmed by western-blotting. Furthermore, high levels of neutralizing antibodies were induced persistently following vaccination in the groups EHV-H&EHV-N and EHV-H, but the EHV-N group. The groups of vaccinated EHV-H and EHV-H&EHV-N pups were monitored for clinical signs, whereas the vaccinated EHV-N group developed moderate symptoms. The present study demonstrated that EHV-1 based recombinant virus carrying CDV H could be a promising vaccine candidate against canine distemper. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin gene of canine distemper virus strains detected from giant panda and raccoon dogs in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Canine distemper virus (CDV) infects a variety of carnivores, including wild and domestic Canidae. In this study, we sequenced and phylogenetic analyses of the hemagglutinin (H) genes from eight canine distemper virus (CDV) isolates obtained from seven raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) and a giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the partial hemagglutinin gene sequences showed close clustering for geographic lineages, clearly distinct from vaccine strains and other wild-type foreign CDV strains, all the CDV strains were characterized as Asia-1 genotype and were highly similar to each other (91.5-99.8% nt and 94.4-99.8% aa). The giant panda and raccoon dogs all were 549Y on the HA protein in this study, irrespective of the host species. Conclusions These findings enhance our knowledge of the genetic characteristics of Chinese CDV isolates, and may facilitate the development of effective strategies for monitoring and controlling CDV for wild canids and non-cainds in China. PMID:23566727

  2. Strain-Detecting Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Terryl A. (Inventor); Smith, Stephen W. (Inventor); Piascik, Robert S. (Inventor); Horne, Michael R. (Inventor); Messick, Peter L. (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor); Glaessgen, Edward H. (Inventor); Hailer, Benjamin T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A composite material includes a structural material and a shape-memory alloy embedded in the structural material. The shape-memory alloy changes crystallographic phase from austenite to martensite in response to a predefined critical macroscopic average strain of the composite material. In a second embodiment, the composite material includes a plurality of particles of a ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy embedded in the structural material. The ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy changes crystallographic phase from austenite to martensite and changes magnetic phase in response to the predefined critical macroscopic average strain of the composite material. A method of forming a composite material for sensing the predefined critical macroscopic average strain includes providing the shape-memory alloy having an austenite crystallographic phase, changing a size and shape of the shape-memory alloy to thereby form a plurality of particles, and combining the structural material and the particles at a temperature of from about 100-700.degree. C. to form the composite material.

  3. Detection of Canine Distemper Virus Nucleoprotein RNA by Reverse Transcription-PCR Using Serum, Whole Blood, and Cerebrospinal Fluid from Dogs with Distemper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisk, A. L.; König, M.; Moritz, A.; Baumgärtner, W.

    1999-01-01

    Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was used to detect canine distemper virus (CDV) nucleoprotein (NP) RNA in serum, whole blood, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 38 dogs with clinically suspected distemper. Results were correlated to clinical findings, anti-CDV neutralizing antibody titers, postmortem findings, and demonstration of CDV NP antigen by immunohistochemistry. The specificity of the RT-PCR was ensured by amplification of RNA from various laboratory CDV strains, restriction enzyme digestion, and Southern blot hybridization. In 29 of 38 dogs, CDV infection was confirmed by postmortem examination and immunohistochemistry. The animals displayed the catarrhal, systemic, and nervous forms of distemper. Seventeen samples (serum, whole blood, or CSF) from dogs with distemper were tested with three sets of primers targeted to different regions of the NP gene of the CDV Onderstepoort strain. Expected amplicons were observed in 82, 53, and 41% of the 17 samples, depending upon the primer pair used. With the most sensitive primer pair (primer pair I), CDV NP RNA was detected in 25 of 29 (86%) serum samples and 14 of 16 (88%) whole blood and CSF samples from dogs with distemper but not in body fluids from immunohistochemically negative dogs. Nucleotide sequence analysis of five RT-PCR amplicons from isolates from the field revealed few silent point mutations. These isolates exhibited greater homology to the Rockborn (97 to 99%) than to the Onderstepoort (95 to 96%) CDV strain. In summary, although the sensitivity of the RT-PCR for detection of CDV is strongly influenced by the location of the selected primers, this nucleic acid detection system represents a highly specific and sensitive method for the antemortem diagnosis of distemper in dogs, regardless of the form of distemper, humoral immune response, and viral antigen distribution. PMID:10523566

  4. Establishment of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid detection and differentiation of canine distemper virus infected and vaccinated animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da-Fei; Liu, Chun-Guo; Tian, Jin; Jiang, Yi-Tong; Zhang, Xiao-Zhan; Chai, Hong-Liang; Yang, Tian-Kuo; Yin, Xiu-Chen; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Liu, Ming; Hua, Yu-Ping; Qu, Lian-Dong

    2015-06-01

    Although widespread vaccination against canine distemper virus (CDV) has been conducted for many decades, several canine distemper outbreaks in vaccinated animals have been reported frequently. In order to detect and differentiate the wild-type and vaccine strains of the CDV from the vaccinated animals, a novel reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) method was developed. A set of four primers-two internal and two external-were designed to target the H gene for the specific detection of wild-type CDV variants. The CDV-H RT-LAMP assay rapidly amplified the target gene, within 60 min, using a water bath held at a constant temperature of 65°C. The assay was 100-fold more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR, with a detection limit of 10(-1)TCID50ml(-1). The system showed a preference for wild-type CDV, and exhibited less sensitivity to canine parvovirus, canine adenovirus type 1 and type 2, canine coronavirus, and canine parainfluenza virus. The assay was validated using 102 clinical samples obtained from vaccinated dog farms, and the results were comparable to a multiplex nested RT-PCR assay. The specific CDV-H RT-LAMP assay provides a simple, rapid, and sensitive tool for the detection of canines infected with wild-type CDV from canines vaccinated with attenuated vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Emergence of canine distemper virus strains with modified molecular signature and enhanced neuronal tropism leading to high mortality in wild carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origgi, F C; Plattet, P; Sattler, U; Robert, N; Casaubon, J; Mavrot, F; Pewsner, M; Wu, N; Giovannini, S; Oevermann, A; Stoffel, M H; Gaschen, V; Segner, H; Ryser-Degiorgis, M-P

    2012-11-01

    An ongoing canine distemper epidemic was first detected in Switzerland in the spring of 2009. Compared to previous local canine distemper outbreaks, it was characterized by unusually high morbidity and mortality, rapid spread over the country, and susceptibility of several wild carnivore species. Here, the authors describe the associated pathologic changes and phylogenetic and biological features of a multiple highly virulent canine distemper virus (CDV) strain detected in and/or isolated from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), Eurasian badgers (Meles meles), stone (Martes foina) and pine (Martes martes) martens, from a Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), and a domestic dog. The main lesions included interstitial to bronchointerstitial pneumonia and meningopolioencephalitis, whereas demyelination--the classic presentation of CDV infection--was observed in few cases only. In the brain lesions, viral inclusions were mainly in the nuclei of the neurons. Some significant differences in brain and lung lesions were observed between foxes and mustelids. Swiss CDV isolates shared together with a Hungarian CDV strain detected in 2004. In vitro analysis of the hemagglutinin protein from one of the Swiss CDV strains revealed functional and structural differences from that of the reference strain A75/17, with the Swiss strain showing increased surface expression and binding efficiency to the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). These features might be part of a novel molecular signature, which might have contributed to an increase in virus pathogenicity, partially explaining the high morbidity and mortality, the rapid spread, and the large host spectrum observed in this outbreak.

  6. Lights and shades on an historical vaccine canine distemper virus, the Rockborn strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, V; Blixenkrone-Møller, M; Elia, G; Lucente, M S; Cirone, F; Decaro, N; Nielsen, L; Bányai, K; Carmichael, L E; Buonavoglia, C

    2011-02-01

    Both egg- and cell-adapted canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccines are suspected to retain residual virulence, especially if administered to immuno-suppressed animals, very young pups or to highly susceptible animal species. In the early 1980s, post-vaccine encephalitis was reported in dogs from various parts of Britain after administration of a particular batch of combined CDV Rockborn strain/canine adenovirus type-1 vaccine, although incrimination of the Rockborn strain was subsequently retracted. Notwithstanding, this, and other reports, led to the view that the Rockborn strain is less attenuated and less safe than other CDV vaccines, and the Rockborn strain was officially withdrawn from the markets in the mid 1990s. By sequencing the H gene of the strain Rockborn from the 46th laboratory passage, and a commercial vaccine (Candur(®) SH+P, Hoechst Rousell Vet GmbH), the virus was found to differ from the commonly used vaccine strain, Onderstepoort (93.0% nt and 91.7% aa), and to resemble more closely (99.6% nt and 99.3% aa) a CDV strain detected in China from a Lesser Panda (Ailurus fulgens). An additional four CDV strains matching (>99% nt identity) the Rockborn virus were identified in the sequence databases. Also, Rockborn-like strains were identified in two vaccines currently in the market. These findings indicate that Rockborn-like viruses may be recovered from dogs or other carnivores with distemper, suggesting cases of residual virulence of vaccines, or circulation of vaccine-derived Rockborn-like viruses in the field. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of Arctic and European cluster of canine distemper virus in north and center of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namroodi, Somayeh; Rostami, Amir; Majidzadeh-Ardebili, Keyvan; Ghalyanchi Langroudi, Arash; Morovvati, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) creates a very contagious viral multi-systemic canine distemper (CD) disease that affects most species of Carnivora order. The virus is genetically heterogeneous, particularly in section of the hemagglutinin (H) gene. Sequence analysis of the H gene can be useful to investigate distinction of various lineages related to geographical distribution and CDV molecular epidemiology. Since vaccination program is conducted only in large cities of Iran, CD still remains as one of the major causes of death in dogs in this country. In order to monitor H gene, CDV has been detected in 14 out of 19 sampled dogs through the amplification of nucleoprotein (NP) gene in nested-PCR assay. In the next step 665 bp of H gene was amplified in 9 out of 14 NP-gene positive dogs. Phylogenetic analysis distinguished two distinct CDV genotypes in Iran. JN941238 has been embedded in European cluster and JN941239 has been embedded in Arctic cluster. Nucleic analysis has been shown high difference among both Iranian CDV lineages with CDV vaccine strains.

  8. Printed strain sensors for early damage detection in engineering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zymelka, Daniel; Yamashita, Takahiro; Takamatsu, Seiichi; Itoh, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the analysis of strain measurements recorded using a screen-printed sensors array bonded to a metal plate and subjected to high strains. The analysis was intended to evaluate the capabilities of the printed strain sensors to detect abnormal strain distribution before actual defects (cracks) in the analyzed structures appear. The results demonstrate that the developed device can accurately localize the enhanced strains at the very early stage of crack formation. The promising performance and low fabrication cost confirm the potential suitability of the printed strain sensors for applications within the framework of structural health monitoring (SHM).

  9. Prevalence of positive antibody test results for canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) and response to modified live vaccination against CPV and CDV in dogs entering animal shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litster, Annette; Nichols, Jamieson; Volpe, Allison

    2012-05-25

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) infections are relatively common in animal shelters and are important population management issues since the immune status of incoming dogs is usually unknown. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of positive antibody test results for CPV and CDV in incoming dogs aged ≥ 4 months and to measure antibody response over 2 weeks following vaccination with a modified live vaccine (MLV). Dogs aged 4-24 months entering an adoption-guarantee shelter (Shelter 1, n=51) and aged ≥ 4 months entering a limited admission shelter (Shelter 2; n=51) were enrolled. Dogs from Shelter 1 had been vaccinated with MLV at a municipal shelter 5 days before enrollment, whereas dogs from Shelter 2 had no known history of vaccination at enrollment. Sera were obtained on day 1, immediately prior to CPV/CDV MLV, and tested using an in-clinic ELISA kit to detect CPV/CDV antibodies. Dogs negative for CPV and/or CDV were retested at day 6-8 and those dogs still negative at day 6-8 were retested at day 13-15. Prior to CPV/CDV MLV on day 1, more dogs tested positive for CPV (Shelter 1 - 68.6%; Shelter 2 - 84.3%) than for CDV (Shelter 1 - 37.3%; Shelter 2 - 41.2%). On day 1, prior to MLV, all spayed/neutered animals tested CPV antibody-positive (n=17/102) and CPV antibody-positive dogs were older than serologically negative dogs (Shelter 1, P=0.0029; Shelter 2, P=0.0042). By day 13-15, almost all dogs were CPV antibody-positive (Shelter 1 - 97.9%; Shelter 2 - 100.0%) and CDV antibody-positive (Shelter 1 - 93.8%; Shelter 2 - 97.8%). MLV induces protective antibody titers against CPV/CDV in almost all dogs after 13-15 days. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparison of the immune responses of dogs exposed to canine distemper virus (CDV) — Differences between vaccinated and wild-type virus exposed dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Danielle; Bender, Scott; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-specific immune response was measured in different dog populations. Three groups of vaccinated or wild-type virus exposed dogs were tested: dogs with a known vaccination history, dogs without a known vaccination history (shelter dogs), and dogs with potential exposure to wild-type CDV. The use of a T-cell proliferation assay demonstrated a detectable CDV-specific T-cell response from both spleen and blood lymphocytes of dogs. Qualitatively, antibody assays [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization assay] predicted the presence of a T-cell response well, although quantitatively neither antibody assays nor the T-cell assay correlated well with each other. An interesting finding from our study was that half of the dogs in shelters were not vaccinated (potentially posing a public veterinary health problem) and that antibody levels in dogs living in an environment with endemic CDV were lower than in vaccinated animals. PMID:20885846

  11. A comparison of the immune responses of dogs exposed to canine distemper virus (CDV) - Differences between vaccinated and wild-type virus exposed dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Danielle; Bender, Scott; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-specific immune response was measured in different dog populations. Three groups of vaccinated or wild-type virus exposed dogs were tested: dogs with a known vaccination history, dogs without a known vaccination history (shelter dogs), and dogs with potential exposure to wild-type CDV. The use of a T-cell proliferation assay demonstrated a detectable CDV-specific T-cell response from both spleen and blood lymphocytes of dogs. Qualitatively, antibody assays [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization assay] predicted the presence of a T-cell response well, although quantitatively neither antibody assays nor the T-cell assay correlated well with each other. An interesting finding from our study was that half of the dogs in shelters were not vaccinated (potentially posing a public veterinary health problem) and that antibody levels in dogs living in an environment with endemic CDV were lower than in vaccinated animals.

  12. Antagonistic pleiotropy and fitness trade-offs reveal specialist and generalist traits in strains of canine distemper virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko M Nikolin

    Full Text Available Theoretically, homogeneous environments favor the evolution of specialists whereas heterogeneous environments favor generalists. Canine distemper is a multi-host carnivore disease caused by canine distemper virus (CDV. The described cell receptor of CDV is SLAM (CD150. Attachment of CDV hemagglutinin protein (CDV-H to this receptor facilitates fusion and virus entry in cooperation with the fusion protein (CDV-F. We investigated whether CDV strains co-evolved in the large, homogeneous domestic dog population exhibited specialist traits, and strains adapted to the heterogeneous environment of smaller populations of different carnivores exhibited generalist traits. Comparison of amino acid sequences of the SLAM binding region revealed higher similarity between sequences from Canidae species than to sequences from other carnivore families. Using an in vitro assay, we quantified syncytia formation mediated by CDV-H proteins from dog and non-dog CDV strains in cells expressing dog, lion or cat SLAM. CDV-H proteins from dog strains produced significantly higher values with cells expressing dog SLAM than with cells expressing lion or cat SLAM. CDV-H proteins from strains of non-dog species produced similar values in all three cell types, but lower values in cells expressing dog SLAM than the values obtained for CDV-H proteins from dog strains. By experimentally changing one amino acid (Y549H in the CDV-H protein of one dog strain we decreased expression of specialist traits and increased expression of generalist traits, thereby confirming its functional importance. A virus titer assay demonstrated that dog strains produced higher titers in cells expressing dog SLAM than cells expressing SLAM of non-dog hosts, which suggested possible fitness benefits of specialization post-cell entry. We provide in vitro evidence for the expression of specialist and generalist traits by CDV strains, and fitness trade-offs across carnivore host environments caused by

  13. Antagonistic Pleiotropy and Fitness Trade-Offs Reveal Specialist and Generalist Traits in Strains of Canine Distemper Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolin, Veljko M.; Osterrieder, Klaus; von Messling, Veronika; Hofer, Heribert; Anderson, Danielle; Dubovi, Edward; Brunner, Edgar; East, Marion L.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretically, homogeneous environments favor the evolution of specialists whereas heterogeneous environments favor generalists. Canine distemper is a multi-host carnivore disease caused by canine distemper virus (CDV). The described cell receptor of CDV is SLAM (CD150). Attachment of CDV hemagglutinin protein (CDV-H) to this receptor facilitates fusion and virus entry in cooperation with the fusion protein (CDV-F). We investigated whether CDV strains co-evolved in the large, homogeneous domestic dog population exhibited specialist traits, and strains adapted to the heterogeneous environment of smaller populations of different carnivores exhibited generalist traits. Comparison of amino acid sequences of the SLAM binding region revealed higher similarity between sequences from Canidae species than to sequences from other carnivore families. Using an in vitro assay, we quantified syncytia formation mediated by CDV-H proteins from dog and non-dog CDV strains in cells expressing dog, lion or cat SLAM. CDV-H proteins from dog strains produced significantly higher values with cells expressing dog SLAM than with cells expressing lion or cat SLAM. CDV-H proteins from strains of non-dog species produced similar values in all three cell types, but lower values in cells expressing dog SLAM than the values obtained for CDV-H proteins from dog strains. By experimentally changing one amino acid (Y549H) in the CDV-H protein of one dog strain we decreased expression of specialist traits and increased expression of generalist traits, thereby confirming its functional importance. A virus titer assay demonstrated that dog strains produced higher titers in cells expressing dog SLAM than cells expressing SLAM of non-dog hosts, which suggested possible fitness benefits of specialization post-cell entry. We provide in vitro evidence for the expression of specialist and generalist traits by CDV strains, and fitness trade-offs across carnivore host environments caused by antagonistic

  14. Genotyping canine distemper virus (CDV) by a hemi-nested multiplex PCR provides a rapid approach for investigation of CDV outbreaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete; Martella, Vito

    2007-01-01

    CDV is a highly contagious viral pathogen causing a lethal systemic disease in dogs and other carnivores. Several lineages or genotypes of CDV exist that are variously distributed throughout several continents. Legal or uncontrolled trading of animals may modify the epidemiology of CDV, introduci...

  15. Strain-based quench detection for a solenoid superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xingzhe; Guan Mingzhi; Ma Lizhen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a non-electric quench detection method based on the strain gauge measurement of a superconducting solenoid magnet at cryogenic temperature under an intense magnetic field. Unlike the traditional voltage measurement of quench detection, the strain-based detection method utilizes low-temperature strain gauges, which evidently reduce electromagnetic noise and breakdown, to measure the magneto/thermo-mechanical behavior of the superconducting magnet during excitation. The magnet excitation, quench tests and trainings were performed on a prototype 5 T superconducting solenoid magnet. The transient strains and their abrupt changes were compared with the current, magnetic field and temperature signals collected during excitation and quench tests to indicate that the strain gauge measurements can detect the quench feature of the superconducting magnet. The proposed method is expected to be able to detect the quench of a superconducting coil independently or utilized together with other electrical methods. In addition, the axial quench propagation velocity of the solenoid is evaluated by the quench time lags among different localized strains. The propagation velocity is enhanced after repeated quench trainings. (paper)

  16. Detecting aseismic strain transients from seismicity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llenos, A.L.; McGuire, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Aseismic deformation transients such as fluid flow, magma migration, and slow slip can trigger changes in seismicity rate. We present a method that can detect these seismicity rate variations and utilize these anomalies to constrain the underlying variations in stressing rate. Because ordinary aftershock sequences often obscure changes in the background seismicity caused by aseismic processes, we combine the stochastic Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence model that describes aftershock sequences well and the physically based rate- and state-dependent friction seismicity model into a single seismicity rate model that models both aftershock activity and changes in background seismicity rate. We implement this model into a data assimilation algorithm that inverts seismicity catalogs to estimate space-time variations in stressing rate. We evaluate the method using a synthetic catalog, and then apply it to a catalog of M???1.5 events that occurred in the Salton Trough from 1990 to 2009. We validate our stressing rate estimates by comparing them to estimates from a geodetically derived slip model for a large creep event on the Obsidian Buttes fault. The results demonstrate that our approach can identify large aseismic deformation transients in a multidecade long earthquake catalog and roughly constrain the absolute magnitude of the stressing rate transients. Our method can therefore provide a way to detect aseismic transients in regions where geodetic resolution in space or time is poor. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

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  3. File list: Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  4. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  5. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  6. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  9. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  13. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Unclassified Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Unclassified Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  17. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  18. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Unclassified Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  20. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  1. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Unclassified Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  7. Identification of a novel linear B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against the carboxy terminus of the canine distemper virus nucleoprotein and sequence analysis of the identified epitope in different CDV isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Li; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Cheng, Yuening; Yang, Yong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Sun, Yaru; Zhang, Miao; Cheng, Shipeng

    2017-09-29

    The Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant and highly immunogenic protein in canine distemper virus (CDV), playing an important role in CDV viral replication and assembly. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, named C8, was produced against the NP protein C terminal (amino acids 401-523). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis.The results indicated that 444 GDKYPIHFNDER 455 was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb C8. Sequence alignments demonstrated that this linear epitope is less conserved among three CDV genotypes. We next analyzed the level of conservation of the defined epitope in19 Chinese CDV clinical isolates, and it has one site variation in amino acid among these CDV isolations. 2 isolates have the amino acid mutations F451L, while one has P448Ssubstitution.Phylogenetic analysis showed the two isolates with F451Lsubstitution had a closer relationship in a virulent strain ZJ-7, so the epitope may be a significant tag associated with virus virulence. This collection of mAb along with defined linear epitope may provide useful reagents for investigations of NP protein function and the development of CDV specific diagnostics.

  8. Early detection of left ventricular dysfunction in asymptomatic diabetic patient using strain and strain rate echocardiographic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Gaber

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Type 2 diabetes mellitus deteriorate both LV systolic and diastolic performance. Strain and strain rate by tissue Doppler Imaging is superior to conventional Doppler in early detection and evaluation of systolic and diastolic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients.

  9. Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms), but not measles virus iscoms, protect dogs against CDV infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. de Vries (Petra); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe potential of immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms), a novel form of antigenic presentation, for the induction of protective immunity against morbillivirus infection was shown by immunizing dogs with canine distemper virus (CDV) iscoms, which contained the fusion (F) protein and a

  10. Detection of antibiotic resistance in clinical bacterial strains from pets

    OpenAIRE

    Poeta, P.; Rodrigues, J.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of different bacterial strains and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance were investigated in several infection processes of pets as skin abscess with purulent discharge, bronco alveolar fluid, earwax, urine, mammary, and eye fluid. Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were the most detected in the different samples. A high frequency of antimicrobial resistance has been observed and this could reflect the wide use of antimicrobials in pets, making the effectiveness ...

  11. An Intelligent Strain Gauge with Debond Detection and Temperature Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The harsh rocket propulsion test environment will expose any inadequacies associated with preexisting instrumentation technologies, and the criticality for collecting reliable test data justifies investigating any encountered data anomalies. Novel concepts for improved systems are often conceived during the high scrutiny investigations by individuals with an in-depth knowledge from maintaining critical test operations. The Intelligent Strain Gauge concept was conceived while performing these kinds of activities. However, the novel concepts are often unexplored even if it has the potential for advancing the current state of the art. Maturing these kinds of concepts is often considered to be a tangential development or a research project which are both normally abandoned within the propulsion-oriented environment. It is also difficult to justify these kinds of projects as a facility enhancement because facility developments are only accepted for mature and proven technologies. Fortunately, the CIF program has provided an avenue for bringing the Intelligent Strain Gauge to fruition. Two types of fully functional smart strain gauges capable of performing reliable and sensitive debond detection have been successfully produced. Ordinary gauges are designed to provide test article data and they lack the ability to supply information concerning the gauge itself. A gauge is considered to be a smart gauge when it provides supplementary data relating other relevant attributes for performing diagnostic function or producing enhanced data. The developed strain gauges provide supplementary signals by measuring strain and temperature through embedded Karma and nickel chromium (NiCr) alloy elements. Intelligently interpreting the supplementary data into valuable information can be performed manually, however, integrating this functionality into an automatic system is considered to be an intelligent gauge. This was achieved while maintaining a very low mass. The low mass enables

  12. File list: Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX...096360,SRX096362 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.CDV.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX...096360,SRX096362 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.CDV.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX1...304813 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX1...304813 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX1...304813 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.CDV.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.10.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Cardiovascular SRX...4,SRX373590,SRX1304811,SRX1304812,SRX377394,SRX377691,SRX275462,SRX275461,SRX066549 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.CDV.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells DRX014747 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cardiova...,SRX080152,SRX080153,SRX367018,SRX367016 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Cardiovas...X320034,SRX346170,SRX346169,SRX373605,SRX680476 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.CDV.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 All antigens Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes SRX1...121699,SRX305918,SRX305920,SRX305919,SRX1121694 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  3. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes SRX305918...,SRX305920,SRX1121699,SRX305919 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 All antigens Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes SRX3...05918,SRX305920,SRX305919,SRX1121699,SRX1121694 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 All antigens Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes SRX3...05918,SRX305920,SRX1121699,SRX305919,SRX1121694 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  6. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes SRX112169...9,SRX305918,SRX305920,SRX305919 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes SRX305918...,SRX305920,SRX305919,SRX1121699 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  8. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes SRX112169...9,SRX305919,SRX305918,SRX305920 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Endocardial ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Endocardial ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 No description Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 No description Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 No description Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 No description Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.CDV.05.AllAg.HUVEC [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.05.AllAg.HUVEC hg19 Input control Cardiovascular HUVEC SRX220065,SRX294968,...271,SRX425273,SRX220068,SRX425270,SRX190192,SRX220067 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.05.AllAg.HUVEC.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 No description Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... DRX021453,DRX021454,DRX021452 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cardiova...,SRX346933,SRX346936,SRX367018,SRX367016 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: InP.CDV.05.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.05.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Cardiovascular SR...SRX190068,SRX220067,SRX190094,SRX080409,SRX190090,SRX699736 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.05.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: InP.CDV.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.10.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Cardiovascular SR...SRX190094,SRX190090,SRX189947,SRX080435,DRX021454,SRX699736 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.CDV.50.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.50.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Cardiovascular SRX...74,SRX517514,SRX373580,SRX320036,SRX320037,SRX1121694,SRX275462,SRX275461,SRX066549 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.CDV.50.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.CDV.20.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.20.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Cardiovascular SRX...75,SRX373609,SRX373610,SRX373590,SRX320036,SRX275461,SRX275462,SRX066549,SRX1121694 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.CDV.20.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  19. File list: InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Carotid Arterie...s DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Carotid Arterie...s DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  1. File list: NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 No description Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Carotid Arterie...s DRX021453,DRX021454,DRX021452 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Carotid Arterie...s DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 No description Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  13. File list: NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 No description Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.CDV.05.RELA.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.RELA.AllCell hg19 TFs and others RELA Cardiovascular SRX425264,SRX425263...,SRX294971,SRX112016,SRX112015,SRX425262,SRX367014,SRX367013,SRX367012,SRX367015 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.RELA.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.CDV.10.RELA.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.RELA.AllCell hg19 TFs and others RELA Cardiovascular SRX425264,SRX425263...,SRX294971,SRX112016,SRX112015,SRX425262,SRX367013,SRX367015,SRX367012,SRX367014 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.RELA.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.CDV.50.RELA.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.RELA.AllCell hg19 TFs and others RELA Cardiovascular SRX425264,SRX294971...,SRX425263,SRX112016,SRX367013,SRX367015,SRX112015,SRX367014,SRX425262,SRX367012 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.RELA.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Endocardial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Endocardial ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls DRX014674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Endocardial ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. Recombinant canine distemper virus strain snyder hill expressing green or red fluorescent proteins causes meningoencephalitis in the ferret

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ludlow (Martin); D.T. Nguyen (Tien); D. Silin; O. Lyubomska; R.D. de Vries (Rory); V. von Messling; S. McQuaid (Stephen); R.L. de Swart (Rik); W.P. Duprex (Paul)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe propensity of canine distemper virus (CDV) to spread to the central nervous system is one of the primary features of distemper. Therefore, we developed a reverse genetics system based on the neurovirulent Snyder Hill (SH) strain of CDV (CDVSH) and show that this virus rapidly

  19. The detection and differentiation of canine respiratory pathogens using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lih-Chiann; Kuo, Ya-Ting; Chueh, Ling-Ling; Huang, Dean; Lin, Jiunn-Horng

    2017-05-01

    Canine respiratory diseases are commonly seen in dogs along with co-infections with multiple respiratory pathogens, including viruses and bacteria. Virus infections in even vaccinated dogs were also reported. The clinical signs caused by different respiratory etiological agents are similar, which makes differential diagnosis imperative. An oligonucleotide microarray system was developed in this study. The wild type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV), influenza virus, canine herpesvirus (CHV), Bordetella bronchiseptica and Mycoplasma cynos were detected and differentiated simultaneously on a microarray chip. The detection limit is 10, 10, 100, 50 and 50 copy numbers for CDV, influenza virus, CHV, B. bronchiseptica and M. cynos, respectively. The clinical test results of nasal swab samples showed that the microarray had remarkably better efficacy than the multiplex PCR-agarose gel method. The positive detection rate of microarray and agarose gel was 59.0% (n=33) and 41.1% (n=23) among the 56 samples, respectively. CDV vaccine strain and pathogen co-infections were further demonstrated by the microarray but not by the multiplex PCR-agarose gel. The oligonucleotide microarray provides a highly efficient diagnosis alternative that could be applied to clinical usage, greatly assisting in disease therapy and control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Covariance of dynamic strain responses for structural damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. Y.; Wang, L. X.; Law, S. S.; Nie, Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    A new approach to address the practical problems with condition evaluation/damage detection of structures is proposed based on the distinct features of a new damage index. The covariance of strain response function (CoS) is a function of modal parameters of the structure. A local stiffness reduction in structure would cause monotonous increase in the CoS. Its sensitivity matrix with respect to local damages of structure is negative and narrow-banded. The damage extent can be estimated with an approximation to the sensitivity matrix to decouple the identification equations. The CoS sensitivity can be calibrated in practice from two previous states of measurements to estimate approximately the damage extent of a structure. A seven-storey plane frame structure is numerically studied to illustrate the features of the CoS index and the proposed method. A steel circular arch in the laboratory is tested. Natural frequencies changed due to damage in the arch and the damage occurrence can be judged. However, the proposed CoS method can identify not only damage happening but also location, even damage extent without need of an analytical model. It is promising for structural condition evaluation of selected components.

  1. Detection of phosphatase activity in aquatic and terrestrial cyanobacterial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Olivera B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria, as highly adaptable microorganisms, are characterized by an ability to survive in different environmental conditions, in which a significant role belongs to their enzymes. Phosphatases are enzymes produced by algae in relatively large quantities in response to a low orthophosphate concentration and their activity is significantly correlated with their primary production. The activity of these enzymes was investigated in 11 cyanobacterial strains in order to determine enzyme synthesis depending on taxonomic and ecological group of cyanobacteria. The study was conducted with 4 terrestrial cyanobacterial strains, which belong to Nostoc and Anabaena genera, and 7 filamentous water cyanobacteria of Nostoc, Oscillatoria, Phormidium and Microcystis genera. The obtained results showed that the activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases strongly depended on cyanobacterial strain and the environment from which the strain originated. Higher activity of alkaline phosphatases, ranging from 3.64 to 85.14 μmolpNP/s/dm3, was recorded in terrestrial strains compared to the studied water strains (1.11-5.96 μmolpNP/s/dm3. The activity of acid phosphatases was higher in most tested water strains (1.67-6.28 μmolpNP/s/dm3 compared to the activity of alkaline phosphatases (1.11-5.96 μmolpNP/s/dm3. Comparing enzyme activity of nitrogen fixing and non-nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria, it was found that most nitrogen fixing strains had a higher activity of alkaline phosphatases. The data obtained in this work indicate that activity of phosphatases is a strain specific property. The results further suggest that synthesis and activity of phosphatases depended on eco-physiological characteristics of the examined cyanobacterial strains. This can be of great importance for the further study of enzymes and mechanisms of their activity as a part of cyanobacterial survival strategy in environments with extreme conditions. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  2. Whole genome sequence analysis of the arctic-lineage strain responsible for distemper in Italian wolves and dogs through a fast and robust next generation sequencing protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcacci, Maurilia; Ancora, Massimo; Mangone, Iolanda; Teodori, Liana; Di Sabatino, Daria; De Massis, Fabrizio; Camma', Cesare; Savini, Giovanni; Lorusso, Alessio

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic surveillance and characterization of canine distemper virus (CDV) circulating strains are essential against possible vaccine breakthroughs events. This study describes the setup of a fast and robust next-generation sequencing (NGS) Ion PGM™ protocol that was used to obtain the complete genome sequence of a CDV isolate (CDV2784/2013). CDV2784/2013 is the prototype of CDV strains responsible for severe clinical distemper in dogs and wolves in Italy during 2013. CDV2784/2013 was isolated on cell culture and total RNA was used for NGS sample preparation. A total of 112.3 Mb of reads were assembled de novo using MIRA version 4.0rc4, which yielded a total number of 403 contigs with 12.1% coverage. The whole genome (15,690 bp) was recovered successfully and compared to those of existing CDV whole genomes. CDV2784/2013 was shown to have 92% nt identity with the Onderstepoort vaccine strain. This study describes for the first time a fast and robust Ion PGM™ platform-based whole genome amplification protocol for non-segmented negative stranded RNA viruses starting from total cell-purified RNA. Additionally, this is the first study reporting the whole genome analysis of an Arctic lineage strain that is known to circulate widely in Europe, Asia and USA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Detecting strain in birefringent materials using spectral polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Harold R. (Inventor); Ragucci, Anthony J. (Inventor); Cisar, Alan J. (Inventor); Huebschman, Michael L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method, computer program product and system for analyzing multispectral images from a plurality of regions of birefringent material, such as a polymer film, using polarized light and a corresponding polar analyzer to identify differential strain in the birefringent material. For example, the birefringement material may be low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyvinylidene chloride, polyester, nylon, or cellophane film. Optionally, the method includes generating a real-time quantitative strain map.

  4. Exposure of pampas fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus and crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous from the Southern region of Brazil to Canine distemper virus (CDV, Canine parvovirus (CPV and Canine coronavirus (CCoV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia de Oliveira Hübner

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The exposure of 13 Brazilian free-ranging nondomestic canids (five pampas fox - Pseudalopex gymnocercus and eight crab-eating fox -Cerdocyon thous from Southern region of Brazil, to Canine distemper virus (CDV, canine parvovirus (CPV and Canine coronavirus (CCoV was investigated. Antibodies against CDV were detected in 38.5% (5/13 of the samples. There were anti-CDV antibodies in 60% (3/5 of P. gymnocercus and in 25% (2/8 of C. thous. The frequency was higher among the adults and males. Eleven canids (84.6% presented antibodies against CPV, 80% (4/5 were from P. gymnocercus and 87.5% (7/8 were from C. thous. There was no difference in positivity rate against CPV between gender and age. Antibodies against CCoV were detected in 38.5% (5/13 of the samples, with 60% (3/5 of positivity in P. gymnocercus and 25% (2/8 in C. thous. The frequency of antibodies against CCoV was higher among the adults and males. The study showed that these canids were exposed to CDV, CPV and CCoV.Foi investigada a ocorrência de exposição em 13 canídeos não domésticos de vida livre (cinco graxains-do-campo - Pseudalopex gymnocercus e oito graxains-do-mato - Cerdocyon thous da região sul do Brasil ao vírus da cinomose canina (CDV, parvovírus canino (CPV e coronavírus canino (CCoV. Anticorpos contra o CDV foram detectados em 38,5% (5/13 das amostras. Haviam anticorpos anti-CDV em 60% (3/5 dos P. gymnocercus e em 25% (2/8 dos C. thous. A freqüência foi maior entre machos e adultos. Para CPV, 11 canídeos (84,6% apresentaram anticorpos, 80% (4/5 eram da espécie P. gymnocercus e 87,5% (7/8 eram C. thous. Não houve diferença de positividade para o CPV entre sexos e idades. Anticorpos contra o CCoV foram detectados em 38,5% (5/13 das amostras, sendo 60% (3/5 de positividade entre os P. gymnocercus e 25% (2/8 entre os C. thous. A freqüência de anticorpos para CCoV foi maior entre os machos e adultos. O estudo revelou que estes canídeos foram expostos ao CDV, CPV

  5. Self-adapted and tunable graphene strain sensors for detecting both subtle and large human motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lu-Qi; Wang, Dan-Yang; Tian, He; Ju, Zhen-Yi; Liu, Ying; Pang, Yu; Chen, Yuan-Quan; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2017-06-22

    Conventional strain sensors rarely have both a high gauge factor and a large strain range simultaneously, so they can only be used in specific situations where only a high sensitivity or a large strain range is required. However, for detecting human motions that include both subtle and large motions, these strain sensors can't meet the diverse demands simultaneously. Here, we come up with laser patterned graphene strain sensors with self-adapted and tunable performance for the first time. A series of strain sensors with either an ultrahigh gauge factor or a preferable strain range can be fabricated simultaneously via one-step laser patterning, and are suitable for detecting all human motions. The strain sensors have a GF of up to 457 with a strain range of 35%, or have a strain range of up to 100% with a GF of 268. Most importantly, the performance of the strain sensors can be easily tuned by adjusting the patterns of the graphene, so that the sensors can meet diverse demands in both subtle and large motion situations. The graphene strain sensors show significant potential in applications such as wearable electronics, health monitoring and intelligent robots. Furthermore, the facile, fast and low-cost fabrication method will make them possible and practical to be used for commercial applications in the future.

  6. Mucosal vaccination with recombinant poxvirus vaccines protects ferrets against symptomatic CDV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, J; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E; Stephensen, C B

    1999-01-28

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets causes a disease characterized by fever, erythema, conjunctivitis and leukocytopenia, similar clinically to measles except for the fatal neurologic sequelae of CDV. We vaccinated juvenile ferrets twice at 4-week intervals by the intranasal or intraduodenal route with attenuated vaccinia (NYVAC) or canarypox virus (ALVAC) constructs containing the CDV hemagglutinin and fusion genes. Controls were vaccinated with the same vectors expressing rabies glycoprotein. Animals were challenged intranasally 4 weeks after the second vaccination with virulent CDV. Body weights, white blood cell (WBC) counts and temperatures were monitored and ferrets were observed daily for clinical signs of infection. WBCs were assayed for the presence of viral RNA by RT-PCR. Intranasally vaccinated animals survived challenge with no virologic or clinical evidence of infection. Vaccination by the intraduodenal route did not provide complete protection. All control animals developed typical distemper. Ferrets can be effectively protected against distemper by mucosal vaccination with poxvirus vaccines.

  7. A duplex PCR assay for the detection of Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype II strains in Musa spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Cellier

    Full Text Available Banana wilt outbreaks that are attributable to Moko disease-causing strains of the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs remain a social and economic burden for both multinational corporations and subsistence farmers. All known Moko strains belong to the phylotype II lineage, which has been previously recognized for its broad genetic basis. Moko strains are paraphyletic and are distributed among seven related but distinct phylogenetic clusters (sequevars that are potentially major threats to Musaceae, Solanaceae, and ornamental crops in many countries. Although clustered within the Moko IIB-4 sequevar, strains of the epidemiologically variant IIB-4NPB do not cause wilt on Cavendish or plantain bananas; instead, they establish a latent infection in the vascular tissues of plantains and demonstrate an expanded host range and high aggressiveness toward Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Although most molecular diagnostic methods focus on strains that wilt Solanaceae (particularly potato, no relevant protocol has been described that universally detects strains of the Musaceae-infecting Rs phylotype II. Thus, a duplex PCR assay targeting Moko and IIB-4NPB variant strains was developed, and its performance was assessed using an extensive collection of 111 strains representing the known diversity of Rs Moko-related strains and IIB-4NPB variant strains along with certain related strains and families. The proposed diagnostic protocol demonstrated both high accuracy (inclusivity and exclusivity and high repeatability, detected targets on either pure culture or spiked plant extracts. Although they did not belong to the Moko clusters described at the time of the study, recently discovered banana-infecting strains from Brazil were also detected. According to our comprehensive evaluation, this duplex PCR assay appears suitable for both research and diagnostic laboratories and provides reliable detection of phylotype II Rs strains that infect Musaceae.

  8. A polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of virulent and attenuated strains of duck plague virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Liji; Xie, Zhixun; Huang, Li; Wang, Sheng; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Luo, Sisi

    2017-11-01

    Sequence analysis of duck plague virus (DPV) revealed that there was a 528bp (B fragment) deletion within the UL2 gene of DPV attenuated vaccine strain in comparison with field virulent strains. The finding of gene deletion provides a potential differentiation test between DPV virulent strain and attenuated strain based on their UL2 gene sizes. Thus we developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting to the DPV UL2 gene for simultaneous detection of DPV virulent strain and attenuated strain, 827bp for virulent strain and 299bp for attenuated strain. This newly developed PCR for DPV was highly sensitive and specific. It detected as low as 100fg of DNA on both DPV virulent and attenuated strains, no same size bands were amplified from other duck viruses including duck paramyxovirus, duck tembusu virus, duck circovirus, Muscovy duck parvovirus, duck hepatitis virus type I, avian influenza virus and gosling plague virus. Therefore, this PCR assay can be used for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of DPV virulent and attenuated strains affecting ducks. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Detection and transmission of extracellular fac-tor producing Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swildens, B.

    2009-01-01

    DETECTION AND TRANSMISSION OF EXTRACELLULAR FACTOR PRODUCING STREPTOCOCCUS SUIS SEROTYPE 2 STRAINS IN PIGS INTRODUCTION Streptococcus suis (S.suis) has been implicated in the etiology of many diseases among which meningitis in pigs. The virulent extracellular factor-positive strains of S.suis

  10. Sequencing of emerging canine distemper virus strain reveals new distinct genetic lineage in the United States associated with disease in wildlife and domestic canine populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Matthew C; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2015-12-18

    Recent outbreaks of canine distemper have prompted examination of strains from clinical samples submitted to the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine (UTCVM) Clinical Virology Lab. We previously described a new strain of CDV that significantly diverged from all genotypes reported to date including America 2, the genotype proposed to be the main lineage currently circulating in the US. The aim of this study was to determine when this new strain appeared and how widespread it is in animal populations, given that it has also been detected in fully vaccinated adult dogs. Additionally, we sequenced complete viral genomes to characterize the strain and determine if variation is confined to known variable regions of the genome or if the changes are also present in more conserved regions. Archived clinical samples were genotyped using real-time RT-PCR amplification and sequencing. The genomes of two unrelated viruses from a dog and fox each from a different state were sequenced and aligned with previously published genomes. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using coding, non-coding and genome-length sequences. Virus neutralization assays were used to evaluate potential antigenic differences between this strain and a vaccine strain and mixed ANOVA test was used to compare the titers. Genotyping revealed this strain first appeared in 2011 and was detected in dogs from multiple states in the Southeast region of the United States. It was the main strain detected among the clinical samples that were typed from 2011-2013, including wildlife submissions. Genome sequencing demonstrated that it is highly conserved within a new lineage and preliminary serologic testing showed significant differences in neutralizing antibody titers between this strain and the strain commonly used in vaccines. This new strain represents an emerging CDV in domestic dogs in the US, may be associated with a stable reservoir in the wildlife population, and could facilitate vaccine

  11. Phylogenetic features of hemagglutin gene in canine distemper virus strains from different genetic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peng; Guo, Li; Wen, Yongjun; Yang, Yangling; Cheng, Shipeng

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the genotype of two Canine distemper virus (CDV) strains, namely, ZJJ-SD and ZJJ-LN, were investigated, based on the whole hemagglutinin (HA) gene. The CDV strains were obtained from two foxes in Shandong Province and Liaoning Province in 2011. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out for 260 CDV strains worldwide, and a statistical analysis was performed in the amino acid substitutions at positions 530 and 549 of the HA protein. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the two strains, ZJJ-SD and ZJJ-LN, belonged to the CDV Asia I lineage. Site 530 of HA protein was found to be relatively conserved within CDV lineages in different host species by combining the genetic sequence data with the published data from 260 CDV strains worldwide. The data analysis showed a bias toward the predicted substitution Y549H for the non-dog strains in Asia I and Europe lineages. The ratio of site 549 genetic drift in the HA gene were significantly different between dogs and non-dogs in the two lineages. The strain ZJJ-SD, from wild canid, has an Y549H substitution. It is one of three Y549H substitution for wild canids in Asia I lineages. Site 530 of HA protein was not immediately relative to CDV genetic drift from dogs to non-dogs. Statistical analysis indicated that non-dog strains have a high probability to contain Y549H than dog strains in Asia I and Europe lineages. Thus, site 549 is considered important in genetic drift from dogs to non-dogs, at least in Asia I and Europe lineages.

  12. [GM1-dot-EIA for the detection of toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markina, O V; Alekseeva, L P; Telesmanich, N R; Chemisova, O S; Akulova, M V; Markin, N V

    2011-05-01

    A new variant of enzyme immunoassay (EIA) has been developed on the basis of GM1 gangliosides to detect the toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae strains--GM1-dot-EIA. Experiments were run using a nitrocellulose membrane to bind GM1 gangliosides and polyclonal antitoxic serum to detect cholerogen. GM1-dot-EIA testing identified cholera toxin in 11 of 13 supernatants of V. cholerae eltor ctx(+) strains isolated from man and in 3 of 7 supernatants of V. cholerae eltor ctx(+) strains isolated from water. These data agree with those obtained in CM1-EIA. There was no reaction with the supernatants of other microorganisms. The sensitivity of the technique was 10 ng/ml. Thus, the simple and specific GM1-dot-EIA may be recommended to detect toxin-producing V cholerae strains isolated from man and water.

  13. Characterization of rotavirus strains detected among children and adults with acute gastroenteritis in Ganozan, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheyami, Ali M.; Dove, W.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Hart, C.A.; Areeshi, Mohammed Y.; Nakagomi, O.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to assess the circulating rotavirus strains among hospitalized children and adults in Gizan City. This cross-sectional study was based in 5 hospitals in the Gizan area. Stool samples were collected between November 2004 and March 2005 from sequential patients with acute dehydrating diarrhea. Rotavirus antigen was detected in stool by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The diversity of rotavirus strains was investigated using electropherotyping and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification of the VP7 and VP4 genes (G and P genotyping). Rotavirus was detected in 54 of 454 (12%) subjects. The ages of those infected with rotavirus ranged from 15 days to 20 years, with a median age of 36 months. The highest rotavirus detection rate (24%) occurred in children in aged 48-59 months. Overall, 50 (93%) of strains could be assigned both a G- and P- type; G1P (8) was the most frequently detected strain type (n=48, 89%) with one rotavirus each of G2P (4) and G9P (8). Rotavirus strains circulating in Gizan would be well covered by current rotavirus vaccines. Rotavirus serotype G9 has been detected in Saudi Arabia for the first time. Continued surveillance of rotavirus strains is required. (author)

  14. A duplex endpoint PCR assay for rapid detection and differentiation of Leptospira strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benacer, Douadi; Zain, Siti Nursheena Mohd; Lewis, John W; Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam Mohd; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a duplex endpoint PCR assay for rapid detection and differentiation of Leptospira strains. Primers were designed to target the rrs (LG1/LG2) and ligB (LP1/LP2) genes to confirm the presence of the Leptospira genus and the pathogenic species, respectively. The assay showed 100% specificity against 17 Leptospira strains with a limit of detection of 23.1pg/µl of leptospiral DNA and sensitivity of 103 leptospires/ml in both spiked urine and water. Our duplex endpoint PCR assay is suitable for rapid early detection of Leptospira with high sensitivity and specificity.

  15. Detection of PCV2e strains in Southeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiankui Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2 has been prevalent in swine herds in China since 2002, causing severe economic loss to the pig industry. The number of live pigs in southeast China is > 20 million. Since information on the genetic variation of PCV2 in the Fujian province is limited, the objective of the present work was to investigate the epidemiological and evolutionary characteristics of PCV2 in southeast China from 2013 to 2017. Of the 685 samples collected from 90 different swine herds from 2013 to 2017, 356 samples from 84 different swine herds were positive for PCV2. PCV2a, PCV2b, PCV2d, and PCV2e co-existed in the Fujian province, with PCV2d being the predominant circulating strain in swineherds and PCV2e being reported for the first time in China. Strikingly, PCV2-FJ-water DNA comes from contaminated river water and not infected animals. Sequence comparison among all isolates indicated that 95 isolates shared approximately 78.7%–100% nucleotide identity and 74.5%–100% amino acid identity for open reading frame 2 (ORF2. Amino acid alignment showed that the Cap protein of PCV2e differed markedly from those of PCV2a, PCV2b, PCV2c, and PCV2d. These results indicated that various PCV2 genotypes exist in China, and that PCV2 is continuously evolving, leading to rapid emergence of new variant stains.

  16. Research on the novel FBG detection system for temperature and strain field distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-chao; Yang, Jin-hua

    2017-10-01

    In order to collect the information of temperature and strain field distribution information, the novel FBG detection system was designed. The system applied linear chirped FBG structure for large bandwidth. The structure of novel FBG cover was designed as a linear change in thickness, in order to have a different response at different locations. It can obtain the temperature and strain field distribution information by reflection spectrum simultaneously. The structure of novel FBG cover was designed, and its theoretical function is calculated. Its solution is derived for strain field distribution. By simulation analysis the change trend of temperature and strain field distribution were analyzed in the conditions of different strain strength and action position, the strain field distribution can be resolved. The FOB100 series equipment was used to test the temperature in experiment, and The JSM-A10 series equipment was used to test the strain field distribution in experiment. The average error of experimental results was better than 1.1% for temperature, and the average error of experimental results was better than 1.3% for strain. There were individual errors when the strain was small in test data. It is feasibility by theoretical analysis, simulation calculation and experiment, and it is very suitable for application practice.

  17. File list: InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Immunomagnetic separation combined with colony immunoblotting for selective enrichment and detection of piliated Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z Q; Wei, Y F; Rao, S Q; Gao, L; Yin, Y Q; Xue, F; Fang, W M; Gu, R X; Jiao, X A

    2016-11-01

    Piliated Lactobacillus rhamnosus (pLR) strains have attracted much attention owing to their excellent mucus adhering capacity and immunomodulatory effects. Here, we aimed to develop a rapid, sensitive method for isolating pLR strains in complex ecosystems using immunomagnetic separation (IMS) with colony immunoblotting (CIB). Magnetic nanobeads (diameter: 180 nm) conjugated with anti-pLR SpaA pilin antibodies (anti-SpaA) were prepared and used to preconcentrate pLR strains in samples, followed by confirmation with anti-SpaA-based CIB analysis. Under optimized experimental conditions, IMS-CIB selectively recovered pLR strains from 10 7  CFU ml -1 of faecal microbiota samples spiked with 2·9 × 10 1 to 2·4 × 10 6  CFU ml -1 of pLR strains. No positive colonies were detected in samples without addition of pLR strains. The detection limit of IMS-CIB was 29 CFU pLR ml -1 of faecal microbiota, which is much lower than that of CIB without IMS preconcentration (2·0 × 10 4  CFU ml -1 ). IMS-CIB allowed selective preconcentration of pLR strains in highly heterogeneous bacterial suspensions and direct detection of pLR colonies, which remained readily available for subsequent isolation. Our findings established an effective method for selective enrichment and detection of pLR strains. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Detection of thermal aging degradation and plastic strain damage for duplex stainless steel using SQUID sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaka, M.; Evanson, S.; Hesegawa, K.; Takaku, K.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus using a SQUID sensor is developed for nondestructive inspection. The measurements are obtained with the SQUID sensor located approximately 150 mm from the specimen. The degradation of thermal aging and plastic strain for duplex stainless steel is successfully detected independently from the magnetic characterization measurements. The magnetic flux density under high polarizing field is found to be independent of thermal aging. Coercive force increases with thermal aging time. On the other hand, the magnetic flux density under high field increases with the plastic strain. Coercive force is found to be independent of the plastic strain. (author)

  5. A real-time PCR assay for the detection of atypical strains of Chlamydiaceae from pigeons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Zocevic

    Full Text Available Recent evidence of the occurrence of atypical Chlamydiaceae strains in pigeons, different from the established Chlamydiaceae, requires the development of a specific and rapid detection tool to investigate their prevalence and significance. Here is described a new real-time PCR assay that allows specific detection of atypical Chlamydiaceae from pigeons. The assay has been used to assess the dissemination of these strains in field samples collected from Parisian pigeon populations in 2009. The results suggest a limited dissemination compared to the usually higher prevalence of Chlamydia psittaci that is the main species associated with avian chlamydiosis.

  6. Strain detection in crystalline heterostructures using bidimensional blocking patterns of channelled particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; David-Bosne, E.; Wahl, U.; Miranda, P.; da Silva, M. R.; Correia, J. G.; Lorenz, K.

    2018-03-01

    Strain is a critical parameter affecting the growth and the performance of many semiconductor systems but, at the same time, the accurate determination of strain profiles in heterostructures can be challenging, especially at the nanoscale. Ion channelling/blocking is a powerful technique for the detection of the strain state of thin films, normally carried out through angular scans with conventional particle detectors. Here we report the novel application of position sensitive detectors for the evaluation of the strain in a series of AlInN/GaN heterostructures with different compositions and thicknesses. The tetragonal strain is varied from compressive to tensile and analysed through bidimensional blocking patterns. The results demonstrate that strain can be correctly quantified when compared to Monte Carlo channelling simulations, which are essential because of the presence of ion steering effects at the interface between the layer and the substrate. Despite this physical limitation caused by ion steering, our results show that full bidimensional patterns can be applied to detect fingerprints and enhance the accuracy for most critical cases, in which the angular shift associated to the lattice distortion is below the critical angle for channelling.

  7. Detection and Identification of Probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum Strains by Multiplex PCR Using RAPD-Derived Primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanis, Alex; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Tassou, Chrysoula C; Chorianopoulos, Nikos

    2015-10-22

    Lactobacillus plantarum 2035 and Lactobacillus plantarum ACA-DC 2640 are two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains that have been isolated from Feta cheese. Both display significant potential for the production of novel probiotic food products. The aim of the present study was the development of an accurate and efficient method for the molecular detection and identification of the above strains in a single reaction. A multiplex PCR assay was designed for each strain, based on specific primers derived from Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Sequenced Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR) analysis. The specificity of the assay was tested with a total of 23 different LAB strains, for L. plantarum 2035 and L. plantarum ACA-DC 2640. The multiplex PCR assay was also successfully applied for the detection of the above cultures in yogurt samples prepared in our lab. The proposed methodology may be applied for monitoring the presence of these strains in food products, thus evaluating their probiotic character. Moreover, our strategy may be adapted for other novel LAB strains with probiotic potential, thus providing a powerful tool for molecular discrimination that could be invaluable to the food industry.

  8. Detection and Identification of Probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum Strains by Multiplex PCR Using RAPD-Derived Primers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Galanis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus plantarum 2035 and Lactobacillus plantarum ACA-DC 2640 are two lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains that have been isolated from Feta cheese. Both display significant potential for the production of novel probiotic food products. The aim of the present study was the development of an accurate and efficient method for the molecular detection and identification of the above strains in a single reaction. A multiplex PCR assay was designed for each strain, based on specific primers derived from Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD Sequenced Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR analysis. The specificity of the assay was tested with a total of 23 different LAB strains, for L. plantarum 2035 and L. plantarum ACA-DC 2640. The multiplex PCR assay was also successfully applied for the detection of the above cultures in yogurt samples prepared in our lab. The proposed methodology may be applied for monitoring the presence of these strains in food products, thus evaluating their probiotic character. Moreover, our strategy may be adapted for other novel LAB strains with probiotic potential, thus providing a powerful tool for molecular discrimination that could be invaluable to the food industry.

  9. Characterisation of a rare, reassortant human G10P[14] rotavirus strain detected in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaye, Osbourne; Roy, Sunando; Rungsrisuriyachai, Kunchala; Esona, Mathew D; Xu, Ziqian; Tam, Ka Ian; Banegas, Dina J Castro; Rey-Benito, Gloria; Bowen, Michael D

    2018-01-01

    Although first detected in animals, the rare rotavirus strain G10P[14] has been sporadically detected in humans in Slovenia, Thailand, United Kingdom and Australia among other countries. Earlier studies suggest that the strains found in humans resulted from interspecies transmission and reassortment between human and bovine rotavirus strains. In this study, a G10P[14] rotavirus genotype detected in a human stool sample in Honduras during the 2010-2011 rotavirus season, from an unvaccinated 30-month old boy who reported at the hospital with severe diarrhea and vomiting, was characterised to determine the possible evolutionary origin of the rare strain. For the sample detected as G10P[14], 10% suspension was prepared and used for RNA extraction and sequence independent amplification. The amplicons were sequenced by next-generation sequencing using the Illumina MiSeq 150 paired end method. The sequence reads were analysed using CLC Genomics Workbench 6.0 and phylogenetic trees were constructed using PhyML version 3.0. The next generation sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of the 11-segmented genome of the G10P[14] strain allowed classification as G10-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. Six of the genes (VP1, VP2, VP3, VP6, NSP2 and NSP4) were DS-1-like. NSP1 and NSP5 were AU-1-like and NSP3 was T6, which suggests that multiple reassortment events occurred in the evolution of the strain. The phylogenetic analyses and genetic distance calculations showed that the VP7, VP4, VP6, VP1, VP3, NSP1, NSP3 and NSP4 genes clustered predominantly with bovine strains. NSP2 and VP2 genes were most closely related to simian and human strains, respectively, and NSP5 was most closely related to a rhesus strain. The genetic characterisation of the G10P[14] strain from Honduras suggests that its genome resulted from multiple reassortment events which were possibly mediated through interspecies transmissions.

  10. Recombinant canine distemper virus strain Snyder Hill expressing green or red fluorescent proteins causes meningoencephalitis in the ferret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, M; Nguyen, D T; Silin, D; Lyubomska, O; de Vries, R D; von Messling, V; McQuaid, S; De Swart, R L; Duprex, W P

    2012-07-01

    The propensity of canine distemper virus (CDV) to spread to the central nervous system is one of the primary features of distemper. Therefore, we developed a reverse genetics system based on the neurovirulent Snyder Hill (SH) strain of CDV (CDV(SH)) and show that this virus rapidly circumvents the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barriers to spread into the subarachnoid space to induce dramatic viral meningoencephalitis. The use of recombinant CDV(SH) (rCDV(SH)) expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or red fluorescent protein (dTomato) facilitated the sensitive pathological assessment of routes of virus spread in vivo. Infection of ferrets with these viruses led to the full spectrum of clinical signs typically associated with distemper in dogs during a rapid, fatal disease course of approximately 2 weeks. Comparison with the ferret-adapted CDV(5804P) and the prototypic wild-type CDV(R252) showed that hematogenous infection of the choroid plexus is not a significant route of virus spread into the CSF. Instead, viral spread into the subarachnoid space in rCDV(SH)-infected animals was triggered by infection of vascular endothelial cells and the hematogenous spread of virus-infected leukocytes from meningeal blood vessels into the subarachnoid space. This resulted in widespread infection of cells of the pia and arachnoid mater of the leptomeninges over large areas of the cerebral hemispheres. The ability to sensitively assess the in vivo spread of a neurovirulent strain of CDV provides a novel model system to study the mechanisms of virus spread into the CSF and the pathogenesis of acute viral meningitis.

  11. A diagnostic PCR assay for the detection of an Australian epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lung infection with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with worsening lung function, increased hospitalisation and reduced life expectancy. A virulent clonal strain of P. aeruginosa (Australian epidemic strain I; AES-I) has been found to be widespread in CF patients in eastern Australia. Methods Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed to identify genetic sequences that are present in the AES-I strain but absent from the sequenced reference strain PAO1. We used PCR to evaluate the distribution of several of the AES-I loci amongst a collection of 188 P. aeruginosa isolates which was comprised of 35 AES-I isolates (as determined by PFGE), 78 non-AES-I CF isolates including other epidemic CF strains as well as 69 P. aeruginosa isolates from other clinical and environmental sources. Results We have identified a unique AES-I genetic locus that is present in all 35 AES-I isolates tested and not present in any of the other 153 P. aeruginosa strains examined. We have used this unique AES-I locus to develop a diagnostic PCR and a real-time PCR assay to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa and AES-I in patient sputum samples. Conclusions We have developed diagnostic PCR assays that are 100% sensitive and 100% specific for the P. aeruginosa strain AES-I. We have also shown that Whatman FTA® Elute cards may be used with PCR-based assays to rapidly detect the presence of P. aeruginosa strains in CF sputum. PMID:20637114

  12. A diagnostic PCR assay for the detection of an Australian epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Anna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lung infection with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF and is associated with worsening lung function, increased hospitalisation and reduced life expectancy. A virulent clonal strain of P. aeruginosa (Australian epidemic strain I; AES-I has been found to be widespread in CF patients in eastern Australia. Methods Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH was employed to identify genetic sequences that are present in the AES-I strain but absent from the sequenced reference strain PAO1. We used PCR to evaluate the distribution of several of the AES-I loci amongst a collection of 188 P. aeruginosa isolates which was comprised of 35 AES-I isolates (as determined by PFGE, 78 non-AES-I CF isolates including other epidemic CF strains as well as 69 P. aeruginosa isolates from other clinical and environmental sources. Results We have identified a unique AES-I genetic locus that is present in all 35 AES-I isolates tested and not present in any of the other 153 P. aeruginosa strains examined. We have used this unique AES-I locus to develop a diagnostic PCR and a real-time PCR assay to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa and AES-I in patient sputum samples. Conclusions We have developed diagnostic PCR assays that are 100% sensitive and 100% specific for the P. aeruginosa strain AES-I. We have also shown that Whatman FTA® Elute cards may be used with PCR-based assays to rapidly detect the presence of P. aeruginosa strains in CF sputum.

  13. Comparison of detection methods for extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in Escherichia coli strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Kałużna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs could be a major challenge for microbiologists – the difficulties arise mainly from the phenotypic differences among strains.Materials and Methods: Evaluation of ESBLs was performed on 42 strains of E. coli by: 1 DDST on MHA, 2 DDST on MHA with cloxacillin, 3 CT on MHA, according to CLSI, 4 CT on MHA with cloxacillin, 5 Etest ESBL (AB Biodisk, 6 CHROMagarTM ESBL (GRASO, 7 ChromID® ESBL (bioMérieux, and 8 automatic system VITEK2 ESBL test (bioMérieux.Result: Positive results were obtained for 20 strains using method 1, for 18 strains using method 2, 17 by method 3, 14 by method 4, 11 by method 5, 39 by method 6, 40 by method 7, and 15 by method 8. Using Etest ESBL 6.0 non-determinable results were obtained. The most consistent results were obtained when comparing the results of method 3 with results of method 2 (97.6%, and comparing the results obtained using methods 3 and 8 (95.2%.Conclusions: Based on our study we conclude that the chromogenic media can only be used as a screening method for the detection of ESBLs in E. coli rods. Etest is less useful compared to other phenotype methods, due to the impossibility of obtaining results for all the tested strains. Adding cloxacillin to MHA does not increase the frequency of detection of ESBLs in E. coli strains. DDST seems to be the most reliable among phenotypic methods for the detection of ESBLs in E. coli rods.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of Austrian canine distemper virus strains from clinical samples from dogs and wild carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetka, V; Leschnik, M; Affenzeller, N; Möstl, K

    2011-04-09

    Austrian field cases of canine distemper (14 dogs, one badger [Meles meles] and one stone marten [Martes foina]) from 2002 to 2007 were investigated and the case histories were summarised briefly. Phylogenetic analysis of fusion (F) and haemagglutinin (H) gene sequences revealed different canine distemper virus (CDV) lineages circulating in Austria. The majority of CDV strains detected from 2002 to 2004 were well embedded in the European lineage. One Austrian canine sample detected in 2003, with a high similarity to Hungarian sequences from 2005 to 2006, could be assigned to the Arctic group (phocine distemper virus type 2-like). The two canine sequences from 2007 formed a clearly distinct group flanked by sequences detected previously in China and the USA on an intermediate position between the European wildlife and the Asia-1 cluster. The Austrian wildlife strains (2006 and 2007) could be assigned to the European wildlife group and were most closely related to, yet clearly different from, the 2007 canine samples. To elucidate the epidemiological role of Austrian wildlife in the transmission of the disease to dogs and vice versa, H protein residues related to receptor and host specificity (residues 530 and 549) were analysed. All samples showed the amino acids expected for their host of origin, with the exception of a canine sequence from 2007, which had an intermediate position between wildlife and canine viral strains. In the period investigated, canine strains circulating in Austria could be assigned to four different lineages reflecting both a high diversity and probably different origins of virus introduction to Austria in different years.

  15. A new approach for structural health monitoring by applying anomaly detection on strain sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichias, Konstantinos; Pijpers, Richard; Meeuwissen, Erik

    2014-03-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems help to monitor critical infrastructures (bridges, tunnels, etc.) remotely and provide up-to-date information about their physical condition. In addition, it helps to predict the structure's life and required maintenance in a cost-efficient way. Typically, inspection data gives insight in the structural health. The global structural behavior, and predominantly the structural loading, is generally measured with vibration and strain sensors. Acoustic emission sensors are more and more used for measuring global crack activity near critical locations. In this paper, we present a procedure for local structural health monitoring by applying Anomaly Detection (AD) on strain sensor data for sensors that are applied in expected crack path. Sensor data is analyzed by automatic anomaly detection in order to find crack activity at an early stage. This approach targets the monitoring of critical structural locations, such as welds, near which strain sensors can be applied during construction and/or locations with limited inspection possibilities during structural operation. We investigate several anomaly detection techniques to detect changes in statistical properties, indicating structural degradation. The most effective one is a novel polynomial fitting technique, which tracks slow changes in sensor data. Our approach has been tested on a representative test structure (bridge deck) in a lab environment, under constant and variable amplitude fatigue loading. In both cases, the evolving cracks at the monitored locations were successfully detected, autonomously, by our AD monitoring tool.

  16. Clinical syndromes of nervous distemper in dogs initially presented without conventional evidences of CDV infectionSíndromes clínicas da apresentação neurológica da cinomose em cães admitidos inicialmente sem as evidencias convencionais da infecção pelo CDV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Mendes Amude

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite large vaccination practice, canine distemper virus (CDV is yet an important infectious agent that leads to nervous disease in canine populations worldwide. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis of distemper encephalomyelitis is often difficult in cases presented without conventional evidences of CDV infection such as systemic signs and myoclonus. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the neurological deficits and the clinical syndromes of nervous distemper in dogs suffering from neurological disease admitted in the absence of the conventional evidences of CDV infection. Dogs presented with central nervous disease in which toxic/traumatic or a CDV-free etiology could be excluded ante mortem were prospectively followed up and which that died (natural death or euthanasia, despite medical treatment and necropsy was carried out were included in this study. Ten out of 35 evaluated dogs were post mortem diagnosed with CDV encephalomyelitis by both CDV RNA detection through RT-PCR assay in nervous tissue and observation of distemper-compatible neuroparenchymal lesions. According to the nervous signs, clinical history, and the age of presentation, the distemper dogs were grouped in three clinical syndromes of CDV encephalomyelitis: i canine distemper encephalitis in immature dogs (CDEID (n=3; ii multifocal distemper encephalomyelitis in mature dogs (MDEMD (n=6; and iii old dog encephalitis (ODE-like syndrome (n=1. The respective nervous deficits expected from each one of the syndromes herein presented were discussed.Apesar da prática de vacinação, o vírus da cinomose canina (CDV ainda é um importante agente infeccioso que leva à doença neurológica na população canina em todo o mundo. Infelizmente, o diagnóstico clínico da encefalomielite pela cinomose é difícil nos casos apresentados sem evidências clínicas convencionais de infecção pelo CDV, tais como sinais sistêmicos e mioclonia. Portanto, o objetivo deste estudo

  17. Intra-strain polymorphisms are detected but no genomic alteration is found in cloned mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Koshichi; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogura, Atsuo; Oishi, Michio

    2006-01-01

    In-gel competitive reassociation (IGCR) is a method for differential subtraction of polymorphic (RFLP) DNA fragments between two DNA samples of interest without probes or specific sequence information. Here, we applied the IGCR procedure to two cloned mice derived from an F1 hybrid of the C57BL/6Cr and DBA/2 strains, in order to investigate the possibility of genomic alteration in the cloned mouse genomes. Each of the five of the genomic alterations we detected between the two cloned mice corresponded to the 'intra-strain' polymorphisms in the C57BL/6Cr and DBA/2 mouse strains. Our result suggests that no severe aberration of genome sequences occurs due to somatic cell nuclear transfer

  18. Molecular detection and antimicrobial resistance of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrheal cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslani, Mehdi M.; Salmanzadeh-Ahrabi, S.; Jafari, F.; Zali, Reza M.; Mani, M.; Alikhani, Yousef M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to identify and classify Iranian isolates of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) on the basis of presence of virulence genes and to determine antibiotic susceptibility of isolated strains. The current cross-sectional study was conducted in 2005 at the Pasteur Institute, Tehran, Iran. One hundred and ninety-three diarrheagenic E. coli isolated from diarrheal patients in different regions of Iran were included in current study. Virulence factors genees for diarrheagenic E. coli were detected by polymerase chain reaction. Of the 193 diarrheagenic E. coli detected by PCR, 86(44.5%) were Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), 74 (38.4%) enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), 19 (9.8%) enteroaggregative E. coli and 14 (7.3%) enterotoxigenic E. coli isolates. Susceptibility to 12 clinically important antimicrobial agents was determined for 193 strains of diarrhheagenic E. coli. A high incidence of resistance to tetracycline (63%), ampicillin (62%), streptomycin (56%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (44.5%), trimetoprim/sulphamethoxazole (39.5%) and cephalothin (37%) was observed. The STEC and EPEC strains with high resistance to tetracycline and ampicillin but highly susceptible to quinolones are among the most important causative agent of diarrhea in Iran. This study suggests that antimicrobial resistance is wide spread among E. coli strains colonizing Iranian patients. Guidelines for appropriate use of antibiotics in developing countries require updating. (author)

  19. Feasibility of Detecting Natural Frequencies of Hydraulic Turbines While in Operation, Using Strain Gauges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentín, David; Presas, Alexandre; Bossio, Matias; Egusquiza, Mònica; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme

    2018-01-10

    Nowadays, hydropower plays an essential role in the energy market. Due to their fast response and regulation capacity, hydraulic turbines operate at off-design conditions with a high number of starts and stops. In this situation, dynamic loads and stresses over the structure are high, registering some failures over time, especially in the runner. Therefore, it is important to know the dynamic response of the runner while in operation, i.e., the natural frequencies, damping and mode shapes, in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems. Detecting the natural frequencies of hydraulic turbine runners while in operation is challenging, because they are inaccessible structures strongly affected by their confinement in water. Strain gauges are used to measure the stresses of hydraulic turbine runners in operation during commissioning. However, in this paper, the feasibility of using them to detect the natural frequencies of hydraulic turbines runners while in operation is studied. For this purpose, a large Francis turbine runner (444 MW) was instrumented with several strain gauges at different positions. First, a complete experimental strain modal testing (SMT) of the runner in air was performed using the strain gauges and accelerometers. Then, the natural frequencies of the runner were estimated during operation by means of analyzing accurately transient events or rough operating conditions.

  20. Detection and Characterization of Histamine-Producing Strains of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae Isolated from Mullets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Trevisani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (Pdd is considered to be an emerging pathogen of marine fish and has also been implicated in cases of histamine food poisoning. In this study, eight strains isolated from mullets of the genera Mugil and Liza captured in the Ligurian Sea were characterized, and a method to detect histamine-producing Pdd from fish samples was developed. The histamine-producing potential of the strains was evaluated in culture media (TSB+ using a histamine biosensor. Subsequently, two strains were used to contaminate mackerel fillets (4 or 40 CFU/g, simulating a cross-contamination on the selling fish stalls. Sample homogenates were enriched in TSB+. The cultures were then inoculated on thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar (TCBS and the dark green colonies were cultured on Niven agar. The violet isolates were characterized using specific biochemical and PCR based tests. All Pdd strains were histamine producers, yielding concentration varying from 167 and 8977 µg/mL in TSB+ cultures incubated at 30 °C for 24 h. Pdd colonies were detected from the inoculated mackerel samples and their histidine decarboxylase gene was amplified using species-specific primer pairs designed for this study. The results indicate that mullets can be source of Pdd and the fish retailers needs to evaluate the risk posed by cross-contamination on the selling fish stalls.

  1. 3D-Structured Stretchable Strain Sensors for Out-of-Plane Force Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Qi, Dianpeng; Leow, Wan Ru; Yu, Jiancan; Xiloyannnis, Michele; Cappello, Leonardo; Liu, Yaqing; Zhu, Bowen; Jiang, Ying; Chen, Geng; Masia, Lorenzo; Liedberg, Bo; Chen, Xiaodong

    2018-05-17

    Stretchable strain sensors, as the soft mechanical interface, provide the key mechanical information of the systems for healthcare monitoring, rehabilitation assistance, soft exoskeletal devices, and soft robotics. Stretchable strain sensors based on 2D flat film have been widely developed to monitor the in-plane force applied within the plane where the sensor is placed. However, to comprehensively obtain the mechanical feedback, the capability to detect the out-of-plane force, caused by the interaction outside of the plane where the senor is located, is needed. Herein, a 3D-structured stretchable strain sensor is reported to monitor the out-of-plane force by employing 3D printing in conjunction with out-of-plane capillary force-assisted self-pinning of carbon nanotubes. The 3D-structured sensor possesses large stretchability, multistrain detection, and strain-direction recognition by one single sensor. It is demonstrated that out-of-plane forces induced by the air/fluid flow are reliably monitored and intricate flow details are clearly recorded. The development opens up for the exploration of next-generation 3D stretchable sensors for electronic skin and soft robotics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Carbon Nanofiber Cement Sensors to Detect Strain and Damage of Concrete Specimens Under Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galao, Oscar; Baeza, F Javier; Zornoza, Emilio; Garcés, Pedro

    2017-11-24

    Cement composites with nano-additions have been vastly studied for their functional applications, such as strain and damage sensing. The capacity of a carbon nanofiber (CNF) cement paste has already been tested. However, this study is focused on the use of CNF cement composites as sensors in regular concrete samples. Different measuring techniques and humidity conditions of CNF samples were tested to optimize the strain and damage sensing of this material. In the strain sensing tests (for compressive stresses up to 10 MPa), the response depends on the maximum stress applied. The material was more sensitive at higher loads. Furthermore, the actual load time history did not influence the electrical response, and similar curves were obtained for different test configurations. On the other hand, damage sensing tests proved the capability of CNF cement composites to measure the strain level of concrete samples, even for loads close to the material's strength. Some problems were detected in the strain transmission between sensor and concrete specimens, which will require specific calibration of each sensor one attached to the structure.

  3. Detection of enterotoxins and genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from Isfahan Educational Hospital, Iran

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    Seyed Asghar Havaei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Staphylococcus aureus is known as one of the most important nosocomial pathogens, which may lead to several infections. The aim of this study was determining the enterotoxins A, C, and TSST-1 and molecular characterization of S. aureus strains with PFGE and MLST typing methods. Materials and methods: In the present study during the sixmonths sampling, fifty S. aureus strains were isolated from patients admitted to Al-Zahra university hospital. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, Multiplex PCR for detection of enterotoxin A, C and TSST-1, pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST were used for molecular typing. Results: In antibiogram the highest and lowest percentage of resistance was belonged to tetracycline and rifampin respectively. Multiplex PCR indicated that 30% of the strains harbored sea and 34% harbored sec genes. However, only 4% of our collected isolates had tsst gene. In PFGE method analysis on all S. aureus strains, a total of 19 different patterns were identified. Nine various sequence types in 27 selected S. aureus isolates were identified by MLST. Conclusions: Present study indicates a possible higher variability among our S. aureus strains by two different molecular typing methods; nevertheless four main common types (CT1, CT7, CT9, and CT11 with at least one toxin genes were determined.

  4. Surface Crack Detection in Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipes Using BOTDA Strain Sensors

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    Zhigang Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural deterioration after a period of service can induce the failure of prestressed concrete cylinder pipes (PCCPs, with microcracks in the coating leading to the corrosion of the prestressed wires. In this paper, we propose the use of Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA strain sensors for detecting the onset of microcracking in PCCP coating: the BOTDA strain sensors are mounted on the surface of the PCCP, and distributed strain measurements are employed to assess the cracks in the mortar coating and the structural state of the pipe. To validate the feasibility of the proposed approach, experimental investigations were conducted on a prototype PCCP segment, wherein the inner pressure was gradually increased to 1.6 MPa. Two types of BOTDA strain sensors—the steel wire packaged fiber optic sensor and the polyelastic packaged fiber optic sensor—were employed in the experiments. The experimental distributed measurements agreed well with the finite element computations, evidencing that the investigated strain sensors are sensitive to localized deterioration behaviors such as PCCP microcracking.

  5. Tip-induced local strain on Mo S2/graphite detected by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wonhee; Hus, Saban M.; Li, Xufan; Berlijn, Tom; Nguyen, Giang D.; Xiao, Kai; Li, An-Ping

    2018-03-01

    We report the detection of tip-induced local strain applied to the monolayer Mo S2 grown on a graphite substrate by scanning tunneling microscope. Monolayer Mo S2 behaves as both mechanical and tunneling barriers that prevent the tip from contacting the graphite while maintaining the tunneling current. Inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy (IETS) is utilized to probe the phonon modes in graphite. As the tip pushes the sample, IETS reveals a continuous phonon softening in graphite, corroborated by a downward shift of the phonon energy as calculated by density-functional theory. Our results demonstrate a way to apply local mechanical strain and simultaneously detect the induced change in phonon modes by unitizing IETS with two-dimensional materials as a tunneling barrier.

  6. Characterization of two recent Japanese field isolates of canine distemper virus and examination of the avirulent strain utility as an attenuated vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Akiko; Yoneda, Misako; Seki, Takahiro; Uema, Masashi; Kooriyama, Takanori; Nishi, Toshiya; Fujita, Kentaro; Miura, Ryuichi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2014-12-05

    Recently, several new strains of canine distemper virus (CDV) have been isolated in Japan. To investigate their pathogenesis in dogs, the Yanaka and Bunkyo-K strains were investigated by infecting dogs and determining clinical signs, amount of virus, and antibody responses. The Yanaka strain is avirulent and induced an antibody response. The Bunkyo-K strain induced typical CDV clinical signs in infected dogs and virulence was enhanced by brain passage. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of H genes demonstrated the Bunkyo-K strains were of a different lineage from Asia-1 group including the Yanaka strain and Asia-2 group that contain recent Japanese isolates, which were recently identified as major prevalent strains worldwide but distinct from old vaccine strains. Based on these data, we tested the ability of the Yanaka strain for vaccination. Inoculation with the Yanaka strain efficiently induced CDV neutralizing antibodies with no clinical signs, and the protection effects against challenge with either old virulent strain or Bunkyo-K strain were equal or greater when compared with vaccination by an original vaccine strain. Thus, the Yanaka strain is a potential vaccine candidate against recent prevalent CDV strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Damage Detection Based on Static Strain Responses Using FBG in a Wind Turbine Blade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shaohua; Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng; Xie, Yong

    2015-08-14

    The damage detection of a wind turbine blade enables better operation of the turbines, and provides an early alert to the destroyed events of the blade in order to avoid catastrophic losses. A new non-baseline damage detection method based on the Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in a wind turbine blade is developed in this paper. Firstly, the Chi-square distribution is proven to be an effective damage-sensitive feature which is adopted as the individual information source for the local decision. In order to obtain the global and optimal decision for the damage detection, the feature information fusion (FIF) method is proposed to fuse and optimize information in above individual information sources, and the damage is detected accurately through of the global decision. Then a 13.2 m wind turbine blade with the distributed strain sensor system is adopted to describe the feasibility of the proposed method, and the strain energy method (SEM) is used to describe the advantage of the proposed method. Finally results show that the proposed method can deliver encouraging results of the damage detection in the wind turbine blade.

  8. Rapid detection and strain typing of Chlamydia trachomatis using a highly multiplexed microfluidic PCR assay.

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    Rosemary S Turingan

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs are recommended by the CDC for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct urogenital infections. Current commercial NAATs require technical expertise and sophisticated laboratory infrastructure, are time-consuming and expensive, and do not differentiate the lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV strains that require a longer duration of treatment than non-LGV strains. The multiplexed microfluidic PCR-based assay presented in this work simultaneously interrogates 13 loci to detect Ct and identify LGV and non-LGV strain-types. Based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms, the assay differentiates LGV, ocular, urogenital, and proctocolitis clades, and also serovars L1, L2, and L3 within the LGV group. The assay was evaluated in a blinded fashion using 95 clinical swabs, with 76 previously reported as urogenital Ct-positive samples and typed by ompA genotyping and/or Multi-Locus Sequence Typing. Results of the 13-plex assay showed that 51 samples fell within urogenital clade 2 or 4, 24 samples showed both clade 2 and 4 signatures, indicating possible mixed infection, gene rearrangement, or inter-clade recombination, and one sample was a noninvasive trachoma biovar (either a clade 3 or 4. The remaining 19 blinded samples were correctly identified as LGV clade 1 (3, ocular clade 3 (4, or as negatives (12. To date, no NAAT assay can provide a point-of-care applicable turnaround time for Ct detection while identifying clinically significant Ct strain types to inform appropriate treatment. Coupled with rapid DNA processing of clinical swabs (approximately 60 minutes from swab-in to result-out, the assay has significant potential as a rapid POC diagnostic for Ct infections.

  9. Smart bricks for strain sensing and crack detection in masonry structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Austin; D'Alessandro, Antonella; Laflamme, Simon; Ubertini, Filippo

    2018-01-01

    The paper proposes the novel concept of smart bricks as a durable sensing solution for structural health monitoring of masonry structures. The term smart bricks denotes piezoresistive clay bricks with suitable electronics capable of outputting measurable changes in their electrical properties under changes in their state of strain. This feature can be exploited to evaluate stress at critical locations inside a masonry wall and to detect changes in loading paths associated with structural damage, for instance following an earthquake. Results from an experimental campaign show that normal clay bricks, fabricated in the laboratory with embedded electrodes made of a special steel for resisting the high baking temperature, exhibit a quite linear and repeatable piezoresistive behavior. That is a change in electrical resistance proportional to a change in axial strain. In order to be able to exploit this feature for strain sensing, high-resolution electronics are used with a biphasic DC measurement approach to eliminate any resistance drift due to material polarization. Then, an enhanced nanocomposite smart brick is proposed, where titania is mixed with clay before baking, in order to enhance the brick’s mechanical properties, improve its noise rejection, and increase its electrical conductivity. Titania was selected among other possible conductive nanofillers due to its resistance to high temperatures and its ability to improve the durability of construction materials while maintaining the aesthetic appearance of clay bricks. An application of smart bricks for crack detection in masonry walls is demonstrated by laboratory testing of a small-scale wall specimen under different loading conditions and controlled damage. Overall, it is demonstrated that a few strategically placed smart bricks enable monitoring of the state of strain within the wall and provide information that is capable of crack detection.

  10. Detection in Japan of an equine-like G3P[8] reassortant rotavirus A strain that is highly homologous to European strains across all genome segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Wakako; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Gauchan, Punita; Agbemabiese, Chantal Ama; Noguchi, Atsuko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2018-03-01

    Equine-like G3P[8] rotavirus A strains with DS-1-like backbone genes have emerged since 2013. An equine-like RVA/Human-wt/JPN/15R429/2015/G3P[8] strain possessing I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 was detected in Japan in 2015. Its VP7 gene was ≥ 99.3% identical to those of equine-like G3P[4] strains detected in Japan, and the remaining 10 genes were 98.6-99.8% identical to G1P[8] double-gene reassortants detected in Japan, Thailand and the Philippines. Thus, 15R429 was likely generated through reassortment between the equine-like G3P[4] and G1P[8] reassortant strains. Notably, 15R429 was 98.5-99.8% identical across all 11 genes of the equine-like G3P[8] strains detected in Spain and Hungary in 2015.

  11. [Detection of putative polysaccharide biosynthesis genes in Azospirillum brasilense strains from serogroups I and II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, L P; Prilipov, A G; Katsy, E I

    2017-01-01

    It is known that in Azospirillum brasilense strains Sp245 and SR75 included in serogroup I, the repeat units of their O-polysaccharides consist of five residues of D-rhamnose, and in strain SR15, of four; and the heteropolymeric O-polysaccharide of A. brasilense type strain Sp7 from serogroup II contains not less than five types of repeat units. In the present work, a complex of nondegenerate primers to the genes of A. brasilense Sp245 plasmids AZOBR_p6, AZOBR_p3, and AZOBR_p2, which encode putative enzymes for the biosynthesis of core oligosaccharide and O-polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide, capsular polysaccharides, and exopolysaccharides, was proposed. By using the designed primers, products of the expected sizes were synthesized in polymerase chain reactions on genomic DNA of A. brasilense Sp245, SR75, SR15, and Sp7 in 36, 29, 23, and 12 cases, respectively. As a result of sequencing of a number of amplicons, a high (86–99%) level of identity of the corresponding putative polysaccharide biosynthesis genes in three A. brasilense strains from serogroup I was detected. In a blotting-hybridization reaction with the biotin-labeled DNA of the A. brasilense gene AZOBR_p60122 coding for putative permease of the ABC transporter of polysaccharides, localization of the homologous gene in ~120-MDa plasmids of the bacteria A. brasilense SR15 and SR75 was revealed.

  12. Molecular Detection of Aflatoxin Producing Strains of Aspergillus Flavus from Peanut (Arachis Hypogaea

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    Adeela Hussain

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are the potential carcinogens produced as secondary metabolites by Aspergillus flavus. They have the ability to contaminate large number of food which ultimately affect the human population. Malt extract agar was selected for the growth of control stains of fungus. The aim of the study was to develop a reliable and quick method for the detection of aflatoxin producing strains in peanuts by using molecular approaches. Total 80 samples of infected peanuts were collected from four different cities of Punjab and checked for their aflatoxin contamination. For aflatoxin detection, three target genes nor1, ver1 and aflR were selected which was involved in the aflatoxin biosynthesis. In all examined cases, 24 out of 80 (30% samples successfully amplified all three genes indicating aflatoxigenic activity. Discrimination between aflatoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic strains were also determined on the basis of amplification of these three target DNA fragments. In this study, it was also demonstrated that only specific strains were able to produce the aflatoxin contamination in peanuts.

  13. Molecular typing of canine distemper virus strains reveals the presence of a new genetic variant in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarute, Nicolás; Pérez, Ruben; Aldaz, Jaime; Alfieri, Amauri A; Alfieri, Alice F; Name, Daniela; Llanes, Jessika; Hernández, Martín; Francia, Lourdes; Panzera, Yanina

    2014-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV, Paramyxoviridae, Morbillivirus) is the causative agent of a severe infectious disease affecting terrestrial and marine carnivores worldwide. Phylogenetic relationships and the genetic variability of the hemagglutinin (H) protein and the fusion protein signal-peptide (Fsp) allow for the classification of field strains into genetic lineages. Currently, there are nine CDV lineages worldwide, two of them co-circulating in South America. Using the Fsp-coding region, we analyzed the genetic variability of strains from Uruguay, Brazil, and Ecuador, and compared them with those described previously in South America and other geographical areas. The results revealed that the Brazilian and Uruguayan strains belong to the already described South America lineage (EU1/SA1), whereas the Ecuadorian strains cluster in a new clade, here named South America 3, which may represent the third CDV lineage described in South America.

  14. Detection and characterisation of trypanosome strains supposedly resistant to trypanocidal drugs in Senegal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaite, A.; Seye, M.; Mane, A.; Ndiaye, T.; Seye, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    In the region of Sokone cattle are constantly exposed to infections with trypanosomes transmitted by Glossina morsitans submorsitans and G. palpalis gambiensis. Trypanocidal drugs are widely used by the farmers on the 50,000 cattle present in the region. Consequently, drug resistance has become a major problem. During the present study goats were inoculated with trypanosome strains isolated from infected cattle. Following the appearance of parasitaemia, the animals were treated with either Berenil, Samorin or Ethidium. The results indicated the parasites were susceptible to Samorin, but one of the Trypanosoma vivax strains showed resistance to Berenil and Ethidium. In addition, the performance of the antigen detection ELISA was compared with that of the Buffy Coat Technique using more than 1000 serum samples from the Sokone region and 100 samples from Northern Senegal infested with tsetse flies. The results showed a very high specificity of 98%. However, additional tests will be necessary to assess the sensitivity properly. (author). 3 refs, 7 tabs

  15. Monitoring of canine parvovirus (CPV) strains detected in vaccinated puppies in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, T X; Costa, E M; Leite, J P; Labarthe, N V; Cubel Garcia, R C N

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate, by partial sequencing of VP2 protein, the variability of CPV detected in 37 fecal samples collected from vaccinated puppies with enteritis. Laboratorial diagnosis of CPV was confirmed by HA/HI and PCR and, for sequencing analyses, two different regions of the VP2 gene were amplified by PCR. From 1995 to 2004, all strains were characterized as CPV-2a. After that, both CPV-2a and CPV-2b were detected. All CPV-2a showed a non-synonymous mutation in the residue 297 (Ser→Ala). A synonymous substitution at the AA 574 was also observed in 15/37 samples. Our findings indicate that the cases of vaccine failure are most likely not associated to the mutations detected in the sequenced regions. However, the monitoring of genotyping mutations that led to new CPV strains is essential to determinate if current vaccines will keep providing protection against all new future variants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Piezoelectric dynamic strain monitoring for detecting local seismic damage in steel buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Masahiro; Li, Xiaohua; Fujita, Kohei; Yamaguchi, Mayako

    2013-01-01

    This research presents a methodology for damage detection along with a sensing system for monitoring seismic damage in steel buildings. The system extracts the location and extent of local damage, such as fracture at a beam–column connection, from changes in the bending moment distribution in a steel moment-resisting frame. We developed a dynamic strain-based sensing system utilizing piezoelectric film sensors and wireless sensing techniques to estimate the bending moments resisted by individual structural members under small amplitude loadings such as ambient vibrations and minor earthquakes. We introduce a new damage index that extracts local damage information from the comparative study of the dynamic strain responses of the structural members before and after a large earthquake event. The damage detection scheme was examined both analytically and numerically using a simple frame example. Then, the entire local damage detection scheme was verified through a series of vibration tests using a one-quarter-scale steel testbed that simulated seismic damage at member ends. (paper)

  17. Rapid and sensitive detection of canine distemper virus by one-tube reverse transcription-insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lee, Pei-Yu; Lee, Fu-Chun; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas

    2014-09-09

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) has been associated with outbreaks of canine infectious respiratory disease in shelters and boarding kennel environments. POCKITTM Nucleic Acid Analyzer is a field-deployable device capable of generating automatically interpreted insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) results from extracted nucleic acid within one hour. In this study, reverse transcription iiPCR (RT-iiPCR) was developed to facilitate point-of-need diagnosis of CDV infection. Analytical sensitivity (limit of detection 95%) of the established CDV RT-iiPCR was about 11 copies of in vitro transcribed RNA per reaction. CDV RT-iiPCR generated positive signals from CDV, but not Bordetella bronchiseptica, canine parvovirus, canine herpesvirus, canine adenovirus 2, canine influenza virus (subtype H3N8), canine parainfluenza virus, and canine respiratory coronavirus. To evaluate accuracy of the established reaction in canine distemper clinical diagnosis, 110 specimens from dogs, raccoons, and foxes suspected with CDV infection were tested simultaneously by CDV RT-iiPCR and real-time RT-PCR. CDV RT-iiPCR demonstrated excellent sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%), compared to real-time RT-PCR. The results indicated an excellent correlation between RT-iiPCR and a reference real time RT-PCR method. Working in a lyophilized format, the established method has great potential to be used for point-of-care diagnosis of canine distemper in animals, especially in resource-limited facilities.

  18. Pathogenesis and phylogenetic analyses of canine distemper virus strain ZJ7 isolate from domestic dogs in China

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    Tan Bin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new isolate of canine distemper virus (CDV, named ZJ7, was isolated from lung tissues of a dog suspected with CDV infection using MDCK cells. The ZJ7 isolate induced cytopathogenic effects of syncytia in MDCK cell after six passages. In order to evaluate pathogenesis of ZJ7 strain, three CDV sero-negative dogs were intranasally inoculated with its virus suspension. All infected dogs developed clinical signs of severe bloody diarrhea, conjunctivitis, ocular discharge, nasal discharge and coughing, fever and weight loss at 21 dpi, whereas the mock group infected with DMEM were normal. The results demonstrated that CDV-ZJ7 strain isolated by MDCK cell was virulent, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of strain ZJ7 had no change after isolation by MDCK cell when compared with the original virus from the fresh tissues. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses for the nucleocapsid (N, phosphoprotein (P and receptor binding haemagglutinin (H gene of the ZJ7 isolate clearly showed it is joins to the Asia 1 group cluster of CDV strains, the predominant genotype in China.

  19. Pathogenesis and phylogenetic analyses of canine distemper virus strain ZJ7 isolate from domestic dogs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bin; Wen, Yong-Jun; Wang, Feng-Xue; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Wang, Xiu-Dong; Hu, Jia-Xin; Shi, Xin-Chuan; Yang, Bo-Chao; Chen, Li-Zhi; Cheng, Shi-Peng; Wu, Hua

    2011-11-16

    A new isolate of canine distemper virus (CDV), named ZJ7, was isolated from lung tissues of a dog suspected with CDV infection using MDCK cells. The ZJ7 isolate induced cytopathogenic effects of syncytia in MDCK cell after six passages. In order to evaluate pathogenesis of ZJ7 strain, three CDV sero-negative dogs were intranasally inoculated with its virus suspension. All infected dogs developed clinical signs of severe bloody diarrhea, conjunctivitis, ocular discharge, nasal discharge and coughing, fever and weight loss at 21 dpi, whereas the mock group infected with DMEM were normal. The results demonstrated that CDV-ZJ7 strain isolated by MDCK cell was virulent, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of strain ZJ7 had no change after isolation by MDCK cell when compared with the original virus from the fresh tissues. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses for the nucleocapsid (N), phosphoprotein (P) and receptor binding haemagglutinin (H) gene of the ZJ7 isolate clearly showed it is joins to the Asia 1 group cluster of CDV strains, the predominant genotype in China.

  20. Detection of highly and minimally leukotoxic Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains in patients with periodontal disease

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    Cortelli Sheila Cavalca

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the prevalence of highly and minimally leukotoxic Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in patients with periodontal disease. Pooled subgingival plaque samples from 136 patients with some form of periodontal disease were examined. Subjects were between 14 and 76 years of age. Clinical examinations included periodontal pocket depth (PD, plaque index (PI and bleeding index (BI. The obtained plaque samples were examined for the presence of highly or minimally leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Chi-square and logistic regression were performed to evaluate the results. Forty-seven subjects were diagnosed with gingivitis, 70 with chronic periodontitis and 19 with aggressive periodontitis. According to chi-square there was no significant correlation detected between PD (chi2 = 0.73, PI (chi2 = 0.35, BI (chi2 = 0.09 and the presence of the highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans. The highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were correlated with subjects that were 28 years of age and younger (chi2 = 7.41. There was a significant correlation between highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans and aggressive periodontitis (chi2 = 22.06. This study of a Brazilian cohort confirms the strong association between highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and the presence of aggressive periodontitis.

  1. Optical strain measurement for fault detection in haul-truck tires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotchon, A; Nobes, D S; Lipsett, M G

    2012-01-01

    Tire condition is integral to the safe operation of heavy machinery, such as ultra-class haul trucks. A new approach to haul truck tire monitoring is being investigated based on optical strain measurement, which has the advantage of providing quantitative information from sensors that do not contact the tire. A laboratory-scale apparatus has been constructed to monitor a tire as it is subjected to various loads and pressures. Digital image correlation is used to calculate the deformation in the tire. Using this method, damage resulting from a horizontal and vertical cut created on the tire surface could be detected. A three-dimensional surface reconstruction of the tire was created to assist in the characterization of more complex damage types such as wear and fatigue. In addition to providing information for a possible industrial scale damage detection system, this apparatus will also further the understanding of damage mechanisms in tires.

  2. Detection of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus strains using a single-stage PCR method

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    Alamian, S.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus are of the most important causes of brucellosis, an infectious disease which is transmitted either directly or indirectly including consuming unpasteurized dairy products. Both strains are considered endemic in Iran. Common diagnostic methods such as bacteriologic cultures are difficult and time consuming regarding the bacteria. The aim of this study was to suggest a single-stage PCR method using a pair of primers to detect both B. melitensis and B. abortus. The primers were named UF1 and UR1 and the results showed that the final size of PCR products were 84 bp and 99 bp for B. melitensis and B. abortus, respectively. Therefore the method could be useful for rapid detection of B. melitensis and B. abortus simultaneously.

  3. Detection of virulence genes in Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC strains by Multiplex-PCR method

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    Javad Mohammadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Urinary tract infection caused by E. coli is one of the most common illnesses in all age groups worldwide. Presence of virulence genes is a key factor in bacterial pathogens in uroepithelial cells. The present study was performed to detect iha, iroN, ompT genes in the Uropathogenic E.coli isolates from clinical samples using multiplex-PCR method in Kerman. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 200 samples of patients with urinary tract infections in Kerman hospitals were collected. After biochemical and microbiological tests, all strains were tested with regard to the presence of iha, iroN, and ompT genes using multiplex-PCR method. Results: The results of Multiplex-PCR showed that all specimens had one, two, or three virulence genes simultaneously. The highest and lowest frequency distribution of genes was related to iha (56.7% and iroN (20% respectively. Conclusion: According to the prevalence of urinary tract infection in the community and distribution of resistance and virulence factors, the fast and accurate detection of the strains and virulence genes is necessary

  4. Differentiation of canine distemper virus isolates in fur animals from various vaccine strains by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism according to phylogenetic relations in china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jianjun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to effectively identify the vaccine and field strains of Canine distemper virus (CDV, a new differential diagnostic test has been developed based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. We selected an 829 bp fragment of the nucleoprotein (N gene of CDV. By RFLP analysis using BamHI, field isolates were distinguishable from the vaccine strains. Two fragments were obtained from the vaccine strains by RT-PCR-RFLP analysis while three were observed in the field strains. An 829 nucleotide region of the CDV N gene was analyzed in 19 CDV field strains isolated from minks, raccoon dogs and foxes in China between 2005 and 2007. The results suggest this method is precise, accurate and efficient. It was also determined that three different genotypes exist in CDV field strains in fur animal herds of the north of China, most of which belong to Asian type. Mutated field strains, JSY06-R1, JSY06-R2 and JDH07-F1 also exist in Northern China, but are most closely related to the standard virulent strain A75/17, designated in Arctic and America-2 genetype in the present study, respectively.

  5. Development of a multiplex Q-PCR to detect Trichoderma harzianum Rifai strain T22 in plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Ivo R; van Rijn, Menno; Zwetsloot, Tom J J; Basmagi, Said; Dirks-Mulder, Anita; van Leeuwen, Willem B; Ravensberg, Willem J; Gravendeel, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The fungal species Trichoderma harzianum is widely used as a biological agent in crop protection. To verify the continued presence of this fungus on plant roots manually inoculated with T. harzianum strain T22, a Q-PCR was designed using specific probes for this particular strain. To develop these molecular diagnostic tools, genome mining was first carried out to retrieve putative new regions by which different strains of T. harzianum could be distinguished. Subsequently, Sanger sequencing of the L-aminoacid oxidase gene (aox1) in T. harzianum was applied to determine the mutations differing between various strains isolated from the Trichoderma collection of Koppert Biological Systems. Based on the sequence information obtained, a set of hydrolysis probes was subsequently developed which discriminated T. harzianum T22 strains varying in only a single nucleotide. Probes designed for two strains uniquely recognized the respective strains in Q-PCR with a detection limit of 12,5ng DNA. Titration assays in which T. harzianum DNA from distinct strains was varied further underscored the specificity of the probes. Lastly, fungal DNA extracted from roots of greenhouse cultured tomato plants was analyzed using the probe-based assay. DNA from T. harzianum strain T22 could readily be identified on roots of greenhouse reared tomato plants inoculated with varying concentrations up to one week after treatment with a detection limit of 3e6 colony forming units of T. harzianum T22. We conclude that the Q-PCR method is a reliable and robust method for assessing the presence and quantity of T. harzianum strain T22 in manually inoculated plant material. Our method provides scope for the development of DNA based strain specific identification of additional strains of Trichoderma and other fungal biological control agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection and phylogenetic analyses of spike genes in porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strains circulating in China in 2016-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiaoling; Liu, Xinsheng; Fang, Yuzhen; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Yongguang

    2017-10-10

    Large-scale outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) have re-emerged in China in recent years. However, little is known about the genetic diversity and molecular epidemiology of field strains of PED virus (PEDV) in China in 2016-2017. To address this issue, in this study, 116 diarrhea samples were collected from pig farms in 6 Chinese provinces in 2016-2017 and were detected using PCR for main porcine enteric pathogens, including PEDV, porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV), porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine kobuvirus (PKV). In addition, the complete S genes from 11 representative PEDV strains were sequenced and analyzed. PCR detection showed that 52.6% (61/116) of these samples were positive for PEDV. Furthermore, sequencing results for the spike (S) genes from 11 of the epidemic PEDV strains showed 93-94% nucleotide identity and 92-93% amino acid identity with the classical CV777 strain. Compared with the CV777 vaccine strain, these strains had an insertion (A 133 ), a deletion (G 155 ), and a continuous 4-amino-acid insertion ( 56 NNTN 59 ) in the S1 region. Phylogenetic analysis based on the S gene indicated that the 11 assessed PEDV strains were genetically diverse and clustered into the G2 group. These results demonstrate that the epidemic strains of PEDV in China in 2016-2017 are mainly virulent strains that belong to the G2 group and genetically differ from the vaccine strain. Importantly, this is the first report that the samples collected in Hainan Province were positive for PEDV (59.2%, 25/42). To our knowledge, this article presents the first report of a virulent PEDV strain isolated from Hainan Island, China. The results of this study will contribute to the understanding of the epidemiology and genetic characteristics of PEDV in China.

  7. One-step triplex PCR/RT-PCR to detect canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, and canine kobuvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dafei; Liu, Fei; Guo, Dongchun; Hu, Xiaoliang; Li, Zhijie; Li, Zhigang; Ma, Jianzhang; Liu, Chunguo

    2018-01-23

    To rapidly distinguish Canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), and canine kobuvirus (CaKoV) in practice, a one-step multiplex PCR/RT-PCR assay was developed, with detection limits of 10 2.1 TCID 50 for CDV, 10 1.9 TCID 50 for CPV and 10 3 copies for CaKoV. This method did not amplify nonspecific DNA or RNA from other canine viruses. Therefore, the assay provides a sensitive tool for the rapid clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance of CDV, CPV and CaKoV in dogs.

  8. Molecular Detection of Inducible Clindamycin Resistance among Staphylococcal Strains Isolated from Hospital Patients

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    Shadiyeh Abdollahi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB antimicrobial agents are used in the treatment of staphylococcal infections. They prevent the microbial protein synthesis system through binding to 23 S rRNA. The aim of this study was to apply molecular methods to detect inducible clindamycin resistance genes among staphylococcal strains isolated from clinical specimens.   Methods : Two hundred staphylococcus strains were isolated from nose and throat swabs of patients in Toohid and Besat hospitals in Sanandaj . Antimicrobial susceptibilities of isolates were determined using disc diffusion method, agar screen test and D-Test. A multiplex PCR was performed using primers specific for erm (A, B, C, TR genes.   Results: Out of 200 isolates, 18.5 % were MRSA and 32% were MRCNS (methicillin resistant coagulase negative staphylococci. Of 80 erythromycin resistant isolates, 48 were coagulase negative and 32 were S. aureus. Among the 48 coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS isolates, 11.63% expressed the MLSB-inducible phenotypes. Using PCR, the frequency of different genes in the collection of isolates were as follows: ermA 5.41 % , erm B 5.41 % , and erm C 3.13%. The ermTR gene was negative in all isolates. Among the 32 S. aureus isolates, 9.38% expressed the MLSB-nducible phenotype. Using PCR, these isolates harbored erm A (2.22%, ermB (2.22%, ermC (2.22% and ermTR (2.22% .   Conclusion: This is the first study to show the rate of inducible clindamycin clinical isolates of staphylococci harboring erm genes in Sananadaj. It also demonstrated the frequency of erm genes was higher among CONS isolates than S. aureus. This data suggested the transfer of resistance gene from nonpathogenic to pathogenic strains is likely to happen. Therefore, screening and control of these resistance genes is recommended at clinical laboratories.

  9. Evaluation of PCR methods for detection of Brucella strains from culture and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiftci, Alper; İça, Tuba; Savaşan, Serap; Sareyyüpoğlu, Barış; Akan, Mehmet; Diker, Kadir Serdar

    2017-04-01

    The genus Brucella causes significant economic losses due to infertility, abortion, stillbirth or weak calves, and neonatal mortality in livestock. Brucellosis is still a zoonosis of public health importance worldwide. The study was aimed to optimize and evaluate PCR assays used for the diagnosis of Brucella infections. For this aim, several primers and PCR protocols were performed and compared with Brucella cultures and biological material inoculated with Brucella. In PCR assays, genus- or species-specific oligonucleotide primers derived from 16S rRNA sequences (F4/R2, Ba148/928, IS711, BruP6-P7) and OMPs (JPF/JPR, 31ter/sd) of Brucella were used. All primers except for BruP6-P7 detected the DNA from reference Brucella strains and field isolates. In spiked blood, milk, and semen samples, F4-R2 primer-oriented PCR assays detected minimal numbers of Brucella. In spiked serum and fetal stomach content, Ba148/928 primer-oriented PCR assays detected minimal numbers of Brucella. Field samples collected from sheep and cattle were examined by bacteriological methods and optimized PCR assays. Overall, sensitivity of PCR assays was found superior to conventional bacteriological isolation. Brucella DNA was detected in 35.1, 1.1, 24.8, 5.0, and 8.0% of aborted fetus, blood, milk, semen, and serum samples by PCR assays, respectively. In conclusion, PCR assay in optimized conditions was found to be valuable in sensitive and specific detection of Brucella infections of animals.

  10. Detection and strain typing of ancient Mycobacterium leprae from a medieval leprosy hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G Michael; Tucker, Katie; Butler, Rachel; Pike, Alistair W G; Lewis, Jamie; Roffey, Simon; Marter, Philip; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Minnikin, David E; Besra, Gurdyal S; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T; Stewart, Graham R

    2013-01-01

    Nine burials excavated from the Magdalen Hill Archaeological Research Project (MHARP) in Winchester, UK, showing skeletal signs of lepromatous leprosy (LL) have been studied using a multidisciplinary approach including osteological, geochemical and biomolecular techniques. DNA from Mycobacterium leprae was amplified from all nine skeletons but not from control skeletons devoid of indicative pathology. In several specimens we corroborated the identification of M. leprae with detection of mycolic acids specific to the cell wall of M. leprae and persistent in the skeletal samples. In five cases, the preservation of the material allowed detailed genotyping using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Three of the five cases proved to be infected with SNP type 3I-1, ancestral to contemporary M. leprae isolates found in southern states of America and likely carried by European migrants. From the remaining two burials we identified, for the first time in the British Isles, the occurrence of SNP type 2F. Stable isotope analysis conducted on tooth enamel taken from two of the type 3I-1 and one of the type 2F remains revealed that all three individuals had probably spent their formative years in the Winchester area. Previously, type 2F has been implicated as the precursor strain that migrated from the Middle East to India and South-East Asia, subsequently evolving to type 1 strains. Thus we show that type 2F had also spread westwards to Britain by the early medieval period.

  11. Detection and strain typing of ancient Mycobacterium leprae from a medieval leprosy hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Michael Taylor

    Full Text Available Nine burials excavated from the Magdalen Hill Archaeological Research Project (MHARP in Winchester, UK, showing skeletal signs of lepromatous leprosy (LL have been studied using a multidisciplinary approach including osteological, geochemical and biomolecular techniques. DNA from Mycobacterium leprae was amplified from all nine skeletons but not from control skeletons devoid of indicative pathology. In several specimens we corroborated the identification of M. leprae with detection of mycolic acids specific to the cell wall of M. leprae and persistent in the skeletal samples. In five cases, the preservation of the material allowed detailed genotyping using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA. Three of the five cases proved to be infected with SNP type 3I-1, ancestral to contemporary M. leprae isolates found in southern states of America and likely carried by European migrants. From the remaining two burials we identified, for the first time in the British Isles, the occurrence of SNP type 2F. Stable isotope analysis conducted on tooth enamel taken from two of the type 3I-1 and one of the type 2F remains revealed that all three individuals had probably spent their formative years in the Winchester area. Previously, type 2F has been implicated as the precursor strain that migrated from the Middle East to India and South-East Asia, subsequently evolving to type 1 strains. Thus we show that type 2F had also spread westwards to Britain by the early medieval period.

  12. Detection of an untyped strain of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in a dairy herd

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    Ingrid Bortolin Affonso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV causes important lower respiratory tract illness in calves. According to F and G proteins genetic sequences, three BRSV subgroups have been reported and characterized in several countries, showing differences in its distribution. In Brazil, the virus is widely disseminated throughout the herds and the few characterized isolates revealed the solely occurrence of the subgroup B. This study describes the detection and characterization of an untyped BRSV strain from a twenty-days-old calf from a herd without clinical respiratory disease. Nasal swabs were analyzed by RT-nested PCR for the F and G proteins genes. One sample has amplified the F protein gene. Sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic reconstruction were accomplished, revealing that the strain could not be grouped with any other BRSV subgroups reported. This result may suggest that the BRSV is in constantly evolution, even in Brazil, where the vaccination is not a common practice. More detailed studies about BRSV characterization are necessary to know the virus subgroups distribution among the Brazilian herds to recommend appropriated immunoprophylaxis.

  13. SIVdrl detection in captive mandrills: are mandrills infected with a third strain of simian immunodeficiency virus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osterhaus Albert DME

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pol-fragment of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV that is highly related to SIVdrl-pol from drill monkeys (Mandrillus leucophaeus was detected in two mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx from Amsterdam Zoo. These captivity-born mandrills had never been in contact with drill monkeys, and were unlikely to be hybrids. Their mitochondrial haplotype suggested that they descended from founder animals in Cameroon or northern Gabon, close to the habitat of the drill. SIVdrl has once before been found in a wild-caught mandrill from the same region, indicating that mandrills are naturally infected with a SIVdrl-like virus. This suggests that mandrills are the first primate species to be infected with three strains of SIV: SIVmnd1, SIVmnd2, and SIVdrl.

  14. Direct sequencing for rapid detection of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakham, Fathiah; Chaoui, Imane; Echchaoui, Amina Hadbae; Chetioui, Fouad; Elmessaoudi, My Driss; Ennaji, My Mustapha; Abid, Mohammed; Mzibri, Mohammed El

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem with high mortality and morbidity rates, especially in low-income countries. Disturbingly, the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) TB cases has worsened the situation, raising concerns of a future epidemic of virtually untreatable TB. Indeed, the rapid diagnosis of MDR TB is a critical issue for TB management. This study is an attempt to establish a rapid diagnosis of MDR TB by sequencing the target fragments of the rpoB gene which linked to resistance against rifampicin and the katG gene and inhA promoter region, which are associated with resistance to isoniazid. For this purpose, 133 sputum samples of TB patients from Morocco were enrolled in this study. One hundred samples were collected from new cases, and the remaining 33 were from previously treated patients (drug relapse or failure, chronic cases) and did not respond to anti-TB drugs after a sufficient duration of treatment. All samples were subjected to rpoB, katG and pinhA mutation analysis by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Molecular analysis showed that seven strains were isoniazid-monoresistant and 17 were rifampicin-monoresistant. MDR TB strains were identified in nine cases (6.8%). Among them, eight were traditionally diagnosed as critical cases, comprising four chronic and four drug-relapse cases. The last strain was isolated from a new case. The most recorded mutation in the rpoB gene was the substitution TCG > TTG at codon 531 (Ser531 Leu), accounting for 46.15%. Significantly, the only mutation found in the katG gene was at codon 315 (AGC to ACC) with a Ser315Thr amino acid change. Only one sample harbored mutation in the inhA promoter region and was a point mutation at the -15p position (C > T). The polymerase chain reaction sequencing approach is an accurate and rapid method for detection of drug-resistant TB in clinical specimens, and could be of great interest in the management of TB in

  15. Biological and bacteriological characterization of the strain of Xylella fastidiosa Xf-PGAICR and detection of X. fastidiosa from leafhoppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin Chaves, Maria Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory tools are developed and optimized for the biological characterization of a strain of Xylella fastidiosa (Xf-PGAICR) isolated of guava. The testing of pathogenesis robustly has allowed the characterization of other strains of X. fastidiosa. The detection of X. fastidiosa is carried out in their insect vectors to establish the relationship with the presence of phytopathogen in the vector, the presence and dissemination of X. fastidiosa to nearby areas [es

  16. Comparison of Quantitative Wall Motion Analysis and Strain For Detection Of Coronary Stenosis With Three-Dimensional Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Katherine M.; Clark, Alexander P.; Goodman, Norman C.; Glover, David K.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantitative analysis of wall motion from three-dimensional (3D) dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) could provide additional diagnostic information not available from qualitative analysis. In this study we compare the effectiveness of 3D fractional shortening (3DFS), a measure of wall motion computed from 3D echocardiography (3DE), to strain and strain rate measured with sonomicrometry for detecting critical stenoses during DSE. Methods Eleven open-chest dogs underwent DSE both with and without a critical stenosis. 3DFS was measured from 3DE images acquired at peak stress. 3DFS was normalized by subtracting average 3DFS during control peak stress (Δ3DFS). Strains in the perfusion defect (PD) were measured from sonomicrometry, and PD size and location were measured with microspheres. Results A Δ3DFS abnormality indicated the presence of a critical stenosis with high sensitivity and specificity (88% and 100%, respectively), and Δ3DFS abnormality size correlated with PD size (R2=0.54). The sensitivity and specificity for Δ3DFS was similar to that for area strain (88%, 100%) and circumferential strain and strain rate (88%, 92% and 88%, 86%, respectively), while longitudinal strain and strain rate were less specific. Δ3DFS correlated significantly with both coronary flow reserve (R2=0.71) and PD size (R2=0.97), while area strain correlated with PD size only (R2=0.67), and other measures were not significantly correlated with flow reserve or PD size. Conclusion Quantitative wall motion analysis using Δ3DFS is effective for detecting critical stenoses during DSE, performing similarly to 3D strain, and provides potentially useful information on the size and location of a perfusion defect. PMID:24815588

  17. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay Targeting the MOMP Gene for Rapid Detection of Chlamydia psittaci Abortus Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Zhen Lin, Fu-Ying Zheng, Ji-Zhang Zhou, Guang-Hua Wang, Xiao-An Cao, Xiao-Wei Gong and Chang-Qing Qiu*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available For rapid detection of the Chlamydia psittaci abortus strain, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay was developed and evaluated in this study. The primers for the LAMP assay were designed on the basis of the main outer membrane protein (MOMP gene sequence of C. psittaci. Analysis showed that the assay could detect the abortus strain of C. psittaci with adequate specificity. The sensitivity of the test was the same as that of the nested-conventional PCR and higher than that of chick embryo isolation. Testing of 153 samples indicated that the LAMP assay could detect the genome of the C. psittaci abortus strain effectively in clinical samples. This assay is a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of C. psittaci infection in sheep, swine and cattle.

  18. Vaccination of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) against phocid distemper with two different inactivated canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.K.G. Visser (Ilona); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); H.N. Brugge; P.J.H. Reijnders; E.J. Vedder (Lies); J. Kuiper; P. de Vries (Petra); J. Groen (Jan); H.C. Walvoort; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractTwo inactivated canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccines--an adjuvanted whole inactivated virus and a subunit ISCOM preparation--were tested for their ability to induce protective immunity in harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) against phocid distemper, a disease that recently killed greater

  19. Plasmid fingerprinting and virulence gene detection among indigenous strains of salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, S.U.; Schwarz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important frequently reported zoonotic pathogen and a common cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The highly conserved Serospecific plasmids (SSPs) and Salmonella plasmid virulence (Spv) genes have been shown to mediate extra-intestinal colonization and systemic infection. The objective of current study was to document the presence of SSPs and SpvB/SpvC genes prevailing in the indigenous population of serovar Enteritidis. A total of 48 epidemiologically unrelated strains of Salmonella enteritidis were included in the study. Preparation of plasmids DNA suitable for endonuclease digestion and separation of respective fragments by agarose gel electrophoresis followed previously described protocols. The plasmids of Escherichia coli V517, 1-kbp ladder, and lambda DNA HindIII fragments served as DNA size standards. Transfer of DNA fragments from agarose gels to nitrocellulose membranes was achieved by capillary blot procedure. An ECL labeled 3.6 kbp HindIII fragment of plasmid PRQ 51 was used as probe for SpvB/SpvC gene detection. Plasmid DNA fingerprinting revealed the presence of two different profiles of approximately 55 kbp and 90 kbp and were identified as virulence plasmids by DNA hybridization. The SpvB/SpvC genes were located on HindIII fragments of 3.6 kbp in each of the two types of virulence plasmids. The study confirms the presence of SSPs and SpvB/SpvC genes in indigenous strains of S. enteritidis isolated from Northern Punjab area of Pakistan and substantiate the previous data on such findings from other parts of the world. (author)

  20. Alpha toxin specific PCR for detection of toxigenic strains of Clostridium perfringens in Poultry

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    Malmarugan Shanmugasamy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim : Isolation of clostridium perfirngens from necrotic enteritis cases in poultry and confirmation by alpha toxin specific PCR Materials and methods: Robertson cooked meat medium with Brain Heart Infusion broth was used for isolation of C. perfringens from intestinal contents of necrotic enteritis suspected birds. Positive cultures from perfringens agar were further confirmed by biochemical tests and subjected to alpha toxin specific PCR. Results: Twenty Clostridium perfringens isolates were isolated from intestinal contents of thirty five NE suspected birds. Out of the twenty isolates, fourteen were isolated from commercial broilers of 2 to 6 wk of age and six from commercial layers of 9 to 15 wk of age. Frequency of isolation of C. perfringens was more with Robertson cooked meat medium with BHI broth than thioglycollate broth alone. When positive cultures were streaked on to clostridial agar appreciable luxuriant growths were obtained and the selective streaking of these colonies on perfringens agar with supplements revealed rough and black colonies with sulphate reduction. The isolates produced rough and black colonies with sulphate reduction on perfringens agar, double zone haemolysis on sheep blood agar, stormy clot fermentation on milk medium and opalescence on egg yolk medium. The isolates were found negative for oxidase, catalase, liquefied gelatin, fermented glucose, maltose, lactose and sucrose except mannitol. All the fourteen isolates obtained from commercial broilers proved the alpha toxin producing strains of C. perfringens when they were subjected to alpha toxin specific PCR. Conclusion : This study revealed alpha toxin specific PCR is highly useful for detection of toxigenic strains of Clostridium perfringens in poultry [Vet. World 2012; 5(6.000: 365-368

  1. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection.

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    Kelley C Henderson

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/μl and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 ± 1 cells/μl. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains.

  2. Molecular Detection of Two Potential Probiotic Lactobacilli Strains and Evaluation of Their Performance as Starter Adjuncts in Yogurt Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxami, Georgia; Papadopoulou, Olga S; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Tassou, Chrysoula C; Galanis, Alex

    2016-05-04

    A molecular method for efficient and accurate detection and identification of two potential probiotic lactobacilli strains isolated from fermented olives, namely Lactobacillus pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, was developed in the present study. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was performed, and strain specific primers were designed and applied in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The specificity of the assay was tested and successfully confirmed in 27 and 22 lactobacilli strains for Lb. pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, respectively. Moreover, the two strains were used as starter cultures in yogurt production. Cell enumeration followed by multiplex PCR analysis demonstrated that the two strains were present in yogurt samples at levels ≥6 log CFU/g even after 35 days of storage at 4 °C. Microbiological analysis showed that lactobacilli and streptococci were present within usual levels, whereas enterobacteriaceae and yeast/mold counts were not detected as expected. Although the pH values of the novel products were slightly lower than the control ones, the yogurt containing the probiotic cultures scored similar values compared to the control in a series of sensory tests. Overall, these results demonstrated the possible use of the two strains as starter adjuncts in the production of yogurt with potential probiotic properties.

  3. Experimental strain modal analysis for beam-like structure by using distributed fiber optics and its damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liangliang; Busca, Giorgio; Cigada, Alfredo

    2017-07-01

    Modal analysis is commonly considered as an effective tool to obtain the intrinsic characteristics of structures including natural frequencies, modal damping ratios, and mode shapes, which are significant indicators for monitoring the health status of engineering structures. The complex mode indicator function (CMIF) can be regarded as an effective numerical tool to perform modal analysis. In this paper, experimental strain modal analysis based on the CMIF has been introduced. Moreover, a distributed fiber-optic sensor, as a dense measuring device, has been applied to acquire strain data along a beam surface. Thanks to the dense spatial resolution of the distributed fiber optics, more detailed mode shapes could be obtained. In order to test the effectiveness of the method, a mass lump—considered as a linear damage component—has been attached to the surface of the beam, and damage detection based on strain mode shape has been carried out. The results manifest that strain modal parameters can be estimated effectively by utilizing the CMIF based on the corresponding simulations and experiments. Furthermore, damage detection based on strain mode shapes benefits from the accuracy of strain mode shape recognition and the excellent performance of the distributed fiber optics.

  4. Molecular Detection of Two Potential Probiotic Lactobacilli Strains and Evaluation of Their Performance as Starter Adjuncts in Yogurt Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Saxami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A molecular method for efficient and accurate detection and identification of two potential probiotic lactobacilli strains isolated from fermented olives, namely Lactobacillus pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, was developed in the present study. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was performed, and strain specific primers were designed and applied in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. The specificity of the assay was tested and successfully confirmed in 27 and 22 lactobacilli strains for Lb. pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, respectively. Moreover, the two strains were used as starter cultures in yogurt production. Cell enumeration followed by multiplex PCR analysis demonstrated that the two strains were present in yogurt samples at levels ≥6 log CFU/g even after 35 days of storage at 4 °C. Microbiological analysis showed that lactobacilli and streptococci were present within usual levels, whereas enterobacteriaceae and yeast/mold counts were not detected as expected. Although the pH values of the novel products were slightly lower than the control ones, the yogurt containing the probiotic cultures scored similar values compared to the control in a series of sensory tests. Overall, these results demonstrated the possible use of the two strains as starter adjuncts in the production of yogurt with potential probiotic properties.

  5. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Kim, Kang; Singh, Vijay P

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis or fatty liver disease occurs when lipids accumulate within the liver and can lead to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and eventual liver failure requiring liver transplant. Conventional brightness mode (B-mode) ultrasound (US) is the most common noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality used to diagnose hepatic steatosis in clinics. However, it is mostly subjective or requires a reference organ such as the kidney or spleen with which to compare. This comparison can be problematic when the reference organ is diseased or absent. The current work presents an alternative approach to noninvasively detecting liver fat content using US-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI). This technique is based on the difference in the change in the speed of sound as a function of temperature between water- and lipid-based tissues. US-TSI was conducted using two system configurations including a mid-frequency scanner with a single linear array transducer (5–14 MHz) for both imaging and heating and a high-frequency (13–24 MHz) small animal imaging system combined with a separate custom-designed US heating transducer array. Fatty livers (n = 10) with high fat content (45.6 ± 11.7%) from an obese mouse model and control livers (n = 10) with low fat content (4.8 ± 2.9%) from wild-type mice were embedded in gelatin. Then, US imaging was performed before and after US induced heating. Heating time periods of ∼3 s and ∼9.2 s were used for the mid-frequency imaging and high-frequency imaging systems, respectively, to induce temperature changes of approximately 1.5 °C. The apparent echo shifts that were induced as a result of sound speed change were estimated using 2D phase-sensitive speckle tracking. Following US-TSI, histology was performed to stain lipids and measure percentage fat in the mouse livers. Thermal strain measurements in fatty livers (−0.065 ± 0.079%) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those measured in control livers (−0.124

  6. Direct sequencing for rapid detection of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakham F

    2013-11-01

    new case. The most recorded mutation in the rpoB gene was the substitution TCG > TTG at codon 531 (Ser531 Leu, accounting for 46.15%. Significantly, the only mutation found in the katG gene was at codon 315 (AGC to ACC with a Ser315Thr amino acid change. Only one sample harbored mutation in the inhA promoter region and was a point mutation at the -15p position (C > T.Conclusion: The polymerase chain reaction sequencing approach is an accurate and rapid method for detection of drug-resistant TB in clinical specimens, and could be of great interest in the management of TB in critical cases to adjust the treatment regimen and limit the emergence of MDR and XDR strains.Keywords: Morocco, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, multidrug resistance, rpoB, katG, inhA promoter

  7. Molecular characterization of rotavirus strains detected during a clinical trial of a human rotavirus vaccine in Blantyre, Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Dove, Winifred; Doan, Yen Hai; Witte, Desiree; Ngwira, Bagrey; Todd, Stacy; Steele, A Duncan; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Cunliffe, Nigel A

    2014-01-01

    The human, G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix) significantly reduced severe rotavirus gastroenteritis episodes in a clinical trial in South Africa and Malawi, but vaccine efficacy was lower in Malawi (49.5%) than reported in South Africa (76.9%) and elsewhere. The aim of this study was to examine the molecular relationships of circulating wild-type rotaviruses detected during the clinical trial in Malawi to RIX4414 (the strain contained in Rotarix) and to common human rotavirus strains. Of 88 rotavirus-positive, diarrhoeal stool specimens, 43 rotaviruses exhibited identifiable RNA migration patterns when examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The genes encoding VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 of 5 representative strains possessing genotypes G12P[6], G1P[8], G9P[8], and G8P[4] were sequenced. While their VP7 (G) and VP4 (P) genotype designations were confirmed, the VP6 (I) and NSP4 (E) genotypes were either I1E1 or I2E2, indicating that they were of human rotavirus origin. RNA-RNA hybridization using 21 culture-adapted strains showed that Malawian rotaviruses had a genomic RNA constellation common to either the Wa-like or DS-1 like human rotaviruses. Overall, the Malawi strains appear similar in their genetic make-up to rotaviruses described in countries where vaccine efficacy is greater, suggesting that the lower efficacy in Malawi is unlikely to be explained by the diversity of circulating strains. PMID:22520123

  8. PCR detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from raw and pasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, V L M; Vieira, F P; Rall, R; Vieitis, R L; Fernandes, A; Candeias, J M G; Cardoso, K F G; Araújo, J P

    2008-12-10

    Milk is considered a nutritious food because it contains several important nutrients including proteins and vitamins. Conversely, it can be a vehicle for several pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study aimed to analyze the frequency of genes encoding the staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) SEA, SEB, SEC, SED, SEE, SEG, SEH, SEI and SEJ in S. aureus strains isolated from raw or pasteurized bovine milk. S. aureus was found in 38 (70.4%) out of 54 raw milk samples at concentrations of up to 8.9 x 10(5) CFU/ml. This microorganism was present in eight samples of pasteurized milk before the expiration date and in 11 samples analyzed on the expiration date. Of the 57 strains studied, 68.4% were positive for one or more genes encoding the enterotoxins, and 12 different genotypes were identified. The gene coding for enterotoxin A, sea, was the most frequent (16 strains, 41%), followed by sec (8 strains, 20.5%), sed (5 strains, 12.8%), seb (3 strains, 7.7%) and see (2 strains, 5.1%). Among the genes encoding the other enterotoxins, seg was the most frequently observed (11 strains, 28.2%), followed by sei (10 strains) and seh and sej (3 strains each). With the recent identification of new SEs, the perceived frequency of enterotoxigenic strains has increased, suggesting that the pathogenic potential of staphylococci may be higher than previously thought; however, further studies are required to assess the expression of these new SEs by S. aureus, and their impact in foodborne disease. The quality of Brazilian milk is still low, and efforts from the government and the entire productive chain are required to attain consumer safety.

  9. Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in the Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain GB11

    OpenAIRE

    Huey Jia Cheng; Robson Ee; Yuet Meng Cheong; Wen-Si Tan; Wai-Fong Yin; Kok-Gan Chan

    2014-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant clinical bacteria strain GB11 was isolated from a wound swab on the leg of a patient. Identity of stain GB11 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was validated by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Detection of the production of signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), was conducted using three different bacterial biosensors. A total of four different AHLs were found to be produced by strain GB11, namely...

  10. RGO-coated elastic fibres as wearable strain sensors for full-scale detection of human motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Qing; Wang, Qi; Zang, Siyao; Mao, Guoming; Zhang, Jinnan; Ren, Xiaomin

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we chose highly-elastic fabric fibres as the functional carrier and then simply coated the fibres with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using plasma treatment, dip coating and hydrothermal reduction steps, finally making a wearable strain sensor. As a result, the full-scale detection of human motions, ranging from bending joints to the pulse beat, has been achieved by these sensors. Moreover, high sensitivity, good stability and excellent repeatability were realized. The good sensing performances and economical fabrication process of this wearable strain sensor have strengthened our confidence in practical applications in smart clothing, smart fabrics, healthcare, and entertainment fields.

  11. Establishment of pseudomonas putida strains for sensitive detection of heavy metals in effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genthe, B.

    1987-09-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate a mutant of Pseudomonas putida that is more sensitive to heavy metal toxicants in water than the wild type. P. putida was the organism chosen in this study as it occurs naturally in unpolluted waters, is nonpathogenic, aerobic and because it is commonly applied in bacterial toxicity assays due to its sensitivity to toxicants. Three methods of mutagenesis were employed, which included N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NG) ; ultraviolet light and transposon-mediated mutagenesis in order to generate as wide a range of mutants as possible. Four mutants, which were more sensitive to mercury, copper, lead, zinc, cadmium and silver were isolated using the NG method of mutagenesis. These mutants were designated strains 53, 56, 60 and 61 and were characterized as P. putida strains on the basis of Gram staining, biochemical reactions and immunological properties. The sensitivity of the mutants to a variety of industrial effluents was compared to that of the parent strain using a bacterial growth test. Using industrial effluents, one of the mutants, namely strain 56 was found to be more sensitive than the parent strain on 71.4% of the tests. Strains 60 and 61 were also both more sensitive than the parent strain on 42.9% of the occasions using industrial effluents. The uptake rates of radioactive mercury were measured for the parent strain of P. putida and the mutants that were found to be more sensitive to mercury

  12. Broadly reactive pan-paramyxovirus reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis for the detection of Canine distemper virus in a case of canine meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzberg, Scott J.; Li, Qiang; Porter, Brian F.; Barber, Renee M.; Claiborne, Mary Kate; Levine, Jonathan M.; Levine, Gwendolyn J.; Israel, Sarah K.; Young, Benjamin D.; Kiupel, Matti; Greene, Craig; Ruone, Susan; Anderson, Larry; Tong, Suxiang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the immunologic protection associated with routine vaccination protocols, Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains an important pathogen of dogs. Antemortem diagnosis of systemic CDV infection may be made by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and/or immunohistochemical testing for CDV antigen; central nervous system infection often requires postmortem confirmation via histopathology and immunohistochemistry. An 8-month-old intact male French Bulldog previously vaccinated for CDV presented with multifocal neurologic signs. Based on clinical and postmortem findings, the dog’s disease was categorized as a meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology. Broadly reactive, pan-paramyxovirus RT-PCR using consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primers, combined with sequence analysis, identified CDV amplicons in the dog’s brain. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of CDV antigens, and a specific CDV RT-PCR based on the phosphoprotein gene identified a wild-type versus vaccinal virus strain. This case illustrates the utility of broadly reactive PCR and sequence analysis for the identification of pathogens in diseases with unknown etiology. PMID:19901287

  13. Detection of Methicillin Resistance and Various Virulence Factors in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Nasal Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Türk Dağı

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococus aureus can be found as a commensal on skin and nasal flora or it may cause local and invasive infections. S. aureus has a large number of virulence factors. Aims: To investigate the methicillin resistance and frequency of various virulence factors in S. aureus nasal isolates. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: Nasal samples collected from university students were cultured in media. S. aureus was identified by conventional methods and the Staphyloslide latex test (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, USA. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were conducted, and the methicillin resistance was determined. The mecA, nuc, pvl and staphylococcal toxin genes were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: S. aureus was isolated in 104 of 600 (17.3% nasal samples. In total, 101 (97.1% S. aureus isolates were methicillin-sensitive and the remaining 3 (2.9% were methicillin-resistant. Furthermore, all but five isolates carried at least one staphylococcal enterotoxin gene, with seg being predominant. The tst and eta genes were determined in 29 (27.9%, and 3 (2.9% isolates, respectively. None of the S. aureus isolates harbored see, etb, and pvl genes. Conclusion: A moderate rate of S. aureus carriage and low frequency of MRSA were detected in healthy students. S. aureus isolates had a high prevalence of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes and the tst gene. In this study, a large number of virulence factors were examined in S. aureus nasal isolates, and the data obtained from this study can be used for monitoring the prevalence of virulence genes in S. aureus strains isolated from nasal carriers.

  14. An oxygen dependent X-ray lesion in Escherichia coli strain B/r detected by penicillin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, N.E.; Obioha, F.I.; Ratnajothi, N.H.

    1979-01-01

    Enhancement of lethal damage to E. coli B/r by penicillin was observed after X-irradiation under aerobic conditions, but not after exposure to X-rays under anoxia or after U.V. (260 nm) irradiation. No enhancement of damage occurred when incubation with penicillin was delayed for 2 hours after aerobic X-irradiation. This enhancing effect was only detected in this strain and not in the filamentous strain E. coli B. It was concluded that an X-ray induced lesion, sensitive to the presence of oxygen at the time of irradiation and probably located in the cell envelope, initiates filamentation in E. coli B/r, which results in lethal damage in this strain. (author)

  15. Rapid focused sequencing: a multiplexed assay for simultaneous detection and strain typing of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary S Turingan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intentional release of Bacillus anthracis in the United States in 2001 has heightened concern about the use of pathogenic microorganisms in bioterrorism attacks. Many of the deadliest bacteria, including the Class A Select Agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis, are highly infectious via the pulmonary route when released in aerosolized form. Hence, rapid, sensitive, and reliable methods for detection of these biothreats and characterization of their potential impact on the exposed population are of critical importance to initiate and support rapid military, public health, and clinical responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed microfluidic multiplexed PCR and sequencing assays based on the simultaneous interrogation of three pathogens per assay and ten loci per pathogen. Microfluidic separation of amplified fluorescently labeled fragments generated characteristic electrophoretic signatures for identification of each agent. The three sets of primers allowed significant strain typing and discrimination from non-pathogenic closely-related species and environmental background strains based on amplicon sizes alone. Furthermore, sequencing of the 10 amplicons per pathogen, termed "Rapid Focused Sequencing," allowed an even greater degree of strain discrimination and, in some cases, can be used to determine virulence. Both amplification and sequencing assays were performed in microfluidic biochips developed for fast thermal cycling and requiring 7 µL per reaction. The 30-plex sequencing assay resulted in genotypic resolution of 84 representative strains belonging to each of the three biothreat species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The microfluidic multiplexed assays allowed identification and strain differentiation of the biothreat agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis and clear discrimination from closely-related species and several environmental

  16. Immunohistochemical detection of autophagy-related microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) in the cerebellums of dogs naturally infected with canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabak, Y B; Sozmen, M; Yarim, M; Guvenc, T; Karayigit, M O; Gulbahar, M Y

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) protein in the cerebellums of dogs infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) using immunohistochemistry to detect autophagy. The cerebellums of 20 dogs infected with CDV were used. Specimens showing demyelination of white matter were considered to have an acute infection, whereas specimens showing signs of severe perivascular cuffing and demyelination of white matter were classified as having chronic CDV. Cerebellar sections were immunostained with CDV and LC3 antibodies. The cytoplasm of Purkinje cells, granular layer cells, motor neurons in large cerebellar ganglia and some neurons in white matter were positive for the LC3 antibody in both the control and CDV-infected dogs. In the infected cerebellums, however, white matter was immunostained more intensely, particularly the neurons and gemistocytic astrocytes in the demyelinated areas, compared to controls. Autophagy also was demonstrated in CDV-positive cells using double immunofluorescence staining. Our findings indicate that increased autophagy in the cerebellum of dogs naturally infected with CDV may play a role in transferring the virus from cell to cell.

  17. Molecular detection and analysis of a novel metalloprotease gene of entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens strains in infected Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambong, J T; Xu, R; Sadiku, A; Chen, Q; Badiss, A; Yu, Q

    2014-04-01

    Serratia marcescens strains isolated from entomopathogenic nematodes (Rhabditis sp.) were examined for their pathogenicity and establishment in wax moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae. All the Serratia strains were potently pathogenic to G. mellonella larvae, leading to death within 48 h. The strains were shown to possess a metalloprotease gene encoding for a novel serralysin-like protein. Rapid establishment of the bacteria in infected larvae was confirmed by specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of a DNA fragment encoding for this protein. Detection of the viable Serratia strains in infected larvae was validated using the SYBR Green reverse transcriptase real-time PCR assay targeting the metalloprotease gene. Nucleotide sequences of the metalloprotease gene obtained in our study showed 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and 3 insertions compared with the metalloprotease gene of S. marcescens E-15. The metalloprotease gene had 60 synonymous and 8 nonsynonymous substitutions relative to the closest GenBank entry, S. marcescens E-15. A comparison of the amino acid composition of the new serralysin-like protein with that of the serralysin protein of S. marcescens E-15 revealed differences at 11 positions and a new aspartic acid residue. Analysis of the effect of protein variation suggests that a new aspartic acid residue resulting from nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations in the protein structure could have the most significant effect on its biological function. The new metalloprotease gene and (or) its product could have applications in plant agricultural biotechnology.

  18. Detection and characterisation of Yersinia enterocolitica strains in cold-stored carcasses of large game animals in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancerz-Kisiel, Agata; Socha, Piotr; Szweda, Wojciech

    2016-02-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is an important foodborne pathogen. The aim of the present study was to identify the bioserotypes and virulence markers of Y.enterocolitica strains isolated from three different anatomical regions of cold-stored carcasses of large game animals intended for human consumption. Y.enterocolitica strains were found in 12/20 (60%) of the roe deer carcasses examined, 7/16 (43.8%) of red deer carcasses and 11/20 (55%) of wild boar carcasses. Of the 52 Y.enterocolitica strains, 19 were isolated from the perineum, followed by 17 strains from the peritoneum of the longissimus dorsi muscle and 16 from the tonsils. Only one strain was isolated from warm culture. Bioserotype 1A/NI was the most commonly found and was detected in 29/52 isolates. All isolates contained amplicons corresponding to ystB gene fragments. The relatively high degree of carcass contamination with Y.enterocolitica is of concern due to the growing popularity of game meat with consumers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental adaptation of wild-type canine distemper virus (CDV to the human entry receptor CD150.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bieringer

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV, a close relative of measles virus (MV, is widespread and well known for its broad host range. When the goal of measles eradication may be achieved, and when measles vaccination will be stopped, CDV might eventually cross the species barrier to humans and emerge as a new human pathogen. In order to get an impression how fast such alterations may occur, we characterized required adaptive mutations to the human entry receptors CD150 (SLAM and nectin-4 as first step to infect human target cells. Recombinant wild-type CDV-A75/17(red adapted quickly to growth in human H358 epithelial cells expressing human nectin-4. Sequencing of the viral attachment proteins (hemagglutinin, H, and fusion protein, F genes revealed that no adaptive alteration was required to utilize human nectin-4. In contrast, the virus replicated only to low titres (10(2 pfu/ml in Vero cells expressing human CD150 (Vero-hSLAM. After three passages using these cells virus was adapted to human CD150 and replicated to high titres (10(5 pfu/ml. Sequence analyses revealed that only one amino acid exchange in the H-protein at position 540 Asp→Gly (D540G was required for functional adaptation to human CD150. Structural modelling suggests that the adaptive mutation D540G in H reflects the sequence alteration from canine to human CD150 at position 70 and 71 from Pro to Leu (P70L and Gly to Glu (G71E, and compensates for the gain of a negative charge in the human CD150 molecule. Using this model system our data indicate that only a minimal alteration, in this case one adaptive mutation, is required for adaptation of CDV to the human entry receptors, and help to understand the molecular basis why this adaptive mutation occurs.

  20. Use of Multidimensional Fiber Grating Strain Sensors for Damage Detection in Composite Pressure Vessels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kunzler, Marley

    2004-01-01

    ... during curing and pressure cycling near cut tow and Teflon tape defects. These changes in the multi-axis strain due to four pressure cycles and repeated impacts are measured and compared to ultrasonic and eddy current scans...

  1. Detecting strain wave propagation through quantum dots by pump-probe spectroscopy: A theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huneke, J; Kuhn, T; Axt, V M

    2010-01-01

    The influence of strain waves traveling across a quantum dot structure on its optical response is studied for two different situations: First, a strain wave is created by the optical excitation of a single quantum dot near a surface which, after reflection at the surface, reenters the dot; second, a phonon wave packet is emitted by the excitation of a nearby second dot and then travels across the quantum dot. Pump-probe type excitations are simulated for quantum dots in the strong confinement limit. We show that the optical signals allow us to monitor crossing strain waves for both structures in the real-time response as well as in the corresponding pump-probe spectra. In the time-derivative of the phase of the polarization a distinct trace reflects the instantaneous shifts of the transition energy during the passage while in the spectra pronounced oscillations reveal the passage of the strain waves.

  2. Cardiac strain findings in children with latent rheumatic heart disease detected by echocardiographic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Andrea; Richards, Hedda; Ploutz, Michelle; Gaur, Lasya; Aliku, Twalib; Lwabi, Peter; Ensing, Greg; Sable, Craig

    2017-08-01

    Identification of patients with latent rheumatic heart disease by echocardiography presents a unique opportunity to prevent disease progression. Myocardial strain is a more sensitive indicator of cardiac performance than traditional measures of systolic function. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that abnormalities in myocardial strain may be present in children with latent rheumatic heart disease. Standard echocardiography images with electrocardiogram gating were obtained from Ugandan children found to have latent rheumatic heart disease as well as control subjects. Traditional echocardiography measures of systolic function were obtained, and offline global longitudinal strain analysis was performed. Comparison between groups was performed using strain as a continuous (Mann-Whitney U-test) and categorical (cut-off 5th percentile for age) variable. Our study included 14 subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease, 13 with borderline rheumatic heart disease, and 112 control subjects. None of the subjects had abnormal left ventricular size or ejection fraction. Global longitudinal strain was lower than the 5th percentile in 44% of the subjects with any rheumatic heart disease (p=0.002 versus controls) and 57% of the subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease (p=0.03). The mean absolute strain values were significantly lower when comparing subjects with any rheumatic heart disease with controls (20.4±3.95 versus 22.4±4.35, p=0.025) and subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease with controls (19.9±4.25 versus 22.4±4.35, p=0.033). Global longitudinal strain is decreased in subjects with rheumatic heart disease in the absence of abnormal systolic function. Larger studies with longer-term follow-up are required to determine whether there is a role for strain to help better understand the pathophysiology of latent rheumatic heart disease.

  3. SERS-based detection methods for screening of genetically modified bacterial strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morelli, Lidia

    factories vary largely, including industrial production of valuable compounds for biofuels, polymer synthesis and food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry. The improvement of computational and biochemical tools has revolutionized the synthesis of novel modified microbial strains, opening up new......The importance of metabolic engineering has been growing over the last decades, establishing the use of genetically modified microbial strains for overproduction of metabolites at industrial scale as an innovative, convenient and biosustainable method. Nowadays, application areas of microbial...

  4. Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in the Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain GB11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey Jia Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A multidrug-resistant clinical bacteria strain GB11 was isolated from a wound swab on the leg of a patient. Identity of stain GB11 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was validated by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Detection of the production of signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs, was conducted using three different bacterial biosensors. A total of four different AHLs were found to be produced by strain GB11, namely N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL, N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL, N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C8-HSL and N-3-oxo-dodecanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL using high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Of these detected AHLs, 3-oxo-C12-HSL was found to be the most abundant AHL produced by P. aeruginosa GB11.

  5. Specific Detection and Identification of American Mulberry-Infecting and Italian Olive-Associated Strains of Xylella fastidiosa by Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guan

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa causes bacterial leaf scorch in many landscape trees including elm, oak, sycamore and mulberry, but methods for specific identification of a particular tree host species-limited strain or differentiation of tree-specific strains are lacking. It is also unknown whether a particular landscape tree-infecting X. fastidiosa strain is capable of infecting multiple landscape tree species in an urban environment. We developed two PCR primers specific for mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa based on the nucleotide sequence of a unique open reading frame identified only in mulberry-infecting strains among all the North and South American strains of X. fastidiosa sequenced to date. PCR using the primers allowed for detection and identification of mulberry-infecting X. fastidiosa strains in cultures and in samples collected from naturally infected mulberry trees. In addition, no mixed infections with or non-specific detections of the mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa were found in naturally X. fastidiosa-infected oak, elm and sycamore trees growing in the same region where naturally infected mulberry trees were grown. This genotype-specific PCR assay will be valuable for disease diagnosis, studies of strain-specific infections in insects and plant hosts, and management of diseases caused by X. fastidiosa. Unexpectedly but interestingly, the unique open reading frame conserved in the mulberry-infecting strains in the U. S. was also identified in the recently sequenced olive-associated strain CoDiRO isolated in Italy. When the primer set was tested against naturally infected olive plant samples collected in Italy, it allowed for detection of olive-associated strains of X. fastidiosa in Italy. This PCR assay, therefore, will also be useful for detection and identification of the Italian group of X. fastidiosa strains to aid understanding of the occurrence, evolution and biology of this new group of X. fastidiosa strains.

  6. Specific Detection and Identification of American Mulberry-Infecting and Italian Olive-Associated Strains of Xylella fastidiosa by Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei; Shao, Jonathan; Elbeaino, Toufic; Davis, Robert E; Zhao, Tingchang; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa causes bacterial leaf scorch in many landscape trees including elm, oak, sycamore and mulberry, but methods for specific identification of a particular tree host species-limited strain or differentiation of tree-specific strains are lacking. It is also unknown whether a particular landscape tree-infecting X. fastidiosa strain is capable of infecting multiple landscape tree species in an urban environment. We developed two PCR primers specific for mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa based on the nucleotide sequence of a unique open reading frame identified only in mulberry-infecting strains among all the North and South American strains of X. fastidiosa sequenced to date. PCR using the primers allowed for detection and identification of mulberry-infecting X. fastidiosa strains in cultures and in samples collected from naturally infected mulberry trees. In addition, no mixed infections with or non-specific detections of the mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa were found in naturally X. fastidiosa-infected oak, elm and sycamore trees growing in the same region where naturally infected mulberry trees were grown. This genotype-specific PCR assay will be valuable for disease diagnosis, studies of strain-specific infections in insects and plant hosts, and management of diseases caused by X. fastidiosa. Unexpectedly but interestingly, the unique open reading frame conserved in the mulberry-infecting strains in the U. S. was also identified in the recently sequenced olive-associated strain CoDiRO isolated in Italy. When the primer set was tested against naturally infected olive plant samples collected in Italy, it allowed for detection of olive-associated strains of X. fastidiosa in Italy. This PCR assay, therefore, will also be useful for detection and identification of the Italian group of X. fastidiosa strains to aid understanding of the occurrence, evolution and biology of this new group of X. fastidiosa strains.

  7. Bacillus 'next generation' diagnostics: Moving from detection towards sub-typing and risk related strain profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika eEhling-Schulz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The highly heterogeneous genus Bacillus comprises the largest species group of endospore forming bacteria. Because of their ubiquitous nature, Bacillus spores can enter food production at several stages resulting in significant economic losses and posing a potential risk to consumers due the capacity of certain Bacillus strains for toxin production. In the past, food microbiological diagnostics was focused on the determination of species using conventional culture based methods, which are still widely used. However, due to the extreme intraspecies diversity found in the genus Bacillus, DNA based identification and typing methods are gaining increasing importance in routine diagnostics. Several studies showed that certain characteristics are rather strain dependent than species specific. Therefore, the challenge for current and future Bacillus diagnostics is not only the efficient and accurate identification on species level but also the development of rapid methods to identify strains with specific characteristics (such as stress resistance or spoilage potential, trace contamination sources, and last but not least discriminate potential hazardous strains from non-toxic strains.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging detects significant sex differences in human myocardial strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynolds Lina M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiology responsible for the significant outcome disparities between men and women with cardiac disease is largely unknown. Further investigation into basic cardiac physiological differences between the sexes is needed. This study utilized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-based multiparametric strain analysis to search for sex-based differences in regional myocardial contractile function. Methods End-systolic strain (circumferential, longitudinal, and radial was interpolated from MRI-based radiofrequency tissue tagging grid point displacements in each of 60 normal adult volunteers (32 females. Results The average global left ventricular (LV strain among normal female volunteers (n = 32 was significantly larger in absolute value (functionally better than in normal male volunteers (n = 28 in both the circumferential direction (Male/Female = -0.19 ± 0.02 vs. -0.21 ± 0.02; p = 0.025 and longitudinal direction (Male/Female = -0.14 ± 0.03 vs. -0.16 ± 0.02; p = 0.007. Conclusions The finding of significantly larger circumferential and longitudinal LV strain among normal female volunteers suggests that baseline contractile differences between the sexes may contribute to the well-recognized divergence in cardiovascular disease outcomes. Further work is needed in order to determine the pathologic changes that occur in LV strain between women and men with the onset of cardiovascular disease.

  9. Molecular characterization of rotavirus strains detected during a clinical trial of a human rotavirus vaccine in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Dove, Winifred; Doan, Yen Hai; Witte, Desiree; Ngwira, Bagrey; Todd, Stacy; Duncan Steele, A; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Cunliffe, Nigel A

    2012-04-27

    The human, G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix™) significantly reduced severe rotavirus gastroenteritis episodes in a clinical trial in South Africa and Malawi, but vaccine efficacy was lower in Malawi (49.5%) than reported in South Africa (76.9%) and elsewhere. The aim of this study was to examine the molecular relationships of circulating wild-type rotaviruses detected during the clinical trial in Malawi to RIX4414 (the strain contained in Rotarix™) and to common human rotavirus strains. Of 88 rotavirus-positive, diarrhoeal stool specimens, 43 rotaviruses exhibited identifiable RNA migration patterns when examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The genes encoding VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 of 5 representative strains possessing genotypes G12P[6], G1P[8], G9P[8], and G8P[4] were sequenced. While their VP7 (G) and VP4 (P) genotype designations were confirmed, the VP6 (I) and NSP4 (E) genotypes were either I1E1 or I2E2, indicating that they were of human rotavirus origin. RNA-RNA hybridization using 21 culture-adapted strains showed that Malawian rotaviruses had a genomic RNA constellation common to either the Wa-like or the DS-1 like human rotaviruses. Overall, the Malawi strains appear similar in their genetic make-up to rotaviruses described in countries where vaccine efficacy is greater, suggesting that the lower efficacy in Malawi is unlikely to be explained by the diversity of circulating strains. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transrectal real-time tissue elastography targeted biopsy coupled with peak strain index improves the detection of clinically important prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qi; Yang, Dong-Rong; Xue, Bo-Xin; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Han-Bin; Dong, Yun; Wang, Cai-Shan; Shan, Yu-Xi

    2017-07-01

    The focus of the present study was to evaluate transrectal real-time tissue elastography (RTE)-targeted two-core biopsy coupled with peak strain index for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) and to compare this method with 10-core systematic biopsy. A total of 141 patients were enrolled for evaluation. The diagnostic value of peak strain index was assessed using a receiver operating characteristic curve. The cancer detection rates of the two approaches and corresponding positive cores and Gleason score were compared. The cancer detection rate per core in the RTE-targeted biopsy (44%) was higher compared with that in systematic biopsy (30%). The peak strain index value of PCa was higher compared with that of the benign lesion. PCa was detected with the highest sensitivity (87.5%) and specificity (85.5%) using the threshold value of a peak strain index of ≥5.97 with an area under the curve value of 0.95. When the Gleason score was ≥7, RTE-targeted biopsy coupled with peak strain index detected 95.6% of PCa cases, but 84.4% were detected using systematic biopsy. Peak strain index as a quantitative parameter may improve the differentiation of PCa from benign lesions in the prostate peripheral zone. Transrectal RTE-targeted biopsy coupled with peak strain index may enhance the detection of clinically significant PCa, particularly when combined with systematic biopsy.

  11. Unexpected detection of porcine rotavirus C strains carrying human origin VP6 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattoor, Jobin Jose; Saurabh, Sharad; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Sircar, Shubhankar; Dhama, Kuldeep; Ghosh, Souvik; Bányai, Krisztián; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Rotavirus C (RVC), a known etiological agent of diarrheal outbreaks, mainly inflicts swine population globally with sporadic incidence in human, cattle, ferret, mink and dog. To demonstrate the presence of RVC in Indian swine population and characterization of its selected structural (VP6) and non-structural (NSP4 and NSP5) genes. A total of 108 diarrheic samples from different regions of India were used. Isolated RNA was loaded onto polyacrylamide gel to screen for the presence of RVs through the identification of specific electrophoretic genomic migration pattern. To characterize the RVC strains, VP6 gene and NSP4 and NSP5 genes were amplified, sequenced and analyzed. Based on VP6 gene specific diagnostic RT-PCR, the presence of RVC was confirmed in 12.0% (13/108) piglet fecal specimens. The nucleotide sequence analysis of VP6 gene, encoding inner capsid protein, from selected porcine RVC (PoRVC) strains revealed more than 93% homologies to human RVC strains (HuRVC) of Eurasian origin. These strains were distant from hitherto reported PoRVCs and clustered with HuRVCs, owning I2 genotype. However, the two non-structural genes, i.e. NSP4 and NSP5, of these strains were found to be of swine type, signifying a re-assortment event that has occurred in the Indian swine population. The findings indicate the presence of human-like RVC in Indian pigs and division of RVC clade with I2 genotype into further sub-clades. To the best of our knowledge, this appears to be the first report of RVC in Indian swine population. Incidence of human-like RVC VP6 gene in swine supports its subsequent zoonotic prospective.

  12. Subclinical Cardiac Dysfunction Detected by Strain Imaging During Breast Irradiation With Persistent Changes 6 Weeks After Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Queenie [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Hee, Leia; Batumalai, Vikneswary [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Allman, Christine [Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); MacDonald, Peter [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); St. Vincent' s Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Lonergan, Denise [Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Thomas, Liza, E-mail: l.thomas@unsw.edu.au [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate 2-dimensional strain imaging (SI) for the detection of subclinical myocardial dysfunction during and after radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Forty women with left-sided breast cancer, undergoing only adjuvant RT to the left chest, were prospectively recruited. Standard echocardiography and SI were performed at baseline, during RT, and 6 weeks after RT. Strain (S) and strain rate (Sr) parameters were measured in the longitudinal, circumferential, and radial planes. Correlation of change in global longitudinal strain (GLS % and Δ change) and the volume of heart receiving 30 Gy (V30) and mean heart dose (MHD) were examined. Results: Left ventricular ejection fraction was unchanged; however, longitudinal systolic S and Sr and radial S were significantly reduced during RT and remained reduced at 6 weeks after treatment [longitudinal S (%) −20.44 ± 2.66 baseline vs −18.60 ± 2.70* during RT vs −18.34 ± 2.86* at 6 weeks after RT; longitudinal Sr (s{sup −1}) −1.19 ± 0.21 vs −1.06 ± 0.18* vs −1.06 ± 0.16*; radial S (%) 56.66 ± 18.57 vs 46.93 ± 14.56* vs 49.22 ± 15.81*; *P<.05 vs baseline]. Diastolic Sr were only reduced 6 weeks after RT [longitudinal E Sr (s{sup −1}) 1.47 ± 0.32 vs 1.29 ± 0.27*; longitudinal A Sr (s{sup −1}) 1.19 ± 0.31 vs 1.03 ± 0.24*; *P<.05 vs baseline], whereas circumferential strain was preserved throughout. A modest correlation between S and Sr and V30 and MHD was observed (GLS Δ change and V30 ρ = 0.314, P=.05; GLS % change and V30 ρ = 0.288, P=.076; GLS Δ change and MHD ρ = 0.348, P=.03; GLS % change and MHD ρ = 0.346, P=.031). Conclusions: Subclinical myocardial dysfunction was detected by 2-dimensional SI during RT, with changes persisting 6 weeks after treatment, though long-term effects remain unknown. Additionally, a modest correlation between strain reduction and radiation dose was observed.

  13. A multiplex ligation detection assay for the characterization of Salmonella enterica strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarts, Henk J.M.; Vos, Pieter; Larsson, Jonas T.

    2011-01-01

    A proof of principle of a multi-target assay for genotyping Salmonella has been developed targeting 62 genomic marker sequences of Salmonella related to pathogenicity. The assay is based on multiplex ligation detection reaction (LDR) followed by customized ArrayTube® microarray detection. The fea...... assessors that support bio-traceability models....

  14. A multiplex ligation detection assay for the characterization of Salmonella enterica strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, H.J.M.; Vos, P.; Larsson, J.T.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Huehn, S.; Weijers, T.; Gronlund, H.A.; Malorny, B.

    2011-01-01

    A proof of principle of a multi-target assay for genotyping Salmonella has been developed targeting 62 genomic marker sequences of Salmonella related to pathogenicity. The assay is based on multiplex ligation detection reaction (LDR) followed by customized ArrayTube (R) microarray detection. The

  15. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Common Strains of Escherichia coli▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joshua; Beriwal, Shilpa; Chandra, Ishwad; Paul, Vinod K.; Kapil, Aarti; Singh, Tripti; Wadowsky, Robert M.; Singh, Vinita; Goyal, Ankur; Jahnukainen, Timo; Johnson, James R.; Tarr, Phillip I.; Vats, Abhay

    2008-01-01

    We developed a highly sensitive and specific LAMP assay for Escherichia coli. It does not require DNA extraction and can detect as few as 10 copies. It detected all 36 of 36 E. coli isolates and all 22 urine samples (out of 89 samples tested) that had E. coli. This assay is rapid, low in cost, and simple to perform. PMID:18550738

  16. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of common strains of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joshua; Beriwal, Shilpa; Chandra, Ishwad; Paul, Vinod K; Kapil, Aarti; Singh, Tripti; Wadowsky, Robert M; Singh, Vinita; Goyal, Ankur; Jahnukainen, Timo; Johnson, James R; Tarr, Phillip I; Vats, Abhay

    2008-08-01

    We developed a highly sensitive and specific LAMP assay for Escherichia coli. It does not require DNA extraction and can detect as few as 10 copies. It detected all 36 of 36 E. coli isolates and all 22 urine samples (out of 89 samples tested) that had E. coli. This assay is rapid, low in cost, and simple to perform.

  17. TRANSFORMATION ISOTHERME D'UN ACIER A HAUTE RESISTANCE 40 CDV 13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A BOUTEFNOUCHET

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available L'étude dilatométrique du comportement de l'austénite en condition isotherme d'un acier ternaire, à haute résistance mécanique de nuance 40 CDV 13, nous a permis de tracer son diagramme TTT. L'austénitisation a été réalisée pendant 10 minutes à  qg = 950°C (utilisée dans  l'industrie. Les températures de maintien sont comprises entre Ac1 = 810°C et Ms  = 310°C. Dans ce diagramme TTT, on distingue deux domaines de transformation isotherme de l'austénite. Le domaine I (625°C £  qiso < Ac1 = 810°C dans lequel l'austénite se transforme en ferrite et en perlite, et le domaine II (325°C  £  qiso £ 475°C où l'austénite se transforme en bainite ou en ferrite probainitique. Ces transformations sont précédées pour toutes les températures de maintien isotherme d'une précipitation de carbures. En outre, ces deux domaines de transformation de l'austénite sont séparés par une large zone de stabilité de l'austénite comprise entre 500°C et 600°C. L'analyse approfondie des courbes dilatométriques enregistrées durant le maintien isotherme et le refroidissement final jusqu'à l'ambiante, nous a permis de déterminer qualitativement et quantitativement les phase mises en jeu par ces transformations isothermes de l'austénite.

  18. Progress of a Cross-Correlation Based Optical Strain Measurement Technique for Detecting Radial Growth on a Rotating Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Woike, Mark R.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The Aeronautical Sciences Project under NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program is interested in the development of novel measurement technologies, such as optical surface measurements for the in situ health monitoring of critical constituents of the internal flow path. In situ health monitoring has the potential to detect flaws, i.e. cracks in key components, such as engine turbine disks, before the flaws lead to catastrophic failure. The present study, aims to further validate and develop an optical strain measurement technique to measure the radial growth and strain field of an already cracked disk, mimicking the geometry of a sub-scale turbine engine disk, under loaded conditions in the NASA Glenn Research Center's High Precision Rotordynamics Laboratory. The technique offers potential fault detection by imaging an applied high-contrast random speckle pattern under unloaded and loaded conditions with a CCD camera. Spinning the cracked disk at high speeds (loaded conditions) induces an external load, resulting in a radial growth of the disk of approximately 50.0-µm in the flawed region and hence, a localized strain field. When imaging the cracked disk under static conditions, the disk will be undistorted; however, during rotation the cracked region will grow radially, thus causing the applied particle pattern to be 'shifted'. The resulting particle displacements between the two images is measured using the two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithms implemented in standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) software to track the disk growth, which facilitates calculation of the localized strain field. A random particle distribution is adhered onto the surface of the cracked disk and two bench top experiments are carried out to evaluate the technique's ability to measure the induced particle displacements. The disk is shifted manually using a translation stage equipped with a fine micrometer and a hotplate is used to induce thermal growth of the disk, causing the

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of canine distemper virus in domestic dogs in Nanjing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhenwei; Wang, Yongshan; Wang, Xiaoli; Xia, Xingxia

    2015-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infects a broad range of carnivores, including wild and domestic Canidae. The hemagglutinin gene, which encodes the attachment protein that determines viral tropism, has been widely used to determine the relationship between CDV strains of different lineages circulating worldwide. We determined the full-length H gene sequences of seven CDV field strains detected in domestic dogs in Nanjing, China. A phylogenetic analysis of the H gene sequences of CDV strains from different geographic regions and vaccine strains was performed. Four of the seven CDV strains were grouped in the same cluster of the Asia-1 lineage to which the vast majority of Chinese CDV strains belong, whereas the other three were clustered within the Asia-4 lineage, which has never been detected in China. This represents the first record of detection of strains of the Asia-4 lineage in China since this lineage was reported in Thailand in 2013.

  20. Computerized strain-gauge plethysmography - An alternative method for the detection of lower limb deep venous thrombosis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elford, Julian; Wells, Irving; Cowie, Jim; Hurlock, Carol; Sanders, Hilary

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To test the ability of computerized strain-gauge plethysmography to act as a screening test for lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over an 8-month period, all patients referred to our Medical Assessment Unit with suspected lower limb DVT were considered for inclusion in the study. Each patient underwent both plethysmography and ascending venography within 24 h, and the presence or absence of thrombus in the popliteal, superficial femoral or iliac veins was noted. The results of the two tests were then used to determine the accuracy of computerized strain-gauge plethysmography in detecting above knee DVT. RESULTS: The screening tests and venograms of 239 patients referred with clinically suspected lower limb DVT were compared. The false negative rate of plethysmography was 15.4%, which is significantly different from the 4.8% claimed by the manufacturers of this device (P = 0.00003). CONCLUSIONS: In a population of acute admissions with suspected lower limb DVT, computerized strain-gauge plethysmography is not suitable for use as a screening test due to an unacceptably high proportion of false negative screens. J. Elford (2000)

  1. A TaqMan-based real time PCR assay for specific detection and quantification of Xylella fastidiosa strains causing bacterial leaf scorch in oleander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei; Shao, Jonathan; Singh, Raghuwinder; Davis, Robert E; Zhao, Tingchang; Huang, Qi

    2013-02-15

    A TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay was developed for specific detection of strains of X. fastidiosa causing oleander leaf scorch. The assay uses primers WG-OLS-F1 and WG-OLS-R1 and the fluorescent probe WG-OLS-P1, designed based on unique sequences found only in the genome of oleander strain Ann1. The assay is specific, allowing detection of only oleander-infecting strains, not other strains of X. fastidiosa nor other plant-associated bacteria tested. The assay is also sensitive, with a detection limit of 10.4fg DNA of X. fastidiosa per reaction in vitro and in planta. The assay can also be applied to detect low numbers of X. fastidiosa in insect samples, or further developed into a multiplex real-time PCR assay to simultaneously detect and distinguish diverse strains of X. fastidiosa that may occupy the same hosts or insect vectors. Specific and sensitive detection and quantification of oleander strains of X. fastidiosa should be useful for disease diagnosis, epidemiological studies, management of oleander leaf scorch disease, and resistance screening for oleander shrubs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Investigation of a Cross-Correlation Based Optical Strain Measurement Technique for Detecting radial Growth on a Rotating Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Woike, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The Aeronautical Sciences Project under NASA`s Fundamental Aeronautics Program is extremely interested in the development of novel measurement technologies, such as optical surface measurements in the internal parts of a flow path, for in situ health monitoring of gas turbine engines. In situ health monitoring has the potential to detect flaws, i.e. cracks in key components, such as engine turbine disks, before the flaws lead to catastrophic failure. In the present study, a cross-correlation imaging technique is investigated in a proof-of-concept study as a possible optical technique to measure the radial growth and strain field on an already cracked sub-scale turbine engine disk under loaded conditions in the NASA Glenn Research Center`s High Precision Rotordynamics Laboratory. The optical strain measurement technique under investigation offers potential fault detection using an applied high-contrast random speckle pattern and imaging the pattern under unloaded and loaded conditions with a CCD camera. Spinning the cracked disk at high speeds induces an external load, resulting in a radial growth of the disk of approximately 50.0-im in the flawed region and hence, a localized strain field. When imaging the cracked disk under static conditions, the disk will be undistorted; however, during rotation the cracked region will grow radially, thus causing the applied particle pattern to be .shifted`. The resulting particle displacements between the two images will then be measured using the two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithms implemented in standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) software to track the disk growth, which facilitates calculation of the localized strain field. In order to develop and validate this optical strain measurement technique an initial proof-of-concept experiment is carried out in a controlled environment. Using PIV optimization principles and guidelines, three potential speckle patterns, for future use on the rotating disk, are developed

  3. Target Detection, Identification, and Marksmanship Under Various Types of Physiological Strain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tikuisis, Peter

    2006-01-01

    .... Using a small arms trainer (SAT), target detection, identification, and engagement were tested under a variety of conditions including heat and cold exposure, fatiguing exercise, and sleep deprivation, with caffeine intervention...

  4. Molecular characterization of canine parvovirus strains in Argentina: Detection of the pathogenic variant CPV2c in vaccinated dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Marina Gallo; Mattion, Nora; Bucafusco, Danilo; Fogel, Fernando; Remorini, Patricia; La Torre, Jose

    2009-08-01

    PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers was used to detect canine parvovirus (CPV) DNA in 38 rectal swabs from Argentine domestic dogs with symptoms compatible with parvovirus disease. Twenty-seven out of 38 samples analyzed were CPV positive. The classical CPV2 strain was not detected in any of the samples, but nine samples were identified as CPV2a variant and 18 samples as CPV2b variant. Further sequence analysis revealed a mutation at amino acid 426 of the VP2 gene (Asp426Glu), characteristic of the CPV2c variant, in 14 out of 18 of the samples identified initially by PCR as CPV2b. The appearance of CPV2c variant in Argentina might be dated at least to the year 2003. Three different pathogenic CPV variants circulating currently in the Argentine domestic dog population were identified, with CPV2c being the only variant affecting vaccinated and unvaccinated dogs during the year 2008.

  5. Detection of potentially cariogenic strains of Streptococcus mutans using the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera Galaviz, Luis Alejandro; Aceves Medina, Ma del Carmen; Estrada García, Iris C

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a pathogen related to the occurrence of human dental caries. The determination of total amounts of mutans streptococci, as well as the proportion related to other oral bacteria, is of interest when assessing the risk of developing caries. In this context, it is better to use a sensitive, specific and non-time consuming method such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), than to use culture and biochemical identification methods. In this work we identified potentially cariogenic strains of S. mutans and assessed the relationship with the dmft, DMFT or dmft/DMFT index. Using DNA isolated from dental plaque, a 192 bp sequence was identified and amplified from the spaP gene and a 722 bp sequence from the dexA gene. The results suggest that it is important to evaluate the presence of cariogenic S. mutans strains in plaque content rather than the accumulation of plaque itself However, other factors like diet, hygiene, genetic background, the flow rate of saliva and the presence of specific antibodies, also play a key role in the development of caries.

  6. Detection of patent infections of Echinococcus granulosus ("sheep-strain", G1) in naturally infected dogs in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherifi, Kurtesh; Rexhepi, Agim; Hamidi, Afrim; Behluli, Behlul; Zessin, Karl-Hans; Mathis, Alexander; Deplazes, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A survey was carried out to assess the occurrence of canine echinococcosis in naturally infected dogs in Kosovo. Using the flotation-ovassay technique, taeniid eggs were found in 23 (7.5%) out of a total of 305 dogs. Eggs from other helminths were detected as well: hookworms 139 (45.5%), Trichuris sp. 87 (28.5%), Toxocara sp. 42 (13.7%), Toxascaris leonina 21 (6.8%) and Dipylidium caninum eight (2.6%). From 21 of the 305 samples (6.9%), taeniids eggs could be collected. Using PCR primers specific for Echinococcus granulosus ("sheep strain", G1), four of these samples (1.3%) resulted positive. The E. granulosus isolates originated from each one stray dog, hunting dog, sheepdog and pet dog. A semi-quantitative analysis showed low to moderate egg counts (2-10 per 1 g faeces) in dogs positive for E. granulosus ("sheep strain", G1) whereas specimens with high (11-20) or very high numbers (> 20) of taeniid eggs were negative in the E. granulosus PCR. Using specific primers for the detection of E. multilocularis, all samples containing taeniid eggs were negative. This is the first report on identification of E. granulosus in dogs from Kosovo where human cystic echinococcosis is a significant medical problem.

  7. SIVdrl detection in captive mandrills: are mandrills infected with a third strain of simian immunodeficiency virus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.; van den Burg, Remco; Hoyer, Mark J.; Gruters, Rob A.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Berkhout, Ben

    2004-01-01

    A pol-fragment of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) that is highly related to SIVdrl-pol from drill monkeys (Mandrillus leucophaeus) was detected in two mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) from Amsterdam Zoo. These captivity-born mandrills had never been in contact with drill monkeys, and were unlikely

  8. Optical detection and virotherapy of live metastatic tumor cells in body fluids with vaccinia strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqiang Wang

    Full Text Available Metastatic tumor cells in body fluids are important targets for treatment, and critical surrogate markers for evaluating cancer prognosis and therapeutic response. Here we report, for the first time, that live metastatic tumor cells in blood samples from mice bearing human tumor xenografts and in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with cancer were successfully detected using a tumor cell-specific recombinant vaccinia virus (VACV. In contrast to the FDA-approved CellSearch system, VACV detects circulating tumor cells (CTCs in a cancer biomarker-independent manner, thus, free of any bias related to the use of antibodies, and can be potentially a universal system for detection of live CTCs of any tumor type, not limited to CTCs of epithelial origin. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that VACV was effective in preventing and reducing circulating tumor cells in mice bearing human tumor xenografts. Importantly, a single intra-peritoneal delivery of VACV resulted in a dramatic decline in the number of tumor cells in the ascitic fluid from a patient with gastric cancer. Taken together, these results suggest VACV to be a useful tool for quantitative detection of live tumor cells in liquid biopsies as well as a potentially effective treatment for reducing or eliminating live tumor cells in body fluids of patients with metastatic disease.

  9. Detection of antibodies against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus GDVII strain in experimental guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häger, C; Glage, S; Held, N; Bleich, E M; Burghard, A; Mähler, M; Bleich, André

    2016-10-01

    A disease affecting guinea pigs called 'guinea pig lameness' characterized by clinical signs of depression, lameness of limbs, flaccid paralysis, weight loss and death within a few weeks was first described by Römer in 1911. After a research group in our facility kept laboratory guinea pigs from two different origins together in one room, lameness was observed in two animals. Further investigations revealed a serological immune response against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV; GDVII strain) in these animals. Histopathology of the lumbar spinal cord of these animals showed mononuclear cell infiltration and necrotic neurons in the anterior horn. Therefore, all guinea pigs from this contaminated animal unit, from other units in our facility, as well as from different European institutions and breeding centres were screened for antibodies directed against GDVII. Our investigations showed that approximately 80% of all guinea pigs from the contaminated animal unit were seropositive for GDVII, whereas animals from other separate units were completely negative. In addition, 43% of tested sera from the different European institutions and breeding centres contained antibodies against GDVII. The present data confirm that an unknown viral infection causes an immune response in experimental guinea pigs leading to seroconversion against GDVII and that guinea pigs from a commercial breeder are the source of the infection. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Detection and quantification of creep strain using process compensated resonance testing (PCRT) sorting modules trained with modeled resonance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Julieanne; Biedermann, Eric; Mayes, Alexander; Livings, Richard; Jauriqui, Leanne; Goodlet, Brent; Aldrin, John C.; Mazdiyasni, Siamack

    2018-04-01

    Process Compensated Resonant Testing (PCRT) is a full-body nondestructive testing (NDT) method that measures the resonance frequencies of a part and correlates them to the part's material and/or damage state. PCRT testing is used in the automotive, aerospace, and power generation industries via automated PASS/FAIL inspections to distinguish parts with nominal process variation from those with the defect(s) of interest. Traditional PCRT tests are created through the statistical analysis of populations of "good" and "bad" parts. However, gathering a statistically significant number of parts can be costly and time-consuming, and the availability of defective parts may be limited. This work uses virtual databases of good and bad parts to create two targeted PCRT inspections for single crystal (SX) nickel-based superalloy turbine blades. Using finite element (FE) models, populations were modeled to include variations in geometric dimensions, material properties, crystallographic orientation, and creep damage. Model results were verified by comparing the frequency variation in the modeled populations with the measured frequency variations of several physical blade populations. Additionally, creep modeling results were verified through the experimental evaluation of coupon geometries. A virtual database of resonance spectra was created from the model data. The virtual database was used to create PCRT inspections to detect crystallographic defects and creep strain. Quantification of creep strain values using the PCRT inspection results was also demonstrated.

  11. Food-Borne Outbreak Investigation and Molecular Typing: High Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Strains and Importance of Toxin Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denayer, Sarah; Nia, Yacine; Botteldoorn, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important aetiological agent of food intoxications in the European Union as it can cause gastro-enteritis through the production of various staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in foods. Reported enterotoxin dose levels causing food-borne illness are scarce and varying. Three food poisoning outbreaks due to enterotoxin-producing S. aureus strains which occurred in 2013 in Belgium are described. The outbreaks occurred in an elderly home, at a barbecue event and in a kindergarten and involved 28, 18, and six cases, respectively. Various food leftovers contained coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS). Low levels of staphylococcal enterotoxins ranging between 0.015 ng/g and 0.019 ng/g for enterotoxin A (SEA), and corresponding to 0.132 ng/g for SEC were quantified in the food leftovers for two of the reported outbreaks. Molecular typing of human and food isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and enterotoxin gene typing, confirmed the link between patients and the suspected foodstuffs. This also demonstrated the high diversity of CPS isolates both in the cases and in healthy persons carrying enterotoxin genes encoding emetic SEs for which no detection methods currently exist. For one outbreak, the investigation pointed out to the food handler who transmitted the outbreak strain to the food. Tools to improve staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) investigations are presented. PMID:29261162

  12. Food-Borne Outbreak Investigation and Molecular Typing: High Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Strains and Importance of Toxin Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denayer, Sarah; Delbrassinne, Laurence; Nia, Yacine; Botteldoorn, Nadine

    2017-12-20

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important aetiological agent of food intoxications in the European Union as it can cause gastro-enteritis through the production of various staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in foods. Reported enterotoxin dose levels causing food-borne illness are scarce and varying. Three food poisoning outbreaks due to enterotoxin-producing S. aureus strains which occurred in 2013 in Belgium are described. The outbreaks occurred in an elderly home, at a barbecue event and in a kindergarten and involved 28, 18, and six cases, respectively. Various food leftovers contained coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS). Low levels of staphylococcal enterotoxins ranging between 0.015 ng/g and 0.019 ng/g for enterotoxin A (SEA), and corresponding to 0.132 ng/g for SEC were quantified in the food leftovers for two of the reported outbreaks. Molecular typing of human and food isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and enterotoxin gene typing, confirmed the link between patients and the suspected foodstuffs. This also demonstrated the high diversity of CPS isolates both in the cases and in healthy persons carrying enterotoxin genes encoding emetic SEs for which no detection methods currently exist. For one outbreak, the investigation pointed out to the food handler who transmitted the outbreak strain to the food. Tools to improve staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) investigations are presented.

  13. Detection and Quantification of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Strain PM1 by Real-Time TaqMan PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Hristova, Krassimira R.; Lutenegger, Christian M.; Scow, Kate M.

    2001-01-01

    The fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a widely distributed groundwater contaminant, shows potential for treatment by in situ bioremediation. The bacterial strain PM1 rapidly mineralizes and grows on MTBE in laboratory cultures and can degrade the contaminant when inoculated into groundwater or soil microcosms. We applied the TaqMan quantitative PCR method to detect and quantify strain PM1 in laboratory and field samples. Specific primers and probes were designed for the 16S ribos...

  14. Detection of biofilm production of Yersinia enterocolitica strains isolated from infected children and comparative antimicrobial susceptibility of biofilm versus planktonic forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, A; Kyratsa, A; Ioannidou, V; Bersimis, S; Chatzipanagiotou, S

    2014-06-01

    The ability of Yersinia species to produce biofilms has not been hitherto systematically studied, although there is evidence, that Y. enterocolitica is able to form biofilms on inanimate surfaces. The present study aimed to detect the production of biofilms by 60 clinical strains of Y. enterocolitica and to compare the antimicrobial susceptibility of planktonic versus biofilm-forming bacteria. Y. enterocolitica strains were collected from stool and blood cultures collected from β-thalassaemic children, with gastroenteritis and/or septicemia. The isolated bacterial strains were grouped by biotyping and serotyping and the antimicrobial susceptibility of the planktonic forms was investigated by MIC determination. Biofilm formation was detected by the use of silicone disks and for the biofilm forming strains the minimum inhibitory concentration for bacterial regrowth (MICBR) of 11 clinically important antimicrobials was determined. The presence of the waaE, a gene reported to be related with biofilm formation was investigated in all the strains. All of 60 strains were positive for biofilm production by the use of silicone disks. The great majority of the biofilm forms were resistant to all the antimicrobials. In antimicrobial concentrations far higher than the CLSI breakpoints, bacterial regrowth from the biofilms was still possible. None of the strains bore the waaE gene. These results, indicate that biofilm formation by Y. enterocolitica might be an inherent feature. The presence of biofilms increased dramatically the MICBR in all antimicrobials. The way in which biofilms could contribute to Y. enterocolitica pathogenicity in humans is a matter needing further investigation.

  15. Development of a new LAMP assay for the detection of CSFV strains from Cuba: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postel, Alexander; Pérez, Lester J; Perera, Carmen L; Schmeiser, Stefanie; Meyer, Denise; Meindl-Boehmer, Alexandra; Rios, Liliam; Austermann-Busch, Sophia; Frias-Lepoureau, Maria T; Becher, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a devastating animal disease of great economic impact worldwide. In many countries, CSF has been endemic for decades, and vaccination of domestic pigs is one of the measures to control the disease. Consequently, differentiating infected from vaccinated animals by antibody ELISA screening is not applicable. In some countries, such as Cuba, lack of molecular techniques for sensitive, rapid and reliable detection of virus genomes is a critical point. To overcome this problem, an easy-to-use one-tube assay based on the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) principle has been developed for detection of the genome of CSF virus (CSFV) of endemic Cuban genotype 1.4 isolates. The assay reliably detected recent isolates from three different regions of Cuba with an analytical sensitivity 10-100 times lower than that of quantitative reverse transcription RT-qPCR. Diagnostic test sensitivity was examined using reference sera from two groups of pigs experimentally infected with Cuban virulent strain CSF0705 "Margarita" and the recent field isolate CSF1058 "Pinar del Rio". Differences in pathogenicity of the two viruses were reflected in the clinical course of disease as well as in virus loads of blood samples. Low viral RNA loads in samples from pigs infected with the field isolate caused serious detection problems in RT-LAMP as well as in RT-qPCR. Thus, it will be necessary in future research to focus on targeted sampling of diseased animals and to restrict diagnosis to the herd level in order to establish LAMP as an efficient tool for diagnosing CSF under field conditions.

  16. A Novel Duplex Real-Time Reverse-Transcription PCR Assay for the Detection of Influenza A and the Novel Influenza A(H1N1 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo P. Sloots

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Timely implementation of antiviral treatment and other public health based responses are dependent on accurate and rapid diagnosis of the novel pandemic influenza A(H1N1 strain. In this study we developed a duplex real-time PCR (RT-PCR (dFLU-TM assay for the simultaneous detection of a broad range of influenza A subtypes and specific detection of the novel H1N1 2009 pandemic strain. The assay was compared to the combined results of two previously described monoplex RT-PCR assays using 183 clinical samples and 10 seasonal influenza A isolates. Overall, the results showed that the dFLU-TM RT-PCR method is suitable for detection of influenza A, including the novel H1N1 pandemic strain, in clinical samples.

  17. Drug resistance detection and mutation patterns of multidrug resistant tuberculosis strains from children in Delhi

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    Jyoti Arora

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A total of 312 sputum samples from pediatric patients presumptive of multidrug resistant tuberculosis were tested for the detection of drug resistance using the GenoTypeMTBDRplus assay. A total of 193 (61.8% patients were smear positive and 119 (38.1% were smear negative by Ziehl–Neelsen staining. Line probe assay (LPA was performed for 208 samples/cultures (193 smear positive samples and 15 cultures from smear negative samples. Valid results were obtained from 198 tests. Of these, 125/198 (63.1% were sensitive to both rifampicin (RIF and isoniazid (INH. 73/198 (36.9% were resistant to at least INH/RIF, out of which 49 (24.7% were resistant to both INH and RIF (multidrug resistant. Children with tuberculosis are often infected by someone close to them, so strengthening of contact tracing in the program may help in early diagnosis to identify additional cases within the household. There is a need to evaluate newer diagnostic assays which have a high sensitivity in the case of smear negative samples, additional samples other than sputum among young children not able to expectorate, and also to fill the gap between estimated and reported cases under the program.

  18. Myocardial multilayer strain does not provide additional value for detection of myocardial viability assessed by SPECT imaging over and beyond standard strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orloff, Elisabeth; Fournier, Pauline; Bouisset, Frédéric; Moine, Thomas; Cournot, Maxime; Elbaz, Meyer; Carrié, Didier; Galinier, Michel; Lairez, Olivier; Cognet, Thomas

    2018-05-14

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of multilayer strain analysis to the assessment of myocardial viability (MV) through the comparison of both speckle tracking echocardiography and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. We also intended to determine which segmental longitudinal strain (LS) cutoff value would be optimal to discriminate viable myocardium. We included 47 patients (average age: 61 ± 11 years) referred to our cardiac imaging center for MV evaluation. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography with measures of LS, SPECT, and coronary angiography. In all, 799 segments were analyzed. We correlated myocardial tracer uptake by SPECT with sub-endocardial, sub-epicardial, and mid-segmental LS values with r = .514 P Multilayer strain analysis does not evaluate MV with more accuracy than standard segmental LS analysis. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Stretchable Complementary Split Ring Resonator (CSRR-Based Radio Frequency (RF Sensor for Strain Direction and Level Detection

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    Seunghyun Eom

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we proposed a stretchable radio frequency (RF sensor to detect strain direction and level. The stretchable sensor is composed of two complementary split ring resonators (CSRR with microfluidic channels. In order to achieve stretchability, liquid metal (eutectic gallium-indium, EGaIn and Ecoflex substrate are used. Microfluidic channels are built by Ecoflex elastomer and microfluidic channel frames. A three-dimensional (3D printer is used for fabrication of microfluidic channel frames. Two CSRR resonators are designed to resonate 2.03 GHz and 3.68 GHz. When the proposed sensor is stretched from 0 to 8 mm along the +x direction, the resonant frequency is shifted from 3.68 GHz to 3.13 GHz. When the proposed sensor is stretched from 0 to 8 mm along the −x direction, the resonant frequency is shifted from 2.03 GHz to 1.78 GHz. Therefore, we can detect stretched length and direction from independent variation of two resonant frequencies.

  20. A multi-channel bioluminescent bacterial biosensor for the on-line detection of metals and toxicity. Part I: design and optimization of bioluminescent bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrier, Thomas; Durand, Marie-Jose; Jouanneau, Sulivan; Thouand, Gerald [UMR CNRS 6144 GEPEA, CBAC, Nantes University, PRES UNAM, Campus de la Courtaisiere-IUT, La Roche-sur-Yon cedex (France); Dion, Michel [UMR CNRS 6204, Nantes University, PRES UNAM, Biotechnologie, Biocatalyse, Bioregulation, 2, Rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, Nantes cedex 3 (France); Pernetti, Mimma; Poncelet, Denis [ONIRIS-ENITIAA, UMR CNRS GEPEA, Rue de la Geraudiere, BP 82225, Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2011-05-15

    This study describes the construction of inducible bioluminescent strains via genetic engineering along with their characterization and optimization in the detection of heavy metals. Firstly, a preliminary comparative study enabled us to select a suitable carbon substrate from pyruvate, glucose, citrate, diluted Luria-Bertani, and acetate. The latter carbon source provided the best induction ratios for comparison. Results showed that the three constructed inducible strains, Escherichia coli DH1 pBzntlux, pBarslux, and pBcoplux, were usable when conducting a bioassay after a 14-h overnight culture at 30 C. Utilizing these sensors gave a range of 12 detected heavy metals including several cross-detections. Detection limits for each metal were often close to and sometimes lower than the European standards for water pollution. Finally, in order to maintain sensitive bacteria within the future biosensor-measuring cell, the agarose immobilization matrix was compared to polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Agarose was selected because the detection limits of the bioluminescent strains were not affected, in contrast to PVA. Specific detection and cross-detection ranges determined in this study will form the basis of a multiple metals detection system by the new multi-channel Lumisens3 biosensor. (orig.)

  1. Multi-Locus Next-Generation Sequence Typing of DNA Extracted From Pooled Colonies Detects Multiple Unrelated Candida albicans Strains in a Significant Proportion of Patient Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningxin Zhang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Candida albicans is an important opportunistic human pathogen. For C. albicans strain typing or drug susceptibility testing, a single colony recovered from a patient sample is normally used. This is insufficient when multiple strains are present at the site sampled. How often this is the case is unclear. Previous studies, confined to oral, vaginal and vulvar samples, have yielded conflicting results and have assessed too small a number of colonies per sample to reliably detect the presence of multiple strains. We developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS modification of the highly discriminatory C. albicans MLST (multilocus sequence typing method, 100+1 NGS-MLST, for detection and typing of multiple strains in clinical samples. In 100+1 NGS-MLST, DNA is extracted from a pool of colonies from a patient sample and also from one of the colonies. MLST amplicons from both DNA preparations are analyzed by high-throughput sequencing. Using base call frequencies, our bespoke DALMATIONS software determines the MLST type of the single colony. If base call frequency differences between pool and single colony indicate the presence of an additional strain, the differences are used to computationally infer the second MLST type without the need for MLST of additional individual colonies. In mixes of previously typed pairs of strains, 100+1 NGS-MLST reliably detected a second strain. Inferred MLST types of second strains were always more similar to their real MLST types than to those of any of 59 other isolates (22 of 31 inferred types were identical to the real type. Using 100+1 NGS-MLST we found that 7/60 human samples, including three superficial candidiasis samples, contained two unrelated strains. In addition, at least one sample contained two highly similar variants of the same strain. The probability of samples containing unrelated strains appears to differ considerably between body sites. Our findings indicate the need for wider surveys to

  2. Molecular detection of β-lactamase and integron genes in clinical strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae by multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Sedighi

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Infections caused by β-lactamase-producing gram-negative bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, are increasing globally with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of the current study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and the prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes (β-lactamase and integron genes using multiplex PCR. METHODS One-hundred K. pneumoniae isolates were collected from different clinical samples. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed with thirteen different antibiotics. Multiplex-PCR was used to detect β-lactamase (bla TEM, bla CTX-M, bla SHV , bla VEB, bla PER, bla GES, bla VIM, bla IMP, bla OXA, and bla KPC and integron genes (int I, int II, and int III. RESULTS: The highest and lowest rate of resistance was exhibited against amikacin (93% and imipenem (8%, respectively. The frequency of β-lactamase-positive K. pneumoniae was 37%, and the prevalence of the bla TEM, bla CTX-M, bla SHV , bla VEB, bla PER, bla GES, bla VIM, bla IMP, bla OXA, and bla KPC genes was 38%, 24%, 19%, 12%, 6%, 11%, 33%, 0%, 28%, and 23%, respectively. Of the 100 isolates, eight (8% were positive for class I integrons; however, class II and III integrons were not detected in any of the strains. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate co-carriage of a number of β-lactamase genes and antibiotic resistance integrons on the same plasmids harboring multi-drug resistance genes. It seems that these properties help to decrease treatment complications due to resistant bacterial infections by rapid detection, infection-control programs and prevention of transmission of drug resistance.

  3. One-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for detecting and genotyping wild-type group A rotavirus strains and vaccine strains (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) in stool samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D.; Tam, Ka Ian; Quaye, Osbourne; Bowen, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group A rotavirus (RVA) infection is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq® and Rotarix®, has dramatically reduced RVA associated AGE and mortality in developed as well as in many developing countries. High-throughput methods are needed to genotype rotavirus wild-type strains and to identify vaccine strains in stool samples. Quantitative RT-PCR assays (qRT-PCR) offer several advantages including increased sensitivity, higher throughput, and faster turnaround time. Methods. In this study, a one-step multiplex qRT-PCR assay was developed to detect and genotype wild-type strains and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) rotavirus strains along with an internal processing control (Xeno or MS2 RNA). Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for VP7 (G1, G2, G3, G4, G9, G12) and VP4 (P[4], P[6] and P[8]) genotypes. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay also included previously published NSP3 qRT-PCR for rotavirus detection and Rotarix® NSP2 and RotaTeq® VP6 qRT-PCRs for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains respectively. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay was validated using 853 sequence confirmed stool samples and 24 lab cultured strains of different rotavirus genotypes. By using thermostable rTth polymerase enzyme, dsRNA denaturation, reverse transcription (RT) and amplification (PCR) steps were performed in single tube by uninterrupted thermocycling profile to reduce chances of sample cross contamination and for rapid generation of results. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Results. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8–100% sensitivity, 99.7–100% specificity, 85–95% efficiency and a limit of detection of 4–60 copies per singleplex reaction. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 81–92% efficiency and limit of detection of 150–600 copies in multiplex reactions. The VP4 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8

  4. Discrimination of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) from Non-EHEC Strains Based on Detection of Various Combinations of Type III Effector Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannoy, Sabine; Beutin, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains comprise a subgroup of Shiga-toxin (Stx)-producing E. coli (STEC) and are characterized by a few serotypes. Among these, seven priority STEC serotypes (O26:H11, O45:H2, O103:H2, O111:H8, O121:H19, O145:H28, and O157:H7) are most frequently implicated in severe clinical illness worldwide. Currently, standard methods using stx, eae, and O-serogroup-specific gene sequences for detecting the top 7 EHEC serotypes bear the disadvantage that these genes can be found in non-EHEC strains as well. Here, we explored the suitability of ureD, espV, espK, espN, Z2098, and espM1 genes and combinations thereof as candidates for a more targeted EHEC screening assay. For a very large panel of E. coli strains (n = 1,100), which comprised EHEC (n = 340), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) (n = 392), STEC (n = 193), and apathogenic strains (n = 175), we showed that these genetic markers were more prevalent in EHEC (67.1% to 92.4%) than in EPEC (13.3% to 45.2%), STEC (0.5% to 3.6%), and apathogenic E. coli strains (0 to 2.9%). It is noteworthy that 38.5% of the EPEC strains that tested positive for at least one of these genetic markers belonged to the top 7 EHEC serotypes, suggesting that such isolates might be Stx-negative derivatives of EHEC. The associations of espK with either espV, ureD, or Z2098 were the best combinations for more specific and sensitive detection of the top 7 EHEC strains, allowing detection of 99.3% to 100% of these strains. In addition, detection of 93.7% of the EHEC strains belonging to other serotypes than the top 7 offers a possibility for identifying new emerging EHEC strains. PMID:23884997

  5. Micromachined silicon cantilevers with integrated high-frequency magnetoimpedance sensors for simultaneous strain and magnetic field detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettel, G.; Joppich, J.; Hartmann, U.

    2017-12-01

    Giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) measurements in the high-frequency regime utilizing a coplanar waveguide with an integrated Permalloy multilayer and micromachined on a silicon cantilever are reported. The fabrication process is described in detail. The aspect ratio of the magnetic multilayer in the magnetoresistive and magnetostrictive device was varied. Tensile strain and compressive strain were applied. Vector network analyzer measurements in the range from the skin effect to ferromagnetic resonance confirm the technological potential of GMI-based micro-electro-mechanical devices for strain and magnetic field sensing applications. The strain-impedance gauge factor was quantified by finite element strain calculations and reaches a maximum value of almost 200.

  6. Detection of cholera (ctx) and zonula occludens (zot) toxin genes in Vibrio cholerae O1, O139 and non-O1 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, I G; Chowdhury, M A; Sanchez, P S; Sato, M I; Huq, A; Colwell, R R; Martins, M T

    1995-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 and V. cholerae non-O1 strains isolated from environmental samples collected in São Paulo, Brazil, during cholera epidemics and pre-epidemic periods were examined for the presence of toxin genes. V. cholerae O1 strains isolated from clinical samples in Peru and Mexico, and V. cholerae O139 strains from India were also examined for the presence of ctx (cholera toxin gene) and zot (zonula occludens toxin gene) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A modified DNA-extraction method applied in this study yielded satisfactory recovery of genomic DNA from vibrios. Results showed that strains of V. cholerae O1 isolated during the preepidemic period were ctx (-)/zot (-) whereas strains isolated during the epidemic were ctx (+)/zot (+). All V. cholerae non-O1 strains tested in the study were ctx (-)/zot (-), whereas all V. cholerae O139 strains were ctx (+)/zot (+). Rapid detection of the virulence genes (ctx and zot) can be achieved by PCR and this can serve as an important tool in the epidemiology and surveillance of V. cholerae.

  7. Detection of Wolbachia pipientis, including a new strain containing the wsp gene, in two sister species of Paraphlebotomus sandflies, potential vectors of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Parvizi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Individual, naturally occurring Phlebotomus mongolensis and Phlebotomus caucasicus from Iran were screened for infections with the maternally inherited intracellular Rickettsia-like bacterium Wolbachia pipientis via targeting a major surface protein gene (wsp. The main objective of this study was to determine if W. pipientis could be detected in these species. The sandflies were screened using polymerase chain reaction to amplify a fragment of the Wolbachia surface protein gene. The obtained sequences were edited and aligned with database sequences to identify W. pipientis haplotypes. Two strains of Wolbachia were found. Strain Turk 54 (accession EU780683 is widespread and has previously been reported in Phlebotomus papatasi and other insects. Strain Turk 07 (accession KC576916 is a novel strain, found for first time in the two sister species. A-group strains of W. pipientis occur throughout much of the habitat of these sandflies. It is possible that Wolbachia is transferred via horizontal transmission. Horizontal transfer could shed light on sandfly control because Wolbachia is believed to drive a deleterious gene into sandflies that reduces their natural population density. With regard to our findings in this study, we can conclude that one species of sandfly can be infected with different Wolbachia strains and that different species of sandflies can be infected with a common strain.

  8. Detection of 2-mm-long strained section in silica fiber using slope-assisted Brillouin optical correlation-domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heeyoung; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2018-02-01

    Slope-assisted Brillouin optical correlation-domain reflectometry is a single-end-access distributed Brillouin sensing technique with high spatial resolution and high-speed operation. We have recently discovered its unique feature, that is, strained or heated sections even shorter than nominal resolution can be detected, but its detailed characterization has not been carried out. Here, after experimentally characterizing this “beyond-nominal-resolution” effect, we show its usefulness by demonstrating the detection of a 2-mm-long strained section along a silica fiber. We also demonstrate the detection of a 5-mm-long heated section along a polymer optical fiber. The lengths of these detected sections are smaller than those of the other demonstrations reported so far.

  9. Comparative evaluation of the Ridascreen Verotoxin enzyme immunoassay for detection of Shiga-toxin producing strains of Escherichia coli (STEC) from food and other sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutin, L; Steinrück, H; Krause, G; Steege, K; Haby, S; Hultsch, G; Appel, B

    2007-03-01

    To evaluate the suitability of the commercially distributed Ridascreen Verotoxin enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for detection of known genetic types of the Vero (Shiga) toxins 1 (Stx1) and 2 (Stx2) families and to determine its relative sensitivity and specificity. The Ridascreen-EIA was compared with the Vero cell assay, a P(1)-glycoprotein receptor EIA and with stx gene-specific PCs for detection of Stx with 43 Shiga toxin-producing strains of Escherichia coli (STEC) reference strains and with 241 test strains. The Ridascreen-EIA detects strains producing Stx1 and variants Stx1c and Stx1d, as well as Stx2 and variants Stx2d1, Stx2d2, Stx2e, Stx2d, Stx2-O118 (Stx2d-ount), Stx2-NV206, Stx2f and Stx2g. The assay showed a relative sensitivity of 95.7% and a relative specificity of 98.7%. Some of the Stx2-O118-, Stx2e- and Stx2g-producing STEC were not detected with the Ridascreen-EIA probably because of low amount of toxin produced by these strains. The Ridascreen-EIA is able to detect all known types of Stx and is applicable for routine screening of bacterial isolates owing to its high specificity. It is less applicable for testing samples where low amounts of Stx are expected, such as mixed cultures and certain Stx2 variants. This study presents a first comprehensive evaluation of the Ridascreen-EIA, a rapid standardized STEC screening test for routine diagnostic laboratories. Data are presented on the type of the spectrum of Stx that are detected with this immunoassay and its advantages and limits for practical use.

  10. Damage detection methodology under variable load conditions based on strain field pattern recognition using FBGs, nonlinear principal component analysis, and clustering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Pérez, Julián; Torres-Arredondo, M.-A.; Alvarez-Montoya, Joham

    2018-01-01

    Structural health monitoring consists of using sensors integrated within structures together with algorithms to perform load monitoring, damage detection, damage location, damage size and severity, and prognosis. One possibility is to use strain sensors to infer structural integrity by comparing patterns in the strain field between the pristine and damaged conditions. In previous works, the authors have demonstrated that it is possible to detect small defects based on strain field pattern recognition by using robust machine learning techniques. They have focused on methodologies based on principal component analysis (PCA) and on the development of several unfolding and standardization techniques, which allow dealing with multiple load conditions. However, before a real implementation of this approach in engineering structures, changes in the strain field due to conditions different from damage occurrence need to be isolated. Since load conditions may vary in most engineering structures and promote significant changes in the strain field, it is necessary to implement novel techniques for uncoupling such changes from those produced by damage occurrence. A damage detection methodology based on optimal baseline selection (OBS) by means of clustering techniques is presented. The methodology includes the use of hierarchical nonlinear PCA as a nonlinear modeling technique in conjunction with Q and nonlinear-T 2 damage indices. The methodology is experimentally validated using strain measurements obtained by 32 fiber Bragg grating sensors bonded to an aluminum beam under dynamic bending loads and simultaneously submitted to variations in its pitch angle. The results demonstrated the capability of the methodology for clustering data according to 13 different load conditions (pitch angles), performing the OBS and detecting six different damages induced in a cumulative way. The proposed methodology showed a true positive rate of 100% and a false positive rate of 1.28% for a

  11. The best body spot to detect the vital capacity from the respiratory movement data obtained by the wearable strain sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haijuan; Guo, Shaopeng; Liu, Huilin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Sujie; Kuramoto-Ahuja, Tsugumi; Sato, Tamae; Kaneko, Junichiro; Onoda, Ko; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2018-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to find the best body spots on the chest and abdomen wall to obtain the correlated indicators to the vital capacity. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy male staff of the center served as the participants were advised to conduct a breathing movement using spirometer and a wearable strain sensor (WSS) respectively, which was the measured at four spots on chest and abdomen wall from maximal end of inspiration to maximal end of expiration. The Pearson's correlation analysis was conducted to find the correlation of the data obtained respectively by the WSS and spirometer. [Results] The correlation of the mobility data at the four body spots to the vital capacity data were calculated for each level by means of Pearson's correlation coefficient, which showed that the values at each body spot were positive significant correlations and the highest value was at the 10th rib. [Conclusion] There was a correlation between the mobility data of the chest and abdomen obtained by the WSS and the vital capacity data obtained by the spirometer, for which, the 10th rib is the best body spot to detect the positive significant correlation.

  12. Rapid and sensitive detection of canine distemper virus by real-time reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianchang; Wang, Jinfeng; Li, Ruiwen; Liu, Libing; Yuan, Wanzhe

    2017-08-15

    Canine distemper, caused by Canine distemper virus (CDV), is a highly contagious and fatal systemic disease in free-living and captive carnivores worldwide. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), as an isothermal gene amplification technique, has been explored for the molecular detection of diverse pathogens. A real-time reverse transcription RPA (RT-RPA) assay for the detection of canine distemper virus (CDV) using primers and exo probe targeting the CDV nucleocapsid protein gene was developed. A series of other viruses were tested by the RT-RPA.Thirty-two field samples were further tested by RT-RPA, and the resuts were compared with those obtained by the real-time RT-PCR. The RT-RPA assay was performed successfully at 40 °C, and the results were obtained within 3 min-12 min. The assay could detect CDV, but did not show cross-detection of canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2), canine coronavirus (CCoV), canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), pseudorabies virus (PRV) or Newcastle disease virus (NDV), demonstrating high specificity. The analytical sensitivity of RT-RPA was 31.8 copies in vitro transcribed CDV RNA, which is 10 times lower than the real-time RT-PCR. The assay performance was validated by testing 32 field samples and compared to real-time RT-PCR. The results indicated an excellent correlation between RT-RPA and a reference real-time RT-PCR method. Both assays provided the same results, and R 2 value of the positive results was 0.947. The results demonstrated that the RT-RPA assay offers an alternative tool for simple, rapid, and reliable detection of CDV both in the laboratory and point-of-care facility, especially in the resource-limited settings.

  13. Electrophoretic analysis of proteins from Mycoplasma hominis strains detected by SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Birkelund, Svend; Christiansen, Gunna

    1987-01-01

    The proteins of 14 strains of Mycoplasma hominis were compared by SDS-PAGE in gradient gels, by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis of extracts of 35S-labelled cells and by immunoblot analysis of cell proteins. The strains examined included the M. hominis type strain PG21 and 13 others...... isolated variously from genital tract, mouth, blood, upper urinary tract and a wound. These 14 strains shared 76-99% of proteins in SDS-gradient gel analysis and 41-72% in the 2D gels. As expected, the immunoblot analysis likewise revealed the existence of an extensive common protein pattern in M. hominis...

  14. Flexible Polydimethylsiloxane Foams Decorated with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Enable Unprecedented Detection of Ultralow Strain and Pressure Coupled with a Large Working Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglio, Rossella; Mariani, Stefano; Robbiano, Valentina; Strambini, Lucanos; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2018-04-25

    Low-cost piezoresistive strain/pressure sensors with large working range, at the same time able to reliably detect ultralow strain (≤0.1%) and pressure (≤1 Pa), are one of the challenges that have still to be overcome for flexible piezoresistive materials toward personalized health-monitoring applications. In this work, we report on unprecedented, simultaneous detection of ultrasmall strain (0.1%, i.e., 10 μm displacement over 10 mm) and subtle pressure (20 Pa, i.e., a force of only 2 mN over an area of 1 cm 2 ) in compression mode, coupled with a large working range (i.e., up to 60% for strain-6 mm in displacement-and 50 kPa for pressure) using piezoresistive, flexible three-dimensional (3D) macroporous polydimethylsiloxane (pPDMS) foams decorated with pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). pPDMS/CNT foams with pore size up to 500 μm (i.e., twice the size of those of commonly used foams, at least) and porosity of 77%, decorated with a nanostructured surface network of CNTs at densities ranging from 7.5 to 37 mg/cm 3 are prepared using a low-cost and scalable process, through replica molding of sacrificial sugar templates and subsequent drop-casting of CNT ink. A thorough characterization shows that piezoresistive properties of the foams can be finely tuned by controlling the CNT density and reach an optimum at a CNT density of 25 mg/cm 3 , for which a maximum change of the material resistivity (e.g., ρ 0 /ρ 50 = 4 at 50% strain) is achieved under compression. Further static and dynamic characterization of the pPDMS/CNT foams with 25 mg/cm 3 of CNTs highlights that detection limits for strain and pressure are 0.03% (3 μm displacement over 10 mm) and 6 Pa (0.6 mN over an area of 1 cm 2 ), respectively; moreover, good stability and limited hysteresis are apparent by cycling the foams with 255 compression-release cycles over the strain range of 0-60%, at different strain rates up to 10 mm/min. Our results on piezoresistive, flexible pPDMS/CNT foams

  15. Reliability of the MicroScan WalkAway PC21 panel in identifying and detecting oxacillin resistance in clinical coagulase-negative staphylococci strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olendzki, A N; Barros, E M; Laport, M S; Dos Santos, K R N; Giambiagi-Demarval, M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the MicroScan WalkAway PosCombo21 (PC21) system for the identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) strains and the detection of oxacillin resistance. Using molecular and phenotypic methods, 196 clinical strains were evaluated. The automated system demonstrated 100 % reliability for the identification of the clinical strains Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus hominis and Staphylococcus cohnii; 98.03 % reliability for the identification of Staphylococcus epidermidis; 70 % reliability for the identification of Staphylococcus lugdunensis; 40 % reliability for the identification of Staphylococcus warneri; and 28.57 % reliability for the identification of Staphylococcus capitis, but no reliability for the identification of Staphylococcus auricularis, Staphylococcus simulans and Staphylococcus xylosus. We concluded that the automated system provides accurate results for the more common CNS species but often fails to accurately identify less prevalent species. For the detection of oxacillin resistance, the automated system showed 100 % specificity and 90.22 % sensitivity. Thus, the PC21 panel detects oxacillin-resistant strains, but is limited by the heteroresistance that is observed when using most phenotypic methods.

  16. Serological detection of infection with canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus and canine adenovirus in communal dogs from Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRee, Anna; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Dawson, Jessica; Parry, Roger; Foggin, Chris; Adams, Hayley; Odoi, Agricola; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2014-09-05

    Domestic dogs are common amongst communities in sub-Saharan Africa and may serve as important reservoirs for infectious agents that may cause diseases in wildlife. Two agents of concern are canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV), which may infect and cause disease in large carnivore species such as African wild dogs and African lions, respectively. The impact of domestic dogs and their diseases on wildlife conservation is increasing in Zimbabwe, necessitating thorough assessment and implementation of control measures. In this study, domestic dogs in north-western Zimbabwe were evaluated for antibodies to CDV, CPV, and canine adenovirus (CAV). These dogs were communal and had no vaccination history. Two hundred and twenty-five blood samples were collected and tested using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibodies to CPV, CDV, and CAV. Of these dogs, 75 (34%) had detectable antibodies to CDV, whilst 191 (84%) had antibodies to CPV. Antibodies to canine adenovirus were present in 28 (13%) dogs. Canine parvovirus had high prevalence in all six geographic areas tested. These results indicate that CPV is circulating widely amongst domestic dogs in the region. In addition, CDV is present at high levels. Both pathogens can infect wildlife species. Efforts for conservation of large carnivores in Zimbabwe must address the role of domestic dogs in disease transmission.

  17. Serological detection of infection with canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus and canine adenovirus in communal dogs from Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna McRee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Domestic dogs are common amongst communities in sub-Saharan Africa and may serve as important reservoirs for infectious agents that may cause diseases in wildlife. Two agents of concern are canine parvovirus (CPV and canine distemper virus (CDV, which may infect and cause disease in large carnivore species such as African wild dogs and African lions, respectively. The impact of domestic dogs and their diseases on wildlife conservation is increasing in Zimbabwe, necessitating thorough assessment and implementation of control measures. In this study, domestic dogs in north-western Zimbabwe were evaluated for antibodies to CDV, CPV, and canine adenovirus (CAV. These dogs were communal and had no vaccination history. Two hundred and twenty-five blood samples were collected and tested using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for antibodies to CPV, CDV, and CAV. Of these dogs, 75 (34% had detectable antibodies to CDV, whilst 191 (84% had antibodies to CPV. Antibodies to canine adenovirus were present in 28 (13% dogs. Canine parvovirus had high prevalence in all six geographic areas tested. These results indicate that CPV is circulating widely amongst domestic dogs in the region. In addition, CDV is present at high levels. Both pathogens can infect wildlife species. Efforts for conservation of large carnivores in Zimbabwe must address the role of domestic dogs in disease transmission.

  18. Sensing sheet: the response of full-bridge strain sensors to thermal variations for detecting and characterizing cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, S.-T.; Glisic, B.

    2016-12-01

    Sensing sheets based on large-area electronics consist of a dense array of unit strain sensors. This new technology has potential for becoming an effective and affordable monitoring tool that can identify, localize and quantify surface damage in structures. This research contributes to their development by investigating the response of full-bridge unit strain sensors to thermal variations. Overall, this investigation quantifies the effects of temperature on thin-film full-bridge strain sensors monitoring uncracked and cracked concrete. Additionally, an empirical formula is developed to estimate crack width given an observed strain change and a measured temperature change. This research led to the understanding of the behavior of full-bridge strain sensors installed on cracked concrete and exposed to temperature variations. It proves the concept of the sensing sheet and its suitability for application in environments with variable temperature.

  19. Detecção do vírus da cinomose canina por RT-PCR utilizando-se oligonucleotídeos para os genes da fosfoproteína, hemaglutinina e neuraminidase Detection of canine distemper virus by RT-PCR using oligonucleotides targeted to the phosphoprotein, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pozza

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Empregou-se a técnica de reação em cadeia pela polimerase precedida de transcrição reversa para detecção do vírus da cinomose canina (CC. Para a padronização da técnica foram selecionados quatro pares de oligonucleotídeos (P1, P2, N1, H1, baseados em seqüências dos genes da fosfoproteína, neuraminidase e hemaglutinina, sendo utilizadas três cepas vacinais de vírus da CC como controles positivos. Foram analisadas três amostras isoladas de cães com cinomose e quatro amostras provenientes de cães com suspeita clínica de cinomose. Não houve amplificação nas amostras com suspeita clínica da doença. Os resultados obtidos com os oligonucleotídeos P1 e N1 foram superiores aos de H1. Os oligonucleotídeos P2 foram considerados inapropriados para a detecção do vírus da CC. Os amplicons obtidos com os oligonucleotídeos P1, N1 e H1 foram clivados com endonucleases de restrição, sendo os perfis das amostras virais comparados aos da amostra vacinal Lederle, utilizada como referência. Um padrão similar de restrição foi observado em todas as amostras analisadas.The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to detect canine distemper virus (CDV. Four oligonucleotide pairs were selected (P1, P2, N1, H1, based on the sequences of the phosphoprotein, hemagglutinin and nuraminidase genes for assay standardization, and three CDV vaccine strains were used as positive controls. Three viral isolates from dogs with canine distemper and four samples from animals clinically suspected of distemper were analysed. No amplification was detected in suspected samples. Results obtained by using P1 and N1 oligonucleotides were superior to those with H1 ones. P2 oligonucleotides were considered inadequate for CDV detection. Amplicons resulting from amplification of P1, N1 and H1 oligonucleotides were submitted to cleavage by restriction endonucleases and restriction patterns of viral samples were compared to that of Lederle strain

  20. FIND Tuberculosis Strain Bank: a Resource for Researchers and Developers Working on Tests To Detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Related Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessema, Belay; Nabeta, Pamela; Valli, Eloise; Albertini, Audrey; Collantes, Jimena; Lan, Nguyen Huu; Romancenco, Elena; Tukavdze, Nestani; Denkinger, Claudia M; Dolinger, David L

    2017-04-01

    A , gyrB , rrs , eis , and tlyA genes; and ethionamide resistance in the ethA genes. Most important lineages are represented in the bank, and further collections have been initiated to increase geographic and lineage diversity. The bank provides highly characterized and high-quality strains as a resource for researchers and developers in support of the development and evaluation of new diagnostics and drug resistance detection tools. Copyright © 2017 Tessema et al.

  1. A molecular tool for detection and tracking of a potential indigenous Beauveria bassiana strain for managing emerald ash borer populations in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johny, Shajahan; Kyei-Poku, George

    2014-10-01

    Emerald ash borer is an invasive species from Asia. Beauveria bassiana strain L49-1AA is being tested for the control of emerald ash borer in Canada, using an autocontamination trapping system. We have developed a simplified allele discrimination polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to screen B. bassiana strain, L49-1AA from other Beauveria species by targeting the inter-strain genetic differences in 5' end of EF1-α gene of the genus Beauveria. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site, T→C was identified only in L49-1AA and was used to develop a simplified allele discrimination polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on a modified allelic inhibition of displacement activity (AIDA) approach for distinguishing B. bassiana L49-1AA from all background Beauveria isolates. The SNP site was employed to design inner primers but with a deliberate mismatch introduced at the 3' antepenultimate from the mutation site in order to maximize specificity and detection efficiency. Amplification was specific to L49-1AA without cross-reaction with DNA from other Beauveria strains. In addition, the designed primers were also tested against environmental samples in L49-1AA released plots and observed to be highly efficient in detecting and discriminating the target strain, L49-1AA from both pure and crude DNA samples. This new method can potentially allow for more discriminatory tracking and monitoring of released L49-1AA in our autocontamination and dissemination projects for managing EAB populations. Additionally, the modified-AIDA format has potential as a tool for simultaneously identifying and differentiating closely related Beauveria species, strains/isolates as well as general classification of other pathogens or organisms. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Related Genes in E. coli Strains Belonging to B2 Phylogroup Isolated from Urinary Tract Infections in Combination with Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Staji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:  This study was conducted to detect the prevalence of EHEC virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance profile of Escherichia coli strains belonging to B2 phylogroup implicated in Urinary tract infections in Semnan, Iran.Methods:   From 240 urine samples 160 E. coli strains were isolated, biochemically. Then, E. coli isolates were examined by Multiplex-PCR for phylogenetic typing and detection of virulence genes (hly, stx1, stx2, eae associated with Enterohemorrhagic E. coli. Finally, Antimicrobial resistance of E. coli isolates were characterized using Disk Diffusion method.  Results:  From 160 E. coli isolates, 75 strains (47% were assigned to B2 phylogenetic group and prevalence of virulence genes were as follow: hly (21.3%, stx1 (16%, stx2 (10.6% and eae (6.7%, subsequently.  Phenotypic antimicrobial resistance of B2 isolates showed that all isolates were sensitive to Meropenem and Furazolidone and then highest frequency of resistance was observed to Streptomycin, Oxytetracycline, Neomycin, Nalidixic acid and Ampicillin (98.7% to 49.3%. Also low resistance prevalence was observed in case of Ceftizoxime, Lincospectin, Imipenem, Chloramphenicol and flurefenicole (16% to 1.3%.Conclusion:   The data suggest a high prevalence of antibiotic resistance in UPEC strains belonging to B2 phylogroup even for the antimicrobials using in pet and farm animals and their potential to cause EHEC specific clinical symptoms which may represent a serious health risk since these strains can be transmitted to GI tract and act as a reservoir for other uropathogenic E. coli and commensal strains.

  3. Whole genome characterisation of a porcine-like human reassortant G26P[19] Rotavirus A strain detected in a child hospitalised for diarrhoea in Nepal, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbemabiese, Chantal Ama; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Gauchan, Punita; Sherchand, Jeevan Bahadur; Pandey, Basu Dev; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2017-10-01

    A rare G26 Rotavirus A strain RVA/Human-wt/NPL/07N1760/2007/G26P[19] was detected in a child hospitalised for acute diarrhoea in Kathmandu, Nepal. The complete genome of 07N1760 was determined in order to explore its evolutionary history as well as examine its relationship to a Vietnamese strain RVA/Human-wt/VNM/30378/2009/G26P[19], the only G26 strain whose complete genotype constellation is known. The genotype constellation of 07N1760 was G26-P[19]-I12-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1, a unique constellation identical to that of the Vietnamese 30378 except the VP6 gene. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both strains were unrelated at the lineage level despite their similar genotype constellation. The I12 VP6 gene of 07N1760 was highly divergent from the six currently deposited I12 sequences in the GenBank. Except for its NSP2 gene, the remaining genes of 07N1760 shared lineages with porcine and porcine-like human RVA genes. The NSP2 gene belonged to a human RVA N1 lineage which was distinct from typical porcine and porcine-like human lineages. In conclusion, the Nepali G26P[19] strain 07N1760 was a porcine RVA strain which derived an NSP2 gene from a human Wa-like RVA strain by intra-genotype reassortment probably after transmission to the human host. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Using PCR-based detection and genotyping to trace Streptococcus salivarius meningitis outbreak strain to oral flora of radiology physician assistant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velusamy Srinivasan

    Full Text Available We recently investigated three cases of bacterial meningitis that were reported from a midwestern radiology clinic where facemasks were not worn during spinal injection of contrast agent during myelography procedures. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis we linked a case strain of S. salivarius to an oral specimen of a radiology physician assistant (RPA. We also used a real-time PCR assay to detect S. salivarius DNA within a culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF specimen. Here we extend this investigation through using a nested PCR/sequencing strategy to link the culture-negative CSF specimen to the case strain. We also provide validation of the real-time PCR assay used, demonstrating that it is not solely specific for Streptococcus salivarius, but is also highly sensitive for detection of the closely related oral species Streptococcus vestibularis. Through using multilocus sequence typing and 16S rDNA sequencing we further strengthen the link between the CSF case isolate and the RPA carriage isolate. We also demonstrate that the newly characterized strains from this study are distinct from previously characterized S. salivarius strains associated with carriage and meningitis.

  5. Dualband MW/LW Strained Layer Superlattice Focal Plane Arrays for Satellite-Based Wildfire Detection, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on Type-II strained layer superlattice (SLS) photodiodes have recently experienced significant advances. In Phase I we...

  6. Dualband MW/LW Strained Layer Superlattice Focal Plane Arrays For Satellite-Based Wildfire Detection, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dualband focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on gallium-free Type-II strained layer superlattice (SLS) photodiodes have recently experienced significant advances. We...

  7. Progress of a Cross-Correlation Based Optical Strain Measurement Technique for Detecting Radial Growth on a Rotating Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Woike, Mark R.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2015-01-01

    The modern turbine engine operates in a harsh environment at high speeds and is repeatedly exposed to combined high mechanical and thermal loads. The cumulative effects of these external forces lead to high stresses and strains on the engine components, such as the rotating turbine disks, which may eventually lead to a catastrophic failure if left undetected. The operating environment makes it difficult to use conventional strain gauges, therefore, non-contact strain measurement techniques is of interest to NASA and the turbine engine community. This presentation describes one such approach; the use of cross correlation analysis to measure strain experienced by the engine turbine disk with the goal of assessing potential faults and damage.

  8. Detection and Specific Enumeration of Multi-Strain Probiotics in the Lumen Contents and Mucus Layers of the Rat Intestine After Oral Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Ji; Orlovich, David A; Tagg, John R; Fawcett, J Paul

    2009-12-01

    Although the detection of viable probiotic bacteria following their ingestion and passage through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been well documented, their mucosal attachment in vivo is more difficult to assess. In this study, we investigated the survival and mucosal attachment of multi-strain probiotics transiting the rat GIT. Rats were administered a commercial mixture of the intestinal probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus LA742, Lactobacillus rhamnosus L2H and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 and the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 every 12 h for 3 days. Intestinal contents, mucus and faeces were tested 6 h, 3 days and 7 days after the last dose by strain-specific enumeration on selective media and by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. At 6 h, viable cells and DNA corresponding to all four probiotics were detected in the faeces and in both the lumen contents and mucus layers of the ileum and colon. Viable probiotic cells of B. lactis and L. rhamnosus were detected for 7 days and L. acidophilus for 3 days after the last dose. B. lactis and L. rhamnosus persisted in the ileal mucus and colon contents, whereas the retention of L. acidophilus appeared to be relatively higher in colonic mucus. No viable cells of S. salivarius K12 were detected in any of the samples at either day 3 or 7. The study demonstrates that probiotic strains of intestinal origin but not of oral origin exhibit temporary colonisation of the rat GIT and that these strains may have differing relative affinities for colonic and ileal mucosa.

  9. Genotyping of canine distemper virus strains circulating in Brazil from 2008 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaszewski, Renata da Fontoura; Pinto, Luciane Dubina; Weber, Matheus Nunes; Caldart, Eloiza Teles; Alves, Christian Diniz Beduschi Travassos; Martella, Vito; Ikuta, Nilo; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo; Canal, Cláudio Wageck

    2014-02-13

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a major pathogen of dogs and represents a serious threat to both unvaccinated and vaccinated animals. This study surveyed dogs with or without clinical signs related to canine distemper from different regions of Brazil from 2008 to 2012. A total of 155 out of 386 animals were found to be CDV positive by RT-PCR; 37 (23.8%) dogs were asymptomatic at the time of sampling, and 90 (58%) displayed clinical signs suggestive of distemper. Nineteen (12.2%) dogs had a record of complete vaccination, 15 (9.6%) had an incomplete vaccination protocol, and 76 (49%) had no vaccination record. Based on the sequence analysis of the complete hemagglutinin gene of 13 samples, 12 of the strains were characterized as Genotype South America-I/Europe. Considering criteria of at least 95% nucleotide identity to define a genotype and 98% to define a subgenotype, South America-I/Europe sequences segregated into eight different phylogenetically well-defined clusters that circulated or co-circulated in distinct geographical areas. Together, these findings highlight the relevance of CDV infection in Brazilian dogs, demonstrate the predominance of one genotype in Brazil and support the need to intensify the current control measures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Escherichia coli Strains Producers of Extended-Spectrum and CMY-2 Type Beta-Lactamases, Isolated from Turtles in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Cortés, Gerardo; Lozano-Zarain, Patricia; Torres, Carmen; Castañeda, Miguel; Sánchez, Gabriela Moreno; Alonso, Carla A; López-Pliego, Liliana; Mayen, María G Gutiérrez; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Rocha-Gracia, Rosa Del Carmen

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria are a growing problem in different environments and hosts, but scarce information exists about their prevalence in reptiles. The aim of this study was to analyze the resistance mechanisms, molecular typing, and plasmid content of cefotaxime-resistant (CTX(R)) Escherichia coli isolates recovered from cloacal samples of 71 turtles sheltered in a herpetarium in Mexico. CTX(R)-E. coli were recovered in 11 of 71 samples (15.5%), and one isolate/sample was characterized. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli isolates were detected in four samples (5.6%): two strains carried the blaCTX-M-2 gene (phylogroup D and ST2732) and two contained the blaCTX-M-15 gene (phylogroup B1 and lineages ST58 and ST156). The blaCMY-2 gene was detected by PCR in E. coli isolates of eight samples (9.8%) (one of them also carried blaCTX-M-2); these isolates were distributed into phylogroups A (n = 1), B1 (n = 6), and D (n = 1) and typed as ST155, ST156, ST2329, and ST2732. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes were detected in five isolates [aac(6')Ib-cr, qnrA, qnrB19, and oqxB]. From three to five replicon plasmids were detected among the strains, being IncFIB, IncI1, IncFrep, and IncK the most prevalent. ESBL or pAmpC genes were transferred by conjugation in four strains, and the blaCTX-M-15 and blaCMY-2 genes were localized in IncFIB or IncI1 plasmids by Southern blot hybridization assays. Class 1 and/or class 2 integrons were detected in eight strains with six different structures of gene cassette arrays. Nine pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns were found among the 11 studied strains. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of ESBL, CMY-2, PMQR, and mobile determinants of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli of turtle origin, highlighting the potential dissemination of multidrug-resistant bacteria from these animals to other environments and hosts, including humans.

  11. Sandwich-dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of canine distemper virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Yanlong; Wang, Huiguo; Jin, Jinhua; Li, Wenzhe

    2013-01-01

    A sandwich-dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot ELISA) was developed for the detection of canine distemper virus (CDV). In 56 dogs suspected to have CD the rates of detection of CDV antigen in samples of blood lymphocytes and palpebral conjunctiva by dot ELISA and ELISA were, respectively, 91% (49/54) and 81% (44/54) for the lymphocyte samples and 88% (28/32) and 75% (24/32) for the conjunctival samples. The CDV detection limits were 10 ng/50 μL for dot ELISA and 40 ng/50 μL for ELISA. The reliability of dot ELISA relative to electron microscopy was 96% with 22 samples: all 21 samples in which CDV particles were observed by electron microscopy yielded positive results with dot ELISA; the single sample in which particles were not observed yielded false-positive results with dot ELISA. The results indicate that the dot ELISA developed can serve as a reliable rapid diagnostic test in suspected cases of CD and also be useful for epidemiologic surveillance of the disease. PMID:24124274

  12. Detection of minute strain in very local areas of materials by using an X-ray microbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Matsui, J; Tsusaka, Y; Kimura, S

    2003-01-01

    In order to analyze the local minute strain in semiconductor materials and devices, we have demonstrated formation of X-ray microbeams by using asymmetric Bragg reflections of the crystal and a zone plate or cylindrical mirror combined with synchrotron radiation. A series of X-ray rocking curves have been obtained by scanning the sample with using the X-ray microbeam. In addition, reciprocal space maps have also been obtained by inserting an analyzer crystal behind the sample. From these data, information on the strain distribution can be obtained for various samples, such as the strain near SiO sub 2 /Si film edges, that in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) crystals, and that in InGaAsP semiconductor laser stripes. (author)

  13. Covalent surface modification of prions: a mass spectrometry-based means of detecting distinctive structural features of prion strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prions (PrPSc) are molecular pathogens that are able to convert the isosequential normal cellular prion protein (PrPC) into a prion. The only demonstrated differences between PrPC and PrPSc is conformational, they are isoforms. A given host can be infected by more than one kind or strain of prion. F...

  14. Acrolein inhalation causes myocardial strain delay and decreased cardiac performance as detected by high-frequency echocardiography in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acrolein, an unsaturated aldehyde found in air pollution, impairs Ca2+ flux and contraction in cardiomyocytes in vitro. To better define direct and delayed functional cardiac effects, we hypothesized that a single exposure to acrolein would modify myocardial strain and performanc...

  15. Optical Method for Detecting Displacements and Strains at Ultra-High Temperatures During Thermo-Mechanical Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Russell W. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Sikora, Joseph G. (Inventor); Roth, Mark C. (Inventor); Johnston, William M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An ultra-high temperature optical method incorporates speckle optics for sensing displacement and strain measurements well above conventional measurement techniques. High temperature pattern materials are used which can endure experimental high temperature environments while simultaneously having a minimum optical aberration. A purge medium is used to reduce or eliminate optical distortions and to reduce, and/or eliminate oxidation of the target specimen.

  16. Distribution, detection of enterotoxigenic strains and antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns of Bacteroides fragilis group in diarrheic and non-diarrheic feces from Brazilian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Paula Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of gastrointestinal diseases and their global distribution, affecting millions of individuals around the world, the role and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria such as those in the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG are still unclear in young children. This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of species in the BFG and enterotoxigenic strains in the fecal microbiota of children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Diarrheic (n=110 and non-diarrheic (n=65 fecal samples from children aged 0-5 years old were evaluated. BFG strains were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. Alternatively, bacteria and enterotoxigenic strains were detected directly from feces by molecular biology. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar dilution method according to the guidelines for isolated bacteria. BFG was detected in 64.3% of the fecal samples (55% diarrheic and 80.4% non-diarrheic, and 4.6% were enterotoxigenic. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, ceftriaxone, clindamycin and chloramphenicol. The data show that these bacteria are prevalent in fecal microbiota at higher levels in healthy children. The molecular methodology was more effective in identifying the B. fragilis group when compared to the biochemical and physiological techniques. The observation of high resistance levels stimulates thoughts about the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs in early infancy. Further quantitative studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the role of these bacteria in acute diarrhea in children.

  17. Dynamic strain distribution measurement and crack detection of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint under cyclic loading using embedded FBG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Xiaoguang; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Wada, Daichi; Kanai, Makoto; Ohsawa, Isamu; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic strain distribution measurement of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint was carried out in a cyclic load test using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded into the adhesive/adherend interface along the overlap length direction. Unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) substrates were bonded by epoxy resin to form the joint, and the FBG sensor was embedded into the surface of one substrate during its curing. The measurement was carried out with a sampling rate of 5 Hz by the sensing system, based on the optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) throughout the test. A finite element analysis (FEA) was performed for the measurement evaluation using a three-dimensional model, which included the embedded FBG sensor. The crack detection method, based on the longitudinal strain distribution measurement, was introduced and performed to estimate the cracks that occurred at the adhesive/adherend interface in the test. (paper)

  18. Truly Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring: From the Telecommunication Optical Fiber Drawling Tower to Water Leakage Detection in Dikes and Concrete Structure Strain Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Henault

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although optical fiber sensors have been developed for 30 years, there is a gap between lab experiments and field applications. This article focuses on specific methods developed to evaluate the whole sensing chain, with an emphasis on (i commercially-available optoelectronic instruments and (ii sensing cable. A number of additional considerations for a successful pairing of these two must be taken into account for successful field applications. These considerations are further developed within this article and illustrated with practical applications of water leakage detection in dikes and concrete structures monitoring, making use of distributed temperature and strain sensing based on Rayleigh, Raman, and Brillouin scattering in optical fibers. They include an adequate choice of working wavelengths, dedicated localization processes, choices of connector type, and further include a useful selection of traditional reference sensors to be installed nearby the optical fiber sensors, as well as temperature compensation in case of strain sensing.

  19. Development of a hydrolysis probe-based real-time assay for the detection of tropical strains of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense race 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf-Wendling, Isabelle; Hostachy, Bruno; Viljoen, Altus; Ioos, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) is one of the most important threats to global banana production. Strategies to control the pathogen are lacking, with plant resistance offering the only long-term solution, if sources of resistance are available. Prevention of introduction of Foc into disease-free areas thus remains a key strategy to continue sustainable banana production. In recent years, strains of Foc affecting Cavendish bananas have destroyed plantations in a number of countries in Asia and in the Middle East, and one African country. One vegetative compatibility group (VCG), 01213/16, is considered the major threat to bananas in tropical and subtropical climatic conditions. However, other genetically related VCGs, such as 0121, may potentially jeopardize banana cultures if they were introduced into disease-free areas. To prevent the introduction of these VCGs into disease-free Cavendish banana-growing countries, a real-time PCR test was developed to accurately detect both VCGs. A previously described putative virulence gene was used to develop a specific combination of hydrolysis probe/primers for the detection of tropical Foc race 4 strains. The real-time PCR parameters were optimized by following a statistical approach relying on orthogonal arrays and the Taguchi method in an attempt to enhance sensitivity and ensure high specificity of the assay. This study also assessed critical performance criteria, such as repeatability, reproducibility, robustness, and specificity, with a large including set of 136 F. oxysporum isolates, including 73 Foc pathogenic strains representing 24 VCGs. The validation data demonstrated that the new assay could be used for regulatory testing applications on banana plant material and can contribute to preventing the introduction and spread of Foc strains affecting Cavendish bananas in the tropics. PMID:28178348

  20. Detection of rifampin resistance patterns in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in Iran by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Nasr Isfahani

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the rpoB locus confer conformational changes leading to defective binding of rifampin (RIF to rpoB and consequently resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP was established as a rapid screening test for the detection of mutations in the rpoB gene, and direct sequencing has been unambiguously applied to characterize mutations. A total of 37 of Iranian isolates of M. tuberculosis, 16 sensitive and 21 resistant to RIF, were used in this study. A 193-bp region of the rpoB gene was amplified and PCR-SSCP patterns were determined by electrophoresis in 10% acrylamide gel and silver staining. Also, 21 samples of 193-bp rpoB amplicons with different PCR-SSCP patterns from RIFr and 10 from RIFs were sequenced. Seven distinguishable PCR-SSCP patterns were recognized in the 21 Iranian RIFr strains, while 15 out of 16 RIFs isolates demonstrated PCR-SSCP banding patterns similar to that of sensitive standard strain H37Rv. However one of the sensitive isolates demonstrated a different pattern. There were seen six different mutations in the amplified region of rpoB gene: codon 516(GAC/GTC, 523(GGG/GGT, 526(CAC/TAC, 531(TCG/TTG, 511(CTG/TTG, and 512(AGC/TCG. This study demonstrated the high specificity (93.8% and sensitivity (95.2% of PCR-SSCP method for detection of mutation in rpoB gene; 85.7% of RIFr strains showed a single mutation and 14.3% had no mutations. Three strains showed mutations caused polymorphism. Our data support the common notion that rifampin resistance genotypes are generally present mutations in codons 531 and 526, most frequently found in M. tuberculosis populations regardless of geographic origin.

  1. Direct Index Method of Beam Damage Location Detection Based on Difference Theory of Strain Modal Shapes and the Genetic Algorithms Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Zhenming

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural damage identification is to determine the structure health status and analyze the test results. The three key problems to be solved are as follows: the existence of damage in structure, to detect the damage location, and to confirm the damage degree or damage form. Damage generally changes the structure physical properties (i.e., stiffness, mass, and damping corresponding with the modal characteristics of the structure (i.e., natural frequencies, modal shapes, and modal damping. The research results show that strain mode can be more sensitive and effective for local damage. The direct index method of damage location detection is based on difference theory, without the modal parameter of the original structure. FEM numerical simulation to partial crack with different degree is done. The criteria of damage location detection can be obtained by strain mode difference curve through cubic spline interpolation. Also the genetic algorithm box in Matlab is used. It has been possible to identify the damage to a reasonable level of accuracy.

  2. Direct bacterial loop-mediated isothermal amplification detection on the pathogenic features of the nosocomial pathogen - Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with respiratory origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qun; Xu, Pusheng; Li, Jiaowu; Chen, Yin; Feng, Jieyi

    2017-08-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification based detection assays using bacterial culture or colony for direct detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) had been developed and evaluated, followed by its extensive application on a large scale of clinical MRSA isolated from respiratory origins, including nasal swabs and sputums. Six primers, including outer primers, inner primers and loop primers, were specifically designed for recognizing eight distinct sequences on four targets: 16SrRNA, femA, mecA and orfX. Twenty-seven reference strains were used to develop, evaluate and optimize this assay. Then, a total of 532 clinical MRSA isolates were employed for each detected targets. And the results were determined through both visual observation of the color change by naked eye and electrophoresis. The specific of each primer had been confirmed, and the optimal amplification was obtained under 65 °C for 40 min. The limit of detections (LOD) of bacteria culture LAMP assays were determined to be 10 4  CFU/ml for 16S rRNA, femA, as well as orfX and 10 5  CFU/ml for mecA, respectively. The established novel assays on MRSA detection may provide new strategies for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Immunocapture RT-PCR detection of Bean common mosaic virus and strain blackeye cowpea mosaic in common bean and black gram in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udayashankar, A.C.; Nayaka, S. Chandra; Niranjana, S.R.

    2012-01-01

    The strains of Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and blackeye cowpea mosaic (BICM), genus Potyvirus, were detected from 25 common bean and 14 black gram seeds among 142 seed samples collected from different legume-growing regions of India. The samples were subjected to a growing-on test, an indicator...... plant test, an electron microscopic observations, an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and an immunocapture RT-PCR. The incidence of the two tested viruses in common bean and black gram seed samples was 1–6% and 0.5–3.5%, respectively in growing-on test evaluations. Electron microscopic observations...

  4. Food Forensics: Using Mass Spectrometry To Detect Foodborne Protein Contaminants, as Exemplified by Shiga Toxin Variants and Prion Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Christopher J

    2018-06-13

    Food forensicists need a variety of tools to detect the many possible food contaminants. As a result of its analytical flexibility, mass spectrometry is one of those tools. Use of the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method expands its use to quantitation as well as detection of infectious proteins (prions) and protein toxins, such as Shiga toxins. The sample processing steps inactivate prions and Shiga toxins; the proteins are digested with proteases to yield peptides suitable for MRM-based analysis. Prions are detected by their distinct physicochemical properties and differential covalent modification. Shiga toxin analysis is based on detecting peptides derived from the five identical binding B subunits comprising the toxin. 15 N-labeled internal standards are prepared from cloned proteins. These examples illustrate the power of MRM, in that the same instrument can be used to safely detect and quantitate protein toxins, prions, and small molecules that might contaminate our food.

  5. Evaluation of Trapper-Collected Nobuto Filter-Paper Blood Samples for Distemper and Parvovirus Antibody Detection in Coyotes (Canis latrans) and Raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, Amanda J; Dubay, Shelli A; Langenberg, Julie; Maes, Roger K

    2015-07-01

    Blood samples are often collected from free-ranging wildlife for antibody detection. However, filter-paper (FP) strips are more cost efficient and easy to collect and store. We evaluated trapper-collected FP strips and body-cavity blood for canine distemper (CDV) and parvovirus (CPV-2) antibody detection in raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans). From 2008 to 2010, licensed trappers near Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, US collected paired samples from harvested animals. Canine distemper antibodies were detected using virus neutralization and parvovirus antibodies were detected using hemagglutination inhibition. Titers ≥ 1:32 for CDV and ≥ 1:25 for CPV-2 were considered evidence of exposure. Using Cohen's kappa test of agreement, FP strip titers agreed with sera for CDV in coyotes (n = 28, K = 0.772) and raccoons (n = 29, K = 0.858) and for CPV-2 in coyotes (n = 40, K = 0.775) and raccoons (n = 70, K = 0.646). However, raccoons determined to be exposed to CPV-2 from sera were unexposed by FP strips in 35% of the samples. Titer results may be affected by quality and volume of blood samples, interval between collection and processing, small sample sizes, and diagnostic testing procedures. Filter-paper strips can be useful for detecting CDV and CPV-2 exposure in coyotes and raccoons with correct field sample collection and appropriate diagnostic testing procedures.

  6. Detection of a Rickettsia Closely Related to Rickettsia aeschlimannii, “Rickettsia heilongjiangensis,” Rickettsia sp. Strain RpA4, and Ehrlichia muris in Ticks Collected in Russia and Kazakhstan

    OpenAIRE

    Shpynov, Stanislav; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Rudakov, Nikolay; Tankibaev, Marat; Tarasevich, Irina; Raoult, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Using PCR, we screened 411 ticks from four genera collected in Russia and Kazakhstan for the presence of rickettsiae and ehrlichiae. In Russia, we detected “Rickettsia heilongjiangensis,” Rickettsia sp. strain RpA4, and Ehrlichia muris. In Kazakhstan, we detected Rickettsia sp. strain RpA4 and a rickettsia closely related to Rickettsia aeschlimannii. These agents should be considered in a differential diagnosis of tick-borne infections in these areas.

  7. Resting multilayer 2D speckle-tracking TTE for detection of ischemic segments confirmed by invasive FFR part-2, using post-systolic-strain-index and time from aortic-valve-closure to regional peak longitudinal-strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Koya; Funabashi, Nobusada; Nishi, Takeshi; Takahara, Masayuki; Fujimoto, Yoshihide; Kamata, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-08-15

    This study evaluated the post-systolic strain index (PSI), and the time interval between aortic valve closure (AVC) and regional peak longitudinal strain (PLS), measured by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), for detection of left ventricular (LV) myocardial ischemic segments confirmed by invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). 39 stable patients (32 males; 65.8±11.9years) with 46 coronary arteries at ≥50% stenosis on invasive coronary angiography underwent 2D speckle tracking TTE (Vivid E9, GE Healthcare) and invasive FFR measurements. PSI, AVC and regional PLS in each LV segment were calculated. FFR ≤0.80 was detected in 27 LV segments. There were no significant differences between segments supplied by FFR ≤0.80 and FFR >0.80 vessels in either PSI or the time interval between AVC and regional PLS. To identify LV segments±FFR ≤0.80, the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves for PSI, and the time interval between AVC and regional PLS had areas under the curve (AUC) values of 0.58 and 0.57, respectively, with best cut-off points of 12% (sensitivity 70.4%, specificity 57.9%) and 88ms (sensitivity 70.4%, specificity 52.6%), respectively, but the AUCs were not statistically significant. In stable coronary artery disease patients with ≥50% coronary artery stenosis, measurement of PSI, and the time interval between AVC and regional PLS, on resting TTE, enabled the identification of LV segments with FFR ≤0.80 using each appropriate threshold for PSI, and the time interval between AVC and regional PLS, with reasonable diagnostic accuracy. However, the AUC values were not statistically significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular detection of viral agents in free-ranging and captive neotropical felids in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Mariana M; Taniwaki, Sueli A; de Barros, Iracema N; Brandão, Paulo E; Catão-Dias, José L; Cavalcanti, Sandra; Cullen, Laury; Filoni, Claudia; Jácomo, Anah T de Almeida; Jorge, Rodrigo S P; Silva, Nairléia Dos Santos; Silveira, Leandro; Ferreira Neto, José S

    2017-09-01

    We describe molecular testing for felid alphaherpesvirus 1 (FHV-1), carnivore protoparvovirus 1 (CPPV-1), feline calicivirus (FCV), alphacoronavirus 1 (feline coronavirus [FCoV]), feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and canine distemper virus (CDV) in whole blood samples of 109 free-ranging and 68 captive neotropical felids from Brazil. Samples from 2 jaguars ( Panthera onca) and 1 oncilla ( Leopardus tigrinus) were positive for FHV-1; 2 jaguars, 1 puma ( Puma concolor), and 1 jaguarundi ( Herpairulus yagouaroundi) tested positive for CPPV-1; and 1 puma was positive for FIV. Based on comparison of 103 nucleotides of the UL24-UL25 gene, the FHV-1 sequences were 99-100% similar to the FHV-1 strain of domestic cats. Nucleotide sequences of CPPV-1 were closely related to sequences detected in other wild carnivores, comparing 294 nucleotides of the VP1 gene. The FIV nucleotide sequence detected in the free-ranging puma, based on comparison of 444 nucleotides of the pol gene, grouped with other lentiviruses described in pumas, and had 82.4% identity with a free-ranging puma from Yellowstone Park and 79.5% with a captive puma from Brazil. Our data document the circulation of FHV-1, CPPV-1, and FIV in neotropical felids in Brazil.

  9. Live Vaccine Strain Francisella tularensis is Detectable at the Inoculation Site but Not in Blood after Vaccination Against Tularemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hepburn, Matthew J; Purcell, Bret K; Lawler, James V; Coyne, Susan R; Petitt, Patricia L; Sellers, Karen D; Norwood, David A; Ulrich, Melanie P

    2006-01-01

    ...) for the detection of F. tularensis in human clinical samples. Methods. Blood and skin swab samples were prospectively collected from volunteers who received the LVS tularemia vaccine at baseline (negative controls...

  10. Detection of the pediocin gene pedA in strains from human faeces by real-time PCR and characterization of Pediococcus acidilactici UVA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cereghetti Tania

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria are commonly used as natural protective cultures. Among them, strains of the genus Pediococcus are particularly interesting for their ability to produce pediocin, a broad spectrum antimicrobial peptide with a strong antagonistic activity against the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Furthermore, there is increasing interest in isolating new bacteriocin-producing strains of human intestinal origin that could be developed for probiotic effects and inhibition of pathogenic bacteria in the gut. In this work, we typed a new strain, co-isolated from baby faeces together with a Bifidobacterium thermophilum strain, and characterized its proteinaceous compound with strong antilisterial activity. Results The newly isolated strain UVA1 was identified as a Pediococcus acidilactici by carbohydrate fermentation profile, growth at 50°C and 16S rDNA sequencing. The partially purified bacteriocin was heat resistant up to 100°C, active over a wide range of pH (2 to 9 and susceptible to proteolytic enzymes. The molecular weight, estimated by SDS-PAGE, was similar to that of pediocin AcH/PA-1 (4.5 kDa. P. acidilactici UVA1 harboured a 9.5-kb plasmid that could be cured easily, which resulted in the loss of the antimicrobial activity. Southern hybridization using the DIG-labelled pedA-probe established that the bacteriocin gene was plasmid-borne as for all pediocin described so far. Nucleotide sequence of the whole operon (3.5 kb showed almost 100 % similarity to the pediocin AcH/PA-1 operon. The mRNA transcript for pedA could be detected in P. acidilactici UVA1 but not in the cured derivative, confirming the expression of the pedA-gene in UVA1. Using a new real-time PCR assay, eleven out of seventeen human faecal samples tested were found to contain pedA-DNA. Conclusion We identified and characterised the first pediocin produced by a human intestinal Pediococcus acidilactici isolate and

  11. Whole genome detection of rotavirus mixed infections in human, porcine and bovine samples co-infected with various rotavirus strains collected from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaga, Martin M; Jere, Khuzwayo C; Esona, Mathew D; Seheri, Mapaseka L; Stucker, Karla M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Akopov, Asmik; Stockwell, Timothy B; Peenze, Ina; Diop, Amadou; Ndiaye, Kader; Boula, Angeline; Maphalala, Gugu; Berejena, Chipo; Mwenda, Jason M; Steele, A Duncan; Wentworth, David E; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are among the main global causes of severe diarrhea in children under the age of 5years. Strain diversity, mixed infections and untypeable RVA strains are frequently reported in Africa. We analysed rotavirus-positive human stool samples (n=13) obtained from hospitalised children under the age of 5years who presented with acute gastroenteritis at sentinel hospital sites in six African countries, as well as bovine and porcine stool samples (n=1 each), to gain insights into rotavirus diversity and evolution. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis and genotyping with G-(VP7) and P-specific (VP4) typing primers suggested that 13 of the 15 samples contained more than 11 segments and/or mixed G/P genotypes. Full-length amplicons for each segment were generated using RVA-specific primers and sequenced using the Ion Torrent and/or Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing platforms. Sequencing detected at least one segment in each sample for which duplicate sequences, often having distinct genotypes, existed. This supported and extended the PAGE and RT-PCR genotyping findings that suggested these samples were collected from individuals that had mixed rotavirus infections. The study reports the first porcine (MRC-DPRU1567) and bovine (MRC-DPRU3010) mixed infections. We also report a unique genome segment 9 (VP7), whose G9 genotype belongs to lineage VI and clusters with porcine reference strains. Previously, African G9 strains have all been in lineage III. Furthermore, additional RVA segments isolated from humans have a clear evolutionary relationship with porcine, bovine and ovine rotavirus sequences, indicating relatively recent interspecies transmission and reassortment. Thus, multiple RVA strains from sub-Saharan Africa are infecting mammalian hosts with unpredictable variations in their gene segment combinations. Whole-genome sequence analyses of mixed RVA strains underscore the considerable diversity of rotavirus sequences and

  12. [Activation of the bioluminescence of the sensor Escherichia coli strains used for detecting N-acyl-homoserine lactones in the presence of nitrofurans and NO generators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaĭtseva, Iu V; Granik, V G; Belik, A S; Koksharova, O A; Khmel', I A

    2010-01-01

    Nitrofurans (nitrofurazone, nitrofurantoin, furazidin, nifuroxazide), and nitric oxide generators (sodium nitroprusside and isosorbide mononitrate) in subinhibitory concentrations were shown to significantly increase the bioluminescence of the sensor Escherichia coli strains used for detecting N-acyl-homoserine lactones, signaling molecules of Quorum Sensing (QS) regulatory systems. The highest activation of bioluminescence (up to 250-400 fold) was observed in the presence of nitrofurazone on E. coli DH5alpha biosensors containing lux-reporter plasmids pSB401 or pSB536. However, this activation was not specifically associated with the functioning of QS systems. We suggest that the effect observed results from a direct action of nitrofurans and NO donors on the process of bioluminescence. The data indicate the necessity of using the biosensors that make it possible to detect specific effects of substances tested on QS regulation.

  13. Lights and shades on an historical vaccine canine distemper virus, the Rockborn strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martella, V.; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete; Elia, G.

    2011-01-01

    Both egg- and cell-adapted canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccines are suspected to retain residual virulence, especially if administered to immuno-suppressed animals, very young pups or to highly susceptible animal species. In the early 1980s, post-vaccine encephalitis was reported in dogs from...... in the sequence databases. Also, Rockborn-like strains were identified in two vaccines currently in the market. These findings indicate that Rockborn-like viruses may be recovered from dogs or other carnivores with distemper, suggesting cases of residual virulence of vaccines, or circulation of vaccine...

  14. Detection of mutations in mtrR gene in quinolone resistant strains of N.gonorrhoeae isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Emergence of multi-drug resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae resulting from new genetic mutation is a serious threat in controlling gonorrhea. This study was undertaken to identify and characterise mutations in the mtrR genes in N.gonorrhoeae isolates resistant to six different antibiotics in the quinolone group. Materials and Methods: The Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of five quinolones for 64 N.gonorrhoeae isolates isolated during Jan 2007-Jun 2009 were determined by E-test method. Mutations in MtrR loci were examined by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing. Results: The proportion of N.gonorrhoeae strains resistant to anti-microbials was 98.4% for norfloxacin and ofloxacin, 96.8% for enoxacin and ciprofloxacin, 95.3% for lomefloxacin. Thirty-one (48.4% strains showed mutation (single/multiple in mtrR gene. Ten different mutations were observed and Gly-45 → Asp, Tyr-105 → His being the most common observed mutation. Conclusion: This is the first report from India on quinolone resistance mutations in MtrRCDE efflux system in N.gonorrhoeae. In conclusion, the high level of resistance to quinolone and single or multiple mutations in mtrR gene could limit the drug choices for gonorrhoea.

  15. [The detection of occurrence rate of genes coding capability to form pili binding in auto-strains of Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, E I; Popkova, S M; Dzhioev, Iu P; Rakova, E B; Dolgikh, V V; Savel'kaeva, M V; Nemchenko, U M; Bukharova, E V; Serdiuk, L V

    2015-01-01

    E. coli is a commensal of intestine of the vertebrata. The exchange of genetic material of different types of bacteria between themselves and with other representatives of family of Enterobacteriaceae in intestinal ecosystem results in development of types of normal colibacillus with genetic characteristics of pathogenicity that can serve as a theoretical substantiation to attribute such strains to pathobionts. The entero-pathogenic colibacillus continues be an important cause of diarrhea in children in developing countries. The gene responsible for formation of pili binding is a necessary condition for virulence of entero-pathogenic colibacillus. The polymerase chain reaction was applied to examine 316 strains of different types of E. coli (normal, with weak enzyme activity and hemolytic activity) isolated from healthy children and children with functional disorders of gastro-intestinal tract for presence of genes coding capability to form pill binding. The presence of this gene in different biochemical types of E. coli permits to establish the fact of formation of reservoir of pathogenicity in indigent microbiota of intestinal biocenosis.

  16. First detection of a human astrovirus type 8 in a child with diarrhea in Belém, Brazil: comparison with other strains worldwide and identification of possible three lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvone B Gabbay

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the genetic relationships of the first human astrovirus type-8 (HAstV-8 detected in Belém-Brazil, during a public hospital-based study. This strain was compared with other HAstV-8 strains identified elsewhere which have sequences available at GeneBank. The regions ORF1a (primers Mon348/Mon340 and ORF2 (primers Mon269/Mon270 were analyzed by nucleotide sequencing and a high similarity rate was observed among the Belém strain and other HAstV-8 strains. In ORF1a, homology values of 93-100% were detected, and in ORF2 96-99%. Considering the sequence variation (7% observed in ORF2 region, it was suggested that HAstV-8 strains could be divided in three different lineages.

  17. Detection and Characterization of Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Yersinia Strains from Human, Animal, and Food Samples in San Luis, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Gabriela Isabel; Lucero Estrada, Cecilia; Cortiñas, Teresa Inés; Escudero, María Esther

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Salmonella spp., and Yersinia species was investigated in humans, animals, and foods in San Luis, Argentina. A total of 453 samples were analyzed by culture and PCR. The antimicrobial susceptibility of all the strains was studied, the genomic relationships among isolates of the same species were determined by PFGE, and the potencial virulence of Y. enterocolitica strains was analyzed. Yersinia species showed higher prevalence (9/453, 2.0%, 95% CI, 0.7–3.3%) than STEC (4/453, 0.9%, 95% CI, 0–1.8%) and Salmonella spp. (3/453, 0.7%, 95% CI, 0–1.5%). Y. enterocolitica and Y. intermedia were isolated from chicken carcasses (6/80, 7.5%, 95% CI, 1.5–13.5%) and porcine skin and bones (3/10, 30%, 95% CI, 0–65%). One STEC strain was recovered from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2%) and STEC stx1/stx2 genes were detected in bovine stools (3/129, 2.3%, 95% CI, 0–5.0%). S. Typhimurium was isolated from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2%) while one S. Newport and two S. Gaminara strains were recovered from one wild boar (1/3, 33%, 95% CI, 0–99%). The knowledge of prevalence and characteristics of these enteropathogens in our region would allow public health services to take adequate preventive measures. PMID:25177351

  18. Diagnostic power of longitudinal strain at rest for the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Houjuan; Yan, Jiangtao; Zeng, Hesong; Li, Wenyu; Li, Pengcheng; Liu, Zhengxiang; Cui, Guanglin; Lv, Jiagao; Wang, Daowen; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Global longitudinal strain (GLS) measured by 2-D speckle-tracking echocardiography (2-D STE) at rest has been recognized as a sensitive parameter in the detection of significant coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the diagnostic power of 2-D STE in the detection of significant CAD in patients with diabetes mellitus is unknown. Two-dimensional STE features were studied in total of 143 consecutive patients who underwent echocardiography and coronary angiography. Left ventricular global and segmental peak systolic longitudinal strains (PSLSs) were quantified by speckle-tracking imaging. In the presence of obstructive CAD (defined as stenosis ≥75%), global PSLS was significantly lower in patients with diabetes mellitus than in patients without (16.65 ± 2.29% vs. 17.32 ± 2.27%, p diabetes mellitus (cutoff value: -18.35%, sensitivity: 78.8%, specificity: 77.5%). However, global PSLS could detect obstructive CAD in diabetic patients at a lower cutoff value with inadequate sensitivity and specificity (cutoff value: -17.15%; sensitivity: 61.1%, specificity: 52.9%). In addition, the results for segmental PSLS were similar to those for global PSLS. In conclusion, global and segmental PSLSs at rest were significantly lower in patients with both obstructive CAD and diabetes mellitus than in patients with obstructive CAD only; thus, PSLSs at rest might not be a useful parameter in the detection of obstructive CAD in patients with diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection and characterisation of trypanosome strains supposedly resistant to trypanocidal drugs in Senegal; Detection au buffy coat technique et en ELISA de souches de trypanosomes supposees chimioresistantes au Senegal et caracterisation therapeutique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaite, A; Seye, M; Mane, A; Ndiaye, T; Seye, M M [Institut Senegalais de Recherches Agricoles (ISRA), Dakar (Senegal). Lab. de Parasitologie

    1997-02-01

    In the region of Sokone cattle are constantly exposed to infections with trypanosomes transmitted by Glossina morsitans submorsitans and G. palpalis gambiensis. Trypanocidal drugs are widely used by the farmers on the 50,000 cattle present in the region. Consequently, drug resistance has become a major problem. During the present study goats were inoculated with trypanosome strains isolated from infected cattle. Following the appearance of parasitaemia, the animals were treated with either Berenil, Samorin or Ethidium. The results indicated the parasites were susceptible to Samorin, but one of the Trypanosoma vivax strains showed resistance to Berenil and Ethidium. In addition, the performance of the antigen detection ELISA was compared with that of the Buffy Coat Technique using more than 1000 serum samples from the Sokone region and 100 samples from Northern Senegal infested with tsetse flies. The results showed a very high specificity of 98%. However, additional tests will be necessary to assess the sensitivity properly. (author). 3 refs, 7 tabs.

  20. Evaluation of a PCR multiplex for detection and differentiation of Mycoplasma synoviae, M. gallisepticum, and M. gallisepticum strain F-vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Mettifogo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS are the mycoplasma infections of most concern for commercial poultry industry. MG infection is commonly designated as chronic respiratory disease (CRD of chickens and infections sinusitis of turkeys. MS causes sub clinical upper respiratory infection and tenosynovitis or bursitis in chickens and turkeys. The multiplex PCR was standardized to detect simultaneously the MS, MG field strains and MG F-vaccine strain specific. The generic PCR for detection of any species of Mollicutes Class was performed and compared to the multiplex PCR and to PCR using species-specific primers. A total of 129 avian tracheal swabs were collected from broiler-breeders, layer hens and broilers in seven different farms and were examined by multiplex PCR methods. The system (multiplex PCR demonstrated to be very rapid, sensitive, and specific. Therefore, the results showed a high prevalence of MS in the flocks examined (27.9%, and indicate that the MS is a recurrent pathogen in Brazilian commercial poultry flocks.

  1. Detection of weak estrogenic flavonoids using a recombinant yeast strain and a modified MCF7 cell proliferation assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke; Larsen, John Christian

    1998-01-01

    A newly developed recombinant yeast strain, in which the human estrogen receptor has been stably integrated into the genome of the yeast, was used to gain information on the estrogenic activity of a large series of dietary flavonoids. Among 23 flavonoids investigated, 8 were found to markedly...... values ranging from 84 to 102 mu M, whereas the remaining flavonoids were devoid of activity. The most potent flavonoid estrogens tested were naringenin, apigenin, kaempferol, phloretin, and the four isoflavonoids equol, genistein, daidzein, and biochanin A. With the exception of biochanin A, the main...... feature required to confer estrogenicity was the presence of a single hydroxyl group in the 4'-position of the B-ring of the flavan nucleus, corresponding to the 4-position on phloretin. The estrogenic potency of the flavonoids was found to be 4 000-4 000 000 times lower than that observed for 17 beta...

  2. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, validation of methods BACTECTM MGIT 960 and AnyplexM TII MTB / MDR / XDR Detection for detection of antibiotic resistance to first and second line in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centeno Urena, Yadel

    2014-01-01

    A literature review is developed of drug-resistant TB in the world and in Costa Rica. The mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics are studied of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis; drug resistance to first-line and second-line, treatment regimen according to the World Health Organization and edge detection methods available in the market. The agreement between the results is studied by the phenotypic detection system of resistance of M. tuberculosis BACTEC MGIT960 and PCR, in real-time of commercial kit Anyplex II MTB/MDR/XDR, for genotypic identification of M. tuberculosis and related mutations to resistance with the referring results to thirty strains provided by the Pan American Health Organization, allowing a significant shortening in the time of obtaining reliable results. The results obtained have allowed to suggest a possible implementation at the Centro Nacional de Referencia en Micobacteriologia (CNRM), to perform antibiotic susceptibility testing and genotypic testing of multidrug cases respectively. The study results have allowed the implementation of the technology of genotypic detection of M. tuberculosis in the CNRM, obtaining for the first time in Costa Rica, information about genes of M. tuberculosis related to the generation of resistance to the major drugs of Primary treatment scheme as well as testing of resistance to second-line drug for resistant strains referred to the Centro Nacional de Referencia en Micobacteriologia in 2013. (author) [es

  3. Development of a sensitive and specific epitope-blocking ELISA for universal detection of antibodies to human enterovirus 71 strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD in young children. It is often associated with severe neurological diseases and mortalities in recent outbreaks across the Asia Pacific region. Currently, there is no efficient universal antibody test available to detect EV71 infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present study, an epitope-blocking ELISA was developed to detect specific antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human or animal sera. The assay relies on a novel monoclonal antibody (Mab 1C6 that specifically binds to capsid proteins in whole EV71 viruses without any cross reaction to any EV71 capsid protein expressed alone. The sensitivity and specificity of the epitope-blocking ELISA for EV71 was evaluated and compared to microneutralization using immunized animal sera to multiple virus genotypes of EV71 and coxsackieviruses. Further, 200 serum sample from human individuals who were potentially infected with EV71 viruses were tested in both the blocking ELISA and microneutralization. Results indicated that antibodies to EV71 were readily detected in immunized animals or human sera by the epitope blocking ELISA whereas specimens with antibodies to other enteroviruses yielded negative results. This assay is not only simpler to perform but also shows higher sensitivity and specificity as compared to microneutralization. CONCLUSION: The epitope-blocking ELISA based on a unique Mab 1C6 provided highly sensitive and 100% specific detection of antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human sera.

  4. Standardization of micro-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies using extracts from Mexican strains as antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, B; Monteón, V; Reyes, P A; Espinoza, B

    2001-01-01

    This report describes two assays for the detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies using Mexican strains of the parasite and the concordance with two assays previously evaluated at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez in Mexico City. Micro-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot were used for the detection of T. cruzi antibodies with a total extract of epimastigote from Ninoa and Queretaro, which are Mexican strains of T. cruzi. To standardize these methods, a total of 246 serum samples was used. In addition, sera from six confirmed Mexican chronic individuals in the asymptomatic phase were also used for comparison with the Argentinean antigen. ELISA was 100% specific in that no false positive results were found with sera of both healthy individuals and non-Chagasic cardiopaths. Sera from individuals infected with Leishmania sp. showed approximately 16% of cross-reaction with ELISA. The test showed a positive predictive value of 90% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Western blot was also a highly sensitive test for detecting chronic Chagasic symptomatic patients from Mexico because no false negative results were obtained. Furthermore, it was possible to use Western blot to detect seven immunodominant antigens of approximately 30, 32, 40, 42, 65, 70, and 83 kDa. Concordance with two previous standardized tests at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología showed a Kappa index of 0.96, indicating high concordance between the results obtained at these two laboratories. Finally, ELISA using Ninoa antigen extract was more sensitive than ELISA with an Argentinean extract, which failed to detect individuals in the chronic asymptomatic phase (undetermined phase) of infection. This study indicates that ELISA and Western blot using Ninoa and/or Queretaro extracts of T. cruzi as antigens are useful tools in the detection of individuals who have been exposed to T. cruzi both in the undetermined/asymptomatic and symptomatic phases

  5. Evaluation of a Direct Immunofluorescent Assay and/or Conjunctival Cytology for Detection of Canine Distemper Virus Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Labrini V; Kantere, Maria C; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Pardali, Dimitra; Adamama Moraitou, Katerina; Polizopoulou, Zoe S

    2018-04-01

    Canine distemper is a common and potentially lethal multisystemic disease caused by the Canine distemper virus (CDV). We evaluated the diagnostic performance of direct immunofluorescent assay (FA) and cytology to detect CDV antigen in conjunctival cells compared with an established polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection assay used as a gold standard for CDV diagnosis. Samples were collected from 57 young dogs presenting with central nervous system signs compatible with distemper disease. Exfoliative epithelial cells were collected from the right and left conjunctiva of each animal using nylon-bristled cytobrushes for cytology and cotton swabs for FA and PCR. For the direct FA, samples were stained with anti-CDV polyclonal antiserum conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate and imaged using a fluorescent microscope. Out of 57 dogs tested, 19 were PCR positive (15 positive in direct FA and 4 positive in cytology, including one that was negative by PCR), whereas 37 dogs were negative in all methods. A good agreement was observed between the FA and PCR, with a κ-value of 0.833 (95% CI: 0.678-0.989). Meanwhile, there was poor agreement between cytology and PCR (κ-value of 0.164; 95% CI: -0.045 to 0.373) and a fair agreement between FA and cytology (κ-value of 0.231; 95% CI: -0.026 to 0.487). Our results indicated a poor performance of cytology for the detection of CDV antigen. In contrast, FA is a 100% specific and an adequately sensitive assay (sensitivity: 78.95%, negative likelihood ratio: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.09-0.50) for antemortem diagnosis of canine distemper.

  6. Detection and genetic characterization of Canine parvovirus and Canine coronavirus strains circulating in district of Tirana in Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Alessandra; Desario, Costantina; Kusi, Ilir; Mari, Viviana; Lorusso, Eleonora; Cirone, Francesco; Kumbe, Ilirjan; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Buonavoglia, Domenico; Decaro, Nicola

    2014-07-01

    An epidemiological survey for Canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2) and Canine coronavirus (CCoV) was conducted in Albania. A total of 57 fecal samples were collected from diarrheic dogs in the District of Tirana during 2011-2013. The molecular assays detected 53 and 31 CPV- and CCoV-positive specimens, respectively, with mixed CPV-CCoV infections diagnosed in 28 dogs. The most frequently detected CPV type was 2a, whereas IIa was the predominant CCoV subtype. A better comprehension of the CPV-CCoV epidemiology in eastern European countries will help to assess the most appropriate vaccination strategies to prevent disease due to infections with these widespread agents of acute gastroenteritis in the dog.

  7. Detection of E.Coli Strains Containing Shiga Toxin (Stx1/2 Gene in Diarrheal Specimens from Children Less than 5 Years Old by PCR Technique and Study of the Patterns of Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Pourmand

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Shiga toxin- producing Escherichia coli (STEC is an emerging bacterial pathogen in developing countries that causes several diseases such as diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis (HC and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, particularly in children. Aim of the research was detection of STEC in diarrheal specimens from under 5 year olds and study of the patterns of antibiotic resistance of these strains. Methods: In the study,300 fecal samples were collected from children with diarrhea referring to Ali Asghar Hospital. E.coli species were isolated by standard bacteriological and biochemical tests. Presence of shiga toxin genes (stx1/2 was investigated by PCR technique (Qiagen. Antibiogram test for strains containing the toxin gene was performed using 16 different antibiotic discs (MAST by disc diffusion agar (Kirby-Bauer method. Results: From 39 E.coli isolates, 9(23.1% strains were detected by PCR to contain stx1/2 gene. One strain was resistant to all 16 antibiotics. All the STEC strains were sensitive to meropenem (MRP, imipenem (IMI, gentamycin (GEN and nitrofurantoin (NI. 4(44.44% strains showed multi-drug resistant pattern. All these 4strains were resistant to cotrimoxazole(SxT. Also, 6(66.66% strains were resistant to at least one antibiotic. Conclusion: In Iran, shiga toxin- producing Escherichia coli (STEC may be a commonly bacterial pathogen causing diarrhea, particularly in children. Therefore, we should use new techniques for investigation of these strains. Increase in number of emerging and new strains that could be resistant to classic antibiotics such as cotrimoxazole may be foreseen. It is suggested that antibiotics prescription programs in treatment of diarrhea causing E.coli strains be updated.

  8. Detection and coexistence of six categories of resistance genes in Escherichia coli strains from chickens in Anhui Province, China

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    Lin Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterise the prevalence of class 1 integrons and gene cassettes, tetracycline-resistance genes, phenicol-resistance genes, 16S rRNA methylase genes, extended-spectrum β-lactamase genes and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants in 184 Escherichia coli isolates from chickens in Anhui Province, China. Susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials was determined using broth micro-dilution. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing were used to characterise the molecular basis of the antibiotic resistance. High rates of antimicrobial resistance were observed; 131 out of the 184 (72.3% isolates were resistant to at least six antimicrobial agents. The prevalences of class 1 integrons, tetracycline-resistance genes, phenicol-resistance genes, 16S rRNA methylase genes, extended-spectrum β-lactamase genes and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants were 49.5, 17.4, 15.8, 0.5, 57.6 and 46.2%, respectively. In 82 isolates, 48 different kinds of coexistence of the different genes were identified. Statistical (χ2 analysis showed that the resistance to amoxicillin, doxycycline, florfenicol, ofloxacin and gentamicin had significant differences (P<0.01 or 0.01strains that carried and did not carry the resistance genes, which showed a certain correlation between antimicrobial resistance and the presence of resistance genes.

  9. Detection of antibodies against H5 and H7 strains in birds: evaluation of influenza pseudovirus particle neutralization tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Wallerström

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Avian influenza viruses circulate in bird populations, and it is important to maintain and uphold our knowledge of the viral strains that are currently of interest in this context. Here, we describe the use of hemagglutinin-pseudotype retroviruses based on highly pathogenic influenza viruses for the screening of avian sera for influenza A antibodies. Our aim was also to determine whether the pseudovirus neutralization tests that we assessed were sensitive and simple to use compared to the traditional methods, including hemagglutination inhibition assays and microneutralization tests. Material and methods: H5 and H7 pseudovirus neutralization tests were evaluated by using serum from infected rabbits. Subsequently, the assays were further investigated using a panel of serum samples from avian species. The panel contained samples that were seropositive for five different hemagglutinin subtypes as well as influenza A seronegative samples. Results and discussion: The results suggest that the pseudovirus neutralization test is an alternative to hemagglutination inhibition assays, as we observed comparable titers to those of both standard microneutralizations assays as well as hemagglutinin inhibition assays. When evaluated by a panel of avian sera, the method also showed its capability to recognize antibodies directed toward low-pathogenic H5 and H7. Hence, we conclude that it is possible to use pseudoviruses based on highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses to screen avian sera for antibodies directed against influenza A subtypes H5 and H7.

  10. Characterization of a Syrian Chickpea chlorotic stunt virus strain and production of polyclonal antibodies for its detection

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    Yaseen ALNAASAN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis with two primer sets of luteoviruses was used to characterize an isolate of Chickpea chlorotic stunt virus (CpCSv, genus Polerovirus, family Luteoviridae (SC402-08 collected from Lattakia, Syria, during the 2007‒2008 chickpea growing season. Sequence analysis revealed that the coat protein gene of the isolate shared nucleotide sequence identities ranging from 97 to 98% with the CpCSv isolates from Egypt, morocco and Syria. The capsid protein was separated as a protein of approximately 20 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and was visually detected by its reaction with CpCSV monoclonal antibody in Western blot. SC402-08 isolate of CpCSV was purified from faba bean-infected plants, and yielded 112–182 μg of purified virions kg-1 of infected tissue. The purified preparation was injected into a white rabbit, and an antiserum was obtained and used to detect CpCSv in infected tissues by tissue-blot immunoassay. The antiserum obtained was able to detect CpCSv by the immunoassay up to a dilution of 1:1,024,000.

  11. Isolation and characterization of Bacteroides host strain HB-73 used to detect sewage specific phages in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavel, Kannappan; Fujioka, Roger; Ebdon, James; Taylor, Huw

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that Escherichia coli and enterococci are unreliable indicators of fecal contamination in Hawaii because of their ability to multiply in environmental soils. In this study, the method of detecting Bacteroides phages as specific markers of sewage contamination in Hawaii's recreational waters was evaluated because these sewage specific phages cannot multiply under environmental conditions. Bacteroides hosts (GB-124, GA-17), were recovered from sewage samples in Europe and were reported to be effective in detecting phages from sewage samples obtained in certain geographical areas. However, GB-124 and GA-17 hosts were ineffective in detecting phages from sewage samples obtained in Hawaii. Bacteroides host HB-73 was isolated from a sewage sample in Hawaii, confirmed as a Bacteroides sp. and shown to recover phages from multiple sources of sewage produced in Hawaii at high concentrations (5.2-7.3 x 10(5) PFU/100 mL). These Bacteroides phages were considered as potential markers of sewage because they also survived for three days in fresh stream water and two days in marine water. Water samples from Hawaii's coastal swimming beaches and harbors, which were known to be contaminated with discharges from streams, were shown to contain moderate (20-187 CFU/100 mL) to elevated (173-816 CFU/100 mL) concentrations of enterococci. These same samples contained undetectable levels (Hawaii and the most likely source of these enterococci is from environmental soil rather than from sewage. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Construction of a gene bank and use of the chromosome walking technique for the detection of new putative agrocin genes in Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain D286

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, G.

    1987-02-01

    A gene bank of Agrobacterium tumefaciens D286 wt has been constructed by cloning D286 wt DNA partially digested with EcoRI in the cosmid vector pLAFRI. The library; composed of 1750 members with a 27.7 kb average insert size was probed with pCDTn5-3, a cosmid vector carrying a D286:: Tn5 insert from the strain D286:: Tn5 Ag-. One recombinant cosmid of the library, pCDO932, was detected. The insert DNA of pCDO932 has sequences homologous to the D286:: Tn5 insert of pCDTn5-3, therefore it carries putative wt agrocin D286 genes. The insert DNA of pCDO932 was isolated and used to probe the D286 wt gene library. Chromosome walking resulted in the detection of pCD2375. EcoRI restriction digestions and DNA homology studies of pCDO932 and pCD2375 showed that their D286 wt inserts are both composed of 4 EcoRI DNA sub-fragments totalling 21.8 and 24.8 kb respectively, with an overlapping sequence extending 3.5 kb. In order to overcome the failure to detect A. tumefaciens cells transformed with pCDO932. Vectors pSUP204-1 was constructed. Such vector has been derived from pSUP204 which were slightly altered by cloning into it a 700 bp λ DNA SalI fragmet. This resulted in insertion inactivation of the Tc r gene, allows the use of pSUP204-1 as a subcloning vector in conjugations and transformations involving pCDO932 or pCD2375 and strains D286:: Tn5 Ag- and C58 C1G. Two recombinant cosmids bearing D286 wt DNA inserts, at least one of which (pCDO932) contains DNA sequences putatively affecting agrocin D286 production, are now available for further genetic manipulations. pSUP204-1 should prove useful as a subcloning vector for transformations and conjugations involving recombinant cosmids from the D286 wt gene bank and Agrobacterium strains. Future work on the molecular biology of agrocin D286 production is discussed. The DNA probe used in this study was labelled with phosphorus 32

  13. A Strain-Based Method to Detect Tires’ Loss of Grip and Estimate Lateral Friction Coefficient from Experimental Data by Fuzzy Logic for Intelligent Tire Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Yunta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tires are a key sub-system of vehicles that have a big responsibility for comfort, fuel consumption and traffic safety. However, current tires are just passive rubber elements which do not contribute actively to improve the driving experience or vehicle safety. The lack of information from the tire during driving gives cause for developing an intelligent tire. Therefore, the aim of the intelligent tire is to monitor tire working conditions in real-time, providing useful information to other systems and becoming an active system. In this paper, tire tread deformation is measured to provide a strong experimental base with different experiments and test results by means of a tire fitted with sensors. Tests under different working conditions such as vertical load or slip angle have been carried out with an indoor tire test rig. The experimental data analysis shows the strong relation that exists between lateral force and the maximum tensile and compressive strain peaks when the tire is not working at the limit of grip. In the last section, an estimation system from experimental data has been developed and implemented in Simulink to show the potential of strain sensors for developing intelligent tire systems, obtaining as major results a signal to detect tire’s loss of grip and estimations of the lateral friction coefficient.

  14. A Strain-Based Method to Detect Tires' Loss of Grip and Estimate Lateral Friction Coefficient from Experimental Data by Fuzzy Logic for Intelligent Tire Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunta, Jorge; Garcia-Pozuelo, Daniel; Diaz, Vicente; Olatunbosun, Oluremi

    2018-02-06

    Tires are a key sub-system of vehicles that have a big responsibility for comfort, fuel consumption and traffic safety. However, current tires are just passive rubber elements which do not contribute actively to improve the driving experience or vehicle safety. The lack of information from the tire during driving gives cause for developing an intelligent tire. Therefore, the aim of the intelligent tire is to monitor tire working conditions in real-time, providing useful information to other systems and becoming an active system. In this paper, tire tread deformation is measured to provide a strong experimental base with different experiments and test results by means of a tire fitted with sensors. Tests under different working conditions such as vertical load or slip angle have been carried out with an indoor tire test rig. The experimental data analysis shows the strong relation that exists between lateral force and the maximum tensile and compressive strain peaks when the tire is not working at the limit of grip. In the last section, an estimation system from experimental data has been developed and implemented in Simulink to show the potential of strain sensors for developing intelligent tire systems, obtaining as major results a signal to detect tire's loss of grip and estimations of the lateral friction coefficient.

  15. LC-MS/MS Detection of Karlotoxins Reveals New Variants in Strains of the Marine Dinoflagellate Karlodinium veneficum from the Ebro Delta (NW Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Krock

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS method was developed for the detection and quantitation of karlotoxins in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM mode. This novel method was based upon the analysis of purified karlotoxins (KcTx-1, KmTx-2, 44-oxo-KmTx-2, KmTx-5, one amphidinol (AM-18, and unpurified extracts of bulk cultures of the marine dinoflagellate Karlodinium veneficum strain CCMP2936 from Delaware (Eastern USA, which produces KmTx-1 and KmTx-3. The limit of detection of the SRM method for KmTx-2 was determined as 2.5 ng on-column. Collision induced dissociation (CID spectra of all putative karlotoxins were recorded to present fragmentation patterns of each compound for their unambiguous identification. Bulk cultures of K. veneficum strain K10 isolated from an embayment of the Ebro Delta, NW Mediterranean, yielded five previously unreported putative karlotoxins with molecular masses 1280, 1298, 1332, 1356, and 1400 Da, and similar fragments to KmTx-5. Analysis of several isolates of K. veneficum from the Ebro Delta revealed small-scale diversity in the karlotoxin spectrum in that one isolate from Fangar Bay produced KmTx-5, whereas the five putative novel karlotoxins were found among several isolates from nearby, but hydrographically distinct Alfacs Bay. Application of this LC-MS/MS method represents an incremental advance in the determination of putative karlotoxins, particularly in the absence of a complete spectrum of purified analytical standards of known specific potency.

  16. Development of specific oligonucleotide probes for the identification and in situ detection of hydrocarbon-degrading Alcanivorax strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syutsubo, K; Kishira, H; Harayama, S

    2001-06-01

    The genus Alcanivorax comprises diverse hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria. Novel 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide DNA probes (ALV735 and ALV735-b) were developed to quantify two subgroups of the Alcanivorax/Fundibacter group by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and the conditions for the single-mismatch discrimination of the probes were optimized. The specificity of the probes was improved further using a singly mismatched oligonucleotide as a competitor. The growth of Alcanivorax cells in crude oil-contaminated sea water under the biostimulation condition was investigated by FISH with the probe ALV735, which targeted the main cluster of the Alcanivorax/Fundibacter group. The size of the Alcanivorax population increased with increasing incubation time and accounted for 91% of the 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) count after incubation for 2 weeks. The probes developed in this study are useful for detecting Alcanivorax populations in petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microbial consortia.

  17. Towards a Molecular Definition of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC): Detection of Genes Located on O Island 57 as Markers To Distinguish EHEC from Closely Related Enteropathogenic E. coli Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannoy, Sabine; Beutin, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Among strains of Shiga-toxin (Stx) producing Escherichia coli (STEC), seven serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157) are associated with severe clinical illness in humans. These strains are also called enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), and the development of methods for their reliable detection from food has been challenging thus far. PCR detection of major EHEC virulence genes stx1, stx2, eae, and O-serogroup-specific genes is useful but does not identify EHEC strains specifically. Searching for the presence of additional genes issued from E. coli O157:H7 genomic islands OI-122 and OI-71 increases the specificity but does not clearly discriminate EHEC from enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) strains. Here, we identified two putative genes, called Z2098 and Z2099, from the genomic island OI-57 that were closely associated with EHEC and their stx-negative derivative strains (87% for Z2098 and 91% for Z2099). Z2098 and Z2099 were rarely found in EPEC (10% for Z2098 and 12% for Z2099), STEC (2 and 15%), and apathogenic E. coli (1% each) strains. Our findings indicate that Z2098 and Z2099 are useful genetic markers for a more targeted diagnosis of typical EHEC and new emerging EHEC strains. PMID:23325824

  18. Detection and genetic characterization of norovirus strains circulating among infants and children with acute gastroenteritis in Japan during 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tung Gia; Takanashi, Sayaka; Kaneshi, Kunio; Ueda, Yuichi; Nakaya, Shigekazu; Nishimura, Shuichi; Sugita, Kumiko; Nishimura, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Atsuko; Yagyu, Fumihiro; Okitsu, Shoko; Maneekarn, Niwat; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    A total of 752 fecal specimens collected during the period of July 2004 to June 2005 from infants and children with acute gastroenteritis from four different regions (Maizuru, Tokyo, Sapporo, and Osaka) of Japan were tested for the presence of norovirus by RT-PCR. It was found that 139 (18.5%) fecal specimens were positive for norovirus. Norovirus infection was detected almost all year round with the highest prevalence in January. Norovirus GII was the most predominant genogroup (98.6%; 137 of 139). The genotypes detected in this study were GI/1, GII/1, GII/3, GII/4, and GII/6. Of these, NoV GII/4 (known as the Lordsdale virus cluster) was re-emerging and became the leading genotype (77.7%). Meanwhile, the incidence of NoV GII/3 (known as the Arg320 virus cluster) has dropped rapidly, accounting for only 15.8%. Another interesting feature of the study was the identification of Picton03/AU-like recombinant NoV for the first time in Japan. Based on the genetic analysis, it was interesting to note that NoV GII/4 in 2004-2005 made a distinct cluster in comparison to other NoV GII/4 circulating in 2002-2003 and 2003-2004. Of note, "new recombinant variant designated GIIb" within NoV GII/3, which was first detected in Saga City, Japan in 2003-2004 in only one case, had increased, spreading widely in Japan and representing 45.5% (10 of 22). Further epidemiological studies should be conducted to determine whether this new recombinant variant strain will be dominant in Japan in the coming year.

  19. Application of a modified culture medium for the simultaneous counting of molds and yeasts and detection of aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimez, J; Fente, C A; Franco, C M; Cepeda, A; Vázquez, B I

    2003-02-01

    Molds and yeasts from 91 samples of feed and raw materials used in feed formulation were enumerated on a new culture medium to which a beta cyclodextrin (beta-W7M 1.8-cyclodextrin) had been added. This medium was compared with other media normally used in laboratories for the routine analysis of fungi, such as Sabouraud agar, malt agar supplemented with 2% dextrose, and potato dextrose agar. When a t test for paired data (0.05 significance level, 95% confidence interval) was applied, no statistically significant differences between the results obtained with the new culture medium and those obtained with the other media used to enumerate molds and yeasts were found. For the evaluation of contamination due to aflatoxin for all of the samples, Sabouraud agar and yeast extract agar, both supplemented with 0.3% beta-W7M 1.8-cyclodextrin, and APA (aflatoxin-producing ability) medium were used. Aflatoxin was detected in 21% of the feed samples and in 23% of the raw-material samples analyzed, with maximal amounts of 2.8 and 6.0 microg of aflatoxin B1 per kg, respectively, being detected. In any case, the aflatoxin contents found exceeded the legally stipulated limits. The t test for paired data (0.05 significance level, 95% confidence interval) did not show statistically significant differences between the results obtained with the different culture media used for the detection of aflatoxins. The advantage of the new medium developed (Sabouraud agar with 0.3% beta-W7M 1.8-cyclodextrin) is that it allows simultaneous fungal enumeration and determination (under UV light) of the presence of aflatoxin-producing strains without prior isolation and culture procedures involving expensive and/or complex specific media and thus saves work, time, and money.

  20. Detection of ctx-M gene in ESBL-producing E. coli strains isolated from urinary tract infection in Semnan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabar, Mahbobeh Mohammad; Mirkalantari, Shiva; Amoli, Rabeeh Izadi

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of urinary tract infections caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta Lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains due to long term and overuse of broad-spectrum cephalosporine is on the rise. CTX beta-lactamase type, a broad-spectrum beta-lactamase, has been expanding in many countries. The ctx gene is harbored on a plasmid that is spread between Enterobacteriaceae family, especially in E. coli. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of antimicrobial resistance and investigate the prevalent ESBL phenotype and the ctx-M gene in E. coli isolated from patients with urinary tract infections (UTI) in Semnan. A cross sectional study was performed on 109 strains of E. coli isolated from the urine culture of patient suffering from a UTI referred to Shafa hospital (Semnan, Iran) during March-July 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was applied and the prevalence of the ESBL phenotype was confirmed using combination disk. PCR methods were completed for amplification of the bla ctx gene. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 software. One hundred ninety samples (4.16%) were identified as E. coli. Twenty one (26.6%) of E. coli were ESBL positive and 73.4% were ESBL negative. There was 100% susceptibility to imipeneme. Twenty (68.97%) out of 29 isolates were positive for the ctx-M gene, as detected by PCR. In urinary tract infections, antibiotic treatment was experimental and detailed information regarding the sensitivity of bacteria in the area can be useful to achieve the best treatment.

  1. Rapid detection of drug resistance and mutational patterns of extensively drug-resistant strains by a novel GenoType® MTBDRsl assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB is a major concern in the India. The burden of XDR-TB is increasing due to inadequate monitoring, lack of proper diagnosis, and treatment. The GenoType ® Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance second line (MTBDRsl assay is a novel line probe assay used for the rapid detection of mutational patterns conferring resistance to XDR-TB. Aim: The aim of this study was to study the rapid detection of drug resistance and mutational patterns of the XDR-TB by a novel GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 98 multidrug-resistant (MDR M. tuberculosis isolates for second line drugs susceptibility testing by 1% proportion method (BacT/ALERT 3D system and GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay for rapid detection of conferring drug resistance to XDR-TB. Results: A total of seven (17.4% were identified as XDR-TB by using standard phenotypic method. The concordance between phenotypic and GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay was 91.7-100% for different antibiotics. The sensitivity and specificity of the MTBDRsl assay were 100% and 100% for aminoglycosides; 100% and 100% for fluoroquinolones; 91.7% and 100% for ethambutol. The most frequent mutations and patterns were gyrA MUT1 (A90V in seven (41.2% and gyrA + WT1-3 + MUT1 in four (23.5%; rrs MUT1 (A1401G in 11 (64.7%, and rrs WT1-2 + MUT1 in eight (47.1%; and embB MUT1B (M306V in 11 (64.7% strains. Conclusions: These data suggest that the GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay is rapid, novel test for detection of resistance to second line anti-tubercular drugs. This assay provides additional information about the frequency and mutational patterns responsible for XDR-TB resistance.

  2. Detection of Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease Using Peak Systolic Global Longitudinal Strain Derived by Two-Dimensional Speckle-Tracking: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kevin; Negishi, Kazuaki; Ho, Suyen; Russell, Elizabeth A; Cranney, Greg; Ooi, Sze-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Global longitudinal strain (GLS) is well validated and has important applications in contemporary clinical practice. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the accuracy of resting peak GLS in the diagnosis of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). A systematic literature search was performed through July 2015 using four databases. Data were extracted independently by two authors and correlated before analyses. Using a random-effect model, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, diagnostic odds ratio, and summary area under the curve for GLS were estimated with their respective 95% CIs. Screening of 1,669 articles yielded 10 studies with 1,385 patients appropriate for inclusion in the analysis. The mean age and left ventricular ejection fraction were 59.9 years and 61.1%. On the whole, 54.9% and 20.9% of the patients had hypertension and diabetes, respectively. Overall, abnormal GLS detected moderate to severe CAD with a pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of 74.4%, 72.1%, 2.9, and 0.35 respectively. The area under the curve and diagnostic odds ratio were 0.81 and 8.5. The mean values of GLS for those with and without CAD were -16.5% (95% CI, -15.8% to -17.3%) and -19.7% (95% CI, -18.8% to -20.7%), respectively. Subgroup analyses for patients with severe CAD and normal left ventricular ejection fractions yielded similar results. Current evidence supports the use of GLS in the detection of moderate to severe obstructive CAD in symptomatic patients. GLS may complement existing diagnostic algorithms and act as an early adjunctive marker of cardiac ischemia. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization technique for detection of atom-size crystalline defects and strains using two-dimensional fast-Fourier-transform sampling Moiré method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodera, Masako; Wang, Qinghua; Ri, Shien; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Akira; Sugiyama, Toru; Hamamoto, Takeshi; Miyashita, Naoto

    2018-04-01

    Recently, we have developed a two-dimensional (2D) fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) sampling Moiré technique to visually and quantitatively determine the locations of minute defects in a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image. We applied this technique for defect detection with GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) devices, and successfully and clearly visualized atom-size defects in AlGaN/GaN crystalline structures. The defect density obtained in the AlGaN/GaN structures is ∼1013 counts/cm2. In addition, we have successfully confirmed that the distribution and number of defects closely depend on the process conditions. Thus, this technique is quite useful for a device development. Moreover, the strain fields in an AlGaN/GaN crystal were effectively calculated with nm-scale resolution using this method. We also demonstrated that this sampling Moiré technique is applicable to silicon devices, which have principal directions different from those of AlGaN/GaN crystals. As a result, we believe that the 2D FFT sampling Moiré method has great potential applications to the discovery of new as yet unknown phenomena occurring between the characteristics of a crystalline material and device performance.

  4. Detection of human antibodies binding with smooth and rough LPSs from Proteus mirabilis O3 strains S1959, R110, R45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleńska-Olender, J; Durlik, K; Konieczna, I; Kowalska, P; Gawęda, J; Kaca, W

    2017-11-01

    Bacteria of the genus Proteus of the family Enterobacteriaceae are facultative human pathogens responsible mainly for urinary tract and wound infections, bacteremia and the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have analyzed and compared by ELISA the titer of antibodies in plasmas of healthy individuals and in sera of rheumatoid arthritis patients recognizing a potential host cross-reactive epitope (lysine-galacturonic acid epitopes) present in Proteus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In our experiments LPSs isolated from two mutants of smooth Proteus mirabilis 1959 (O3), i.e. strains R110 and R45, were used. R110 (Ra type mutant) is lacking the O-specific polysaccharide, but possesses a complete core oligosaccharide, while R45 (Re type) has a reduced core oligosaccharide and contains two 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid residues and one of 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinopyranose residues. Titer of P. mirabilis S1959 LPS-specific-antibodies increased with the age of blood donors. RA and blood donors' sera contained antibodies against S and Ra and Re type of P. mirabilis O3 LPSs. Antibodies recognizing lysine-galacturonic acid epitopes of O3 LPS were detected by ELISA in some plasmas of healthy individuals and sera of rheumatoid arthritis patients. RA patients antibodies reacting with P. mirabilis S1959 S and R LPSs may indicate a potential role of anti-LPS antibodies in molecular mimicry in RA diseases.

  5. Comparative evaluation of culture and PCR for the detection and determination of persistence of bacterial strains and DNAs in the Chinchilla laniger model of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aul, J J; Anderson, K W; Wadowsky, R M; Doyle, W J; Kingsley, L A; Post, J C; Ehrlich, G D

    1998-06-01

    This study was designed to determine the persistence of culturable bacteria versus DNA in the presence of a middle ear effusion in a chinchilla model of otitis media. Cohorts of animals were either infected with an ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae strain or injected with a tripartite inoculum consisting of freeze-thawed Streptococcus pneumoniae; pasteurized Moraxella catarrhalis; and DNA from H influenzae. The H influenzae-infected animals displayed culture positivity and polymerase chain reaction positivity through day 35. In the chinchillas infected with the low-copy number inocula of S pneumoniae, DNA was not detectable after day 1 from the co-inoculated pasteurized M catarrhalis bacteria or the purified H influenzae DNA; however, amplifiable DNA from the live low-copy number bacteria persisted through day 21 even though they were not culture-positive past day 3. These results demonstrate that DNA, and DNA from intact but nonviable bacteria, does not persist in an amplifiable form for more than a day in the presence of an effusion; however, live bacteria, while not culturable, persist in a viable state for weeks.

  6. Detection of uncommon G3P[3] rotavirus A (RVA) strain in rat possessing a human RVA-like VP6 and a novel NSP2 genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianiro, Giovanni; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; De Sabato, Luca; Pampiglione, Guglielmo; Ruggeri, Franco M; Ostanello, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    Rotavirus is one of the leading causes of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children. RVAs infect not only humans but also a wide range of mammals including rats, which represent a reservoir of several other zoonotic pathogens. Due to the segmented nature of the RVA genome, animal RVA strains can easily adapt to the human host by reassortment with co-infecting human viruses. This study aims to detect and characterize RVA in the intestinal content of Italian sinantropic rats (Rattus rattus). Out of 40 samples examined following molecular approach, one resulted positive for RVA. The molecular characterization of VP1-4, 6 and 7, and NSP1-5 genes by sequencing revealed the genomic constellation G3-P[3]-I1-R11-C11-M10-A22-N18-T14-E18-H13. This uncommon genomic combination includes: the VP1-4,VP7, the NSP1, 3, 4 and 5 gene segments, closely related to those of RVA from rodents, the N18 novel genotype established for the NSP2 gene segment and the human Wa-like VP6 gene, suggesting interspecies reassortment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection, Characterization, and In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of Genes Encoding S-Proteins in Lactobacillus gallinarum Strains Isolated from Chicken Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Karen E.; Guan, Le Luo; Tannock, Gerald W.; Korver, Doug R.; Allison, Gwen E.

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-eight isolates of Lactobacillus gallinarum cultured from the crops of broiler chickens were screened for the presence of genes encoding S-layer proteins. All of the isolates had two S-protein genes, which were designated Lactobacillus gallinarum S-protein (lgs) genes. One gene in each isolate was either lgsA or lgsB. The Lactobacillus isolates were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of DNA digests, which grouped the isolates into 17 genotypes (strains). The second gene in each of eight representative strains was sequenced and shown to differ among strains (lgsC, lgsD, lgsE, lgsF, lgsG, lgsH, and lgsI). The genome of each strain thus encoded a common S-protein (encoded by either lgsA or lgsB) and a strain-specific S-protein. The extraction of cell surface proteins from cultures of the eight strains showed that each strain produced a single S-protein that was always encoded by the strain-specific lgs gene. Two of the strains were used to inoculate chickens maintained in a protected environment which were Lactobacillus-free prior to inoculation. DNAs and RNAs extracted from the digesta of the chickens were used for PCR and reverse transcription-PCR, respectively, to demonstrate the presence and transcription of lgs genes in vivo. In both cases, only the strain-specific gene was transcribed. Both of the strains adhered to the crop epithelium, consistent with published data predicting that S-proteins of lactobacilli are adhesins. The results of this study provide a basis for the investigation of gene duplication and sequence variation as mechanisms by which bacterial strains of the same species can share the same habitat. PMID:16269691

  8. Recombinant rabies virus expressing the H protein of canine distemper virus protects dogs from the lethal distemper challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Xue; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Yang, Yong; Sun, Na; Tan, Bin; Li, Zhen-Guang; Cheng, Shi-Peng; Fu, Zhen F; Wen, Yong-Jun

    2014-12-05

    The rabies virus (RV) vector LBNSE expressing foreign antigens have shown considerable promise as vaccines against viral and bacteria diseases, which is effective and safe. We produced a new RV-based vaccine vehicle expressing 1.824 kb hemagglutinin (H) gene of the canine distemper virus (CDV) by reverse genetics technology. The recombinant virus LBNSE-CDV-H retained growth properties similar to those of vector LBNSE both in BSR and mNA cell culture. The H gene of CDV was expressed and detected by immunostaining. To compare the immunogenicity of LBNSE-CDV-H, dogs were immunized with each of these recombinant viruses by intramuscular (i.m.). The dogs were bled at third weeks after the immunization for the measurement of virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) and then challenged with virulent virus (ZJ 7) at fourth weeks. The parent virus (LBNSE) without expression of any foreign molecules was included for comparison. Dogs inoculated with LBNSE-CDV-H showed no any signs of disease and exhibited seroconversion against both RV and CDV H protein. The LBNSE-CDV-H did not cause disease in dogs and conferred protection from challenge with a lethal wild type CDV strain, demonstrating its potential value for wildlife conservation efforts. Together, these studies suggest that recombinant RV expressing H protein from CDV stimulated high levels of adaptive immune responses (VNA), and protected all dogs challenge infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Could quantitative longitudinal peak systolic strain help in the detection of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities in our daily echocardiographic practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyounes, Nadia; Lang, Sylvie; Gout, Olivier; Ancédy, Yann; Etienney, Arnaud; Cohen, Ariel

    2016-10-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is the most commonly used tool for the detection of left ventricular wall motion (LVWM) abnormalities using "naked eye evaluation". This subjective and operator-dependent technique requires a high level of clinical training and experience. Two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (2D-STE), which is less operator-dependent, has been proposed for this purpose. However, the role of on-line segmental longitudinal peak systolic strain (LPSS) values in the prediction of LVWM has not been fully evaluated. To test segmental LPSS for predicting LVWM abnormalities in routine echocardiography laboratory practice. LVWM was evaluated by an experienced cardiologist, during routine practice, in 620 patients; segmental LPSS values were then calculated. In this work, reflecting real life, 99.6% of segments were successfully tracked. Mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) segmental LPSS values for normal basal (n=3409), mid (n=3468) and apical (n=3466) segments were -16.7% (-16.9% to -16.5%), -18.2% (-18.3% to -18.0%) and -21.1% (-21.3% to -20.9%), respectively. Mean (95% CI) segmental LPSS values for hypokinetic basal (n=114), mid (n=116) and apical (n=90) segments were -7.7% (-9.0% to -6.3%), -10.1% (-11.1% to -9.0%) and -9.3% (-10.5% to -8.1%), respectively. Mean (95% CI) segmental LPSS values for akinetic basal (n=128), mid (n=95) and apical (n=91) segments were -6.6% (-8.0% to -5.1%), -6.1% (-7.7% to -4.6%) and -4.2% (-5.4% to -3.0%), respectively. LPSS allowed the differentiation between normal and abnormal segments at basal, mid and apical levels. An LPSS value≥-12% detected abnormal segmental motion with a sensitivity of 78% for basal, 70% for mid and 82% for apical segments. Segmental LPSS values may help to differentiate between normal and abnormal left ventricular segments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Infectious Progression of Canine Distemper Virus from Circulating Cerebrospinal Fluid into the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Akiko; Sato, Hiroki; Ikeda, Fusako; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2016-10-15

    In the current study, we generated recombinant chimeric canine distemper viruses (CDVs) by replacing the hemagglutinin (H) and/or phosphoprotein (P) gene in an avirulent strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) with those of a mouse-adapted neurovirulent strain. An in vitro experimental infection indicated that the chimeric CDVs possessing the H gene derived from the mouse-adapted CDV acquired infectivity for neural cells. These cells lack the CDV receptors that have been identified to date (SLAM and nectin-4), indicating that the H protein defines infectivity in various cell lines. The recombinant viruses were administered intracerebrally to 1-week-old mice. Fatal neurological signs of disease were observed only with a recombinant CDV that possessed both the H and P genes of the mouse-adapted strain, similar to the parental mouse-adapted strain, suggesting that both genes are important to drive virulence of CDV in mice. Using this recombinant CDV, we traced the intracerebral propagation of CDV by detecting EGFP. Widespread infection was observed in the cerebral hemispheres and brainstems of the infected mice. In addition, EGFP fluorescence in the brain slices demonstrated a sequential infectious progression in the central nervous system: CDV primarily infected the neuroependymal cells lining the ventricular wall and the neurons of the hippocampus and cortex adjacent to the ventricle, and it then progressed to an extensive infection of the brain surface, followed by the parenchyma and cortex. In the hippocampal formation, CDV spread in a unidirectional retrograde pattern along neuronal processes in the hippocampal formation from the CA1 region to the CA3 region and the dentate gyrus. Our mouse model demonstrated that the main target cells of CDV are neurons in the acute phase and that the virus spreads via neuronal transmission pathways in the hippocampal formation. CDV is the etiological agent of distemper in dogs and other carnivores, and in

  11. A rapid procedure for the detection and isolation of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) serogroup O26, O103, O111, O118, O121, O145 and O157 strains and the aggregative EHEC O104:H4 strain from ready-to-eat vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzschoppe, Markus; Martin, Annett; Beutin, Lothar

    2012-01-03

    Human infections with Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains (EHEC) as agents of Haemorrhagic Colitis (HC) and Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome (HUS) are frequently associated with the consumption of EHEC contaminated foodstuffs of different origins. EHEC O26, O103, O111, O118, O121, O145 and O157 strains are responsible for the majority of HC and HUS cases worldwide. In May 2011, the emerging aggregative EHEC O104:H4 strain caused a large outbreak with high HUS incidence in northern Germany. Contaminated sprouted seeds were suspected to be the vehicles of transmission. The examination of vegetables retailed for raw consumption revealed low numbers of E. coli (vegetables are not yet published. Therefore, we have developed a rapid and sensitive method for detecting low EHEC contamination in vegetables (1-10 cfu/25 g) with artificially EHEC contaminated ready-to-eat salads. A 6-hour enrichment period in BRILA-broth was sufficient to detect 1-10 EHEC from spiked samples after plating 0.1 ml portions of enrichment culture on selective TBX-agar and CHROMagar STEC plates that were incubated at 44 °C overnight. Unlike EHEC strains, the growth of bacteria of the plant flora was substantially inhibited at 44 °C. DNA for real-time PCR detection of EHEC characteristic genes (stx(1), stx(2), eae, ehxA, and O-antigen associated) was prepared with bacteria grown on TBX-agar plates. The storage of EHEC inoculated salad samples for 72 h at 6 °C resulted in a significant reduction (mean value 14.6%) of detectable EHEC, suggesting interference of EHEC with the resident plant microflora. CHROMagar STEC was evaluated as a selective medium for the detection of EHEC strains. Growth on CHROMagar STEC was closely associated with EHEC O26:[H11], O111:[H8], O118:H16, O121:[H19], O145:[H28], O157:[H7] and aggregative EHEC O104:H4 strains and with the presence of the terB gene (tellurite resistance). TerB sequences were found in 87.2% of 235 EHEC but only in only 12.5% of 567 non

  12. A self-strain feedback tuning-fork-shaped ionic polymer metal composite clamping actuator with soft matter elasticity-detecting capability for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guo-Hua; Huang, Wei-Lun

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a smart tuning-fork-shaped ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) clamping actuator for biomedical applications. The two fingers of the actuator, which perform the clamping motion, can be electrically controlled through a unique electrode design on the IPMC material. The generated displacement or strain of the fingers can be sensed using an integrated soft strain-gage sensor. The IPMC actuator and associated soft strain gage were fabricated using a micromachining technique. A 13.5×4×2 mm(3) actuator was shaped from Nafion solution and a selectively grown metal electrode formed the active region. The strain gage consisted of patterned copper foil and polyethylene as a substrate. The relationship between the strain gage voltage output and the displacement at the front end of the actuator's fingers was characterized. The equivalent Young's modulus, 13.65 MPa, of the soft-strain-gage-integrated IPMC finger was analyzed. The produced clamping force exhibited a linear increasing rate of 1.07 mN/s, based on a dc driving voltage of 7 V. Using the developed actuator to clamp soft matter and simultaneously acquire its Young's modulus was achieved. This demonstrated the feasibility of the palpation function and the potential use of the actuator in minimally invasive surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular surveillance of canine distemper virus in diarrhoetic puppies in northeast China from May 2014 to April 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunqiu; Guo, Donghua; Wu, Rui; Kong, Fanzhi; Zhai, Junjun; Yuan, Dongwei; Sun, Dongbo

    2018-04-24

    To trace the prevalence of canine distemper virus (CDV) in diarrhoetic dogs, a total of 201 stool samples were collected in the Heilongjiang province of northeastern China from May 2014 to April 2015. The 201 fecal samples were subjected to the detection of CDV by using RT-PCR targeting the partial N gene, phylogenetic analysis based on the complete H gene, and co-infection analysis. Results indicated that 24.88% (50/201) of the samples were positive for CDV. The fifty CDV samples exhibited an overall co-infection rate of 94% (47/50) with four enteric viruses (82%, 41/50) and five bacteria (72%, 36/50). The positivity rate of CDV exhibited differences among regions, seasons, ages, and immunization status. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete H genes (n=6) revealed that the CDV strains identified in our study belonged to the Asia-1 group, and showed genetic diversities. These data provide evidence that there are a number of genetically diverse CDV Asia-1 strains circulating in diarrhoetic dogs in northeastern China; the CDV-affected animals exhibit the high co-infection with other enteric viruses and bacteria.

  14. In-planta detection and monitorization of endophytic colonization by a Beauveria bassiana strain using a new-developed nested and quantitative PCR-based assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, B B; López-Díaz, C; Jiménez-Fernández, D; Montes-Borrego, M; Muñoz-Ledesma, F J; Ortiz-Urquiza, A; Quesada-Moraga, E

    2013-10-01

    Beauveria bassiana strain 04/01-Tip obtained from larvae of the opium poppy stem gall Iraella luteipes endophytically colonizes opium poppy plants and protect it against this pest. Development of a specific, rapid and sensitive technique that allows accurately determining the process and factors leading to the establishment of this strain in opium poppy plants would be essential to achieve its efficient control in a large field scale. For that purpose in the present study, species-specific primers that can be used in conventional or quantitative PCR protocols were developed for specifically identification and detection of B. bassiana in plant tissues. The combination of the designed BB.fw/BB.rv primer set with the universal ITS1-F/ITS4 primer set in a two-step nested-PCR approach, has allowed the amplification of up to 10fg of B. bassiana. This represented an increase in sensitivity of 10000- and 1000-fold of detection than when using the BB.fw/BB.rv primers in a single or single-tube semi-nested PCR approaches, respectively. The BB.fw and BB.rv primer set were subsequently optimized to be used in real time quantitative PCR assays and allowed to accurately quantify B. bassiana DNA in different plant DNA backgrounds (leaves and seeds) without losing accuracy and efficiency. The qPCR protocol was used to monitor the endophytic colonization of opium poppy leaves byB. bassiana after inoculation with the strain EABb 04/01-Tip, detecting as low as 26fg of target DNA in leaves and a decrease in fungal biomass over time. PCR quantification data were supported in parallel with CLMS by the monitoring of spatial and temporal patterns of leaf and stem colonization using a GFP-tagged transformant of the B. bassiana EABb 04/01-Tip strain, which enabled to demonstrate that B. bassiana effectively colonizes aerial tissues of opium poppy plants mainly through intercellular spaces and even leaf trichomes. A decline in endophytic colonization was also observed by the last sampling

  15. Avaliação da urina e de leucócitos como amostras biológicas para a detecção ante mortem do vírus da cinomose canina por RT-PCR em cães naturalmente infectados Evaluation of the urine and leucocytes as biological samples for ante mortem detection of canine distemper virus by RT-PCR assay in naturally infected dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Negrão

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Urine and leucocytes were comparatively evaluated as clinical samples for ante mortem detection of the canine distemper virus (CDV by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay. One hundred and eighty eight dogs with clinical symptoms of distemper, were distributed in three groups. The group A was constituted of 93 dogs with systemic signs of distemper; the group B by 11 dogs with neurological signs, and the group C by 84 dogs that presented simultaneously systemic and neurological signs. In 66.5% (125/188 of the dogs was amplified an amplicon with 287 base pair of the CDV nucleoprotein gene. In 60.8% (76/125 of the animals the CDV was detected simultaneously in the urine and leucocytes, and in 39.2% (49/125 of the dogs just a type of clinical sample (urine: n=37; leucocytes: n=12 was positive. These results demonstrate that the different forms of clinical distemper disease can hinder the choice of only one type of clinical sample to carry out the ante mortem etiological diagnosis of CDV infection, and false-negative results can be generated.

  16. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of canine distemper virus among domestic dogs in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dung Van; Suzuki, Junko; Minami, Shohei; Yonemitsu, Kenzo; Nagata, Nao; Kuwata, Ryusei; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Vu, Chien Kim; Truong, Thuy Quoc; Maeda, Ken

    2017-01-20

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is one of the most serious pathogens found in many species of carnivores, including domestic dogs. In this study, hemagglutinin (H) genes were detected in five domestic Vietnamese dogs with diarrhea, and two CDVs were successfully isolated from dogs positive for H genes. The complete genome of one isolate, CDV/dog/HCM/33/140816, was determined. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all Vietnamese CDVs belonged to the Asia-1 genotype. In addition, the H proteins of Vietnamese CDV strains were the most homologous to those of Chinese CDVs (98.4% to 99.3% identity). These results indicated that the Asia-1 genotype of CDV was the predominant genotype circulating among the domestic dog population in Vietnam and that transboundary transmission of CDV has occurred between Vietnam and China.

  17. Rapid and sensitive detection of canine parvovirus type 2 by recombinase polymerase amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianchang; Liu, Libing; Li, Ruiwen; Wang, Jinfeng; Fu, Qi; Yuan, Wanzhe

    2016-04-01

    A novel recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA)-based method for detection of canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) was developed. Sensitivity analysis showed that the detection limit of RPA was 10 copies of CPV-2 genomic DNA. RPA amplified both CPV-2a and -2b DNA but did not amplify the template of other important dog viruses (CCoV, PRV or CDV), demonstrating high specificity. The method was further validated with 57 canine fecal samples. An outstanding advantage of RPA is that it is an isothermal reaction and can be performed in a water bath, making RPA a potential alternative method for CPV-2 detection in resource-limited settings.

  18. Detection and characterization of pXFSL21, a novel single-copy plasmid from Xylella fastidiosa Strain Stag’s Leap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa Strain Stag’s Leap, originally isolated from Napa Valley, California, is highly virulent in causing Pierce’s Disease (PD) of grapevine. Plasmids are extrachromosomal genetic elements associated with bacterial environmental adaptation such as virulence development. In this study, t...

  19. The efficacy of the skin delayed-type hypersensitivity using a brucellin prepared from a mucoid strain of Brucella abortus to detect brucellosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bercovich, Z.; Muskens, J.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Eight-hundred-and-ninety-six cattle belonging to herds officially designated Brucella-free, and 190 cattle belonging to infected herds were tested with the skin delayed-type hypersensitivity (SDTH) test, using brucellin (273) prepared from a rnucoid strain of Brucella abortus. An increase in

  20. Clostridium difficile infection among immunocompromised patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and detection of moxifloxacin resistance in a ribotype 014 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secco, Danielle Angst; Balassiano, Ilana Teruszkin; Boente, Renata Ferreira; Miranda, Karla Rodrigues; Brazier, Jon; Hall, Val; dos Santos-Filho, Joaquim; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Domingues, Regina Maria Cavalcanti Pilotto

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive spore forming anaerobic bacterium, often associated with nosocomial diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. The acquisition of this organism occurs primarily in hospitals through accidental ingestion of spores, and its establishment and proliferation in the colon results from the removal of members of the normal intestinal flora during or after antibiotic therapy. In this study, stool samples from patients admitted to the University Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCCF/UFRJ) were screened for C. difficile toxins with an ELISA test and cultured with standard techniques for C. difficile isolation. A total of 74 stool samples were collected from patients undergoing antibiotic therapy between August 2009 and November 2010, only two (2.7%) were positive in the ELISA test and culture. A third isolate was obtained from a negative ELISA test sample. All cases of CDI were identified in patients with acute lymphoid or myeloid leukemia. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization showed that all strains carried toxins A and B genes, and belonged to PCR-ribotypes 014, 043 and 046. The isolated strains were sensitive to metronidazole and vancomycin, and resistant to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. Resistance to moxifloxacin, was present in the strain from PCR-ribotype 014, that showed an amino acid substitution in gyrB gene (Asp 426 → Asn). This is the first time that this mutation in a PCR-ribotype 014 strain has been described in Brazil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular detection of genes encoding AcrAB , Qep A efflux pumps in Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from hospitalized patients in selected hospitals in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Heidary

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Increasing emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance among clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae  (K. pneumoniae, has limited the treatment options for treatment of infections caused by these bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate the dissemination of genes encoding AcrAB and QepA efflux pumps among K. pneumoniae strains. Methods: This study was carried out on 117 K. pneumoniae strains isolated from patients hospitalized in selected hospitals in Tehran city, 2015-2016, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed using disk diffusion method (based on CLSI guidelines and identification of acr A, acr B and qep A genes using PCR assay. Results: In this study, colistin and tigecycline had the best effect against clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae. According to PCR results, 110 (94% isolates had acrA gene and 102 (87% isolates had acrB gene, respectively. The qepA gene was not found in any of the K. pneumoniae strains. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, dissemination of the genes encoding AcrAB efflux pumps among K. pneumoniae strains, which cause resistance to fluoroquinolones, is a matter of concern. Therefore, infection control and prevention of the spread of drug-resistant bacteria requires careful management in drug prescription and identification of resistant isolates.

  2. Detection of a Bacteriophage Gene Encoding a Mu-like Portal Protein in Haemophilus parasuis Reference Strains and Field Isolates by Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    A nested PCR assay was developed to determine the presence of a gene encoding a bacteriophage Mu-like portal protein, gp29, in 15 reference strains and 31 field isolates of Haemophilus parasuis. Specific primers, based on the gene’s sequence, were utilized. A majority of the virulent reference strai...

  3. Isokinetic strength assessment offers limited predictive validity for detecting risk of future hamstring strain in sport: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Brady; Bourne, Matthew N; Pizzari, Tania

    2018-03-01

    To examine the value of isokinetic strength assessment for predicting risk of hamstring strain injury, and to direct future research into hamstring strain injuries. Systematic review. Database searches for Medline, CINAHL, Embase, AMED, AUSPORT, SPORTDiscus, PEDro and Cochrane Library from inception to April 2017. Manual reference checks, ahead-of-press and citation tracking. Prospective studies evaluating isokinetic hamstrings, quadriceps and hip extensor strength testing as a risk factor for occurrence of hamstring muscle strain. Independent search result screening. Risk of bias assessment by independent reviewers using Quality in Prognosis Studies tool. Best evidence synthesis and meta-analyses of standardised mean difference (SMD). Twelve studies were included, capturing 508 hamstring strain injuries in 2912 athletes. Isokinetic knee flexor, knee extensor and hip extensor outputs were examined at angular velocities ranging 30-300°/s, concentric or eccentric, and relative (Nm/kg) or absolute (Nm) measures. Strength ratios ranged between 30°/s and 300°/s. Meta-analyses revealed a small, significant predictive effect for absolute (SMD=-0.16, P=0.04, 95% CI -0.31 to -0.01) and relative (SMD=-0.17, P=0.03, 95% CI -0.33 to -0.014) eccentric knee flexor strength (60°/s). No other testing speed or strength ratio showed statistical association. Best evidence synthesis found over half of all variables had moderate or strong evidence for no association with future hamstring injury. Despite an isolated finding for eccentric knee flexor strength at slow speeds, the role and application of isokinetic assessment for predicting hamstring strain risk should be reconsidered, particularly given costs and specialised training required. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Detection and characterization of bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis strains Detecção e caracterização de Lactococcus lactis produtores de bacteriocinas

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    Izildinha Moreno

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sixty seven strains of Lactococcus lactis were screened for bacteriocin production by well diffusion assay of GM17 agar. Fourteen (8.4% produced antimicrobial activity other than organic acids, bacteriophages or hydrogen peroxide. The frequency of bacteriocin production ranged from 2% in L. lactis subsp. cremoris up to 12% in L. lactis subsp. lactis. Antimicrobial activities were not observed in any strain of L. lactis subsp. lactis var. diacetylactis. Among thirteen bacteriocin-producing strains and two nisin-producing strains (L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 and L. lactis subsp. lactis CNRZ 150, eight (53% were characterized as lactose-positive (Lac+ and proteinase-negative (Prt-. The bacteriocin-producing cultures were also characterized on the basis of plasmid content. All strains had 2 to 7 plasmids with molecular weights varying from 0.5 to 28.1 Mdal. Four strains (ITAL 435, ITAL 436, ITAL 437 and ITAL 438 showed identical profiles and the other were quite distinct.Um total de 167 linhagens de L. lactis foi selecionado para os testes de produção de bacteriocinas pelo método de difusão em poços em agar GM17. Desse total, 14 (8.4% produziram substâncias inibidoras que não foram associadas com ácidos orgânicos, peróxido de hidrogênio e bacteriófagos. A frequência de produção de bacteriocinas variou de 2% em L. lactis subsp. cremoris a 12% em L. lactis subsp. lactis. Nenhuma das linhagens de L. lactis subsp. lactis var. diacetylactis produziu substâncias inibidoras. De 13 linhagens produtoras de bacteriocinas e duas de nisina (L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 e L. lactis subsp. lactis CNRZ 150, 8 (53% foram caracterizadas como lactose-positivas (Lac+ e proteinase-negativas (Prt-. As linhagens produtoras de bacteriocinas também foram caracterizadas no seu conteúdo de plasmídios. Elas apresentaram de 2 a 7 plasmídios, com pesos moleculares aproximados de 0.5 a 28.1 Mdal. Quatro linhagens (ITAL 435, ITAL 436

  5. Detection of B. fragilis group and diversity of bft enterotoxin and antibiotic resistance markers cepA, cfiA and nim among intestinal Bacteroides fragilis strains in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidan, Marjan; Azimirad, Masoumeh; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Ghobakhlou, Mehdi; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2018-04-01

    We compared frequency of the members of B. fragilis group in 100 and 20 colon biopsy specimens of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and non-IBD patients. Agar dilution and PCR were orderly used to detect minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin, imipenem, and metronidazole, and carriage of related resistance genes cepA, cfi, and nim. B. fragilis group was detected in 38% of IBD (UC: 36/89; CD:1/11) and 25% (5/20) of non-IBD patients. While B. vulgatus (UC: 20/36, CD: 1/2, control: 1/6); B. fragilis (UC: 18/36, CD: 1/2, control: 5/6); B. ovatus (UC: 2/36); B. caccae (UC: 1/36); and B. eggerthii (UC: 1/36) were characterized, colonization of B. thetaiotamicron, B. merdae, B. distasonis, B. stercoris and B. dorei species was not detected in these specimens. Co-existence of B. fragilis + B. vulgatus (5 patients) and B. vulgatus + B. caccae (1 patient) was detected just in UC patients. bft was detected among 31.5% (6/19) of B. fragilis strains in the IBD and 40% (2/5) in the non-IBD groups. Nearly, 73.6% of the strains from the patient group and 80% in control group harbored cepA; 31.5% and 20% in the patients and control groups harbored cfiA, and none of them harbored nim determinant. Co-occurrence of the cepA and cfiA was orderly detected in 10.5% (2/19) and 20% (1/5) of the strains in these groups. The resistance rates were detected as 95.8% (23/24 (to ampicillin (MIC range of ≤0.5-≥16 μg/ml), 0% to metronidazole and 29.1% to imipenem (7/24, MIC range ≤4-32 μg/ml). Nearly 25% (6/24) of the strains were resistant to ampicillin and imipenem, simultaneously. No statistically significant difference was detected between the IBD and control groups for drug resistance phenotypes. Statistical analysis showed significant associations between resistance to ampicillin or imipenem and carriage of cepA or cfiA, respectively (p value = 0.0007). PCR results on the extracted plasmids confirmed their roles in carriage of cfiA and cepA. These

  6. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent Assay for detecting of antibody to canine distemper virus

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    Sudarisman

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Serum neutralisation test (SNT has been established for evaluating canine distemper vaccination, but until now SNT was rarely used due to the need for continuous tissue culture facilities and requires 3 days to perform. For detecting antibody to canine distemper virus, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA is relatively simple and rapid seroassay. ELISA for canine immunoglobulin (Ig G antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV was developed by using Onderstepoort strain of canine distemper virus as coating antigen. Rabbit anti canine IgG labelled with horse radish peroxidase was used as the conjugate, while phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (OPD was used as the substrate. The ELISA results were then compared with the results of the SNT, using the sera of 312 random-source dogs from West Java. The two test-results had a high degree of correlation. Very few discrepancies occurred and most of these were at the lower limits of each test. When the sera were tested at 1 : 100 dilutions, there was a 95.5% agreement between the ELISA and SNT. Their sensitivity and spesificity were 83.9 and 98.4%. Titrated SNT and ELISA also were performed on sera from 7 dogs whose lifetime medical histories were known. The antibodies were inclining up after two months of post vaccination, where the titre was not in zero/lower position at the day of vaccination. However, antibody zero or low position were found at 28 days post vaccination. All of the results indicated that ELISA can be used for evaluating antibody to canine distemper virus response, replacing the SNT.

  7. Detection of canine distemper virus nucleoprotein gene by RT-PCR in urine of dogs with distemper clinical signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebara, C.M.S.; Wosiachi, S.R.; Negrao, F.J.; Oliveira, D.B. de; Beloni, S.N.E.; Alfieri, A.A.; Alfieri, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    The urine of 87 dogs with clinical signs suggestive of canine distemper was analyzed by RT-PCR for detection of canine distemper virus (CDV) nucleoprotein gene. The samples were allotted to the following groups: group A- with 41 dogs with systemic symptoms, group B- with 37 dogs with neurological signs, and group C- with 9 dogs with simultaneous systemic and neurological clinical signs. Group D (control) included 20 assymptomatic dogs. A c2 was used to test RT-PCR results according to clinical form and hematological characteristics. The RT-PCR was positive for CDV in 47% (41/87) of the urine samples from dogs with clinical signs. All samples from assymptomatic dogs were RT-PCR negatives. Positive samples were found in all groups of dogs with distemper symptoms according to the following propositions: 51.2% (21/41), 29% (11/37) and 100% (9/9) for groups A, B and C, respectively. In all clinical forms (groups A, B and C) leucocytosis was the most frequent observed hematological alteration. No relationship between RT-PCR results and hematological changes was observed. The results showed that independently of the clinical stage of the illness the RT-PCR based on urine sample can be applied for ante mortem diagnosis of CDV

  8. Pathogenesis of canine distemper virus in experimentally infected raccoon dogs, foxes, and minks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianjun; Shi, Ning; Sun, Yangang; Martella, Vito; Nikolin, Veljko; Zhu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Hailing; Hu, Bo; Bai, Xue; Yan, Xijun

    2015-10-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infects a broad range of carnivores and causes a highly contagious disease with severe immunosuppression. The disease severity markedly varies in different species. To investigate the pathogenesis of CDV in raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides), fox (Vulpes vulpes) and mink (Neovison vison) species, three groups of CDV sero-negative animals were infected with CDV strain LN(10)1. This CDV strain belongs to the Asia-1 genotype, which is epidemiologically predominant in carnivores in China. CDV infection provoked marked differences in virulence in the three species that were studied. Raccoon dogs developed fever, severe conjunctivitis, and pathological lesions, with 100% (5/5) mortality and with high viral RNA loads in organs within 15 days post infection (dpi). In infected foxes, the onset of the disease was delayed, with 40% (2/5) mortality by 21 dpi. Infected minks developed only mild clinical signs and pathological lesions, and mortality was not observed. Raccoon dogs and foxes showed more severe immune suppression (lymphopenia, decreased lymphocyte proliferation, viremia and low-level virus neutralizing antibodies) than minks. We also observed a distinct pattern of cytokine mRNA transcripts at different times after infection. Decreased IFN-γ and IL-4 mRNA responses were evident in the animals with fatal disease, while up-regulation of these cytokines was observed in the animals surviving the infection. Increased TNF-α response was detected in animals with mild or severe clinical signs. Based on the results, we could distinguish three different patterns of disease after experimental CDV infection, e.g. a mild form in minks, a moderate form in foxes and a severe disease in raccoon dogs. The observed differences in susceptibility to CDV could be related to distinct host cytokine profiles. Comparative evaluation of CDV pathogenesis in various animal species is pivotal to generate models suitable for the evaluation of CDV

  9. Evidence of Two Cocirculating Canine Distemper Virus Strains in Mesocarnivores from Northern Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wostenberg, Darren J; Walker, Nikki; Fox, Karen A; Spraker, Terry R; Piaggio, Antoinette J; Gilbert, Amy

    2018-03-02

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious pathogen that principally infects wildlife and domestic carnivores. Peridomestic species such as raccoons ( Procyon lotor) experience outbreaks with high mortality. Clinical signs of infection include anorexia, fever, respiratory infection, and neurologic complications. Although not zoonotic, CDV poses a high risk to unvaccinated domestic animals and the conservation of endangered species. During 2013-2016, we opportunistically collected wild and domestic carnivore specimens through a rabies surveillance program in northern Colorado. Brainstem and cerebellar tissue samples were independently tested for rabies and CDV by fluorescent antibody test. We tested a total of 478 animals for CDV, comprised of 10 wild and domestic carnivore species. A total of 24% (71/300) raccoons and 4% (1/26) coyotes ( Canis latrans) tested positive for CDV, but coinfection with rabies virus was not observed among CDV-positive animals. We extracted RNA from positive tissues, and a reverse-transcription PCR was used to create complementary DNA. We amplified and sequenced the hemagglutinin gene from 60 CDV-positive tissues, and a median joining network and maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree revealed two major lineages among samples. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that our sequences were most similar to: 1) the America-2 ( n=55) and 2) the America-3 ( n=5) CDV lineages circulating in North America. Our results indicated two distinct and distantly related clades of CDV overlapping geographically and temporally among raccoon populations in northern Colorado.

  10. The detection and sequencing of a broad-host-range conjugative IncP-1β plasmid in an epidemic strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii.

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    Sylvia Cardoso Leão

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An extended outbreak of mycobacterial surgical infections occurred in Brazil during 2004-2008. Most infections were caused by a single strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, which was characterized by a specific rpoB sequevar and two highly similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE patterns differentiated by the presence of a ∼50 kb band. The nature of this band was investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genomic sequencing of the prototype outbreak isolate INCQS 00594 using the SOLiD platform demonstrated the presence of a 56,267-bp [corrected] circular plasmid, designated pMAB01. Identity matrices, genetic distances and phylogeny analyses indicated that pMAB01 belongs to the broad-host-range plasmid subgroup IncP-1β and is highly related to BRA100, pJP4, pAKD33 and pB10. The presence of pMAB01-derived sequences in 41 M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates was evaluated using PCR, PFGE and Southern blot hybridization. Sixteen of the 41 isolates showed the presence of the plasmid. The plasmid was visualized as a ∼50-kb band using PFGE and Southern blot hybridization in 12 isolates. The remaining 25 isolates did not exhibit any evidence of this plasmid. The plasmid was successfully transferred to Escherichia coli by conjugation and transformation. Lateral transfer of pMAB01 to the high efficient plasmid transformation strain Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2155 could not be demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The occurrence of a broad-host-range IncP-1β plasmid in mycobacteria is reported for the first time. Thus, genetic exchange could result in the emergence of specific strains that might be better adapted to cause human disease.

  11. Detection of the IncX3 plasmid carrying blaKPC-3 in a Serratia marcescens strain isolated from a kidney-liver transplanted patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gona, Floriana; Caio, Carla; Iannolo, Gioacchin; Monaco, Francesco; Di Mento, Giuseppina; Cuscino, Nicola; Fontana, Ignazio; Panarello, Giovanna; Maugeri, Gaetano; Mezzatesta, Maria Lina; Stefani, Stefania; Conaldi, Pier Giulio

    2017-10-01

    Dissemination of resistance to carbapenems among Enterobacteriaceae through plasmids is an increasingly important concern in health care worldwide. Here we report the first description of an IncX3 plasmid carrying the blaKPC-3 gene in a strain of Serratia marcescens isolated from a kidney-liver transplanted patient at the transplantation centre ISMETT (Istituto Mediterraneo per i Trapianti e Terapie ad Alta Specializzazione, Palermo, Italy). To localize the transposable element containing the resistance-associated gene Next-Generation Sequencing of the bacterial DNA was performed. S. marcescens was positive for blaKPC-3 and blaSHV-11 genes. The molecular analysis demonstrated that the blaKPC-3 gene of this bacterial strain was located in one copy of the Tn-3-like element Tn4401-a carried in a plasmid that is 53 392 bp in size and showed the typical IncX3 scaffold. Our data demonstrated the presence of a new blaKPC-3 harbouring the IncX3 plasmid in S. marcescens. The possible dissemination among Enterobacteriaceae of this type of plasmid should be monitored and evaluated in terms of clinical risk.

  12. Detection of antifungal properties in Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei SM20, SM29, and SM63 and molecular typing of the strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenninger, Susanne Miescher; von Ah, Ueli; Niederer, Brigitte; Teuber, Michael; Meile, Leo

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacilli isolated from different food and feed samples such as raw milk, cheese, yoghurt, olives, sour dough, as well as corn and grass silage, were screened for their antifungal activities. Out of 1,424 isolates tested, 82 were shown to be inhibitory to different yeasts (Candida spp. and Zygosaccharomyces bailii) and a Penicillium sp., which were previously isolated from spoiled yoghurt and fruits. Carbohydrate fermentation patterns suggested that a substantial portion, 25%, belonged to the Lactobacillus casei group, including L. casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus. The isolates SM20 (DSM14514), SM29 (DSM14515), and SM63 (DSM14516) were classified by PCR using species-specific primers to target the corresponding type strains (L. casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus) as controls. Further molecular typing methods such as randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene allowed classifying strains SM20, SM29, and SM63 as L. paracasei subsp. paracasei in accordance with the new reclassification of the L. casei group proposed by Collins et al.

  13. Development of an indirect ELISA to detect Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis specific antibodies in sheep employing T1 strain culture supernatant as antigen

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    Miriam F. Rebouças

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the etiologic agent of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA, a chronic disease that affects goats and sheep, characterized by granuloma formation in subcutaneous and internal lymph nodes. CLA causes significant economic losses to commercial goat herds. In this study, we aimed to test secreted antigens secreted from T1 strain bacteria grown in brain heart infusion (BHI broth in an indirect ELISA system to determine the presence of specific immunoglobulins against C. pseudotuberculosis. We analyzed the BHI antigen electrophoretic profile and the recognition pattern by infected sheep sera samples. The ELISA results were compared with multiplex PCR assay and IFN-gamma production. The ELISA was able to discriminate between negative and positive animals, with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 99%, using microbiological isolation as gold standard. When this assay was compared with multiplex PCR and specific IFN-gamma quantification, six discrepant results were found among thirty-two samples. We concluded that the ELISA using antigens secreted from C. pseudotuberculosis T1 strain growth in BHI broth culture can be used for the serodiagnosis of CLA in sheep.

  14. Monitoring of antibiotic-induced alterations in the human intestinal microflora and detection of probiotic strains by use of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernberg, Cecilia; Sullivan, Asa; Edlund, Charlotta; Jansson, Janet K

    2005-01-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was investigated as a tool for monitoring the human intestinal microflora during antibiotic treatment and during ingestion of a probiotic product. Fecal samples from eight healthy volunteers were taken before, during, and after administration of clindamycin. During treatment, four subjects were given a probiotic, and four subjects were given a placebo. Changes in the microbial intestinal community composition and relative abundance of specific microbial populations in each subject were monitored by using viable counts and T-RFLP fingerprints. T-RFLP was also used to monitor specific bacterial populations that were either positively or negatively affected by clindamycin. Some dominant bacterial groups, such as Eubacterium spp., were easily monitored by T-RFLP, while they were hard to recover by cultivation. Furthermore, the two probiotic Lactobacillus strains were easily tracked by T-RFLP and were shown to be the dominant Lactobacillus community members in the intestinal microflora of subjects who received the probiotic.

  15. Partial VP2 sequencing of canine parvovirus (CPV strains circulating in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: detection of the new variant CPV-2c

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    T.X. Castro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Canine parvovirus (CPV is the most important enteric virus for dogs and it seems to be undergoing continuous evolution, generating new genetic and antigenic variants throughout the world. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of CPV variants from 1995 to 2009 and to investigate the circulation of the new variant CPV-2c in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In addition, the clinical features of CPV infection were also reported. After CPV laboratorial confirmation by HA/HI and PCR, thirty-two fecal samples were analyzed by sequencing a 583-bp fragment of the VP2 gene. One sample, collected in 2008 was typed as the new type CPV-2c. All samples from 1995 to 2003 were identified as "new CPV-2a". From 2004 to 2006, both "new CPV-2a" and CPV-2b were observed. From 2006 to 2009, most of the samples were characterized as CPV-2b. The classical signs of CPV enteritis were observed in 16/18 CPV-2a and 5/13 CPV-2b infected puppies. These results show that continuous epidemiological surveillance of CPV strain distribution is essential for studying the patterns of CPV-2a and 2b spread and for determining whether the new variant CPV-2c has become permanently established in Brazilian canine population.

  16. Morphometric analysis of the thymus of puppies infected with the Snyder Hill Strain of canine distemper virus Análise morfométrica do timo de cães filhotes infectados com a amostra Snyder Hill do vírus de cinomose canina

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    C.M. Alves

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The thymic morphometry analysis was used for determining apoptosis and atrophy of the thymus of eight puppies inoculated with canine distemper virus (CDV. Three healthy dogs were used as negative controls. Sections, 5µm thick, were stained by HE and Shorr, and the latter were evaluated by morphometry. CDV nucleoprotein was detected by immunohistochemistry. Morphometric results confirmed lymphoid hypotrophy in CDV inoculated dog thymuses, more stroma, less parenchyma and higher apoptotic index/field than negative control (not inoculated puppies. Apoptosis plays a role in the mechanism of thymus atrophy that develops in canine distemper.Determinaram-se a apoptose e a atrofia no timo de oito cães novos, inoculados experimentalmente com o vírus de cinomose. Três cães saudáveis foram usados como controle negativo. Secções coradas pelo Shorr foram avaliadas por morfometria. A nucleoproteína viral foi detectada por imunoistoquímica. Os resultados morfométricos confirmaram a hipotrofia e mostraram que o timo dos cães inoculados tinha mais estroma, menos parênquima e maior índice apoptótico/campo que o dos animais-controle. Pode-se concluir que a apoptose desempenha importante papel no mecanismo de hipotrofia tímica que se desenvolve na cinomose.

  17. Detección de cepas de Neisseria meningitidis resistentes a rifampicina en el Uruguay Detection of rifampicin-resistant strains of Neisseria meningitidis in Uruguay

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    Gabriel Pérez Giffoni

    2011-12-01

    involving transmission of severe meningococcal meningitis that occurred in September and October 2010 in Montevideo, Uruguay. The most recent 10 years of data from the national antimicrobial resistance surveillance system were reviewed to estimate the frequency of the particular meningococcal features that were characterized. Rifampicin resistance was studied using the epsilometer test. The serotype and serosubtype of the isolates were determined by ELISA, and the genotype was characterized using DNA digestion with Nhel and pulse field gel electrophoresis. The two isolates were identical: B:2a:P1.5. In the collection of 408 strains of N. meningitidis isolated in Uruguay in the past 10 years, the phenotype only appeared in two isolates, which were sensitive to rifampicin. The two isolates studied also shared a single pulse type, which was different from that of two other rifampicin-resistant isolates obtained in 2003 and 2007. Consequently, it was concluded that both cases of transmission were caused by a single rifampicin-resistant strain, which could have been an import from another country or else the result of a drift from serogroup C to B due to selective pressure exerted by vaccines administered to the population. It is essential to maintain and maximize surveillance. However, since this type of finding has been sporadic so far, unless a secondary case is identified, there is no justification for changing the antimicrobial drug currently being administered to contacts as prophylaxis.

  18. Rickettsia sp. strain colombianensi (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae): a new proposed Rickettsia detected in Amblyomma dissimile (Acari: Ixodidae) from iguanas and free-living larvae ticks from vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Jorge; Portillo, Aránzazu; Oteo, José A; Mattar, Salim

    2012-07-01

    From January to December 2009, 55 Amblyomma dissimile (Koch) ticks removed from iguanas in the municipality of Monteria and 3,114 ticks [458 Amblyomma sp. larvae, 2,636 Rhipicephalus microplus (Canestrini) larvae and 20 Amblyomma sp. nymphs] collected over vegetation in Los Cordobas were included in the study. The ticks were pooled into groups from which DNA was extracted. For initial screening of Rickettsia sp., each pool was analyzed by gltA real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Positive pools were further studied using gltA, ompA, and ompB conventional PCR assays. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were also conducted. Rickettsial DNA was found in 28 pools of ticks (16 A. dissimile pools and 12 free-living larvae pools) out of 113 (24.7%) using real-time PCR. The same 28 pools were also positive using conventional PCR assays aimed to amplify gltA, ompA, and ompB. For each gene analyzed, PCR products obtained from 4/28 pools (two pools of A. dissimile, one pool of Amblyomma sp. larvae and one pool of Rh. microplus larvae) were randomly chosen and sequenced twice. Nucleotide sequences generated were identical to each other for each of the rickettsial genes gltA, ompA, and ompB, and showed 99.4, 95.6, and 96.4% identity with those of Rickettsia tamurae. They were deposited in the GenBank database under accession numbers JF905456, JF905458, and JF905457, respectively. In conclusion, we present the first molecular evidence of a novel Rickettsia (Rickettsia sp. strain Colombianensi) infecting A. dissimile ticks collected from iguanas, and also Rh. microplus and unspeciated Amblyomma larvae from vegetation in Colombia.

  19. Canine distemper virus: an emerging disease in wild endangered Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seimon, Tracie A; Miquelle, Dale G; Chang, Tylis Y; Newton, Alisa L; Korotkova, Irina; Ivanchuk, Galina; Lyubchenko, Elena; Tupikov, Andre; Slabe, Evgeny; McAloose, Denise

    2013-08-13

    Fewer than 500 Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) remain in the wild. Due to low numbers and their solitary and reclusive nature, tiger sightings across their range in the Russian Far East and China are rare; sightings of sick tigers are rarer still. Serious neurologic disease observed in several wild tigers since 2001 suggested disease emergence in this endangered species. To investigate this possibility, histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), in situ hybridization (ISH), and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) were performed on tissues from 5 affected tigers that died or were destroyed in 2001, 2004, or 2010. Our results reveal canine distemper virus (CDV) infection as the cause of neurologic disease in two tigers and definitively establish infection in a third. Nonsuppurative encephalitis with demyelination, eosinophilic nuclear viral inclusions, and positive immunolabeling for CDV by IHC and ISH were present in the two tigers with available brain tissue. CDV phosphoprotein (P) and hemagglutinin (H) gene products were obtained from brains of these two tigers by RT-PCR, and a short fragment of CDV P gene sequence was detected in lymph node tissue of a third tiger. Phylogenetically, Amur tiger CDV groups with an Arctic-like strain in Baikal seals (Phoca siberica). Our results, which include mapping the location of positive tigers and recognition of a cluster of cases in 2010, coupled with a lack of reported CDV antibodies in Amur tigers prior to 2000 suggest wide geographic distribution of CDV across the tiger range and recent emergence of CDV as a significant infectious disease threat to endangered Amur tigers in the Russian Far East. Recognition of disease emergence in wildlife is a rare occurrence. Here, for the first time, we identify and characterize a canine distemper virus (CDV), the second most common cause of infectious disease death in domestic dogs and a viral disease of global importance in common and endangered carnivores, as the etiology of

  20. Differentiation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae strains by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic regions, and development of a species specific oligonucleotide for in situ detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fussing, Vivian; Paster, Bruce J.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.

    1998-01-01

    . The larger RIS's were different between the 3 species tested. The sequence of the 16S ribosomal gene was determined for 8 serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. These sequences showed only minor base differences, indicating a close genetic relatedness of these serotypes within the species. An oligonucleotide DNA...... probe designed from the 16S rRNA gene sequence of A. pleuropneumoniae was specific for all strains of the target species and did not cross react with A. lignieresii, the closest known relative of A. pleuropneumoniae. This species-specific DNA probe labeled with fluorescein was used for in situ......The aims of this study were to characterize and determine intraspecies and interspecies relatedness of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to Actinobacillus lignieresii and Actinobacillus suis by sequence analysis of the ribosomal operon and to find a species-specific area for in situ detection of A...

  1. Molecular characterization of complete genome of a canine distemper virus associated with fatal infection in dogs in Gabon, Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maganga, Gael D; Labouba, Ingrid; Ngoubangoye, Barthélémy; Nkili-Meyong, Andriniaina A; Obame Ondo, Daniel; Leroy, Eric M; Berthet, Nicolas

    2018-03-02

    Canine distemper (CD) is the most deadly disease in dogs with mortality rates reaching 50%. The pathological agent, the CD virus (CDV), generally causes a severe systemic disease, although the nervous form can coexist with the acute catarrhal form in the same individual. In this study, we describe an outbreak of 18 cases of CD that occurred in 2015 in a German Shepherd dog population in northwestern Gabon. In addition, we determined the sequence of the CDV genotype associated with this fatal distemper infection in Gabon and compared it with other published CDV sequences. The CDV was detected using RT-PCR on cDNA from RNA of harvested brains and other organs. The identification was confirmed by sequencing amplicons. Moreover, we obtained the whole genome sequence using high-throughput sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Gabonese CDV strain clustered with European strains belonging to the Europe genotype. This study provided the first molecular detection of the CDV strain associated with this fatal distemper infection in Central Africa region. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Arctic lineage-canine distemper virus as a cause of death in Apennine wolves (Canis lupus in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Di Sabatino

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV infection is a primary threat affecting a wide number of carnivore species, including wild animals. In January 2013, two carcasses of Apennine wolves (Canis lupus were collected in Ortona dei Marsi (L'Aquila province, Italy by the local Veterinary Services. CDV was immediately identified either by RT-PCR or immunohistochemistry in lung and central nervous tissue samples. At the same time, severe clinical signs consistent with CDV infection were identified and taped (Videos S1-S3 from three wolves rescued in the areas surrounding the National Parks of the Abruzzi region by the Veterinary Services. The samples collected from these symptomatic animals also turned out CDV positive by RT-PCR. So far, 30 carcasses of wolves were screened and CDV was detected in 20 of them. The sequencing of the haemagglutinin gene and subsequent phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the identified virus belonged to the CDV Arctic lineage. Strains belonging to this lineage are known to circulate in Italy and in Eastern Europe amongst domestic dogs. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of CDV Arctic lineage epidemics in the wild population in Europe.

  3. An outbreak of canine distemper virus in tigers (Panthera tigris): possible transmission from wild animals to zoo animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yumiko; Nishio, Yohei; Shiomoda, Hiroshi; Tamaru, Seiji; Shimojima, Masayuki; Goto, Megumi; Une, Yumi; Sato, Azusa; Ikebe, Yusuke; Maeda, Ken

    2012-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a morbillivirus that causes one of the most contagious and lethal viral diseases known in canids, has an expanding host range, including wild animals. Since December 2009, several dead or dying wild raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) were found in and around one safari-style zoo in Japan, and CDV was isolated from four of these animals. In the subsequent months (January to February 2010), 12 tigers (Panthera tigris) in the zoo developed respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases, and CDV RNA was detected in fecal samples of the examined tigers. In March 2010, one of the tigers developed a neurological disorder and died; CDV was isolated from the lung of this animal. Sequence analysis of the complete hemagglutinin (H) gene and the signal peptide region of the fusion (F) gene showed high homology among these isolates (99.8-100%), indicating that CDV might have been transmitted from raccoon dog to tiger. In addition, these isolates belonged to genotype Asia-1 and had lower homology (<90%) to the vaccine strain (Onderstepoort). Seropositivity of lions (Panthera leo) in the zoo and wild bears (Ursus thibetanus) captured around this area supported the theory that a CDV epidemic had occurred in many mammal species in and around the zoo. These results indicate a risk of CDV transmission among many animal species, including large felids and endangered species.

  4. A multiplex, internally controlled real-time PCR assay for detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile and identification of hypervirulent strain 027/ST-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh, A M; Nielsen, J B; Lester, A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile and simultaneously identifying C. difficile ribotype 027/ST-1 by targeting the toxin genes tcdA, tcdB and cdtA in one reaction and in a separate reaction identifying the Δ...... to confirm the correct identification of the Δ117 deletion in tcdC and C. difficile ribotype 027/ST-1, respectively. The PCR assay displayed a sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 99.0%, 97.4%, 87.4% and 99.8%, respectively, compared to toxigenic culture on 665 samples evaluable both by PCR and culture....... Sequencing of tcdC, ribotyping and MLST of cultured isolates validated the genotyping assay and confirmed the ability of the assay to correctly identify C. difficile ribotype 027/ST-1 in our current epidemiological setting. We describe the use of a combination of two separate PCR assays for sensitive...

  5. Anticorpos neutralizantes contra os vírus da cinomose e da parainfluenza em cães de canis dos municípios de Novo Hamburgo e Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil Neutralizing antibodies to distemper and parainfluenza viruses in dogs in shelter kennels in the municipalities of Novo Hamburgo and Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamahine Larronda Schmidt Hartmann

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo, foi realizada uma pesquisa em busca de anticorpos neutralizantes contra os vírus da cinomose (CDV e da parainfluenza (CPIV caninos em amostras de soro de 173 cães recolhidos a canis municipais em Novo Hamburgo (n=82 e Porto Alegre (n=91, RS. A pesquisa de anticorpos neutralizantes foi realizada pela técnica de soroneutralização frente a duas amostras vacinais de CDV (Rockborn e Snyder Hill e frente a uma amostra de CPIV (V660. Em relação ao CDV, 95,9% das amostras de soros foram negativas para anticorpos neutralizantes contra a amostra Snyder Hill e 90,7% soronegativas para a amostra Rockborn. Entre os soropositivos (n=20; 11,6%, somente três deles apresentaram anticorpos neutralizantes frente às duas amostras de CDV testadas, indicando pouca reatividade cruzada entre as mesmas. Quanto ao CPIV, a prevalência de anticorpos neutralizantes encontrada frente à amostra V660 foi de 51,4%. Esses achados indicam que a maioria dos cães examinados não teve contato prévio com o CDV, seja por infecção natural ou por imunização prévia. O CPIV, porém, parece estar amplamente difundido na população canina examinada, provavelmente por exposição natural ao vírus.In this report a serological survey was carried out in search for antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV and canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV in 173 sera from dogs withdraw in kennels of the municipalities of Novo Hamburgo (n=82 and Porto Alegre (n=91, RS, Brazil. Neutralizing antibodies were evaluated against two CDV strains used for vaccine production (Rockborn and Snyder Hill as well as one strain of CPIV (V660. Search for anti-CDV neutralizing antibodies revealed that 95.9% of sera were negative for antibodies to CDV Snyder Hill and 90.7% were negative for antibodies to CDV Rockborn. Among the positive sera (n=20; 11.6 % only three of those had neutralizing antibodies to both CDV strains, indicating a low degree of cross reactivity between those. As

  6. Evaluation of Antibiotic Resistance and Detection of papC and papG genes in Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Patients with Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Alishah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Escherichia coli is the most common etiologic factor of urinary tract infection, which its most important virulence factor is P fimbriae. Uropathogenic E. coli expresses various types of adhesins, such as pili adhesins (pyelonephritis-associated pili, Pap that mediates binding to the surface of epithelial cells of the urinary tract. This study aims to identify papC and papG genes and to evaluate antibiotic resistance level in the isolated E. coli samples. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 50 samples were collected from patients with urinary tract infection and after isolation of bacteria and DNA extraction, antibiotic susceptibility tests was performed by disc diffusion method using related antibiotics. Presence of papG and papC genes (class I, II, and III was assessed by multiplex PCR method. Statistical data were analyzed using descriptive t-test. Results: The isolated E. coli samples were susceptible to amikacin (100% and cefepime (72% and resistant to ampicillin (100% and nitrofurantoin (94%. Eighteen samples (32.7% had papG gene, of which 17 (30.9% samples had papGII gene and 1 sample (1.8% had papGIII gene; papGI gene was not detected in any of the samples. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that papC and papGI genes are the most common Pap fimbriae adhesion-encoding genes in E. coli isolated from urinary tract infection. The difference between the results of this study with those of other studies is due to geographic diversity. Keywords: Escherichia coli; Adhesion pap, Disk diffusion antimicrobial tests; Multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

  7. A more sensitive, efficient and ISO 17025 validated Magnetic Capture real time PCR method for the detection of archetypal Toxoplasma gondii strains in meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert Algaba, Ignacio; Geerts, Manon; Jennes, Malgorzata; Coucke, Wim; Opsteegh, Marieke; Cox, Eric; Dorny, Pierre; Dierick, Katelijne; De Craeye, Stéphane

    2017-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a globally prevalent, zoonotic parasite of major importance to public health. Various indirect and direct methods can be used for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. Whereas serological tests are useful to prove contact with the parasite has occurred, the actual presence of the parasite in the tissues of a seropositive animal is not demonstrated. For this, a bioassay is still the reference method. As an alternative, various PCR methods have been developed, but due to the limited amount of sample that can be tested, combined with a low tissue cyst density, those have proved to be insufficiently sensitive. A major improvement of the sensitivity was achieved with magnetic capture-based DNA extraction. By combining the hybridization of specific, biotinylated probes with the capture of those probes with streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, T. gondii DNA can selectively be "fished out" from a large volume of meat lysate. Still, several studies showed an insufficient sensitivity compared with the mouse bioassay. Here we present a method that is more sensitive (99% limit of detection: 65.4 tachyzoites per 100g of meat), economical and reliable (ISO 17025 validated) by adding a non-competitive PCR inhibition control (co-capture of cellular r18S) and making the release of the target DNA from the streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads UV-dependent. The presented results demonstrate the potential of the modified Magnetic Capture real time PCR as a full alternative to the mouse bioassay for the screening of various types of tissues and meat, with the additional advantage of being quantitative. Copyright © 2017 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunohistochemical detection of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, anti-oxidant like 1 protein (AOP-1 and synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP-25 in the cerebella of dogs naturally infected with spontaneous canine distemper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza C. Cardoso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In most viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS, the integrity of brain extracelluar matrix (ECM, oxidative stress and dysfunction in neuronal transmission may contribute to the observed pathology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of these factors in demyelinating canine distemper virus (CDV infections. Regardless of ECM integrity, the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 was visualized in microglial-like cells, whereas the expression of anti-oxidant like-1 (AOP-1 and synaptosomal associated protein (SNAP-25 was frequently detected in Purkinje cells (r2 = 0.989; p < 0.05, regardless of whether the lesions were classified as acute or chronic. Increased numbers of immunolabeled microglia-like cells and reactive gliosis were observed in advanced cases of demyelinating CDV, suggesting that the expression of AOP-1 and SNAP-25 is correlated with the ultimate death of affected cells. Our findings bring a new perspective to understanding the role of the AOP-1, MMP-9 and SNAP-25 proteins in mediating chronic leukoencephalitis caused by CDV. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 1, pp. 41–48

  9. A negative search of acute canine distemper virus infection in DogSLAM transgenic C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somporn Techangamsuwan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Canine distemper is a highly contagious and immunosuppressive viral disease caused by canine distemper virus(CDV, an enveloped RNA virus of the family Paramyxoviridae. The susceptible host spectrum of CDV is broad andincludes all families of the order Carnivora. To accomplish the infection, CDV requires an expression of signaling lymphocyteactivation molecule (SLAM functioning as a cellular receptor which generally presents in a variety of different lymphoid cellsubpopulations, including immature thymocytes, primary B cells, activated T cells, memory T cells, macrophages and maturedendritic cells. The distribution of SLAM-presenting cells is in accordance with the lymphotropism and immunosuppressionfollowing morbillivirus infection. In the present study, the C57BL/6 mice engrafted with dog-specific SLAM sequence(DogSLAM were used. The weanling (3-week-old transgenic offspring C57BL/6 mice were infected with CDV Snyder Hill(CDV-SH strain via the intranasal (n=6, intracerebral (n=6 and intraperitoneal (n=5 routes. Clinical signs, hematology,histopathology, immunohistochemistry, virus isolation and RT-PCR were observed for two weeks post infection. Resultsshowed that CDV-SH-inoculated transgenic mice displayed mild-to-moderate congestion of various organs (brain, lung,spleen, kidney, lymph node, and adrenal gland. By means of immunohistochemistry, virus isolation and RT-PCR, CDV couldnot be detected. The evidence of CDV infection in this study could not be demonstrated in acute phase. Even though thetransgenic mouse is not a suitable animal model for CDV, or a longer incubation period is prerequisite, it needs to be clarifiedin a future study.

  10. Thermoresistance in radioresistant strains of 'Drosophila nebulosa'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratz, F.L.

    1977-01-01

    The detection of thermoresistance in radioresistant strains of 'D. nebulosa' is described, as well as some conclusions on the genetic nature of these differences are presented. The strains used in this experiment were MF 204, from 'Morro de Ferro', in Pocos de Caldas (MG) (one of the biggest radioactive anomalies in the world) whose radioresistance is due to its additive genetic components (Kratz, 1973 and 1975); 85(87) R, an induced radioresistant strain; and MF K a control 'pooled' strain obtained near 'Morro do Ferro'. Survival tests, 72 hours after temperature shocks, performed in the interval of 36 0 C to 39 0 C showed a decreasing gradient of thermoresistance with the following regression coefficients: MF 204 b= - 5,4; 85(87)R b= - 7,2 and MF K b= - 7,9. Bifactorial analysis (strains and sexes) performed at 38 0 C and 39 0 C confirmed differences among strains (P [pt

  11. Detection of strain behavior during phase-transformation in welds by the laser speckle method. Report 3. Application of the laser speckle method to strain masurement in the welding process; Reza supekkuru ho ni yoru yosetsubu no sohentai tojo no hizumi kenshutsu. 3. Reza supekkuru ni yoru hizumi sokuteiho no yosetsu eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Kuroda, S. [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Gross, H-G. [Rostock Univ., Rostock (Germany)

    1996-11-05

    It corresponds to an information relating to defect formation due to residual stress and its accompanying defect formation to find out the period of phase-transformation and expansion volume on the transformation forming at welding. In order to estimate texture of the heat affected zone, there is an SH-CCT diagram, which is important on weld metallurgy. However, this is formed by giving a thermal recycling to a small size specimen under stress-free, which has some problems to estimate the transformation starting period in actual welding. And, the expansion volume containing the transformation cannot be found out directly by this. In this study, as the first step adaptable to this problem with laser speckle method measurable with non-contact and high precision, a linear heating with TIG to a SUS304 stainless steel thin plate without transformation was executed at first, the strain behavior accompanied with it was confirmed. Secondly, using a thin plate of 9% Ni steel showing any transformation at comparatively low temperature, probability of a phase transformation detection was investigated on a way of cooling by executing resemble linear heating. As a result, the laser speckle method was confirmed to be adaptable to this problem. 14 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Detection Antibiotic Resistance of Enviromental Bacterial Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Zuheir Majeed

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available      Antibiotics are randomly prescribed  for veterinary and human medication. Antibiotics by little number are used by human , animals are digested uncompletely  in their digestive system and ended up in communal sewage and hospitals, eventually discharge in environmental water sources directly with no processing.     Water itself consider as major factor of dispersal of bacteria between different environmental components. Besides, bacteria had  transferable genetic mobile elements to different sites of soil, water and humans.       Environmental swabs were collected locally including 50 swabs of hospital environment , 15 samples of poultry feces and chicken guts , 20 sample of heavy water and 15 sample of fish tank to identify16 isolate of Staphylococcus (4 isolate of Staphylococus aureus and 12 isolate of coagulase –ve Staphylococcus , 19 isolate of Enterococcus spp. , 7 isolates of Pseudomonas and 5 environment isolates for each Shigella spp.  and Salmonella spp. .           Teicoplanin and Vancomycin sensitivity test of isolates was done , showing that 2out of 16 isolates of Staphylococcus (12.5% were Vancomycin-resistant , and 3out of 19 isolates of Enterococcus (15.7 % were Vancomycin-resistant, while the rest of isolates were Vancomycin- sensitive. From other side , all isolates was Teicoplanin- sensitive except only 1 Enterococcus spp. Isolate which was intermediate . The range of the Vancomycin MIC were (6-64 µg/ml . Vancomycin resistant isolates , showed that some isolates have one plasmid band after Extraction of their DNA.

  13. Rapid and simple method by combining FTA™ card DNA extraction with two set multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains and virulence genes in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S A; Park, S H; Lee, S I; Ricke, S C

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this research was to optimize two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays that could simultaneously detect six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) as well as the three virulence genes. We also investigated the potential of combining the FTA™ card-based DNA extraction with the multiplex PCR assays. Two multiplex PCR assays were optimized using six primer pairs for each non-O157 STEC serogroup and three primer pairs for virulence genes respectively. Each STEC strain specific primer pair only amplified 155, 238, 321, 438, 587 and 750 bp product for O26, O45, O103, O111, O121 and O145 respectively. Three virulence genes were successfully multiplexed: 375 bp for eae, 655 bp for stx1 and 477 bp for stx2. When two multiplex PCR assays were validated with ground beef samples, distinctive bands were also successfully produced. Since the two multiplex PCR examined here can be conducted under the same PCR conditions, the six non-O157 STEC and their virulence genes could be concurrently detected with one run on the thermocycler. In addition, all bands clearly appeared to be amplified by FTA card DNA extraction in the multiplex PCR assay from the ground beef sample, suggesting that an FTA card could be a viable sampling approach for rapid and simple DNA extraction to reduce time and labour and therefore may have practical use for the food industry. Two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were optimized for discrimination of six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and identification of their major virulence genes within a single reaction, simultaneously. This study also determined the successful ability of the FTA™ card as an alternative to commercial DNA extraction method for conducting multiplex STEC PCR assays. The FTA™ card combined with multiplex PCR holds promise for the food industry by offering a simple and rapid DNA sample method for reducing time, cost and labour for detection of STEC in

  14. Detection of Rare G3P[19] Porcine Rotavirus Strains in Chiang Mai, Thailand, Provides Evidence for Origin of the VP4 Genes of Mc323 and Mc345 Human Rotaviruses▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneekarn, Niwat; Khamrin, Pattara; Chan-it, Wisoot; Peerakome, Supatra; Sukchai, Sujin; Pringprao, Kidsadagon; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Among 175 fecal specimens collected from diarrheic piglets during a surveillance of porcine rotavirus (PoRV) strains in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 39 (22.3%) were positive for group A rotaviruses. Of these, 33.3% (13 of 39) belonged to G3P[19], which was a rare P genotype seldom reported. Interestingly, their VP4 nucleotide sequences were most closely related to human P[19] strains (Mc323 and Mc345) isolated in 1989 from the same geographical area where these PoRV strains were isolated. These P[19] PoRV strains were also closely related to another human P[19] strain (RMC321), isolated from India in 1990. The VP4 sequence identities with human P[19] were 95.4% to 97.4%, while those to a porcine P[19] strain (4F) were only 87.6 to 89.1%. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP4 gene revealed that PoRV P[19] strains clustered with human P[19] strains in a monophyletic branch separated from strain 4F. Analysis of the VP7 gene confirmed that these strains belonged to the G3 genotype and shared 97.7% to 98.3% nucleotide identities with other G3 PoRV strains circulating in the regions. This close genetic relationship was also reflected in the phylogenetic analysis of their VP7 genes. Altogether, the findings provided peculiar evidence that supported the porcine origin of VP4 genes of Mc323 and Mc345 human rotaviruses. PMID:16988014

  15. Differentiation of five strains of infectious bursal disease virus: Development of a strain-specific multiplex PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, M.; Kabell, Susanne; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2005-01-01

    and histopathology. Since these methods are laborious and have low specificity alternatives are needed. In the present study, we report the development of a strain-specific multiplex RT-PCR technique, which can detect and differentiate between field strains of IBDV and vaccine virus strains including a so-called hot...

  16. Serologic evaluation, efficacy, and safety of a commerical modified-live canine distemper vaccine in domestic ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimsatt, J; Jay, M T; Innes, K E; Jessen, M; Collins, J K

    2001-05-01

    To determine efficacy and safety of a commercial modified-live canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine used for prophylaxis in domestic ferrets. Sixteen 16-week-old neutered male ferrets. Equal groups of ferrets were inoculated subcutaneously at 16 and 20 weeks of age with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution or a vaccine derived from the Onderstepoort CDV strain and attenuated in a primate cell line. Live virulent CDV was administered to all ferrets intranasally and orally 3 weeks after the second inoculation. Clinical signs and body weights were monitored regularly during the study. Blood samples for serologic examination were drawn prior to each inoculation, before challenge exposure, and 10, 15, and 21 days after exposure. Blood samples for reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were obtained 5 days after the first vaccination, and 5, 10, 15, and 21 days after challenge exposure. After challenge exposure, control ferrets had significantly more clinical signs and weight loss, compared with vaccinates. All vaccinated ferrets survived, whereas all control ferrets died. The RT-PCR assay was successful in detecting CDV in blood and fresh or formalin-fixed tissues from infected ferrets. Findings suggest that the vaccine when given SC to domestic ferrets as directed is safe and protective against challenge exposure with virulent CDV. The RT-PCR assay may simplify detection of CDV in fresh and fixed tissues.

  17. Strain-Modulated Epitaxy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, April

    1999-01-01

    Strain-Modulated Epitaxy (SME) is a novel approach, invented at Georgia Tech, to utilize subsurface stressors to control strain and therefore material properties and growth kinetics in the material above the stressors...

  18. Hamstring strain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulled hamstring muscle; Sprain - hamstring ... There are 3 levels of hamstring strains: Grade 1 -- mild muscle strain or pull Grade 2 -- partial muscle tear Grade 3 -- complete muscle tear Recovery time depends ...

  19. A strain gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The invention relates to a strain gauge of a carrier layer and a meandering measurement grid positioned on the carrier layer, wherein the strain gauge comprises two reinforcement members positioned on the carrier layer at opposite ends of the measurement grid in the axial direction....... The reinforcement members are each placed within a certain axial distance to the measurement grid with the axial distance being equal to or smaller than a factor times the grid spacing. The invention further relates to a multi-axial strain gauge such as a bi-axial strain gauge or a strain gauge rosette where each...... of the strain gauges comprises reinforcement members. The invention further relates to a method for manufacturing a strain gauge as mentioned above....

  20. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichi Miura

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV-LACK, rCDV-TSA, and rCDV-LmSTI1, respectively. Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV-TSA- and rCDV-LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV-LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs.

  1. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ryuichi; Kooriyama, Takanori; Yoneda, Misako; Takenaka, Akiko; Doki, Miho; Goto, Yasuyuki; Sanjoba, Chizu; Endo, Yasuyuki; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Sugai, Akihiro; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV-LACK, rCDV-TSA, and rCDV-LmSTI1, respectively). Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears) with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV-TSA- and rCDV-LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV-LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs.

  2. Mobilomics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menconi, Giulia; Battaglia, Giovanni; Grossi, Roberto; Pisanti, Nadia; Marangoni, Roberto

    2013-03-20

    Mobile Genetic Elements (MGEs) are selfish DNA integrated in the genomes. Their detection is mainly based on consensus-like searches by scanning the investigated genome against the sequence of an already identified MGE. Mobilomics aims at discovering all the MGEs in a genome and understanding their dynamic behavior: The data for this kind of investigation can be provided by comparative genomics of closely related organisms. The amount of data thus involved requires a strong computational effort, which should be alleviated. Our approach proposes to exploit the high similarity among homologous chromosomes of different strains of the same species, following a progressive comparative genomics philosophy. We introduce a software tool based on our new fast algorithm, called regender, which is able to identify the conserved regions between chromosomes. Our case study is represented by a unique recently available dataset of 39 different strains of S.cerevisiae, which regender is able to compare in few minutes. By exploring the non-conserved regions, where MGEs are mainly retrotransposons called Tys, and marking the candidate Tys based on their length, we are able to locate a priori and automatically all the already known Tys and map all the putative Tys in all the strains. The remaining putative mobile elements (PMEs) emerging from this intra-specific comparison are sharp markers of inter-specific evolution: indeed, many events of non-conservation among different yeast strains correspond to PMEs. A clustering based on the presence/absence of the candidate Tys in the strains suggests an evolutionary interconnection that is very similar to classic phylogenetic trees based on SNPs analysis, even though it is computed without using phylogenetic information. The case study indicates that the proposed methodology brings two major advantages: (a) it does not require any template sequence for the wanted MGEs and (b) it can be applied to infer MGEs also for low coverage genomes

  3. Mobilomics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile Genetic Elements (MGEs) are selfish DNA integrated in the genomes. Their detection is mainly based on consensus–like searches by scanning the investigated genome against the sequence of an already identified MGE. Mobilomics aims at discovering all the MGEs in a genome and understanding their dynamic behavior: The data for this kind of investigation can be provided by comparative genomics of closely related organisms. The amount of data thus involved requires a strong computational effort, which should be alleviated. Results Our approach proposes to exploit the high similarity among homologous chromosomes of different strains of the same species, following a progressive comparative genomics philosophy. We introduce a software tool based on our new fast algorithm, called regender, which is able to identify the conserved regions between chromosomes. Our case study is represented by a unique recently available dataset of 39 different strains of S.cerevisiae, which regender is able to compare in few minutes. By exploring the non–conserved regions, where MGEs are mainly retrotransposons called Tys, and marking the candidate Tys based on their length, we are able to locate a priori and automatically all the already known Tys and map all the putative Tys in all the strains. The remaining putative mobile elements (PMEs) emerging from this intra–specific comparison are sharp markers of inter–specific evolution: indeed, many events of non–conservation among different yeast strains correspond to PMEs. A clustering based on the presence/absence of the candidate Tys in the strains suggests an evolutionary interconnection that is very similar to classic phylogenetic trees based on SNPs analysis, even though it is computed without using phylogenetic information. Conclusions The case study indicates that the proposed methodology brings two major advantages: (a) it does not require any template sequence for the wanted MGEs and (b) it can be applied to

  4. Three dimensional strained semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Leao, Cedric Rocha; Shao, Qinghui

    2016-11-08

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and at least one thin film in contact with at least one exterior surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the three dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and depositing at least one thin film on at least one surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the structure.

  5. Direct Application of the INNO-LiPA Rif.TB Line-Probe Assay for Rapid Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains and Detection of Rifampin Resistance in 360 Smear-Positive Respiratory Specimens from an Area of High Incidence of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveiros, Miguel; Leandro, Clara; Rodrigues, Liliana; Almeida, Josefina; Bettencourt, Rosário; Couto, Isabel; Carrilho, Lurdes; Diogo, José; Fonseca, Ana; Lito, Luís; Lopes, João; Pacheco, Teresa; Pessanha, Mariana; Quirim, Judite; Sancho, Luísa; Salfinger, Max; Amaral, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    The INNO-LiPA Rif.TB assay for the identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains and the detection of rifampin (RIF) resistance has been evaluated with 360 smear-positive respiratory specimens from an area of high incidence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The sensitivity when compared to conventional identification/culture methods was 82.2%, and the specificity was 66.7%; the sensitivity and specificity were 100.0% and 96.9%, respectively, for the detection of RIF resistance. This assay has the potential to provide rapid information that is essential for the effective management of MDR-TB. PMID:16145166

  6. Strain measurement technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The 10 contributions are concerned with selected areas of application, such as strain measurements in wood, rubber/metal compounds, sets of strain measurements on buildings, reinforced concrete structures without gaps, pipes buried in the ground and measurements of pressure fluctuations. To increase the availability and safety of plant, stress analyses were made on gas turbine rotors with HT-DMS or capacitive HT-DMS (high temperature strain measurements). (DG) [de

  7. Strained Silicon Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf B. Wehrspohn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent progress in the field of strained silicon photonics is presented. The application of strain to waveguide and photonic crystal structures can be used to alter the linear and nonlinear optical properties of these devices. Here, methods for the fabrication of strained devices are summarized and recent examples of linear and nonlinear optical devices are discussed. Furthermore, the relation between strain and the enhancement of the second order nonlinear susceptibility is investigated, which may enable the construction of optically active photonic devices made of silicon.

  8. Fumonisin and Ochratoxin Production in Industrial Aspergillus niger Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Thrane, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    as safe). However, A. niger has the potential to produce two groups of potentially carcinogenic mycotoxins: fumonisins and ochratoxins. In this study all available industrial and many non-industrial strains of A. niger (180 strains) as well as 228 strains from 17 related black Aspergillus species were...... examined for mycotoxin production. None of the related 17 species of black Aspergilli produced fumonisins. Fumonisins (B(2), B(4), and B(6)) were detected in 81% of A. niger, and ochratoxin A in 17%, while 10% of the strains produced both mycotoxins. Among the industrial strains the same ratios were 83......%, 33% and 26% respectively. Some of the most frequently used strains in industry NRRL 337, 3112 and 3122 produced both toxins and several strains used for citric acid production were among the best producers of fumonisins in pure agar culture. Most strains used for other biotechnological processes also...

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli Strain WG5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imamovic, Lejla; Misiakou, Maria-Anna; van der Helm, Eric

    2018-01-01

    Escherichia coli strain WG5 is a widely used host for phage detection, including somatic coliphages employed as standard ISO method 10705-1 (2000). Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a commercial E. coli WG5 strain.......Escherichia coli strain WG5 is a widely used host for phage detection, including somatic coliphages employed as standard ISO method 10705-1 (2000). Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a commercial E. coli WG5 strain....

  10. A strain gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The invention relates to a strain gauge of a carrier layer and a meandering measurement grid (101) positioned on the carrier layer, wherein the measurement grid comprises a number of measurement grid sections placed side by side with gaps in between, and a number of end loops (106) interconnecting...... relates to a method for manufacturing a strain gauge as mentioned above....

  11. Chemical Profile of Monascus ruber Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamed M. Moharram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical profile of Monascus ruber strains has been studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS analysis. The colour intensity of the red pigment and secondary metabolic products of two M. ruber strains (AUMC 4066 and AUMC 5705 cultivated on ten different media were also studied. Metabolic products can be classified into four categories: anticholesterol, anticancer, food colouring, and essential fatty acids necessary for human health. Using GC/MS, the following 88 metabolic products were detected: butyric acid and its derivatives (25 products, other fatty acids and their derivatives (19 products, pyran and its derivatives (22 products and other metabolites (22 products. Among these, 32 metabolites were specific for AUMC 4066 strain and 34 for AUMC 5705 strain, whereas 22 metabolites were produced by both strains on different tested substrates. Production of some metabolites depended on the substrate used. High number of metabolites was recorded in the red pigment extract obtained by both strains grown on malt broth and malt agar. Also, 42 aroma compounds were recorded (4 alcohols, 2 benzaldehydes, 27 esters, 3 lactones, 1 phenol, 1 terpenoid, 3 thiol compounds and acetate-3-mercapto butyric acid. Thin layer chromatography and GC/MS analyses revealed no mycotoxin citrinin in any media used for the growth of the two M. ruber strains.

  12. Safety Evaluation of Enterocin Producer Enterococcus sp. Strains Isolated from Traditional Turkish Cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcı, Mine; Özden Tuncer, Banu

    2017-07-06

    The purpose of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity and occurrence of bacteriocin structural genes in Enterococcus spp. isolated from different cheeses and also investigate some of their virulence factors. Enterococcus strains were isolated from 33 different cheeses. Enterococcus faecium (6 strains) and Enterococcus faecalis (5 strains) enterocin-producing strains were identified by 16S rDNA analyses. Structural genes entA, entB, entP and entX were detected in some isolates. Multiple enterocin structural genes were found in 7 strains. None of the tested enterococci demonstrated anyβ-haemolytic activity and only one strain had gelatinase activity. Six strains showed multiple antibiotic resistance patterns and in addition, vanA and several virulence genes were detected in many strains. Only E. faecalis MBE1-9 showed tyrosine decarboxylase activity and tdc gene was detected only in this strain.

  13. Molecular detection of canine distemper virus (CDV, canine adenovirus A type 1 and 2 (CAdV-1 and CAdV-2, and canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2 in the urine of naturally infected dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine babesiosis is an important disease of cattle where Rhipicephalus microplus acts as a vector for the two causal organisms Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina. A total of 22 calves were randomly monitored during three years by semi-nested PCR assay and ELISA test to determine prevalence of B. bovis and B. bigemina. The overall prevalence of B. bovis and B. bigemina was 30% and 35% by nested PCR (nPCR, and 70% and 75% by ELISA, respectively. Statistical analysis of the characteristics of animals showed that age and tick infestations (p<0.05 might play an important role in the spread of babesiosis as animal less than 6 months old. A high correlation (Kappa index of 0.70 for B. bovis and 0.65 for B. bigemina, respectively between serological and molecular tests suggests that the combination of the utilized techniques in the present study is suitable for babesiosis diagnosis in an endemic unstable area.

  14. Impact of exopolysaccharide production on functional properties of some Lactobacillus salivarius strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercan, Emin; İspirli, Hümeyra; Sert, Durmuş; Yılmaz, Mustafa Tahsin; Dertli, Enes

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize functional properties of Lactobacillus salivarius strains isolated from chicken feces. Detection of genes responsible for exopolysaccharide (EPS) production revealed that all strains harbored a dextransucrase gene, but p-gtf gene was only detected in strain E4. Analysis of EPS production levels showed significant alterations among strains tested. Biofilm formation was found to be medium composition dependant, and there was a negative correlation with biofilm formation and EPS production. Autoaggregation properties and coaggregation of L. salivarius strains with chicken pathogens were appeared to be specific at strain level. An increment in bacterial adhesion to chicken gut explants was observed in L. salivarius strains with the reduction in EPS production levels. This study showed that strain-specific properties can determine the functional properties of L. salivarius strains, and the interference of these properties might be crucial for final selection of these strains for technological purposes.

  15. Tunable strain gauges based on two-dimensional silver nanowire networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Xinning; Cheng, Chek Kweng; Tey, Ju Nie; Wei, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Strain gauges are used in various applications such as wearable strain gauges and strain gauges in airplanes or structural health monitoring. Sensitivity of the strain gauge required varies, depending on the application of the strain gauge. This paper reports a tunable strain gauge based on a two-dimensional percolative network of silver nanowires. By varying the surface coverage of the nanowire network and the waviness of the nanowires in the network, the sensitivity of the strain gauge can be controlled. Hence, a tunable strain gauge can be engineered, based on demands of the application. A few applications are demonstrated. The strain gauge can be adhered to the human neck to detect throat movements and a glove integrated with such a strain gauge can detect the bending of the forefinger. Other classes of two-dimensional percolative networks of one-dimensional materials are also expected to exhibit similar tunable properties. (paper)

  16. Internally Mounting Strain Gages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, J. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Technique for mounting strain gages inside bolt or cylinder simultaneously inserts gage, attached dowel segment, and length of expandable tubing. Expandable tubing holds gage in place while adhesive cures, assuring even distribution of pressure on gage and area gaged.

  17. Running Title: Strained Yoghurts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2012-09-27

    Sep 27, 2012 ... ever, the traditional method of producing strained yoghurt ... Food market studies have the essential function of providing ..... Communication No: 2001/21. ... fermented foods and beverages of Turkey. Crit. Rev. Food. Sci. Nutr.

  18. Mechanical control over valley magnetotransport in strained graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ning, E-mail: maning@stu.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Department of Applied Physics, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhang, Shengli, E-mail: zhangsl@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Liu, Daqing, E-mail: liudq@cczu.edu.cn [School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China)

    2016-05-06

    Recent experiments report that the graphene exhibits Landau levels (LLs) that form in the presence of a uniform strain pseudomagnetic field with magnitudes up to hundreds of tesla. We further reveal that the strain removes the valley degeneracy in LLs, and leads to a significant valley polarization with inversion symmetry broken. This accordingly gives rise to the well separated valley Hall plateaus and Shubnikov–de Haas oscillations. These effects are absent in strainless graphene, and can be used to generate and detect valley polarization by mechanical means, forming the basis for the new paradigm “valleytronics” applications. - Highlights: • We explore the mechanical strain effects on the valley magnetotransport in graphene. • We analytically derive the dc collisional and Hall conductivities under strain. • The strain removes the valley degeneracy in Landau levels. • The strain causes a significant valley polarization with inversion symmetry broken. • The strain leads to the well separated valley Hall and Shubnikov–de Haas effects.

  19. Flexible piezotronic strain sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Gu, Yudong; Fei, Peng; Mai, Wenjie; Gao, Yifan; Yang, Rusen; Bao, Gang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2008-09-01

    Strain sensors based on individual ZnO piezoelectric fine-wires (PFWs; nanowires, microwires) have been fabricated by a simple, reliable, and cost-effective technique. The electromechanical sensor device consists of a single electrically connected PFW that is placed on the outer surface of a flexible polystyrene (PS) substrate and bonded at its two ends. The entire device is fully packaged by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) thin layer. The PFW has Schottky contacts at its two ends but with distinctly different barrier heights. The I- V characteristic is highly sensitive to strain mainly due to the change in Schottky barrier height (SBH), which scales linear with strain. The change in SBH is suggested owing to the strain induced band structure change and piezoelectric effect. The experimental data can be well-described by the thermionic emission-diffusion model. A gauge factor of as high as 1250 has been demonstrated, which is 25% higher than the best gauge factor demonstrated for carbon nanotubes. The strain sensor developed here has applications in strain and stress measurements in cell biology, biomedical sciences, MEMS devices, structure monitoring, and more.

  20. Different distribution patterns of ten virulence genes in Legionella reference strains and strains isolated from environmental water and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Virulence genes are distinct regions of DNA which are present in the genome of pathogenic bacteria and absent in nonpathogenic strains of the same or related species. Virulence genes are frequently associated with bacterial pathogenicity in genus Legionella. In the present study, an assay was performed to detect ten virulence genes, including iraA, iraB, lvrA, lvrB, lvhD, cpxR, cpxA, dotA, icmC and icmD in different pathogenicity islands of 47 Legionella reference strains, 235 environmental strains isolated from water, and 4 clinical strains isolated from the lung tissue of pneumonia patients. The distribution frequencies of these genes in reference or/and environmental L. pneumophila strains were much higher than those in reference non-L. pneumophila or/and environmental non-L. pneumophila strains, respectively. L. pneumophila clinical strains also maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to four other types of Legionella strains. Distribution frequencies of these genes in reference L. pneumophila strains were similar to those in environmental L. pneumophila strains. In contrast, environmental non-L. pneumophila maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to those found in reference non-L. pneumophila strains. This study illustrates the association of virulence genes with Legionella pathogenicity and reveals the possible virulence evolution of non-L. pneumophia strains isolated from environmental water.