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Sample records for cdrh x-ray calibration

  1. Services of the CDRH X-ray calibration laboratory and their traceability to National Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerra, F.; Heaton, H.T. [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The X-ray Calibration Laboratory (XCL) of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) provides calibration services for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The instruments calibrated are used by FDA and contract state inspectors to verify compliance with federal x-ray performance standards and for national surveys of x-ray trends. In order to provide traceability of measurements, the CDRH XCL is accredited by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) for reference, diagnostic, and x-ray survey instrument calibrations. In addition to these accredited services, the CDRH XCL also calibrates non-invasive kVp meters in single- and three-phase x-ray beams, and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips used to measure CT beam profiles. The poster illustrates these services and shows the traceability links back to the National Standards.

  2. Miniature x-ray point source for alignment and calibration of x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A miniature x-ray point source of high brightness similar to that of Rovinsky, et al. is described. One version of the x-ray source is used to align the x-ray optics on the Argus and Shiva laser systems. A second version is used to determine the spatial and spectral transmission functions of the x-ray optics. The spatial and spectral characteristics of the x-ray emission from the x-ray point source are described. The physical constraints including size, intensity and thermal limitations, and useful lifetime are discussed. The alignment and calibration techniques for various x-ray optics and detector combinations are described

  3. LLNL X-ray Calibration and Standards Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LLNL X-ray Calibration and Standards Laboratory is a unique facility for developing and calibrating x-ray sources, detectors, and materials, and for conducting x-ray physics research in support of our weapon and fusion-energy programs

  4. Absolute calibration of soft X-ray plates by using a self-calibrated X-ray bolometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of soft X-ray plates, Kodak 101-05 and ILFORD Q-PLATE at 1.1 keV was measured by using a self-calibrated X-ray bolometer as a standard detector for absolute measurements of soft X-rays. Cross-calibration was also made by using an X-ray sensitive diamond detector. Good agreement in the absolute sensitivity was obtained between the bolometer and the diamond detector. (author)

  5. Measurement of specifications of x-ray quality for calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The filtered continuous X-rays are often used for the calibration and measurement of the energy response of γ-ray dosemeter and dose ratemeter. These X-rays are easily made and sufficiently available for the measurement which does not require the strictly monoenergetic X-ray beam. It is necessary for the employment of continuous X-rays to specify the X-ray qualities such as representative energy and degree of filtration. This report describes a measurement of some specifications of the X-ray quality for a X-ray generator with 50 -- 120 kV of tube potential and a comparison between existing and ISO-4037 proposing expressions on the X-ray quality. According to the resolution of X-ray spectrum, we made four different X-ray quality sets : Wide, Middle, Narrow, and Extra-narrow spectrum series. The information described here about the filtered X-rays will be of use for the calibration and measurement of energy response of the health physics instruments. (J.P.N.)

  6. Note: X-ray streak camera sweep speed calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray streak cameras are extensively used to study transient x-ray processes in experiments carried out on various laser facilities at the Research Center of Laser Fusion. Precise calibration and clear description of the sweep speed of the x-ray streak camera are vital for obtaining precise temporal information to understand the fast physics phenomena. An x-ray streak camera named wide-slit x-ray streak camera has been calibrated using a small-scale laser facility with pulse duration of 8 ps. Sweep speeds on most part of the output screen (charge coupled device) are obtained. These calibration results can be used to correct the nonlinearity of sweep speed in measurement of temporal processes.

  7. Calibration of Cone Beam Rotational X-Ray Image Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUHengyong; MOUXuanqin; CAIYuanlong

    2004-01-01

    The real X-ray projection does not abide by Lambert-Beer Law, since the X-ray is polychromatic and the imaging chains are nonlinear. Based on the generating process of X-ray images, an equivalent nonlinear transform model is firstly proposed which considers all the nonlinear factors as one nonlinear transform. Then the 3D (three-dimensional) X-ray projection of cone beam is defined. The constraints of Radon transform, named H-L (Helgasson-ludwig) consistency conditions, are expanded to fan-beam. After that an algorithm is developed to calibrate Rotational X-ray image sequence (RXIS). The algorithm uses a set of exponential functions to approximate the nonlinear inverse transform. According to expanded H-L consistency conditions, finally a kind of nonlinear measure for RXIS is defined. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can decrease the nonlinear measure to below 0.01.

  8. Temporal characteristics calibration for an X-ray streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray streak cameras are very important in inertial confinement fusion experiments. The characterization of the cameras should be carried out to ensure the reliability and accuracy of the experimental data. The temporal characteristics of the X-ray streak camera, such as sweep speed and temporal resolution, were calibrated for the first time on the 20 TW laser facility at High Power Laser and Physics Joint Laboratory of Shanghai. Results of the calibration experiments show that some of the specifications of the X-ray camera have changed compared with their nominal values. With these calibration data, the processing and the analysis of the ICF experimental results are turned out to be more creditable. (authors)

  9. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, F.; Kemp, G. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Pino, J.; Scott, H.; Ayers, S.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B., E-mail: fournier2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, M. J.; Agliata, A.; Yaakobi, B.; Marshall, F. J.; Hamilton, R. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jaquez, J.; Farrell, M.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the OMEGA laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2–18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  10. The Rainwater Memorial Calibration Facility for X-Ray Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brejnholt, Nicolai; Christensen, Finn Erland; Hailey, Charles J.; Barrière, Nicolas M.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian; Koglin, Jason; Madsen, Kristin Kruse; Vogel, Julia K.; An, Hongjun; Blaedel, Kenneth; Brown, Josh; Decker, Todd; Haider, Zeshan; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Sleator, Clio; Stefanik, Dennis; Stern, Marcela; Tajiri, Gordon; Thornhill, Douglas; Cushman, Jeremy S.

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing hard X-ray (5–80 keV) telescope to orbit. The ground calibration of the optics posed a challenge as the need to suppress finite source distance effects over the full optic and the...... beamline sports a 48 cm diameter 5–100 keV X-ray beam and is capable of carrying out detailed studies of large diameter optic elements, such as the NuSTAR optics, as well as flat multilayer-coated Silicon wafers....

  11. X-ray calibration facility for plasma diagnostics of the MegaJoule laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) located at CEA-CESTA will be equipped with x-ray plasma diagnostics using different kinds of x-ray components such as filters, mirrors, crystals, detectors and cameras. To guarantee LMJ measurements, detectors such as x-ray cameras need to be regularly calibrated. An x-ray laboratory is devoted to this task and performs absolute x-ray calibrations for similar x-ray cameras running on Laser Integration Line (LIL). This paper presents the x-ray calibration bench with its x-ray tube based High Energy x-ray Source (HEXS) and some calibration results. By mean of an ingenious transposition system under vacuum absolute x-ray calibration of x-ray cameras, like streak and stripline ones, can be carried out. Coupled to a new collimation system with micrometric accuracy on aperture sensitivity quantum efficiency measurements can be achieved with reduced uncertainties. (authors)

  12. Calibration of the MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Richard D.; Schlemm, Charles E., II; Ho, George C.; Nittler, Larry R.; Gold, Robert E.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-03-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) that flew on the MESSENGER spacecraft measured X-rays from the surface of Mercury in the energy range ~1-10 keV. Detection of characteristic Kα-line emissions from Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe yielded the surface abundances of these geologically important elements. Spatial resolution as fine as ~40 km (across track) was possible at periapsis for those elements for which counting statistics were not a limiting factor. Four years of orbital observations have made it possible to generate from XRS spectra detailed elemental composition maps that cover a majority of Mercury's surface. Converting measurements to compositions requires a thorough understanding of the XRS instrument capabilities. The ground and flight calibration measurements presented here are necessary for the reduction and analysis of the X-ray data from the MESSENGER mission.

  13. The Rainwater Memorial Calibration Facility for X-Ray Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Brejnholt, Nicolai F.; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Barrière, Nicolas M.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian; Koglin, Jason; Madsen, Kristin Kruse; Vogel, Julia K.; An, Hongjun; Blaedel, Kenneth; Brown, Josh; Decker, Todd; Haider, Zeshan; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing hard X-ray (5–80 keV) telescope to orbit. The ground calibration of the optics posed a challenge as the need to suppress finite source distance effects over the full optic and the energy range of interest were unique requirements not met by any existing facility. In this paper we present the requirements for the NuSTAR optics ground calibration, and how the Rainwater Memorial...

  14. Absolute calibration of the soft X-ray streak camera static characteristic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soft X-ray streak camera is very important detection tool for studying soft X-ray time characteristics. We have calibrated its absolute energy response in terms of X rays provided by synchrotron Radiation Source on the BSRF. The combined uncertainty of quantum efficiency of the streak camera in 100-1000 eV photon energy region is 23%

  15. Developing small vacuum spark as an x-ray source for calibration of an x-ray focusing crystal spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique of x-ray focusing crystal spectrometers’ calibration is the desired result. For this purpose the spectrometer is designed to register radiated copper Kα and Kβ lines by using a flat α-quartz crystal. This experiment uses pre-breakdown x-ray emissions in low vacuum of about 2.5–3 mbar. At this pressure the pinch will not form so the plasma will not radiate. The anode material is copper and the capacity of the capacitor bank is 22.6 nF. This experiment designed and mounted a repetitive triggering system to save the operator time making hundreds of shots. This emission amount is good for calibration and geometrical adjustment of an optical crystal x-ray focusing spectrometer.

  16. Absolutely calibrated soft-x-ray streak camera for laser-fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intensity output of a soft-x-ray streak camera was calibrated (SXRSC) in order to make absolute flux measurements of x rays emitted from laser-produced plasmas. The SXRSC developed at LLNL is used to time-resolve x-ray pulses to better than 20 ps. The SXRSC uses a Au photocathode on a thin carbon substrate which is sensitive to x rays from 100 eV to greater than 10 keV. Calibrations are done in the dynamic mode using a small laser-produced x-ray source. The SXRSC is calibrated by comparing its integrated signal to the output of calibrated x-ray diodes monitoring the source strength. The measured SXRSC response is linear over greater than two orders of magnitude. Using these calibrations, absolute intensities can be measured to an accuracy of +-30%

  17. HETE Soft X-ray Camera imaging: Calibration, performance, and sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HETE Soft X-ray Camera (SXC) uses X-ray CCDs and a micro-fabricated coded aperture mask to image X-ray sources with sub-arcminute accuracy over a steradian field of view. Calibration of imaging with observations of the Crab and Sco X-1 is described. The accuracy of SXC localizations is determined trough observations of known steady and transient galactic X-ray sources and sensitivity to GRBs is estimated through detections of steady and transient Galactic X-ray sources. [NB: As of October 2002, the SXC had localized 4 GRBs to arcminute accuracy

  18. System for calibration of instruments of x-ray measurement (CIR-X) applying the PGCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Metrology of Ionizing Radiations of the ININ carries out calibration of instruments for X-ray measurement that determine the operation parameters in X-ray diagnostic machines of the health and private sectors. To facilitate this task, the Department of Automation and Instrumentation developed a system for acquisition and signals processing coming from a reference voltage divider with traceability at NIST that is connected directly to the X-rays tube. The system is integrated by the X-ray unit, the X-ray measurement equipment Dynalizer IIIU of RADCAL, a data acquisition card, a personal computer and the acquisition software and signals processing. (Author)

  19. Efficiency calibration of an HPGe X-ray detector for quantitative PIXE analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) is an analytical technique, which provides reliably and accurately quantitative results without the need of standards when the efficiency of the X-ray detection system is calibrated. The ion beam microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory at the University of North Texas is equipped with a 100 mm2 high purity germanium X-ray detector (Canberra GUL0110 Ultra-LEGe). In order to calibrate the efficiency of the detector for standard less PIXE analysis we have measured the X-ray yield of a set of commercially available X-ray fluorescence standards. The set contained elements from low atomic number Z = 11 (sodium) to higher atomic numbers to cover the X-ray energy region from 1.25 keV to about 20 keV where the detector is most efficient. The effective charge was obtained from the proton backscattering yield of a calibrated particle detector

  20. Calibration Of X-Ray Imaging Devices For Accurate Intensity Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

  1. CALIBRATION OF X-RAY IMAGING DEVICES FOR ACCURATE INTENSITY MEASUREMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugh, M J; Charest, M R; Ross, P W; Lee, J J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Teruya, A T

    2012-02-16

    National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

  2. The calibration and characterization of a research x-ray unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.M.

    1996-06-01

    The proper characterization of an X-ray unit is necessary for the utilization of the source as a dosimetry calibration standard. Upon calibration, the X-ray unit can be used for X-ray calibrations of survey, diagnostic, and reference-class, instruments and for X-ray irradiations of personnel dosimeters. It was the goal of this research to provide the Radiation Calibration Laboratory at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a characterized research X-ray unit that could be used in reference dosimetry. The energy spectra were characterized by performing half value layer measurements and by performing a spectral analysis. Two spectral reconstruction techniques were investigated and compared. One involved using a previously determined detector response matrix and a backstripping technique. The other reconstruction technique was developed for this research using neural computing. A neural network was designed and trained to reconstruct measured X-ray spectra from data collected with a high- purity germanium spectroscopy system. Five X-ray beams were successfully characterized and found to replicate the ANSI N13.11 and the National Institute of Standards Technology X-ray beam codes. As a result, these prepared X-ray beams have been used for reference dosimetry. It has been shown that a neural network can be used as a spectral reconstruction technique, which contributes less error to the lower energy portion of the spectrum than other techniques.

  3. A Computer Program for Calculation of Calibration Curves for Quantitative X-Ray Diffraction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Frank N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a FORTRAN IV program written to supplement a laboratory exercise dealing with quantitative x-ray diffraction analysis of mixtures of polycrystalline phases in an introductory course in x-ray diffraction. Gives an example of the use of the program and compares calculated and observed calibration data. (Author/GS)

  4. Single-shot calibration of soft x-ray mirrors using a sinusoidal transmission grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpilman, Z.; Ehrlich, Y.; Maman, S.; Levy, I.; Shussman, T.; Oren, G.; Zakosky Nueberger, I.; Hurvitz, G.

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of soft x-ray diagnostics is a challenge due to the lack of laboratory-size calibrated sources. An in situ calibration method for newly developed x-ray mirrors, is presented. The x-ray source is produced by laser-matter interaction, and twin transmission gratings which create two identical dispersion lines. The gratings have a sinusoidal transmission function, which produces a highly precise high-orders free spectrum. An x-ray mirror interacts with one of the dispersion lines, and the mirror efficiency curve as a function of wavelength is extracted. Mirror efficiency shows good agreement with the literature, and evidence of water layer may justify the need of in situ calibration.

  5. Calibration of x-ray digital tomosynthesis system including the compensation for image distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Jun; Koh, Kuk Won; Cho, Hyungsuck; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyung C.; Byun, Jong-Eun

    1998-10-01

    X-ray laminography and DT (digital tomosynthesis) are promising technologies to form a cross-section image of 3D objects and can be a good solution for inspection interior defects of industrial products. It has been known that digital tomosynthesis method has several advantages over laminography method in that it can overcome the problems such as blurring effect or artifact. The DT system consists of a scanning x-ray tube, an image intensifier as an x-ray image detector, and a CCD camera. To acquire an x-ray image of an arbitrary plane of objects, a set of images (8 images or more) should be synthesized by averaging or minimally calculating point by point. The images, however are distorted according to the configurations of the image intensifier and the x-ray source position. To get a clear and accurate synthesized image, the corresponding points in the distorted images should be accurately determined, and therefore, precise calibration of the DT system is needed to map the corresponding points correctly. In this work, a series of calibration methods for the DT system are presented including the correction of the center offset between the x-ray and the image intensifer, the x-ray steering calibration, and the correction of the distortion of the image. The calibration models are implemented to the DT system and the experiment results are presented and discussed in detail.

  6. Characterization of X-ray fields at the center for devices and radiological health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerra, F. [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This talk summarizes the process undertaken by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) for establishing reference x-ray fields in its accredited calibration laboratory. The main considerations and their effects on the calibration parameters are discussed. The characterization of fields may be broken down into two parts: (1) the initial setup of the calibration beam spectra and (2) the ongoing measurements and controls which ensure consistency of the reference fields. The methods employed by CDRH for both these stages and underlying considerations are presented. Uncertainties associated with the various parameters are discussed. Finally, the laboratory`s performance, as evidenced by ongoing measurement quality assurance results, is reported.

  7. Hard X-ray Detector Calibrations for the FOXSI Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A.; Glesener, L.; Buitrago Casas, J. C.; Han, R.; Ishikawa, S. N.; Christe, S.; Krucker, S.

    2015-12-01

    In the study of high-energy solar flares, detailed X-ray images and spectra of the Sun are required. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket experiment is used to test direct-focusing X-ray telescopes and Double-sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSD) for solar flare study and to further understand coronal heating. The measurement of active region differential emission measures, flare temperatures, and possible quiet-Sun emission requires a precisely calibrated spectral response. This poster describes recent updates in the calibration of FOXSI's DSSDs based on new calibration tests that were performed after the second flight. The gain for each strip was recalculated using additional radioactive sources. Additionally, the varying strip sensitivity across the detectors was investigated and based on these measurements, the flight images were flatfielded. These improvements lead to more precise X-ray data for future FOXSI flights and show promise for these new technologies in imaging the Sun.

  8. Calibrated time-resolved transmission grating spectrometer for the study of ultrafast x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J F; Chaker, M; Kieffer, J C

    1996-01-01

    A transmission grating spectrometer has been coupled to a high-temporal-resolution soft x-ray streak camera for the study of picosecond laser-plasma x-ray sources. A procedure to deconvolve the overlapping contributions of diffraction orders and to calibrate the instrument has been established in order to obtain absolute time-resolved x-ray emission spectra in the 0.1-1.2 keV spectral region. The deconvolution and calibration techniques are presented along with measurements establishing the temporal resolution of this diagnostic at ~2 ps. Examples of calibrated spectra of laser-plasma x-ray sources created by 400 fs laser pulses at intensities of 1018 W/cm2 are also shown. PMID:21307534

  9. The x-ray calibration facility of the laser integration line in the 0.9-10 keV range: The high energy x-ray source and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser integration line (LIL) located at CEA-CESTA is equipped with x-ray plasma diagnostics using different kinds of x-ray components such as filters, mirrors, crystals, detectors, and cameras. The CEA-DAM of Arpajon is currently developing x-ray calibration methods and carrying out absolute calibration of LIL x-ray photodetectors. To guarantee LIL measurements, detectors such as x-ray cameras must be regularly calibrated close to the facility. A new x-ray facility is currently available to perform these absolute x-ray calibrations. This paper presents the x-ray tube based high energy x-ray source delivering x-ray energies ranging from 0.9 to 10 keV by means of an anode barrel. The purpose of this source is mainly to calibrate LIL x-ray cameras but it can also be used to measure x-ray filter transmission of plasma diagnostics. Different x-ray absolute calibrations such as x-ray streak and framing camera yields, x-ray charge-coupled device quantum efficiencies, and x-ray filter transmissions are presented in this paper. A x-ray flat photocathode detector sensitivity calibration recently performed for a CEA Z-pinch facility is also presented.

  10. Influence of smoothing of X-ray spectra on parameters of calibration model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parameters of the calibration model before and after smoothing of X-ray spectra have been investigated. The calibration model was calculated using multivariate procedure - namely the partial least square regression (PLS). Investigations have been performed on an example of six sets of various standards used for calibration of some instruments based on X-ray fluorescence principle. The smoothing methods were compared: regression splines, Savitzky-Golay and Discrete Fourier Transform. The calculations were performed using a software package MATLAB and some home-made programs. (author)

  11. Calibration Method for Confocal X-Ray Microanalysis with Polychromatic Excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Sosa, C.; Stoytschew, V.; Leani, J.; H. J. Sánchez; C. A. Pérez; R. D. Perez

    2015-01-01

    To apply the fundamental parameters method at the confocal setup the knowledge of the sensitivity of the spectrometer is required which depends on the characteristics of two X-ray lenses: one in the excitation channel and another in the detection channel. For the particular case of polychromatic excitation, the theory shows that the focalization properties of the excitation lens for all incident energies affect the X-ray fluorescence intensity. Therefore the traditional calibration method bas...

  12. Expanded beam x-ray optics calibration facility at the Daresbury Synchrotron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; FREDERIKSEN, P; ABDALI, S; Grundsøe, Peter; SCHNOPPER, HW; LEWIS, R; HALL, CH; BOROZDIN, K

    1994-01-01

    interval from 6 kev to 12 kev, the facility features a 1D sheet of X-rays, approximately 200 mm wide, obtained from an extremely asymmetric reflection in large perfect crystals of Si. The beam is collimated to < 20 arcsec. Data from tests using large (approximately 250 mm long) beam expander crystals in...... the energy range from 6 - 12 kev are presented. The planned calibration of the two X-ray telescopes (XSPECT/SODART and JET-X) will be described....

  13. Use of sampling based correction for non-radioactivity X-ray energy calibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Cheng; WEI Yong-Bo; JIANG Da-Zhen

    2005-01-01

    As the requirement of non-radioactivity measurement has increased in recent years, various energy calibration methods applied in portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometers have been developed. In this paper, a sampling based correction energy calibration has been discussed. In this method both history information and current state of the instrument are considered and relative high precision and reliability can be obtained.

  14. Efficiency calibration of an HPGe X-ray detector for quantitative PIXE analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulware, Stephen J., E-mail: Stephenmulware@my.unt.edu; Baxley, Jacob D., E-mail: jacob.baxley351@topper.wku.edu; Rout, Bibhudutta, E-mail: bibhu@unt.edu; Reinert, Tilo, E-mail: tilo@unt.edu

    2014-08-01

    Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) is an analytical technique, which provides reliably and accurately quantitative results without the need of standards when the efficiency of the X-ray detection system is calibrated. The ion beam microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory at the University of North Texas is equipped with a 100 mm{sup 2} high purity germanium X-ray detector (Canberra GUL0110 Ultra-LEGe). In order to calibrate the efficiency of the detector for standard less PIXE analysis we have measured the X-ray yield of a set of commercially available X-ray fluorescence standards. The set contained elements from low atomic number Z = 11 (sodium) to higher atomic numbers to cover the X-ray energy region from 1.25 keV to about 20 keV where the detector is most efficient. The effective charge was obtained from the proton backscattering yield of a calibrated particle detector.

  15. Calibration model for the DCXC x-ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A physical model for the DCXC camera used in x-radiographic studies of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is described. Empirical calibration procedures, based on pulsed, bremsstrahlung sources, are proposed

  16. X-ray system signal derivation circuits for heat unit indicators and/or calibration meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliampere and kilovolt signals are monitored from the X-ray tube system high tension transformer. These signals may be connected to a heat unit indicator or a calibration meter or both. With the heat unit indicator, the heat level in an X-ray tube anode is monitored and referred to the level corresponding to the ambient room temperature as zero reference. As successive signal exposures or series of exposures are made, the X-ray tube heat loading is automatically monitored and displayed. The cooling characteristics of the tube are automatically reflected in the reading. A calibration meter may be connected to the signal derivation circuitry to indicate a plurality of operating parameters. The circuitry includes automatic scaling device for maintaining the relatively accurate signals required for the accurate operation of the heat indicator and the calibration meter. (UK)

  17. K X-ray fluorescent source for energy-channel calibration of the spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new K X-ray fluorescent source for calibrating the X or γ-ray multichannel analyzer spectrometer is introduced. A detailed description of the K fluorescent source device is given. The calibration method used and experimental results obtained are presented. The purity and efficiency of K fluorescence photons from this device are discussed. This new fluorescent source may be used as a substitute for radioactive nuclides for the energy-channel calibration of some MCA spectrometers.

  18. Calibration technique for radiation measurements in vacuum ultraviolet - soft x-ray region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a collection of the papers presented at the workshop on ''Calibration Technique for Radiation Measurements in Vacuum Ultraviolet - Soft X-ray Region'' held at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, on December 19 - 20, 1985, under the Collaborating Research Program at the Institute. The following topics were discussed at the workshop: the needs for the calibration of plasma diagnostic devices, present status of the calibration technique, use of the Synchrotron Orbit Radiations for radiometry, and others. (author)

  19. Characterization of X-ray beams by attenuation method for personnel dosemeters calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been used the attenuation method to characterize the X rays beams used for calibration of personal dosemeters at Calibration and Dosimetry Laboratory of Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN). Voltages applied to the X ray tube and the additional filters have been made according to publication ANSI No.13. Half value layer, the homogeneity coefficient and mean energy were determined from attenuation data. Average relative differences of 3, 40 and 4 % respectively were found with respect to values published in ANSI No.13. Also spectral distributions and their resolutions were determined. Relative differences of 16 and 9% respectively were found in comparison with values calculated by the Montecarlo's Method. (author)

  20. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W; Chen, Z Y; Jin, W; Huang, D W; Ding, Y H; Li, J C; Zhang, X Q; Lee, S G; Shi, Y J; Zhuang, G

    2014-11-01

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase. PMID:25430323

  1. In-flight calibration system for the INTEGRAL x-ray monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Barbanera, L.; Frutti, M.; Rubini, A.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Schnopper, H.W.

    to detect very small variations on most x-ray sources, but only if accurately calibrated. The in- flight calibration system of the JEM-X experiment is devoted to measure the response of the detection chain (detector plus electronics) in a small set of positions and energies. The data from this system...... of Amptek Cool-X15 X-ray generators. The latter is a novel product, based on a pyroelectric crystal used to generate energetic electrons that produce fluorescence lines by hitting a metallic target. We plan to use the four low intensity radioactive sources for monitoring the four independent anode...... chains, and the two x- ray tubes, one with a copper and the other with a molybdenum target, shared on the two twin detectors, for a flat illumination of the whole detectors area....

  2. Dental x-ray qualities for test and calibration purposes at CRCN/CNEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental X-ray examinations represent around 30% of the total radiological procedures involving the exposure to ionizing radiation derived from medical practices in Brazil. There are approximately 75,000 intra-oral dental X-ray units and the great majority of them are single-phase x-ray units with 50 to 70 kVp tube potentials. Despite the great number of these devices sold in Brazil, there is no regulatory or standard requirements and each manufacturer produces the x-ray units according to their own design. In spite of this lack of regulation, the Brazilian Health Regulatory Agency (ANVISA-MS) establishes some criteria which must be met for quality assurance in dental practices. In order to contribute for the quality assurances programs, a single-phase dental unit with adjustable kVp and mA was developed at CRCN, aiming to define dental X-ray beam qualities for tests and calibrations purposes. With this equipment it is possible to have continuous X-ray production during a few minutes, thanks to the size of X-ray tube head, which permits a better cooling, and the low tube current (0.2 to 1.0 mA range). Due to its characteristics, the unit can also be utilized for X-ray spectrometry purposes. Measurements of the inherent filtration and half-value layers were carried out. The radiation field size and uniformity, radiation leakage through tube shielding, and other parameters were also evaluated on the basis of ANVISA quality criteria. The X-ray spectra at 50, 60 and 70 kVp were obtained by using an Amptek CdTe detector with pinhole collimators, alignment devices and associated software. These spectra were compared with those obtained for commercial dental X-ray units. The results show that the behavior of this test equipment is similar to the one for commercial units. The X-ray qualities obtained in this work are the first step to establish X-ray beam standards for dental radiology in Brazil. (author)

  3. Energy calibration of the pixels of spectral X-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panta, Raj Kumar; Walsh, Michael F; Bell, Stephen T; Anderson, Nigel G; Butler, Anthony P; Butler, Philip H

    2015-03-01

    The energy information acquired using spectral X-ray detectors allows noninvasive identification and characterization of chemical components of a material. To achieve this, it is important that the energy response of the detector is calibrated. The established techniques for energy calibration are not practical for routine use in pre-clinical or clinical research environment. This is due to the requirements of using monochromatic radiation sources such as synchrotron, radio-isotopes, and prohibitively long time needed to set up the equipment and make measurements. To address these limitations, we have developed an automated technique for calibrating the energy response of the pixels in a spectral X-ray detector that runs with minimal user intervention. This technique uses the X-ray tube voltage (kVp) as a reference energy, which is stepped through an energy range of interest. This technique locates the energy threshold where a pixel transitions from not-counting (off) to counting (on). Similarly, we have developed a technique for calibrating the energy response of individual pixels using X-ray fluorescence generated by metallic targets directly irradiated with polychromatic X-rays, and additionally γ-rays from (241)Am. This technique was used to measure the energy response of individual pixels in CdTe-Medipix3RX by characterizing noise performance, threshold dispersion, gain variation and spectral resolution. The comparison of these two techniques shows the energy difference of 1 keV at 59.5 keV which is less than the spectral resolution of the detector (full-width at half-maximum of 8 keV at 59.5 keV). Both techniques can be used as quality control tools in a pre-clinical multi-energy CT scanner using spectral X-ray detectors. PMID:25051546

  4. Automatic Extraction of Femur Contours from Calibrated X-Ray Images using Statistical Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Dong

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Automatic identification and extraction of bone contours from x-ray images is an essential first step task for further medical image analysis. In this paper we propose a 3D statistical model based framework for the proximal femur contour extraction from calibrated x-ray images. The automatic initialization to align the 3D model with the x-ray images is solved by an Estimation of Bayesian Network Algorithm to fit a simplified multiple component geometrical model of the proximal femur to the x-ray data. Landmarks can be extracted from the geometrical model for the initialization of the 3D statistical model. The contour extraction is then accomplished by a joint registration and segmentation procedure. We iteratively updates the extracted bone contours and an instanced 3D model to fit the x-ray images. Taking the projected silhouettes of the instanced 3D model on the registered x-ray images as templates, bone contours can be extracted by a graphical model based Bayesian inference. The 3D model can then be updated by a non-rigid 2D/3D registration between the 3D statistical model and the extracted bone contours. Preliminary experiments on clinical data sets verified its validity.

  5. Calibration of a flat field soft x-ray grating spectrometer for laser produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Brown, G V; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Beiersdorfer, P; Cone, K V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Magee, E W; May, M J; Porter, F S

    2010-10-01

    We have calibrated the x-ray response of a variable line spaced grating spectrometer, known as the VSG, at the Fusion and Astrophysics Data and Diagnostic Calibration Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The VSG has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasmas, such as those created at the Jupiter Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility at LLNL and at both the Omega and Omega EP lasers at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The bandwidth of the VSG spans the range of ∼6-60 Å. The calibration results presented here include the VSG's dispersion and quantum efficiency. The dispersion is determined by measuring the x rays emitted from the hydrogenlike and heliumlike ions of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, and aluminum. The quantum efficiency is calibrated to an accuracy of 30% or better by normalizing the x-ray intensities recorded by the VSG to those simultaneously recorded by an x-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer. PMID:21034017

  6. In-flight calibration system for the INTEGRAL x-ray monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Barbanera, L.;

    1996-01-01

    to detect very small variations on most x-ray sources, but only if accurately calibrated. The in- flight calibration system of the JEM-X experiment is devoted to measure the response of the detection chain (detector plus electronics) in a small set of positions and energies. The data from this system......, together with on ground calibrations and simulations, must provide the capability to deconvolve pulse height spectra of celestial sources. The baseline for the in-flight calibration system foresees a set of four radioactive sources, maybe by Fe(superscript 55) and Cd(superscript 109) nuclides, and a pair...

  7. Patient positioning with X-ray detector self-calibration for image guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Automatic alignment estimation from projection images has a range of applications, but misaligned cameras induce inaccuracies. Calibration methods for optical cameras requiring calibration bodies or detectable features have been a matter of research for years. Not so for image guided therapy, although exact patient pose recovery is crucial. To image patient anatomy, X-ray instead of optical equipment is used. Feature detection is often infeasible. Furthermore, a method not requiring a calibration body, usable during treatment, would be desirable to improve accuracy of the patient alignment. We present a novel approach not relying on image features but combining intensity based calibration with 3D pose recovery. A stereoscopic X-ray camera model is proposed, and effects of erroneous parameters on the patient alignment are evaluated. The relevant camera parameters are automatically computed by comparison of X-ray to CT images and are incorporated in the patient alignment computation. The methods were tested with ground truth data of an anatomic phantom with artificially produced misalignments and available real-patient images from a particle therapy machine. We show that our approach can compensate patient alignment errors through mis-calibration of a camera from more than 5 mm to below 0.2 mm. Usage of images with artificial noise shows that the method is robust against image degradation of 2-5%. X-ray camera sel calibration improves accuracy when cameras are misaligned. We could show that rigid body alignment was computed more accurately and that self-calibration is possible, even if detection of corresponding image features is not. (author)

  8. Adjustment of a low energy, X-rays generator (6 kV - 50 mA). Application to X-rays detectors calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this memoir is the calibration of an aluminium photocathode X-rays photoelectric detector, in the spectral range 0,5 keV - 1,5 KeV, with a continuous X-ray source. The detectors's calibration consist to measure the detector's sensitivity versus incident energy. In order to produce monochromatic incident beam on the detector, we used a multilayer mirror whose reflectivity was characterized. The measurements are compared to those realized in an other laboratory. (authors). 36 refs., 61 figs., 13 tabs., 2 photos

  9. Pulsed versus direct current calibration of a proximity focused x-ray streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute sensitivity of a proximity focused x-ray streak tube was measured with dc Henke tube x-ray line sources. Calibration covered the photon energy range from 0.930 to 8.05 keV at five points. These data were compared to a model of sensitivity based on photocathode response and matched the model well on a relative scale. A pulsed comparison was performed using a laser-plasma x-ray source. The calculated camera sensitivity was folded with the measured spectrum and compared to measured film exposures. The predicted exposures were 6.5 times less than the measured exposures, verifying concerns that the proximity focused tube response is nonlinear with flux at low, dc flux levels. Results of dc recalibrations that varied flux levels determined the extent of this phenomenon

  10. Sub-keV x-ray calibration of plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several types of x-ray detectors have found widespread use for plasma diagnostic applications in the energy range below a few keV. Silicon diodes, photoelectric diodes, and plastic scintillators have been used to obtain diagnostic information in this region. Sub-keV calibration data for plastic scintillator detectors are reported, and the advantages and limitations of these three detectors in diagnostic measurements are compared. In a previous paper calibration data for plastic scintillators from 1.5 to 20 keV were given. In this paper the data are extended to the C-K/sub α/ line (277 eV). These data represent one application of a new sub-keV x-ray calibration facility at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

  11. Establishment of standard low energy x-ray, radioprotection levels, for calibration of instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven standard low energy X-rays fields were established, radioprotection level, at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. Five of the standard calibration qualities used at the National Physical Laboratory, England, with energies between 16 and 38 keV, and two recommended by the International Standard Organization, with energies of 33 and 48 keV, were reproduced. The calibration conditions, radiotherapy level, from 14 to 21 keV, were also verified. Different portable radiation monitors as ionization chambers and Geiger-Mueller detectors were studied in relation to their energy dependence. (author)

  12. Absolute calibration of space-resolving soft X-ray spectrograph for plasma diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshikawa, M; Kawamori, E; Watanabe, Y; Watabe, C; Yamaguchi, N; Tamano, T

    2001-01-01

    A grazing incidence flat-field soft X-ray (20-350 A) spectrograph was constructed and applied for impurity diagnostics in the GAMMA 10 fusion plasma. The spectrograph consisted of a limited height entrance slit, an aberration-corrected concave grating, a microchannel-plate intensified detector and an instant camera/a high speed solid state camera. An absolute calibration experiment for the SX spectrograph was performed at the Photon Factory in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization with monitoring the incident synchrotron beam intensity by using an absolutely calibrated XUV silicon photodiode. From the results of absolute calibration of the spectrograph, the radiation loss from the plasma was obtained.

  13. X ray spectra and qualities for use in diagnostic radiology and equipment calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this work was the standardization of radiation qualities of diagnostic X ray equipment of the Assay Laboratory of the Institute for Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy, Brazil. X ray spectra were determined from pulse height distribution measured directly on the primary beam using a high pure planar Ge detector. A program was developed to convert pulse height distribution into radiation spectra in the range from 20 to 150 keV. X ray qualities based on those used by the 'Physikalish-Technish Bundesantalt' (PTB) primary laboratory were implanted in three radiological equipment of the Assay Laboratory. These qualities simulate radiation beams on patients submitted to typical radiological examinations. Besides the spectrometric system, a reference measurement system based on an ionization chamber calibrated in air kerma was used to establish parameters such as kilovoltage, first and second half-value layer, mean energy, effective energy and inherent filtration. Our data have shown that the implantation of these radiation qualities in the Assay Laboratory results on a metrological basis for calibration of dose measurement assemblies and kV-meters, like those used by IRD to evaluate the parameters of X ray equipment around the country. A catalogue of spectral data resulting from this work is a data bank that allows various applications like dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. (author)

  14. Narrow Line X-Ray Calibration Source for High Resolution Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokin, M. S.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K. M.; Bandler, S. R.; Lee, S. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Smith, S. J.

    2014-08-01

    We are developing a narrow line calibration source for use with X-ray microcalorimeters. At energies below 300 eV fluorescent lines are intrinsically broad, making calibration of high resolution detectors difficult. This source consists of a 405 nm (3 eV) laser diode coupled to an optical fiber. The diode is pulsed to create approximately one hundred photons in a few microseconds. If the pulses are short compared to the rise time of the detector, they will be detected as single events with a total energy in the soft X-ray range. Poisson fluctuations in photon number per pulse create a comb of X-ray lines with 3 eV spacing, so detectors with energy resolution better than 2 eV are required to resolve the individual lines. Our currently unstabilized diode has a multimode width less than 1 nm, giving a 300 eV event a FWHM less than 0.1 eV. By varying the driving voltage, or pulse width, the source can produce a comb centered on a wide range of energies. The calibration events are produced at precisely known times. This allows continuous calibration of a flight mission without contaminating the observed spectrum and with minimal deadtime.

  15. Ground calibrations of the Solar Intensity X-ray Spectrometer (SIXS) on board BepiColombo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present the methods, results, and analysis of the BepiColombo SIXS instruments' ground calibrations. The aim of these calibrations was to characterize the performance of the three SIXS X-ray detectors to enable reliable spectral analysis of the solar X-ray data. The ground calibrations for characterizing the performance of the three separate HPSi (High-Purity Silicon) PIN (Positive Intrinsic Negative) X-ray detectors included the following tasks. Determination of the energy resolution as a function of photon energy at different operational temperatures, determination of the detector sensitivity within the FoV (Field of View) as a function of the off-axis and roll angles, pile-up tests for determining the speed of the read out electronics, measurements of the low energy threshold of the energy scale, i.e. the minimum measurable photon energy corresponding to the adjustable software parameter, a comparison calibration of the fluorescence line fluxes with the SMART-1 XSM FS (Flight Spare) detector, and determination of the shifting of the energy scale as a function of the ambient temperature. We also describe the method and results of determining the geometrical area of the detector apertures based on the image analysis of very high resolution photographs obtained with by the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). -- Highlights: • Ground calibrations of the X-ray detectors of SIXS were carried out in 2012. • The sensor energy scales, FoV, pile-up and low energy limits were characterized. • The SIXS detectors were found to fulfill their scientific performance requirements

  16. Calibrating Data from the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope and Associated Uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Kobelski, Adam R; Weber, Mark A; McKenzie, David E; Reeves, Katharine K

    2013-01-01

    The X-Ray Telescope (XRT) onboard the Hinode satellite, launched 23 September 2006 by the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is a joint mission between Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom to study the solar corona. In particular XRT was designed to study solar plasmas with temperatures between 1 and 10 MK with $\\approx1''$ pixels ($\\approx2''$ resolution). Prior to analysis, the data product from this instrument must be properly calibrated and data values quantified in order to assess accurately the information contained within. We present here the standard methods of calibration for these data. The calibration is performed on an empirical basis which uses the least complicated correction that accurately describes the data while suppressing spurious features. By analyzing the uncertainties remaining in the data after calibration, we conclude that the procedure is successful, as the remaining uncertainty after calibration is dominated by photon noise. This calibration software is availab...

  17. X-ray beams characterization by the attenuation method for the personal dosemeters calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The choice of the attenuation method to characterize the x-ray beams used in the calibration of personal dosemeters at the Calibration and Dosimetry Laboratory of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN). Voltages applied to the X-ray tube and the addition of filters have been made according to the publication ANSI No. 13. Half value layer, homogeneity coefficient and mean energy were determined from attenuation data. Average relative differences of 3, 40 and 4% respectively were found with respect to values published in ANSI No. 13. Also spectral distributions and their resolutions were determined. relative differences of 6 and 19% respectively were found in comparison with values calculated by the Monte Carlo Method

  18. Multi-species beam hardening calibration device for x-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evershed, Anthony N. Z.; Mills, David; Davis, Graham

    2012-10-01

    Impact-source X-ray microtomography (XMT) is a widely-used benchtop alternative to synchrotron radiation microtomography. Since X-rays from a tube are polychromatic, however, greyscale `beam hardening' artefacts are produced by the preferential absorption of low-energy photons in the beam path. A multi-material `carousel' test piece was developed to offer a wider range of X-ray attenuations from well-characterised filters than single-material step wedges can produce practically, and optimization software was developed to produce a beam hardening correction by use of the Nelder-Mead optimization method, tuned for specimens composed of other materials (such as hydroxyapatite [HA] or barium for dental applications.) The carousel test piece produced calibration polynomials reliably and with a significantly smaller discrepancy between the calculated and measured attenuations than the calibration step wedge previously in use. An immersion tank was constructed and used to simplify multi-material samples in order to negate the beam hardening effect of low atomic number materials within the specimen when measuring mineral concentration of higher-Z regions. When scanned in water at an acceleration voltage of 90 kV a Scanco AG hydroxyapatite / poly(methyl methacrylate) calibration phantom closely approximates a single-material system, producing accurate hydroxyapatite concentration measurements. This system can then be corrected for beam hardening for the material of interest.

  19. Energy Calibration of the Pixels of Spectral X-ray Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Panta, Raj Kumar; Bell, Stephen T; Anderson, Nigel G; Butler, Anthony P; Butler, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    The energy information acquired using spectral X-ray detectors allows noninvasive identification and characterization of chemical components of a material. To achieve this, it is important that the energy response of the detector is calibrated. The established techniques for energy calibration are not practical for routine use in pre-clinical or clinical research environment. This is due to the requirements of using monochromatic radiation sources such as synchrotron, radio-isotopes, and prohibitively long time needed to set up the equipment and make measurements. To address these limitations, we have developed an automated technique for calibrating the energy response of the pixels in a spectral X-ray detector that runs with minimal user intervention. This technique uses the X-ray tube voltage (kVp) as a reference energy, which is stepped through an energy range of interest. This technique locates the energy threshold where a pixel transitions from not-counting (off) to counting (on). Similarly, we have deve...

  20. Calibration of the Soft X-ray Telescopes (SXT) Onboard the ASTRO-H Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Yang; Okajima, Takashi; Serlemitsos, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    ASTRO-H is an astrophysics satellite dedicated for non-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic study on selective celestial X-ray sources. Among the onboard instruments there are four Wolter-I X-ray mirrors of their reflectors' figure in conical approximation. Two of the four are soft X-ray mirrors, of which the energy range is from a few hundred eV to 15 keV. The focal point instruments will be a calorimeter (SXS) and a CCD camera (SXI), respectively. The mirrors were in quadrant configuration with photons being reflected consecutively in the primary and secondary stage before landing on the focal plane of 5.6 m away from the interface between the two stages. The reflectors of the mirror are made of heat-formed aluminum substrate of the thickness gauged of 152 m, 229 m, and 305 m of the alloy 5052 H-19, followed by epoxy replication on gold-sputtered smooth Pyrex cylindrical mandrels to acquire the X-ray reflective surface. The epoxy layer is 10 m nominal and surface gold layer of 0.2 m. Improvements on angular response over its predecessors, e.g. Astro-E1/Suzaku mirrors, come from error reduction on the figure, the roundness, and the grazing angle/radius mismatching of the reflecting surface, and tighter specs and mechanical strength on supporting structure to reduce the reflector positioning and the assembly errors. Each soft x-ray telescope (SXT), FM1 or FM2, were integrated from four independent quadrants of mirrors. The stray-light baffles, in quadrant configuration, were mounted onto the integrated mirror. Thermal control units were attached to the perimeter of the integrated mirror to keep the mirror within operating temperature in space. The completed instrument went through a series of optical alignment, thus made the quadrant images confocal and their optical axes in parallel to achieve highest throughput possible. Environmental tests were carried out, and optical quality of the telescopes has been confirmed. The optical and x-ray calibrations also include

  1. X-Ray Ccds for Space Applications: Calibration, Radiation Hardness, and Use for Measuring the Spectrum of the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith Charles

    1995-01-01

    This thesis has two distinct components. One concerns the physics of the high energy resolution X-ray charge coupled devices (CCD) detectors used to measure the cosmic X-ray background (XRB) spectrum. The other involves the measurements and analysis of the XRB spectrum and instrumental background with these detectors on board the advanced satellite for cosmology and astrophysics (ASCA). The XRB has a soft component and a hard component divided at ~2 keV. The hard component is extremely isotropic, suggesting a cosmological origin. The soft component is extremely anisotropic. A galactic component most likely dominates the soft band with X-ray line emission due to a hot plasma surrounding the solar system. ASCA is one of the first of a class of missions designed to overlap the hard and soft X-ray bands. The X-ray CCD's energy resolution allows us to spectrally separate the galactic and cosmological components. Also, the resolution offers the ability to test several specific cosmological models which would make up the XRB. I have concentrated on models for the XRB origin which include active galactic nuclei (AGN) as principal components. I use ASCA data to put spectral constraints on the AGN synthesis model for the XRB. The instrumental portion of this thesis concerns the development and calibration of the X-ray CCDs. I designed, built and operated an X-ray calibration facility for these detectors. It makes use of a reflection grating spectrometer to measure absolute detection efficiency, characteristic absorption edge strengths, and spectral redistribution in the CCD response function. Part of my thesis research includes a study of radiation damage mechanisms in CCDs. This work revealed radiation damage-induced degradation in the spectral response to X-rays. It also uncovered systematic effects which affect both data analysis and CCD design. I have developed a model involving trap energy levels in the CCD band gap structure. These traps reduce the efficiency in which

  2. Application of an EMCCD Camera for Calibration of Hard X-Ray Telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent technological innovations now make it feasible to construct hard x-ray telescopes for space-based astronomical missions. Focusing optics are capable of improving the sensitivity in the energy range above 10 keV by orders of magnitude compared to previously used instruments. The last decade has seen focusing optics developed for balloon experiments and they will soon be implemented in approved space missions such as the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and ASTRO-H. The full characterization of x-ray optics for astrophysical and solar imaging missions, including measurement of the point spread function (PSF) as well as scattering and reflectivity properties of substrate coatings, requires a very high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, photon counting and energy discriminating, large area detector. Novel back-thinned Electron Multiplying Charge-Coupled Devices (EMCCDs) are highly suitable detectors for ground-based calibrations. Their chip can be optically coupled to a microcolumnar CsI(Tl) scintillator via a fiberoptic taper. Not only does this device exhibit low noise and high spatial resolution inherent to CCDs, but the EMCCD is also able to handle high frame rates due to its controllable internal gain. Additionally, thick CsI(Tl) yields high detection efficiency for x-rays. This type of detector has already proven to be a unique device very suitable for calibrations in astrophysics: such a camera was used to support the characterization of the performance for all NuSTAR optics. Further optimization will enable similar cameras to be improved and used to calibrate x-ray telescopes for future space missions. In this paper, we discuss the advantages of using an EMCCD to calibrate hard x-ray optics. We will illustrate the promising features of this detector solution using examples of data obtained during the ground calibration of the NuSTAR telescopes performed at Columbia University during 2010/2011. Finally, we give an outlook on ongoing

  3. Calibration Method for Confocal X-Ray Microanalysis with Polychromatic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sosa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To apply the fundamental parameters method at the confocal setup the knowledge of the sensitivity of the spectrometer is required which depends on the characteristics of two X-ray lenses: one in the excitation channel and another in the detection channel. For the particular case of polychromatic excitation, the theory shows that the focalization properties of the excitation lens for all incident energies affect the X-ray fluorescence intensity. Therefore the traditional calibration method based on the measurement of standard samples becomes unstable since the number of required fitting parameters is too high. To reduce these parameters a previous characterization of the excitation lens by a simulation program was employed giving rise to a simplified confocal setup calibration. The developed calibration method was applied for a confocal spectrometer implemented in the Brazilian Synchrotron Radiation Source (LNLS with white beam. The experimental parameters of the sensitivity were obtained from depth profile analysis of several pure thin films. The calibrated confocal setup was used to quantify reference standards in order to validate the calibration procedure. Our results for elemental concentrations show relative errors less than 15% for the quantitative analysis of a light matrix reference standard.

  4. Relative calibration of photodiodes in the soft-x-ray spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of obtaining a relative calibration of Si photodiodes for the spectral range of soft x rays (1--30 keV) is presented. A simple mathematical model of the p-n diode is adopted which allows the response to be described in terms of a small set of parameters. The diffusion length as well as the thickness of a dead layer below the front surface of the diodes are obtained from measurements of angular dependences of the photoinduced current. It is shown that a precise characterization of the diode response and an accurate relative calibration can be obtained using this method. However, it was found that the presence of a dead layer a few tenths of a micrometer thick can pose severe restrictions on the use of planar diode arrays in x-ray tomography systems where uniformity of response is crucial. The method has been applied to the diode arrays equipping the x-ray tomography system built for the TCV tokamak, a magnetic fusion research device. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  5. Low and medium energy standard X-Ray calibration facility in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to increased use of radioisotopes in medical, industrial, R and D etc., applications, the need of radiation protection level instruments has increased many folds. Type testing of newly developed instruments is essential before their routine use. Depending on intended photon energy range specified by manufacturer, the evaluation of energy response characteristics of the instrument requires International Organization for Standardization (ISO) recommended for low and medium X-ray beam qualities. Also type testing as per international standards provides confidence, traceability in measurements and to ascertain healthy operating condition of these instruments for their intended long time use. Calibration of radiation monitoring instruments at low and medium energy X-ray is presently carried out only at the national apex laboratory (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre in India). The beam qualities and measurement techniques are available as per recommendations of ISO 4037 and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Report Series 16. Present paper is intended to provide information about the low and medium energy standard X-ray calibration facility available at Radiation Standards Section, Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre for radiation field users and instrument manufacturers/developers to avail this facility

  6. Calibration of X-Ray diffractometer by the experimental comparison method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudka, A. P., E-mail: dudka@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    A software for calibrating an X-ray diffractometer with area detector has been developed. It is proposed to search for detector and goniometer calibration models whose parameters are reproduced in a series of measurements on a reference crystal. Reference (standard) crystals are prepared during the investigation; they should provide the agreement of structural models in repeated analyses. The technique developed has been used to calibrate Xcalibur Sapphire and Eos, Gemini Ruby (Agilent) and Apex x8 and Apex Duo (Bruker) diffractometers. The main conclusions are as follows: the calibration maps are stable for several years and can be used to improve structural results, verified CCD detectors exhibit significant inhomogeneity of the efficiency (response) function, and a Bruker goniometer introduces smaller distortions than an Agilent goniometer.

  7. Registration-based geometric calibration of industrial X-ray tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a general and efficient method for geometrical calibration of industrial X-ray tomography systems without the use of any phantom. In the field of nondestructive testing (NDT), an accurate numerical model of the object is usually available. By extending the classical volume-to-image registration framework, the method estimates both the parameters related to the position of the object, and those related to the positions and the orientations of the X-ray source, the detector and the rotation axis. Only using the projections data and the numerical model of the object, the values of the geometrical parameters are estimated with a good accuracy. Numerical experiments show that the method provides good results, even if the initialization of the process is far from the real values. (authors)

  8. CDRH FOIA Electronic Reading Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDRH FOIA electronic reading room contains frequently requested information via the Freedom of Information Act from the Center for Devices and Radiological...

  9. Calibration of the NuSTAR High-energy Focusing X-ray Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Markwardt, Craig B.; An, Hongjun; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Bachetti, Matteo; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Kitaguchi, Takao; Bhalerao, Varun; Boggs, Steve; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Fuerst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J.; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Walton, Dominic J.; Jørgen Westergaard, Niels; Zhang, William W.

    2015-09-01

    We present the calibration of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) X-ray satellite. We used the Crab as the primary effective area calibrator and constructed a piece-wise linear spline function to modify the vignetting response. The achieved residuals for all off-axis angles and energies, compared to the assumed spectrum, are typically better than ±2% up to 40 keV and 5%-10% above due to limited counting statistics. An empirical adjustment to the theoretical two-dimensional point-spread function (PSF) was found using several strong point sources, and no increase of the PSF half-power diameter has been observed since the beginning of the mission. We report on the detector gain calibration, good to 60 eV for all grades, and discuss the timing capabilities of the observatory, which has an absolute timing of ±3 ms. Finally, we present cross-calibration results from two campaigns between all the major concurrent X-ray observatories (Chandra, Swift, Suzaku, and XMM-Newton), conducted in 2012 and 2013 on the sources 3C 273 and PKS 2155-304, and show that the differences in measured flux is within ˜10% for all instruments with respect to NuSTAR.

  10. Calibration of the NuSTAR High Energy Focusing X-ray Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, Kristin K; Markwardt, Craig; An, Hongjun; Grefenstette, Brian W; Bachetti, Matteo; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Kitaguchi, Takao; Bhalerao, Varun; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Fuerst, Felix; Walton, Dominic J; Hailey, Charles J; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Westergaard, Niels-Jørgen; Zhang, William

    2015-01-01

    We present the calibration of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) X-ray satellite. We used the Crab as the primary effective area calibrator and constructed a piece-wise linear spline function to modify the vignetting response. The achieved residuals for all off-axis angles and energies, compared to the assumed spectrum, are typically better than +/-2% up to 40 keV and 5--10% above due to limited counting statistics. An empirical adjustment to the theoretical 2D point spread function (PSF) was found using several strong point sources, and no increase of the PSF half power diameter (HPD) has been observed since the beginning of the mission. We report on the detector gain calibration, good to 60 eV for all grades, and discuss the timing capabilities of the observatory, which has an absolute timing of +/-3ms. Finally we present cross-calibration results from two campaigns between all the major concurrent X-ray observatories Chandra, Swift, Suzaku and XMM-Newton, conducted in 2012 and 2013 on the s...

  11. Systematic calibration of an integrated x-ray and optical tomography system for preclinical radiation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yidong, E-mail: yidongyang@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33136 (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Wong, John W. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Eslami, Sohrab; Iordachita, Iulian I. [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Patterson, Michael S. [Juravinski Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S4K1 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    .0% difference between simulated and measured signal. The calibration of the entire system was confirmed through the CBCT and BLT reconstruction of a bioluminescence source placed inside a tissue-simulating optical phantom. Using a spatial region constraint, the source position was reconstructed with less than 1 mm error and the source strength reconstructed with less than 24% error. Conclusions: A practical and systematic method has been developed to calibrate an integrated x-ray and optical tomography imaging system, including the respective CBCT and optical tomography system calibration and the geometrical calibration of the entire system. The method can be modified and adopted to calibrate CBCT and optical tomography systems that are operated independently or hybrid x-ray and optical tomography imaging systems.

  12. Systematic calibration of an integrated x-ray and optical tomography system for preclinical radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    .0% difference between simulated and measured signal. The calibration of the entire system was confirmed through the CBCT and BLT reconstruction of a bioluminescence source placed inside a tissue-simulating optical phantom. Using a spatial region constraint, the source position was reconstructed with less than 1 mm error and the source strength reconstructed with less than 24% error. Conclusions: A practical and systematic method has been developed to calibrate an integrated x-ray and optical tomography imaging system, including the respective CBCT and optical tomography system calibration and the geometrical calibration of the entire system. The method can be modified and adopted to calibrate CBCT and optical tomography systems that are operated independently or hybrid x-ray and optical tomography imaging systems

  13. Calibration-free quantification of interior properties of porous media with x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for interpreting the values of x-ray attenuation coefficients reconstructed in computed tomography of porous media, while overcoming the ambiguity caused by the multichromatic nature of x-rays, dilution by void, and material heterogeneity. The method enables determination of porosity without relying on calibration or image segmentation or thresholding to discriminate pores from solid material. It distinguishes between solution-accessible and inaccessible pores, and provides the spatial and frequency distributions of solid-matrix material in a heterogeneous medium. This is accomplished by matching an image of a sample saturated with a contrast solution with that saturated with a transparent solution. Voxels occupied with solid-material and inaccessible pores are identified by the fact that they maintain the same location and image attributes in both images, with voxels containing inaccessible pores appearing empty in both images. Fully porous and accessible voxels exhibit the maximum contrast, while the rest are porous voxels containing mixtures of pore solutions and solid. This matching process is performed with an image registration computer code, and image processing software that requires only simple subtraction and multiplication (scaling) processes. The process is demonstrated in dolomite (non-uniform void distribution, homogeneous solid matrix) and sandstone (nearly uniform void distribution, heterogeneous solid matrix) samples, and its overall performance is shown to compare favorably with a method based on calibration and thresholding. - Highlights: • A method is presented for quantifying x-ray CT data for porous media. • The method neither requires calibration nor segmentation nor thresholding. • We use voxel matching between images of a sample saturated with two distinct solutions. • Method is demonstrated for micro-CT images of dolomite and sandstone samples. • Overall performance compares favorably with a calibration

  14. Calibration of thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF : Mg : Ti) at different x-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the distance between the x-ray target (source) and the reference point on the housing of the newly installed secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) at Sudan Atomic Energy Commission in Soba were determined, using the inverse square law. Six x-ray qualities were used at different positions. The results showed that the distance of the source to reference point is found to be (22± 2 cm). The calibration factors for the (LIF: Mg: Ti) TLD chips with the harshow model 2000C reader was determined for x-ray energies for quality (3) (KV = 80, filtration (1mm Al +5.30 mm Cu, HVL= 0.59 mm Cu), and for quality (4) (KV = 100, filtration ( 1mm Al + 5.30 mm Cu), HVL= 1.15 mm Cu) at 3 meter distance. The calibration factors for these two qualities is found to be ( 0.1030 ± 0.0002 ), (o.1098± 0.0004 ) m Gray per nano coulomb respectively. These values m and those obtained earlier at SAEC (1996) lab, by using Sr-90 irradiator (Beta- energy 2.27 MeV) calibration factor is found to be ( 0.1030 mGray per nano coulomb), confirm that within accuracies needed at radiation protection level, ( LiF: Mg: TI ) TLDs chips can be considered as an energy independent detector in the studied energy range. It is suggested that further measurements should be carried for other energies for determination of calibration factors for the full range of energies in use. ( Author )

  15. Automated correction on X-rays calibration using transmission chamber and LabVIEWTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncertainties during prolonged exposure times on X-rays calibration procedures at the Instruments Calibration facilities at IPEN may suffer from efficiency (and therefore intensity) variations on the industrial X-Ray generator used. Using a transmission chamber as an online reference chamber during the whole irradiation process is proposed in order to compensate for such error source. Also temperature (and pressure) fluctuations may arise from the performance limited calibration room air conditioning system. As an open ionization chamber, that monitor chamber does require calculation of a correction factor due to the temperature and pressure effects on air density. Sending and processing data from all related instruments (electrometer, thermometer and barometer) can be more easily achieved by interfacing them to a host computer running an especially developed algorithm using LabVIEWTM environment which will not only apply the proper correction factors during runtime, but also determine the exact length of time to reach a desired condition, which can be: time period, charge collected, or air kerma, based on the previous calibration of the whole system using a reference chamber traceable to primary standard dosimetry laboratories. When performing such calibration, two temperature sensors (secondary standard thermistors) are simultaneously used, one for the transmission chamber, and other for the reference chamber. As the substitution method is used during actual customer's calibration, the readings from the second thermistor can also be used when desired for further corrections. Use of LabVIEWTM programming language allowed for a shorter development time, and it is also extremely convenient to make things easier when improvements and modifications are called for. (author)

  16. Maximum-Likelihood Calibration of an X-ray Computed Tomography System

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Jared W.; Van Holen, Roel; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2010-01-01

    We present a maximum-likelihood (ML) method for calibrating the geometrical parameters of an x-ray computed tomography (CT) system. This method makes use of the full image data and not a reduced set of data. This algorithm is particularly useful for CT systems that change their geometry during the CT acquisition, such as an adaptive CT scan. Our ML search method uses a contracting-grid algorithm that does not require initial starting values to perform its estimate, thus avoiding problems asso...

  17. Calibration of X-ray densitometers for the determination of uranium and plutonium concentrations in reprocessing input and product solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 1985 a calibration exercise has been carried out, which included the calibration of the KfK K-Edge Densitometer for uranium assay in the uranium product solutions from reprocessing, and the calibration of the Hybrid K-Edge/K-XRF Instrument for the determination of total uranium and plutonium in reprocessing input solutions. The calibration measuremnts performed with the two X-ray densitometers are described and analyzed, and calibration constants are evaluated from the obtained results. (orig.)

  18. Raytracing with MARX: x-ray observatory design, calibration, and support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John E.; Bautz, Marshall W.; Dewey, Daniel; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Houck, John C.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Marshall, Herman L.; Nowak, Michael A.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Smith, Randall K.

    2012-09-01

    MARX is a portable ray-trace program that was originally developed to simulate event data from the trans- mission grating spectrometers on-board the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO). MARX has since evolved to include detailed models of all CXO science instruments and has been further modified to serve as an event simulator for future X-ray observatory design concepts. We first review a number of CXO applications of MARX to demonstrate the roles such a program could play throughout the life of a mission, including its design and calibration, the production of input data products for the development of the various software pipelines, and for observer proposal planning. We describe how MARX was utilized in the design of a proposed future X-ray spectroscopy mission called ÆGIS (Astrophysics Experiment for Grating and Imaging Spectroscopy), a mission concept optimized for the 0.2 to 1 keV soft X-ray band. ÆGIS consists of six independent Critical Angle Transmission Grating Spectrometers (CATGS) arranged to provide a resolving power of 3000 and an effective area exceeding 1000 cm2 across its passband. Such high spectral resolution and effective area will permit ÆGIS to address many astrophysics questions including those that pertain to the evolution of Large Scale Structure of the universe, and the behavior of matter at very high densities. The MARX ray-trace of the ÆGIS spectrometer yields quantitative estimates of how the spectrometer’s performance is affected by misalignments between the various system elements, and by deviations of those elements from their idealized geometry. From this information, we are able to make the appropriate design tradeoffs to maximize the performance of the system.

  19. Using the X-pinch x-ray source to Cross Calibrate new X-ray films with DEF from 1 - 10 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Chandler, K. M.; Pikuz, S. A.; Mitchell, M. D.; Hammer, D. A.; Knauer, J.; Meyerhofer, D.; Carpenter, B.

    2004-11-01

    Due to the recent cessation of the production of DEF x-ray film, cross calibration with other films has become necessary in order to find a replacement for DEF. DEF is sensitive over a large energy range, 2 - 35 keV, with peak sensitivity in the range of 2.5 - 5 keV, and is used in many applications. Cross calibration tests were carried out for the following Kodak films: BiomaxMR, BiomaxXAR, M100, Technical Pan, and T-Max and the same development procedures as described by Henke et al.^2 were followed for all films in every test. Various wire materials were used for the X pinches, including Al, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pd, and Ti, to span the desired x-ray energy range. In each test, a convex mica spectrograph and a Focusing Spectrometer with Spatial Resolution in 1D (FSSR-1D) with a spherically bent mica crystal were used with two pieces of 35 mm film that were cut in half. One half piece of DEF and one half piece of one of the aforementioned films were placed in each of the spectrometers so that both films were exposed by the same x-ray fluence and spectrum in every case. The same spectrum was recorded on both films in each spectrometer so that a direct comparison of the spectral sensitivities is possible. The results of these cross-calibrations will be presented and discussed. This research was supported largely by the SSAA program of the NNSA under DOE Cooperative agreement DE-FC03-02NA00057 with Cornell University. ^2Henke, et. al, "High-energy x-ray response of photographic films: models and measurement" J.Opt.Soc.AmB Vol.3, No.11, Nov 1986.

  20. Predictive sensor based x-ray calibration using a physical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many computer assisted surgery systems are based on intraoperative x-ray images. To achieve reliable and accurate results these images have to be calibrated concerning geometric distortions, which can be distinguished between constant distortions and distortions caused by magnetic fields. Instead of using an intraoperative calibration phantom that has to be visible within each image resulting in overlaying markers, the presented approach directly takes advantage of the physical background of the distortions. Based on a computed physical model of an image intensifier and a magnetic field sensor, an online compensation of distortions can be achieved without the need of an intraoperative calibration phantom. The model has to be adapted once to each specific image intensifier through calibration, which is based on an optimization algorithm systematically altering the physical model parameters, until a minimal error is reached. Once calibrated, the model is able to predict the distortions caused by the measured magnetic field vector and build an appropriate dewarping function. The time needed for model calibration is not yet optimized and takes up to 4 h on a 3 GHz CPU. In contrast, the time needed for distortion correction is less than 1 s and therefore absolutely acceptable for intraoperative use. First evaluations showed that by using the model based dewarping algorithm the distortions of an XRII with a 21 cm FOV could be significantly reduced. The model was able to predict and compensate distortions by approximately 80% to a remaining error of 0.45 mm (max) (0.19 mm rms)

  1. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS): Results from Gusev Crater and Calibration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B.; Dreibus, G.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.; Waenke, H.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.; Squyres, S.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of rocks and soils on Mars analyzed during the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit Mission was determined by X-ray analyses with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). Details of the data analysis method and the instrument calibration are presented. Measurements performed on Mars to address geometry effects and background contributions are shown. Cross calibration measurements among several instrument sensors and sources are discussed. An unintentional swap of the two flight instruments is evaluated. New concentration data acquired during the first 470 sols of rover Spirit in Gusev Crater are presented. There are two geological regions, the Gusev plains and the Columbia Hills. The plains contain soils that are very similar to previous landing sites on Mars. A meteoritic component in the soil is identified. Rocks in the plains revealed thin weathering rinds. The underlying abraded rock was classified as primitive basalt. One of these rocks contained significant Br that is probably associated with vein-filling material of different composition. One of the trenches showed large subsurface enrichments of Mg, S, and Br. Disturbed soils and rocks in the Columbia Hills revealed different elemental compositions. These rocks are significantly weathered and enriched in mobile elements, such as P, S, Cl, or Br. Even abraded rock surfaces have high Br concentrations. Thus, in contrast to the rocks and soils in the Gusev Plains, the Columbia Hills material shows more significant evidence of ancient aqueous alteration.

  2. Setting of the soft X-ray field for the calibration of the dosimeters used in mammographic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to produce a cheap and stable X-ray generator system for calibration of dosimeters used in mammographic field, a dummy source of mammographic X-ray was developed using a tungsten (W) target X-ray tube and a molybdenum (Mo) filter. The photon fluence spectra of mammographic equipment were calculated using Birch's formula and aluminum (Al) attenuation curves were derived. The Al attenuation curves of X-rays from W target with Mo filter of various thicknesses were similarly obtained. Comparing the similarities of attenuation curves, the best fit Mo filter thickness was chosen. Consequently, a 0.04 mm thick Mo plus a 4 mm thick poly-methylmethacrylate filter were chosen to be added to W target industrial X-ray tube. The similarity of Al attenuation curves were verified by ionization chamber measurements. (author)

  3. The beam-based calibration of an X-ray pinhole camera at SSRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pinhole camera for imaging X-ray synchrotron radiation from a dipole magnet is now in operation at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring. The electron beam. size is derived by unfolding the radiation image and the point spread function (PSF) with deconvolution techniques. The performance of the pinhole is determined by the accuracy of the PSF measurement. This article will focus on a beam-based calibration scheme to measure the PSF system by varying the beam images with different quadrupole settings and fitting them with the corresponding theoretical beam sizes. Applying this method at SSRF, the PSF value of the pinhole is revised from 37 to 44 μm. The deviation in beam size between the theoretical value and the measured value is minimized to 4% after calibration. This optimization allows us to observe the horizontal disturbance due to injection down to as small as 0.5 μm. (authors)

  4. On-Orbit Performance and Calibration of the Soft X-Ray Telescope on Yohkoh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Loren W.

    2016-02-01

    This paper documents details of the on-orbit performance, data problem solving, and calibration of the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) experiment on Yohkoh. This information is important to a full understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the SXT data set. The paper begins with summaries of SXT calibration issues and how they have been addressed, operational anomalies experienced during the mission, and a brief discussion of the SXT optical train. The following section on the accuracy of Yohkoh pointing determination provides information important for alignment of SXT images with each other and with other solar data. The remainder of the paper gives details of work by the experiment team to understand and ameliorate the many instrument anomalies and changes which impacted the scientific data.

  5. CALIBRATING THE CORRELATION BETWEEN BLACK HOLE MASS AND X-RAY VARIABILITY AMPLITUDE: X-RAY ONLY BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND ULTRA-LUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calibration is made for the correlation between the X-ray Variability Amplitude (XVA) and black hole (BH) mass. The correlation for 21 reverberation-mapped Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) appears very tight, with an intrinsic dispersion of 0.20 dex. The intrinsic dispersion of 0.27 dex can be obtained if BH masses are estimated from the stellar velocity dispersions. We further test the uncertainties of mass estimates from XVAs for objects that have been observed multiple times with good enough data quality. The results show that the XVAs derived from multiple observations change by a factor of 3. This means that BH mass uncertainty from a single observation is slightly worse than either reverberation-mapping or stellar velocity dispersion measurements; however, BH mass estimates with X-ray data only can be more accurate if the mean XVA value from more observations is used. With this calibrated relation, the BH mass and accretion rate may be determined for a large sample of AGNs with the planned International X-ray Observatory mission. Proper interpretation of the first AGN X-ray quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO), seen in the Seyfert galaxy RE J1034+396, depends on its BH mass, which is not currently known very well. Applying this relation, the BH mass of RE J1034+396 is found to be 4+3-2 x 106 Msun. The high end of the mass range follows the relationship between the 2f0 frequencies of high-frequency QPO and the BH masses derived from the Galactic X-ray binaries. We also calculate the high-frequency constant C = 2.37 Msun Hz-1 from 21 reverberation-mapped AGNs. As suggested by Gierlinski et al., MBH = C/CM, where CM is the high-frequency variability derived from XVA. Given the similar shape of power-law dominated X-ray spectra in ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) and AGNs, this can be applied to BH mass estimates of ULXs. We discuss the observed QPO frequencies and BH mass estimates in the ULXs M82 X-1 and NGC 5408 X-1 and favor ULXs as intermediate mass BH systems.

  6. In-flight PSF calibration of the NuSTAR hard X-ray optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, Hongjun; Madsen, Kristin K.; Westergaard, Niels J.;

    2014-01-01

    We present results of the point spread function (PSF) calibration of the hard X-ray optics of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Immediately post-launch, NuSTAR has observed bright point sources such as Cyg X-1, Vela X-1, and Her X-1 for the PSF calibration. We use the point sour...

  7. Empirical versus theoretical calibration of a total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (TXRF) is a well established technique for trace analysis. It has been developed in the last ten years, being applied in a wide range of analytical problems. Most of the literature regarding TXRF analysis for quantification reports the use of a relative sensitivity calibration curve. This means internal standardization is required with an element that is not present in the sample. In the present work the quantification of different samples was done by TXRF using two methods of calibration and calculation of the sensitivity factors: a) multielemental solutions were prepared and measured in the TXRF unit to calculate the relative sensitivity factors with respect to selenium chosen as reference; b) fundamental parameters for molybdenum excitation were taken from tables reported in the literature to calculate the sensitivities. Reference materials were analyzed to establish the adecuacy of both methods of calibration. It was concluded that the method of multielemental solutions is adecuate for quantification using a TXRF system. Due to the special excitation conditions in the total reflection geometry, the use of fundamental parameters reported in the literature cited is an incorrect procedure for TXRF calibration if direct gross radiation is applied to the samples (not filtered radiation) because the excitation beam is not monoenergetic. (author)

  8. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Hanbean; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Yun, Seungman [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Kyung, E-mail: hokyung@pusan.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Advanced Medical Engineering Research, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ∼5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative

  9. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ∼5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative

  10. Effective x-ray attenuation coefficient measurements from two full field digital mammography systems for data calibration applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jerry A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Currently, there is no standard method for measuring this important factor. Work presented here represents an essential component of an ongoing project that seeks to determine the appropriate method for calibrating (standardizing mammography image data to account for the x-ray image acquisition influences. Longer term goals of this project are to make accurate breast density measurements in support of risk studies. Methods Logarithmic response calibration curves and effective x-ray attenuation coefficients were measured from two full field digital mammography (FFDM systems with breast tissue equivalent phantom imaging and compared. Normalization methods were studied to assess the possibility of reducing the amount of calibration data collection. The percent glandular calibration map functional form was investigated. Spatial variations in the calibration data were used to assess the uncertainty in the calibration application by applying error propagation analyses. Results Logarithmic response curves are well approximated as linear. Measured effective x-ray attenuation coefficients are characteristic quantities independent of the imaging system and are in agreement with those predicted numerically. Calibration data collection can be reduced by applying a simple normalization technique. The calibration map is well approximated as linear. Intrasystem calibration variation was on the order of four percent, which was approximately half of the intersystem variation. Conclusion FFDM systems provide a quantitative output, and the calibration quantities presented here may be used for data acquired on similar FFDM systems.

  11. Characteristic parameters analysis on diagnostic X-ray beams for dosemeter calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation metrology is the base to achieve reliable dose measurements in ali areas; it is also part of the framework that is established to assure radiation protection procedures in order to avoid or minimize the harmful biological effect that may be caused by ionizing radiation. A well done metrology means the use of reliable instruments that comply with standard performance requirements worldwide accepted. Those instruments are expected to be calibrated by Metrology Laboratories under well defined conditions. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in Standard 61267 established the reference radiations for medical diagnostic x-ray equipment that are recommended to be used for calibrating dosimetric systems for diagnostic dosimetry. In this work, X-ray beam qualities were established in a Calibration Laboratory and their characteristics were analyzed through the measurement of beam parameters like inherent tube filtration, beam uniformity and field size, energy spectra and peak voltage for additional filtration with 94.425 por cent and 99.999 por cent purity filters. Also, the first half-value layer and the homogeneity coefficient were measured for the three RQR 2, RQR 6 and RQR 10 IEC beam qualities and they were analyzed according to the IEC standard. Air-kerma measurements were carried out with an ionization chamber that had its reliability confirmed through repetition and reproducibility reading tests. In 50 sets of measurements the maximum standard deviation found of 10 successive readings was 0.19 %; the maximum shift of the reading mean value at a fixed geometry condition was 0.80 % with an overall standard deviation of 0.23 %. Results showed that the use of different purity filters did not cause a relevant influence on the beam energy spectra. An ionization chamber was also calibrated against a standard dosimeter in ali implemented reference radiations and the relevant sources of uncertainties were estimated. Calibration could be done

  12. X-ray and gamma-ray standards for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Measurements and Evaluation of X- and Gamma-Ray Standards for Detector Efficiency Calibration in 1986 with the aim of alleviating the generation of such discrepancies. Within the framework of this CRP, representatives of nine research groups from six Member States and one international organization performed a number of precise measurements and systematic in-depth evaluations of the required decay data. They have also contributed to the development of evaluation methodology and measurement techniques, and stimulated a number of such studies at laboratories not directly involved in the IAEA project. The results of the work of the CRP, which was finished in 1990, are presented in this report. Recommended values of half-lives and photon emission probabilities are given for a carefully selected set of radionuclides that are suitable for detector efficiency calibration (X-rays from 5 to 90 keV and gamma-rays from 30 to about 3000 keV). Detector efficiency calibration for higher gamma-ray energies (up to 14 MeV) is also considered. The evaluation procedures used to obtain the recommended values and their estimated uncertainties are reported, and a summary of the remaining discrepancies is given. Refs and tabs

  13. Calibration standard of body tissue with magnetic nanocomposites for MRI and X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Helene; Woodward, Robert; House, Michael; Engineer, Diana; Feindel, Kirk; Dutz, Silvio; Odenbach, Stefan; StPierre, Tim

    2016-05-01

    We present a first study of a long-term phantom for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and X-ray imaging of biological tissues with magnetic nanocomposites (MNC) suitable for 3-dimensional and quantitative imaging of tissues after, e.g. magnetically assisted cancer treatments. We performed a cross-calibration of X-ray microcomputed tomography (XμCT) and MRI with a joint calibration standard for both imaging techniques. For this, we have designed a phantom for MRI and X-ray computed tomography which represents biological tissue enriched with MNC. The developed phantoms consist of an elastomer with different concentrations of multi-core MNC. The matrix material is a synthetic thermoplastic gel, PermaGel (PG). The developed phantoms have been analyzed with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Relaxometry (Bruker minispec mq 60) at 1.4 T to obtain R2 transverse relaxation rates, with SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) magnetometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) to verify the magnetite concentration, and with XμCT and 9.4 T MRI to visualize the phantoms 3-dimensionally and also to obtain T2 relaxation times. A specification of a sensitivity range is determined for standard imaging techniques X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and MRI as well as with NMR. These novel phantoms show a long-term stability over several months up to years. It was possible to suspend a particular MNC within the PG reaching a concentration range from 0 mg/ml to 6.914 mg/ml. The R2 relaxation rates from 1.4 T NMR-relaxometry show a clear connection (R2=0.994) with MNC concentrations between 0 mg/ml and 4.5 mg/ml. The MRI experiments have shown a linear correlation of R2 relaxation and MNC concentrations as well but in a range between MNC concentrations of 0 mg/ml and 1.435 mg/ml. It could be shown that XμCT displays best moderate and high MNC concentrations. The sensitivity range for this particular XμCT apparatus yields from 0.569 mg/ml to 6.914 mg/ml. The

  14. Facilities and techniques for x-ray diagnostic calibration in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a pioneer in the field of x-ray diagnostic calibration for more than 20 years. We have built steady state x-ray sources capable of supplying fluorescent lines of high spectral purity in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range, and these sources have been used in the calibration of x-ray detectors, mirrors, crystals, filters, and film. This paper discusses our calibration philosophy and techniques, and describes some of our x-ray sources. Examples of actual calibration data are presented as well

  15. A fully Bayesian method for jointly fitting instrumental calibration and X-ray spectral models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jin; Yu, Yaming [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Van Dyk, David A. [Statistics Section, Imperial College London, Huxley Building, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Drake, Jeremy; Ratzlaff, Pete [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Connors, Alanna; Meng, Xiao-Li, E-mail: jinx@uci.edu, E-mail: yamingy@ics.uci.edu, E-mail: dvandyk@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: pratzlaff@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: meng@stat.harvard.edu [Department of Statistics, Harvard University, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Owing to a lack of robust principled methods, systematic instrumental uncertainties have generally been ignored in astrophysical data analysis despite wide recognition of the importance of including them. Ignoring calibration uncertainty can cause bias in the estimation of source model parameters and can lead to underestimation of the variance of these estimates. We previously introduced a pragmatic Bayesian method to address this problem. The method is 'pragmatic' in that it introduced an ad hoc technique that simplified computation by neglecting the potential information in the data for narrowing the uncertainty for the calibration product. Following that work, we use a principal component analysis to efficiently represent the uncertainty of the effective area of an X-ray (or γ-ray) telescope. Here, however, we leverage this representation to enable a principled, fully Bayesian method that coherently accounts for the calibration uncertainty in high-energy spectral analysis. In this setting, the method is compared with standard analysis techniques and the pragmatic Bayesian method. The advantage of the fully Bayesian method is that it allows the data to provide information not only for estimation of the source parameters but also for the calibration product—here the effective area, conditional on the adopted spectral model. In this way, it can yield more accurate and efficient estimates of the source parameters along with valid estimates of their uncertainty. Provided that the source spectrum can be accurately described by a parameterized model, this method allows rigorous inference about the effective area by quantifying which possible curves are most consistent with the data.

  16. A fully Bayesian method for jointly fitting instrumental calibration and X-ray spectral models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to a lack of robust principled methods, systematic instrumental uncertainties have generally been ignored in astrophysical data analysis despite wide recognition of the importance of including them. Ignoring calibration uncertainty can cause bias in the estimation of source model parameters and can lead to underestimation of the variance of these estimates. We previously introduced a pragmatic Bayesian method to address this problem. The method is 'pragmatic' in that it introduced an ad hoc technique that simplified computation by neglecting the potential information in the data for narrowing the uncertainty for the calibration product. Following that work, we use a principal component analysis to efficiently represent the uncertainty of the effective area of an X-ray (or γ-ray) telescope. Here, however, we leverage this representation to enable a principled, fully Bayesian method that coherently accounts for the calibration uncertainty in high-energy spectral analysis. In this setting, the method is compared with standard analysis techniques and the pragmatic Bayesian method. The advantage of the fully Bayesian method is that it allows the data to provide information not only for estimation of the source parameters but also for the calibration product—here the effective area, conditional on the adopted spectral model. In this way, it can yield more accurate and efficient estimates of the source parameters along with valid estimates of their uncertainty. Provided that the source spectrum can be accurately described by a parameterized model, this method allows rigorous inference about the effective area by quantifying which possible curves are most consistent with the data.

  17. Towards geometrical calibration of x-ray computed tomography systems—a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial x-ray computed tomography (XCT) is seen as a potentially effective tool for the industrial inspection of complex parts. In particular, XCT is an attractive solution for the measurement of internal geometries, which are inaccessible by conventional coordinate measuring systems. While the technology is available and the benefits are recognized, methods to establish the measurement assurance of XCT systems are lacking. More specifically, the assessment of measurement uncertainty and the subsequent establishment of measurement traceability is a largely unknown process. This paper is a review of research that contributes to the development of a geometrical calibration procedure for XCT systems. A brief introduction to the geometry of cone-beam tomography systems is given, after which the geometrical influence factors are outlined. Mathematical measurement models play a significant role in understanding how geometrical offsets and misalignments contribute to error in measurements; therefore, the application of mathematical models in simulating geometrical errors is discussed and the corresponding literature is presented. Then, the various methods that have been developed to measure certain geometrical errors are reviewed. The findings from this review are discussed and suggestions are provided for future work towards the development of a comprehensive and practical geometrical calibration procedure. (topical review)

  18. The beam-based calibration of an X-ray pinhole camera at SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LENG Yong-Bin; HUANG Guo-Qing; ZHANG Man-Zhou; CHEN Zhi-Chu; CHEN Jie; YE Kai-Rong

    2012-01-01

    A pinhole camera for imaging X-ray synchrotron radiation from a dipole magnet is now in operation at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring.The electron beam size is derived by unfolding the radiation image and the point spread function (PSF) with deconvolution techniques.The performance of the pinhole is determined by the accuracy of the PSF measurement.This article will focus on a beam-based calibration scheme to measure the PSF system by varying the beam images with different quadrupole settings and fitting them with the corresponding theoretical beam sizes.Applying this method at SSRF,the PSF value of the pinhole is revised from 37 to 44 μm.The deviation in beam size between the theoretical value and the measured value is minimized to 4% after calibration.This optimization allows us to observe the horizontal disturbance due to injection down to as small as 0.5 μm.

  19. Status of the eROSITA Telescope testing and calibrating the x-ray mirror assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwitz, Vadim; Predehl, Peter; Bräuninger, Heinrich; Burkert, Wolfgang; Dennerl, Konrad; Eder, Josef; Friedrich, Peter; Fürmetz, Maria; Grisoni, Gabriele; Hartner, Gisela; Marioni, Fabio; Menz, Benedikt; Pfeffermann, Elmar; Valsecchi, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    The eROSITA X-ray observatory that will be launched on board the Russian Spectrum-RG mission comprises seven X-ray telescopes, each with its own mirror assembly (mirror module + X-ray baffle), electron deflector, filter wheel, and CCD camera with its control electronics. The completed flight mirror modules are undergoing many thorough X-ray tests at the PANTHER X-ray test facility after delivery, after being mated with the X-ray baffle, and again after both the vibration and thermal-vacuum tests. A description of the work done with mirror modules/assemblies and the test results obtained will be reported here. We report also on the environmental tests that have been performed on the eROSITA telescope qualification model.

  20. Response of the 'patient dose calibrator' chamber for incident positions and sizes of X-ray fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of patient doses is an important tool for optimizing radiodiagnostic medical procedures with conventional X-ray equipment and for improving the quality of the radiographic image. The Patient Dose Calibrator (PDC) chamber is a dosimetric instrument that is used in the evaluation of the air kerma-area product (PKA) quantity aiming the reduction of patient doses. The objective this work was to study the PKA variation caused by different field incident positions and sizes of the X-ray beam on the PDC chamber. Results showed that the PDC chamber has repeatability lower than 0.6%, beam position dependence of 3% and linearity response within ± 6%; these characteristics are to be taken into account during evaluation of the radiological protection conditions of conventional x-ray equipment. (author)

  1. Effective x-ray attenuation coefficient measurements from two full field digital mammography systems for data calibration applications

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Jerry A; Heine John J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Currently, there is no standard method for measuring this important factor. Work presented here represents an essential component of an ongoing project that seeks to determine the appropriate method for calibrating (standardizing) mammography image data to account for the x-ray image acquisition influences. Longer term goals of this project are to make accurate breast density measurements in support of risk studies...

  2. Optical Density Analysis of X-Rays Utilizing Calibration Tooling to Estimate Thickness of Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, David

    2012-01-01

    This process is designed to estimate the thickness change of a material through data analysis of a digitized version of an x-ray (or a digital x-ray) containing the material (with the thickness in question) and various tooling. Using this process, it is possible to estimate a material's thickness change in a region of the material or part that is thinner than the rest of the reference thickness. However, that same principle process can be used to determine the thickness change of material using a thinner region to determine thickening, or it can be used to develop contour plots of an entire part. Proper tooling must be used. An x-ray film with an S-shaped characteristic curve or a digital x-ray device with a product resulting in like characteristics is necessary. If a film exists with linear characteristics, this type of film would be ideal; however, at the time of this reporting, no such film has been known. Machined components (with known fractional thicknesses) of a like material (similar density) to that of the material to be measured are necessary. The machined components should have machined through-holes. For ease of use and better accuracy, the throughholes should be a size larger than 0.125 in. (.3 mm). Standard components for this use are known as penetrameters or image quality indicators. Also needed is standard x-ray equipment, if film is used in place of digital equipment, or x-ray digitization equipment with proven conversion properties. Typical x-ray digitization equipment is commonly used in the medical industry, and creates digital images of x-rays in DICOM format. It is recommended to scan the image in a 16-bit format. However, 12-bit and 8-bit resolutions are acceptable. Finally, x-ray analysis software that allows accurate digital image density calculations, such as Image-J freeware, is needed. The actual procedure requires the test article to be placed on the raw x-ray, ensuring the region of interest is aligned for perpendicular x-ray exposure

  3. The effect of x-ray summing in calibration of extended energy range GE detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemola, S. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-04-01

    Gamma spectrometric analyses of low-level samples are usually performed using close measuring geometry. In this measuring set-up the effect of the true coincidence summing (TCS) has to be taken into account. The detection of true coincidence sum pulse is possible when a nuclide emits two or more cascading photons within the resolving time of a spectrometer. The magnitude of summing depends strongly on the total and full energy peak efficiencies of the detector and on the decay scheme of the nuclide. In addition to summing of gamma rays, other radiation, especially X-rays, can be in true coincidence with the gamma rays. X-rays in cascade with gamma rays can originate from electron capture, positron decay, or internal conversion. The summing effects with most of the X-rays can be ignored for the p-type Ge detectors having thick dead layer. On the contrary, the detectors with a thin entrance window, e.g. n-type detectors and new extended range p-type detectors, can experience severe summing of X-rays and gamma rays. (au)

  4. The effect of x-ray summing in calibration of extended energy range GE detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma spectrometric analyses of low-level samples are usually performed using close measuring geometry. In this measuring set-up the effect of the true coincidence summing (TCS) has to be taken into account. The detection of true coincidence sum pulse is possible when a nuclide emits two or more cascading photons within the resolving time of a spectrometer. The magnitude of summing depends strongly on the total and full energy peak efficiencies of the detector and on the decay scheme of the nuclide. In addition to summing of gamma rays, other radiation, especially X-rays, can be in true coincidence with the gamma rays. X-rays in cascade with gamma rays can originate from electron capture, positron decay, or internal conversion. The summing effects with most of the X-rays can be ignored for the p-type Ge detectors having thick dead layer. On the contrary, the detectors with a thin entrance window, e.g. n-type detectors and new extended range p-type detectors, can experience severe summing of X-rays and gamma rays. (au)

  5. Calibration of the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) Hard X-ray Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Gaskin, Jessica; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert; Tennant, Allyn; Swartz, Doug; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Elsner, Ron; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    On September 21-22, 2013, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) hard X-ray telescope, flew as a balloon payload from Ft. Sumner, N.M. HEROES observed the Sun, the black hole binary GRS 1915+105, and the Crab Nebula during its 27 hour flight. In this paper we describe laboratory calibration measurements of the HEROES detectors using line and continuum sources, applications of these measurements to define channel to energy (gain) corrections for observed events and to define detector response matrices. We characterize the HEROES X-ray grazing incidence optics using measurements taken in the Stray-Light (SLF) Facility in Huntsville, AL, and using ray traces.

  6. Calibration-free coronary artery measurements for interventional device sizing using inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy: in vivo validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2014-03-01

    Proper sizing of interventional devices to match coronary vessel dimensions improves procedural efficiency and therapeutic outcomes. We have developed a novel method using inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy to automatically determine vessel dimensions without the need for magnification calibration or optimal views. To validate this method in vivo, we compared results to intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in a healthy porcine model. Coronary angiography was performed using Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray (SBDX), an inverse geometry fluoroscopy system that performs multiplane digital x-ray tomosynthesis in real time. From a single frame, 3D reconstruction of the arteries was performed by localizing the depth of vessel lumen edges. The 3D model was used to directly calculate length and to determine the best imaging plane to use for diameter measurements, where outof- plane blur was minimized and the known pixel spacing was used to obtain absolute vessel diameter. End-diastolic length and diameter measurements were compared to measurements from CCTA and IVUS, respectively. For vessel segment lengths measuring 6 mm to 73 mm by CCTA, the SBDX length error was -0.49 +/- 1.76 mm (SBDX - CCTA, mean +/- 1 SD). For vessel diameters measuring 2.1 mm to 3.6 mm by IVUS, the SBDX diameter error was 0.07 +/- 0.27 mm (SBDX - minimum IVUS diameter, mean +/- 1 SD). The in vivo agreement between SBDX-based vessel sizing and gold standard techniques supports the feasibility of calibration-free coronary vessel sizing using inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy.

  7. Analysis of X-ray beam parameters used to implement reference radiations for calibrating dosimetric systems for diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation metrology is the base to achieve reliable dose measurements in all areas; it is also part of the framework of a radiological protection program that requires the use of reliable instruments that comply with standard performance criteria worldwide accepted. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) established the X-ray reference radiations that are recommended to be used for calibrating dosimetric systems for diagnostic dosimetry. In this work, X-ray beam qualities were implemented in the Dosimeter Calibration Laboratory of the Development Centre of Nuclear Technology; the characteristics of the beams were analyzed through the measurement of parameters like inherent tube filtration, beam uniformity; beam field size, energy spectra and peak voltage. The influence of using 99.425% and 99.999% purity filters was also investigated. The first half-value layers and the homogeneity coefficients were measured for the three RQR2, RQR6 and RQR10 IEC beam qualities. An ionization chamber was also calibrated against a standard chamber in all implemented reference radiations and the relevant sources of uncertainties were estimated. Beam parameters were adjusted to comply with IEC standard; the main source of uncertainty during the calibration process was due to the ionization chamber positioning set-up and the purity of the filters did not cause relevant influence on the beam energy spectra. (author)

  8. Transmission function calibration of an angular resolved analyzer for X-ray photoemission spectroscopy: Theory vs experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A calibration method for the transmission function of modern XPS analyser is shown. • This method can be applied to any soft X-ray photoemission setup. • Ray tracing calculations well agree with experimental results. • A fine calibration is carried out through variable photon energy XPS. • An escape depth correction must be included in the calibration process. - Abstract: In order to achieve the most accurate quantification results in an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experiment, a fine calibration of the analyzer response is required. In this work an experimental characterization of a modern angle-resolved analyzer, carried out with a unfocused and a highly collimated synchrotron source, is shown. The transmission function is extrapolated from the discrepancy between experimental and theoretically predicted XPS peak areas; the influence of different sensitivity factors and of the escape depth correction on the expected values is also discussed. The analyzer response and the theoretical approach are then tested against energy dispersive XPS measurements (EDXPS). These results are finally compared with TF calculated on the basis of an high accuracy electron ray tracing code, also described in this work

  9. An original calibration technique for soft x-ray detectors and its use in the Tore Supra tomographic systema)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazon, D.; Pacella, D.; Malard, P.; Garnier, D.; Romano, A.; Bouchand, C.

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes in detail the recent progresses which have been made in Tore Supra for developing a new technique of calibration of the soft x-ray (SXR) detectors in the range 1-30keV. The diode response as a function of the flux of photons resulted accurately linear over almost three orders of magnitude. Apart from a limited number of deficient detectors, promptly replaced with new ones, the spread of the diode responses (84 detectors) is about 20% total of the average value. It allowed the derivation of the calibration factor for each detector of the tomography system. The effect of the environmental temperature, in the range 15°-40°, has also been studied, revealing that up to 35° the linearity of diode response and these calibration factors remain constant. It demonstrates the capability of discriminating slight and localized changes in the two dimensional spatial distribution of the SXR intensity.

  10. Particle-induced x-ray emission: Instrumentation, calibration, and application to contact lens solutions and fulvic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An expression was derived describing the profile of the proton beam at the PIXE target position. The expression was used to predict the profile for several experimental configurations. The profile was experimentally measured. The PIXE system was calibrated using solutions and commercial foils. Experimental data was adjusted for all absorbers and interferences, and a quadratic relationship was determined relating calibration factor and atomic number for each series of X-ray transitions. Calibration factors were determined for all elements above aluminum, for both a pinhole filter and a 14-mil mylar filter. A group of contact lens solutions was analyzed using PIXE, ICP, and ISE. A digestion method was developed for removal. of chloride ion. Cluster analysis was used to classify the data. A commercial humic acid was separated into three fractions. The fulvic acid was characterized, and separations of metal-fulvic acid complexes from metal ions in solution were attempted using ultrafiltration

  11. Particle-induced x-ray emission: Instrumentation, calibration, and application to contact lens solutions and fulvic acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenson, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    An expression was derived describing the profile of the proton beam at the PIXE target position. The expression was used to predict the profile for several experimental configurations. The profile was experimentally measured. The PIXE system was calibrated using solutions and commercial foils. Experimental data was adjusted for all absorbers and interferences, and a quadratic relationship was determined relating calibration factor and atomic number for each series of X-ray transitions. Calibration factors were determined for all elements above aluminum, for both a pinhole filter and a 14-mil mylar filter. A group of contact lens solutions was analyzed using PIXE, ICP, and ISE. A digestion method was developed for removal. of chloride ion. Cluster analysis was used to classify the data. A commercial humic acid was separated into three fractions. The fulvic acid was characterized, and separations of metal-fulvic acid complexes from metal ions in solution were attempted using ultrafiltration.

  12. Effective area calibration of the reflection grating spectrometers of XMM-Newton. I. X-ray spectroscopy of the Crab nebula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaastra, J.S.; de Vries, C.P.; Costantini, E.; den Herder, J.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    Context. The Crab nebula and pulsar have been widely used as a calibration source for X-ray instruments. The in-flight effective area calibration of the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) of XMM-Newton depend upon the availability of reliable calibration sources. Aims. We investigate how the abs

  13. Calibration of kVp meter used in quality control tests of diagnostic x-ray units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In diagnostic radiology, the tube voltage [peak kilo-voltage (kVp)] is one of the most important parameter affecting both radiation exposure and image contrast. So, an accurate kVp meter is necessary to control kV p in the medical radiography practice with the overall uncertainty less than ±5 % according to IEC 61676. Therefore, both invasive and non-invasive calibration methods of kVp meter were established and applied to different kinds of commercial quality control instruments for diagnostic radiology. Calibration of kVp meter by the invasive method is the most accurate (with uncertainty of 1.67 %, k=2); however, the non-invasive method also provides good results (with uncertainty of 3.12 %, k=2). Due to their detailed design, the commercial kV p meters have various responses with X-ray beam, so the working regime of a particular device type must be appropriately selected with a specific X-ray machine used for calibration of kVp meter. (authors)

  14. Calibration of CVD-diamond based dosimeter in high-power electron and x-ray radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a study of dosimetry characteristics of a prototype of the detector based on a polycrystalline diamond film (CVD-diamond) produced in NSC KIPT are summarized. The techniques of the detector calibration against the electron and X-ray radiation dose rate are developed. The conditions of calibration were studied by means of computer simulation. For determination of detector sensitivity to electron radiation, it was placed inside of a standard polystyrene phantom. An additional filter of electrons was used at measurement in the X-ray field. Every time detector irradiation was carried out together with the Harwell Red Perpex 4034 dosimeters, which registrations provided the calibration data. The measurements, executed at the LU-10, EPOS and LU-40 linacs of NSC KIPT, have demonstrated, that the values of detector sensitivity against each type of radiation are close and conform to ones obtained earlier for the low-intensity radiation fields. Considering significant radiation durability of the CVD-diamond, it enables its application in technological dosimetry.

  15. Flight Calibration and Operations of the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the current on-orbit calibration and operational plans for the Swift XRT. The XRT is a largely autonomous instrument and requires very little manual commanding for normal operations. A detailed calibration plan is being developed to verify the instrumental performance on-orbit, including effective area, point spread function, vignetting, spectroscopic performance, and timing accuracy. Operational plans include regular calibration measurements using on-board calibration sources as well as periodic calibration observations using celestial targets

  16. Reflectometer end station for synchrotron calibrations of Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility flight optics and for spectrometric research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparations have been underway to construct and test a facility for grazing incidence reflectance calibrations of flat mirrors at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The purpose is to conduct calibrations on witness flats to the coating process of the flight mirrors for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The x-ray energy range required is 50 eV--12 keV. Three monochromatic beamlines (X8C, X8A, U3A) will provide energy tunability over this entire range. The goal is to calibrate the AXAF flight mirrors with uncertainties approaching 1%. A portable end station with a precision-positioning reflectometer has been developed for this work. We have resolved the vacuum cleanliness requirements to preserve the coating integrity of the flats with the strict grazing-angle certainty requirements placed on the rotational control system of the reflectometer. A precision positioning table permits alignment of the system to the synchrotron beam to within 10 arcsec; the reflectometer's rotational control system can then produce grazing angle accuracy to within less than 2 arcsec, provided that the electron orbit is stable. At 10--12 keV, this degree of angular accuracy is necessary to achieve the calibration accuracy required for AXAF. However the most important energy regions for the synchrotron calibration are in the 2000--3200 eV range, where the M-edge absorption features of the coating element, iridium, appear, and the 300--700 eV range of the Ir N edges. The detail versus energy exhibited in these features cannot be traced adequately without a tunable energy source, which necessitates a synchrotron for this work. We present the mechanical designs, motion control systems, detection and measurement capabilities, and selected procedures for our measurements, as well as reflectance data

  17. Optimization of a data acquisition and control system for calibration of X rays detectors with usage of computational tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brazilian standard ABNT ISO/IEC 17025/2005 specifies general requirements for the competence of testing and calibration facilities. One of these requirements states that these facilities must always optimize their processes and thus, uncertainties must be estimated and lowered as much as possible. In order to achieve such goal, the Laboratorio de Calibracao de Instrumentos (LCI), a laboratory responsible for dosimeter calibration at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN) have acquired some equipment for the LCI's X-Ray calibration system, such as a rotating filter holder, and it has also been developing software in order to provide the best calibration results with lowest external interferences (from the operator, for instance) to diminish the possibilities of error occurrences. A semi-automated LabVIEW-based calibration software has been developed at LCI and it has been subjected to constant testing and improvements so far. The software is divided in two basic modules: one is responsible for calibration of the monitor chamber with a reference standard dosimeter, while the other is used to perform instruments calibrations using the monitor chamber as reference. Several influence quantities have been analyzed and the proper corrections have been added to the software as multiplicative correction factors. The software is not only able to acquire data from all the equipment used in the laboratory, but also it is able to calculate calibration factors and its uncertainties. A later analysis shows how this system has optimized the whole calibration process, lowering the occupational dose, reducing the mean time of calibration, uncertainties and preventing errors caused by the system's users. (author)

  18. SIM.RI(I)-K3 comparison of calibration coefficients at radiotherapy level for orthovoltage X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air-kerma calibration coefficients were compared at the radiotherapy level for orthovoltage x-ray beams in the SIM.RI(I)-K3 comparison for members of the Sistema Interamericano de Metrologia (SIM). Five SIM laboratories participated in the comparison: NIST, NRC, ININ, CNEA and LNMRI, the NIST being the pilot laboratory. Results from the comparison are linked to the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison reference value through the NIST-BIPM comparison made in 2003 and will meet requirements of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) to support several CMCs (calibration and measurement capability claims) of the participants. The comparison began in October of 2007 and the measurements were completed in September 2008. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air-kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The evaluation of the degrees of equivalence was performed as described in the comparison protocol. The comparison of the calibration coefficients for the four chambers is based on the average ratios of the calibration coefficients measured at the NIST and at each participating laboratory. (authors)

  19. A Monte Carlo (MC) based individual calibration method for in vivo x-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Marie; Isaksson, Mats

    2007-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) is a non-invasive method that can be used for in vivo determination of thyroid iodine content. System calibrations with phantoms resembling the neck may give misleading results in the cases when the measurement situation largely differs from the calibration situation. In such cases, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations offer a possibility of improving the calibration by better accounting for individual features of the measured subjects. This study investigates the prospects of implementing MC simulations in a calibration procedure applicable to in vivo XRF measurements. Simulations were performed with Penelope 2005 to examine a procedure where a parameter, independent of the iodine concentration, was used to get an estimate of the expected detector signal if the thyroid had been measured outside the neck. An attempt to increase the simulation speed and reduce the variance by exclusion of electrons and by implementation of interaction forcing was conducted. Special attention was given to the geometry features: analysed volume, source-sample-detector distances, thyroid lobe size and position in the neck. Implementation of interaction forcing and exclusion of electrons had no obvious adverse effect on the quotients while the simulation time involved in an individual calibration was low enough to be clinically feasible.

  20. Technique for in situ calibration of an x-ray streak camera in the nanosecond regime using a high density Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for calibrating an x-ray streak camera in situ has been developed. It has been applied to an x-ray streak camera installed on a collapsing gas shell Z-pinch. The calibration was done by simultaneously measuring the emitted x-rays using a pinhole camera, an InP:Fe photoconductive detector, and the streak camera. The spatial dimension of the streak image was calibrated by integrating the film density over time and fitting the resulting data to the corresponding information taken from an x-ray pinhole image. The temporal calibration was obtained by similarly fitting the film density from the x-ray streak image as a function of time integrated over the appropriate part of the spatial dimension with the signal from an InP:Fe photoconductive detector. By using this technique we have found a spatial magnification of the streak camera system consistent with the results derived from the geometrical optics to within 10%. A temporal dispersion of 2.5 +- 0.5 ns/mm was obtained, which is in agreement with the nominal speed of 2.5 ns/mm. This technique also yielded an absolute intensity calibration of the streak camera

  1. Weight-based synthesized standards preparation for correction-free calibration in X-ray fluorescence determination of tungsten in high-speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper suggests a correction-free calibration method in wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis in order to determine tungsten as a major alloyed element in high-speed steels accurately. Matrix effects on fluorescent X-ray intensity of tungsten Lα line were minimized by borate fusion, and the total amount of tungsten in the glassy matrix could be quantified. Glass bead specimens were prepared with 10 to 12 mg of the steel sample and 4.0 g of lithium tetraborate as a flux agent. Without untraceable X-ray intensity correction, a linear calibration curve was obtained by measuring synthesized calibration standards prepared by using standard solutions. As compared with fundamental parameter calculations, the present method gave more accurate results of tungsten in certified reference materials of high-speed steel. (author)

  2. Independence of calibration curves for EBT Gafchromic films of the size of high-energy X-ray fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Tsang [City University of Hong Kong, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Butson, Martin J. [City University of Hong Kong, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China) and Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Department of Medical Physics, Crown St, Wollongong, N.S.W 2500 (Australia)]. E-mail: butsonm@iahs.nsw.gov.au; Yu, Peter K.N. [City University of Hong Kong, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China)

    2006-09-15

    The EBT Gafchromic radiochromic film is a relatively new product designed specifically for dosimetry in radiation therapy. Due to the weak dependence of its response on the photon energy (variations are below 10% in the 50 kVp-10 MVp range), the film is ideal for dosimetry when the photon energy spectrum may be changing or unknown. In order to convert a map of optical densities into a map of absorbed radiation doses, a calibration curve constructed on the basis of standard calibration films is necessary. Our results have shown that, with the EBT Gafchromic film, one can use the same calibration curve for 6-MV X-ray fields of any size in the range from 5x5 cm{sup 2} up to 40x40 cm{sup 2}. This is not the case for radiographic films, such as Kodak X-Omat V, whose response to the same dose varies approximately by 10% depending on the field size in this range. This insensitivity of the EBT Gafchromic film to size of the radiation field makes it possible to assess doses delivered by small radiation fields. With the help of this film, it was shown that the output factor for a 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2} field is 0.60{+-}0.03 (2SD) relative to the 10x10 cm{sup 2} field.

  3. How to prepare a calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation using X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work shows the main features of a system for calibration and testing of radiation detectors used in low and medium energy. It is based on pre-assembly System Laboratory of Metrology Division (DIMET) Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN). (author)

  4. Application of an EMCCD Camera for Calibration of Hard X-Ray Telescopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Julia K.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Nagarkar, V. V.;

    2012-01-01

    (EMCCDs) [4] are highly suitable detectors for ground-based calibrations. Their chip can be optically coupled to a microcolumnar CsI(Tl) scintillator [5] via a fiberoptic taper. Not only does this device exhibit low noise and high spatial resolution inherent to CCDs, but the EMCCD is also able to handle...

  5. Application of an EMCCD camera for calibration of hard X-ray telescopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Julia K.; Pivovaro, Michael J.; Craig, William W.;

    2012-01-01

    for ground-based calibrations if combined with a scintillating material. This optical coupling of the EMCCD chip to a microcolumnar CsI(Tl) scintillator can be achieved via a fiberoptic taper. Not only does this detector system exhibit low noise and high spatial resolution inherent to CCDs, but the EMCCD...

  6. Calibration of Mg2SiO4(Tb) thermoluminescent dosimeters for use in determining diagnostic X-ray doses to Adult Health Study participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of Mg2SiO4(Tb) thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were ascertained preparatory to measuring dose from diagnostic X-ray examinations received by Adult Health Study participants. These detectors are small, relatively sensitive to low-dose X rays, and are appropriate for precise dosimetry. Extensive calibration is necessary for precisely determining doses according to their thermoluminescent intensities. Their sensitivities were investigated, by dose according to X-ray tube voltage, and by exposure direction, to obtain directional dependence. Dosimeter sensitivity lessened due to the fading effect and diminution of the planchet. However, these adverse effects can be avoided by storing the dosimeters at least 1.5 hours and by using fresh silver-plated planchets. Thus, the TLDs, for which sensitivities were determined in this study, will be useful in subsequent diagnostic X-ray dosimetry. (author)

  7. Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-Star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, Feryal; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Diaz-Trigo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the...

  8. A compact low cost “master–slave” double crystal monochromator for x-ray cameras calibration of the Laser MégaJoule Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA-CESTA, France) built a specific double crystal monochromator (DCM) to perform calibration of x-ray cameras (CCD, streak and gated cameras) by means of a multiple anode diode type x-ray source for the MégaJoule Laser Facility. This DCM, based on pantograph geometry, was specifically modeled to respond to relevant engineering constraints and requirements. The major benefits are mechanical drive of the second crystal on the first one, through a single drive motor, as well as compactness of the entire device. Designed for flat beryl or Ge crystals, this DCM covers the 0.9–10 keV range of our High Energy X-ray Source. In this paper we present the mechanical design of the DCM, its features quantitatively measured and its calibration to finally provide monochromatized spectra displaying spectral purities better than 98%

  9. Calibration of the Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) at a polarized hard X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a concept for an astronomical hard X-ray Compton polarimeter operating in the 50-500 keV energy band. The instrument has been optimized for wide-field polarization measurements of transient outbursts from energetic astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts and solar flares. The GRAPE instrument is composed of identical modules, each of which consists of an array of scintillator elements read out by a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). Incident photons Compton scatter in plastic scintillator elements and are subsequently absorbed in inorganic scintillator elements; a net polarization signal is revealed by a characteristic asymmetry in the azimuthal scattering angles. We have constructed a prototype GRAPE module containing a single CsI(Na) calorimeter element, at the center of the MAPMT, surrounded by 60 plastic elements. The prototype has been combined with custom readout electronics and software to create a complete 'engineering model' of the GRAPE instrument. This engineering model has been calibrated using a nearly 100% polarized hard X-ray beam at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. We find modulation factors of 0.46±0.06 and 0.48±0.03 at 69.5 and 129.5 keV, respectively, in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present details of the beam test, data analysis, and simulations, and discuss the implications of our results for the further development of the GRAPE concept.

  10. The ground calibration of X-ray CCD cameras (XIS) with front-illuminated chips onboard Astro-E2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the results of the ground calibration of Astro-E2 XIS with front-illuminated (FI) chips. The sensors have basically the same performance as that of Astro-E XIS. However, there are some improved points: (1) A 55Fe radio isotope is equipped on the door and (2) the capability for charge injection (CI) has been added. We measured the gain, energy resolution, and quantum efficiency (QE) of the FI sensors as a function of energy by using characteristic X-rays for each sensor. An energy resolution of 130 eV at 5.9 keV in FWHM and a QE of 52% at 8.6 keV are achieved. After XIS is launched, the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) will increase due to radiation damage by cosmic rays. Then XIS is equipped with the CI capability to calibrate and compensate for the increase in CTI. We estimate the time variability in the amount of the injected charge

  11. Calibrating the X-ray attenuation of liquid water and correcting sample movement artefacts during in operando synchrotron X-ray radiographic imaging of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Nan; Chevalier, Stéphane; Hinebaugh, James; Yip, Ronnie; Lee, Jongmin; Antonacci, Patrick; Kotaka, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Bazylak, Aimy

    2016-03-01

    Synchrotron X-ray radiography, due to its high temporal and spatial resolutions, provides a valuable means for understanding the in operando water transport behaviour in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The purpose of this study is to address the specific artefact of imaging sample movement, which poses a significant challenge to synchrotron-based imaging for fuel cell diagnostics. Specifically, the impact of the micrometer-scale movement of the sample was determined, and a correction methodology was developed. At a photon energy level of 20 keV, a maximum movement of 7.5 µm resulted in a false water thickness of 0.93 cm (9% higher than the maximum amount of water that the experimental apparatus could physically contain). This artefact was corrected by image translations based on the relationship between the false water thickness value and the distance moved by the sample. The implementation of this correction method led to a significant reduction in false water thickness (to ∼0.04 cm). Furthermore, to account for inaccuracies in pixel intensities due to the scattering effect and higher harmonics, a calibration technique was introduced for the liquid water X-ray attenuation coefficient, which was found to be 0.657 ± 0.023 cm(-1) at 20 keV. The work presented in this paper provides valuable tools for artefact compensation and accuracy improvements for dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging of fuel cells. PMID:26917148

  12. Adjustment of a goniometer for X-rays optics calibration in the spectral range 1.5-20 KeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this memoir is the adjustment of a (θ, 2θ) goniometer coupled to X-rays source to calibrate mirrors (single layers like C, Ni, Au, etc... and multilayers like C/W, Si/W, etc...) in the spectral range 1.5 - 20 keV. For each kind of tested optics the adjustment of the goniometer include the procedure alignment of the different components (X-ray source, collimation slits, optics, detectors) and the first reflectivity measurements. Those measurements are compared those realized at LURE, using synchrotron radiation provided by SUPER ACO storage ring, and to a theoretical simulation

  13. X-ray calibration of SZ scaling relations with the ACCEPT catalogue of galaxy clusters observed by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Comis, B; Conte, A; Lamagna, L; De Gregori, S

    2011-01-01

    We explore the scaling relation between the flux of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect and the total mass of galaxy clusters using already reduced Chandra X-ray data present in the ACCEPT (Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables) catalogue. The analysis is conducted over a sample of 226 objects, examining the relatively small scale corresponding to a cluster overdensity equal to 2500 times the critical density of the background universe, at which the total masses have been calculated exploiting the hydrostatic equilibrium hypothesis. Core entropy (K0) is strongly correlated with the central cooling time, and is therefore used to identify cooling-core (CC) objects in our sample. Our results confirm the self-similarity of the scaling relation between the integrated Comptonization parameter (Y) and the cluster mass, for both CC and NCC (non-cooling-core) clusters. The consistency of our calibration with recent ones has been checked, with further support for Y as a good mass proxy. We also investigate t...

  14. System for calibration of instruments of x-ray measurement (CIR-X) applying the PGCS; Sistema para calibracion de instrumentos de medicion de rayos X (CIR-X) aplicando el PGCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaytan G, E.; Rivero G, T.; Cruz E, P.; Tovar M, V.M.; Vergara M, F.J. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: egg@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    The Department of Metrology of Ionizing Radiations of the ININ carries out calibration of instruments for X-ray measurement that determine the operation parameters in X-ray diagnostic machines of the health and private sectors. To facilitate this task, the Department of Automation and Instrumentation developed a system for acquisition and signals processing coming from a reference voltage divider with traceability at NIST that is connected directly to the X-rays tube. The system is integrated by the X-ray unit, the X-ray measurement equipment Dynalizer IIIU of RADCAL, a data acquisition card, a personal computer and the acquisition software and signals processing. (Author)

  15. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology

  16. 多通道软X射线Dante谱仪标定及实验%Calibration and application of multi-channel soft X-ray Dante spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张思群; 黄显宾; 李晶; 杨礼兵; 崔明启; 赵屹东

    2009-01-01

    介绍了用于阳加速器上Z箍缩内爆实验诊断的Dante谱仪的结构和通道配置,详细讨论了X射线二极管、掠入射平面反射镜和滤片等主要元器件的标定结果,分析了标定结果与理论计算发生偏差的原因,给出了喷气Z箍缩等离子体辐射的测量结果,X光辐射功率30~40 GW,能量约0.8 kJ,并与闪烁体光电管测量结果进行了比较,差异约20%.%In Z-pinch diagnostic,Dante spectrometer plays an important role in the measurement of soft X-ray spectrum and total flux.This paper reports on the structure and channel configuration of a "Dante" spectrometer designed for z-pinch experiments on Yang accelerator.Calibration of X-ray devices used in the spectrometer,such as X-ray diodes,grazing incidence mirrors and filters are described in detail and reasons accounting for the deviation from theoretical values have also been discussed.Waveforms and unfolding results which also compared with X-ray scintillator powermeter obtained in an argon gas-puff experiment are presented as well,the power of X- ray radiation is about 30~40 GW and the energy of it is about 0.8 kJ,the difference of the results of Dante spectrometer and X-ray scintillator powermeter is about 20%.

  17. The Optics and Alignment of the Divergent Beam Laboratory X-ray Powder Diffractometer and its Calibration Using NIST Standard Reference Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Cline, James P.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Black, David; Windover, Donald; Henins, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The laboratory X-ray powder diffractometer is one of the primary analytical tools in materials science. It is applicable to nearly any crystalline material, and with advanced data analysis methods, it can provide a wealth of information concerning sample character. Data from these machines, however, are beset by a complex aberration function that can be addressed through calibration with the use of NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs). Laboratory diffractometers can be set up in a range o...

  18. Implementation of the method air-kerma product area in KAP camera calibration with reference qualities of X-ray series at the SSDL RQR of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-Ray machines, at a reference laboratory for the instrument calibration in diagnostic radiology, should compliance with the ISO requirements. Sometimes there is not available as much laboratories as needed in Latin American countries. So this project shows the KAP ionization chamber implementation method using the TRS-457 radiation quality from the IAEA at the SSDL of Mexico. The KAP instruments calibration method consists in doing a substitution comparison using a standard reference with traceability to a primary laboratory and a transmission-monitoring chamber that measures the number of photons of the X-ray primary beam. A KAP chamber calibration requires a special array that consists in collocating the chamber in two different positions of its calibration process. Then, with air kerma-area product coefficient together with a corrected electrometer measure at referential conditions, the patient dosimetry magnitudes are calculated. The dosimetry necessity at hospitals always will be in function of possessing a highly reliable calibration coefficient chamber for making these measures. That dosimetry results will help in reducing the total or partial irradiation emitted to the human body of the patient. This is how stochastic risks will be lessened due to diagnostic studies. The purpose of this project is to have a synergy with calibration for making known that the SSDL of Mexico has the technical capacity to act as a link between primary standard dosimetry laboratories and the ionizing radiation equipment users who require that their KAP chamber have traceability from the primary standard to the user. (author)

  19. Cross-calibration of bone mineral density between two different dual X-ray absorptiometry systems: Hologic QDR 4500-A and lunar EXPERT-XL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cross-calibration equation is needed to compare bone mineral density measured by different dual X-ray absoptiometry systems. We performed this study to establish appropriate cross-calibration equations between two different dual X-ray absorptiometry systems. Bone mineral density of anterior-posterior lumbar spine (L2-4 level) and femoral neck were measured in 109 women (55±11yr) using two different dual X-ray absorptiometry systems (Lunar EXPERT-XL and Hologic QDR 4500-A). Bone mineral density values measured by two systems, including area, bone mass content, bone mineral density and percentile of young normals were compared and cross-calibration equations between two systems derived. The bone mineral density values of 109 women measured by Lunar system were 0.958±0.17 g/cm2 at L2-4 and 0.768±0.131 g/cm2 at femur neck, which were significantly higher (13±6% at L2-4 and 19±7% at femur neck, p2 at L2-4 and 0.649±0.108 g/cm2 at femur neck) by Hologic system. Bone mineral content and percentile of young normals measured by Lunar system were also significantly higher than those by Hologic system (p0.05). There was a high correlation between bone mineral density values of L2-4 and femoral neck obtained with both dual X-ray absortiometry systems (r=0.96 and 0.95, respectively). Cross-calibration equations relating the bone mineral density were Lunar=1.1287 X Hologic-0.0027 for L2-4 and Lunar=1.1556 X Hologic + 0.0182 for femoral neck. We obtained cross-calibration equations of bone mineral density between Lunar EXPERT-XL and Hologic QDR 4500-A. These equations can be useful in comparing bone mineral density obtained by different dual X-ray absorptiometry systems

  20. Cross-calibration of the X-ray Instruments onboard the Chandra, INTEGRAL, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton Observatories using G21.5-0.9

    CERN Document Server

    Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Plucinsky, Paul P; Beardmore, Andrew P; Ishida, Manabu; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Posson-Brown, Jennifer L L; Read, Andrew M; Saxton, Richard D; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai V

    2010-01-01

    Context. The Crab nebula has been used as a celestial calibration source of the X-ray flux and spectral shape for many years by X-ray astronomy missions. However, the object is often too bright for current and future missions equipped with instruments with improved sensitivity. Aims. We use G21.5-0.9 as a viable, fainter substitute to the Crab, which is another pulsar-wind nebula with a time-constant powerlaw spectrum with a flux of a few milli Crab in the X-ray band. Using this source, we conduct a cross-calibration study of the instruments onboard currently active observatories: Chandra ACIS, Suzaku XIS, Swift XRT, XMM-Newton EPIC (MOS and pn) for the soft-band, and INTEGRAL IBIS-ISGRI, RXTE PCA, and Suzaku HXD-PIN for the hard band. Methods. We extract spectra from all the instruments and fit them under the same astrophysical assumptions. We compare the spectral parameters of the G21.5-0.9 model: power-law photon index, H-equivalent column density of the interstellar photoelectric absorption, flux in the s...

  1. Mass Calibration and Cosmological Analysis of the SPT-SZ Galaxy Cluster Sample Using Velocity Dispersion $\\sigma_v$ and X-ray $Y_\\textrm{X}$ Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bocquet, S; Mohr, J J; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bayliss, M; Bazin, G; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chiu, I; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Desai, S; de Haan, T; Dietrich, J P; Dobbs, M A; Foley, R J; Forman, W R; Gangkofner, D; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Hennig, C; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Marrone, D P; McDonald, M; McMahon, J J; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L; Murray, S S; Padin, S; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruel, J; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Stanford, S A; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2014-01-01

    We present a velocity dispersion-based mass calibration of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey (SPT-SZ) galaxy cluster sample. Using a homogeneously selected sample of 100 cluster candidates from 720 deg2 of the survey along with 63 velocity dispersion ($\\sigma_v$) and 16 X-ray Yx measurements of sample clusters, we simultaneously calibrate the mass-observable relation and constrain cosmological parameters. The calibrations using $\\sigma_v$ and Yx are consistent at the $0.6\\sigma$ level, with the $\\sigma_v$ calibration preferring ~16% higher masses. We use the full cluster dataset to measure $\\sigma_8(\\Omega_ m/0.27)^{0.3}=0.809\\pm0.036$. The SPT cluster abundance is lower than preferred by either the WMAP9 or Planck+WMAP9 polarization (WP) data, but assuming the sum of the neutrino masses is $\\sum m_\

  2. HIFLUGCS: X-ray luminosity -- dynamical mass relation and its implications for mass calibrations with the SPIDERS and 4MOST surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yu-Ying; Schneider, Peter; Clerc, Nicolas; Merloni, Andrea; Schwope, Axel; Borm, Katharina; Andernach, Heinz; Caretta, César A; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We present the X-ray luminosity (L) versus dynamical mass (M) relation for 63 nearby clusters in the HIFLUGCS. The luminosity measurements are obtained based on ~1.3 Ms of clean XMM data and ROSAT pointed observations. The masses are estimated using optical spectroscopic redshifts of 13647 cluster galaxies in total. Given sufficient numbers of member galaxies in computing the dynamical masses, the L-M relations agree between the disturbed and undisturbed clusters. The cool-core clusters still dominate the scatter in the L-M relation even when a core corrected X-ray luminosity is used, which indicates that the scatter mainly reflects the structure formation history of the clusters. As shown by the clusters with a small number of redshifts, the dynamical masses can be underestimated leading to a biased scaling relation. To investigate the potential of spectroscopic surveys to follow up high-redshift galaxy clusters/groups observed in X-ray surveys for the identifications and mass calibrations, we carried out Mo...

  3. Absolute calibration of Kodak Biomax-MS film response to x rays in the 1.5- to 8-keV energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Anderson, D.; Schmitt, B. L.

    2006-10-01

    The absolute response of Kodak Biomax-MS film to x rays in the range from 1.5- to 8-keV has been measured using a laboratory electron-beam generated x-ray source. The measurements were taken at specific line energies by using Bragg diffraction to produce monochromatic beams of x rays. Multiple exposures were taken on Biomax MS film up to levels exceeding optical densities of 2 as measured by a microdensitometer. The absolute beam intensity for each exposure was measured with a Si (Li) detector. Additional response measurements were taken with Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) so as to compare the results of this technique to previously published calibrations. The Biomax-MS results have been fitted to a semiempirical mathematical model (Knauer et al., these proceedings). Users of the model can infer absolute fluences from observed exposure levels at either interpolated or extrapolated energies. To summarize the results: Biomax MS has comparable sensitivity to DEF film below 3keV but has reduced sensitivity above 3keV (˜50%). The lower exposure results from thinner emulsion layers, designed for use with phosphor screens. The ease with which Biomax-MS can be used in place of DEF (same format film, same developing process, and comparable sensitivity) makes it a good replacement.

  4. Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-Star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Guver, Tolga; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Diaz-Trigo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE/PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0$\\pm$0.3% less flux than the RXTE/PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared to EPIC-MOS1, MOS2 and ACIS-S detectors. We also address the calibration uncertainty in the RXTE/PCA int...

  5. The performance of the INER improved free-air ionization chamber in the comparison of air kerma calibration coefficients for medium-energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.-H. E-mail: jhlee@iner.gov.tw; Kotler, L.H.; Bueermann, Ludwig; Hwang, W.-S.; Chiu, J.-H.; Wang, C.-F

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes modifications to an original design, correction factors and uncertainty evaluations for an improved free-air ionization chamber constructed at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). In addition, a comparison of secondary standard air kerma calibration coefficients for 100-250 kV medium-energy X-rays was performed to verify the experimental accuracy and measurement consistency of the improved chamber. The comparison results showed a satisfactory agreement in the measurements which were within the combined expanded uncertainties (k=2)

  6. The performance of the INER improved free-air ionization chamber in the comparison of air kerma calibration coefficients for medium-energy X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes modifications to an original design, correction factors and uncertainty evaluations for an improved free-air ionization chamber constructed at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). In addition, a comparison of secondary standard air kerma calibration coefficients for 100-250 kV medium-energy X-rays was performed to verify the experimental accuracy and measurement consistency of the improved chamber. The comparison results showed a satisfactory agreement in the measurements which were within the combined expanded uncertainties (k=2)

  7. X-ray tracing using Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an extension to the Geant4 software package that allows it to be used as a general purpose X-ray tracing package. We demonstrate the use of our extension by building a model of the X-ray optics of the X-ray observatory XMM-Newton, calculating its effective area, and comparing the results with the published calibration curves.

  8. Binary pseudo-random patterned structures for modulation transfer function calibration and resolution characterization of a full-field transmission soft x-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) one-dimensional sequences and two-dimensional arrays as an effective method for spectral characterization in the spatial frequency domain of a broad variety of metrology instrumentation, including interferometric microscopes, scatterometers, phase shifting Fizeau interferometers, scanning and transmission electron microscopes, and at this time, x-ray microscopes. The inherent power spectral density of BPR gratings and arrays, which has a deterministic white-noise-like character, allows a direct determination of the MTF with a uniform sensitivity over the entire spatial frequency range and field of view of an instrument. We demonstrate the MTF calibration and resolution characterization over the full field of a transmission soft x-ray microscope using a BPR multilayer (ML) test sample with 2.8 nm fundamental layer thickness. We show that beyond providing a direct measurement of the microscope’s MTF, tests with the BPRML sample can be used to fine tune the instrument’s focal distance. Our results confirm the universality of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters

  9. Binary pseudo-random patterned structures for modulation transfer function calibration and resolution characterization of a full-field transmission soft x-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, V. V., E-mail: VVYashchuk@lbl.gov; Chan, E. R.; Lacey, I. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fischer, P. J. [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 94056 (United States); Conley, R. [Advance Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); McKinney, W. R. [Diablo Valley College, 321 Golf Club Road, Pleasant Hill, California 94523 (United States); Artemiev, N. A. [KLA-Tencor Corp., 1 Technology Drive, Milpitas, California 95035 (United States); Bouet, N. [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Cabrini, S. [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Calafiore, G.; Peroz, C.; Babin, S. [aBeam Technologies, Inc., Hayward, California 94541 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We present a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) one-dimensional sequences and two-dimensional arrays as an effective method for spectral characterization in the spatial frequency domain of a broad variety of metrology instrumentation, including interferometric microscopes, scatterometers, phase shifting Fizeau interferometers, scanning and transmission electron microscopes, and at this time, x-ray microscopes. The inherent power spectral density of BPR gratings and arrays, which has a deterministic white-noise-like character, allows a direct determination of the MTF with a uniform sensitivity over the entire spatial frequency range and field of view of an instrument. We demonstrate the MTF calibration and resolution characterization over the full field of a transmission soft x-ray microscope using a BPR multilayer (ML) test sample with 2.8 nm fundamental layer thickness. We show that beyond providing a direct measurement of the microscope’s MTF, tests with the BPRML sample can be used to fine tune the instrument’s focal distance. Our results confirm the universality of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  10. Binary pseudo-random patterned structures for modulation transfer function calibration and resolution characterization of a full-field transmission soft x-ray microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, V V; Fischer, P J; Chan, E R; Conley, R; McKinney, W R; Artemiev, N A; Bouet, N; Cabrini, S; Calafiore, G; Lacey, I; Peroz, C; Babin, S

    2015-12-01

    We present a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) one-dimensional sequences and two-dimensional arrays as an effective method for spectral characterization in the spatial frequency domain of a broad variety of metrology instrumentation, including interferometric microscopes, scatterometers, phase shifting Fizeau interferometers, scanning and transmission electron microscopes, and at this time, x-ray microscopes. The inherent power spectral density of BPR gratings and arrays, which has a deterministic white-noise-like character, allows a direct determination of the MTF with a uniform sensitivity over the entire spatial frequency range and field of view of an instrument. We demonstrate the MTF calibration and resolution characterization over the full field of a transmission soft x-ray microscope using a BPR multilayer (ML) test sample with 2.8 nm fundamental layer thickness. We show that beyond providing a direct measurement of the microscope's MTF, tests with the BPRML sample can be used to fine tune the instrument's focal distance. Our results confirm the universality of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters. PMID:26724037

  11. Binary pseudo-random patterned structures for modulation transfer function calibration and resolution characterization of a full-field transmission soft x-ray microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, V. V.; Fischer, P. J.; Chan, E. R.; Conley, R.; McKinney, W. R.; Artemiev, N. A.; Bouet, N.; Cabrini, S.; Calafiore, G.; Lacey, I.; Peroz, C.; Babin, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) one-dimensional sequences and two-dimensional arrays as an effective method for spectral characterization in the spatial frequency domain of a broad variety of metrology instrumentation, including interferometric microscopes, scatterometers, phase shifting Fizeau interferometers, scanning and transmission electron microscopes, and at this time, x-ray microscopes. The inherent power spectral density of BPR gratings and arrays, which has a deterministic white-noise-like character, allows a direct determination of the MTF with a uniform sensitivity over the entire spatial frequency range and field of view of an instrument. We demonstrate the MTF calibration and resolution characterization over the full field of a transmission soft x-ray microscope using a BPR multilayer (ML) test sample with 2.8 nm fundamental layer thickness. We show that beyond providing a direct measurement of the microscope's MTF, tests with the BPRML sample can be used to fine tune the instrument's focal distance. Our results confirm the universality of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  12. Characterization of different qualities in X-rays, for instruments calibration in radiological protection; Caracterizacion de diferentes calidades en rayos X, para calibracion de instrumentos en proteccion radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejudo A, J.; Tovar M, V. M.; Vergara M, F., E-mail: jesus.cejudo@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Laboratorio Secundario de Calibracion Dosimetrica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    In the Secondary Laboratory of Dosimetric Calibration in Mexico was realized the qualities characterization of the series X-rays RQR reported in the International Code of Practices in Dosimetry and Diagnostic Radiology No. 457, using attenuator filters of high purity aluminum and ionizing radiation equipment of inherent filtration of 4 mm Be with and emergent X-radiation beam of 40 grades. For the attenuation was used a geometric arrangement with three beam limiters and a monitor camera prepared on the established form in the mentioned technical report, and a spherical ionization chamber with collection volume of 3.6 cm{sup 3}, aligning its geometric center with the focus of X-rays tube to get that the incident radiation direction will be perpendicular to the ionization chamber. From the perspective of the radiological protection is important to know the X-radiation quality for the application dedicated to the instruments calibration and can to give to these the traceability to a reference laboratory, this way the quality combination and reference chamber can give as a result a procedure for the evaluation of the entrance in surface dose to estimate the dose orientate levels, specified in the basic standards of safety. (Author)

  13. Calibration of the Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) at a Polarized Hard X-Ray Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; McConnell, M L; Macri, J R; Bancroft, C M; Connor, T P; Ryan, J M

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a concept for an astronomical hard X-ray Compton polarimeter operating in the 50 - 500 keV energy band. The instrument has been optimized for wide-field polarization measurements of transient outbursts from energetic astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts and solar flares. The GRAPE instrument is composed of identical modules, each of which consists of an array of scintillator elements read out by a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). Incident photons Compton scatter in plastic scintillator elements and are subsequently absorbed in inorganic scintillator elements; a net polarization signal is revealed by a characteristic asymmetry in the azimuthal scattering angles. We have constructed a prototype GRAPE module containing a single CsI(Na) calorimeter element, at the center of the MAPMT, surrounded by 60 plastic elements. The prototype has been combined with custom readout electronics and software to create a complete "engineering model" of the GRAPE...

  14. Sample preparation and system calibration for proton-induced X-ray emission analysis of hair from occupationally exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood and urine collections are commonly used to monitor trace element concentration in the body. Hair may also be used. The concentration of many elements is much higher in hair than in either blood or urine and may provide a ready record of a period of exposure to heavy metals. Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been used to study trace elements in hair. A method of preparing samples by charring hair and mixing with yttrium-spiked graphite has been developed. Thick targets suitable for PIXE analysis are made. The trace elements K, Ca, Tl, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Br, Rb, and Sr are routinely measured in most samples and Cr, Co, As, Bi, Se, Zr, and Cd can be measured in occupationally exposed workers. Helium backscattering and elastic recoil detection are used to determine the major component H, C, N, O, and S. 23 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  15. Performance of a 3 mm × 3 mm silicon photomultiplier for use on the X-ray calibration system of the SVOM gamma ray monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calibration detector of a gamma ray monitor (GRM) is designed to detect alpha particles from 241Am and to send out the coincidence signal to the GRM X-ray detector. The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), as a novel photon device, is a good candidate to convert alpha-exciting fluorescent photons into electric signals. Three types of SiPMs from SSPM and MPPC, each having an active area of 3 mm × 3 mm, were compared in the matter of the spectra from low-intensity light, dark count, crosstalk probability and I-V curve. The temperature coefficient of SSPM-0710G9MM was also characterized. The application of a SiPM on the GRM has been proved to be feasible. (authors)

  16. Performance of a 3 mm×3 mm silicon photomultiplier for use on the X-ray calibration system of the SVOM gamma ray monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Fei; DONG Yong-Wei; CHAI Jun-Ying; LIU Jiang-Tao; WU Bo-Bing; ZHAO Dong-Hua; XU He

    2012-01-01

    The calibration detector of a gamma ray monitor (GRM) is designed to detect alpha particles from 241Am and to send out the coincidence signal to the GRM X-ray detector.The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM),as a novel photon device,is a good candidate to convert alpha-exciting fluorescent photons into electric signals.Three types of SiPMs from SSPM and MPPC,each having an active area of 3 mm×3 mm,were compared in the matter of the spectra from low-intensity light,dark count,crosstalk probability and Ⅰ-V curve.The temperature coefficient of SSPM-0710G9MM was alsocharacterized.The application of a SiPM on the GRM has been proved to be feasible.

  17. Characteristic parameters analysis on diagnostic X-ray beams for dosemeter calibration; Analise de parametros caracteristicos de feixes de raios-X diagnostico para calibracao de dosimetros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de

    2008-07-01

    Ionizing radiation metrology is the base to achieve reliable dose measurements in ali areas; it is also part of the framework that is established to assure radiation protection procedures in order to avoid or minimize the harmful biological effect that may be caused by ionizing radiation. A well done metrology means the use of reliable instruments that comply with standard performance requirements worldwide accepted. Those instruments are expected to be calibrated by Metrology Laboratories under well defined conditions. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in Standard 61267 established the reference radiations for medical diagnostic x-ray equipment that are recommended to be used for calibrating dosimetric systems for diagnostic dosimetry. In this work, X-ray beam qualities were established in a Calibration Laboratory and their characteristics were analyzed through the measurement of beam parameters like inherent tube filtration, beam uniformity and field size, energy spectra and peak voltage for additional filtration with 94.425 por cent and 99.999 por cent purity filters. Also, the first half-value layer and the homogeneity coefficient were measured for the three RQR 2, RQR 6 and RQR 10 IEC beam qualities and they were analyzed according to the IEC standard. Air-kerma measurements were carried out with an ionization chamber that had its reliability confirmed through repetition and reproducibility reading tests. In 50 sets of measurements the maximum standard deviation found of 10 successive readings was 0.19 %; the maximum shift of the reading mean value at a fixed geometry condition was 0.80 % with an overall standard deviation of 0.23 %. Results showed that the use of different purity filters did not cause a relevant influence on the beam energy spectra. An ionization chamber was also calibrated against a standard dosimeter in ali implemented reference radiations and the relevant sources of uncertainties were estimated. Calibration could be done

  18. The IHS diagnostic X-ray equipment radiation protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian Health Service (IHS) operates or contracts with Tribal groups to operate 50 hospitals and approximately 165 primary ambulatory care centers. These facilities contain approximately 275 medical and 800 dental diagnostic x-ray machines. IHS environmental health personnel in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) developed a diagnostic x-ray protection program including standard survey procedures and menu-driven calculations software. Important features of the program include the evaluation of equipment performance collection of average patient entrance skin exposure (ESE) measurements for selected procedures, and quality assurance. The ESE data, collected using the National Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) protocol, will be presented. The IHS Diagnostic X-ray Radiation Protection Program is dynamic and is adapting to changes in technology and workload

  19. Joint x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  20. The Optics and Alignment of the Divergent Beam Laboratory X-ray Powder Diffractometer and its Calibration Using NIST Standard Reference Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, James P; Mendenhall, Marcus H; Black, David; Windover, Donald; Henins, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The laboratory X-ray powder diffractometer is one of the primary analytical tools in materials science. It is applicable to nearly any crystalline material, and with advanced data analysis methods, it can provide a wealth of information concerning sample character. Data from these machines, however, are beset by a complex aberration function that can be addressed through calibration with the use of NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs). Laboratory diffractometers can be set up in a range of optical geometries; considered herein are those of Bragg-Brentano divergent beam configuration using both incident and diffracted beam monochromators. We review the origin of the various aberrations affecting instruments of this geometry and the methods developed at NIST to align these machines in a first principles context. Data analysis methods are considered as being in two distinct categories: those that use empirical methods to parameterize the nature of the data for subsequent analysis, and those that use model functions to link the observation directly to a specific aspect of the experiment. We consider a multifaceted approach to instrument calibration using both the empirical and model based data analysis methods. The particular benefits of the fundamental parameters approach are reviewed. PMID:26958446

  1. Methods for calibrating the gain and offset of the DSSC detector for the European XFEL using X-ray line sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DSSC (DEPFET Sensor with Signal Compression) will be a silicon based, 2d 1 Mpx imaging detector for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser Facility (XFEL.EU) in Hamburg, Germany. The DSSC is foreseen for soft X-radiation from 0.5 keV up to 6 keV . Driven by its scientific requirements, the design goals of the detector system are single photon detection, high dynamic range and a high frame rate of up to 4.5 MHz. Signal compression and amplification will be performed in the silicon sensor pixels yielding a low signal noise. Utilizing an in-pixel active filtering stage and an 8/9-bit ADC, the detector will provide parallel read-out of all pixels. In order to calibrate offset and gain, the procedure currently under investigation relies on determining peak positions in measurements with calibration line sources such as 55Fe. Here the status of studies of the stability and performance of a parameterized fit function designed for this task will be presented

  2. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  3. A new anthropometric phantom of the human leg for calibrating in vivo measurements of stable lead in bone using x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. A new anthropometric phantom of the human leg has been developed for calibrating in vivo measurements of stable lead in the bone using x-ray fluorescence. The phantom reproduces the shape and radiological characteristics of the midshaft of the human leg and includes tissue substitutes for cortical bone, bone marrow, and muscle which have been formulated using polyurethanes and calcium carbonate to provide the desired characteristics of density x-ray attenuation, and calcium content. The phantom includes a set of simulated tibia bones, each containing a precisely known concentration of stable lead, that can be easily inserted into the leg. Formerly, of a set of plexiglas cylinders filled with plaster of-paris, each containing a known lead content, was the consensus standard calibration phantom. Tissue substitute materials used in the new anthropometric calibration phantom are much more uniform in density and composition than the plaster-of-paris phantoms and its realistic appearance provides a practical means of evaluating the variability in measurements results due to the changes in subject-detector positioning. Use of the new anthropometric calibration phantom results in a energy spectrum that closely resembles the spectrum observed when measuring a human subject. The energy spectrum produced by the plaster-of-paris phantom lacks the substantial Compton Scattering component produced by the leg muscle mass which leads to unrealistic estimates of in vivo measurement sensitivity. The minimum detection limit (MDL) for in vivo measurement of stable lead in bone, using an efficiency derived from the new anthropometric phantom, ranges from 18,6 parts per million (ppm) to 26,3 ppm using the Kβ1,3/Elastic ratio or the K1/Elastic ratio, respectively. These values are significantly greater than the MDL cited in the literature obtained using a efficiency derived the conventional cylindrical plaster-of-paris phantom. Likewise, the realistic shape of the new

  4. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  5. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to ... to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit ...

  6. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  7. X-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  8. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic x-ray device, readily convertible between conventional radiographic and tomographic operating modes, is described. An improved drive system interconnects and drives the x-ray source and the imaging device through coordinated movements for tomography

  9. X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  11. X-Ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  12. X-Ray Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band ...

  13. The color of X-rays: Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Schioppa

    2014-01-01

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray flu

  14. X-ray Fluorescence Particle Size and Scattering Angle Considerations Preparatory Experiments for the Calibration and Interpretation of C1XS Data

    OpenAIRE

    Weider, S.Z.; Gow, J.; Joy, K. H.; Crawford, I. A.; Smith, D R; Holland, A. D.; Swinyard, B. M.

    2008-01-01

    ISRO’s Chandrayaan-1 mission to the Moon is due to be launched in April 2008. Part of its payload is C1XS, a compact X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer which will provide high quality elemental mapping of the lunar surface [1]. In flight, the input source (solar X-ray spectrum) will be measured by the accompanying XSM payload [2]. An ‘in-house’ IDL XRF modelling code (referred to as the ‘C1XS XRF code’ [3]), which is based on the methods of [4], will be used to convert the C1XS data from X...

  15. Development of a quality assurance program for ionizing radiation secondary calibration laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For calibration laboratories, routine calibrations of instruments meeting stated accuracy goals are important. One method of achieving the accuracy goals is to establish and follow a quality assurance program designed to monitor all aspects of the calibration program and to provide the appropriate feedback mechanism if adjustments are needed. In the United States there are a number of organizations with laboratory accreditation programs. All existing accreditation programs require that the laboratory implement a quality assurance program with essentially the same elements in all of these programs. Collectively, these elements have been designated as a Measurement Quality Assurance (MQA) program. This paper will briefly discuss the interrelationship of the elements of an MQA program. Using the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) X-ray Calibration Laboratory (XCL) as an example, it will focus on setting up a quality control program for the equipment in a Secondary Calibration Laboratory

  16. Development of a quality assurance program for ionizing radiation secondary calibration laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, H.T. II; Taylor, A.R. Jr. [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    For calibration laboratories, routine calibrations of instruments meeting stated accuracy goals are important. One method of achieving the accuracy goals is to establish and follow a quality assurance program designed to monitor all aspects of the calibration program and to provide the appropriate feedback mechanism if adjustments are needed. In the United States there are a number of organizations with laboratory accreditation programs. All existing accreditation programs require that the laboratory implement a quality assurance program with essentially the same elements in all of these programs. Collectively, these elements have been designated as a Measurement Quality Assurance (MQA) program. This paper will briefly discuss the interrelationship of the elements of an MQA program. Using the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) X-ray Calibration Laboratory (XCL) as an example, it will focus on setting up a quality control program for the equipment in a Secondary Calibration Laboratory.

  17. X-ray interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved type of amplitude-division x-ray interferometer is described. The wavelength at which the interferometer can operate is variable, allowing the instrument to be used to measure x-ray wavelength, and the angle of inclination is variable for sample investigation. (U.K.)

  18. X-ray - skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    A skeletal x-ray is an imaging test used to look at the bones. It is used to detect fractures , tumors, or ... in the health care provider's office by an x-ray technologist. You will lie on a table or ...

  19. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  20. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... addition, many dentists are taking x-rays using digital technology. The image runs through a computer. The amount of radiation given off during the procedure is less than traditional methods. Other types of dental x-rays can create a 3-D picture ...

  1. Time-resolved suprathermal x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temporally resolved x-ray spectra in the range of 1 to 20 keV have been obtained from gold disk targets irradiated by 1.06 μm laser pulses from the Argus facility. The x-ray streak camera used for the measurement has been calibrated for streak speed and dynamic range by using an air-gap Fabry-Perot etalon, and the instrument response has been calibrated using a multi-range monoenergetic x-ray source. The experimental results indicate that we are able to observe the ''hot'' x-ray temperature evolve in time and that the experimentally observed values can be qualitatively predicted by LASNEX code computations when the inhibited transport model is used

  2. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  6. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  8. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  9. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A patient support system for X-ray equipment in arteriographic studies of the heart is described in detail. The support system has been designed to overcome many of the practical problems encountered in using previous types of arteriographic X-ray equipment. The support system is capable of horizontal movement and, by a series of shafts attached to the main support system, the X-ray source and image intensifier or detector may be rotated through the same angle. The system is highly flexible and details are given of several possible operational modes. (U.K.)

  10. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  11. X-Ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  12. Medical X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) publishes Suggested State Regulations for the Control of Radiation , ... eSubmitter Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff - Assembler's Guide to Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  14. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  16. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Video: Contrast Material Radiology and You Take our survey About this Site ... radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  18. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight June is Men's Health Month Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids ... to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny ...

  19. X-ray beam qualities for dental radiology purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcus Aurelio P. dos; Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de F.; Lima, Ricardo de A.; Hazim, Clovis A., E-mail: masantos@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: mariacc05@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: ralima@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In order to establish characteristics or properties of equipment for diagnostic radiology, e.g. ion chambers and semiconductor detectors, calibration laboratories offer a set of well-defined radiation conditions, called X-ray qualities, which can be used for many Physics studies and medical purposes. The standardization of radiation qualities has been carried out in several fields of study, but little attention has been given to the area of dental radiology, mainly for medical and physical applications using single-phase units with half-wave rectification. For this reason, a single-phase dental unit with adjustable peak voltage and tube current, called 'variable potential X-ray equipment', was developed aiming to define X-ray beam qualities for test and calibrations purposes. X-ray spectra at 50, 60 and 70 kVp were determined by using a CdTe detector and compared with those obtained for ten commercial X-ray dental units. As a result of this study, a set of X-ray qualities for the variable potential X-ray equipment was determined. The X-ray qualities spectra were utilized as reference for determination of a new set of X-ray qualities characterized for a constant potential X-ray equipment. Thus, sets of X-ray qualities were standardized and implemented in two X-ray laboratories: one with the variable potential X-ray equipment and other with constant potential X-ray equipment. These reference X-ray beam qualities should be used for test and calibration purposes involving scientific studies and services. (author)

  20. X-ray beam qualities for dental radiology purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to establish characteristics or properties of equipment for diagnostic radiology, e.g. ion chambers and semiconductor detectors, calibration laboratories offer a set of well-defined radiation conditions, called X-ray qualities, which can be used for many Physics studies and medical purposes. The standardization of radiation qualities has been carried out in several fields of study, but little attention has been given to the area of dental radiology, mainly for medical and physical applications using single-phase units with half-wave rectification. For this reason, a single-phase dental unit with adjustable peak voltage and tube current, called 'variable potential X-ray equipment', was developed aiming to define X-ray beam qualities for test and calibrations purposes. X-ray spectra at 50, 60 and 70 kVp were determined by using a CdTe detector and compared with those obtained for ten commercial X-ray dental units. As a result of this study, a set of X-ray qualities for the variable potential X-ray equipment was determined. The X-ray qualities spectra were utilized as reference for determination of a new set of X-ray qualities characterized for a constant potential X-ray equipment. Thus, sets of X-ray qualities were standardized and implemented in two X-ray laboratories: one with the variable potential X-ray equipment and other with constant potential X-ray equipment. These reference X-ray beam qualities should be used for test and calibration purposes involving scientific studies and services. (author)

  1. X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved form of x-ray tube is described which consists of a rotatable anode disc and an electron beam source enclosed in an envelope. The beam of electrons strikes the edge of the anode disc at an acute angle, producing x-rays which are transmitted through a window in the envelope. To improve performance and life of the anode disc it is additionally reciprocated back and forth along its axis of rotation. Dimensions are specified. (U.K.)

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... around or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no ... might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  5. X-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray is among the most important research tools today, and has given priceless contributions to all disciplines within the natural sciences. State of the art in this field is called XFEL, X-ray Free Electron Laser, which may be 10 thousand million times stronger than the x-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble. In addition XFEL has properties that allow the study of processes which previously would have been impossible. Of special interest are depictions on atomic- and molecular level by the use of x-ray holographic methods, and being able to study chemical reactions in nature's own timescale, the femtosecond. Conclusion: The construction of x-ray lasers is a natural development in a scientific field which has an enormous influence on the surrounding society. While the discovery of x-ray was an important breakthrough in itself, new applications appear one after the other: Medical depiction, dissemination, diffraction, DNA and protein structures, synchrotron radiation and tomography. There is reason to believe that XFEL implies a technological leap as big as the synchrotrons some decades ago. As we are now talking about studies of femtosecond and direct depiction of chemical reactions, it is obvious that we are dealing with a revolution to come, with extensive consequences, both scientifically and culturally. (EW)

  6. Comparison of x-ray output of inverter-type x-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The x-ray output of 54 inverter-type x-ray apparatuses used at 18 institutions was investigated. The reproducibility and linearity of x-ray output and variations among the x-ray equipment were evaluated using the same fluorescence meter. In addition, the x-ray apparatuses were re-measured using the same non-invasive instrument to check for variations in tube voltage, tube current, and irradiation time. The non-invasive instrument was calibrated by simultaneously obtaining measurements with an invasive instrument, employing the tube voltage and current used for the invasive instrument, and the difference was calculated. Reproducibility of x-ray output was satisfactory for all x-ray apparatuses. The coefficient of variation was 0.04 or less for irradiation times of 5 ms or longer. In 84.3% of all x-ray equipment, variation in the linearity of x-ray output was 15% or less for an irradiation time of 5 ms. However, for all the apparatuses, the figure was 50% when irradiation time was the shortest (1 to 3 ms). Variation in x-ray output increased as irradiation time decreased. Variation in x-ray output ranged between 1.8 and 2.5 compared with the maximum and minimum values, excluding those obtained at the shortest irradiation time. The relative standard deviation ranged from ±15.5% to ±21.0%. The largest variation in x-ray output was confirmed in regions irradiated for the shortest time, with smaller variations observed for longer irradiation times. The major factor responsible for variation in x-ray output in regions irradiated for 10 ms or longer, which is a relatively long irradiation time, was variation in tube current. Variation in tube current was slightly greater than 30% at maximum, with an average value of 7% compared with the preset tube current. Variations in x-ray output in regions irradiated for the shortest time were due to photographic effects related to the rise and fall times of the tube voltage waveform. Accordingly, in order to obtain constant x-ray

  7. X-ray nanotomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasov, Alexander

    2004-10-01

    A compact laboratory x-ray "nano-CT" scanner has been created for 3D non-invasive imaging with 150-200 nanometers 3D spatial resolution, using advanced x-ray technologies and specific physical phenomena for signal detection. This spatial resolution in volume terms is 3 orders better than can be achieved in synchrotron tomography, 5 orders better then in existing laboratory micro-CT instruments and 10-12 orders better in comparison to clinical CT. The instrument employs an x-ray source with a 300-400nm x-ray spot size and uses small-angle scattering to attain a detail detectability of 150-200nm. An object manipulator allows positioning and rotation with an accuracy of 150nm. The x-ray detector is based on an intensified CCD with single-photon sensitivity. A typical acquisition cycle for 3D reconstruction of the full object volume takes from 10 to 60 minutes, with the collection of several hundred angular views. Subsequent volumetric reconstruction produces results as a set of cross sections with isotropic voxel size down to 140 x 140 x 140nm, or as a 3D-model, which can be virtually manipulated and measured. This unique spatial resolution in non-invasive investigations gives previously unattainable 3D images in several application areas, such as composite materials, paper and wood microstructure, biomedical applications and others.

  8. X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsars shine thanks to the conversion of the gravitational energy of accreted material to X-ray radiation. The accretion rate is modulated by geometrical and hydrodynamical effects in the stellar wind of the pulsar companions and/or by instabilities in accretion discs. Wind driven flows are highly unstable close to neutron stars and responsible for X-ray variability by factors $10^3$ on time scale of hours. Disk driven flows feature slower state transitions and quasi periodic oscillations related to orbital motion and precession or resonance. On shorter time scales, and closer to the surface of the neutron star, X-ray variability is dominated by the interactions of the accreting flow with the spinning magnetosphere. When the pulsar magnetic field is large, the flow is confined in a relatively narrow accretion column, whose geometrical properties drive the observed X-ray emission. In low magnetized systems, an increasing accretion rate allows the ignition of powerful explosive thermonuclear burning at t...

  9. Direct chlorine determination in crude oils by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry: An improved method based on a proper strategy for sample homogenization and calibration with inorganic standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Official guidelines to perform chlorine determination in crude oil are (i) American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D6470, which is based on the extraction of water from the oil and subsequent determination of the chloride by potentiometry, (ii) ASTM D3230, that measures the conductivity of a solution of crude oil in a mixture of organic solvents and (iii) US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 9075 that uses energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to quantify chlorine and it is applicable for the range from 200 μg g-1 to percent levels of the analyte. The goal of this work is to propose method to quantify lower amounts of chlorine in crude oil using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using a simple calibration strategy. Sample homogenization procedure was carefully studied in order to enable accurate results. The calibration curve was made with standards prepared by diluting aqueous NaCl standard in glycerin. The method presented a linear response that covers the range from 8 to at least 100 μg g-1 of chlorine. Chlorine in crude oil samples from Campos Basin - Brazil were quantified by the proposed method and by potentiometry after extraction of chlorine from the oil. Results achieved using both methods were statistically the same at 95% confidence level.

  10. Direct chlorine determination in crude oils by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry: An improved method based on a proper strategy for sample homogenization and calibration with inorganic standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, Adriana [Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225. Gavea. Rio de Janeiro. RJ. 22451-900 (Brazil); Saavedra, Alvaro; Tristao, Maria Luiza B. [Leopoldo Americo Miguez de Mello Research Center, Petrobras (CENPES), Cidade Universitaria, Quadra 7, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21949-900 (Brazil); Nele, Marcio [Escola de Quimica/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro, 21949-900 (Brazil); Aucelio, Ricardo Q., E-mail: aucelior@puc-rio.br [Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225. Gavea. Rio de Janeiro. RJ. 22451-900 (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    Official guidelines to perform chlorine determination in crude oil are (i) American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D6470, which is based on the extraction of water from the oil and subsequent determination of the chloride by potentiometry, (ii) ASTM D3230, that measures the conductivity of a solution of crude oil in a mixture of organic solvents and (iii) US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 9075 that uses energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to quantify chlorine and it is applicable for the range from 200 {mu}g g{sup -1} to percent levels of the analyte. The goal of this work is to propose method to quantify lower amounts of chlorine in crude oil using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using a simple calibration strategy. Sample homogenization procedure was carefully studied in order to enable accurate results. The calibration curve was made with standards prepared by diluting aqueous NaCl standard in glycerin. The method presented a linear response that covers the range from 8 to at least 100 {mu}g g{sup -1} of chlorine. Chlorine in crude oil samples from Campos Basin - Brazil were quantified by the proposed method and by potentiometry after extraction of chlorine from the oil. Results achieved using both methods were statistically the same at 95% confidence level.

  11. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains the lectures, and the most important seminars held at the NATO meeting on X-Ray astronomy in Erice, July 1979. The meeting was an opportune forum to discuss the results of the first 8-months of operation of the X-ray satellite, HEAO-2 (Einstein Observatory) which was launched at the end of 1978. Besides surveying these results, the meeting covered extragalactic astronomy, including the relevant observations obtained in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum (ultra-violet, optical, infrared and radio). The discussion on galactic X-ray sources essentially covered classical binaries, globular clusters and bursters and its significance to extragalactic sources and to high energy astrophysics was borne in mind. (orig.)

  12. CRL X-RAY TUBE

    OpenAIRE

    Kolchevsky, N. N.; Petrov, P. V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel types of X-ray tubes with refractive lenses are proposed. CRL-R X-ray tube consists of Compound Refractive Lens- CRL and Reflection X-ray tube. CRL acts as X-ray window. CRL-T X-ray consists of CRL and Transmission X-ray tube. CRL acts as target for electron beam. CRL refractive lens acts as filter, collimator, waveguide and focusing lens. Properties and construction of the CRL X-ray tube are discussed.

  13. Photoemission measurements for low energy x-ray detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoemission has been studied for nearly 100 years as both a means of investigating quantum physics, and as a practical technique for transducing optical/x-ray photons into electrical currents. Numerous x-ray detection schemes, such as streak cameras and x-ray sensitive diodes, exploit this process because of its simplicity, adaptability, and speed. Recent emphasis on diagnostics for low temperature, high density, and short-lived, plasmas for inertial confinement fusion has stimulated interest in x-ray photoemission in the sub-kilovolt regime. In this paper, a review of x-ray photoemission measurements in the 50 eV to 10 keV x-ray region is given and the experimental techniques are reviewed. A semiempirical model of x-ray photoemission is discussed and compared to experimental measurements. Finally, examples of absolutely calibrated instruments are shown

  14. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of the Goddard group to the history of X-ray astronomy are numerous and varied. One role that the group has continued to play involves the pursuit of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of the X-ray spectra of cosmic sources. The latest development is the selection of the X-ray microcalorimeter for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) study payload. This technology is likely to revolutionize the study of cosmic X-ray spectra.

  15. Calibration procedures of area monitors in terms of the Ambient Dose Equivalent H*(10), for gamma, x-ray radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present thesis procedures for calibrating portable survey meters in terms of the new ICRU quantities H*(10) ambient dose equivalent are discussed. Also the remendations of International Comission on Radiation Protection in their report ICRP 60 that inludes the operational magnitudes that the International Comission of Radiation Units proposed for calibrating area monitors

  16. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention discloses an X-ray apparatus that can be used for tomography with the aid of a computer. With this apparatus plus computer, it is possible to quickly achieve the required edge values whereby the influence of the movement is diminished

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  18. Medical x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book describes the fundamental subject about medical radiography. It is a multidisciplinary field that requires cross professional input from scientists, engineers and medical doctors. However, it is presented in simple language to suit different levels of readers from x-ray operators and radiographers to physists, general practitioners and radiology specialists.The book is written in accordance to the requirements of the standard syllabus approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia for the training of medical x-ray operator and general practitioners. In general, the content is not only designed to provide relevant and essential subject for related professionals in medical radiological services such as x-ray operator, radiographer and radiologists, but also to address those in associated radiological services including nurses, medical technologists and physicists.The book is organized and arranged sequentially into 3 parts for easy reference: Radiation safety; X-ray equipment and associated facilities; Radiography practices. With proper grasping of all these parts, the radiological services could be provided with confident and the highest professional standard. Thus, medical imaging with highest quality that can provide useful diagnostic information at minimum doses and at cost effective could be assured

  19. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  20. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... time! Spotlight Recently posted: Pediatric MRI Intravascular Ultrasound Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Head CT ...

  1. Pyroelectric x-ray detectors and x-ray pyrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses pyroelectric detectors which are very promising x-ray detectors for intense pulsed x-ray/γ-ray measurements and can be used as x-ray pyrometers. They are fast, passive, and inherently flat in spectral response for low energy x-rays. The authors report tests of LiTaO3, Sr.5Ba.5Nb2O6 and LiNbO3 detectors at Nova laser with 1 ns low energy x-rays and at Zapp Z-pinch machine with 100 ns x-rays. The temporal and spectral responses are discussed

  2. Pyroelectric x-ray detectors and x-ray pyrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyroelectric detectors are very promising x-ray detectors for intense pulsed x-ray/γ-ray measurements and can be used as x-ray pyrometers. They are fast, passive, and inherently flat in spectral response for low-energy x rays. We report our tests of LiTaO3 detectors at Nova laser with 1-ns low-energy x rays and at Zapp Z-pinch machine with 100-ns x rays. The temporal and spectral responses are discussed

  3. X ray Production. Chapter 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differential absorption of X rays in tissues and organs, owing to their atomic composition, is the basis for the various imaging methods used in diagnostic radiology. The principles in the production of X rays have remained the same since their discovery. However, much refinement has gone into the design of X ray tubes to achieve the performance required for today’s radiological examinations. In this chapter, an outline of the principles of X ray production and a characterization of the radiation output of X ray tubes will be given. The basic processes producing X rays are dealt with in Section 1.4

  4. Cosmology with X-ray Cluster Baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linder, Eric V.

    2007-04-10

    X-ray cluster measurements interpreted with a universal baryon/gas mass fraction can theoretically serve as a cosmological distance probe. We examine issues of cosmological sensitivity for current (e.g., Chandra X-ray Observatory, XMM-Newton) and next generation (e.g., Con-X, XEUS) observations, along with systematic uncertainties and biases. To give competitive next generation constraints on dark energy, we find that systematics will need to be controlled to better than 1percent and any evolution in f_gas (and other cluster gas properties) must be calibrated so the residual uncertainty is weaker than (1+z)0.03.

  5. Dose levels in conventional X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There were a series of measures in the General Hospital of Fresnillo in the X-ray Department in the areas of X-1 and X-2-ray rooms and in the neonatal intensive care unit 2, was determined the dose surface entry in eyes, thyroid and gonads for patients undergoing to X-ray study of chest Tele by thermoluminescent dosimetry. Five dosemeters were used in each one of the scans; so find the following dose ranges 20 +- 23 mGy to 350 +- 41 mGy. With the results obtained we can conclude that the procedures used and the equipment calibration is adequate. (Author)

  6. Cross-Calibration of GE Healthcare Lunar Prodigy and iDXA Dual-Energy X-Ray Densitometers for Bone Mineral Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarelainen, J; Hakulinen, M; Rikkonen, T; Kröger, H; Tuppurainen, M; Koivumaa-Honkanen, H; Honkanen, R; Hujo, M; Jurvelin, J S

    2016-01-01

    In long-term prospective studies, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) devices need to be inevitably changed. It is essential to assess whether systematic differences will exist between measurements with the new and old device. A group of female volunteers (21-72 years) underwent anteroposterior lumbar spine L2-L4 (n = 72), proximal femur (n = 72), and total body (n = 62) measurements with the Prodigy and the iDXA scanners at the same visit. The bone mineral density (BMD) measurements with these two scanners showed a high linear association at all tested sites (r = 0.962-0.995; p < 0.0001). The average iDXA BMD values were 1.5%, 0.5%, and 0.9% higher than those of Prodigy for lumbar spine (L2-L4) (p < 0.0001), femoral neck (p = 0.048), and total hip (p < 0.0001), respectively. Total body BMD values measured with the iDXA were -1.3% lower (p < 0.0001) than those measured with the Prodigy. For total body, lumbar spine, and femoral neck, the BMD differences as measured with these two devices were independent of subject height and weight. Linear correction equations were developed to ensure comparability of BMD measurements obtained with both DXA scanners. Importantly, use of equations from previous studies would have increased the discrepancy between these particular DXA scanners, especially at hip and at spine. PMID:27239366

  7. X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the authors describe the application of a new high-resolution X-ray tomographic microscope to the study of porous media. The microscope was designed to exploit the properties of a synchrotron X-ray source to perform three dimensional tomography on millimeter sized objects with micron resolution and has been used in materials science studies with both synchrotron and conventional and synchrotron sources will be compared. In this work the authors have applied the microscope to measure the three dimensional structure of fused bead packs and berea sandstones with micron resolution and have performed preliminary studies of flow in these media with the microscope operated in a digital subtraction radiography mode. Computer graphics techniques have been applied to the data to visually display the structure of the pore body system. Tomographic imaging after flow experiments should detect the structure of the oil-water interface in the pore network and this work is ongoing

  8. X-ray generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 4 provides a comparative survey on generators for stationary applications as available on the German market. It provides decision-making tools, physical characteristics, suggestions for radiation protection and for safe appliance operation as well as a concept for inspections all of which have been developed jointly by physicians of various specialities, physicists, engineers, business men, hospital experts and medicotechnical X-ray staff on the basis of a well-tried working concept. The systematic representation of correlations relevant to decision-making processes is based on a profile of technico-physical characteristics (standard product information) which was established by way of interdisciplinary dialog and which will enable any hospital or clinic to easily equip its X-ray department in an economic and purposeful way. The information on device data, device descriptions and market survey furnish the data tested by the manufacturers without guarantee and subject to correction. (orig./HP)

  9. X-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An invention relating to the development of photo-resists used in X-ray lithography is described. A COP resist which has been exposed to X-ray radiation, is developed with methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) developer and an ethanol solvent. The resist is first developed in a strong developing solution and then with a weaker developer whose concentration is slightly above that required to obtain complete development. Preferably the resist is exposed so as to obtain about a fifty per cent developed thickness and the developing is carried out in steps, the first with a concentration of 5:1.8 (MEK to ethanol) for five seconds, the second using concentrations of 5:1.8 and 5:2.7 for ten seconds and the third with a concentration of 5:2.7 for five seconds. (author)

  10. Absolute Energy Calibration of X-ray TESs with 0.04 eV Uncertainty at 6.4 keV in a Hadron-Beam Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Tatsuno, H; Bennett, D A; Curceanu, C; Fowler, J W; Gard, J; Gustafsson, F P; Hashimoto, T; Hayano, R S; Hays-Wehle, J P; Hilton, G C; Iliescu, M; Ishimoto, S; Itahashi, K; Iwasaki, M; Kuwabara, K; Ma, Y; Marton, J; Noda, H; O'Neil, G C; Okada, S; Outa, H; Reintsema, C D; Sato, M; Schmidt, D R; Shi, H; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, T; Uhlig, J; Ullom, J N; Widmann, E; Yamada, S; Zmeskal, J; Swetz, D S

    2016-01-01

    A performance evaluation of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) in the environment of a pion beam line at a particle accelerator is presented. Averaged across the 209 functioning sensors in the array, the achieved energy resolution is 5.2 eV FWHM at Co $K_{\\alpha}$ (6.9 keV) when the pion beam is off and 7.3 eV at a beam rate of 1.45 MHz. Absolute energy uncertainty of $\\pm$0.04 eV is demonstrated for Fe $K_{\\alpha}$ (6.4 keV) with in-situ energy calibration obtained from other nearby known x-ray lines. To achieve this small uncertainty, it is essential to consider the non-Gaussian energy response of the TESs and thermal cross-talk pile-up effects due to charged-particle hits in the silicon substrate of the TES array.

  11. Absolute Energy Calibration of X-ray TESs with 0.04 eV Uncertainty at 6.4 keV in a Hadron-Beam Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, H.; Doriese, W. B.; Bennett, D. A.; Curceanu, C.; Fowler, J. W.; Gard, J.; Gustafsson, F. P.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayano, R. S.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Kuwabara, K.; Ma, Y.; Marton, J.; Noda, H.; O'Neil, G. C.; Okada, S.; Outa, H.; Reintsema, C. D.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, D. R.; Shi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, T.; Uhlig, J.; Ullom, J. N.; Widmann, E.; Yamada, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Swetz, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    A performance evaluation of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) in the environment of a pion beam line at a particle accelerator is presented. Averaged across the 209 functioning sensors in the array, the achieved energy resolution is 5.2 eV FWHM at Co K_{α } (6.9 keV) when the pion beam is off and 7.3 eV at a beam rate of 1.45 MHz. Absolute energy uncertainty of ± 0.04 eV is demonstrated for Fe K_{α } (6.4 keV) with in-situ energy calibration obtained from other nearby known X-ray lines. To achieve this small uncertainty, it is essential to consider the non-Gaussian energy response of the TESs and thermal cross-talk pile-up effects due to charged particle hits in the silicon substrate of the TES array.

  12. Absolute Energy Calibration of X-ray TESs with 0.04 eV Uncertainty at 6.4 keV in a Hadron-Beam Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, H.; Doriese, W. B.; Bennett, D. A.; Curceanu, C.; Fowler, J. W.; Gard, J.; Gustafsson, F. P.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayano, R. S.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Kuwabara, K.; Ma, Y.; Marton, J.; Noda, H.; O'Neil, G. C.; Okada, S.; Outa, H.; Reintsema, C. D.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, D. R.; Shi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, T.; Uhlig, J.; Ullom, J. N.; Widmann, E.; Yamada, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Swetz, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    A performance evaluation of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) in the environment of a pion beam line at a particle accelerator is presented. Averaged across the 209 functioning sensors in the array, the achieved energy resolution is 5.2 eV FWHM at Co K_{α } (6.9 keV) when the pion beam is off and 7.3 eV at a beam rate of 1.45 MHz. Absolute energy uncertainty of ± 0.04 eV is demonstrated for Fe K_{α } (6.4 keV) with in-situ energy calibration obtained from other nearby known X-ray lines. To achieve this small uncertainty, it is essential to consider the non-Gaussian energy response of the TESs and thermal cross-talk pile-up effects due to charged particle hits in the silicon substrate of the TES array.

  13. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  14. The quantum X-ray radiology apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    Hilt, B; Prevot, G

    2000-01-01

    The paper entitled 'New Quantum Detection System for Very Low Dose X-ray Radiology', presented at the talk session, discusses the preliminary data obtained using a new quantum X-ray radiology system with a high-efficiency solid-state detector and highly sensitive electronics, making it possible to reduce significantly the dose administered to a patient in X-ray radiology examinations. The present paper focuses more on the technological aspects of the apparatus, such as the integration of the detector with the two Asics, and the computer system. Namely, it is shown how the computer system calibrates the detection system, acquires the data in real time, and controls the scan parameters and image filtering process.

  15. The UHURU X-ray instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoda, N.; Austin, G.; Mickiewicz, S.; Goddard, R.

    1972-01-01

    On Dec. 12, 1970, the UHURU X-ray observatory was launched into equatorial orbit with the prime mission of conducting an all-sky survey of astronomical X-ray sources with intensities of 0.00005 Sco-X1 or greater. The X-ray detection system contains 12 gas-filled proportional counters, 6 behind each collimator. The aspect system is discussed together with the structure, the pulse height analyzer, the command system, the calibration system, and the power distribution system. Pulse shape discrimination circuits used on UHURU use the same technique that was used on the system originally developed for large area proportional counters described by Gorenstein and Mickiewicz (1968).

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is ... care is taken during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ...

  18. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic radiography is described in detail. It comprises a tubular target carrier supporting at its distal end a target with an inclined forward face. Image definition is improved by positioning in the path of the X-rays a window of X-ray transmitting ceramic material, e.g. 90% oxide of Be, or Al, 7% Si02. The target carrier forms a probe which can be positioned in the patient's mouth. X-rays are directed forwardly and laterally of the target to an X-ray film positioned externally. The probe is provided with a detachable sleeve having V-form arms of X-ray opaque material which serve to depress the tongue out of the radiation path and also shield the roof of the mouth and other regions of the head from the X-ray pattern. A cylindrical lead shield defines the X-ray beam angle. (author)

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  20. Soft X-ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations ... patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, ... and Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to X-ray ( ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As a result, bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on large film sheets (much ...

  5. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of ... oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone x-ray makes images of any ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page ... the patient standing upright, as in cases of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is ...

  8. How to prepare a calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation using X rays; Como preparar um laboratorio para calibracao em radiacoes ionizantes utilizando raios X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossio, Francisco; Cardoso, Ricardo de Souza; Quaresma, Daniel da Silva; Batista Filha, Luzianete do Amaral; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira, E-mail: bossio@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ/LNMRI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes

    2013-07-01

    This work shows the main features of a system for calibration and testing of radiation detectors used in low and medium energy. It is based on pre-assembly System Laboratory of Metrology Division (DIMET) Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN). (author)

  9. Active X-ray Optics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudec, René; Inneman, A.; Pina, L.; Černá, D.; Tichý, V.

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2013 - (Juha, L.; Bajt, S.; London, R.; Hudec, R.; Pína, L.), 877718/1-877718/7. (Proceedings of SPIE. 8777). ISBN 9780819495792. [Damage to VUV, EUV, and X-ray Optics IV; and EUV and X-ray Optics: Synergy between Laboratory and Space III. Praha (CZ), 15.04.2013-18.04.2013] Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : X-ray optics * active optics * active X-ray optics Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  10. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lies. A drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... that is extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of ... and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency ...

  13. Tunable X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  14. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  16. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  17. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  18. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Forearm Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: brazo What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  19. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: pelvis What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  20. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The x-ray tube is connected to a flexible arm that is extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ...

  2. 125I-induced DNA double strand breaks: use in calibration of the neutral filter elution technique and comparison with X-ray induced breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutral filter elution assay, for measurement of DNA double strand breakage, has been calibrated using mouse L cells and Chinese hamster V79 cells labelled with [125I]dUrd and then held at liquid nitrogen temperature to accumulate decays. The basis of the calibration is the observation that each 125I decay, occurring in DNA, produces a DNA double strand break. Linear relationships between 125I decays per cell and lethal lesions per cell (minus natural logarithm survival) and the level of elution, were found. Using the calibration data, it was calculated that the yield of DNA double strand breaks after X-irradiation of both cell types was from 6 to 9 x 10-12 DNA double strand breaks per Gy per dalton of DNA, for doses greater than 6 Gy. Neutral filter elution and survival data for X-irradiated and 125I-labelled cells suggested that the relationships between lethal lesions and DNA double strand breakage were significantly different for both cell types. An attempt was made to study the repair kinetics for 125I-induced DNA double strand breaks, but was frustrated by the rapid DNA degradation which occurs in cells that have been killed by the freezing-thawing process. (author)

  3. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  4. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multicell X-ray or gamma detector is used in computer tomography. To achieve good spatial resolution, the electrode plates are narrowly spaced in each cell and are designed identical over the whole length of the detector group. The uniform spacing and precise check of the angles between the electrodes and accurate control of the dimensions of the whole detector structure are achieved by depositing, in the fabrication process, a viscous, resin type material (e.g., epoxy resin) or glue at selected points between the electrodes and insulators. (ORU)

  5. X-ray instrumentation in astronomy II; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 15-17, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various papers on X-ray instrumentation in astronomy are presented. Individual topics addressed include: concentrating hard X-ray collector, advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility high resolution camera, Fano-noise-limited CCDs, linear CCD with enhanced X-ray quantum efficiency, advances in microchannel plate detectors, X-ray imaging spectroscopy with EEV CCDs, large aperture imaging gas scintillation proportional counter, all-sky monitor for the X-ray Timing Explorer, and miniature satellite technology capabilities for space astronomy. Also discussed are: high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy using microcalorimeters, high-throughput X-ray astrophysics cornerstone, gas mixtures for X-ray proportional counters, transmission grating spectrometer for SPEKTROSAT, efficiency of X-ray reflection gratings, soft X-ray spectrographs for solar observations, observability of coronal variations, Berkeley extreme-UV calibration facility, SURF-II radiometric instrumentation calibration facility, and evaluation of toroidal gratings in the EUV

  6. Precise 3D pose recovery from single calibrated X-ray image for computer-assisted distal locking of intramedullary nails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Guoyan; Zhang Xuan [MEM Research Center, ISTB, Univ. of Bern (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    This paper presents a precise approach for pose recovery of the distal locking holes using single calibrated fluoroscopic images. The problem is formulated as a model-based optimal fitting process, where the control variables are decomposed into two sets: (a) the angle between the nail axis and its projection on the imaging plane, and (b) the translation and rotation of the geometrical model of the distal locking hole around the nail axis. By using an iterative algorithm to find the optimal values of the latter set of variables from any given value of the former variable, we reduce the multiple-dimensional model-based optimal fitting problem to a one-dimensional search along a finite interval. We report the results of our laboratory as well as in-vitro experiments, which demonstrate that the accuracy of our approach is adequate for successful distal locking of intramedullary nails. (orig.)

  7. Cross calibration of QDR-2000 and QDR-1000 dual-energy X-ray densitometers for bone mineral and soft-tissue measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Gram, J; Hansen, T B;

    1995-01-01

    ) and fan beam (FB) modes (n = 40-62) as a quality control measure. A total of 83 subjects (79 females and four males) with a wide range of bone mineral densities (BMD) were studied. There was a linear relationship between results with the QDR-1000W and QDR-2000 in SB mode, and between SB and FB mode on...... the QDR-2000, but the magnitude of the coefficients and constants differed for the different anatomic regions. In SB mode the QDR-2000 underestimated whole body and forearm BMD by 3% relative to the QDR-1000W, even after cross calibration using a spine phantom. Femoral total BMD was slightly, but not...... device. Soft-tissue composition with FB (enhanced analysis protocol) on the QDR-2000 differed greatly from that obtained using SB (standard protocol). Lean tissue mass was 4 kg lower and fat mass 4 kg higher in FB mode.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  8. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodoroaba, V.-D., E-mail: Dan.Hodoroaba@bam.d [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division VI.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Radtke, M. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division I.3 Structure Analysis, Polymer Analysis, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Vincze, L. [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Rackwitz, V.; Reuter, D. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division VI.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  9. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  10. X-ray Studies of Flaring Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Sylwester; J. Sylwester; K. J. H. Phillips

    2008-03-01

    We present some methods of X-ray data analysis employed in our laboratory for deducing the physical parameters of flaring plasma. For example, we have used a flare well observed with Polish instrument RESIK aboard Russian CORONAS-F satellite. Based on a careful instrument calibration, the absolute fluxes in a number of individual spectral lines have been obtained. The analysis of these lines allows us to follow the evolution of important thermodynamic parameters characterizing the emitting plasma throughout this flare evolution.

  11. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The beam line has a unity magnification toroidal mirror that produces a 50 by 200 micron focus just inside an x-ray hutch at the position of an x-y slit. The beam path in the hutch consists of source defining slits, a four bounce Ge or Si monochromator, followed by elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror pair which focuses the beam from the slits to sub micron dimensions (0.8 x 0.8 microns). An important feature of this arrangement is the ability to switch between white and monochromatic beams that are essential for characterizing crystals or crystal grains in the sub-micron range. Since sample rotation is fixed they have facilities for precision translation of the specimen to allow them to scan different crystal regions or grains. The sample stage rests on a state of the art six-circle diffractometer equipped with encoders in the main rotation stages calibrated to a second of arc. The detector is a 4K x 4K CCD (Bruker) with a 9 x 9 cm view area mounted on a detector arm that can be positioned around the sample. The detector itself can also be positioned to better than 1 micron along the detector arm. Using this facility they have been able to measure the orientation structure of single grains of passivated or buried Al interconnect test structures. Such structures or their equivalents are important in connecting individual components on integrated circuits. Their sub-micron dimensions result in very high current densities that can result in interconnect failures. The variation in sub-grain structure in a single grain is rich in detail. They have obtained detailed maps of misorientations in single grains using white beam Laue diffraction patterns From these they have been

  12. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, M V; Zheludeva, S I; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O P; Arutynyan, E H; Kheiker, D M; Kreines, A Y; Lider, V V; Pashaev, E M; Shilina, N Y; Shishkov, V A

    2000-01-01

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  13. X-ray lithography sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron from dipole magnets in electron storage rings has emerged as a useful source of x-rays for lithography. To meet the need for these sources numerous groups around the world have embarked on projects to design and construct storage rings for x-ray lithography. Both conventional electromagnets as well as superconducting (SC) dipoles have been incorporated into the various designs. An overview of the worldwide effort to produce commercial x-ray sources will be presented. To better illustrate the elements involved in these sources a closer examination of the Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source Project (SXLS) at BNL will be presented. 11 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  14. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  15. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  16. Simulation and evaluation of mammography quality from an X-ray equipment of a instrument calibration laboratory; Simulacao e avaliacao das qualidades da mamografia do equipamento de raios-x de um laboratorio de calibracao de instrumentos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Natalia F. da; Castro, Maysa C. de; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: na.fiorini@gmail.com, E-mail: maysadecastro@gmail.com, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The Instrument Calibration Laboratory (ICL) of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil has developed some work in order to establish a primary standard system for low energy X-ray employing a ionization chamber of free air. For this, one of the most important steps is the determination of factors of correction of its answer. Simulation is a frequently used tool for this because some correction factors can not be determined experimentally. For the correct simulation of these correction factors is necessary some input parameters such as geometry, the material composition of the dosimeter, the experimental arrangement and the radiation source are specified correctly. For the ionization chamber available on the LCI, the geometry, the material components and the experimental arrangement can be obtained easily. On the other hand, spectrum of radiation energy source, which must be inserted into the computer code has not been obtained. Thus, this study aims to determine this radiation spectrum, thus enabling the characterization of the new primary standard for low power X-radiation of ICL.

  17. Radioisotope x-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope x-ray fluorescence and x-ray preferential absorption (XRA) techniques are used extensively for the analysis of materials, covering such diverse applications as analysis of alloys, coal, environmental samples, paper, waste materials, and metalliferous mineral ores and products. Many of these analyses are undertaken in the harsh environment of industrial plants and in the field. Some are continuous on-line analyses of material being processed in industry, where instantaneous analysis information is required for the control of rapidly changing processes. Radioisotope x-ray analysis systems are often tailored to a specific but limited range of applications. They are simpler and often considerably less expensive than analysis systems based on x-ray tubes. These systems are preferred to x-ray tube techniques when simplicity, ruggedness, reliability, and cost of equipment are important; when minimum size, weight, and power consumption are necessary; when a very constant and predictable x-ray output is required; when the use of high-energy x-rays is advantageous; and when short x-ray path lengths are required to minimize the absorption of low-energy x-rays in air. This chapter reviews radioisotope XRF, preferential absorption, and scattering techniques. Some of the basic analysis equations are given. The characteristics of radioisotope sources and x-ray detectors are described, and then the x-ray analytical techniques are presented. The choice of radioisotope technique for a specific application is discussed. This is followed by a summary of applications of these techniques, with a more detailed account given of some of the applications, particularly those of considerable industrial importance. 79 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing ...

  19. X-ray Dynamic Defectoscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavřík, Daniel; Visschers, J.; Jakůbek, J.; Ponchut, C.

    Orosei : IMC S.r.l., 2001. s. 47. [International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors /3./. 23.09.2001-27.09.2001, Orosei] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/00/D064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 210000018 Keywords : X-ray Defectoscopy * Damage * X-ray Detectors Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  20. X-ray diagnostic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray tube is connected to several different image processing devices in X-ray diagnostic equipment. Only a single organ selector is allocated to it, for which the picture parameters for each image processing device are selected. The choice of the correct combination of picture parameters is made by means of a selector switch. (DG)

  1. X-ray tube arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray tube is described incorporating an elongated target/ anode over which the electron beam is deflected and from which x-rays are emitted. Improved methods of monitoring and controlling the amplitude of the beam deflection are presented. (U.K.)

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... frequently compared to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist, an individual specially trained to perform radiology examinations, positions the patient on the x-ray ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ...

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods and results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of plasmons, alloys and gold compounds are discussed. After a comprehensive introduction, seven papers by the author, previously published elsewhere, are reprinted and these cover a wide range of the uses of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. (W.D.L.)

  5. Research in quantitative microscopic X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A feasibility study of quantitative elemental microanalysis of biological materials and glass samples by microbeam X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was completed. The research included testing the homogeneity of existing standards for X-ray fluorescence calibration and verification of a fundamental parameters method for quantitative analysis. The goal was to evaluate the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer as a tool for elemental analysis at the microscale level. Glass Standard Reference Materials were analyzed. The glass specimens consisted of flat, optically polished slabs having three different thicknesses. For calibration, metal thin films were used. The microbeam X-ray fluorescence spectrometer utilizing capillary optics with effective beam diameter equal to about 30 μm has been applied in this research. Sources of uncertainties considered in this work were detector and X-ray tube stability, specimen movement, and spectral deconvolution. Concentrations of analytes were calculated using a fundamental parameters approach. Coherently and incoherently scattered lines of tube target were used for matrix correction and to estimate the mass thickness of the sample. The synchrotron microbeam X-ray fluorescence technique was used for quantitative analysis of human brain tissue samples. In measurements the monochromatic and polychromatic synchrotron microbeams were applied. The same area of tissue sample was scanned with the use of both X-ray microbeams. The concentrations of selected elements were computed. A reasonably good agreement between results of both analyses was obtained

  6. Energy Scales in X-Ray Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, W. A.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Cottam, J.; Figueroa, E.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Stahle, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Microcalorimeter pulse shape characteristics, such as pulse height, decay time and rise time, are dependent on the detector temperature and bias as well as the photon energy and flux. We examine the nature of the temperature dependency by illuminating the ASTRO-E2 X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) microcalorimeter array with X-rays generated by electron impact on a range of foil targets. The resulting pulses are collected for a range of detector temperatures. We observe and model the temperature dependence of the pulse shape characteristics by fitting the data with non-linear pulse models. Our aim is to determine a robust method for correcting the energy scale obtained in ground calibration for slight differences in the operating conditions while in orbit.

  7. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  8. X-ray quasars and the X-ray background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Einstein X-ray observations of a sample of 202 radio-and optically-selected quasars due to Ku, Helfand and Lucy and to Zamorani et al. are analysed. Correlations between X-ray, optical and radio luminosities are examined. The contribution of radio-loud quasars to the 2-keV X-ray background is estimated using high-frequency radio-source counts, and the contribution due to radio-quiet, optically bright quasars using optical counts. It is shown that radio-loud quasars and radio-quiet optically bright quasars together contribute approximately 15 per cent of the observed 2-keV X-ray background. The contribution of optically faint radio-quiet quasars is uncertain, but may be limited to a maximum of approximately 30 per cent if recent indications of a flattening in optical counts at faint magnitudes are correct. (author)

  9. X-ray diffraction apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides an x-ray diffraction apparatus permitting the rotation of the divergence sit in conjunction with the rotation of the x-ray irradiated specimen, whereby the dimensions of the x-ray irradiated portion of the specimen remain substantially constant during the rotation of the specimen. In a preferred embodiment, the divergence slit is connected to a structural element linked with a second structural element connected to the specimen such that the divergence slit rotates at a lower angular speed than the specimen

  10. X-ray crystal interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various configurations of the X-ray crystal interferometer are reviewed. The interferometer applications considered include metrology, the measurement of fundamental physical constants, the study of weakly absorbing phase objects, time-resolved diagnostics, the determination of hard X-ray beam parameters, and the characterization of structural defects in the context of developing an X-ray Michelson interferometer. The three-crystal Laue interferometer (LLL-interferometer), its design, and the experimental opportunities it offers are given particular attention. (instruments and methods of investigation)

  11. Calibration voltage test of non invasive meter for radiodiagnostic on equipment of constant potential X-ray; Teste de calibracao de medidor nao invasivo de tensao para radiodiagnostico em equipamentos de raios X de potencial constante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Manoel M.O.; Peixoto, J. Guilherme P., E-mail: mmoramos@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, Marco A.G.S., E-mail: guedes@iee.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work evaluates the utilization of the non invasive voltage meter PTW Diavolt Universal in industrial X ray equipment of constant potential. With the performed measurements, the conclusion is that conclusion is possible, once his use limits are identified

  12. Experimental calibration and determination of the relative response for Lif: Mg, Ti(TLD-100) dosemeters at 60Co gamma and 60 kVp X-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermoluminescence efficiency of LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100) dosemeters has been determined for photon beams from 60Co gamma rays and 60 kVp X-rays. It has been proven that light yield varies as a function of the photon energy. An experiment was performed using an X-ray beam whose spectrum has been determined by an X-ray fluorescence method. This enabled a direct calculation of the absorbed doses in the T1 material for the different operation conditions. These values and the experimental ones from measuring T1 intensities have been used to obtain the efficiency for energy X-ray spectrum. From the above values, the dosemeter T1 response, relative to 60Co, has been evaluated. (author)

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x- ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and ...

  15. Duodenal X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication provides an overview of duodenal X-ray diagnostics with the aid of barium meals in 1362 patients. The introducing paragraphs deal with the topographic anatomy of the region and the methodics of X-ray investigation. The chapter entitled ''processes at the duodenum itself'' describes mainly ulcers, diverticula, congenital anomalies, tumors and inflammations. The neighbourhood processes comprise in the first place diseases having their origin at the pancreas and bile ducts. As a conclusion, endoscopic rectograde cholangio-pancreaticography and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography are pointed out as advanced X-ray investigation methods. In the annex of X-ray images some of the described phenomena are shown in exemplary manner. (orig./MG)

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little to no special ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like a photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient lies. A drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . ... when feasible to protect from radiation. You must hold very still and may be asked to keep ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... technologist, an individual specially trained to perform radiology examinations, positions the patient on the x-ray table ... bone is forming), for comparison purposes. When the examination is complete, you may be asked to wait ...

  20. Picosecond x-ray science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report discusses the exciting times for short pulse X-rays and the current users of the technology in the United States. Tracking nuclear motions with X-rays transcends scientific disciplines and includes Biology, Materials Science, Condensed Matter and Chemistry. 1 picosecond accesses many phenomena previously hidden at 100ps. Synchrotron advantage over laser plasma and LCLS is that it's easily tunable. There is a large and diverse user community of this technology that is growing rapidly. A working group is being formed to implement 'fast track' Phases 1 and 2 which includes tunable, polarized, monochromatic, focused X-rays; variable pulse length (1 to 100ps) and 1 kHz, 109 X-rays/s with 1% bandwidth. ERL would be a major advance for ultrafast time-resolved studies.

  1. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syryamkin, V. I., E-mail: klestov-simon@mail.ru; Klestov, S. A., E-mail: klestov-simon@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special ... to 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? A bone ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  4. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic dental radiography is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun having an elongated tubular target carrier extending into the patient's mouth. The carrier supports an inclined target for direction of an X-ray pattern towards a film positioned externally of the patient's mouth. Image definition is improved by a focusing anode which focuses the electron beam into a sharp spot (0.05 to 0.10 mm diameter) on the target. The potential on the focusing anode is adjustable to vary the size of the spot. An X-ray transmitting ceramic (oxides of Be, Al and Si) window is positioned adjacent to the front face of the target. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that ... around joints, and in evaluating the hips of children with congenital problems. top of page This page ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can be taken to the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray ... and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way ...

  9. X-ray thickness gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New design of X-ray gauge of rolled product thickness is suggested. It is supplied with self-compensation unit, removing the error, caused by changes of half-cycles of supply voltage of radiation source

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. ... appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in ... injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray tube is connected to ... equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency rooms, physician offices, ambulatory care centers, nursing homes ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the baby. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page ... procedure varies. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their ...

  19. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  20. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  1. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  2. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  3. Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, M C; Van Speybroeck, L P; O'Dell, S L

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), the x-ray component of NASA's Great Observatories, was launched early in the morning of 1999, July 23 by the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Shuttle launch was only the first step in placing the observatory in orbit. After release from the cargo bay, the Inertial Upper Stage performed two firings, and separated from the observatory as planned. Finally, after five firings of Chandra's own Integral Propulsion System--- the last of which took place 15 days after launch--- the observatory was placed in its highly elliptical orbit of 140,000 km apogee and 10,000 km perigee. After activation, the first x-rays focussed by the telescope were observed on 1999, August 12. Beginning with these initial observations one could see that the telescope had survived the launch environment and was operating as expected. The month following the opening of the sunshade door was spent adjusting the focus for each set of instrument configurations, determining the optical axis, calibrating the star c...

  4. X-ray laser; Roentgenlaser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, Emil J.; Breiby, Dag W.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray is among the most important research tools today, and has given priceless contributions to all disciplines within the natural sciences. State of the art in this field is called XFEL, X-ray Free Electron Laser, which may be 10 thousand million times stronger than the x-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble. In addition XFEL has properties that allow the study of processes which previously would have been impossible. Of special interest are depictions on atomic- and molecular level by the use of x-ray holographic methods, and being able to study chemical reactions in nature's own timescale, the femtosecond. Conclusion: The construction of x-ray lasers is a natural development in a scientific field which has an enormous influence on the surrounding society. While the discovery of x-ray was an important breakthrough in itself, new applications appear one after the other: Medical depiction, dissemination, diffraction, DNA and protein structures, synchrotron radiation and tomography. There is reason to believe that XFEL implies a technological leap as big as the synchrotrons some decades ago. As we are now talking about studies of femtosecond and direct depiction of chemical reactions, it is obvious that we are dealing with a revolution to come, with extensive consequences, both scientifically and culturally. (EW)

  5. X-ray diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A falling load type X-ray diagnostic apparatus comprises a low voltage power source, AC-DC converting means connected to the low voltage power source so as to apply a rectified low DC voltage, chopping means connected to the AC-DC converting means and chopping said DC voltage into a low AC voltage, high voltage applying means for transforming said low AC voltage into a high AC voltage, said high AC voltage being applied as a tube voltage to an X-ray tube from which X-rays are irradiated toward an object to be examined, means for controlling a filament heating power of the X-ray tube, programming means for supplying a control signal to said filament heating control means so as to reduce the emission current of said X-ray tube during the irradiation, and chopper control means for controlling the chopping ratio of said chopping means by evaluating said rectified DC voltage with a preset tube voltage generated in said programming means, said programming means compensating said tube voltage by receiving said control signal in such a manner that said tube voltage is maintained substantially constant during the irradiation by varying said preset tube voltage so as to control the chopping ratio based upon the reduction of the filament heating power for the X-ray tube

  6. Low energy (soft) x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry of low-energy (soft) X rays produced by the SOFTEX Model CMBW-2 was performed using Nuclear Associates Type 30 - 330 PTW, Exradin Type A2, and Shonka-Wyckoff ionization chambers with a Keithley Model 602 electrometer. Thermoluminescent (BeO chip) dosimeters were used with a Harshaw Detector 2000-A and Picoammeter-B readout system. Beam quality measurements were made using aluminum absorbers; exposure rates were assessed by the current of the X-ray tube and by exposure times. Dose distributions were established, and the average factors for non-uniformity were calculated. The means of obtaining accurate absorbed and exposed doses using these methods are discussed. Survival of V79 cells was assessed by irradiating them with soft X rays, 200 kVp X rays, and 60Co gamma rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for soft X rays with 0, 0.2, 0.7 mm added thicknesses of aluminum were 1.6, which were compared to 60Co. The RBE of 200 kVp X rays relative to 60Co was 1.3. Results of this study are available for reference in future RERF studies of cell survival. (author)

  7. Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/ΔE is greater than 104 and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally

  8. Structure in galactic soft X-ray features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations are described of the soft X-ray background in a part of the northern hemisphere in the energy range 0.06 - 3.0 keV. The X-ray instruments, placed onboard a sounding rocket, are a one-dimensional focusing collector with multi-cell proportional counters in the focal plane and eight large area counters on deployable panels. A description of the instruments and their preflight calibration is given. Precautions were taken to prevent UV sensitivity of the X-ray instruments. The observation program, which consisted of a number of pre-programmed slow scans, is outlined. The spectral date on the soft X-ray background in these and previous observations showed that at least two components of different temperature are present. A low temperature component of approximately (3-10)x105 is found all over the sky. Components of higher temperature approximately 3x106 K are found in regions of soft X-ray enhancement; The North Polar Spur has been observed in two scans at the galactic latitude b=250 and b=750. The X-ray ridge structure is found to be strongly energy dependent. The low energy data (0 reveals two separate emission features on the ridge, both probably of finite extensions (approximately equal to 00.5). A wider X-ray ridge (approximately equal to 100) is observed above 0.4 keV. (Auth.)

  9. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors

  10. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, M.V.; Shilin, Yu.N.; Zheludeva, S.I. E-mail: zheludeva@ns.crys.ras.ru; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O.P.; Arutynyan, E.H.; Kheiker, D.M.; Kreines, A.Ya.; Lider, V.V.; Pashaev, E.M.; Shilina, N.Yu.; Shishkov, V.A

    2000-06-21

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  11. X-rays and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is one of the specialized books issued by the Arab Atomic Energy Agency about the key technologies of interest to Arab researchers . The book contains 10 chapters as follows: the nature of X-ray, methods of production and measurement of X-rays, X-ray and materials, X-ray crystallography, X-ray and chemistry, X-ray and physics, biological effects of X-ray, radiography in the field of medicine and biology, X-ray in the field of industry, other applications in agriculture, imaging artifacts and paintings and geology.

  12. Implementation of the method air-kerma product area in KAP camera calibration with reference qualities of X-ray series at the SSDL RQR of Mexico; Implementacion del metodo producto kerma en aire-area en la calibracion de camaras KAP con calidades de referencia de rayos X de la serie RQR en el LSCD de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejudo, Jesus; Tovar, Victor M., E-mail: jesus.cejudo@ini.gob.mx, E-mail: victor.tovar@inin.gob.mx [lnstituto Nacional de lnvestigaciones Nucleares (DMRI/LSDC/lNlN), Ocoyoacac (Mexico). Centro Nuclear Dr. Nabor Carrillo Flores. Laboratorio Secundario de Calibracion Dosimetrica

    2013-10-01

    The X-Ray machines, at a reference laboratory for the instrument calibration in diagnostic radiology, should compliance with the ISO requirements. Sometimes there is not available as much laboratories as needed in Latin American countries. So this project shows the KAP ionization chamber implementation method using the TRS-457 radiation quality from the IAEA at the SSDL of Mexico. The KAP instruments calibration method consists in doing a substitution comparison using a standard reference with traceability to a primary laboratory and a transmission-monitoring chamber that measures the number of photons of the X-ray primary beam. A KAP chamber calibration requires a special array that consists in collocating the chamber in two different positions of its calibration process. Then, with air kerma-area product coefficient together with a corrected electrometer measure at referential conditions, the patient dosimetry magnitudes are calculated. The dosimetry necessity at hospitals always will be in function of possessing a highly reliable calibration coefficient chamber for making these measures. That dosimetry results will help in reducing the total or partial irradiation emitted to the human body of the patient. This is how stochastic risks will be lessened due to diagnostic studies. The purpose of this project is to have a synergy with calibration for making known that the SSDL of Mexico has the technical capacity to act as a link between primary standard dosimetry laboratories and the ionizing radiation equipment users who require that their KAP chamber have traceability from the primary standard to the user. (author)

  13. A low power x-ray tube for use in energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low power X-ray tube with thin molybdenum transmission target for use in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ENDXRF) element analysis has been indigenously built, along with its power supply. The X-ray tube has been in operation since August 1979, and it has been operated upto maximum target voltage of 35 KV and tube current upto 200 μA which is more than sufficient for trace element analysis. This X-ray tube has been used alongwith the indigenously built Si(Li) detector X-ray spectrometer with an energy resolution of 200 eV at 5.9 Kev MnKsub(α) X-ray peak for ENDXRF analysis. A simple procedure of calibration has been developed for thin samples based on the cellulose diluted, thin multielement standard pellets. Analytical sensitivities of the order of a few p.p.m. have been obtained with the experimental setup for elements with 20 < = Z < = 38 and 60 < = Z < = 90. A number of X-ray spectra for samples of environmental, biological, agricultural, industrial and metallurgical interest are presented to demonstrate the salient features of the experimental sep up. (auth.)

  14. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  15. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  16. X-ray echo spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1--0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power $> 10^8$) with broadband $\\simeq$~5--13~meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than $10^3$ signal e...

  17. MO-A-BRD-07: Feasibility of X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography as a Tool for Calibration and In Vivo Dosimetry of Radiotherapy Electron and Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This work simulates radiation-induced acoustic waves to assess the feasibility of x-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) as a dosimeter. XACT exploits the phenomenon that acoustic waves with amplitude proportional to the dose deposited are induced following a radiation pulse. After detecting these acoustic waves with an ultrasound transducer, an image of the dose distribution can be reconstructed in realtime. Methods: Monte Carlo was used to simulate the dose distribution for monoenergetic 6 MeV photon and 9 MeV electron beams incident on a water tank. The dose distribution for a prostate patient planned with a photon 4-field box technique was calculated using clinical treatment planning software. All three dose distributions were converted into initial pressure distributions, and transportation of the induced acoustic waves was simulated using an open-source toolkit. Ideal transducers were placed around the circumference of the target to detect the acoustic waves, and a time reversal reconstruction algorithm was used to obtain an XACT image of the dose for each radiation pulse. Results: For the photon water tank relative dosimetry case, it was found that the normalized acoustic signal amplitude agreed with the normalized dose at depths from 0 cm to 10 cm, with an average percent difference of 0.5%. For the reconstructed in-plane dose distribution of an electron water tank irradiation, all pixels passed a 3%–3 mm 2D gamma test. The reconstructed prostate dose distribution closely resembled the plan, with 89% of pixels passing a 3%–3 mm 2D gamma test. For all situations, the amplitude of the induced acoustic waves ranged from 0.01 Pa to 1 Pa. Conclusion: Based on the amplitude of the radiation-induced acoustic waves and accuracy of the reconstructed dose distributions, XACT is a feasible technique for dosimetry in both calibration and in vivo environments for photon and electron beams and merits further investigation. Funding from NSERC, CIHR and Mc

  18. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral X-ray apparatus which reduces the number of exposures necessary to obtain panoramic dental radiographs is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun, a tubular target carrier projecting from the gun along the beam axis and carrying at its distal end a target surrounded by a shield of X-ray opaque material. This shield extends forward and laterally of the target and has surfaces which define a wedge or cone-shaped radiation pattern delimited vertically by the root tips of the patient's teeth. A film holder is located externally of the patient's mouth. A disposable member can fit on the target carrier to depress the patient's tongue out of the radiation pattern and to further shield the roof of the mouth. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  19. Extragalactic X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 40% of the X-ray sources in the third UHURU catalogue are extragalactic. One, SMC X-1 has been identified with a binary star in the lesser Magellanic Cloud, while five sources, three probably binary stars, have been found in the greater Magellanic Cloud. X-ray sources in normal galaxies (M31), radiogalaxies (NGC5128), Seyfert galaxies (NGC4151), quasars (3C273) and galaxy clusters (Virgo X-1 and Perseus X-1) are briefly discussed. The most probable explanation for the origin of X-ray emissions from galaxy clusters appears at present to be that the cluster is filled with a thin, very hot gas which emits X-radiation by thermal bremsstrahlung. The main alternative is a socalled inverse Compton effect. (JIW)

  20. Determination of plutonium in nitric acid solutions using energy dispersive L X-ray fluorescence with a low power X-ray generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the development of an in-line energy dispersive L X-ray fluorescence spectrometer set-up, with a low power X-ray generator and a secondary target, for the determination of plutonium concentration in nitric acid solutions. The intensity of the L X-rays from the internal conversion and gamma rays emitted by the daughter nuclei from plutonium is minimized and corrected, in order to eliminate the interferences with the L X-ray fluorescence spectrum. The matrix effects are then corrected by the Compton peak method. A calibration plot for plutonium solutions within the range 0.1–20 g L−1 is given

  1. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  2. Possible applications of synchrotron radiation to x-ray astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the instrumentation for observations in high energy astrophysics has grown increasingly sophisticated, so too has the need developed for improved calibration techniques and facilities. Contemporary satellite-borne observatories contain high resolution spectrometers, polarimeters and x-ray image-forming optics focussed on position sensitive detectors. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, a planned free-flying, shuttle-launched x-ray telescope (1.2 m diameter, 10 m focal length), will provide 0.5 arcsecond imagery over a several arcminute field and spectrometry with E/ΔE > 1000 in the energy range 0.1 to 8 keV. Other telescopes in the planning stage include the possibility of approx. 0.5 arcminute imagery at energies in excess of 100 keV. A few examples from the long list of calibration needs of inidvidual detectors and subsystems are listed as applications of synchrotron radiation

  3. X-ray hot plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray plasma emission study is powerful diagnostic tool of hot plasmas. In this review article the main techniques of X-ray plasma emission measurement are shortly presented: X-ray spectrometry using absorbent filters, crystal and grating spectrometers, imaging techniques using pinhole cameras, X-ray microscopes and Fresnel zone plate cameras, X-ray plasma emission calorimetry. Advances in these techniques with examples for different hot plasma devices are also presentes. (author)

  4. Authentication of vegetable oils by confocal X-ray scattering analysis with coherent/incoherent scattered X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an alternative analytical method based on the Rayleigh to Compton scattering intensity ratio and effective atomic number for non-destructive identification of vegetable oils using confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering spectrometry. A calibration curve for the Rayleigh to Compton scattering intensity ratio and effective atomic number was constructed on the basis of a reliable physical model for X-ray scattering. The content of light elements, which are "invisible" using X-ray fluorescence, can be calculated "by difference" from the calibration curve. In this work, we demonstrated the use of this proposed approach to identify complex organic matrices in different vegetable oils with high precision and accuracy. PMID:27211668

  5. Is X-ray emissivity constant on magnetic flux surfaces?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of the elongations and shifts of internal magnetic flux surfaces can be used to determine the q profile in elongated tokamak plasmas. X-ray tomography is thought to be a reasonable technique for independently measuring internal flux surface shapes, because it is widely believed that X-ray emissivity should be constant on a magnetic flux surface. In the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the X-ray tomography diagnostic system consists of four arrays of 38 chords each. A comparison of reconstructed X-ray contours with magnetic flux surfaces shows a small but consistent discrepancy in the radial profile of elongation. Numerous computational tests have been performed to verify these findings, including tests of the sensitivity to calibration and viewing geometry errors, the accuracy of the tomography reconstruction algorithms, and other subtler effects. We conclude that the discrepancy between the X-ray contours and the magnetic flux surfaces is real, leading to the conclusion that X-ray emissivity is not exactly constant on a flux surface. (orig.)

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exam requires little to no special preparation. Tell your doctor and the technologist if there is any possibility you are pregnant. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What are some ...

  7. X-ray image converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention pertains to rare earth phosphor admixtures utilizing thulium-activated lanthanum or gadolinium oxyhalide phosphor material. These materials increase the relative speed and resolution of an X-ray image compared with conventional phosphors as well as reducing the still serious crossover problem now experienced with conventional phosphors. (Auth.)

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Images related to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray ( ... are the fastest and easiest way for your doctor to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and ...

  10. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  11. X-ray diagnostic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lateral and orbital scanning movements can be carried out with the equipment. The assessment is carried out by a computer. Differences in sensitivity of the detectors can be compensated for by displacement of the electron beam of the X-ray tube compared to the anti-cathode or by bending of the electron beam by electromagnetic coils. (RW)

  12. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of Literature on x-ray fluorescence spectrometry starts with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. It is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is subdivided according to spectra, equipment, applications and absorption analysis

  13. X-ray film processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray films have to be highly sensitive, for radiation protection reasons. The films used in radiology are coated on both sides with a photosensitive emulsion. This applies to all dental films. Their properties and the development of the different exposed films are explained. (DG)

  14. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest ... cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk. The effective radiation dose for this procedure varies. ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest ... cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk. ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest ... evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk. The effective ... more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  2. X-Ray Polarimetry: Historical Remarks and Other Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    We briefly discuss the history of X-ray polarimetry for astronomical applications including a guide to the appropriate statistics. We also provide an introduction to some of the new techniques discussed in more detail elsewhere in these proceedings. We conclude our discussion with our concerns over adequate ground calibration, especially with respect to unpolarized beams, and at the system level.

  3. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  4. Next Generation X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Kittle, Joe

    sources that were previously unobtainable within realistic observation times e.g. Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Standard photoelectric X-ray polarimeter designs are both quantum efficiency (QE) limited and challenging to calibrate due to diffusion of electron signal as it drifts through the gas. Drifting negative ions decreases diffusion to the thermal limit thereby decoupling sensitivity from drift distance and enabling larger detector areas that can be at the focus of larger diameter mirrors and single reflection concentrator optics. NITPCs also allow the selection of constituent gasses and pressures to be based on the optimization of modulation and QE rather than diffusion properties. This versatility enables a large improvement in sensitivity without driving cost and with only moderate increase to mass and power of the detector and/or instrument. Furthermore, the energy band of NGXP will be tunable to maximize the science return. Following the efforts of this proposal NGXP will be proposed as sounding rocket experiment and as a candidate instrument for future opportunities. The GSFC polarimeter group has demonstrated NITPCs for several detector concepts. This proposal leverages the previous effort and team expertise with goals to establish the NITPC as the baseline for narrow field observations of faint persistent sources and to improve the technology readiness of associated technologies such as stainless steel gas electron multipliers and finer readout pitch.

  5. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings Spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    OpenAIRE

    Hurvitz, G.; Ehrlich, Y.; Strum, G.; Shpilman, Z.; Levy, I.; Fraenkel, M.

    2012-01-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses Focused-Ion-Beam (FIB) technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on Transmission Electron Microscopy grids (TEM-grid). High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100...

  6. X-ray Cryogenic Facility (XRCF) Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegley, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray & Cryogenic Facility (XRCF) Handbook is a guide for planning operations at the facility. A summary of the capabilities, policies, and procedures is provided to enhance project coordination between the facility user and XRCF personnel. This handbook includes basic information that will enable the XRCF to effectively plan and support test activities. In addition, this handbook describes the facilities and systems available at the XRCF for supporting test operations. 1.2 General Facility Description The XRCF was built in 1989 to meet the stringent requirements associated with calibration of X-ray optics, instruments, and telescopes and was subsequently modified in 1999 & 2005 to perform the challenging cryogenic verification of Ultraviolet, Optical, and Infrared mirrors. These unique and premier specialty capabilities, coupled with its ability to meet multiple generic thermal vacuum test requirements for large payloads, make the XRCF the most versatile and adaptable space environmental test facility in the Agency. XRCF is also recognized as the newest, most cost effective, most highly utilized facility in the portfolio and as one of only five NASA facilities having unique capabilities. The XRCF is capable of supporting and has supported missions during all phases from technology development to flight verification. Programs/projects that have benefited from XRCF include Chandra, Solar X-ray Imager, Hinode, and James Webb Space Telescope. All test programs have been completed on-schedule and within budget and have experienced no delays due to facility readiness or failures. XRCF is currently supporting Strategic Astrophysics Technology Development for Cosmic Origins. Throughout the years, XRCF has partnered with and continues to maintain positive working relationships with organizations such as ATK, Ball Aerospace, Northrop Grumman Aerospace, Excelis (formerly Kodak/ITT), Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Alabama

  7. In vivo X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements on five occupationally exposed persons have shown that it is possible to use X-ray fluorescence analysis for in vivo measurements of lead in the skeleton. The technique for calibrating in vivo X-ray fluorescence measurements of lead in bone tissue has been studied in detail and a two-component phantom simulating the bone and the soft tissue parts of the finger constructed. The technique has been used for in vivo measurements on 22 occupationally exposed persons. The minimum detectable concentration of lead in fingerbones was found to be around 20 μg x g-1. The lead concentrations in their skeletons and blood were compared: the correlation was poor. The variations in lead concentrations in the skeleton have been studied in occupationally exposed persons and in samples from archaeological skeletons. The sensitivity and the minimum detectable concentration of cadmium in the kidney cortex in in vivo measurements has been studied by measurements on kidney models. The minimum detectable concentration was 20 μg x g-1 at a skin-kidney distance of 30 mm and 40 μg x g-1 at 40 mm. Five persons occupationally exposed were studied. (Author)

  8. X-ray spectroscopy of NGC 5548

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S; Raassen, A J J; Van der Meer, R L J; Brinkman, A C; Liedahl, D A; Behar, E; De Rosa, A

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548, for the full 0.1-10 keV band, using improved calibration results of the Chandra-LETGS instrument. The warm absorber consists of at least three ionization components, namely one with a low, medium and high ionization parameter. The X-ray absorbing material, from an outflowing wind, covers the full range of velocity components found from UV absorption lines. The presence of redshifted emission components for the strongest blue-shifted resonance absorption lines indicate that the absorber is located at a distance larger than the edge of the accretion disk. We derive an upper limit to the edge of the accretion disk of 1 light year. Absorption lines from ions of at least ten chemical elements have been detected, and in general for these elements there are no strong deviations from solar abundances. The narrow emission lines from the O VII and Ne IX forbidden and intercombination lines probably originate from much larger distances to th...

  9. The Astro-E2 X-ray spectrometer/EBIT microcalorimeter x-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The x-ray spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary nondispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare XRS microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I and SuperEBIT facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolving power. The XRS microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06 K and by carefully engineering the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration 'library' for the Astro-E2 observatory

  10. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers

  11. Reference factor F(CT)Q and X ray tube ionization yield R(TUBE)Q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operational facility procedures in diagnostic radiology standardization and calibration, through the relation between the X ray tube current and the ionization chamber current in a radiation quality Q, shown the reference factor F(CT)Q as the reality estimate to the X ray tube ionization yield, R(TUBE)Q . (author)

  12. Digital x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital radiography is progressively replacing conventional (film-based) radiographic techniques promising consistently high levels of image quality, more effective use of radiation and more efficient work practices. At the same time its introduction poses new challenges to those physical scientists who design radiological imaging systems and those who provide scientific/technical support to a clinical radiology service. In this review scientific aspects of those digital x-ray imaging systems which are proving most successful are described. Physical measurement techniques developed to evaluate the imaging performance and radiation dose efficiency of clinical digital radiography systems are outlined. Finally, directions in which digital x-ray imaging technology may evolve in the coming decade are discussed. (author)

  13. Soft x-ray tomoholography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate an x-ray imaging method that combines Fourier transform holography with tomography (‘tomoholography’) for three-dimensional (3D) microscopic imaging. A 3D image of a diatom shell with a spatial resolution of 140 nm is presented. The experiment is realized by using a small gold sphere as the reference wave source for holographic imaging. This setup allows us to rotate the sample and to collect a number of 2D projections for tomography. (paper)

  14. Soft x-ray tomoholography

    OpenAIRE

    Guehrs, E.; Stadler, A.M.; Flewett, S.; Frömmel, S.; Geilhufe, J.; Pfau, B; Rander, T.; Schaffert, S.; Büldt, G; Eisebitt, S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an x-ray imaging method that combines Fourier transform holography with tomography ('tomoholography') for three-dimensional (3D) microscopic imaging. A 3D image of a diatom shell with a spatial resolution of 140 nm is presented. The experiment is realized by using a small gold sphere as the reference wave source for holographic imaging. This setup allows us to rotate the sample and to collect a number of 2D projections for tomography.

  15. X-ray tube arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for ensuring the rapid correction of both amplitude and offset errors in the deflectional movement of an electron beam along an X-ray emissive target is described. The movement is monitored at at least two positions during a sweep and differences, between the two movements and a desired movement, at these positions are combined in different proportions to produce a corrective servo signal. Such arrangements find application, for example, in computerised tomographic scanners. (author)

  16. X-ray-powered macronovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kisaka, Shota; Nakar, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after short gamma-ray burst, GRB 130603B. Although the $r$-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose that the X-ray excess simultaneously observed with the infrared excess can naturally heat the ejecta, leading to the thermal re-emission as observed in infrared. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source by the central engine like a black hole, and allows for broader parameter region, in particular smaller ejecta mass $\\sim10^{-3}-10^{-2}M_{\\odot}$ with iron mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers, than the previous models. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  17. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  18. X-Ray-powered Macronovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakar, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after the short gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B. Although the r-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires a huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose a new model in which the X-ray excess gives rise to the simultaneously observed infrared excess via thermal re-emission, and explore what constraints this would place on the mass and velocity of the ejecta. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source such as the central engine like a black hole, and allows for a broader parameter region than the previous models, in particular a smaller ejecta mass ˜ {10}-3{--}{10}-2{M}⊙ and higher iron abundance mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and the implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  19. Scattered x-rays in medical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumakhov, M. A.; Gamaliy, A. F.; Vasiliev, V. N.; Zaytsev, M. Y.; Zaytseva, K. V.; Markelov, A. A.; Ozerov, Yu. V.

    2005-07-01

    The VolumeScope, a prototype X-ray scanner based on Compton backscatter detection, is described. The device was designed for measurement of 3D electron density distribution of biological objects. General principles and technical parameters of the device are presented. A few test phantoms and biological objects were examined to evaluate an image quality of the device: a human forearm phantom, a CT calibration phantom and a young pig. 3D electron density distributions were reconstructed and represented as gray-scale sections and 3D surfaces of internal structures. Cartilages, bones, and other internal objects inside the pig head are well visible. Electron density contrast of bones in the objects is in qualitative agreement with real parameters of used tissue-equivalent materials. Some underestimation of the electron density was obtained in deep slices and most pronounced under the bones.

  20. Benchmarking of Back Thinned 512x512 X-ray CCD Camera Measurements with DEF X-ray film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambo, N. A.; Workman, J.; Kyrala, G.; Hurry, T.; Gonzales, R.; Evans, S. C.

    1999-11-01

    Using the Trident Laser Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory 25-micron thick, 2mm diameter titanium disks were shot with a 527nm(green) laser light to measure x-ray yield. 1.0 mil and 0.5 mil Aluminum steps were used to test the linearity of the CCD Camera and DEF X-ray film was used to test the calibration of the CCD Camera response at 4.75keV. Both laser spot size and incident laser intensity were constrained to give constancy to the experimental data. This poster will discuss both the experimental design and results.

  1. X-ray fluorescence analysis major elements in silicate minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    An automated wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer is operational for analysis of major elements in rocks and minerals. Procedures for trace-element analysis are being developed. Sample preparation methods and analytical techniques are similar to those commonly used elsewhere, but data reduction is conducted by the Fundamental Parameters program developed by Criss. Unlike empirically derived calibration curves, this data reduction method considers x-ray absorption and secondary fluorescence, which vary with differences in sample composition. X-ray intensities for each element from several standards are averaged to develop a theoretical standard for comparison with samples of unknown composition. Accurate data for samples with wide compositional ranges result from these data reduction and standardization techniques.

  2. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  3. Stabilized x-ray generator power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analysis are very much adopted in laboratories to determine the type and structure of the constituent compounds in solid materials, chemical composition of materials, stress developed on metals etc. These experiments need X-ray beam of fixed intensity and wave length. This can only be achieved by X-ray generator having highly stabilized tube voltage and tube current. This paper describes how X-ray tube high voltage and electron beam current are stabilized. This paper also highlights generation of X-rays, diffractometry and X-ray fluorescence analysis and their wide applications. Principle of operation for stabilizing the X-ray tube voltage and current, different protection circuits adopted, special features of the mains H.V. transformer and H.T. tank are described in this report. (author)

  4. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  5. Optical element for X-ray microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chadzitaskos, G.

    2008-01-01

    We present a proposal for a X-ray optical element suitable for X-ray microscopy and other X-ray-based display systems. Its principle is based on the Fresnel lenses condition and the Bragg condition for X-ray scattering on a slice of monocrystal. These conditions are fulfilled simultaneously due to a properly machined shape of the monocrystal with a stress at its ends.

  6. Thermoluminescent dosimeters for low dose X-ray measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, S Del Sol; García-Salcedo, R; Sánchez-Guzmán, D; Ramírez-Rodríguez, G; Gaona, E; de León-Alfaro, M A; Rivera-Montalvo, T

    2016-01-01

    The response of TLD-100, CaSO4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P for a range of X-ray low dose was measured. For calibration, the TLDs were arranged at the center of the X-ray field. The dose output of the X-ray machine was determined using an ACCU-Gold. All dosimeters were exposed at the available air kerma values of 14.69 mGy within a field 10×10 cm(2) at 80 cm of SSD. Results of LiF:Mg,Cu,P X-ray irradiated showed 4.8 times higher sensitivity than TLD-100. Meanwhile, TL response of CaSO4:Dy exposed at the same dose was 5.6 time higher than TLD-100. Experimental results show for low dose X-ray measurements a better linearity for LiF:Mg,Cu,P compared with that of TLD-100. CaSO4:Dy showed a linearity from 0.1 to 60 mGy. PMID:26609683

  7. X-ray laser related experiments and theory at Princeton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a new system for the development of an x-ray laser in the wavelength region from 5 nm to 1 nm utilizing a Powerful Sub-Picosecond Laser (PP-Laser) of expected peak power up to 0.5 TW in a 300 fs pulse. Soft x-ray spectra generated by the interaction of the PP-Laser beam with different targets are presented and compared to the spectra generated by a much less intense laser beam (20--30 GW). A theoretical model for the interaction of atoms with such a strong laser EM field is also briefly discussed. The development of additional amplifiers for the recombining soft x-ray laser and the design of a cavity are presented from the point of view of applications for x-ray microscopy and microlithography. This overview concludes with the presentation of recent results on the quenching of spontaneous emission radiation and its possible effect on the absolute intensity calibration of soft x-ray spectrometers. 26 refs., 18 figs

  8. Soft x-ray streak camera for laser fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reviews the development and significance of the soft x-ray streak camera (SXRSC) in the context of inertial confinement fusion energy development. A brief introduction of laser fusion and laser fusion diagnostics is presented. The need for a soft x-ray streak camera as a laser fusion diagnostic is shown. Basic x-ray streak camera characteristics, design, and operation are reviewed. The SXRSC design criteria, the requirement for a subkilovolt x-ray transmitting window, and the resulting camera design are explained. Theory and design of reflector-filter pair combinations for three subkilovolt channels centered at 220 eV, 460 eV, and 620 eV are also presented. Calibration experiments are explained and data showing a dynamic range of 1000 and a sweep speed of 134 psec/mm are presented. Sensitivity modifications to the soft x-ray streak camera for a high-power target shot are described. A preliminary investigation, using a stepped cathode, of the thickness dependence of the gold photocathode response is discussed. Data from a typical Argus laser gold-disk target experiment are shown

  9. ASTRO-H Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos Peter J.; Okajima, Takashi; Hahne, Devin

    2011-01-01

    ASTRO-H is an astrophysics satellite dedicated for X-ray spectroscopic study non-dispersively and to carry out survey complementally, which will be borne out of US-Japanese collaborative effort. Among the onboard instruments there are four conically approximated Wolter-I X-ray mirrors, among which two of them are soft X-ray mirrors\\ of which the energy range is from a few hundred eV to 15 keY, currently being fabricated in the X-ray Optics Lab at Goddard Space Flight Center. The focal point instruments will be a calorimeter (SXS) and a CCD camera (SXI), respectively. The reflectors of the mirror are made of heat-formed aluminum substrate of the thickness gauged of 152 micron, 229 micron, and 305 micron of the alloy 5052 H-19, followed by epoxy replication on gold-sputtered smooth Pyrex cylindrical mandrels to acquire the X-ray reflective surface. The epoxy layer is 10 micron nominal and surface gold layer of 0.2 micron. Improvements on angular response over the Astro-El/Suzaku mirrors come from error reduction on the figure, the roundness, and the grazing angle/radius mismatching of the reflecting surface, and tighter specs and mechanical strength on supporting structure to reduce the reflector positioning and the assembly errors. In this paper, we report the results of calibration of the engineering model of SXT (EM), and project the quality of the flight mirrors.

  10. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source.

  11. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Neck Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  12. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  13. Electron beam parallel X-ray generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, P.

    1967-01-01

    Broad X ray source produces a highly collimated beam of low energy X rays - a beam with 2 to 5 arc minutes of divergence at energies between 1 and 6 keV in less than 5 feet. The X ray beam is generated by electron bombardment of a target from a large area electron gun.

  14. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source

  15. Optimization of a data acquisition and control system for calibration of X rays detectors with usage of computational tools; Otimizacao de um sistema de controle e aquisicao de dados para calibracao de medidores de radiacao X com utilizacao de ferramentas computacionais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Yklys Santos

    2013-07-01

    The Brazilian standard ABNT ISO/IEC 17025/2005 specifies general requirements for the competence of testing and calibration facilities. One of these requirements states that these facilities must always optimize their processes and thus, uncertainties must be estimated and lowered as much as possible. In order to achieve such goal, the Laboratorio de Calibracao de Instrumentos (LCI), a laboratory responsible for dosimeter calibration at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN) have acquired some equipment for the LCI's X-Ray calibration system, such as a rotating filter holder, and it has also been developing software in order to provide the best calibration results with lowest external interferences (from the operator, for instance) to diminish the possibilities of error occurrences. A semi-automated LabVIEW-based calibration software has been developed at LCI and it has been subjected to constant testing and improvements so far. The software is divided in two basic modules: one is responsible for calibration of the monitor chamber with a reference standard dosimeter, while the other is used to perform instruments calibrations using the monitor chamber as reference. Several influence quantities have been analyzed and the proper corrections have been added to the software as multiplicative correction factors. The software is not only able to acquire data from all the equipment used in the laboratory, but also it is able to calculate calibration factors and its uncertainties. A later analysis shows how this system has optimized the whole calibration process, lowering the occupational dose, reducing the mean time of calibration, uncertainties and preventing errors caused by the system's users. (author)

  16. Zernike x-ray ptychography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Mohacsi, Istvan; Stachnik, Karolina; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; David, Christian; Meents, Alke

    2016-02-15

    We present an imaging technique combining Zernike phase-contrast imaging and ptychography. The contrast formation is explained by following the theory of Zernike phase-contrast imaging. The method is demonstrated with x-rays at a photon energy of 6.2 keV, showing how ptychographic reconstruction of a phase sample leads to a Zernike phase-contrast image appearing in the amplitude reconstruction. In addition, the results presented in this Letter indicate an improvement of the resolution of the reconstructed object in the case of Zernike ptychography compared with the conventional one. PMID:26872172

  17. Protonium X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gotta, D

    1999-01-01

    The Lyman and Balmer transitions from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium were studied extensively at the low-energy-antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. A first series of experiments $9 was performed with semiconductor and gaseous X-ray detectors. In the last years of LEAR operation using a Bragg crystal spectrometer, strong interaction parameters in the 2p states of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium were measured $9 directly. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (39 refs).

  18. X-ray tomographic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray tomographic system consists of a radiation source such as gamma or x radiation which produces a fan-shaped beam. The fan is wide enough to encompass the patient circle. The system further includes means for rotating the radiation source about the patient for less than a full rotation, and detectors for detecting the radiation at positions that surround the patient by 1800 plus the angle of the fan beam plus the angle between adjacent fan detectors. Attenuation data from the detectors is sorted into detector fans of attenuation data, then processed. The convolved data is back-projected into an image memory and displayed on a video monitor

  19. X-ray Pulsations in the Supersoft X-ray Binary CAL 83

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidtke, P. C.; Cowley, A. P.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray data reveal that the supersoft X-ray binary CAL 83 exhibits 38.4 minute pulsations at some epochs. These X-ray variations are similar to those found in some novae and are likely to be caused by nonradial pulsations the white dwarf. This is the first detection of pulsations in a classical supersoft X-ray binary.

  20. X-ray-fluorescence measurement of thin film thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus were developed for X-ray fluorescence measurement of the thicknesses of thin metal films deposited on top of each other on a substrate. The method is highly accurate and rapid and is especially useful for making microelectronic devices. The system involves exposing the metal films to X-ray radiation, then measuring the intensity of the various fluorescent lines excited by the radiation. The lead-detecting collimator has a conical bore and a very small entrance aperture used to define the surface area of the top film from which excited fluorescence is to be detected. The collimator has an opening in the side to allow some of the incident X-rays from the source to enter the bore to excite fluorescence in the lead. This fluorescence is monitored by a detector as a measure of the intensity of the incident X-rays. The system is first calibrated in a systematic way to specify a set of parameters characteristic of the plated-metal configuration to be measured. The sample is irradiated and the number of counts in each of the selector characteristic lines of the platings and substrate is measured. The thickness of the plating layers are then calculated by an iterative method in accordance with specified relationships between the calibrated parameters and the measured counts. (DN)

  1. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  2. Swift Observations of X-ray supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Li, K. L.; Pun, Chun. S. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a result of X-ray supernovae (SNe) survey using the Swift satellite public archive. An automatic searching program was designed to search X-ray SNe among all of the Swift archival observations between November 2004 and February 2011. Using the C++ program, 24 X-ray detectable supernovae have been found in the archive and 3 of them were newly-discovered in X-rays which are SN 1986L, SN 2003lx, and SN 2007od. In addition, SN 2003lx is a Type Ia supernova which may be the second X-ray...

  3. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.R.; /SLAC; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  4. Symbiotic stars in X-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K; Nelson, T.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of nine white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that had previously been detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The nine new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbi...

  5. Determination of the characteristics of low energy X-ray fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental set-up for therapy level calibration dosimeters in low energy X-ray fields (ing into account the difficulty in obtaining the half-value layer in low energy X-ray fields, has been developed with dosimeters presenting a beam energy dependent response. Once the radiation field characteristics has been established, a superficial ionization chamber (tertiary standard), to be used in routine measurements, was calibrated. (author)

  6. Management of dental x-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of dental x-ray exposure and how they might be minimized were reviewed. The frequency of dental x-ray exposures in Japan was presented for each year, sex, age group and site of x-ray photography separately. The doses of exposure at various parts of the body per x-ray examination were also presented, and the probabilities of genetic damage, and of development of leukemia or cancer were calculated. The allowable dose of exposure for radiation workers was discussed. It is important to take account of radiation quality, area of irradiation field, and posture of patients to minimize the radiation effect. The actual statistics on the x-ray exposure at the dentists, distribution of the dispersed radiation in the x-ray room, methods of protection against exposure, and plans and designs of the x-ray room were discussed. (Kaihara, S.)

  7. X ray imaging microscope for cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology employed during the Stanford MSFC LLNL Rocket X Ray Spectroheliograph flight established that doubly reflecting, normal incidence multilayer optics can be designed, fabricated, and used for high resolution x ray imaging of the Sun. Technology developed as part of the MSFC X Ray Microscope program, showed that high quality, high resolution multilayer x ray imaging microscopes are feasible. Using technology developed at Stanford University and at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Troy W. Barbee, Jr. has fabricated multilayer coatings with near theoretical reflectivities and perfect bandpass matching for a new rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). Advanced Flow Polishing has provided multilayer mirror substrates with sub-angstrom (rms) smoothnesss for the astronomical x ray telescopes and x ray microscopes. The combination of these important technological advancements has paved the way for the development of a Water Window Imaging X Ray Microscope for cancer research.

  8. Parametric X-Ray Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchagin, Alexander

    1997-10-01

    The main PXR properties [1,2] are considered in the paper: energy, width, smooth tuning of monochromatic PXR spectral line; fine structure and absolute differential yields of PXR in the vicinity of and at angular distances from Brag directions; angular spread of the PXR beam; the influence of incident electron energy and of the density effect on the PXR properties; linear polarization of PXR; background in PXR spectra. Experimental setups for linacs and the results of measurements are discussed. Experimental data are compared to theoretical calculations at PXR energies between 5 and 400 keV for incident electron energies ranging from 15 to 1200 MeV. Possible applications of PXR as a new source of a bright, tunable X-ray beam in science and industry are discussed. [1] A.V. Shchagin and N.A. Khizhnyak, NIM B119, 115-122 (1996). [2] A.V. Shchagin and X.K. Maruyama, "Parametric X-rays", a chapter in the book "Accelerator-based Atomic Physics Techniques and Applications", edited by S.M. Shafroth and J.C. Austin, AIP Press, 1997, pp 279-307.

  9. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Tianxi; MacDonald, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  10. Indirect measurements of X-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To the effects of measuring the spectral distribution of the radiation emitted by the x-ray tubes and electron accelerators, numerous procedures that are grouped in two big categories exist at the present time: direct and indirect methods. The first ones use high resolution detectors that should be positioned, together with the appropriate collimator, in the direction of the x ray beam. The user should be an expert in the use and correction of the obtained data by the different effects that affect the detector operation such as efficiency and resolution in terms of the energy of the detected radiation. The indirect procedures, although its are more simple to use, its also require a considerable space along the beam to position the ionization chamber and the necessary absorbents to construct by this way the denominated attenuation curve. We will analyze the operation principle of the indirect methods and a new proposal in which such important novelties are introduced as the beam dispersion to avoid to measure along the main beam and that of determination of the attenuation curve in simultaneous form. By this way, with a single shot of the tube, the attenuation curve is measured, being necessary at most a shot of additional calibration to know the relative response of the detectors used in the experimental array. The physical processes involved in the obtaining of an attenuation curve are very well well-known and this it finishes it can be theoretically calculated if the analytic form of the spectrum is supposed well-known. Finally, we will see a spectra reconstruction example with the Kramers parametric form and comparisons with numeric simulations carried out with broadly validated programs as well as the possibility of the use of solid state dosemeters in the obtention of the attenuation curve. (Author)

  11. Sample preparation for x-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In my experience over many years it is not uncommon for a geologist to present a suite of rocks or powders for analysis and demand results of high analytical precision which are not warranted for the following reasons: 1. Sample collection is unsatisfactory. 2. Little or no attention has been given to cleaning and splitting the sample. The ultimate aim of the preparation laboratory is to produce a homogeneous, uncontaminated aliquot of the total sample pulverised to a grain size of less than 10 microns. Clearly this is not possible as the grinding equipment will always impart some level of contamination to the sample and there is no grinder available which can produce powders of grain size less than 10 microns without imparting unacceptable levels of contamination to the sample. Modern x-ray spectrometers are extremely stable instruments. Most laboratories run a drift monitor at the start of each shift or when starting analyses requiring a different calibration. Depending on the method of sample preparation errors from this source can be up to two orders of magnitude greater than instrumental errors. For this reason it is imperative that sample preparation methods for a particular analysis are carefully set up and that these procedures are followed implicitly by the sample preparation laboratory. All too often sample preparation is relegated to a secondary role carried out in poorly designed work areas with inappropriate equipment by poorly trained unsupervised staff. Over the past few years staffing reductions and the requirement to crush an increasingly large volume of sample has given the impetus to develop improved jaw crushers. An example of this is the Boyd Crusher which has been designed to minimise these problems, ie this crusher has high throughput, can be easily cleaned and produces minimal contamination. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  12. Absolute, soft x-ray calorimetry on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple and reliable x-ray fluence measurements, in addition to time-resolved diagnostics, are needed to understand the physics of hot Z-pinch plasmas. A commercially available laser calorimeter has been modified for measuring soft x-ray fluence from the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The x-ray absorber of this calorimeter is an aluminum disk, attached to a two-dimensional thermopile and surrounded by an isoperibol shroud. The time integral and the maximum of the thermopile voltage signal are both proportional to the x-ray energy deposited. Data are collected for 90 s, and the instrument has, thus far, been used in the 1 - 25 mJ range. A wider dynamic measuring range for x-ray fluence (energy/area) can be achieved by varying the area of the defining aperture. The calorimeter is calibrated by an electrical substitution method. Calibrations are performed before and after each x-ray experiment on the Z facility. The calibration of the time integral of the thermopile voltage versus energy deposited (or the peak of thermopile voltage versus energy deposited) is linear with zero intercept at the 95% confidence level. The irreproducibility of the calibration is <2%, and the imprecision in the measurement of the incident x-ray energy (inferred from signal noise and the calibration) is estimated to be ∼0.9 mJ (95% confidence level). The systematic uncertainty (inaccuracy), due to correctable baseline shifts, is estimated at ±10%. Comparisons have been made of the calorimeter to time-resolved x-ray diagnostics, e.g., bolometers and x-ray diode arrays, by integrating the flux measured by such instruments over time. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  13. X-ray microtomography: applications and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: X-ray microtomography has followed a classical development path being originally available only to those with the expertise to piece together the often cumbersome components to required to make a practical x-ray microtomography system. Subsequent technological and scientific advances have meant that x-ray microtomography instruments are now off-the-shelf items with a cost well within the equipment budgets of research institutions and industry. The technological advances that have contributed to the development of x-ray microtomography include commercially available x-ray micro-sources, high-resolution CCD cameras and highspeed, low-cost computers. The scientific developments have been predominantly in image reconstruction. Some of these scientific developments are, with the advantage of hindsight, very simple while others, such as resolution enhancement using the Fresnel fringes in x-ray projection images, are not so intuitive. As a consequence of the availability of 'black-box' instruments, x-ray microtomography is spreading to a wide range of applications. The materials most suited to examination by x-ray microtomography are those with a medium level of x-ray absorption such as bone, teeth, rocks, porous metals, composite materials and plant materials. For these materials, 3D information can be obtained at resolutions comparable to the resolution of a high-quality optical microscope. A few of these applications will be demonstrated in the presentation. Technological advances that aid x-ray microtomography will continue with x-ray sources becoming smaller, computers becoming faster and CCD cameras having increased numbers of pixels. It will be interesting to see if nano x-ray microtomography is achieved. Developments in x-ray microtomography are required in areas such as contrast enhancement particularly for problematic materials such as soft tissue and low-density polymers. For low-density polymers x-ray absorption is very low while for soft tissue

  14. Installation of an automatic X-ray spectrachemical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several steps necessary to install an X-ray spectrometer automation system for stcels and raw material analysis, are discussed. Equipment description, analytical programme, calibration, tests and other subjects regarding personnel training, technical assistance and maintenance, are included. A perfect adjustment of the choosen equipment, in so far as it cocerns the technical performance and operation costs, is also dotained. A condensed translation in English of the principals chapters is presented at the end of the work

  15. Using computational modeling to compare X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Practical Peak Voltage-PPV has been adopted to measure the voltage applied to an X-ray tube. The PPV was recommended by the IEC document and accepted and published in the TRS no. 457 code of practice. The PPV is defined and applied to all forms of waves and is related to the spectral distribution of X-rays and to the properties of the image. The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. An X-ray tube for Dental Radiology (operated from a single phase power supply) and an X-ray tube used as a reference (supplied from a constant potential power supply) were used in simulations across the energy range of interest of 40 kV to 100 kV. Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the tubes involved. - Highlights: • Computational Model was developed to X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology. • The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. • The energy range was 40–100 kV. • Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the Dental Radiology and reference X-ray tubes

  16. X-ray diagnostic developments for laser-matter interaction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports on progress in the development of new X-ray diagnostic instruments required for laser-matter interaction experiments, with emphasis on the range of soft and hard X-ray emission between 100 eV and 100 keV. For high spatial/temporal X-ray measurements, a soft X-ray streak camera with lamellar electron optics has been developed. This camera is used with a cylindrical mirror for diagnosis in the range 100 eV to a few keV. Recently, a new optimized prototype has been tested and higher spatial/temporal resolution has been measured. For soft X-ray imaging techniques (from 50 eV to a few keV) a Wolter microscope has been developed and tested, and a detection system has been built around a small image converter tube with an X-ray photocathode and a phosphor screen. The image on this screen is read by a charge-coupled device (CCD) working in the visible spectral range. For higher energy X-ray imaging, a simple pinhole camera is used which is connected to an electronic image readout, using a CCD array that provides two-dimensional spatial information in the 2-10 keV spectral range. For spectroscopic measurements, an X-ray spectrometer is used, with a curved TlA phosphate crystal and a linear array of 4096 photodiodes with automatic 12 bit digitization (range 1.3-28 keV). For accurate energy balance measurements in the keV spectral range, a number of quasi-linear adiabatic X-ray calorimeters and bolometers have been built for which absolute electrical calibration is possible. The paper also presents some preliminary results on X-ray calibration with a pulsed soft X-ray source working with various gases. (author). 6 refs, 11 figs

  17. Anomalous x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of tunable synchrotron radiation has made it possible systematically to perform x-ray diffraction studies in regions of anomalous scattering near absorption edges, e.g. in order to derive phase information for crystal structure determination. An overview is given of recent experimental and theoretical work and discuss the properties of the anomalous atomic scattering factor, with emphasis on threshold resonances and damping effects. The results are applied to a discussion of the very strong anomalous dispersion recently observed near the L3 edge in a cesium complex. Also given is an overview of elements and levels where similar behavior can be expected. Finally, the influence of solid state and chemical effects on the absorption edge structure is discussed. 64 references

  18. X-ray intensifying screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray intensifying screen comprises a support which has a luminescent composition comprising an isotropic phosphor and a polymer having an index of refraction within 0.02 of that of the phosphor over at least 80 percent of its emission spectrum. The support has an index of refraction up to or equal to 0.05 units higher than that of the phosphor and has a reflection optical density of at least 1.7 to light emitted by the phosphor. A preferred luminescent composition comprises Kl:Tl, Rbl:Tl at BaSrFCl:Eu mixed with two monomers such as 1-naphthylmethylmethacrylate, S(1-naphthylmethyl) thioacrylate, 1-bromo-2-naphthylacrylate, and benzyl methacrylate, coated on black anodised Al and polymerised in situ. The ratio of monomers is adjusted to give the desired refractive index. Other phosphors, polymers and supports are specified together with the preparation of the monomers and polymers. (author)

  19. X-ray flat panel detectors and X-ray tubes contributing to development of X-ray diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray flat panel detectors (FPDs) and X-ray tubes are key devices allowing X-ray diagnostic systems to support more sophisticated medical care. FPDs provide valuable information for the diagnosis of various diseases through the conversion of X-ray images of the human body into electronic signals, while X-ray tubes are used in a wide range of applications such as computed tomography (CT), angiography, fluoroscopy, mammography, and dental systems. Toshiba Electron Tubes and Devices Co., Ltd. has developed and commercialized FPDs providing high-quality diagnostic X-ray images with low dose exposure through the development of cutting-edge technologies including a fine crystal formation technology for cesium iodide (CsI) scintillators, thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays with photodiodes, and so on. In the field of X-ray tubes that can generate a high output of X-rays, we have developed a liquid metal hydrodynamic bearing (LM bearing) technology for various diagnostic systems including medical CT systems with a long lifetime and high rotation speed, and cardiovascular imaging systems with quiet operation. Furthermore, LM bearing technology reduces the burden on the environment by replacing insulating oil with water coolant for the cooling system and making the X-ray tubes more compact. (author)

  20. Development of confocal micro X-ray fluorescence instrument using two X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new confocal micro X-ray fluorescence instrument was developed. This instrument has two independent micro X-ray tubes with Mo targets. A full polycapillary X-ray lens was attached to each X-ray tube. Another half polycapillary lens was attached to a silicon drift X-ray detector (SDD). The focal spots of the three lenses were adjusted to a common position. The effects of the excitation of two X-ray beams were investigated. The instrument enabled highly sensitive three-dimensional X-ray fluorescence analysis. We confirmed that the X-ray fluorescence intensity from the sample increased by applying the two independent X-ray tubes in confocal configuration. Elemental depth profiling of black wheat was demonstrated with the result that each element in the surface coat of a wheat grain showed unique distribution

  1. Acoustooptics of x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakhanov, M.V.; Pustovoyt, V.I.; Radzhabov, R.U.; Khabibullayev, P.K.

    Scattering of x-rays by acoustic phonons in crystals during excitation of a noise phonon flux thermodynamically at equilibrium is analyzed from the standpoint of the dynamic diffraction theory, emphasis being put on the differences with the conventional acoustooptic effect attributable to lower frequencies and smaller amplitudes. The structural peak and the diffusional peak are calculated from known relations for the intensity of scattering in each mode, assuming that the Laue condition is satisfied. Interaction of x-rays and an acoustic wave is considered, the conditions for a diffraction peak being determined by the relations between location of that peak and angular dimensions of the structural peak. Experiments were performed in crystals of photosensitive piezoelectric semiconductors with phonon generation. Rectangular or variable-shape voltage pulses with amplitudes up to 800 V were applied to 6-60 ..mu..m thick CdS crystals at repetition rates up to 800 Hz. The electron concentration was (1.3-4.5) x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ and the electron mobility, according to saturation of the current-voltage characteristics, was differentially in time. The results reveal sharp anisotropy of scattering, evident in the dependence of scattering intensity on the angle of crystal rotation and the resulting lobar scattering pattern. Structural scattering varies exponentially and diffusional scattering varies linearly with increasing amplitude of the applied voltage. According to the dependence of the spectral density of phonon generation on the concentration of charge carriers, the phase of the scattering effect changes upon transition from the structural range to the diffusional range. 8 references, 3 figures.

  2. Soft x-ray interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument's components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200 angstrom wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency

  3. Temporal Gain Correction for X-ray Calorimeter Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, F. S.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Fujimoto, R.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; McCammon, D.; Mitsuda, K.; Sawada, M.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Takei, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Watanabe, T.; Yamada, S.

    2016-07-01

    Calorimetric X-ray detectors are very sensitive to their environment. The boundary conditions can have a profound effect on the gain including heat sink temperature, the local radiation temperature, bias, and the temperature of the readout electronics. Any variation in the boundary conditions can cause temporal variations in the gain of the detector and compromise both the energy scale and the resolving power of the spectrometer. Most production X-ray calorimeter spectrometers, both on the ground and in space, have some means of tracking the gain as a function of time, often using a calibration spectral line. For small gain changes, a linear stretch correction is often sufficient. However, the detectors are intrinsically non-linear and often the event analysis, i.e., shaping, optimal filters etc., add additional non-linearity. Thus for large gain variations or when the best possible precision is required, a linear stretch correction is not sufficient. Here, we discuss a new correction technique based on non-linear interpolation of the energy-scale functions. Using Astro-H/SXS calibration data, we demonstrate that the correction can recover the X-ray energy to better than 1 part in 104 over the entire spectral band to above 12 keV even for large-scale gain variations. This method will be used to correct any temporal drift of the on-orbit per-pixel gain using on-board calibration sources for the SXS instrument on the Astro-H observatory.

  4. Evolution of specific antigen recognition: size reduction and restricted length distribution of the CDRH3 regions in the rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, T; De Guerra, A; Charlemagne, J

    1995-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain repertoire in fish was investigated by cloning a total of 88 rearranged VDJ junctions from the head kidney B cell mRNA of a salmonid, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Trout DH segments are short and cannot be classified into independent DH families. Several of the ten identified putative DH segments had stretches of nucleotide sequence identity with mouse (DQ52, DFL 16.2 and Dsp 2.1), human (DM1) and chicken (DH4) DH. There was a clear preference for one or two of the three putative DH reading frames and a stop codon is often present in the less used reading frame. Four of the six JH segments are preferentially used, and analysis of the VH-DH and DH-JH junctions suggest the presence of N-nucleotides. The absolute size and size heterogeneity of the rainbow trout CDRH3 are smaller than those of the Xenopus, mouse and human CDRH3. About 75% of the 84 in-frame trout CDRH3 have 8, 9 or 10 residues and none of them have more than 11 residues. This homogeneization of the CDRH3 loop size may partly explain the restricted antibody diversity in lower vertebrates. PMID:7843242

  5. Spectral response calibration of Au and Csl transmission photocathodes of X-ray streak camera in a 60-5500 eV photon energy region%软X射线条纹相机透射式Au与CsI阴极谱响应灵敏度标定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾鹏; 袁铮; 邓博; 袁永腾; 李志超; 刘慎业; 赵屹东; 洪才浩; 郑雷; 崔明启

    2012-01-01

    本文利用北京同步辐射光源(BSRF),提出了对条纹相机Au和Csl透射阴极谱响应灵敏度进行绝对标定的方案,给出了在60—5500 eV能区的绝对谱响应灵敏度,标定不确定度好于10%.同时,基于Henke等人的计算模型,给出了透射阴极的相对谱响应灵敏度,并且进行了CH支撑衬底X射线透过率的修正.结果表明标定值与理论值符合较好.%A method is described of measuring absolute spectral response for Au and CsI transmission photocathodes in soft X-ray streak camera,which is of great importance for the inertial confinement fusion(ICF) diagnostics.Transmission photocathode is conventionally employed as photo-to-electron conversion accessories.To derive quantity information of X-ray spectra,the absolute response of photocathode must be calibrated in a range of interest.Here Au and CsI transmission photocathodes with slits are calibrated respectively on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility(BSRF),in a photon energy range of 60 eV—5500 eV.This method has an uncertainty less than 10%and good feasibility.Calibration results are in good agreement with the calculation results obtained from the Henke’s photon emission model,with CH substrate effect revised.

  6. Soft x-ray polarimeter laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kendrah D.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Jenks, Kevin; Sommer, Sophie J. B.; Marshall, Eric A.

    2010-07-01

    Multilayer-coated optics can strongly polarize X-rays and are central to a new design of a broad-band, soft X-ray polarimeter. We have begun laboratory work to verify the performance of components that could be used in future soft X-ray polarimetric instrumentation. We have reconfigured a 17 meter beamline facility, originally developed for testing transmission gratings for Chandra, to include a polarized X-ray source, an X-ray-dispersing transmission grating, and a multilayer-coated optic that illuminates a CCD detector. The X-rays produced from a Manson Model 5, multi-anode source are polarized by a multilayer-coated flat mirror. The current configuration allows for a 180 degree rotation of the source in order to rotate the direction of polarization. We will present progress in source characterization and system modulation measurements as well as null and robustness tests.

  7. X-rays for medical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessenbruch, A.

    1995-11-01

    1995 is the centenary of the discovery of X-rays by the German physicist Wilhelm C Rontgen. In the past hundred years, the new rays have developed from being unknown to finding application in many walks of life, not least in medicine. This is so much so that in common speech the word `x-ray` refers not to a form of radiation but to an X-ray photograph taken for the purposes of diagnosis (as in: `I had an X-ray done to see if my leg was broken`). X-rays are now used routinely, and they are used both for diagnosis and for therapy. This paper will give an outline of the use of X-rays in medicine throughout our present century.

  8. Handbook of X-Ray Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornack, Günter

    2007-01-01

    This sourcebook is intended as an X-ray data reference for scientists and engineers working in the field of energy or wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry and related fields of basic and applied research, technology, or process and quality controlling. In a concise and informative manner, the most important data connected with the emission of characteristic X-ray lines are tabulated for all elements up to Z = 95 (Americium). This includes X-ray energies, emission rates and widths as well as level characteristics such as binding energies, fluorescence yields, level widths and absorption edges. The tabulated data are characterized and, in most cases, evaluated. Furthermore, all important processes and phenomena connected with the production, emission and detection of characteristic X-rays are discussed. This reference book addresses all researchers and practitioners working with X-ray radiation and fills a gap in the available literature.

  9. Clinical X-ray diagnostics. v. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After introductory remarks on historical aspects of the development of X-ray diagnostics, the physical and technological fundamentals of the generation and recording of radiographs are elaborated. In a comprehensive chapter such topics as X-rays, X-ray tubes, X-ray generators, contrast media, interrelations between X-rays and patients as well as classical and recent methods of recording with regard to geometrical conditions, and of picture quality are outlined. Brief notes on analysis, documentation and filing of radiographs are added. Physico-technological fundamentals of radiation protection, remarks concerning radiation protection in the GDR, and special problems of radiation protection as to X-ray diagnostics are discussed

  10. Radiation safety in X-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guide specifies the radiation safety requirements for structural shielding and other safety arrangements used in X-ray facilities in medical and veterinary X-ray activities and in industry, research and education. The guide is also applicable to premises in which X-ray equipment intended for radiation therapy and operating at a voltage of less than 25 kV is used. The guide applies to new X-ray facilities in which X-ray equipment that has been used elsewhere is transferred. The radiation safety requirements for radiation therapy X-ray devices operating at a voltage exceeding 25 kV, and for the premices in which such devices are used, are set out in Guide ST 2.2

  11. Radiation safety in X-ray facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    The guide specifies the radiation safety requirements for structural shielding and other safety arrangements used in X-ray facilities in medical and veterinary X-ray activities and in industry, research and education. The guide is also applicable to premises in which X-ray equipment intended for radiation therapy and operating at a voltage of less than 25 kV is used. The guide applies to new X-ray facilities in which X-ray equipment that has been used elsewhere is transferred. The radiation safety requirements for radiation therapy X-ray devices operating at a voltage exceeding 25 kV, and for the premices in which such devices are used, are set out in Guide ST 2.2.

  12. X-ray microlaminography with polycapillary optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate layer-by-layer x-ray microimaging using polycapillary optics. The depth resolution is achieved without sample or source rotation and in a way similar to classical tomography or laminography. The method takes advantage from large angular apertures of polycapillary optics and from their specific microstructure, which is treated as a coded aperture. The imaging geometry is compatible with polychromatic x-ray sources and with scanning and confocal x-ray fluorescence setups.

  13. X-ray microlaminography with polycapillary optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, K. M.; Dul, D. T.; Wróbel, A.; Korecki, P.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate layer-by-layer x-ray microimaging using polycapillary optics. The depth resolution is achieved without sample or source rotation and in a way similar to classical tomography or laminography. The method takes advantage from large angular apertures of polycapillary optics and from their specific microstructure, which is treated as a coded aperture. The imaging geometry is compatible with polychromatic x-ray sources and with scanning and confocal x-ray fluorescence setups.

  14. X-ray spot film device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvements are described in an X-ray spot film device which is used in conjunction with an X-ray table to make a selected number of radiographic exposures on a single film and to perform fluoroscopic examinations. To date, the spot film devices consist of two X-ray field defining masks, one of which is moved manually. The present device is more convenient to use and speeds up the procedure. (U.K.)

  15. X-ray microlaminography with polycapillary optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabrowski, K. M.; Dul, D. T.; Wrobel, A.; Korecki, P. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2013-06-03

    We demonstrate layer-by-layer x-ray microimaging using polycapillary optics. The depth resolution is achieved without sample or source rotation and in a way similar to classical tomography or laminography. The method takes advantage from large angular apertures of polycapillary optics and from their specific microstructure, which is treated as a coded aperture. The imaging geometry is compatible with polychromatic x-ray sources and with scanning and confocal x-ray fluorescence setups.

  16. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  17. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities

  18. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (ed.)

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  19. Novel optics for X-ray telescopes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudec, René; Pína, L.; Semencová, V.; Inneman, A.; Skulinová, Michaela; Nekola, Martin

    Berlin : Springer, 2009 - (Brandl, B.), s. 1-8 ISBN 978-90-481-2232-5. [400 Years of Astronomical Telescopes. Leiden (NL), 29.09.2008-02.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX01220701; GA ČR GP202/07/P510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : X-ray telescopes * X-ray optics * X-ray astronomy Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  20. X-ray transient AGN and galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Grupe, D.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray transience is the most extreme form of variability observed in AGN or normal in-active galaxies. While factors of 2-3 on timescales of days to years are quite commen among AGN, X-ray transients appear only once and vanish from the X-ray sky years later. The ROSAT All-Sky Survey was the tool to discover these sources. X-ray transience in AGN or galaxies can be caused by dramatic changes in the accretion rate of the central black hole or by changes of the properties of the accretion disk.

  1. Microfabrication of hard x-ray lenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stöhr, Frederik

    characterization details that cannot be obtained by other means. The respective x-ray techniques largely benefit from continuously improved x-ray sources, x-ray detectors and x-ray optics. For instance, some techniques aiming for structural investigation of poly-crystalline materials directly benefit from more...... by their potential for compact integration, which makes them cost-effective, easy to handle and stable on-axis optics. A Si-CRL comprises multiple bi-parabolic cylindrical cavities. The bi-parabolic patterns are defined lithographically and vertically transferred into the Si substrate using deep reactive ion etching...

  2. Advanced X-ray diffractive optics

    OpenAIRE

    Vila-Comamala, J.; Jefimovs, K.; Pilvi, T.; Ritala, M; Sarkar, S S; Solak, H H; Guzenko, V.A.; Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; J. Raabe; G. Tzvetkov; Fink, R H; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C.N.; Kaulich, B

    2009-01-01

    X-ray microscopy greatly bene�ts from the advances in x-ray optics. At the Paul Scherrer Institut, developments in x-ray di�ractive optics include the manufacture and optimization of Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) and di�ractive optical elements for both soft and hard x-ray regimes. In particular, we demonstrate here a novel method for the production of ultra-high resolution FZPs. This technique is based on the deposition of a zone plate material (iridium) onto the sidewalls of a p...

  3. Microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Zhang, Kun; Li, Changqing

    2015-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) was emerged as a new hybrid imaging modality, in which the x-rays are used to excite phosphors emitting optical photons to be measured for imaging. In this paper, we reported a microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography (microXLCT) with a spatial resolution up to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets. We use a superfine x-ray pencil beam to scan the phosphor targets. The superfine x-ray pencil beam is generated by a small collimator mounted in front of a powerful x-ray tube (93212, Oxford Instrument). A CT detector is used to image the x-ray beam. We have generated an x-ray beam with a diameter of 192 micrometers with a collimator of 100 micrometers in diameter. The emitted optical photons on the top surface of phantom are reflected by a mirror and acquired by an electron multiplier charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera (C9100-13, Hamamatsu Photonics). The microXLCT imaging system is built inside an x-ray shielding and light tight cabinet. The EMCCD camera is placed in a lead box. All the imaging components are controlled by a VC++ program. The optical photon propagation is modeled with the diffusion equation solved by the finite element method. We have applied different regularization methods including L2 and L1 in the microXLCT reconstruction algorithms. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments are used to validate the microXLCT imaging system.

  4. Imaging with x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Cauble, B.; Frieders, G.; Koch, J.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Mrowka, S.; Ress, D.; Trebes, J.E.; Weiland, T.L.

    1993-11-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35--300 {Angstrom}. These sources have high peak brightness and are now being utilized for x-ray imaging and plasma interferometry. In this paper we will describe our efforts to probe long scalelength plasmas using Moire deflectrometry and soft x-ray imaging. The progress in the development of short pulse x-ray lasers using a double pulse irradiation technique which incorporates a travelling wave pump will also be presented.

  5. X-ray Emission from Elliptical Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Sarazin, Craig L.

    1996-01-01

    Elliptical galaxies are generally luminous sources of X-ray radiation, and contain large amounts of hot, interstellar gas. In the brighter X-ray galaxies, the inferred masses of hot gas are consistent with those expected given the present rates of stellar mass loss. The required rates of heating of the gas are also roughly consistent with those expected from the motions of gas losing stars. X-ray observations, particularly X-ray spectra, require a low rate of Type Ia supernova heating and che...

  6. X-ray Observations of Planetary Nebulae

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R A

    2003-01-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) are an exciting addition to the zoo of X-ray sources. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations have detected diffuse X-ray emission from shocked fast winds in PN interiors as well as bow-shocks of fast collimated outflows impinging on the nebular envelope. Point X-ray sources associated with PN central stars are also detected, with the soft X-ray (>0.5 keV) emission from instability shocks in the fast stellar wind itself or from a low-mass companion's coronal activit...

  7. Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fangjun

    2011-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) will be China's first astronomical satellite. On board HXMT there are three kinds of slat-collimated telescopes, the High Energy X-ray Telescope (HE, 20-250 keV, 5000 cm^2), the Medium Energy X-ray Telescope (ME, 5-30 keV, 952 cm^2), and the Low Energy X-ray Telescope (LE, 1-15 keV, 384 cm^2).

  8. X-ray pulsar rush in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present recent remarkable topics about discoveries of X-ray pulsars. 1. Pulsations from two Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters: These pulsars have enormously strong magnetic field (B ∼ 1015 G), thus these are called as 'magnetar', new type of X-ray pulsars. 2. New Crab-like pulsars: These discoveries lead to suggesting universality of Crab-like pulsars. 3. An X-ray bursting millisecond pulsar: This is strong evidence for the recycle theory of generating radio millisecond pulsars. 4. X-ray pulsar rush in the SMC: This indicates the younger star formation history in the SMC. (author)

  9. The Lunar X-ray Observatory (LXO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray emission from charge exchange recombination between the highly ionized solar wind and neutral material i n Earth's magnetosheath has complicated x-ray observations of celestial objects with x-ray observatories including ROSAT, Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku. However, the charge-exchange emission can also be used as an important diagnostic of the solar-wind interacting with the magnetosheath. Soft x-ray observations from low-earth orbit or even the highly eccentric orbits of Chandra and XMM-Newton are likely superpositions of the celestial object of interest, the true extra-solar soft x-ray background, geospheric charge exchange, and heliospheric charge exchange. We show that with a small x-ray telescope placed either on the moon, in a similar vein as the Apollo ALSOP instruments, or at a stable orbit near L1, we can begin t o disentangle the complicated emission structure in the soft x-ray band. Here we present initial results of a feasibility study recently funded by NASA t o place a small x-ray telescope on the lunar surface. The telescope operates during lunar night to observe charge exchange interactions between the solar wind and magnetospheric neutrals, between the solar wind and the lunar atmosphere, and an unobstructed view of the soft x-ray background without the geospheric component.

  10. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90{sup o} Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated {approx} 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 {angstrom}) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has

  11. X-ray pulsars: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, I

    2012-01-01

    Accreting X-ray pulsars are among the most luminous objects in the X-ray sky. In highly magnetized neutron stars (B~10^12 G), the flow of matter is dominated by the strong magnetic field. The general properties of accreting X-ray binaries are presented, focusing on the spectral characteristics of the systems. The use of cyclotron lines as a tool to directly measure a neutron star's magnetic field and to test the theory of accretion are discussed. We conclude with the current and future prospects for accreting X-ray binary studies.

  12. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90o Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ∼ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 (angstrom)) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been

  13. X-rays pinpoint tumour targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a surgeon in Birmingham used an X-ray photograph to guide the removal of a needle buried in a woman's hand in January 1896, it became the first X-ray guided operation in medical history. Since then X-rays have been widely used for medical imaging, and 'computed tomography' now provides us with exquisite 2D cross-sectional images of the human body. The technique creates images by passing X-rays along a plane through the body and recording the transmitted signals from various angles. A 'CT scan' lets us locate and visualize tumours with a resolution of 1 mm. But there is more to X-rays than imaging - they can also treat patients by killing cancerous tumours. When X-rays interact with tissue, they release highly reactive radicals that break the double strands in DNA molecules and cause the rapidly dividing cancerous cells to die. But because X-rays kill both healthy and diseased tissue in equal measure, it is vital to minimize the radiation received by healthy organs and tissue surrounding the tumour. The goal of radiotherapy is to find the precise location of a tumour using a CT scan - or other imaging technique - and then concentrate the X-rays on it to destroy the diseased tissue. In the August issue of Physics World Matin Durrani describes how intensity-modulated radiation therapy can deliver precise doses of X-rays to tumours while leaving surrounding, healthy tissue relatively unscathed. (U.K.)

  14. Study of semiconductor detectors applied to diagnostic X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims an evaluation of procedures for photons spectrum determination, produced by a X ray tube, normally used for medical diagnoses which operation voltage ranges from 20 to 150 kVp, to allow more precise characterization of the photon beam. The use of spectrum analysis will contribute to reduce the uncertainty in the ionization camera calibrations. For this purpose, two kind of detectors were selected, a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) and a planar HPGe detector. The X ray interaction with the detector's crystal produces, by electronic processes, a pulse high distribution as an output, which is no the true photon spectrum, due to the presence of K shell escape peaks, Compton scattering and to the fact that the detectors efficiency diminish rapidly with the increase of the photon energy. A detailed analysis of the contributing factors to distortions in the spectrum is necessary and was performed by Monte Carlo calculation with the MCNP 4B computer code. In order to determine the actual photon spectrum for a X ray tube a spectra stripping procedure is described for the HPGe detector. The detector's response curves, determined by the Monte Carlo calculation, were compared to the experimental ones, for isotropic point sources. For the methodology validation, stripped spectra were compared to the theoretical ones, for the same X ray tube's settings, for a qualitative evaluation. The air kerma rate calculated with the photon spectra were compared to the direct measurement using an ionization chamber, for a quantitative evaluation. (author)

  15. Highlights and Discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Tananbaum, H; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-01-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extrasolar X-ray source in 1962,NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond X-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08X-ray sources to high precision, detecting extremely faint sources, and obtaining high resolution spectra of selected cosmic phenomena. The extended Chandra mission provides a long observing baseline with stable and well-calibrated instruments, enabling temporal studies over time-scales from milliseconds to years. In this report we present a selection of highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding ...

  16. X-ray imaging using a tunable coherent X-ray source based on parametric X-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel X-ray source based on parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) has been employed for X-ray imaging at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application (LEBRA), Nihon University. Notable features of PXR are tunable energy, monochromaticity with spatial chirp, narrow local bandwidth and spatial coherence. Since the X-ray beam from the PXR system has a large irradiation area with uniform flux density, the PXR-based source is suited for X-ray imaging, especially for application to phase-contrast imaging. Despite the cone-like X-ray beam, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) can be employed as a phase contrast imaging technique. DEI experiments were performed using 14- to 34-keV X-rays and the phase-gradient images were obtained. The results demonstrated the capability of PXR as an X-ray source for phase-contrast imaging with a large irradiation field attributed to the cone-beam effect. Given the significant properties of the LEBRA-PXR source, the result suggests the possible construction of a compact linac-driven PXR-Imaging instrument and its application to medical diagnoses

  17. X-ray measurements at the stand-alone electron cooler for LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the X-rays emitted in the energy region from 2 to 30 keV from the electron beam in the electron cooler built for the CERN Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). Besides an intense continuum of bremsstrahlung photons, a high rate of characteristic X-rays is also observed. A sensitive dependence of the intensity of these lines on the parameters of the electron cooler, such as beam energy, loss current, and the residual pressure is found. This gives information about the parts of the cooler which are hit by electrons, in particular by those in the loss current, and therefore demonstrates that X-rays could be a sensitive diagnostics for electron beam losses. The results give indications of the background which can be expected in X-ray measurements of electron-ion recombination in the cooler. A beneficial use of this X-ray background could be for wavelength calibration. (orig.)

  18. Using computational modeling to compare X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda Cassiano, Deisemar; Arruda Correa, Samanda Cristine; de Souza, Edmilson Monteiro; da Silva, Ademir Xaxier; Pereira Peixoto, José Guilherme; Tadeu Lopes, Ricardo

    2014-02-01

    The Practical Peak Voltage-PPV has been adopted to measure the voltage applied to an X-ray tube. The PPV was recommended by the IEC document and accepted and published in the TRS no. 457 code of practice. The PPV is defined and applied to all forms of waves and is related to the spectral distribution of X-rays and to the properties of the image. The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. An X-ray tube for Dental Radiology (operated from a single phase power supply) and an X-ray tube used as a reference (supplied from a constant potential power supply) were used in simulations across the energy range of interest of 40 kV to 100 kV. Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the tubes involved.

  19. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  20. On the universal X-ray luminosity function of binary X-ray sources in galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Postnov, K. A.

    2002-01-01

    The empirically determined universal power-law shape of X-ray luminosity function of high mass X-ray binaries in galaxies is explained by fundamental mass-luminosity and mass-radius relations for massive stars.

  1. Wide field x-ray telescopes: Detecting x-ray transients/afterglows related to GRBs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent discovery of X-ray afterglows of GRBs opens the possibility of analyses of GRBs by their X-ray detections. However, imaging X-ray telescopes in current use mostly have limited fields of view. Alternative X-ray optics geometries achieving very large fields of view have been theoretically suggested in the 70's but not constructed and used so far. We review the geometries and basic properties of the wide-field X-ray optical systems based on one- and two-dimensional lobster-eye geometry and suggest technologies for their development and construction. First results of the development of double replicated X-ray reflecting flats for use in one-dimensional X-ray optics of lobster-eye type are presented and discussed. The optimum strategy for locating GRBs upon their X-ray counterparts is also presented and discussed

  2. X-ray diagnostics developments for a laser-matter interaction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are particularly interested by the soft and hard X-ray emission between 100 eV and 100 keV. For high spatio-temporal X-ray measurements we have developed a soft X-ray streak camera with lamellar electron optics. This camera is used with a cylindrical mirror to diagnose in the range 100 eV - some keV. Recently we have tested a new optimized prototype and higher spatio-temporal resolution have been measured. Among the various soft X-ray imaging techniques (from 50 eV to some keV) we have developed and tested a Wolter microscope and a detection system built around a small image converter tube with an X-ray photocathode and P20 phosphor screen, read by a C.C.D. working in the visible spectral range. For higher energy X-ray imaging we used simple pinhole camera connected with a similar electronic image readout using a C.C.D. array that provides two dimension spatial information in the 2-10 keV spectral range. For spectroscopic measurements we use an X-ray spectrometer using a curved TlAp crystal and a linear array of photodiodes. For accurate measurements of energy balance in the keV spectral range we have designed and built a lot of quasi- adiabatic X-ray calorimeters and bolometers. For both, absolute electrical calibration is possible. Finally we present some preliminary results about X-ray calibration using a pulsed soft X-ray source working with various gases chosen for their characteristics lines

  3. Multicell X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector for X-radiation or other ionizing radiation is described comprising a pair of curved metal bars lying in spaced apart parallel planes. Ceramic members are bonded to the respective bars in facing relationship. Each ceramic member has a plurality of radially extending circumferentially spaced grooves facing similar grooves in the other member. A plurality of electrode plates are held in juxtaposed and circumferentially spaced apart relationship by disposing their respective upper and lower edges in the grooves of opposed ceramic members. The faces of adjacent electrode plates define gas-filled gaps in which photoelectron-ion pairs are produced when radiation enters from the front edges of the plates. The above described assembly is disposed within a pressurized gas-filled chamber having an X-ray transmissive window adjacent the front edges of the plates. A cover encloses the chamber. It has insulator feed-throughs for connecting the electrode plates with external electric circuits. Photoelectrons and/or ions, created by the ionizing radiation, are collected on the electrode plates and thereby generate an electrical signal which corresponds to the incident ionizing radiation. (Auth.)

  4. X-ray radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper described a radiographic apparatus containing a radiation source, a diaphragm with collimating windows and a cassette holder with a cassette for the X-ray film. In order to increase the efficiency and quality of monitoring, the diaphragm and the cassette are made in the form of cylindrical shells, the centre of curvature of which coincides with the position of the radiation source focus. Each collimating window of the diaphragm is made in the form of two coaxially connected truncated cones, joined at the large bases in such a way that the angle at the vertex of the cone nearer the source is not less than the central angle with the vertex at the focus of the radiation source supported by the larger base, and 15-300 less than the angle at the vertex of the cone further from the source. By this means monitoring efficiency is increased by a factor of 1.5-2 and the quality of the radiographs improved. The apparatus is used for flaw detection in cylindrical objects. (author)

  5. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  6. Lenses for Soft X-Rays and X-ray Microscopy Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the development of zone plates as x-ray lenses by the use of a uv-holographic lithography technique. Condenser zone plates as well as scanning x-ray microscopes are described. In addition, results of x-ray microscopy experiments are presented, which have been performed with an imaging x-ray microscope installed at the BESSY electron storage ring in Berlin

  7. Instrumental limits to our knowledge of the X-ray sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guainazzi, Matteo

    2014-08-01

    In the last decade, performances of X-ray detectors have improved over all parameter spaces (throughput, energy and spatial resolution, timing). However, the quality of our science is only as good as the quality our instruments' calibration. Measurements of X-ray observables in celestial sources are increasingly limited by systematic rather then by statistical errors. Unfortunately, all attempts at defining X-ray "standard candles" have proven unsuccessful so far. The energy scale can be still absolutely calibrated through emission lines produced by atomic transitions in on-board or astrophysical calibration sources. Likewise, timing accuracy can be estimated using fast rotators such as the Crab pulsar. On the other hand, uncertainties at the level of the order of 10% (and more) affect the absolute flux calibration. These "cross-calibration" uncertainties are energy-dependent, thus implying uncertainties on spectral measurements. I present in this talk the calibration and cross-calibration status of historical and operational X-ray detectors. Efforts to monitor, document and improve the cross-calibration status are carried out primarily by the IACHEC (International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration: http://web.mit.edu/iachec/). I will also briefly discuss the impact that these uncertainties (may) have on fields as diverse as the measurements of spin in accreting black holes, and the determination of cosmological parameters through surveys of galaxy clusters.

  8. X-ray topography and multiple diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short summary on X-ray topography, which is based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, is made. The applications and properties related to the use of the multiple diffraction technique are analized and discussed. (L.C.)

  9. Proton induced X-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The developments in proton induced X-ray emission analysis are reviewed. Techniques for analyzing thick and thin samples of different origin are described. Discussions on the application of proton induced X-ray emission analysis in different fields, comparison of the sensitivity of this method with other analytical techniques, its limitations and possible improvements are presented

  10. Rotatable target for x-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distorsion of the focal trace results in reduction of X-ray intensity, which may stop the desired use of the X-ray tube early. This distorsion can be avoided almost by use of molybdenum alloys for base body and substrate. Different alloys together with belonging measured values are described. (J.K.)

  11. X-ray diagnosis in birds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes techniques of X- ray examination in birds and the advantages of using contrast medium. He gives the medical indications of such examinations and lists the main anatomical features to be well known in birds for a better interpretation of X-ray pictures

  12. X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Giorgio

    I discuss two topics in X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs: reflection from the white dwarf surface, and opacity effects in the post shock plasma. I also briefly mention future observational perspectives, with particular emphasis on the Constellation X-ray mission.

  13. Tracing the X-Ray Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    What you need to know about… Tracing the X-ray Trail If you’ve just completed an x-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) Start here! or other diagnostic imaging procedure, you probably want to know when you will ... los rayos X Si acaba de hacerse una radiografía, tomografía ¡Empezar ...

  14. Coccidioidomycosis - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chest x-ray shows the affects of a fungal infection, coccidioidomycosis. In the middle of the left lung (seen on the ... defined borders. Other diseases that may explain these x-ray findings include lung abscesses, chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic ...

  15. X-ray diagnosis of retropatellar diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article reports on a comprehensive, stepwise diagnosis in diseases of the knee joints. This includes a description of the indication, the technique of taking X-ray films, and X-ray findings, as well as arthrography of the femoropatellar joint in retropatellar diseases such as chondropathia patellae, osteochondrosis dissecans, traumas of the knee joints and arthrosis deformans. (orig.)

  16. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  17. X-Ray Detection Visits the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Luis; Farinha, Ana; Pinto, Ana

    2008-01-01

    Film has been used to detect x-rays since the early days of their discovery by Rontgen. Although nowadays superseded by other techniques, film still provides a cheap means of x-ray detection, making it attractive in high-school or undergraduate university courses. If some sort of quantitative result is required, the film's optical absorbance or…

  18. Soft x rays for radiobiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lethal effects and chromosome aberrations induced in cells exposed to low energy (soft) X rays demonstrated that these relatively low energy X rays are just as effective as those of higher energy for radiobiological studies, and even more effective for irradiating cultured mammalian cells than laboratory animals. (author)

  19. X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Child All About Food Allergies X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis Print A A A Text Size What's ... routinely check kids for scoliosis during regular physical exams, and some schools also test for scoliosis. If ...

  20. Large X-ray optics: lobster alternative

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudec, René; Pína, L.; Inneman, A.

    Garching : MaxPlanck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, 2003 - (Hasinger, G.; Boller, T.; Parmer, A.), s. 271-277 [XEUS - studying the evolution of the hot Universe. Garching (DE), 11.03.2002-13.03.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : XEUS X-ray telescope * lobster eye X-ray optics Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  1. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  2. X-ray scattering measurements from thin-foil x-ray mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; BYRNAK, BP; Hornstrup, Allan;

    1992-01-01

    Thin foil X-ray mirrors are to be used as the reflecting elements in the telescopes of the X-ray satellites Spectrum-X-Gamma (SRG) and ASTRO-D. High resolution X-ray scattering measurements from the Au coated and dip-lacquered Al foils are presented. These were obtained from SRG mirrors positioned...

  3. Soft X-Ray Spectra of AGN Discovered Via Their Hard X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    This final report is a study of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Investigation of the soft x-ray spectra of AGN were performed by using their hard x-ray emission. ROSAT observations of AGN was also performed, which allowed for the study of these x-ray spectra and the structures of 7 clusters of galaxies.

  4. X-ray devices contributing to sophistication of X-ray diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray tubes to generate X-rays, as well as X-ray image intensifiers (I.I.s) and X-ray flat panel detectors (FPDs) to convert X-ray images into electronic signals, are key devices in X-ray diagnostic systems, which are playing a major role in the advancement of diagnosis and treatment. Toshiba Electron Tubes and Devices Co., Ltd. has been offering optimal products incorporating the most advanced technologies to customers through continuous technological innovations. These include a high-sensitivity technology for X-ray I.I.s and X-ray FPDs to suppress patient exposure doses, a focal spot design technology for X-ray tubes and high-resolution technologies for X-ray I.I.s and X-ray FPDs that enhance image quality and make it possible to detect smaller lesion areas, and a noise reduction technology for X-ray tubes to realize a comfortable medical environment with reduced stress on both patients and medical staff. (author)

  5. Modeled soft X-ray solar irradiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    Solar soft X-rays have historically been inaccurately modeled in both relative variations and absolute magnitudes by empirical solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance models. This is a result of the use of a limited number of rocket data sets which were primarily associated with the calibration of the AE-E satellite EUV data set. In this work, the EUV91 solar EUV irradiance model has been upgraded to improve the accuracy of the 3.0 to 5.0 nm relative irradiance variations. The absolute magnitude estimate of the flux in this wavelength range has also been revised upwards. The upgrade was accomplished by first digitizing the SOLRAD 11 satellite 4.4 to 6.0 nm measured energy flux data set, then extracting and extrapolating a derived 3.0 to 5.0 nm photon flux from these data, and finally by performing a correlation between these derived data and the daily and 81-day mean 10.7 cm radio flux emission using a multiple linear regression technique. A correlation coefficient of greater than 0.9 was obtained between the dependent and independent data sets. The derived and modeled 3.0 to 5.0 nm flux varies by more than an order of magnitude over a solar cycle, ranging from a flux below 1 x 10(exp 8) to a flux greater than 1 x 10(exp 9) photons per sq cm per sec. Solar rotational (27-day) variations in the flux magnitude are a factor of 2. The derived and modeled irradiance absolute values are an order of magnitude greater than previous values from rocket data sets related to the calibration of the AE-E satellite.

  6. Accuracy evaluation of an X-ray microtomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Jaquiel S; Appoloni, Carlos R; Fernandes, Celso P

    2016-06-01

    Microstructural parameter evaluation of reservoir rocks is of great importance to petroleum production companies. In this connection, X-ray computed microtomography (μ-CT) has proven to be a quite useful method for the assessment of rocks, as it provides important microstructural parameters, such as porosity, permeability, pore size distribution and porous phase of the sample. X-ray computed microtomography is a non-destructive technique that enables the reuse of samples already measured and also yields 2-D cross-sectional images of the sample as well as volume rendering. This technique offers an additional advantage, as it does not require sample preparation, of reducing the measurement time, which is approximately one to three hours, depending on the spatial resolution used. Although this technique is extensively used, accuracy verification of measurements is hard to obtain because the existing calibrated samples (phantoms) have large volumes and are assessed in medical CT scanners with millimeter spatial resolution. Accordingly, this study aims to determine the accuracy of an X-ray computed microtomography system using a Skyscan 1172 X-ray microtomograph. To accomplish this investigation, it was used a nylon thread set with known appropriate diameter inserted into a glass tube. The results for porosity size and phase distribution by X-ray microtomography were very close to the geometrically calculated values. The geometrically calculated porosity and the porosity determined by the methodology using the μ-CT was 33.4±3.4% and 31.0±0.3%, respectively. The outcome of this investigation was excellent. It was also observed a small variability in the results along all 401 sections of the analyzed image. Minimum and maximum porosity values between the cross sections were 30.9% and 31.1%, respectively. A 3-D image representing the actual structure of the sample was also rendered from the 2-D images. PMID:27064197

  7. Determination of plutonium in nitric acid solutions using energy dispersive L X-ray fluorescence with a low power X-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Py, J. [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, F-25030 Besançon (France); Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Groetz, J.-E., E-mail: jegroetz@univ-fcomte.fr [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, F-25030 Besançon (France); Hubinois, J.-C.; Cardona, D. [Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2015-04-21

    This work presents the development of an in-line energy dispersive L X-ray fluorescence spectrometer set-up, with a low power X-ray generator and a secondary target, for the determination of plutonium concentration in nitric acid solutions. The intensity of the L X-rays from the internal conversion and gamma rays emitted by the daughter nuclei from plutonium is minimized and corrected, in order to eliminate the interferences with the L X-ray fluorescence spectrum. The matrix effects are then corrected by the Compton peak method. A calibration plot for plutonium solutions within the range 0.1–20 g L{sup −1} is given.

  8. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  9. Requirements for industrial x-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety code is concerned with the protection of all individuals who may be exposed to radiation emitted by X-ray equipment operating at energies up to 1 MeV as used in industrial radiography. This code presents basic radiation safety information for the protection of personnel operating and servicing X-ray equipment and other workers and the general public in the vicinity of areas where X-ray equipment is in operation. It specifies general safety features of design, construction and functioning of X-ray equipment and facilities; describes the responsibilities of the user, operator and maintenance personnel; contains recommendations to ensure that the X-ray equipment is used and maintained in accordance with the ALARA principle; and describes a program of personnel monitoring and radiation safety surveys. ( 6 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.)

  10. Development of coherent x-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed x-ray laser applications such as interferometry and holography require coherent radiation. The fact that x-ray laser media are short-lived high-temperature plasmas leads to very different coherence properties from those of ordinary lasers. Research aimed at developing theoretical models and experimentally characterizing and improving x-ray laser coherence is discussed. Longitudinal coherence is already sufficient for several applications due to the narrow linewidths. However, transverse coherence is estimated to be poor for most current x-ray lasers. To quantify these estimates and to design better lasers, both wave and geometric optics propagation and coherence theories have been developed. These theories and resulting predictions of the coherence length are presented and compared. Measurements of x-ray laser beam patterns and coherence lengths are presented and compared to detailed theoretical simulations. Designs for more coherent lasers are given

  11. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberger, J.; Hell, E.; Knüpfer, W.

    2001-06-01

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  12. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques

  13. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberger, J. E-mail: joerg.freudenberger@med.siemens.de; Hell, E.; Knuepfer, W

    2001-06-21

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  14. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings Spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    CERN Document Server

    Hurvitz, G; Strum, G; Shpilman, Z; Levy, I; Fraenkel, M

    2012-01-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses Focused-Ion-Beam (FIB) technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on Transmission Electron Microscopy grids (TEM-grid). High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  15. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurvitz, G.; Ehrlich, Y.; Strum, G.; Shpilman, Z.; Levy, I.; Fraenkel, M.

    2012-08-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  16. Detection of x-ray emission in a nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao; Yu, Yang; Niu, Zheng; Yan, Ping; Zhou, Yuanxiang

    2010-12-01

    Measurement of x-ray emission is an important parameter to investigate runaway behavior of fast electrons produced in nanosecond-pulse gas discharge. An online detection system of x rays is described in this paper, and the system consists of an x-ray detector with NaI (Tl) scintillator and photomultiplier tube, and an integrated multichannel analyzer. The system is responsible for detecting x-ray emission signal, processing the detected signals, and scaling the energy distribution. The calibration results show that every channel of the detection system represents a given x-ray energy and various x rays can be divided into different energy ranges between 10 and 130 keV. For a repetitive nanosecond-pulse breakdown between highly nonuniform gaps in open air, an energy distribution is obtained using the online detection system. It shows that the x-ray emission is a continuous spectrum and the x rays of above 60 keV dominate in the detected energy distribution. PMID:21198017

  17. Thermoluminescent response of CaSO4:Dy+PTFE induced by X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the feasibility of the utilization of CaSO4:Dy pellets for X-ray measurements in a general radiology department. Thermoluminescence (TL) response of CaSO4:Dy+PTFE was compared to the TL response of commercial LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) samples. TL pellets were exposed to X-ray beam from X-ray machine CMR for clinical diagnosis purpose. The calibration curve of CaSO4:Dy+PTFE was obtained and it showed a linear response as a function of absorbed dose in air at the studied dose interval. Despite this fact, this material can be used for X-ray beams measurements if appropriate calibration procedures are performed. - Highlights: ► Developing of CaSO4:Dy to quasimono-energetic X-ray low energy dosimetry. ► Thermoluminescent response of caSO4:Dy to X-ray low dose. ► TL characteristics of CaSO4:Dy for X-ray beam quality control.

  18. Analysis of uranium ores by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of uranium in ores by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XFA) is demonstrated for uranium ore samples of known content. For calibration silica gel standards are used. Matrix effects are corrected by measuring the Compton scattering peaks. The radionuclide 109Cd as well as a X-ray tube in combination with Mo or Sn as secondary targets are suited as X-ray sources. The mean relative deviation of the values found from the given values is 5%. (orig.)

  19. The CHANDRA HETGS X-ray Grating Spectrum of Eta Car

    OpenAIRE

    Corcoran, M. F; Swank, J.H.; Petre, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Townsley, L.; Smith, R.; S. White; Viotti, R; A. Damineli

    2001-01-01

    Eta Car may be the most massive and luminous star in the Galaxy and is suspected to be a massive, colliding wind binary system. The CHANDRA X-ray observatory has obtained a calibrated, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the star uncontaminated by the nearby extended soft X-ray emisssion. Our 89 ksec CHANDRA observation with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) shows that the hot gas near the star is non-isothermal. The temperature distribution may represent the emission on...

  20. Theoretical L X-ray emission probabilities in the decay of 241Am

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L X-rays emitted in the decay of 241Am are widely used for the calibration of X-ray detectors. Many measurements of the X-ray intensities in this decay have been made, however detailed balancing of the decay scheme has not yet been successful. This work attempts balancing of the decay scheme. The balance does not work with published values of fluorescence yields and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities but produces a better balance than previous studies and also shows the possibility of problems due to chemical effects with 241Am as a standard. (orig.)