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Sample records for cdnas encoding unique

  1. Formation of functional asialoglycoprotein receptor after transfection with cDNAs encoding the receptor proteins.

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    McPhaul, M; Berg, P.

    1986-01-01

    The rat asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) has been expressed in cultured rat hepatoma cells (HTC cells) after transfection with cloned cDNAs. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of transfected cells was used to identify the functional cDNA clones and to isolate cells expressing the ASGP-R. Simultaneous or sequential transfections with two cloned cDNAs that encode related but distinctive polypeptide chains were needed to obtain ASGP-R activity; transfection with either cDNA alone failed to ...

  2. Characterization and expression analysis of two cDNAs encoding Xa1 and oxysterol binding proteins in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and subsequent microarray analysis, expression profiles of sorghum genes responsive to greenbug phloem-feeding were obtained and identified. Among the profiles, two cDNAs designated to MM73 and MM95 were identified to encode Xa1 (Xa1) and oxysterol ...

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding metalloproteinases from snake venom glands.

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    Jia, Ying; Pérez, John C

    2010-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are a superfamily of zinc-dependent proteases and participate in a number of important biological, physiological and pathophysiological processes. In this work, we simultaneously amplified nine cDNAs encoding different classes of metalloproteinases from glands of four different snake species (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus, Crotalus atrox, Crotalus viridis viridis and Agkistrodon piscivorus leucostoma) by RT-PCR with a pair of primers. Among the encoded metalloproteinases, two enzymes (AclVMP-I and AplVMP-I), three enzymes (CaVMP-II, CvvVMP-II and AplVMP-II) and four enzymes (AclVMP-III, CaVMP-III, CvvVMP-III and AplVMP-III) with the characteristic motif (HEXXHXXGXXH) of metalloproteinase belong to type P-I, P-II and P-III enzymes, respectively. Disintegrin domains of CaVMP-II and CvvVMP-II from two Crotatus snakes contain RGD-motif whereas AplVMP-II from Agkistrodon snake has KGD-motif. Instead of R/KGD-motif within disintegrin domain of SVMP-II enzyme, CaVMP-III, CvvVMP-III and AplVMP-III enzymes contain SECD-motif, while AclVMP-III has DDCD-motif in their corresponding position of disintegrin-like domains. There are 12 Cys amino acids in cysterin-rich domains of each P-III enzyme. Moreover, a disintegrin precursor (AplDis) with RGD-motif also simultaneously amplified from the glands of A.p. leucostoma while amplifying AplVMP-II and AplVMP-III, which indicated that different types of SVMPs and related genes are present in a single species of snake and share a consensus sequence at the 3' and 5' untranslated regions. RT-PCR result also showed that P-III is highly expressed in Crotalus snakes than in Agkistrodon snakes. Aligning the deduced amino acid sequence of these enzymes with other SVMPs from GenBank database indicated that this is the first report on the isolation of cDNAs encoding P-II and P-III enzymes from C.v. viridis and A.p. leucostoma snakes. The availability of these SVMP sequences directly facilitated

  4. Isolation and characterisation of two cDNAs encoding transglutaminase from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

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    Furnes, Clemens; Kileng, Øyvind; Jensen, Ingvill; Karki, Pralav; Eichacker, Lutz; Robertsen, Børre

    2014-01-01

    Two cDNAs encoding transglutaminase (TG) were identified in a subtractive cDNA library prepared from the head kidney of poly I:C stimulated Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Full-length TG-1 and TG-2 cDNA were cloned from the head kidney by a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence for TG-1 was 695 aa with an estimated molecular mass of 78.3 kDa, while TG-2 was a 698 aa protein with an estimated molecular mass of 78.8 kDa. The two proteins were named TG-1 and TG-2 and both possess transglutaminase/protease-like homologous domains (TGc) and full conservation of amino acids cysteine, histidine, and aspartate residues that form the catalytic triad. Sequence analysis showed high similarity (93.1%) with Alaska pollock TG, and the TGs were grouped together with TGs from chum salmon, Japanese flounder, Nile tilapia, and red sea bream in addition to Alaska pollock in phylogenetic analysis. Interestingly, they showed different tissue distribution with highest constitutive expression in reproductive and immunological organs, indicating important roles in these organs. Furthermore, the up-regulation of TG-1 and TG-2 in head kidney after stimulating Atlantic cod with poly I:C suggested a role of TGs in immune response in Atlantic cod.

  5. Cloning of cDNAs encoding C-type lectins from Elapidae snakes Bungarus fasciatus and Bungarus multicinctus.

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    Zha, H G; Lee, W H; Zhang, Y

    2001-12-01

    A number of C-type lectins with various biological activities have been purified and characterized from Viperidae snake venoms. In contrast, only a few reports could be found in literature concerning the C-type lectins in Elapidae snake venoms. Based on the published cDNA sequences of C-type lectins from Viperidae snake venoms, oligonucleotide primers were designed and used to screen the cDNA libraries made from the venom glands of Bungarus fasciatus and Bungarus multicinctus. This allowed the cloning of three full length cDNAs encoding C-type lectins. The encoded proteins, named BFL-1, BFL-2 and BML, exhibit high degrees of sequence identities with Viperidae snake venom saccharide-binding lectins (around 60% with Trimeresurus stejnegeri venom lectin, Crotalus atrox venom lectin and Agkistrodon piscivorus venom lectin). They show much less identities with other venom C-type lectin-like proteins (around 30% with the platelet glycoprotein Ib-binding protein from Agkistrodon blomhoffi venom and the factor IX/X-binding protein from Trimeresurus flavoviridis venom). The cDNAs revealed that the precursors contain potential signal peptides characterized by a hydrophobic core. To our knowledge, these are the first cDNA cloning of group VII C-type lectins (Drickamer K. 1993. Prog. Nucleic Acid Res. Mol. Biol. 45, 207-232) from Elapidae snake venom glands.

  6. Isolation and functional analysis of two Cistus creticus cDNAs encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pateraki, Irene; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2008-05-01

    Cistus creticus ssp. creticus is an indigenous shrub of the Mediterranean area. The glandular trichomes covering its leaf surfaces secrete a resin called "ladanum", which among others contains a number of specific labdane-type diterpenes that exhibit antibacterial and antifungal action as well as in vitro and in vivo cytotoxic and cytostatic activity against human cancer cell lines. In view of the properties and possible future exploitation of these metabolites, it was deemed necessary to study the geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase enzyme (GGDPS, EC 2.5.1.30), a short chain prenyltransferase responsible for the synthesis of the precursor molecule of all diterpenes. In this work, we present the cloning, functional characterisation and expression profile at the gene and protein levels of two differentially expressed C. creticus full-length cDNAs, CcGGDPS1 and CcGGDPS2. Heterologous yeast cell expression system showed that these cDNAs exhibited GGDPS enzyme activity. Gene and protein expression analyses suggest that this enzyme is developmentally and tissue-regulated showing maximum expression in trichomes and smallest leaves (0.5-1.0cm). This work is the first attempt to study the terpenoid biosynthesis at the molecular level in C. creticus ssp. creticus.

  7. Isolation and characterization of cloned cDNAs as encoding human liver chlordecone reductase

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    Winters, C.J.; Molowa, D.T.; Guzelian, P.S. (Medical College of Virginia, Richmond (USA))

    1990-01-30

    Chlordecone (Kepone), a toxic organochlorine pesticide, undergoes bioreduction to chlorodecone alcohol in human liver. This reaction is controlled by a cytosolic enzyme, chlordecone reductase (CDR), which may be of the aldo-keto reductase family of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. To further investigate the primary structure and expression of CDR, the authors screened a library of human liver cDNAs cloned in the expression vector {lambda}gt11 and isolated an 800 bp cDNA that directed synthesis of a fusion protein recognized by polyclonal anti-CDR antibodies. Using this cDNA as a probe, they screened two human liver cDNA libraries and found several 1.2-kb cDNAs which would code for polypeptide with 308 residues (35.8 kDa). However, a similar full-length cDNA, possibly the transcript of a pseudogene, contained an in-frame nonsense codon. The deduced protein sequence of CDR showed 65% similarity to the primary structure of human liver aldehyde reductase and 66% similarity to the inferred protein sequence of rat lens aldose reductase. A search of GenBank revealed significant nucleotide similarity to a cDNA coding for bovine lung prostaglandin f synthase and to a partial cDNA coding for frog lens {rho}-crystallin. RNA from adult but not fetal human liver, and from the human hepatoma cell-line Hep G2, contained major (1.6 kb) and minor (2.8 kb) species hybridizable to a CDR cDNA. The relative amounts of these RNAs varied markedly among nine subjects. From this initial description of the nucleotide sequence for a human carbonyl reductase, they conclude that CDR and several related enzymes are part of a novel multigene family involved in the metabolism of such xenobiotics as chlordecone and possibly endogenous substrates.

  8. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase from Populus trichocarpa.

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    Lijun Wang

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs contribute to poplar defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcripts of PA biosynthetic genes accumulated rapidly in response to infection by the fungus Marssonina brunnea f.sp. multigermtubi, treatments of salicylic acid (SA and wounding, resulting in PA accumulation in poplar leaves. Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR are two key enzymes of the PA biosynthesis that produce the main subunits: (+-catechin and (--epicatechin required for formation of PA polymers. In Populus, ANR and LAR are encoded by at least two and three highly related genes, respectively. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized genes PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 from P. trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Populus ANR1 and LAR1 occurr in two distinct phylogenetic lineages, but both genes have little difference in their tissue distribution, preferentially expressed in roots. Overexpression of PtrANR1 in poplar resulted in a significant increase in PA levels but no impact on catechin levels. Antisense down-regulation of PtrANR1 showed reduced PA accumulation in transgenic lines, but increased levels of anthocyanin content. Ectopic expression of PtrLAR1 in poplar positively regulated the biosynthesis of PAs, whereas the accumulation of anthocyanin and flavonol was significantly reduced (P<0.05 in all transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that both PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 contribute to PA biosynthesis in Populus.

  9. Identification of sugarcane cDNAs encoding components of the cell cycle machinery

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    Andrietta Mírian Helene

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on cell cycle research in plants indicate that the majority of the fundamental regulators are conserved with other eukaryotes, but the controlling mechanisms imposed on them, and their integration into growth and development is unique to plants. To date, most studies on cell division have been conducted in dicot plants. However, monocot plants have distinct developmental strategies that will affect the regulation of cell division at the meristems. In order to advance our understanding how cell division is integrated with the basic mechanisms controlling cell growth and development in monocots, we took advantage of the sugarcane EST Project (Sucest to carry an exhaustive data mining to identify components of the cell cycle machinery. Results obtained include the description of distinct classes of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs; A, B, D, and H-type cyclins; CDK-interacting proteins, CDK-inhibitory and activating kinases, pRB and E2F transcription factors. Most sugarcane cell cycle genes seem to be member of multigene families. Like in dicot plants, CDKa transcription is not restricted to tissues with elevated meristematic activity, but the vast majority of CDKb-related ESTs are found in regions of high proliferation rates. Expression of CKI genes is far more abundant in regions of less cell division, notably in lateral buds. Shared expression patterns for a group of clusters was unraveled by transcriptional profiling, and we suggest that similar approaches could be used to identify genes that are part of the same regulatory network.

  10. Molecular and functional characterization of cDNAs putatively encoding carboxylesterases from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

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    Jianqin Zhang

    Full Text Available Carboxylesterases (CarEs belong to a superfamily of metabolic enzymes encoded by a number of genes and are widely distributed in microbes, plants and animals including insects. These enzymes play important roles in detoxification of insecticides and other xenobiotics, degradation of pheromones, regulation of neurodevelopment, and control of animal development. In this study, we characterized a total of 39 full-length cDNAs putatively encoding different CarEs from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, one of the most severe insect pests in many regions of the world, and evaluated the role of four CarE genes in insecticide detoxification. Our phylogenetic analysis grouped the 39 CarEs into five different clades including 20 CarEs in clade A, 3 in D, 13 in E, 1 in F and 2 in I. Four CarE genes (LmCesA3, LmCesA20, LmCesD1, LmCesE1, representing three different clades (A, D and E, were selected for further analyses. The transcripts of the four genes were detectable in all the developmental stages and tissues examined. LmCesA3 and LmCesE1 were mainly expressed in the fat bodies and Malpighian tubules, whereas LmCesA20 and LmCesD1 were predominately expressed in the muscles and hemolymph, respectively. The injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA synthesized from each of the four CarE genes followed by the bioassay with each of four insecticides (chlorpyrifos, malathion, carbaryl and deltamethrin increased the nymphal mortalities by 37.2 and 28.4% in response to malathion after LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 were silenced, respectively. Thus, we proposed that both LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 played an important role in detoxification of malathion in the locust. These results are expected to help researchers reveal the characteristics of diverse CarEs and assess the risk of insecticide resistance conferred by CarEs in the locust and other insect species.

  11. Molecular and functional characterization of cDNAs putatively encoding carboxylesterases from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianqin; Li, Daqi; Ge, Pingting; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) belong to a superfamily of metabolic enzymes encoded by a number of genes and are widely distributed in microbes, plants and animals including insects. These enzymes play important roles in detoxification of insecticides and other xenobiotics, degradation of pheromones, regulation of neurodevelopment, and control of animal development. In this study, we characterized a total of 39 full-length cDNAs putatively encoding different CarEs from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, one of the most severe insect pests in many regions of the world, and evaluated the role of four CarE genes in insecticide detoxification. Our phylogenetic analysis grouped the 39 CarEs into five different clades including 20 CarEs in clade A, 3 in D, 13 in E, 1 in F and 2 in I. Four CarE genes (LmCesA3, LmCesA20, LmCesD1, LmCesE1), representing three different clades (A, D and E), were selected for further analyses. The transcripts of the four genes were detectable in all the developmental stages and tissues examined. LmCesA3 and LmCesE1 were mainly expressed in the fat bodies and Malpighian tubules, whereas LmCesA20 and LmCesD1 were predominately expressed in the muscles and hemolymph, respectively. The injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) synthesized from each of the four CarE genes followed by the bioassay with each of four insecticides (chlorpyrifos, malathion, carbaryl and deltamethrin) increased the nymphal mortalities by 37.2 and 28.4% in response to malathion after LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 were silenced, respectively. Thus, we proposed that both LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 played an important role in detoxification of malathion in the locust. These results are expected to help researchers reveal the characteristics of diverse CarEs and assess the risk of insecticide resistance conferred by CarEs in the locust and other insect species.

  12. Cloning and functional characterization of two cDNAs encoding NADPH-dependent 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductased from developing cotton fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Mei QIN; Francois MA PUJOL; Yong Hui SHI; Jian Xun FENG; Yi Ming LIU; Alexander J KASTANIOTIS; J Kalervo HILTUNEN; Yu Xian ZHU

    2005-01-01

    Genes encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of very long chain fatty acids were significantly up-regulated during early cotton fiber development. Two cDNAs, GhKCR1 and GhKCR2 encoding putative cotton 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductases that catalyze the second step in fatty acid elongation, were isolated from developing cotton fibers. GhKCR1 and 2 contain open reading frames of 963 bp and 924 bp encoding proteins of 320 and 307 amino acid residues,respectively. Quantatitive RT-PCR analysis showed that both these genes were highly preferentially expressed during the cotton fiber elongation period with much lower levels recovered from roots, stems and leaves. GhKCR1 and 2 showed 30%-32% identity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ybr159p at the deduced amino acid level. These cotton cDNAs were cloned and expressed in yeast haploid ybr159w△ mutant that was deficient in 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase activity.Wild-type growth rate was restored in ybr159w△ cells that expressed either GhKCR1 or 2. Further analysis showed that GhKCR1 and 2 were co-sedimented within the membranous pellet fraction after high-speed centrifugation, similar to the yeast endoplasmic reticulum marker ScKar2p. Both GhKCR(s) showed NADPH-dependent 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase activity in an in vitro assay system using palmitoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA as substrates. Our results suggest that GhKCR1 and 2 are functional orthologues of ScYbr159p.

  13. Identities among actin-encoding cDNAs of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus and other eukaryote species revealed by nucleotide and amino acid sequence analyses

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    Andréia B. Poletto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Actin-encoding cDNAs of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus were isolated by RT-PCR using total RNA samples of different tissues and further characterized by nucleotide sequencing and in silico amino acid (aa sequence analysis. Comparisons among the actin gene sequences of O. niloticus and those of other species evidenced that the isolated genes present a high similarity to other fish and other vertebrate actin genes. The highest nucleotide resemblance was observed between O. niloticus and O. mossambicus a-actin and b-actin genes. Analysis of the predicted aa sequences revealed two distinct types of cytoplasmic actins, one cardiac muscle actin type and one skeletal muscle actin type that were expressed in different tissues of Nile tilapia. The evolutionary relationships between the Nile tilapia actin genes and diverse other organisms is discussed.

  14. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of cDNAs encoding androgenic gland hormone precursors from two porcellionidae species, Porcellio scaber and P. dilatatus.

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    Ohira, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yuriko; Tominaga, Satoshi; Okuno, Atsuro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2003-01-01

    Male sexual characteristics in Crustacea are induced by androgenic gland hormone (AGH), which is produced by the male-specific androgenic gland. Recently, AGH in the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare was characterized and its cDNA cloned, the first example in which the structure of AGH was elucidated. We report here the molecular cloning of cDNAs encoding AGH precursors from two additional terrestrial isopods, Porcellio scaber and P. dilatatus. cDNA fragments encoding Porcellio scaber AGH (Pos-AGH) and P. dilatatus AGH (Pod-AGH) were amplified by RT-PCR using degenerate oligonucleotide primers designed based on the amino acid sequence of A. vulgare AGH (Arv-AGH). Subsequently, full length cDNAs were obtained by 5'- and 3'-RACE. Both AGH precursors consisted of a signal peptide, B chain, C peptide and A chain, and exhibited the same organization as that of Arv-AGH. The amino acid sequences of the A and B chains, which comprise mature AGH peptide, were highly conserved among the three species, while that of the C peptide showed only low sequence similarity. In Northern blot analysis, each cDNA fragment used as a probe specifically hybridized with a single band (0.75 kb) in mRNA extracted from whole male reproductive organs. In analysis of the tissue-specific gene expression of these two AGHs by RT-PCR, it was revealed that both AGH transcripts were detected only in cDNA synthesized using total RNA from the testis carrying the androgenic glands, but not in that from testis only, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, or hepatopancreas.

  15. A plasmid toolkit for cloning chimeric cDNAs encoding customized fusion proteins into any Gateway destination expression vector.

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    Buj, Raquel; Iglesias, Noa; Planas, Anna M; Santalucía, Tomàs

    2013-08-20

    Valuable clone collections encoding the complete ORFeomes for some model organisms have been constructed following the completion of their genome sequencing projects. These libraries are based on Gateway cloning technology, which facilitates the study of protein function by simplifying the subcloning of open reading frames (ORF) into any suitable destination vector. The expression of proteins of interest as fusions with functional modules is a frequent approach in their initial functional characterization. A limited number of Gateway destination expression vectors allow the construction of fusion proteins from ORFeome-derived sequences, but they are restricted to the possibilities offered by their inbuilt functional modules and their pre-defined model organism-specificity. Thus, the availability of cloning systems that overcome these limitations would be highly advantageous. We present a versatile cloning toolkit for constructing fully-customizable three-part fusion proteins based on the MultiSite Gateway cloning system. The fusion protein components are encoded in the three plasmids integral to the kit. These can recombine with any purposely-engineered destination vector that uses a heterologous promoter external to the Gateway cassette, leading to the in-frame cloning of an ORF of interest flanked by two functional modules. In contrast to previous systems, a third part becomes available for peptide-encoding as it no longer needs to contain a promoter, resulting in an increased number of possible fusion combinations. We have constructed the kit's component plasmids and demonstrate its functionality by providing proof-of-principle data on the expression of prototype fluorescent fusions in transiently-transfected cells. We have developed a toolkit for creating fusion proteins with customized N- and C-term modules from Gateway entry clones encoding ORFs of interest. Importantly, our method allows entry clones obtained from ORFeome collections to be used without prior

  16. Characterization of cDNAs encoding human leukosialin and localization of the leukosialin gene to chromosome 16

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    Pallant, A.; Eskenazi, A.; Frelinger, J.G. (Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (USA)); Mattei, M.G. (Hopital d' Enfants de la Timone, Marseille (France)); Fournier, R.E.K. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Carlsson, S.R.; Fukuda, M. (La Jolla Center Research Foundation, CA (USA))

    1989-02-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding human leukosialin, a major sialoglycoprotein of human leukocytes. Leukosialin is very closely related or identical to the sialophorin molecule, which is involved in T-cell proliferation and whose expression is altered in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-chromosome-linked immunodeficiency disease. Using a rabbit antiserum to leukosialin, a cDNA clone was isolated from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library constructed from human peripheral blood cells. The {lambda}gt11 clone was used to isolate longer cDNA clones that correspond to the entire coding sequence of leukosialin. DNA sequence analysis reveals three domains in the predicted mature protein. The extracellular domain is enriched for Ser, Thr, and Pro and contains four contiguous 18-amino acid repeats. The transmembrane and intracellular domains of the human leukosialin molecule are highly homologous to the rat W3/13 molecule. RNA gel blot analysis reveals two polyadenylylated species of 2.3 and 8 kilobases. Southern blot analysis suggests that human leukosialin is a single-copy gene. Analysis of monochromosomal cell hybrids indicates that the leukosialin gene is not X chromosome linked and in situ hybridization shows leukosialin is located on chromosome 16. These findings demonstrate that the primary mutation in WAS is not a defect in the structural gene for leukosialin.

  17. ISOLATION, CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIN-ENCODING cDNAs FROM Jatropha curcas L. IP-2P

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    Kinya Akashi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Actin is a major component of the plant cytoskeleton, so all cells contain this protein. Actin is expressed constitutivelyand is involved in basic housekeeping functions required for cell maintenance. Because of this, it has been frequentlyused as an internal control to normalize changes in gene expressions analysis. Actually, the information of nucleotidesequence of actin gene of Jatropha curcas L. population IP-2P from Indonesia is not available yet. The objective of thisresearch was to isolate, clone and characterize cDNA of actin genes of J. curcas IP-2P. Three partial actin genesequences had been successfully isolated by PCR using total cDNA as template, and actin primer designed fromconserved region of Arabidopsis thaliana. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the length of JcACT fragment is610, 534, and 701 bp encoding 203, 177, and 234 amino acids respectively. Local alignment analysis based on mRNAsequences shows that JcACT fragment shares 98% similarity with actin mRNA of Hevea brasiliensis and 99% withactin mRNA of Ricinus communis. Based on deduced amino acid sequence, JcACT is 100% identical to actins fromPrunus salicina, Gossypium hirsutum, and Betula luminifera. Even though these clones of cDNA are not completed yet,they can be used as reference in J. curcas L. gene expression analysis.

  18. Comparative analysis of cloned cDNAs encoding Chinese yellow cattle and Gansu black swine integrin receptors for foot-and-mouth disease virus.

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    Du, Ping; Shang, Youjun; Yin, Shuanghui; Zhang, Keshan; Wang, Guangxiang; Lv, Zhanlu; Yang, Shunli; Wu, Jinyan; Jin, Ye; Chen, Yan; Liu, Yongjie; Tian, Hong; Liu, Xiangtao

    2013-10-01

    To analyze foot-and-mouth disease virus tropism and host range with respect to the integrin receptor, we cloned cDNAs encoding the integrin αν, β1, β3, β6 and β8 subunits from Chinese yellow cattle and Gansu black swine and carried out comparative analysis of their molecular characteristics. The lengths of the mature proteins and the functional domains of the four integrin β subunits were the same between bovine and swine; however, the number of putative N-linked glycosylation sites and cysteine residues and their arrangement varied. Homology analysis of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences showed that FMDV integrin receptors of Chinese yellow cattle and Gansu black swine are highly conserved. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all FMDV integrin receptor subunits of cattle and swine are clustered into the Artiodactyla group; however, Chinese yellow cattle are phylogenetically closer to sheep than to Gansu black swine. We postulate that the host tropism of FMDV may, in part, be related to the divergence of integrin subunits among different species.

  19. Characterization of cDNAs encoding two distinct miraculin-like proteins and stress-related modulation of the corresponding mRNAs in Citrus jambhiri lush.

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    Tsukuda, Shintaro; Gomi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2006-01-01

    Two distinct full-length cDNAs from rough lemon that encoded miraculin-like proteins were isolated by random amplification of cDNA ends (RACEs), based on sequence information from subtractive PCR previously described, and designated as RlemMLP1 and RlemMLP2. The transcripts of both RlemMLP1 and RlemMLP2 were not detected in leaves, or stems but accumulated in fruits. Transcripts accumulated to higher levels in leaves after wounding, inoculation with conidia of Alternaria alternata, or treatment with methyl jasmonate vapors. Treatment with methyl salicylate antagonized the signaling pathway of wounding. Treatment with methyl salicylate at 2 h after wounding significantly reduced wounding-induced gene expression of both RlemMLP1 and RlemMLP2. Protein products of these genes were obtained by using a prokaryotic expression system, and had protease inhibitor activity. RlemMLP2, but not RlemMLP1, contained a thaumatin motif, and only RlemMLP2 showed anti-fungal activity against Alternaria citri. Cellular localization analysis with RlemMLP1 or RlemMLP2 fused to a green fluorescence protein gene following transient translation using a particle bombardment in onion cells indicated that both RlemMLP1 and RlemMLP2 were localized to the cytosol. These evidences revealed that rough lemon RlemMLPs are likely to have defensive function against pathogens at least when host cells are broken by their infections.

  20. Characterization and expression of two chicken cDNAs encoding ubiquitin fused to ribosomal proteins of 52 and 80 amino acids.

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    Mezquita, J; Pau, M; Mezquita, C

    1997-08-22

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of two chicken cDNAs, Ub-t52 and Ub-t80, encoding ubiquitin fused to ribosomal proteins of 52 and 80 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequences of the ribosomal proteins are identical or very similar to the homologous human and rat proteins and to the corresponding proteins of other species. Unexpectedly, the ubiquitin moiety of the Ub-t52 protein showed two amino acid substitutions: serine-20 has been replaced by asparagine and serine-57 by alanine. Ubiquitin is a protein strongly conserved during evolution, with no changes in sequence previously reported in vertebrates. Ub-t52 and Ub-t80 are highly expressed in early embryogenesis and during postmitotic stages of spermatogenesis, in parallel with the expression of the polyubiquitin gene UbII. Whereas the 5' untranslated regions (5'UTRs) of the chicken polyubiquitin mRNAs showed marked differences in mature testes in relation to somatic tissues, no differences were observed in the 5'UTRs of the ubiquitin-ribosomal protein mRNAs. These mRNAs possess a 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract that could be used as a mechanism to postpone translation during postmitotic stages of spermatogenesis, as has been proposed in quiescent cells.

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase in bitter melon (Momordica charantia).

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    Tuan, Pham Anh; Park, Sang Un

    2013-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are a family of enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of carotenoids at various chain positions to form a broad spectrum of apocarotenoids, including aromatic substances, pigments and phytohormones. Using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR method, we isolated three cDNA-encoding CCDs (McCCD1, McCCD4, and McNCED) from Momordica charantia. Amino acid sequence alignments showed that they share high sequence identity with other orthologous genes. Quantitative real-time RT PCR (reverse transcriptase PCR) analysis revealed that the expression of McCCD1 and McCCD4 was highest in flowers, and lowest in roots and old leaves (O-leaves). During fruit maturation, the two genes displayed differential expression, with McCCD1 peaking at mid-stage maturation while McCCD4 showed the lowest expression at that stage. The mRNA expression level of McNCED, a key enzyme involved in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, was high during fruit maturation and further increased at the beginning of seed germination. When first-leaf stage plants of M. charantia were exposed to dehydration stress, McNCED mRNA expression was induced primarily in the leaves and, to a lesser extend, in roots and stems. McNCED expression was also induced by high temperature and salinity, while treatment with exogenous ABA led to a decrease. These results should be helpful in determining the substrates and cleavage sites catalyzed by CCD genes in M. charantia, and also in defining the roles of CCDs in growth and development, and in the plant's response to environmental stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of cDNAs encoding serine proteases and their transcriptional responses to Cry1Ab protoxin in the gut of Ostrinia nubilalis larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxiu Yao

    Full Text Available Serine proteases, such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, are the primary digestive enzymes in lepidopteran larvae, and are also involved in Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt protoxin activation and protoxin/toxin degradation. We isolated and sequenced 34 cDNAs putatively encoding trypsins, chymotrypsins and their homologs from the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis larval gut. Our analyses of the cDNA-deduced amino acid sequences indicated that 12 were putative trypsins, 12 were putative chymotrypsins, and the remaining 10 were trypsin and chymotrypsin homologs that lack one or more conserved residues of typical trypsins and chymotrypsins. Reverse transcription PCR analysis indicated that all genes were highly expressed in gut tissues, but one group of phylogenetically-related trypsin genes, OnTry-G2, was highly expressed in larval foregut and midgut, whereas another group, OnTry-G3, was highly expressed in the midgut and hindgut. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that several trypsin genes (OnTry5 and OnTry6 were significantly up-regulated in the gut of third-instar larvae after feeding on Cry1Ab protoxin from 2 to 24 h, whereas one trypsin (OnTry2 was down-regulated at all time points. Four chymotrypsin and chymotrypsin homolog genes (OnCTP2, OnCTP5, OnCTP12 and OnCTP13 were up-regulated at least 2-fold in the gut of the larvae after feeding on Cry1Ab protoxin for 24 h. Our data represent the first in-depth study of gut transcripts encoding expanded families of protease genes in O. nubilalis larvae and demonstrate differential expression of protease genes that may be related to Cry1Ab intoxication and/or resistance.

  3. 乙醇脱氢酶Ⅰ类基因全长cDNA的克隆与表达%Cloning and Expression of the Full-length cDNAs Encoding Human Class Ⅰ Alcohol Dehydrogenases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文婷; 李景鹏; 崔羽; 张永红; 李世荣

    2007-01-01

    Background & Objective:Background &Objective: The class Ⅰ Alcohol Dehydrogenases (ADH) play a key role in hepatic alcohol catabolism. Human ADH is encoded by at least seven genes, and three class Ⅰ ADH genes-ADH1, ADH2 and ADH3, which encode the α, β, and γ subunit respectively, had been isolated and mapped on chromosome 4q21-q25. This experiment tends to clone the human class Ⅰ ADH and investigate its role in the hepatic alcohol catabolism. Methods: A pair of primers were designed and the full-length cDNAs encoding human Class Ⅰ ADH were cloned at one time. Class Ⅰ ADH cDNAs were amplified with RT-PCR from total RNA extracted from fetal human liver and kidney, and cloned into pGEM-T vector. To identify cDNA segments, a pair of differential primers was designed. By using them, a portion of the ADHs which encodes the segment from -4 to 296 was cloned. These cDNA segments then were detected directly when being digested with Kpn Ⅰ and Pst Ⅰ, respectively. Then all the full-length cDNAs were subcloned in the plasmid pTYB11 and expressed in E. Coli. Stably. Alcohol Dehydrogenase activity of catalyzing alcohol were monitored at 340 nm. Results: Here we had successfully the human class Ⅰ ADH cloned and the full-length cDNAs expressed in E.col.I stably. The relative activity of recombinant enzymes metabolizing ethanol was 0.81 ~1.31 U/mg,0.09 ~0.15 U/mg and 0.76~1.11 U/mg, respectively. Conclusions: In the paper, the full-length cDNAs encoding human class Ⅰ AD H were successfully cloned and expressed and the recombinant enzymes showed the activities similar to the ones isolated from liver.%目的:克隆编码人Ⅰ类乙醇脱氢酶基因,并探讨Ⅰ类乙醇脱氢酶(ADH)在乙醇的肝代谢中的作用.方法:从胎儿肝,肾提取的总RNA;经RT-PCR扩增得到cDNA并克隆至pGEM-T载体.cDNA序列用Kpn Ⅰ和Pst Ⅰ酶切鉴定,并检测其在大肠杆菌中表达活性.通过吸光法检测酶的活性.结果:成功克隆了人Ⅰ类乙

  4. Molecular cloning and expression of three polygalacturonase cDNAs from the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three unique cDNAs encoding putative polygalacturonase enzymes were isolated from the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois) (Hemiptera: Miridae). The three nucleotide sequences were dissimilar to one another, but the deduced amino acid sequences were similar to each other and ...

  5. A unique endoglucanase-encoding gene cloned from the phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, H; Jones, R W

    1995-01-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence derived from a Macrophomina phaseolina beta-1,4-endoglucanase-encoding gene revealed 48% identity (over 119 amino acids) with egl1 from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas solanacearum. Its similarity to saprophyte endoglucanases was not significant. Its minimum substrate size, unlike that of any known saprophyte endoglucanase, was cellopentaose. The unique characteristics of M. phaseolina egl1-encoded endoglucanase suggest that it is phytopathogen specific.

  6. A unique endoglucanase-encoding gene cloned from the phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Jones, R W

    1995-05-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence derived from a Macrophomina phaseolina beta-1,4-endoglucanase-encoding gene revealed 48% identity (over 119 amino acids) with egl1 from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas solanacearum. Its similarity to saprophyte endoglucanases was not significant. Its minimum substrate size, unlike that of any known saprophyte endoglucanase, was cellopentaose. The unique characteristics of M. phaseolina egl1-encoded endoglucanase suggest that it is phytopathogen specific.

  7. Cloning and analysis of cDNAs encoding the hypusine-containing protein eIF5A of two lepidopteran insect species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oers, M M; van Marwijk, M; Kwa, M S; Vlak, J M; Thomas, A A

    1999-11-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor eIF5A is essential for cell viability and contains a characteristic post-translational modification of a specific lysine residue into a hypusine. cDNAs with similarity to eIF5A sequences were derived from Spodoptera exigua and S. frugiperda cDNA libraries. The deduced amino acid sequences are identical for both species and predict a protein with a molecular mass of 17.5 kDa. The Drosophila melanogaster eIF5A cDNA sequence was retrieved from the Drosophila EST Project. The predicted protein is 80% similar to Spodoptera eIF5A. A single eIF5A gene copy is present in the S. frugiperda genome, which is transcribed into four different transcripts. Infection of S. frugiperda cells with a baculovirus resulted in a strong decline of all four transcripts already at 12 h after infection. In contrast, the eIF5A protein was fairly stable up to 48 h post infection.

  8. Characterization of the cDNAs encoding three GnRH forms in the pejerrey fish Odontesthes bonariensis (Atheriniformes) and the evolution of GnRH precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilgur, Leonardo G; Ortí, Guillermo; Strobl-Mazzulla, Pablo H; Fernandino, Juan I; Miranda, Leandro A; Somoza, Gustavo M

    2007-06-01

    Most vertebrates express two gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) variants in brain tissue but there is an increasing number of fish species for which a third GnRH form has been detected. We characterized the precursors (cDNAs) of all three forms expressed in the brain of the pejerrey (silverside) fish, Odontesthes bonariensis (Atheriniformes): type I (GnRH-I; 440 bp), type II (GnRH-II; 529 bp), and type III (GnRH-III; 515 bp). The expression of these GnRHs precursors was also observed in peripheral tissues related to reproduction (gonads), visual and chemical senses (eye and olfactory epithelium), and osmoregulation (gill), suggesting that in teleost fish and possibly other vertebrates GnRH mediates directly or indirectly many other functions besides reproduction. We also present a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis including representatives of all chordate GnRH precursors characterized to date that supports the idea of two main paralogous GnRH lineages with different function. A "forebrain lineage" separates evolutionarily from the "midbrain lineage" as a result of an ancient duplication (ca. 600 million years ago). A third, fish-only clade of GnRH genes seems to have originated before the divergence of fish and tetrapods but retained only in fish. Phylogenetic analyses of GnRH precursors (DNA and protein sequences) under different optimality criteria converge on this result. Although alternative scenarios could not be statistically rejected in this study due to the relatively short size of the analyzed molecules, this hypothesis also receives support from chromosomal studies of synteny around the GnRH genes in vertebrates.

  9. Identification through bioinformatics of cDNAs encoding human thymic shared Ag-1/stem cell Ag-2. A new member of the human Ly-6 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, M C; Gorman, D M; Ching, E P; Zlotnik, A

    1996-08-01

    The Ly-6 family of cell surface molecules includes many members that have been characterized in the mouse. Until recently, very few Ly-6 family members had been described in the human. A significant development with important implications for novel gene discovery has been the growth of the public Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) database. Here we report that, through the application of bioinformatics analysis to the dbEST database, we obtained the sequence of human TSA-1/SCA-2, a new member of the human Ly-6 family. In addition, we identified full-length clones encoding this molecule as well as expression data in various tissues. Sequencing of the clones identified this way confirmed the sequence predicted through bioinformatics. This study constitutes an example of the application of bioinformatics to the analysis of the recently expanded databases for the identification of genes of potential importance in the immune system.

  10. Molecular cloning of cDNAs encoding lamp A, a human lysosomal membrane glycoprotein with apparent M sub r approx 120,000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viitala, J.; Carlsson, S.R.; Siebert, P.D.; Fukuda, M. (La Jolla Cancer Research Foundation, CA (USA))

    1988-06-01

    Although several lysosomal membrane glycoproteins have been characterized by using specific antibodies, none of the studies so far elucidated the amino acid sequence of a lysosomal membrane glycoprotein. Here we describe cDNA clones encoding for one of the lysosome-associated membrane proteins with apparent M{sub r} {approx} 120,000, lamp A. The amino acid sequence based on the fully coded cDNA shows that as many as 18 potential N-glycosylation sites can be found in the total of 385 amino acid residues. The results obtained by endoglycosidase F digestion support the conclusion that this glycoprotein contains 18 N-glycans. These N-glycosylation sites are clustered in two domains; one contains 10 and the other contains 8 N-glycosylation sites. These domains are separated by a (proline-serine)-rich region that has a distinct homology to the IgA hinge structure. The first N-glycosylated domain is elongated to a potential leader peptide toward the NH{sub 2}-terminal end. The second N-glycosylated domain, on the other hand, is connected to a putative transmembrane portion consisting of hydrophobic amino acids. This segment, in turn, is elongated to a short cytoplasmic segment composed of 11 amino acid residues at the COOH-terminal end.

  11. Purification of Aminopeptidase N Protein and Differences in cDNAs Encoding APN1 Between Susceptible and Resistant Helicoverpa armigera Strains to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Ge-mei; WANG Gui-rong; XU Guang; WU Kong-ming; GUO Yu-yuan

    2004-01-01

    The brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) in midgut of Helicoverpa armigera were successfully separated, and most of the Aminopeptidase N (APN) activities in BBMV were preserved. The 3-[(3-chlor-amidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-l-propane-sulphonate (CHAPS)can enhance the dissolution of BBMV, and phosphatidylinositol-specific phosopholipase C (PI-PLC) can cleave the APN from midgut membrane. The APN was primarily purified using a Mono-Q column. The results of immunoblotting showed that the 120 and 170 kDa proteins in the BBMV could bind CrylAc, and 120kDa APN was a glycosylphosphalidylinositol(GPI)anchored protein. Two Bt-resistant strains (Bt-P, Bt-M) were obtained after being selected for more than five years in laboratory using Bt insecticides and Bt transgenic cotton incorporated into diet separately. The resistance of Bt-P and Bt-M were 1 083.3and 48.7 times that of susceptible strain. The genes encoding APN1 in midgut of susceptible and resistant H.armigera were cloned by PCR and RACE techniques. The inferred amino acid sequences of APN1 possessed the common character of APN family in insects. In comparison with APN1 in susceptible strain, three nucleotide mutations were observed in the APN1 of Bt-M strain and resulted in two amino acid replace in the putative protein sequences, and eight nucleotide mutations were observed in Bt-P strain and resulted in five amino acid replace.

  12. Molecular characterization and expression analyses of cDNAs encoding the thioredoxin-interacting protein and selenoprotein P genes and histological changes in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in response to silver nanoparticle exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thummabancha, Kubpaphas; Onparn, Nuttaphon; Srisapoome, Prapansak

    2016-02-15

    Herein, Nile tilapia thioredoxin-interacting protein (On-TXNIP) and selenoprotein P (On-SEPP) cDNAs were cloned and characterized. The full-length On-TXNIP cDNA contained 2 arrestin domains, 2 conserved cysteine residues that bind to thioredoxin to inhibit thioredoxin function, and 2 PPXY motifs, which negatively regulate the protein by stimulating binding to E3 ubiquitin ligase. The On-SEPP cDNA contained 17 selenocysteines (Sec) encoded by the TGA codon, which can be recognized as either a stop codon or a Sec codon. The On-SEPP cDNA also carried 2 typical SECIS elements located in the 3'UTR that are important for selenocysteine translation. Evolutionary analyses of both the On-TXNIP and On-SEPP genes revealed that these genes are closely related to the TXNIP and SEPP genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio), with amino acid similarities of 91.8% and 61.9%, respectively. A normal tissue distribution analysis indicated that the On-TXNIP and On-SEPP genes were ubiquitously expressed in all tissues examined, and the highest expression levels of these genes were observed in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and the trunk kidney, respectively. The expression levels of On-TXNIP and On-SEPP transcripts were acutely and chronically analyzed following the injection of fish with 1, 10 or 100mg/kg silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). Significant up-regulation of On-TXNIP and On-SEPP transcripts was observed in the liver, spleen, and head kidney at the early phase of Ag NP exposure (hours 6 through 48). Down-regulation of On-SEPP transcripts was clearly observed in the liver at weeks 1 to 4. Histopathology analysis demonstrated that the fish livers exhibited a dramatic infiltration of Kupffer cells, elevated bi-nucleated cells, expanded sinusoidal blood congestion and severe necrosis in a dose-dependent manner. Based on these findings, coupling of the expression analysis of these two cellular stress response genes and histopathological observation of fish exposed to Ag NPs should be

  13. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding a unique surface (S-) layer of Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok-Woo; Sabet, Mojgan; Um, Heung-Sik; Yang, Jun; Kim, Hyeong C; Zhu, Weidong

    2006-04-12

    A newly emerged periodontopathic pathogen Tannerella forsythia (formerly Bacteroides forsythus), a Gram-negative, filament-shaped, strict anaerobic, non-pigmented oral bacterium, possesses a surface (S-) layer. In our previous studies, the S-layer has been isolated, and shown to mediate hemagglutination, adhesion/invasion of epithelial cell, and murine subcutaneous abscess formation. In the present study, biochemical and molecular genetic characterization of the S-layer are reported. Amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry indicated that the S-layer is composed of two different proteins, termed 200 and 210 kDa proteins. It was also shown that these proteins are glycosylated. The genes encoding the core proteins of these glycoproteins, designated as tfsA and tfsB, have been identified in silico, cloned, and their sequences have been determined. The tfsA (3.5 kb) and tfsB (4.1 kb) genes are located in tandem, and encode for 135 and 152 kDa proteins, respectively. An apparent discrepancy in molecular weights, 135 vs. 200 kDa and 152 vs. 210 kDa, is accounted for carbohydrate residues attached to the core proteins. Amino acid sequence comparison exhibited a 24% similarity between the 200 and 210 kDa proteins. Further sequence analyses showed that TfsA and TfsB possess putative signal peptide sequences with cleavage sites at alanine residues, and transmembrane domains on the C-terminal region. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses confirmed an operon structure of tfsAB, suggesting co-regulation of these genes in producing the S-layer. Putative promoter sequences and transcription termination sequences for this operon have also been identified. Comparison with database indicates that the S-layer of T. forsythia has a unique structure exhibiting no homology to other known S-layers of prokaryotic organisms. The present study shows that the T. forsythia S-layer is very unique, since it appears to be composed of two large glycoproteins, and it does not reveal any homology to

  14. A Novel Staphylococcus Podophage Encodes a Unique Lysin with Unusual Modular Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Katie; Dandu, Vidya Sree; Bari, S. M. Nayeemul; Lackey, Kim; Everett, Gabriel F. K.

    2017-01-01

    and community settings, underscoring the urgent need for new strategies to combat staphylococcal infections. Bacterial viruses (phages) and the enzymes that they use to degrade bacterial cell walls (lysins) show promise as alternative antimicrobials; however, only a limited variety of staphylococcal phages and their lysins have yet been identified. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of a novel staphylococcal phage, Andhra. We show that Andhra encodes two lysins (Andhra_gp10 and Andhra_gp14) that inhibit growth and degrade the cell walls of diverse staphylococci, including S. aureus and S. epidermidis strains. Andhra and its unique lysins add to the arsenal of antimicrobials with potential for therapeutic use. PMID:28357414

  15. Insect Cells Encode a Class II α-Mannosidase with Unique Properties*

    OpenAIRE

    Kawar, Ziad; Karaveg, Khanita; Moremen, Kelley W.; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    Previously, we cloned and characterized an insect (Sf9) cell cDNA encoding a class II α-mannosidase with amino acid sequence and biochemical similarities to mammalian Golgi α-mannosidase II. Since then, it has been demonstrated that other mammalian class II α-mannosidases can participate in N-glycan processing. Thus, the present study was performed to evaluate the catalytic properties of the Sf9 class II α-mannosidase and to more clearly determine its relationship to mammalian Golgi α-mannosi...

  16. The cia Operon of Streptococcus mutans Encodes a Unique Component Required for Calcium-Mediated Autoregulation

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xuesong; Wu, Chenggang; Yarbrough, Daniel; Sim, Lucy; Niu, Guoqing; Merritt, Justin; Shi, Wenyuan; Qi, Fengxia

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a primary pathogen for dental caries in humans. CiaR and CiaH of S. mutans comprise a two-component signal transduction system (TCS) involved in regulating various virulent factors. However, the signal that triggers the CiaRH response remains unknown. In this study, we show that calcium is a signal for regulation of the ciaRH operon, and that a double-glycine-containing small peptide encoded within the ciaRH operon (renamed ciaX) mediates this regulation. CiaX contains...

  17. A strategy for isolation of cDNAs encoding proteins affecting human intestinal epithelial cell growth and differentiation: characterization of a novel gut-specific N-myristoylated annexin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wice, B M; Gordon, J I

    1992-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium is rapidly and perpetually renewed as the descendants of multipotent stem cells located in crypts undergo proliferation, differentiation, and eventual exfoliation during a very well organized migration along the crypt to villus axis. The mechanisms that establish and maintain this balance between proliferation and differentiation are largely unknown. We have utilized HT-29 cells, derived from a human colon adenocarcinoma, as a model system for identifying gene products that may regulate these processes. Proliferating HT-29 cells cultured in the absence of glucose (e.g., using inosine as the carbon source) have some of the characteristics of undifferentiated but committed crypt epithelial cells while postconfluent cells cultured in the absence of glucose resemble terminally differentiated enterocytes or goblet cells. A cDNA library, constructed from exponentially growing HT-29 cells maintained in inosine-containing media, was sequentially screened with a series of probes depleted of sequences encoding housekeeping functions and enriched for intestine-specific sequences that are expressed in proliferating committed, but not differentiated, epithelial cells. Of 100,000 recombinant phage surveyed, one was found whose cDNA was derived from an apparently gut-specific mRNA. It encodes a 316 residue, 35,463-D protein that is a new member of the annexin/lipocortin family. Other family members have been implicated in regulation of cellular growth and in signal transduction pathways. RNA blot and in situ hybridization studies indicate that the gene encoding this new annexin exhibits region-specific expression along both axes of the human gut: (a) highest levels of mRNA are present in the jejunum with marked and progressive reductions occurring distally; (b) its mRNA appears in crypt-associated epithelial cells and increases in concentration as they exit the crypt. Villus-associated epithelial cells continue to transcribe this gene during their

  18. AaeAP1 and AaeAP2: Novel Antimicrobial Peptides from the Venom of the Scorpion, Androctonus aeneas: Structural Characterisation, Molecular Cloning of Biosynthetic Precursor-Encoding cDNAs and Engineering of Analogues with Enhanced Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Du

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main functions of the abundant polypeptide toxins present in scorpion venoms are the debilitation of arthropod prey or defence against predators. These effects are achieved mainly through the blocking of an array of ion channel types within the membranes of excitable cells. However, while these ion channel-blocking toxins are tightly-folded by multiple disulphide bridges between cysteine residues, there are additional groups of peptides in the venoms that are devoid of cysteine residues. These non-disulphide bridged peptides are the subject of much research interest, and among these are peptides that exhibit antimicrobial activity. Here, we describe two novel non-disulphide-bridged antimicrobial peptides that are present in the venom of the North African scorpion, Androctonus aeneas. The cDNAs encoding the biosynthetic precursors of both peptides were cloned from a venom-derived cDNA library using 3'- and 5'-RACE strategies. Both translated precursors contained open-reading frames of 74 amino acid residues, each encoding one copy of a putative novel nonadecapeptide, whose primary structures were FLFSLIPSVIAGLVSAIRN and FLFSLIPSAIAGLVSAIRN, respectively. Both peptides were C-terminally amidated. Synthetic versions of each natural peptide displayed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, but were devoid of antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines. However, synthetic analogues of each peptide, engineered for enhanced cationicity and amphipathicity, exhibited increases in antimicrobial potency and acquired antiproliferative activity against a range of human cancer cell lines. These data clearly illustrate the potential that natural peptide templates provide towards the design of synthetic analogues for therapeutic exploitation.

  19. Water deficit modulates gene expression in growing zones of soybean seedlings. Analysis of differentially expressed cDNAs, a new beta-tubulin gene, and expression of genes encoding cell wall proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E

    1991-10-01

    Transfer of soybean seedlings to low-water-potential vermiculite (psi w = -0.3 MPa) results in a reversible decrease in hypocotyl growth and modulation of several polysomal mRNAs (Plant Physiol 92: 205-214). We report here the isolation of two cDNA clones (pGE16 and pGE95) which correspond to genes whose mRNA levels are increased, and one cDNA clone (pGE23) which corresponds to a gene whose mRNA level is decreased in the hypocotyl zone of cell elongation by water deficit. In well-watered seedlings mRNAs hybridizing to pGE16 and pGE95 are most abundant in mature regions of the seedling, but in water-deficient seedlings mRNA levels are reduced in mature regions and enhanced in elongating regions. RNA corresponding to soybean proline-rich protein 1 (sbPRP1) shows a similar tissue distribution and response to water deficit. In contrast, in well-watered seedlings, the gene corresponding to pGE23 was highly expressed in the hypocotyl and root growing zones. Transfer of seedlings to low-water-potential vermiculite caused a rapid decrease in mRNA hybridizing to pGE23. Sequence analysis revealed that pGE23 has high homology with beta-tubulin. Water deficit also reduced the level of mRNA hybridizing to JCW1, an auxin-modulated gene, although with different kinetics. Furthermore, mRNA encoding actin, glycine-rich proteins (GRPs), and hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) were down-regulated in the hypocotyl zone of elongation of seedlings exposed to water deficit. No effect of water deficit was observed on the expression of chalcone synthase. Decreased expression of beta-tubulin, actin, JCW1, HRGP and GRP and increased expression of sbPRP1, pGE95 and pGE16 in the hypocotyl zone of cell elongation could participate in the reversible growth inhibition observed in water-deficient soybean seedlings.

  20. Cloning of a gene encoding a unique haemolysin from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its potential use as a species-specific gene probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin-Ching, Chuang; Jer-Horng, Su; Ching-Nan, Lin; Ming-Chung, Chang

    2002-07-01

    A gene, designated khe, that encodes a haemolysin of Klebsiella pneumoniae CMC-1 has been cloned and sequenced. When expressed in Escherichia coli, a unique peptide of approximately 20kDa was identified. Nucleotide sequence analysis predicted a single open reading frame (ORF) of 486bp encoding a 162 amino acid polypeptide with an estimated pI of 6.77. No extensive sequence homology could be identified between khe and any reported sequence at either the nucleotide or amino acid level. Furthermore, DNA hybridizations under high stringency conditions failed to show any cross hybridizations to several bacteria including K. oxytoca, K. planticola, K. terrigena and K. ornithinolytica. These data indicate that we have cloned a unique gene, which is highly conserved among tested K. pneumoniae isolates.

  1. Cloning of Full-Length cDNAs Encoding Two Methyl-Binding Domain Proteins and Their Expression Patterns in Wheat Seeds%两个小麦甲基结合蛋白基因cDNA全长克隆及其在种子中的表达特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟凡荣; 李永春; 凌娜; 王潇; 司志飞; 张艳霞; 尹钧

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] Analyzing the sequence characteristics of two wheat MBD genes,TaMBD1 and TaMBD6 and their expression patterns during the seed development and germination,which will provide an insight into epigenctic regulation mechanisms involved in the development and germination of wheat seeds.[Method] RACE technology was used in full-length cDNAs cloning and proper bioinformatics softwares were applied for characterizing the cloned genes and the deduced proteins.Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression patterns of cloned genes.[Result]Two full-length cDNAs of TaMBD1 and TaMBD6 were cloned,which encodes 193 and 187 amino acids,respectively.The amino acid sequence analysis showed that a typical methyl-CpG-binding domain was included in TaMBD1 and TaMBD6,and a CW-type Zinc finger domain was found in TaMBD1,additionally.Structure prediction revealed that both of TaMBD1 and TaMBD6 could fold into an alpha/beta sandwich structure comprising a layer of twisted beta sheet,backed by another layer formed by the aiphal helix and loops at the C terminus.The RT-PCR analysis showed that the TaMBD1 was steadily expressed with a relative higher level during the seed development,while gradually up-and down-regulated in embryo and endosperm tissues,respectively,along with the germination of wheat seeds.The expression of TaMBD6 is vibrated during the seed development and it was highly expressed at the time point of 15 days after pollination.However,the expression of TaMBD6 was not detected during the seed germination.[Conclusion]Two full-length cDNAs of TaMBD1 and TaMBD6 were firstly cloned from wheat and the typical DNA binding domains were found in the deduced proteins.The expression patterns of these two genes indicated that TaMBD1 might play an importan regulating role during the seed development and germination in wheat,while TaMBD6 was only involved in the regulation of seed development.The results provided important information for further studies on

  2. Differential Display of Cotton cDNAs Expressed by Salicylic Acid Induction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李骥; 赵广荣; 刘进元

    2003-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is very important in systemic acquired resistance and hypersensitive response in plant defense, and yet its role is not fully understood.This study seeks to clarify the mechanism of SA induced resistance in cotton.Total RNA was extracted from low-gossypol cultivated cotton seedlings treated with exogenous SA and subjected to fluorescent differential display-PCR (FDD-PCR).Seven cDNA fragments were selected from the total ten differential bands.Comparison with Genbank database shows that all seven cDNA sequences are newly discovered in cotton.However, they share high amino acid identity to some registered cDNAs.Among them, three of the cDNAs could be predicted to encode basic chitinase, penicillin-binding 6 b precursor and ATP-dependent DNA helicase RecG, while the functions of the other four cDNAs are undetermined.Dot blot analysis demonstrates that the expression of five cDNAs in cotton seedlings is induced by SA, while SA induction has a negative effect on the transcript accumulation of the other two cDNAs (E13 and E14).Since SA was previously shown to enhance the resistance to cotton wilt disease, the finding of a basic chitinase gene in cotton expressed by SA induction will provide a new insight into induced disease resistance in cotton.

  3. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts.

  4. Type 3 Fimbriae Encoded on Plasmids Are Expressed from a Unique Promoter without Affecting Host Motility, Facilitating an Exceptional Phenotype That Enhances Conjugal Plasmid Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Riber, Leise; Kot, Witold; Basfeld, Alrun; Burmølle, Mette; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transmission of genetic material to a recipient that is not the progeny of the donor, is fundamental in bacterial evolution. HGT is often mediated by mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which may be in conflict with the chromosomal elements of the genome because they are independent replicons that may petition their own evolutionary strategy. Here we study differences between type 3 fimbriae encoded on wild type plasmids and in chromosomes. Using known and newly characterized plasmids we show that the expression of type 3 fimbriae encoded on plasmids is systematically different, as MrkH, a c-di-GMP dependent transcriptional activator is not needed for strong expression of the fimbriae. MrkH is required for expression of type 3 fimbriae of the Klebsiella pneumoniae chromosome, wherefrom the fimbriae operon (mrkABCDF) of plasmids is believed to have originated. We find that mrkABCDFs of plasmids are highly expressed via a unique promoter that differs from the original Klebsiella promoter resulting in fundamental behavioral consequences. Plasmid associated mrkABCDFs did not influence the swimming behavior of the host, that hereby acquired an exceptional phenotype being able to both actively swim (planktonic behavior) and express biofilm associated fimbriae (sessile behavior). We show that this exceptional phenotype enhances the conjugal transfer of the plasmid. PMID:27627107

  5. Evolution of gnathostome prodynorphin and proenkephalin: characterization of a shark proenkephalin and prodynorphin cDNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowski, Leanne K; Lecaude, Stephanie G; Westring, Christian G; Danielson, Phillip B; Dores, Robert M

    2012-07-01

    Analyses of prodynorphin and proenkephalin cDNAs cloned from the central nervous system of the shark, Heterodontus portusjacksoni, provided additional evidence that these two opioid precursor-coding genes were most likely directly derived from a common ancestral gene. The two cDNAs could be aligned by inserting only seven gaps. The prodynorphin cDNA encodes five opioid sequences which could be aligned to opioid positions B through F in the proenkephalin cDNA. The sequence identity within the opioid positions was 59% at the amino acid level. Shark α-neo-endorphin, dynorphin A, and dynorphin B have amino acid motifs in common with shark met-enkephalin-8, and shark proenkephalin opioid positions E and F, respectively, which have not been observed in other gnathostome prodynorphin and proenkephalin precursor sequences. Shark prodynorphin encodes both kappa (α-neo-endorphin, dynorphin A, and dynorphin B) and delta (met-enkephalin and leu-enkephalin) opioid sequences. Mixed function prodynorphin precursors (encoding both enkephalins and dynorphins) are also found in representatives of the teleost fishes, lungfishes, and amphibians. It appears that only mammals evolved a prodynorphin precursor that exclusively encodes kappa opioid agonists (dynorphins). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Unique cis-Encoded Small Noncoding RNA Is Regulating Legionella pneumophila Hfq Expression in a Life Cycle-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Oliva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium that parasitizes protozoa, but it may also infect humans, thereby causing a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. To cycle between the environment and a eukaryotic host, L. pneumophila is regulating the expression of virulence factors in a life cycle-dependent manner: replicating bacteria do not express virulence factors, whereas transmissive bacteria are highly motile and infective. Here we show that Hfq is an important regulator in this network. Hfq is highly expressed in transmissive bacteria but is expressed at very low levels in replicating bacteria. A L. pneumophila hfq deletion mutant exhibits reduced abilities to infect and multiply in Acanthamoeba castellanii at environmental temperatures. The life cycle-dependent regulation of Hfq expression depends on a unique cis-encoded small RNA named Anti-hfq that is transcribed antisense of the hfq transcript and overlaps its 5′ untranslated region. The Anti-hfq sRNA is highly expressed only in replicating L. pneumophila where it regulates hfq expression through binding to the complementary regions of the hfq transcripts. This results in reduced Hfq protein levels in exponentially growing cells. Both the small noncoding RNA (sRNA and hfq mRNA are bound and stabilized by the Hfq protein, likely leading to the cleavage of the RNA duplex by the endoribonuclease RNase III. In contrast, after the switch to transmissive bacteria, the sRNA is not expressed, allowing now an efficient expression of the hfq gene and consequently Hfq. Our results place Hfq and its newly identified sRNA anti-hfq in the center of the regulatory network governing L. pneumophila differentiation from nonvirulent to virulent bacteria.

  7. A Unique cis-Encoded Small Noncoding RNA Is Regulating Legionella pneumophila Hfq Expression in a Life Cycle-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Giulia; Sahr, Tobias; Rolando, Monica; Knoth, Maike

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium that parasitizes protozoa, but it may also infect humans, thereby causing a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. To cycle between the environment and a eukaryotic host, L. pneumophila is regulating the expression of virulence factors in a life cycle-dependent manner: replicating bacteria do not express virulence factors, whereas transmissive bacteria are highly motile and infective. Here we show that Hfq is an important regulator in this network. Hfq is highly expressed in transmissive bacteria but is expressed at very low levels in replicating bacteria. A L. pneumophila hfq deletion mutant exhibits reduced abilities to infect and multiply in Acanthamoeba castellanii at environmental temperatures. The life cycle-dependent regulation of Hfq expression depends on a unique cis-encoded small RNA named Anti-hfq that is transcribed antisense of the hfq transcript and overlaps its 5′ untranslated region. The Anti-hfq sRNA is highly expressed only in replicating L. pneumophila where it regulates hfq expression through binding to the complementary regions of the hfq transcripts. This results in reduced Hfq protein levels in exponentially growing cells. Both the small noncoding RNA (sRNA) and hfq mRNA are bound and stabilized by the Hfq protein, likely leading to the cleavage of the RNA duplex by the endoribonuclease RNase III. In contrast, after the switch to transmissive bacteria, the sRNA is not expressed, allowing now an efficient expression of the hfq gene and consequently Hfq. Our results place Hfq and its newly identified sRNA anti-hfq in the center of the regulatory network governing L. pneumophila differentiation from nonvirulent to virulent bacteria. PMID:28074027

  8. Type 3 fimbriae encoded on plasmids are expressed from a unique promoter without affecting host motility, facilitating an exceptional phenotype that enhances conjugal plasmid transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Riber, Leise; Kot, Witold Piotr;

    2016-01-01

    of the genome because they are independent replicons that may petition their own evolutionary strategy. Here we study differences between type 3 fimbriae encoded on wild type plasmids and in chromosomes. Using known and newly characterized plasmids we show that the expression of type 3 fimbriae encoded...

  9. Sequence analysis of a Molluscum contagiosum virus DNA region which includes the gene encoding protein kinase 2 and other genes with unique organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gallardo, A; Moratilla, M; Funes, J M; Agromayor, M; Nuñez, A; Varas, A J; Collado, M; Valencia, A; Lopez-Estebaranz, J L; Esteban, M

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a near left-terminal region from the genome of Molluscum contagiosum virus subtype I (MCVI) was determined. This region was contained within three adjacent BamHI fragments, designated L (2.4 kilobases (kb)), M (1.8 kb), and N (1.6 kb). BamHI cleavage of MCVI DNA produced another 1.6-kb fragment (N'), which had been mapped 30-50 kb from the L,M region. The MCVI restriction fragments were cloned and end-sequenced. The N fragment that maps at the L,M region was identified by the polymerase chain reaction, using primers devised from the sequence of each fragment. The results from this analysis led to establish the relative position of these fragments within the MCVI genome. The analysis of 3.6 kb of DNA sequence revealed the presence of ten open reading frames (ORFs). Comparison of the amino acid sequence of these ORFs to the amino acid sequence of vaccinia virus (VAC) proteins revealed that two complete MCVI ORFs, termed N1L and L1L, showed high degree of homology with VAC F9 and F10 genes, respectively. The F10 gene encodes a 52-kDa serine/threonine protein kinase (protein kinase 2), an essential protein involved in virus morphogenesis. The MCVI homologue (L1L) encoded a putative polypeptide of 443 aa, with a calculated molecular mass of 53 kDa, and 60.5/30.2% sequence identity/similarity to VAC F10. The MCV N1L (213 aa, 24 kDa) showed 42.6/40.6% amino acid sequence identity/similarity to VAC F9, a gene of unknown function encoding a 24-kDa protein with a hydrophobic C-terminal domain, which was conserved in MCVI. The genomic arrangement of MCVI N1L and L1L was equivalent to that of the vaccinia and variola virus homologues. However, the ORFs contained within MCVI fragment M (leftward) showed no homology, neither similarity in genetic organization, to the genes encoded by the corresponding regions of vaccinia and variola viruses.

  10. Functional and expression analyses of transcripts based on full-length cDNAs of Sorghum bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Setsuko; Makita, Yuko; Kuriyama-Kondou, Tomoko; Kawashima, Mika; Mochizuki, Yoshiki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Sato, Shusei; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Matsui, Minami

    2015-12-01

    Sorghum bicolor is one of the most important crops for food and bioethanol production. Its small diploid genome and resistance to environmental stress make sorghum an attractive model for studying the functional genomics of the Saccharinae and other C4 grasses. We analyzed the domain-based functional annotation of the cDNAs using the gene ontology (GO) categories for molecular function to characterize all the genes cloned in the full-length cDNA library of sorghum. The sorghum cDNA library successfully captured a wide range of cDNA-encoded proteins with various functions. To characterize the protein function of newly identified cDNAs, a search of their deduced domains and comparative analyses in the Oryza sativa and Zea mays genomes were carried out. Furthermore, genes on the sense strand corresponding to antisense transcripts were classified based on the GO of molecular function. To add more information about these genes, we have analyzed the expression profiles using RNA-Seq of three tissues (spikelet, seed and stem) during the starch-filling phase. We performed functional analysis of tissue-specific genes and expression analysis of genes of starch biosynthesis enzymes. This functional analysis of sorghum full-length cDNAs and the transcriptome information will facilitate further analysis of the Saccharinae and grass families.

  11. Type 3 Fimbriae Encoded on Plasmids Are Expressed from a Unique Promoter without Affecting Host Motility, Facilitating an Exceptional Phenotype That Enhances Conjugal Plasmid Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenlokke; Riber, Leise; Kot, Witold;

    2016-01-01

    on plasmids is systematically different, as MrkH, a c-di-GMP dependent transcriptional activator is not needed for strong expression of the fimbriae. MrkH is required for expression of type 3 fimbriae of the Klebsiella pneumoniae chromosome, wherefrom the fimbriae operon (mrkABCDF) of plasmids is believed...... to have originated. We find that mrkABCDFs of plasmids are highly expressed via a unique promoter that differs from the original Klebsiella promoter resulting in fundamental behavioral consequences. Plasmid associated mrkABCDFs did not influence the swimming behavior of the host, that hereby acquired...

  12. Isolation and characterization of BetaM protein encoded by ATP1B4 - a unique member of the Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunit gene family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestov, Nikolay B. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Zhao, Hao [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Basrur, Venkatesha [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Modyanov, Nikolai N., E-mail: nikolai.modyanov@utoledo.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Structural properties of BetaM and Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunits are sharply different. {yields} BetaM protein is concentrated in nuclear membrane of skeletal myocytes. {yields} BetaM does not associate with a Na,K-ATPase {alpha}-subunit in skeletal muscle. {yields} Polypeptide chain of the native BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases. {yields} BetaM in neonatal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B. -- Abstract: ATP1B4 genes represent a rare instance of the orthologous gene co-option that radically changed functions of encoded BetaM proteins during vertebrate evolution. In lower vertebrates, this protein is a {beta}-subunit of Na,K-ATPase located in the cell membrane. In placental mammals, BetaM completely lost its ancestral role and through acquisition of two extended Glu-rich clusters into the N-terminal domain gained entirely new properties as a muscle-specific protein of the inner nuclear membrane possessing the ability to regulate gene expression. Strict temporal regulation of BetaM expression, which is the highest in late fetal and early postnatal myocytes, indicates that it plays an essential role in perinatal development. Here we report the first structural characterization of the native eutherian BetaM protein. It should be noted that, in contrast to structurally related Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunits, the polypeptide chain of BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases that greatly complicated its isolation. Nevertheless, using a complex of protease inhibitors, a sample of authentic BetaM was isolated from pig neonatal skeletal muscle by a combination of ion-exchange and lectin-affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE. Results of the analysis of the BetaM tryptic digest using MALDI-TOF and ESI-MS/MS mass spectrometry have demonstrated that native BetaM in neonatal skeletal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B and comprised of 351 amino acid residues. Isolated BetaM protein was

  13. Cloning and molecular characterization of cDNAs encoding three Ancylostoma ceylanicum secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwińska, Anna M; Bąska, Piotr; Daniłowicz-Luebert, Emilia; Januszkiewicz, Kamil; Długosz, Ewa; Wędrychowicz, Halina; Cappello, Michael; Wiśniewski, Marcin

    2013-03-01

    Ancylostoma ceylanicum belongs to a group of soil-transmitted helminths, which infect almost 576 mln people worldwide and are a major cause of anaemia and malnutrition. Upon contact with a permissive host, third-stage larvae (L3) residing in the environment become activated larvae (ssL3), a process associated with changes in the profile of gene expression. Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs) are the major proteins secreted during larvae activation and play a crucial role in hookworm adaptation to parasitism. Here we report the cloning using RACE-PCR technique of three novel ASPs from the hookworm A. ceylanicum (Ace-asp-3, Ace-asp-4, and Ace-asp-5) and computational analysis of the protein sequences. All three proteins contain SCP (Sperm Coating Protein) domain characteristic for previously described ASP proteins. Real-time PCR analysis shows significant up-regulation of Ace-asp-3 and Ace-asp-5 expression in adult worms and correlated down-regulation in ssL3 larvae. On the other hand, expression of Ace-asp-4 was increased in ssL3 stages and decreased in adult parasites.

  14. cDNAs encoding for storage proteins in the tubers of taro (Colocasia esculenta Schott).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, M; Nakamura, K; Imai, T; Sato, T

    1993-06-01

    Two major protein groups of taro (Colocasia esculenta) tuber were purified, and their antisera were used for the screening of the cDNA library constructed from poly(A)+ RNA of taro tuber. A cDNA clone obtained by screening with an anti-12 kD protein antiserum had an insert 1058 bp-long, and an open reading frame for a peptide of 268 amino acids. The analyses of the N-terminal amino acid sequence and in vitro translation product suggested that the protein was synthesized as a peptide with a molecular weight of 27 kD, and then processed into two mature peptides with a molecular weight of 12.5 and 13.9 kD and an extra peptide with a molecular weight of 0.6 kD. The cDNA clones obtained using the anti-25 kD protein antiserum were highly homologous with each other. One of them had an insert 958 bp-long and an open reading frame for a peptide with 209 amino acids. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of this clone indicated that the 25 kD proteins were homologous to the trypsin inhibitors of soybean and winged bean as well as sporamins, the storage proteins of sweet potato.

  15. The cloning of Dmc1 cDNAs and a comparative study of its expression in different ploidy cyprinid fishes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Dmc1 (disrupted meiotic cDNA) is a functionally specific gene, which was firstly discovered in yeast and then found to encode a protein required for homologous chromosome synapsis during the process of meiosis. In this investigation, we cloned the partial cDNAs of Dmc1 of diploid red crucian carp, Japanese crucian carp, common carp, triploid crucian carp and allotetraploid hybrids by using a pair of degenerate primers based on the conservative sequence of amino acids of the DMC1 protein in yeast, mouse and human. The full length cDNAs were then obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Our data showed that the full length cDNAs of Dmc1 in the three diploid fishes are all 1375 bp long, while it is 1383 bp long in triploids and 1379 bp long in allotetraploids. And despite of the variation in length, all the cDNAs encode a protein of 342 amino acids. A high homology of 97.3% of the DMC1 protein can be drawn by comparing the amino acid sequences in the three diploids, which is also of 86%, 86% and 95% similarity to human, mouse and zebrafish, respectively. A comparative study of the expression pattern of Dmc1 was carried out by RT-PCR using specific primers against the same se-quences of coding regions in different ploidy cyprinid fishes, from which it was showed that Dmc1 was expressed only in gonads of these five kinds of fishes. The expression pattern of Dmc1 in both ovaries and testes from different ploidy fishes within breeding season was also studied by Real-time PCR, and the results showed that the expression of this gene was greatly different among the three different ploidy fishes, which was the highest of triploid and lowest of allotetraploids. The histological sections data showed matured gonads of both diploid red crucian carp and allotetraploids in breeding season, although the latter demonstrated a higher maturation, and no gonadal maturation could be observed in triploids. In conclusion, we suggest that Dmc1 is specifically expressed in the

  16. The cloning of Dmc1 cDNAs and a comparative study of its expression in different ploidy cyprinid fishes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Dmc1 (disrupted meiotic cDNA) is a functionally specific gene, which was firstly discovered in yeast and then found to encode a protein required for homologous chromosome synapsis during the process of meiosis. In this investigation, we cloned the partial cDNAs of Dmc1 of diploid red crucian carp, Japanese crucian carp, common carp, triploid crucian carp and allotetraploid hybrids by using a pair of degenerate primers based on the conservative sequence of amino acids of the DMC1 protein in yeast, mouse and human. The full length cDNAs were then obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Our data showed that the full length cDNAs of Dmc1 in the three diploid fishes are all 1375 bp long, while it is 1383 bp long in triploids and 1379 bp long in allotetraploids. And despite of the variation in length, all the cDNAs encode a protein of 342 amino acids. A high homology of 97.3% of the DMC1 protein can be drawn by comparing the amino acid sequences in the three diploids, which is also of 86%, 86% and 95% similarity to human, mouse and zebrafish, respectively. A comparative study of the expression pattern of Dmc1 was carried out by RT-PCR using specific primers against the same sequences of coding regions in different ploidy cyprinid fishes, from which it was showed that Dmc1 was expressed only in gonads of these five kinds of fishes. The expression pattern of Dmc1 in both ovaries and testes from different ploidy fishes within breeding season was also studied by Real-time PCR, and the results showed that the expression of this gene was greatly different among the three different ploidy fishes, which was the highest of triploid and lowest of allotetraploids. The histological sections data showed matured gonads of both diploid red crucian carp and allotetraploids in breeding season, although the latter demonstrated a higher maturation, and no gonadal maturation could be observed in triploids. In conclusion, we suggest that Dmc1 is specifically expressed in the

  17. Gene discovery in the hamster: a comparative genomics approach for gene annotation by sequencing of hamster testis cDNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Shafiq A

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete genome annotation will likely be achieved through a combination of computer-based analysis of available genome sequences combined with direct experimental characterization of expressed regions of individual genomes. We have utilized a comparative genomics approach involving the sequencing of randomly selected hamster testis cDNAs to begin to identify genes not previously annotated on the human, mouse, rat and Fugu (pufferfish genomes. Results 735 distinct sequences were analyzed for their relatedness to known sequences in public databases. Eight of these sequences were derived from previously unidentified genes and expression of these genes in testis was confirmed by Northern blotting. The genomic locations of each sequence were mapped in human, mouse, rat and pufferfish, where applicable, and the structure of their cognate genes was derived using computer-based predictions, genomic comparisons and analysis of uncharacterized cDNA sequences from human and macaque. Conclusion The use of a comparative genomics approach resulted in the identification of eight cDNAs that correspond to previously uncharacterized genes in the human genome. The proteins encoded by these genes included a new member of the kinesin superfamily, a SET/MYND-domain protein, and six proteins for which no specific function could be predicted. Each gene was expressed primarily in testis, suggesting that they may play roles in the development and/or function of testicular cells.

  18. Analysis of two novel cDNAs from the Smith-Magenis syndrome region on chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z.Y.; Lee, C.C.; Jiralerspong, S. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome associated with deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. To date, only one gene encoding snRNA U3 has been mapped to this region. Here we report the identification of two novel genes, designated 463 and B9, which have been mapped to the SMS region. A full-length cDNA corresponding to each of these genes has been cloned and sequenced. Deletion analysis has been conducted on somatic cell hybrids retaining the del(17)(p11.2) chromosome from each of 15 SMS patients by PCR of sequence tagged sites for the cDNAs and confirmed by Southern analysis. The gene 463 is deleted in 15/15 patients analyzed to date, whereas the gene B9 is deleted in 10/15 of the patients analyzed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization is used to analyze additional SMS patients for hemizygosity at these loci. A physical map of the region is being constructed to determine the relative location of these cDNAs within 17p11.2. Our studies to date, thus, suggest that although both genes 463 and B9 are located within 17p11.2, gene 463 is more likely to be associated with SMS. Complete and exhaustive definition of the critical interval is required to demonstrate the role and importance of gene 463 in SMS.

  19. CAFTAN: a tool for fast mapping, and quality assessment of cDNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotz-Wagenblatt Agnes

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The German cDNA Consortium has been cloning full length cDNAs and continued with their exploitation in protein localization experiments and cellular assays. However, the efficient use of large cDNA resources requires the development of strategies that are capable of a speedy selection of truly useful cDNAs from biological and experimental noise. To this end we have developed a new high-throughput analysis tool, CAFTAN, which simplifies these efforts and thus fills the gap between large-scale cDNA collections and their systematic annotation and application in functional genomics. Results CAFTAN is built around the mapping of cDNAs to the genome assembly, and the subsequent analysis of their genomic context. It uses sequence features like the presence and type of PolyA signals, inner and flanking repeats, the GC-content, splice site types, etc. All these features are evaluated in individual tests and classify cDNAs according to their sequence quality and likelihood to have been generated from fully processed mRNAs. Additionally, CAFTAN compares the coordinates of mapped cDNAs with the genomic coordinates of reference sets from public available resources (e.g., VEGA, ENSEMBL. This provides detailed information about overlapping exons and the structural classification of cDNAs with respect to the reference set of splice variants. The evaluation of CAFTAN showed that is able to correctly classify more than 85% of 5950 selected "known protein-coding" VEGA cDNAs as high quality multi- or single-exon. It identified as good 80.6 % of the single exon cDNAs and 85 % of the multiple exon cDNAs. The program is written in Perl and in a modular way, allowing the adoption of this strategy to other tasks like EST-annotation, or to extend it by adding new classification rules and new organism databases as they become available. We think that it is a very useful program for the annotation and research of unfinished genomes. Conclusion CAFTAN is

  20. Cloning of genes encoding nonhost hypersensitive response-inducing elicitors from Phytophthora boehmeriae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; ZHANG HaiFeng; ZHANG ZhengGuang; WANG YuanChao; ZHENG XiaoBo

    2007-01-01

    We have devised a high-throughput functional cloning method to isolate cDNAs from Phytophthora boehmeriae of which the products elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco. The cDNAs were cloned into a binary potato virus X (PVX)-based expression vector and transformed into Agrobacterium tumefeciens (Mog101). 4100 colonies were individually toothpick-inoculated onto leaflets of Nicotiana benthamiana. 12 cDNAs were identified whose expression induced formation of a necrotic lesion around the inoculation site. 7 of these clones have different sequences. One of these clones PBC43 encodes specific elicitin. Clone PBC163 encodes a protein highly homologous to Rab; PBC241 encodes a prohibitin protein; PBN62 encodes a Heat Shock Protein 60 (HSP60). The other five cDNAs reveal no homology to known protein and are thus considered novel. These observations suggest that this functional screening method is a versatile strategy to identify cDNAs of pathogens that encode elicitors and other HR-inducing proteins.

  1. Large-scale collection and annotation of full-length enriched cDNAs from a model halophyte, Thellungiella halophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seki Motoaki

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thellungiella halophila (also known as Thellungiella salsuginea is a model halophyte with a small plant size, short life cycle, and small genome. It easily undergoes genetic transformation by the floral dipping method used with its close relative, Arabidopsis thaliana. Thellungiella genes exhibit high sequence identity (approximately 90% at the cDNA level with Arabidopsis genes. Furthermore, Thellungiella not only shows tolerance to extreme salinity stress, but also to chilling, freezing, and ozone stress, supporting the use of Thellungiella as a good genomic resource in studies of abiotic stress tolerance. Results We constructed a full-length enriched Thellungiella (Shan Dong ecotype cDNA library from various tissues and whole plants subjected to environmental stresses, including high salinity, chilling, freezing, and abscisic acid treatment. We randomly selected about 20 000 clones and sequenced them from both ends to obtain a total of 35 171 sequences. CAP3 software was used to assemble the sequences and cluster them into 9569 nonredundant cDNA groups. We named these cDNAs "RTFL" (RIKEN Thellungiella Full-Length cDNAs. Information on functional domains and Gene Ontology (GO terms for the RTFL cDNAs were obtained using InterPro. The 8289 genes assigned to InterPro IDs were classified according to the GO terms using Plant GO Slim. Categorical comparison between the whole Arabidopsis genome and Thellungiella genes showing low identity to Arabidopsis genes revealed that the population of Thellungiella transport genes is approximately 1.5 times the size of the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. This suggests that these genes regulate a unique ion transportation system in Thellungiella. Conclusion As the number of Thellungiella halophila (Thellungiella salsuginea expressed sequence tags (ESTs was 9388 in July 2008, the number of ESTs has increased to approximately four times the original value as a result of this effort. Our

  2. [Molecular cloning and analysis of cDNA sequences encoding serine proteinase and Kunitz type inhibitor in venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanova, A S; Fil'kin, S Iu; Starkov, V G; Utkin, Iu N

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteinases and Kunitz type inhibitors are widely represented in venoms of snakes from different genera. During the study of the venoms from snakes inhabiting Russia we have cloned cDNAs encoding new proteins belonging to these protein families. Thus, a new serine proteinase called nikobin was identified in the venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper. By amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA sequence, nikobin differs from serine proteinases identified in other snake species. Nikobin amino acid sequence contains 15 unique substitutions. This is the first serine proteinase of viper from Vipera genus for which a complete amino acid sequence established. The cDNA encoding Kunitz type inhibitor was also cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence of inhibitor is homologous to those of other proteins from that snakes of Vipera genus. However there are several unusual amino acid substitutions that might result in the change of biological activity of inhibitor.

  3. Selection and fine mapping of chromosome-specific cDNAs: application to human chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, M; Sala, C; Rivella, S; Toniolo, D

    1996-12-01

    We have developed a methodology for identification and fine mapping of chromosome-specific transcripts. Combining digestion of DNA with different restriction enzymes, ligation to "bubble" linkers, and PCR amplification from Alu and "bubble" primers, we have synthesized human chromosome 1-specific sequences from DNA of a somatic cell hybrid, A9Neol. After hybridization to human fetal brain cDNA, we could efficiently capture chromosome 1-specific cDNAs. The cDNAs were sequenced and used as probes in hybridizations to high-density filters containing the arrayed CEPH Mega-YAC library and to the arrayed cDNA library from infant brain made by B. Soares, which has been extensively sequenced. By this approach we have been able to select chromosome 1-specific cDNAs, to map them to chromosome 1 YAC contigs, and to identify and map corresponding longer cDNAs and ESTs.

  4. Cloning Full-Length cDNAs from Vascular Tissues and Cells by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) and RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen

    1999-01-01

    The isolation of full-length cDNAs remains a frequent task undertaken in many laboratories. A full-length cDNA is often desirable for one of the following purposes: 1) to complete the sequence of a partial cDNA cloned by library screenings or the yeast one- or two-hybrid system; 2) to derive the cDNA sequence encoding a protein, based on peptide sequences; 3) to obtain the sequence of a reported cDNA for functional analysis or expression studies; and 4) to define exon/intron boundaries of a cloned gene or determine transcription start site(s) of a promoter.

  5. Transcript annotation in FANTOM3: mouse gene catalog based on physical cDNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Maeda

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The international FANTOM consortium aims to produce a comprehensive picture of the mammalian transcriptome, based upon an extensive cDNA collection and functional annotation of full-length enriched cDNAs. The previous dataset, FANTOM2, comprised 60,770 full-length enriched cDNAs. Functional annotation revealed that this cDNA dataset contained only about half of the estimated number of mouse protein-coding genes, indicating that a number of cDNAs still remained to be collected and identified. To pursue the complete gene catalog that covers all predicted mouse genes, cloning and sequencing of full-length enriched cDNAs has been continued since FANTOM2. In FANTOM3, 42,031 newly isolated cDNAs were subjected to functional annotation, and the annotation of 4,347 FANTOM2 cDNAs was updated. To accomplish accurate functional annotation, we improved our automated annotation pipeline by introducing new coding sequence prediction programs and developed a Web-based annotation interface for simplifying the annotation procedures to reduce manual annotation errors. Automated coding sequence and function prediction was followed with manual curation and review by expert curators. A total of 102,801 full-length enriched mouse cDNAs were annotated. Out of 102,801 transcripts, 56,722 were functionally annotated as protein coding (including partial or truncated transcripts, providing to our knowledge the greatest current coverage of the mouse proteome by full-length cDNAs. The total number of distinct non-protein-coding transcripts increased to 34,030. The FANTOM3 annotation system, consisting of automated computational prediction, manual curation, and final expert curation, facilitated the comprehensive characterization of the mouse transcriptome, and could be applied to the transcriptomes of other species.

  6. Molecular cloning of cDNAs and structural model analysis of two gonadotropin beta-subunits of snakehead fish (Channa maculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Shen, San-Tai; Yu, John Yuh-Lin

    2005-09-15

    The cDNAs encoding beta-subunits of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) have been cloned from the pituitary of snakehead fish, Channa maculata, and the three-dimensional structural models of the encoded FSH and LH were investigated. The cloned cDNAs, including 5'-untranslated region (UTR), open-reading frame, and 3'-UTR followed by a poly(A) tail, were obtained by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and rapid amplification of cDNA end methods. The open-reading frames of FSH-beta cDNA encodes a 120-amino acid protein with a signal peptide of 18 amino acids and a mature protein of 102 amino acids; while LH-beta cDNA encodes a 140-amino acid protein with a signal peptide of 33 amino acids and a mature protein of 115 amino acids. The amino acid sequence identities of snakehead fish FSH-beta and LH-beta in comparison with other fish are 27.8-81.9% and 45.2-88.8%, respectively; while in comparison with tetrapods are 26.2-28.9% and 37.5-51.2%, respectively. Both FSH-beta and LH-beta of snakehead fish resemble most to those of Perciformes, implying their closer phylogenetic relationship. All 12 cysteine residues are conserved in snakehead fish LH-beta; while 11 cysteine residues are conserved in its FSH-beta. The third cysteine is absent in snakehead fish FSH-beta; instead, a positionally shifted cysteine residue is present at the N-terminus, as found in some phylogenetic related fish. The structure models of snakehead fish FSH and LH, constructed by using the crystal structures of human FSH and human chorionic gonadotropin as respective template, showed that the positionally shifted N-terminal cysteine residue of snakehead fish FSH-beta likely can substitute the third cysteine to form a disulfide bond with the 12th cysteine.

  7. Cloning, characterization, and mRNA expression analysis of novel human fetal cochlear cDNAs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijendijk, M.W.J.; Pol, T.J.R. van de; Duijnhoven, G.C.F. van; Hollander, A.I. den; Caat, J. ten; Limpt, V. van; Brunner, H.G.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2003-01-01

    To identify novel genes that are expressed specifically or preferentially in the cochlea, we constructed a cDNA library enriched for human cochlear cDNAs using a suppression subtractive hybridization technique. We analyzed 2640 clones by sequencing and BLAST similarity searches. One hundred and fift

  8. Isolation and annotation of 10828 putative full length cDNAs from indica rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Kabin; ZHANG; Jianwei; XIANG; Yong; FENG; Qi; HAN; Bin

    2005-01-01

    We reported the isolation and identification of 10828 putative full-length cDNAs (FL-cDNA) from an indica rice cultivar, Minghui 63, with the long-term goal to isolate all full-length cDNAs from indica genome. Comparison with the databases showed that 780 of them are new rice cDNAs with no match in japonica cDNA database. Totally, 9078 of the FL-cDNAs contained predicted ORFs matching with japonica FL-cDNAs and 6543 could find homologous proteins with complete ORFs. 53% of the matched FL-cDNAs isolated in this study had longer 5′UTR than japonica FL-cDNAs. In silico mapping showed that 9776 (90.28%) of the FL-cDNAs had matched genomic sequences in the japonica genome and 10046 (92.78%) had matched genomic sequences in the indica genome. The average nucleotide sequence identity between the two subspecies is 99.2%. A majority of FL-cDNAs (90%) could be classified with GO (gene ontology) terms based on homology proteins. More than 60% of the new cDNAs isolated in this study had no homology to the known proteins. This set of FL-cDNAs should be useful for functional genomics and proteomics studies.

  9. cDNA2Genome: A tool for mapping and annotating cDNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhai Sandor

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last years several high-throughput cDNA sequencing projects have been funded worldwide with the aim of identifying and characterizing the structure of complete novel human transcripts. However some of these cDNAs are error prone due to frameshifts and stop codon errors caused by low sequence quality, or to cloning of truncated inserts, among other reasons. Therefore, accurate CDS prediction from these sequences first require the identification of potentially problematic cDNAs in order to speed up the posterior annotation process. Results cDNA2Genome is an application for the automatic high-throughput mapping and characterization of cDNAs. It utilizes current annotation data and the most up to date databases, especially in the case of ESTs and mRNAs in conjunction with a vast number of approaches to gene prediction in order to perform a comprehensive assessment of the cDNA exon-intron structure. The final result of cDNA2Genome is an XML file containing all relevant information obtained in the process. This XML output can easily be used for further analysis such us program pipelines, or the integration of results into databases. The web interface to cDNA2Genome also presents this data in HTML, where the annotation is additionally shown in a graphical form. cDNA2Genome has been implemented under the W3H task framework which allows the combination of bioinformatics tools in tailor-made analysis task flows as well as the sequential or parallel computation of many sequences for large-scale analysis. Conclusions cDNA2Genome represents a new versatile and easily extensible approach to the automated mapping and annotation of human cDNAs. The underlying approach allows sequential or parallel computation of sequences for high-throughput analysis of cDNAs.

  10. Cloning of Encoding Sequences for Chemokine Receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 from a Chinese Lymphocyte cDNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ It has been known recently that cofactors, which belong to the family of seven-transmembrane GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors, are necessary for the entry of HIV-1 into CD4+cells. The CXC chemokine receptor 4(CXCR4) was first found to act as the coreceptor for the infection of T cell line-tropic HIV-1 strains to T helper cells in 1996. Keeping in step with this find the CC chemokine receptor 5(CCR5)was also identified as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic virus. Both of the coreceptors could be used in basic research and application design for AIDS.

  11. Characterization of Three Homoeologous cDNAs Encoding Chloroplast-targeted Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase in Common Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Takenouchi; Haruka Nakajima; Kengo Kanamaru; Shigeo Takumi

    2011-01-01

    In the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway of higher plants,5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is metabolized by ALA dehydratase (ALAD).Here,we isolated ALAD1 cDNA from common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and its diploid progenitors,and produced transgenic tobacco plants expressing the wheat ALAD1 gene.The ALAD1 genes were highly conserved among wheat relatives,and three homoeologous loci of wheat ALAD1 (TaALAD1) were equally transcribed in common wheat.A transient expression assay of a TaALAD1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion protein suggested that TaALAD1 is localized in chloroplasts.Overexpression of TaALAD1 in transgenic tobacco resulted in a significant increase in ALAD activity in leaves.Moreover,the transgenic tobacco showed vigorous growth and increased survival rate on medium containing ALA at herbicidal concentrations.These results indicate that wheat ALAD1 has catalytic activity in metabolizing ALA in plastids,and that ectopic expression of TaALAD1 in transgenic plants increases their tolerance to ALA application at high concentrations.

  12. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of two juvenile hormone esterase-like carboxylesterase cDNAs in Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Zhao, Muzi; Deng, Yanfei; Yang, Yuanjie; Li, Xuguang; Lu, Quanping; Ge, Jiachun; Pan, Jianlin; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2017-03-01

    Precise regulation of methyl farnesoate (MF) titer is of prime importance throughout the crustacean life-cycle. Although the synthetic pathway of MF is well-documented, little is known about its degradation and recycling in crustaceans. Juvenile hormone esterase-like (JHE-like) carboxylesterase (CXE) is a key enzyme in MF degradation, thus playing a significant role in regulating the MF titer. We identified and characterized two cDNAs, Es-CXE1 and Es-CXE2, encoding JHE-like CXEs in Chinese mitten crab. Full-length cDNAs of Es-CXE1 and Es-CXE2 encode proteins composed of 584 and 597 amino acids, respectively, both of which contain a typical carboxylesterase domain. Alignment and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Es-CXEs are highly similar to those of other crustaceans. To further validate their functions, we evaluated the mRNA expression patterns of the Es-CXEs in various tissues and in different physiological conditions. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that the two Es-CXEs were predominantly expressed in the hepatopancreas and ovaries, which are the major tissues for MF metabolism. Es-CXE2 expression levels in the hepatopancreas and ovaries were about 100 and 25-fold higher, than the respective Es-CXE1 expressions. During ovarian rapid development stage, the global expressions of Es-CXEs were up-regulated in the hepatopancreas and down-regulated in the ovaries. After eyestalk ablation (ESA), the mRNA expressions of the two Es-CXEs were up-regulated in the hepatopancreas, further indicating their potential in degrading MF. Taken together, our results suggest that Es-CXEs, the key component of the juvenile hormone degradation pathway, may play vital roles in the development and reproduction of the Chinese mitten crab.

  13. Isolation of Light-Enhanced cDNAs of Cercospora kikuchii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenshaft, M; Upchurch, R G

    1991-09-01

    Cercospora kikuchii is a fungal pathogen of soybeans which produces a photosensitizing phytotoxic polyketide metabolite, cercosporin. Cercosporin synthesis in culture is modulated by several environmental factors. In addition to the light requirement for toxin action, cercosporin biosynthesis is also highly light regulated. As a first step towards identifying genes involved in cercosporin regulation and biosynthesis, we have used subtractive hybridization to isolate light-enhanced cDNA clones. Six distinct cDNA clones representing genes from a wild-type C. kikuchii strain for which transcript accumulation is positively regulated by light were isolated. To assess the relationship of these light-enhanced cDNAs to cercosporin biosynthesis, we compared corresponding steady-state RNA levels in the wild type and in three mutant strains altered in toxin biosynthesis. Two of the mutant C. kikuchii strains which fail to accumulate cercosporin in response to light also fail to exhibit light-enhanced accumulation of transcripts corresponding to all six light-enhanced cDNAs. Cercosporin accumulation in the third mutant strain, S2, is regulated by medium composition as well as light. S2 fails to accumulate cercosporin in complete medium, a medium which allows significant cercosporin accumulation by the wild-type strain. When cultured in complete medium, this mutant strain also fails to show the wild-type, light-enhanced accumulation of transcripts corresponding to five of the six light-enhanced cDNAs. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that transcript accumulation for two of the six light-enhanced cDNAs strongly paralleled cercosporin accumulation in light-grown wild-type culture.

  14. cDNA2Genome: A tool for mapping and annotating cDNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Suhai Sandor; Glatting Karl-Heinz; del Val Coral

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background In the last years several high-throughput cDNA sequencing projects have been funded worldwide with the aim of identifying and characterizing the structure of complete novel human transcripts. However some of these cDNAs are error prone due to frameshifts and stop codon errors caused by low sequence quality, or to cloning of truncated inserts, among other reasons. Therefore, accurate CDS prediction from these sequences first require the identification of potentially problem...

  15. Identification of cDNAs by direct hybridization using cosmid probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennon, G.G.; Lieuallen, K.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this effort is to quickly obtain as many chromosome-specific cDNAs with as much map and sequence detail as possible. Many techniques have been proposed to isolate and identify genes within defined genomic regions; the technique discussed here is direct hybridization of a relatively complex genomic probe, an entire cosmid clone, to cDNA libraries. This method continues to be a straightforward technique with a fair number of successes.

  16. Cloning of cDNA and genomic DNA encoding human type XVIII collagen and localization of the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen gene to mouse chromosome 10 and human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S.P.; Warman, M.L.; Timmons, S.; Olsen, B.R.; Knoll, J.H.M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Seldin, M.F. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Cheng, Sou-De (Children' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Types XV and XVIII collagen belong to a unique and novel subclass of the collagen superfamily for which the authors have proposed the name the MULTIPLEXIN family. Members of this class contain polypeptides with multiple triple-helical domains separated and flanked by non-triple-helical regions. In this paper, they report the isolation of human cDNAs and genomic DNAs encoding the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen chain. Utilizing a genomic clone as probe, they have mapped the COL18A1 gene to chromosome 21q22.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In addition, using an interspecific backcross panel, they have shown that the murine Col18a1 locus is on chromosome 10, close to the loci for Col6a1 and Col6a2. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Differential screening and characterization analysis of the egg envelope glycoprotein ZP3 cDNAs between gynogenetic and gonochoristic crucian carp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Gynogenetic silver crucian carp,Carassius auratus gibelio,is an intriguing model system.In the present work,a systemic study has been initiated by introducing suppression subtractive hybridization technique into this model system to identify the differentially expressed genes in oocytes between gynogenetic silver crucian carp and its closely related gonochoristic color crucian carp.Five differential cDNA fragments were identified from the preliminary screening,and two of them are ZP3 homologues.Moreover,the full length ZP3 cDNAs were cloned from their oocyte cDNA libraries.The length of ZP3 cDNAs were 1378 bp for gyno-carp and 1367 bp for gono-carp,and they can be translated into proteins with 435 amino acids.Obvious differences are not only in the composition of amino acids,but also in the number of potential O-linked oligosaccharide sites.In addition,gyno-carp ZP3 amino acid sequence has an unexpected higher identity value with common carp (83.5%) than that with the closely related gono-carp (74.7%).The unique homology may be originated from the ancient hybridization.Northern blot analysis confirmed that expression of the ZP3 gene occurred exclusively in the oocytes.Because O-linked oligosaccharides on ZP3 have been demonstrated to play very important roles in fertilization,it is suggested that the extra O-linked glycosylation sites may be related to the unique sperm-egg recognition mechanism in gynogenesis.

  18. Cynomolgus monkey testicular cDNAs for discovery of novel human genes in the human genome sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terao Keiji

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to contribute to the establishment of a complete map of transcribed regions of the human genome, we constructed a testicular cDNA library for the cynomolgus monkey, and attempted to find novel transcripts for identification of their human homologues. Result The full-insert sequences of 512 cDNA clones were determined. Ultimately we found 302 non-redundant cDNAs carrying open reading frames of 300 bp-length or longer. Among them, 89 cDNAs were found not to be annotated previously in the Ensembl human database. After searching against the Ensembl mouse database, we also found 69 putative coding sequences have no homologous cDNAs in the annotated human and mouse genome sequences in Ensembl. We subsequently designed a DNA microarray including 396 non-redundant cDNAs (with and without open reading frames to examine the expression of the full-sequenced genes. With the testicular probe and a mixture of probes of 10 other tissues, 316 of 332 effective spots showed intense hybridized signals and 75 cDNAs were shown to be expressed very highly in the cynomolgus monkey testis, but not ubiquitously. Conclusions In this report, we determined 302 full-insert sequences of cynomolgus monkey cDNAs with enough length of open reading frames to discover novel transcripts as human homologues. Among 302 cDNA sequences, human homologues of 89 cDNAs have not been predicted in the annotated human genome sequence in the Ensembl. Additionally, we identified 75 dominantly expressed genes in testis among the full-sequenced clones by using a DNA microarray. Our cDNA clones and analytical results will be valuable resources for future functional genomic studies.

  19. A Comprehensive Software Suite for the Analysis of cDNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuharu Arakawa; Haruo Suzuki; Kosuke Fujishima; Kenji Fujimoto; Sho Ueda; Motomu Matsui; Masaru Tomita

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a comprehensive software suite for bioinformatics research of cDNAs; it is aimed at rapid characterization of the features of genes and the proteins they code. Methods implemented include the detection of translation initiation and termination signals, statistical analysis of codon usage, comparative study of amino acid composition, comparative modeling of the structures of product proteins, prediction of alternative splice forms, and metabolic pathway reconstruction.The software package is freely available under the GNU General Public License at http://www.g-language.org/data/cdna/.

  20. Expression profiles of defence related cDNAs in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) inoculated with mycorrhizae and Trichoderma harzianum Rifai T32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yung-Chie; Wong, Mui-Yun; Ho, Chai-Ling

    2015-11-01

    Basal stem rot is one of the major diseases of oil palm (Elaies guineensis Jacq.) caused by pathogenic Ganoderma species. Trichoderma and mycorrhizae were proposed to be able to reduce the disease severity. However, their roles in improving oil palm defence system by possibly inducing defence-related genes in the host are not well characterized. To better understand that, transcript profiles of eleven putative defence-related cDNAs in the roots of oil palm inoculated with Trichoderma harzianum T32 and mycorrhizae at different time points were studied. Transcripts encoding putative Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (EgBBI2) and defensin (EgDFS) increased more than 2 fold in mycorrhizae-treated roots at 6 weeks post inoculation (wpi) compared to those in controls. Transcripts encoding putative dehydrin (EgDHN), glycine-rich RNA binding protein (EgGRRBP), isoflavone reductase (EgIFR), type 2 ribosome inactivating protein (EgT2RIP), and EgDFS increased in the oil palm roots treated with T. harzianum at 6 and/or 12 wpi compared to those in the controls. Some of these genes were also expressed in oil palm roots treated with Ganoderma boninense. This study provides an insight of some defence-related genes induced by Trichoderma and mycorrhizae, and their roles as potential agents to boost the plant defence system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Four rice seed cDNA clones belonging to the alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor gene family encode potential rice allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, A M; Fukuhara, E; Nakase, M; Adachi, T; Aoki, N; Nakamura, R; Matsuda, T

    1995-07-01

    Four rice seed proteins encoded by cDNAs belonging to the alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor gene family were overexpressed as TrpE-fusion proteins in E. coli. The expressed rice proteins were detected by SDS-PAGE as major proteins in bacterial cell lysates. Western blot analyses showed that all the recombinant proteins were immunologically reactive to rabbit polyclonal antibodies and to a mouse monoclonal antibody (25B9) specific for a previously isolated rice allergen of 16 kDa. Some truncated proteins from deletion mutants of the cDNAs retained their reactivity to the specific antibodies. These results suggest that the cDNAs encode potential rice allergens and that some epitopes of the recombinant proteins are still immunoreactive when they are expressed as their fragments.

  2. Sequencing, mapping, and analysis of 27,455 maize full-length cDNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Soderlund

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Full-length cDNA (FLcDNA sequencing establishes the precise primary structure of individual gene transcripts. From two libraries representing 27 B73 tissues and abiotic stress treatments, 27,455 high-quality FLcDNAs were sequenced. The average transcript length was 1.44 kb including 218 bases and 321 bases of 5' and 3' UTR, respectively, with 8.6% of the FLcDNAs encoding predicted proteins of fewer than 100 amino acids. Approximately 94% of the FLcDNAs were stringently mapped to the maize genome. Although nearly two-thirds of this genome is composed of transposable elements (TEs, only 5.6% of the FLcDNAs contained TE sequences in coding or UTR regions. Approximately 7.2% of the FLcDNAs are putative transcription factors, suggesting that rare transcripts are well-enriched in our FLcDNA set. Protein similarity searching identified 1,737 maize transcripts not present in rice, sorghum, Arabidopsis, or poplar annotated genes. A strict FLcDNA assembly generated 24,467 non-redundant sequences, of which 88% have non-maize protein matches. The FLcDNAs were also assembled with 41,759 FLcDNAs in GenBank from other projects, where semi-strict parameters were used to identify 13,368 potentially unique non-redundant sequences from this project. The libraries, ESTs, and FLcDNA sequences produced from this project are publicly available. The annotated EST and FLcDNA assemblies are available through the maize FLcDNA web resource (www.maizecdna.org.

  3. Three synonymous genes encode calmodulin in a reptile, the Japanese tortoise, Clemmys japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouji Shimoda

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Three distinct calmodulin (CaM-encoding cDNAs were isolated from a reptile, the Japanese tortoise (Clemmys japonica, based on degenerative primer PCR. Because of synonymous codon usages, the deduced amino acid (aa sequences were exactly the same in all three genes and identical to the aa sequence of vertebrate CaM. The three cDNAs, referred to as CaM-A, -B, and -C, seemed to belong to the same type as CaMI, CaMII, and CaMIII, respectively, based on their sequence identity with those of the mammalian cDNAs and the glutamate codon biases. Northern blot analysis detected CaM-A and -B as bands corresponding to 1.8 kb, with the most abundant levels in the brain and testis, while CaM-C was detected most abundantly in the brain as bands of 1.4 and 2.0 kb. Our results indicate that, in the tortoise, CaM protein is encoded by at least three non-allelic genes, and that the ‘multigene-one protein' principle of CaM synthesis is applicable to all classes of vertebrates, from fishes to mammals.

  4. Human Chromosome 21: Mapping of the chromosomes and cloning of cDNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonarakis, S.E.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the research funded by DOE grant DE-FG02-89ER60857 from 6/15/89 to 8/31/91 was to contribute to the physical mapping of human chromosome 21 (HC21) by cloning large fragments of DNA into Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs) and identify YACs that map on HC21. A total of 54 sequence tagged sites (STS) have been developed and mapped in our laboratory to HC21 and can be used as initial reference points for YAC identification and construction of overlapping clones. A small YAC library was constructed which is HC21 specific. DNA from somatic cell hybrid WAV17 or from flow-sorted HC21 was partially digested with EcoRI, ligated into vectors PJS97, PJS98, and YACs have been obtained with average size insert of more than 300 kb. This library has been deposited in D. Patterson's lab for the Joint YAC screening effort. Additional YAC libraries from ICI Pharmaceuticals or from Los Alamos National Laboratories have been screened with several STS and positive YACs have been identified. Work in progress includes screening of YAC libraries in order to construct overlapping clones, characterization of the cloning ends of YACs, characterization of additional STS and cloning of HC21 specific cDNAs. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Inconsistencies of genome annotations in apicomplexan parasites revealed by 5'-end-one-pass and full-length sequences of oligo-capped cDNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugano Sumio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apicomplexan parasites are causative agents of various diseases including malaria and have been targets of extensive genomic sequencing. We generated 5'-EST collections for six apicomplexa parasites using our full-length oligo-capping cDNA library method. To improve upon the current genome annotations, as well as to validate the importance for physical cDNA clone resources, we generated a large-scale collection of full-length cDNAs for several apicomplexa parasites. Results In this study, we used a total of 61,056 5'-end-single-pass cDNA sequences from Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. yoelii, P. berghei, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Toxoplasma gondii. We compared these partially sequenced cDNA sequences with the currently annotated gene models and observed significant inconsistencies between the two datasets. In particular, we found that on average 14% of the exons in the current gene models were not supported by any cDNA evidence, and that 16% of the current gene models may contain at least one mis-annotation and should be re-evaluated. We also identified a large number of transcripts that had been previously unidentified. For 732 cDNAs in T. gondii, the entire sequences were determined in order to evaluate the annotated gene models at the complete full-length transcript level. We found that 41% of the T. gondii gene models contained at least one inconsistency. We also identified and confirmed by RT-PCR 140 previously unidentified transcripts found in the intergenic regions of the current gene annotations. We show that the majority of these discrepancies are due to questionable predictions of one or two extra exons in the upstream or downstream regions of the genes. Conclusion Our data indicates that the current gene models are likely to still be incomplete and have much room for improvement. Our unique full-length cDNA information is especially useful for further refinement of the annotations for the genomes of

  6. Isolation and characterization of human cerebellum cDNAs containing polymorphic CAG trinucleotide repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, S.; Onodera, O.; Tanaka, H. [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It has been discovered that neurologic diseases such as X linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, Huntington`s disease, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) are caused by unstable expansions of CAG repeats, which shed a light on a new mechanism of human hereditary diseases. The genetic anticipation, a common genetic feature in these diseases, can be explained by the trinucleotide repeat expansions, and an inverse correlation between the ages of onset and the numbers of trinucleotide repeats is demonstrated in these diseases. Furthermore, there have been diseases such as spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) and Machado-Joseph disease showing similar genetic anticipation, which suggests that their causative mutations are unstable expansions of trinucleotide repeats. To identify candidate genes for neurodegenerative diseases which are expressed in human cerebellum and contain CAG repeats, we screened a human cerebellum cDNA library with an oligonucleotide (CAG){sub 10}, labelled with [{gamma}{sup 32}P]ATP. Out of 78 clones we have isolated, 43 clones were partially sequenced and 31 clones were shown to contain CAG or CTG tinucleotide repeats. From homology searches, 12 of the 59 clones were identified to contain known sequences including human MAR/SAR DNA binding protein, human glial fibrillary acidic protein, human myelin transcription factor 1, human neuronal growth protein 43 and human myocyte-specific enhancer 2. From 6 clones out of the 43 novel genes, we were able to develop primer pairs flanking CAG repeats and determined chromosomal localizations with human and rodent hybrid mapping panels. These CAG repeats were shown to be polymorphic and mapped to 1, 15, 17 and 18. These novel cDNAs will be useful as candidate genes for hereditary neurologic diseases showing genetic anticipation.

  7. Glycosylation analysis and protein structure determination of murine fetal antigen 1 (mFA1)--the circulating gene product of the delta-like protein (dlk), preadipocyte factor 1 (Pref-1) and stromal-cell-derived protein 1 (SCP-1) cDNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, T N; Bachmann, E; Teisner, B

    1997-01-01

    By means of sequence analysis, murine fetal antigen 1 (mFA1) isolated from Mus musculus amniotic fluid was shown to be the circulating protein of the delta-like protein, stromal-cell-derived protein 1 (SCP-1) and preadipocyte factor 1 (Pref-1) gene products. The protein contains 36 cysteine resid......, Ser193 and fucose at Thr201) was tentatively ascertained by combining Edman degradation and MALDI-MS. The results presented shows mFA1 to be the circulating heterogeneous cleavage products of the membrane-bound protein encoded by the murine cDNAs dlk, pref-1 and SCP-1....

  8. Screening cDNA Libraries Using Partial Probes to Isolate Full-Length cDNAs from Vascular Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csortos, C; Lazar, V; Garcia, J G

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of screening cDNA libraries is to isolate a particular cDNA clone encoding a mRNA and by implication, a protein, of interest. The screening is based on identification of the desired clone among a large number of recombinant clones within the library selected (1,2). As an example of both the utility and power of library screening, we will relate our own library screening efforts utilized to isolate the nonmuscle high molecular weight myosin light chain kinase isoform from a human umbilical vein endothelial cell cDNA library (3). This unique nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase isoform phosphorylates myosin light chains, thereby playing an essential role in agonist-mediated endothelial cell contraction, paracellular gap formation and increased vascular permeability. We are hopeful that this step-by-step approach will help the reader to understand the discussed methods.

  9. Identification and initial characterization of the 3' end of gene transcripts encoding putative members of the pheromone receptor subfamily in Lepidoptera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen F. Garczynski; Kevin W. Wanner; Thomas R. Unruh

    2012-01-01

    Semiochemicals,including pheromones and kairomones,used in pest management programs reduce the need for chemical insecticides,and understanding their interactions with their membrane receptors may help make them more effective in the field.Identification of odorant receptors in the Lepidoptera has mainly been achieved using bioinformatics to search DNA sequences generated by genome or expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing projects.This study reports a rapid method to identify members of the pheromone receptor subfamily in Lepidoptera.Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed against a conserved amino acid sequence in the carboxyl terminus of known lepidopteran pheromone receptors,and the primers were used in a 3' rapid amplification of complementary DNA (cDNA) ends procedure.Polymerase chain reaction products generated from seven different lepidopteran species were TA cloned and sequenced.The eDNA sequences of 25 transcripts were determined to encode potential members of the pheromone receptor subfamily.These cDNAs ranged from 238 to 642 bp and encoded 49-54 amino acids of the carboxyl terminus.Analysis of the 3' untranslated region reveals that most of the transcripts contain multiple polyadenylation signal sequences,and in the case ofManduca sexta,an alternate polyadenylation signal appears to be used in transcript processing.The 3' untranslated region was also useful in determining unique receptors encoded by transcripts having highly similar nucleotide and amino acid sequences.Overall,this technique provides a complementary method of pheromone receptor identification in EST sequencing projects,or can be used as a stand-alone method in conjunction with 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends procedures.

  10. Unique Path Partitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessenrodt, Christine; Olsson, Jørn Børling; Sellers, James A.

    2013-01-01

    We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions.......We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions....

  11. Genes encoding Pir51,Beclin 1,RbAp48 and aldolase b are up or down-regulated in human primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Song; Shuang-Luo Xia; Cheng Liao; Yi-Liang Li; Yi-Fei Wang; Tsai-Ping Li; Mu-Jun Zhao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To reveal new tumor markers and target genes from differentially expressed genes of primary tumor samples using cDNA microarray.METHODS: The 33p labeled cDNAs were synthesized by reverse transcription of message RNA from the liver cancerous tissue and adjacent non-cancerous liver tissue from the same patient and used to hybridize to LifeGrid 1.0cDNA microarray blot containing 8400 known and unique human cDNA gene targets, and an expression profile of genes was produced in one paired human liver tumor tissue.After a global analysis of gene expression of 8400 genes,we selected some genes to confirm the differential expression using Northern blot and RT-PCR.RESULTS: Parallel analysis of the hybridized signals enabled us to get an expression profile of genes in which about 500genes were differentially expressed in the paired liver tumor tissues. We identified 4 genes, the expression of three(Beclin 1, RbAp48 and Pir51) were increased and one (aldolase b)was decreased in liver tumor tissues. In addition, the expression of these genes in 6 hepatoma cell lines was also showed by RT-PCR analysis.CONCLUSION: cDNA microarray permits a high throughput identification of changes in gene expression. The genes encoding Beclin 1, RbAp48, Pir51 and aldolase b are first reported that may be related with hepatocarcinoma.

  12. STUDIES ON THE FUSION OF LIGNINOLYTIC ENZYME cDNAS AND THEIR EXPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Shiyu Fu; Xiaoli Xu; Jun Yang; Guohui Zhu; Ning Xu; Lei Feng; Jun Xie

    2007-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP) are two major peroxidases involved in lignin biodegradation. The cDNA mnp1 encoding a kind of MnPs, and cDNA clg5 encoding a kind of LiPs were fused to one cDNA mnp1- clg5 (rmc15) by over-lap PCR technology in this research. Then the recombinant cDNA rmc15 was cloned into a vector pTrcHisB to construct its efficient expression plasmid pTHmc15 in Escherichia coli. The E. coli transformed by pTHmc15 was induced by isopropyl--D-thiogalactos...

  13. STUDIES ON THE FUSION OF LIGNINOLYTIC ENZYME cDNAS AND THEIR EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyu Fu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Manganese peroxidase (MnP and lignin peroxidase (LiP are two major peroxidases involved in lignin biodegradation. The cDNA mnp1 encoding a kind of MnPs, and cDNA clg5 encoding a kind of LiPs were fused to one cDNA mnp1- clg5 (rmc15 by over-lap PCR technology in this research. Then the recombinant cDNA rmc15 was cloned into a vector pTrcHisB to construct its efficient expression plasmid pTHmc15 in Escherichia coli. The E. coli transformed by pTHmc15 was induced by isopropyl--D-thiogalactoside. The expressed protein was analyzed by SDS-PAGE, and a new one was observed with a molecular weight of about 77KD. Enzyme activities of MnP and LiP could not be observed in the unfolded fused protein. However, the enzyme activity of MnP was detected in the recombinant protein after it was refolded and activated by Ca2+ and heme, while the activity of LiP was not detected. These results show that the enzyme activity of the protein at N-terminal was not affected, but at C-terminal it was affected in the fusion protein of ligninolytic enzymes. Therefore, it is unfeasible to construct the gene of bifunctional ligninolytic enzyme with the fusion of the cDNA mnp1 encoding MnP and cDNA clg5 encoding LiP.

  14. Collection and comparative analysis of 1888 full-length cDNAs from wild rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. W1943.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tingting; Yu, Shuliang; Fan, Danlin; Mu, Jie; Shangguan, Yingying; Wang, Zixuan; Minobe, Yuzo; Lin, Zhixin; Han, Bin

    2008-10-01

    A huge amount of cDNA and EST resources have been developed for cultivated rice species Oryza sativa; however, only few cDNA resources are available for wild rice species. In this study, we isolated and completely sequenced 1888 putative full-length cDNA (FLcDNA) clones from wild rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. W1943 for comparative analysis between wild and cultivated rice species. Two cDNA libraries were constructed from 3-week-old leaf samples under either normal or cold-treated conditions. Homology searching of these cDNA sequences revealed that >96.8% of the wild rice cDNAs were matched to the cultivated rice O. sativa ssp. japonica cv. Nipponbare genome sequence. However, sequence. The comparative analysis showed that O. rufipogon W1943 had greater similarity to O. sativa ssp. japonica than to ssp. indica cultivars. In addition, 17 novel rice cDNAs were identified, and 41 putative tissue-specific expression genes were defined through searching the rice massively parallel signature-sequencing database. In conclusion, these FLcDNA clones are a resource for further function verification and could be broadly utilized in rice biological studies.

  15. Unique Access to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of 1047 completely sequenced cDNAs from an Arabidopsis-related model halophyte, Thellungiella halophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Masatomo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thellungiella halophila (also known as T. salsuginea is a model halophyte with a small size, short life cycle, and small genome. Thellungiella genes exhibit a high degree of sequence identity with Arabidopsis genes (90% at the cDNA level. We previously generated a full-length enriched cDNA library of T. halophila from various tissues and from whole plants treated with salinity, chilling, freezing stress, or ABA. We determined the DNA sequences of 20 000 cDNAs at both the 5'- and 3' ends, and identified 9569 distinct genes. Results Here, we completely sequenced 1047 Thellungiella full-length cDNAs representing abiotic-stress-related genes, transcription factor genes, and protein phosphatase 2C genes. The predicted coding sequences, 5'-UTRs, and 3'-UTRs were compared with those of orthologous genes from Arabidopsis for length, sequence similarity, and structure. The 5'-UTR sequences of Thellungiella and Arabidopsis orthologs shared a significant level of similarity, although the motifs were rearranged. While examining the stress-related Thellungiella coding sequences, we found a short splicing variant of T. halophila salt overly sensitive 1 (ThSOS1, designated ThSOS1S. ThSOS1S contains the transmembrane domain of ThSOS1 but lacks the C-terminal hydrophilic region. The expression level of ThSOS1S under normal growth conditions was higher than that of ThSOS1. We also compared the expression levels of Na+-transport-system genes between Thellungiella and Arabidopsis by using full-length cDNAs from each species as probes. Several genes that play essential roles in Na+ excretion, compartmentation, and diffusion (SOS1, SOS2, NHX1, and HKT1 were expressed at higher levels in Thellungiella than in Arabidopsis. Conclusions The full-length cDNA sequences obtained in this study will be essential for the ongoing annotation of the Thellungiella genome, especially for further improvement of gene prediction. Moreover, they will enable us to

  17. Cloning,sequencing and prokaryotic expression of cDNAs for antifreeze protein family from Beetle Tenebrio molitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongyuan LIU; Yun WANG; Guodong LU; Xianlei WANG; Fuchun ZHANG; Ji MA

    2008-01-01

    Partial cDNA sequences coding for antifreeze proteins in Tenebrio molitor were obtained by RT-PCR.Sequence analysis revealed nine putative cDNAs with a high degree of homology to Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein genes published in GenBank.The recombinant pGEX-4T-l-tmafp-XJ430 was introduced into E.coli BL21 to induce a GST fusion protein by IPTG.SDS-PAGE analysis for the fusion protein shows a band of 38 kDa.pCDNA3- tmafp-XJ430 was injected into mice to generate antiserum which was later detected by indirect ELISA.The titer of the antibody was 1:2000.Western blot-ting analysis shows that the antiserum was specifically against the antifreeze protein.Our results laid the founda-tion for further studies on the properties and functions of insect antifreeze proteins.

  18. Construction of human and mouse brain cDNA libraries and isolation of full-length cDNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    cDNA libraries from aborted human 3-month fetal brain,adult rat and mouse brain were constructed by using a yZAP express cDNA library construction kin.Low molecular weight fragments of the second strand cDNASA were removed by flowing through the Sepharose CL-4B column and the frractionated long,Middle,Short fragments and the combined fragments weire respectively inserted into clone vectors to construct the cDNA libraries of the brain of human 3-month fetus.The 5'ends of 1200 clones from each of human fetal brain cDNA libraries were sequenced.A total of 894 ESTs were obtained and some full-length clones were squenced.By andalyaing the se-quences,12 novel full-length cDNAs were obtained.

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNAs of the superoxide dismutase gene family in the resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolova, Elena; Rashkova, Maya; Anachkov, Nikolay; Denev, Iliya; Toneva, Valentina; Minkov, Ivan; Yahubyan, Galina

    2012-06-01

    Resurrection plants can tolerate almost complete water loss in their vegetative parts. The superoxide dismutases (SODs) are essential enzymes of defense against the oxidative damage caused by water stress. Here, we cloned and characterized cDNAs of the SOD gene family in the resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis. Seven full-length cDNAs, and their partial genomic clones, were obtained by combination of degenerate PCR, RT-PCR and RACE. The derived amino acid sequences exhibited a very high degree of similarity to cytosolic Cu,Zn-SODs (HrCSD2, HrCSD3), chloroplastic Cu,Zn-SODs (HrCSD5), other Cu,Zn-SODs (HrCSD4), Mn-SODs (HrMSD) and Fe-SODs (HrFSD). One cDNA turned out to be a pseudogene (HrCSD1). All identified SOD genes were found expressed at transcriptional level--the HrCSD2, HrCSD5, HrMSD and HrFSD were constitutively expressed in all organs, while the HrCSD3 and HrCSD4 were organ-specific. The transcripts of the housekeeping SOD genes were detected at significant levels even in air-dry leaves. The multigene SOD family of H. rhodopensis is the first studied SOD family amongst resurrection plant species. Our finding of well expressed SOD transcripts in fully dehydrated leaves correlates with retention of SOD activity, and with the ability of H. rhodopensis to revive upon rehydration. Because of the endemic relict nature of that species, our findings may help to further elucidate the evolutionary relationships among different SOD isoforms from distinct plant species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Feleucins: Novel Bombinin Precursor-Encoded Nonapeptide Amides from the Skin Secretion of Bombina variegata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Bai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The first amphibian skin antimicrobial peptide (AMP to be identified was named bombinin, reflecting its origin from the skin of the European yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata. Bombinins and their related peptides, the bombinin Hs, were subsequently reported from other bombinid toads. Molecular cloning of bombinin-encoding cDNAs from skin found that bombinins and bombinin Hs were coencoded on the same precursor proteins. Here, we report the molecular cloning of two novel cDNAs from a skin secretion-derived cDNA library of B. variegata whose open-reading frames each encode a novel bombinin (GIGGALLNVGKVALKGLAKGLAEHFANamide and a C-terminally located single copy of a novel nonapeptide (FLGLLGGLLamide or FLGLIGSLLamide. These novel nonapeptides were named feleucin-BV1 and feleucin-BV2, respectively. The novel bombinin exhibited 89% identity to homologues from the toads, B. microdeladigitora and B. maxima. The feleucins exhibited no identity with any amphibian AMP archived in databases. Synthetic feleucins exhibited a weak activity against Staphylococcus aureus (128–256 mg/L but feleucin-BV1 exhibited a synergistic action with the novel bombinin. The present report clearly demonstrates that the skin secretions of bombinid toads continue to represent a source of peptides of novel structure that could provide templates for the design of therapeutics.

  1. NASA's unique networking environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1988-01-01

    Networking is an infrastructure technology; it is a tool for NASA to support its space and aeronautics missions. Some of NASA's networking problems are shared by the commercial and/or military communities, and can be solved by working with these communities. However, some of NASA's networking problems are unique and will not be addressed by these other communities. Individual characteristics of NASA's space-mission networking enviroment are examined, the combination of all these characteristics that distinguish NASA's networking systems from either commercial or military systems is explained, and some research areas that are important for NASA to pursue are outlined.

  2. Cloning of Salt Tolerance-Related cDNAs from the Mangrove Plant Sesuvium portulacastrum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Cai Zeng; Liu-Hong Deng; Chun-Fa Zhang

    2006-01-01

    In an attempt to isolate and identify the target genes relevant to salt tolerance in a mangrove plant (Sesuvium portulacastrum L.), a subtracted cDNA library was constructed via suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH), in which the poly(A)+RNA isolated from salt-tolerant S. portulacastrum leaves was used as a tester,whereas the driver was poly(A)+RNA, derived from salt-sensitive S. portulacastrum leaves. Screening of this subtracted cDNA library revealed five clones, of which the expression levels in the salt-tolerant plant were markedly higher than those observed in the salt-sensitive plant, indicating that these candidate clones may be involved in salt-tolerance pathways. Among the clones isolated, P66, P175, and P233 are novel because no significant similarity was obtained upon alignment with the GenBank database. Clone P89demonstrated high homology with NADPH of Arabidopsis thaliana, whereas clone P152 was highly homologous with the gene encoding late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein of A. thaliana. The full-length gene of clone P152, with a predicated 344 amino acid residues, was shown to bear LEA-2 domains, a signature motif for proteins that have been enriched under salty and drought conditions. It is thus implied that clone P152 would be a salt-tolerance gene of S. portulacastrum. In addition, we have also developed a strategy for the extraction of total RNA from mangrove plants.

  3. Identification of cDNAs associated with late dedifferentiation in adult newt forelimb regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vascotto, Sandy G; Beug, Shawn; Liversage, Richard A; Tsilfidis, Catherine

    2005-06-01

    Epimorphic limb regeneration in the adult newt involves the dedifferentiation of differentiated cells to yield a pluripotent blastemal cell. These mesenchymal-like cells proliferate and subsequently respond to patterning and differentiation cues to form a new limb. Understanding the dedifferentiation process requires the selective identification of dedifferentiating cells within the heterogeneous population of cells in the regenerate. In this study, representational differences analysis was used to produce an enriched population of dedifferentiation-associated cDNA fragments. Fifty-nine unique cDNA fragments were identified, sequenced, and analyzed using bioinformatics tools and databases. Some of these clones demonstrate significant similarity to known genes in other species. Other clones can be linked by homology to pathways previously implicated in the dedifferentiation process. These data will form the basis for further analyses to elucidate the role of candidate genes in the dedifferentiation process during newt forelimb regeneration.

  4. Accelerated evolution of fetuin family proteins in Protobothrops flavoviridis (habu snake) serum and the discovery of an L1-like genomic element in the intronic sequence of a fetuin-encoding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yasuyoshi; Oyama, Sachiko; Hori, Shin-ichi; Ushio, Koya; Shioi, Narumi; Terada, Shigeyuki; Deshimaru, Masanobu

    2013-01-01

    Habu serum factor (HSF) and HSF-like protein (HLP) are fetuin family proteins isolated from Protobothrops flavoviridis (habu snake) serum with different physiological activities. A comparison of their cDNAs and intronic sequences revealed that nucleotide substitutions were primarily in protein-coding regions, and the substitution patterns indicated accelerated evolution of these proteins. Genomic DNA fragment analysis, including intron 1, revealed a 6.6-kb insertion homologous to the full-length mammalian LINE1 (L1) retrotransposable element (PfL1) only in the HLP gene. This segment retains an open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a reverse transcriptase (RT)-like protein (PfRT). We further found that a large number of homologous segments have dispersed in the habu snake genome, although we could not determine the enzymatic activities of their products. Moreover, an analysis of habu snake liver RNA indicated active transcription of the PfRT genes, suggesting that high levels of RT activity in this snake have driven the evolution of unique phenotypes of venom enzymes and serum inhibitors of them.

  5. RNA chaperones encoded by RNA viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yang; Hongjie Xia; Qi Qian; Xi Zhou

    2015-01-01

    RNAs are functionally diverse macromolecules whose proper functions rely strictly upon their correct tertiary structures. However, because of their high structural flexibility, correct folding of RNAs is challenging and slow. Therefore, cells and viruses encode a variety of RNA remodeling proteins, including helicases and RNA chaperones. In RNA viruses, these proteins are believed to play pivotal roles in all the processes involving viral RNAs during the life cycle. RNA helicases have been studied extensively for decades, whereas RNA chaperones, particularly virus-encoded RNA chaperones, are often overlooked. This review describes the activities of RNA chaperones encoded by RNA viruses, particularly the ones identified and characterized in recent years, and the functions of these proteins in different steps of viral life cycles, and presents an overview of this unique group of proteins.

  6. The Golden Ratio Encoder

    CERN Document Server

    Daubechies, I; Wang, Y; Yilmaz, Ö

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel Nyquist-rate analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion algorithm which achieves exponential accuracy in the bit-rate despite using imperfect components. The proposed algorithm is based on a robust implementation of a beta-encoder where the value of the base beta is equal to golden mean. It was previously shown that beta-encoders can be implemented in such a way that their exponential accuracy is robust against threshold offsets in the quantizer element. This paper extends this result by allowing for imperfect analog multipliers with imprecise gain values as well. A formal computational model for algorithmic encoders and a general test bed for evaluating their robustness is also proposed.

  7. Holoprosencephaly: Characterization of the deletion of 21q22.3 and isolation of cDNAs by a direct selection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakawa, K.; Colbern, S.; Brusilovsky, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HP) is characterized by impaired cleavage of the embryonic forebrain and incomplete mid-facial development. The etiology is heterogeneous and may include aneuploidies for chromosomes 2, 3, 7, 13, 18 and 21. We have narrowed the chromosome 21 candidate region by analyzing 2 cases of HP with deletion 21q22 using FISH and Southern blot techniques. For the smaller deletion, the regions for D21S25, D21S154, D21S171 and D21S44 were deleted and for D21S42 was not. Combining these data with previous reports of deletion of 21q22.3 (ColVIA2-ter) without the holoprosencephaly phenotype indicate that the region responsible for holoprosencephaly spans the 2-3 Mb region including PFKL and ITGB2 (CD18) that has also been linked to progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1). In order to isolate genes responsible for these diseases, we constructed a cDNA library from a 14-week trisomy 21 fetal brain using Uni-Zap XR (Stratagene). More than 95% clones have inserts ranging from 1-4 kb (ave. 2 kb). In addition we applied a direct cDNA selection method to BACs (Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes) in the 21q22.3 region. Using cDNA synthesized from trisomy 21 fetal brain, we attached Sau3AI linkers, digested with Sau3AI, attached second linkers and hybridized to biotinylated BAC DNAs which cover the candidate region. cDNA/BAC DNA hybrid molecules were captured on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, non-specific cDNA were washed out, and specifically hybridized cDNA were eluted and amplified by PCR. Twice-selected PCR products were subcloned and analyzed. Southern blot analyses revealed that 21 out of 30 (70%) of fragments yielded unique bands on the original BACs. Eight clones contained repetitive sequences. We are now isolating cDNAs expressed in the Down syndrome fetal brain using these cDNA fragments. These genes now provide candidates for EPM1 and holoprosencephaly.

  8. Fasciola hepatica mucin-encoding gene: expression, variability and its potential relevance in host-parasite relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela, Martín; Santos, Guilherme B; Carmona, Carlos; Ferreira, Henrique B; Tort, José Francisco; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2015-12-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a zoonosis with significant impact both in human and animal health. Understanding the basic processes of parasite biology, especially those related to interactions with its host, will contribute to control F. hepatica infections and hence liver pathology. Mucins have been described as important mediators for parasite establishment within its host, due to their key roles in immune evasion. In F. hepatica, mucin expression is upregulated in the mammalian invasive newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) stage in comparison with the adult stage. Here, we performed sequencing of mucin cDNAs prepared from NEJ RNA, resulting in six different cDNAs clusters. The differences are due to the presence of a tandem repeated sequence of 66 bp encoded by different exons. Two groups of apomucins one with three and the other with four repeats, with 459 and 393 bp respectively, were identified. These cDNAs have open reading frames encoding Ser-Thr enriched proteins with an N-terminal signal peptide, characteristic of apomucin backbone. We cloned a 4470 bp gene comprising eight exons and seven introns that encodes all the cDNA variants identified in NEJs. By real time polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting approaches of individual flukes we infer that fhemuc-1 is a single-copy gene, with at least two different alleles. Our data suggest that both gene polymorphism and alternative splicing might account for apomucin variability in the fhemuc-1 gene that is upregulated in NEJ invasive stage. The relevance of this variation in host-parasite interplay is discussed.

  9. Cloning of fiber-specific cDNAs and their structural variations in 4 fiber mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A mRNA preferentially expressed in cotton fiber was cloned from fiber total RNA of normal upland cotton TM-1 (wild-type) by using RT-PCR and corresponding cDNA (signed as TM-E6) was sequenced. TM-E6 gene had no intron and contained an open reading frame of 771 bp long, and might encode a peptide of 246 amino acids. Other 4 genes, Fl-E6, Li-E6, N-E6 and Bl-E6, which were homologous to TM-E6 gene, were also isolated from 4 fiber mutants of Fiberless Xu-zhou 142, Ligon lintless, Naked seed and Brown lint, respectively. Sequence analysis of each of these mutant genes revealed many variations in structure and nucleotide composition of gene when compared with the sequence of TM-E6 gene. (ⅰ) There was a changeable repetitive segment in which GGCTCA (Gly-Ser) was repeated 3-5 times between the 82nd and the 93rd codons in different mutant genes. Since the change of Gly-Ser repetitive segment occurred not only in the mutants but also in the wild-type cotton, the repeat frequency might not be associated with the mutation of fiber characteristics. (ⅱ) Among the 4 mutant genes, the percentage of changed codons was 7.05% in Fl-E6, 4.98% in Li-E6, and 4.15% in N-E6 and Bl-E6. It seems that the percentage of changed codons in E6 sequence was posi-tively correlated to the degree of fiber morphological varia-tion. (ⅲ) E6 polypeptides of two long-fiberless mutants (Fi-berless Xuzhou 142 and Ligon lintless) contained high simi-lar (99.4%) variation in the region of 1-174 amino acids from N-terminus, and those of short-fiberless mutants (Fi-berless Xuzhou and naked seed) revealed identical variation in the region of 116th-220th amino acids. It also seems that there was a parallel relation between E6 protein variation and fiber phenotype mutation. (ⅳ) Li-E6 and Bl-E6 genes also expressed at low level in seed coat besides at high level in fiber.

  10. Molecular characterization of genes encoding inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels in the bed bug (Cimex lectularius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidala, Praveen; Mittapelly, Priyanka; Jones, Susan C; Piermarini, Peter M; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2013-04-01

    The molecular genetics of inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channels in insects is poorly understood. To date, Kir channel genes have been characterized only from a few representative dipterans (i.e., fruit flies and mosquitoes). The goal of the present study was to characterize Kir channel cDNAs in a hemipteran, the bed bug (Cimex lectularius). Using our previously reported bed bug transcriptome (RNA-seq), we identified two cDNAs that encode putative Kir channels. One was a full-length cDNA that encodes a protein belonging to the insect 'Kir3' clade, which we designate as 'ClKir3'. The other was a partial cDNA that encodes a protein with similarity to both the insect 'Kir1' and 'Kir2' clades, which we designate as 'ClKir1/2'. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that ClKir1/2 and ClKir3 exhibited peak expression levels in late-instar nymphs and early-instar nymphs, respectively. Furthermore, ClKir3, but not ClKir1/2, showed tissue-specific expression in Malpighian tubules of adult bed bugs. Lastly, using an improved procedure for delivering double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to male and female bed bugs (via the cervical membrane) we demonstrate rapid and systemic knockdown of ClKir3 transcripts. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the bed bug possesses at least two genes encoding Kir channels, and that RNAi is possible for at least Kir3, thereby offering a potential approach for elucidating the roles of Kir channel genes in bed bug physiology.

  11. Negative Beta Encoder

    CERN Document Server

    Kohda, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    A new class of analog-digital (A/D), digital-analog (D/A) converters as an alternative to conventional ones, called $\\beta$-encoder, has been shown to have exponential accuracy in the bit rates while possessing self-correction property for fluctuations of amplifier factor $\\beta$ and quantizer threshold $\

  12. DNA sequences encoding erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F.K.

    1987-10-27

    A purified and isolated DNA sequence is described consisting essentially of a DNA sequence encoding a polypeptide having an amino acid sequence sufficiently duplicative of that of erythropoietin to allow possession of the biological property of causing bone marrow cells to increase production of reticulocytes and red blood cells, and to increase hemoglobin synthesis or iron uptake.

  13. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  14. Hypomorphic mutations in PGAP2, encoding a GPI-anchor-remodeling protein, cause autosomal-recessive intellectual disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    PGAP2 encodes a protein involved in remodeling the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor in the Golgi apparatus. After synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), GPI anchors are transferred to the proteins and are remodeled while transported through the Golgi to the cell membrane. Germline...... rescue when we used strong promoters before the mutant cDNAs, suggesting a hypomorphic effect of the mutations. We report on alterations in the Golgi-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway and extend the phenotypic spectrum of the GPI-anchor deficiencies to isolated intellectual disability...

  15. Microarrays for global expression constructed with a low redundancy set of 27,500 sequenced cDNAs representing an array of developmental stages and physiological conditions of the soybean plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retzel Ernest

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are an important tool with which to examine coordinated gene expression. Soybean (Glycine max is one of the most economically valuable crop species in the world food supply. In order to accelerate both gene discovery as well as hypothesis-driven research in soybean, global expression resources needed to be developed. The applications of microarray for determining patterns of expression in different tissues or during conditional treatments by dual labeling of the mRNAs are unlimited. In addition, discovery of the molecular basis of traits through examination of naturally occurring variation in hundreds of mutant lines could be enhanced by the construction and use of soybean cDNA microarrays. Results We report the construction and analysis of a low redundancy 'unigene' set of 27,513 clones that represent a variety of soybean cDNA libraries made from a wide array of source tissue and organ systems, developmental stages, and stress or pathogen-challenged plants. The set was assembled from the 5' sequence data of the cDNA clones using cluster analysis programs. The selected clones were then physically reracked and sequenced at the 3' end. In order to increase gene discovery from immature cotyledon libraries that contain abundant mRNAs representing storage protein gene families, we utilized a high density filter normalization approach to preferentially select more weakly expressed cDNAs. All 27,513 cDNA inserts were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The amplified products, along with some repetitively spotted control or 'choice' clones, were used to produce three 9,728-element microarrays that have been used to examine tissue specific gene expression and global expression in mutant isolines. Conclusions Global expression studies will be greatly aided by the availability of the sequence-validated and low redundancy cDNA sets described in this report. These cDNAs and ESTs represent a wide array of developmental

  16. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothini Odman-Naresh

    Full Text Available Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM, an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps, which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran

  17. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Duevel, Margret; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM), an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps), which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran digestive tract facing

  18. Isolation and characterisation of mRNA encoding the salmon- and chicken-II type gonadotrophin-releasing hormones in the teleost fish Rutilus rutilus (Cyprinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penlington, M C; Williams, M A; Sumpter, J P; Rand-Weaver, M; Hoole, D; Arme, C

    1997-12-01

    The complementary DNAs (cDNA) encoding the [Trp7,Leu8]-gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (salmon-type GnRH; sGnRH:GeneBank accession no. u60667) and the [His5,Trp7,Tyr8]-GnRH (chicken-II-type GnRH; cGnRH-II: GeneBank accession no. u60668) precursor in the roach (Rutilus rutilus) were isolated and sequenced following reverse transcription and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The sGnRH and cGnRH-II precursor cDNAs consisted of 439 and 628 bp, and included open reading frames of 282 and 255 bp respectively. The structures of the encoded peptides were the same as GnRHs previously identified in other vertebrates. The sGnRH and cGnRH-II precursor cDNAs, including the non-coding regions, had 88.6 and 79.9% identity respectively, to those identified in goldfish (Carassius auratus). However, significant similarity was not observed between the non-coding regions of the GnRH cDNAs of Cyprinidae and other fish. The presumed third exon, encoding partial sGnRH associated peptide (GAP) of roach, demonstrated significant nucleotide and amino acid similarity with the appropriate regions in the goldfish, but not with other species, and this may indicate functional differences of GAP between different families of fish. cGnRH-II precursor cDNAs from roach had relatively high nucleotide similarity across this GnRH variant. Cladistic analysis classified the sGnRH and cGnRH-II precursor cDNAs into three and two groups respectively. However, the divergence between nucleotide sequences within the sGnRH variant was greater than those encoding the cGnRH-II precursors. Consistent with the consensus developed from previous studies, Northern blot analysis demonstrated that expression of sGnRH and cGnRH-II was restricted to the olfactory bulbs and midbrain of roach respectively. This work forms the basis for further study on the mechanisms by which the tapeworm, Ligula intestinalis, interacts with the pituitary-gonadal axis of its fish host.

  19. Molecular cloning of partial cDNAs for rat DNA topoisomerase II isoforms and their differential expression in brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, K; Tsutsui, K; Okada, S; Watanabe, M; Shohmori, T; Seki, S; Inoue, Y

    1993-09-05

    cDNA segments for DNA topoisomerase II were amplified from rat brain RNA after reverse transcription by the polymerase chain reaction, using degenerate oligonucleotide primers deduced from the conserved regions of topoisomerase II of higher eukaryotes. The cDNA product from a successful amplification was homogeneous in length but heterogeneous in sequence. Restriction mapping of the cloned cDNA fragments revealed that they consisted of two distinct sequence groups. DNA sequencing of representative clones from each group, designated A and B, showed that they are highly homologous to cDNAs of human topoisomerase II isoforms, alpha and beta, respectively. Northern blot analysis indicated that the transcript level for rat topoisomerase II alpha was high in embryonic brain and in the cerebellum of 2-day newborns, followed by rapid decrease to a undetectable level at 4 weeks after birth. In contrast, rat topoisomerase II beta transcript was present throughout the embryonic and postnatal stages. In the developing cerebellum, cells expressing topoisomerase II alpha were confirmed exclusively to the outer mitotic zone of the external granular layer, whereas the transcript of topoisomerase II beta was detected over the entire cortical region. These results clearly indicate that the isoform alpha is expressed only in proliferating cells. The differential expression of topoisomerase II isozymes was also observed among developed tissues. Therefore, the isozymes are most likely to be involved in the following different physiological processes: topoisomerase II alpha in cell proliferation, and topoisomerase II beta in some processes unrelated to cell proliferation.

  20. Collection of Macaca fascicularis cDNAs derived from bone marrow, kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and thymus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kameoka Yosuke

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consolidating transcriptome data of non-human primates is essential to annotate primate genome sequences, and will facilitate research using non-human primates in the genomic era. Macaca fascicularis is a macaque monkey that is commonly used for biomedical and ecological research. Findings We constructed cDNA libraries of Macaca fascicularis, derived from tissues obtained from bone marrow, liver, pancreas, spleen, and thymus of a young male, and kidney of a young female. In total, 5'-end sequences of 56,856 clones were determined. Including the previously established cDNA libraries from brain and testis, we have isolated 112,587 cDNAs of Macaca fascicularis, which correspond to 56% of the curated human reference genes. Conclusion These sequences were deposited in the public sequence database as well as in-house macaque genome database http://genebank.nibio.go.jp/qfbase/. These data will become valuable resources for identifying functional parts of the genome of macaque monkeys in future studies.

  1. Uniqueness is Important in Competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ai-Xia; XV Xiu-Lian; HE Da-Ren

    2009-01-01

    We propose a quantitative network description on the function of uniqueness in a competition system. Two statistical parameters, competition ability and uniqueness are defined, and their relationship in ordinary cases is analytically discussed. The competition between Chinese regional universities is taken as an example. The empirical investigation results show that the uniqueness of a university is really important in competition. Also,uniqueness is very helpful in the promotion of the university overall quality.

  2. Identification of HR-inducing cDNAs from plant pathogens via a Gateway(®)-compatible binary Potato virus X-expression vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esse, H Peter

    2012-01-01

    Identification of pathogen effectors that elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) in resistant plant hosts is essential to study disease resistance. In this method, it is described how to generate a cDNA library, how to transfer the library into a binary PVX-expression vector, and finally how to set up a high-throughput screen for HR-inducing cDNAs from plant pathogens.

  3. The characterisation of tapetum-specific cDNAs isolated from a Lilium henryi L. meiocyte subtractive cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, S J; Greenland, A J; Dickinson, H G

    1995-01-01

    Differential screening of a meiocyte subtractive cDNA library from Lilium henryi L. has identified a group of 16 anther-specific partial cDNAs. Three of these sequences, LHM2, LHM6 and LHM7 have been further characterised. Hybridisation in situ with antisense riboprobes of LHM2, LHM6, and LHM7 gives a strong, clear signal which, contrary to expectations, is localised to the tapetal layer surrounding the meiocytes and not the meiocytes themselves. Developmental slot blots demonstrate that mRNAs corresponding to the three LHM cDNAs are transcribed from prophase of meiosis I to the uninucleate microspore stage, while Northern analysis reveals these tapetally expressed cDNAs to correspond with transcripts of some 500 bp. Although LHM2 is less abundant than LHM6 and LHM7, the pattern of developmental expression, and the size range of the transcripts suggests that all three cDNAs may be related. The deduced polypeptide products of LHM6 and LHM7 share 71% identity over a conserved region of 38 residues. Inverse polymerase chain reaction was used to obtain the full sequence for LHM7. Its deduced protein sequence has a signal peptide indicating it may be secreted; the cleaved protein has a molecular weight of 8.9 kDa. Furthermore, the LHM7 protein has significant levels of homology with tapetally expressed proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana, Antirrhinum majus and Lycopersicon esculentum. All contain a highly conserved pattern of cysteine residues present in seed and non-specific lipid transfer proteins. The function of this gene product is discussed in the perspective of current models of another development.

  4. On Uniqueness of coalitional equilibria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finus, M.; Mouche, van P.H.M.; Rundshagen, B.

    2014-01-01

    For the so-called "new approach" of coalitio formation it is important that coalitional equilibria are unique. Uniqueness comes down to existene and to semi-uniqueness, i.e.\\\\that there exists at most one equilibrium. Although conditions for existence are not problematic, conditions for semi-uniquen

  5. Current Density Imaging through Acoustically Encoded Magnetometry: A Theoretical Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Sheltraw, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The problem of determining a current density confined to a volume from measurements of the magnetic field it produces exterior to that volume is known to have non-unique solutions. To uniquely determine the current density, or the non-silent components of it, additional spatial encoding of the electric current is needed. In biological systems such as the brain and heart, which generate electric current associated with normal function, a reliable means of generating such additional encoding, on a spatial and temporal scale meaningful to the study of such systems, would be a boon for research. This paper explores a speculative method by which the required additional encoding might be accomplished, on the time scale associated with the propagation of sound across the volume of interest, by means of the application of a radially encoding pulsed acoustic spherical wave.

  6. A new allele of flower color gene W1 encoding flavonoid 3'5'-hydroxylase is responsible for light purple flowers in wild soybean Glycine soja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubouzet Joseph G

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycine soja is a wild relative of soybean that has purple flowers. No flower color variant of Glycine soja has been found in the natural habitat. Results B09121, an accession with light purple flowers, was discovered in southern Japan. Genetic analysis revealed that the gene responsible for the light purple flowers was allelic to the W1 locus encoding flavonoid 3'5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H. The new allele was designated as w1-lp. The dominance relationship of the locus was W1 >w1-lp >w1. One F2 plant and four F3 plants with purple flowers were generated in the cross between B09121 and a Clark near-isogenic line with w1 allele. Flower petals of B09121 contained lower amounts of four major anthocyanins (malvidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside, petunidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside, delphinidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside and delphinidin 3-O-glucoside common in purple flowers and contained small amounts of the 5'-unsubstituted versions of the above anthocyanins, peonidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside, cyanidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside and cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, suggesting that F3'5'H activity was reduced and flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase activity was increased. F3'5'H cDNAs were cloned from Clark and B09121 by RT-PCR. The cDNA of B09121 had a unique base substitution resulting in the substitution of valine with methionine at amino acid position 210. The base substitution was ascertained by dCAPS analysis. The polymorphism associated with the dCAPS markers co-segregated with flower color in the F2 population. F3 progeny test, and dCAPS and indel analyses suggested that the plants with purple flowers might be due to intragenic recombination and that the 65 bp insertion responsible for gene dysfunction might have been eliminated in such plants. Conclusions B09121 may be the first example of a flower color variant found in nature. The light purple flower was controlled by a new allele of the W1 locus encoding F3'5'H. The flower petals contained unique anthocyanins not found in soybean

  7. Cloning of artemisinin biosynthetic cDNAs and novel ESTs and quantification of low temperature-induced gene overexpression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To isolate and verify novel genes from qinghao (Artemisia annua) based on the development-specific and environment-induced transcriptomics, leaves have been harvested from the flowering A. annua plants and exposed to low temperature for isolation of total RNAs and cloning of full-length cDNAs and cDNA fragments, or expressed sequence tags (ESTs). After being sequenced and browsed for homol- ogy, these sequences have been submitted to GenBank. Among the accessed 75 sequences, 4 full-length cDNAs are highly homologous to the known A. annua genes, but 71 ESTs are absent in the sequence records of A. annua genes, in which 34 sequences are homologous to other plant genes, including 24 identified protein-coding sequences and 10 unidentified protein-coding sequences, while other 37 sequences are not present in the sequence records of any plant genes, representing the first cloned plant genes. In order to investigate the responsive patterns of A. annua genes to extreme envi- ronmental stresses, especially low temperature, the expression levels of 3 critical qinhaosu (artemisi- nin) biosynthetic genes, ADS, CYP71AV1 and CPR, have been measured in pre- and post-chilling A. annua seedlings cultured in vitro by semi-quantitative PCR (SQ-PCR). Consequently, ADS and CYP71AV1 genes are strongly induced by chilling, but CPR gene is not significantly affected by such treatment. Furthermore, induction of these genes by chilling can be potently suppressed by Ca2+ channel inhibitor LaCl3 or Ca2+ chelator EGTA, suggesting a putative involvement of Ca2+-CaM signal transduction pathway in chilling-induced overexpression of ADS and CYP71AV1 genes. The real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (RFQ-PCR) assay of A. annua seedlings exposed to chilling has shown that the expression level of CaM gene is up-regulated for more than 2.5 folds, thereby confirming our above inference on the relevance of Ca2+-CaM-mediated signal transduction to chilling-induced gene overexpression. Finally, 7 newly

  8. Cloning of artemisinin biosynthetic cDNAs and novel ESTs and quantification of low temperature-induced gene overexpression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG QingPing; ZHAO Chang; YIN LuLu; YANG RuiYi; ZENG XiaoMei; HUANG Ying; FENG LiLing; YANG XueQin

    2008-01-01

    To isolate and verify novel genes from qinghao (Artemisia annua) based on the development-specific and environment-induced transcriptomics, leaves have been harvested from the flowering A. annua plants and exposed to low temperature for isolation of total RNAs and cloning of full-length cDNAs and cDNA fragments, or expressed sequence tags (ESTs). After being sequenced and browsed for homology, these sequences have been submitted to GenBank. Among the accessed 75 sequences, 4 full-length cDNAs are highly homologous to the known A. annua genes, but 71 ESTs are absent in the sequence records of A. annua genes, in which 34 sequences are homologous to other plant genes,including 24 identified protein-coding sequences and 10 unidentified protein-coding sequences, while other 37 sequences are not present in the sequence records of any plant genes, representing the first cloned plant genes. In order to investigate the responsive patterns of A. annua genes to extreme environmental stresses, especially low temperature, the expression levels of 3 critical qinhaosu (artemisinin) biosynthetic genes, ADS, CYP71AV1 and CPR, have been measured in pre- and post-chilling A.annua seedlings cultured in vitro by semi-quantitative PCR (SQ-PCR). Consequently, ADS and CYP71AV1 genes are strongly induced by chilling, but CPR gene is not significantly affected by such treatment. Furthermore, induction of these genes by chilling can be potently suppressed by Ca2+channel inhibitor LaCl3 or Ca2+ chelator EGTA, suggesting a putative involvement of Ca2+-CaM signal transduction pathway in chilling-induced overexpression of ADS and CYP71AV1 genes. The real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (RFQ-PCR) assay of A. annua seedlings exposed to chilling has shown that the expression level of CaM gene is up-regulated for more than 2.5 folds, thereby confirming our above inference on the relevance of Ca2+-CaM-mediated signal transduction to chilling-induced gene overexpression. Finally, 7 newly isolated A

  9. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tearney, G.J.; Webb, R.H.; Bouma, B.E. [Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Blossom Street, BAR 703, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    1998-08-01

    An endoscope-compatible, submicrometer-resolution scanning confocal microscopy imaging system is presented. This approach, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), uses a quasi-monochromatic light source and a transmission diffraction grating to detect the reflectivity simultaneously at multiple points along a transverse line within the sample. Since this method does not require fast spatial scanning within the probe, the equipment can be miniaturized and incorporated into a catheter or endoscope. Confocal images of an electron microscope grid were acquired with SECM to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Optical Society of America}

  10. Review of Random Phase Encoding in Volume Holographic Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chia Su

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Random phase encoding is a unique technique for volume hologram which can be applied to various applications such as holographic multiplexing storage, image encryption, and optical sensing. In this review article, we first review and discuss diffraction selectivity of random phase encoding in volume holograms, which is the most important parameter related to multiplexing capacity of volume holographic storage. We then review an image encryption system based on random phase encoding. The alignment of phase key for decryption of the encoded image stored in holographic memory is analyzed and discussed. In the latter part of the review, an all-optical sensing system implemented by random phase encoding and holographic interconnection is presented.

  11. Differentially-Enhanced Sideband Imaging via Radio-frequency Encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Fard, A M; Jalali, B

    2015-01-01

    We present a microscope paradigm that performs differential interference imaging with high sensitivity via optical amplification and radio-frequency (RF) heterodyne detection. This method, termed differentially-enhanced sideband imaging via radio-frequency encoding (DESIRE), uniquely exploits frequency-to-space mapping technique to encode the image of an object onto the RF sidebands of an illumination beam. As a proof-of-concept, we show validation experiment by implementing radio frequency (f = 15 GHz) phase modulation in conjunction with spectrally-encoded laser scanning technique to acquire one-dimensional image of a barcode-like object using a commercial RF spectrum analyzer.

  12. Organization and expression of two tandemly oriented genes encoding ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundle, S J; Zielinski, R E

    1991-03-15

    We have isolated and structurally characterized genomic DNA and cDNA sequences encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rbu-P2 carboxylase) activase from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Three Rbu-P2 carboxylase activase (Rca) polypeptides are encoded in the barley genome by two closely linked, tandemly oriented nuclear genes (RcaA and RcaB); cDNAs encoding each of the three Rbu-P2 carboxylase activase polypeptides were isolated from cDNA libraries of barley leaf mRNA. RcaA produces two mRNAs, which encode polypeptides of 42 and 46 kDa, by an alternative splicing mechanism identical to that previously reported for spinach and Arabidopsis Rca genes (Werneke, J.M., Chatfield, J.M., and Ogren, W. L. (1989) Plant Cell 1, 815-825). RcaB is transcribed to produce a single mRNA, which encodes a mature peptide of 42 kDa. Genomic Southern blots indicate that RcaA and RcaB represent the entire Rbu-P2 carboxylase activase gene family in barley. The genes share 80% nucleotide sequence identity, and the 42-kDa polypeptides encoded by RcaA and RcaB share 87% amino acid sequence identity. Coding regions of the two barley Rca genes are separated by 1 kilobase pair of flanking DNA. DNA sequence motifs similar to those thought to control light-regulated gene expression in other nuclear-encoded plastid polypeptide genes are found at the 5' end of both barley Rca genes. Probes specific to three mRNAs were used to determine the relative contribution each species makes to the total Rca mRNA pool.

  13. Cytochrome P450c17 (steroid 17. cap alpha. -hydroxylase/17,20 lyase): cloning of human adrenal and testis cDNAs indicates the same gene is expressed in both tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, B.; Picado-Leonard, J.; Haniu, M.; Bienkowski, M.; Hall, P.F.; Shively, J.E.; Miller, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    P450c17 is the single enzyme mediating both 17..cap alpha..-hydroxylase (steroid 17..cap alpha..-monooxygenase, EC 1.14.99.9) and 17,20 lyase activities in the synthesis of steroid hormones. It has been suggested that different P450c17 isozymes mediate these activities in the adrenal gland and testis. The authors sequenced 423 of the 509 amino acids (83%) of the porcine adrenal enzyme; based on this partial sequence, a 128-fold degenerate 17-mer was synthesized and used to screen a porcine adrenal cDNA library. This yielded a 380-base cloned cDNA, which in turn was used to isolate several human adrenal cDNAs. The longest of these, lambda hac 17-2, is 1754 base pairs long and includes the full-length coding region, the complete 3'-untranslated region, and 41 bases of the 5'-untranslated region. This cDNA encodes a protein of 508 amino acids having a predicted molecular weight of 57,379.82. High-stringency screening of a human testicular cDNA library yielded a partial clone containing 1303 identical bases. RNA gel blots and nuclease S1-protection experiments confirm that the adrenal and testicular P450c17 mRNAs are indistinguishable. These data indicate that the testis possesses a P450c17 identical to that in the adrenal. The human amino acid sequence is 66.7% homologous to the corresponding regions of the porcine sequence, and the human cDNA and amino acid sequences are 80.1 and 70.3% homologous, respectively, to bovine adrenal P450c17 cDNA. Both comparisons indicate that a central region comprising amino acid residues 160-268 is hypervariable among these species of P450c17.

  14. Neuropeptide-like precursor 4 is uniquely expressed during pupal diapause in the flesh fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppression subtractive hybridization comparing brains from diapausing and nondiapausing pupae of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga crassipalpis, suggested that the gene encoding neuropeptide-like precursor 4 (Nplp4) was uniquely expressed during diapause. We have sequenced the full-length cDNA encoding Npl...

  15. Mutational analysis of the coding regions of the genes encoding protein kinase B-alpha and -beta, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1, phosphatase targeting to glycogen, protein phosphatase inhibitor-1, and glycogenin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Fjordvang, H; Rasmussen, S K

    1999-01-01

    be caused by genetic variability in the genes encoding proteins shown by biochemical evidence to be involved in insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle. In 70 insulin-resistant Danish NIDDM patients, mutational analysis by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-single strand...... conformation polymorphism-heteroduplex analysis was performed on genomic DNA or skeletal muscle-derived cDNAs encoding glycogenin, protein phosphatase inhibitor-1, phophatase targeting to glycogen, protein kinase B-alpha and -beta, and the phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1. Although a number...

  16. Screening and analysis of hepatocellular carcinomaassociated antigens and their encoding genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yongyu; WANG Hongcheng; LI Yan; PANG Xuewen; SUN Wensheng; CHEN Weifeng

    2003-01-01

    Identification of hepatocellular carcinoma- associated tumor antigens is necessary and pivotal for specific immunotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In the present study, HCC cDNAs are constructed into ZAP cDNA expression library and screened by sera of patients with HCC. The positive clones are DNA sequenced and analyzed by bioinformatics. Thirty-one genes of hepatocellular carcinoma-associated tumor antigens are identified, of which 1 is unknown and 30 are known. The proteins encoded by these known genes can be classified into 8 categories: constitutive molecules of hepatocytes, RNA transcription and splicing-associated molecules, protein metabolism-associated molecules, energy synthesis-associated molecules, signal transduction molecules, cell adhesion molecules, immunosuppressive molecules, and proteins with unknown function. Among these genes, CAGE is a cancer-testis (CT) antigen. It is concluded that identification of hepatocellular carcinoma-associated tumor antigens provides potential targets for immunotherapy of HCC patients and facilitates explanation of carcinogenesis of HCC.

  17. Selecting Operations for Assembler Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Praczyk

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembler Encoding is a neuro-evolutionary method in which a neural network is represented in the form of a simple program called Assembler Encoding Program. The task of the program is to create the so-called Network Definition Matrix which maintains all the information necessary to construct the network. To generate Assembler Encoding Programs and the subsequent neural networks evolutionary techniques are used.
    The performance of Assembler Encoding strongly depends on operations used in Assembler Encoding Programs. To select the most effective operations, experiments in the optimization and the predator-prey problem were carried out. In the experiments, Assembler Encoding Programs equipped with different types of operations were tested. The results of the tests are presented at the end of the paper.

  18. Sequence and characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana cDNAs isolated by functional complementation of a yeast gln3 gdh1 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, H N; Caboche, M; Daniel-Vedele, F

    1997-06-30

    We have isolated two Arabidopsis thaliana cDNAs by complementation of a yeast gln3 gdh1 strain that is affected in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism. The two clones (RGA1 and RGA2) are homologous to each other and to the SCARECROW (SCR) gene that is involved in regulating an asymmetric cell division in plants. RGA1, RGA2 and SCR share several structural features and may define a new family of genes. RGA1 and RGA2 have been mapped, respectively, to chromosome II and I, and their expression in plant is constitutive.

  19. Uniqueness property for quasiharmonic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevdiyor A. Imomkulov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider a class of continuous functions, called quasiaharmonic functions, admitting best approximations by harmonic polynomials. In this class we prove a uniqueness theorem by analogy with the analytic functions.

  20. Diabetes: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF Choosing Wisely: Diabetes Tests and Treatments Download Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Diabetes Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ...

  1. Osteoporosis: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Osteoporosis Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... and widely-prescribed medications for the treatment of osteoporosis. Some serious side effects of these medication have ...

  2. Nutrition: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nutrition Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... teeth that are needed for grinding up food, nutrition suffers. If you are unable to chew and ...

  3. Classification of rice allergenic protein cDNAs belonging to the alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, A M; Adachi, T; Nakase, M; Aoki, N; Nakamura, R; Matsuda, T

    1995-09-06

    Seven cDNA clones encoding rice allergenic proteins were newly isolated. Comparison of the sequences of ten cDNA clones, including the previously isolated three clones results in their classification into four subfamilies. Homologies in the nucleotide sequences among and within subfamilies are 70-85% and above 95%, respectively. A sequence of twenty five amino-acid residues at the C-terminal proximal region is highly conserved among all clones and resembles that of plant lipid transfer proteins.

  4. High-resolution MRI encoding using radiofrequency phase gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jonathan C; King, Scott B; Deng, Qunli; Volotovskyy, Vyacheslav; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2013-11-01

    Although MRI offers highly diagnostic medical imagery, patient access to this modality worldwide is very limited when compared with X-ray or ultrasound. One reason for this is the expense and complexity of the equipment used to generate the switched magnetic fields necessary for MRI encoding. These field gradients are also responsible for intense acoustic noise and have the potential to induce nerve stimulation. We present results with a new MRI encoding principle which operates entirely without the use of conventional B0 field gradients. This new approach--'Transmit Array Spatial Encoding' (TRASE)--uses only the resonant radiofrequency (RF) field to produce Fourier spatial encoding equivalent to conventional MRI. k-space traversal (image encoding) is achieved by spin refocusing with phase gradient transmit fields in spin echo trains. A transmit coil array, driven by just a single transmitter channel, was constructed to produce four phase gradient fields, which allows the encoding of two orthogonal spatial axes. High-resolution two-dimensional-encoded in vivo MR images of hand and wrist were obtained at 0.2 T. TRASE exploits RF field phase gradients, and offers the possibility of very low-cost diagnostics and novel experiments exploiting unique capabilities, such as imaging without disturbance of the main B0 magnetic field. Lower field imaging (imaging are favorable application domains as, in both cases, it is technically easier to achieve the short RF pulses desirable for long echo trains, and also to limit RF power deposition. As TRASE is simply an alternative mechanism (and technology) of moving through k space, there are many close analogies between it and conventional B0 -encoded techniques. TRASE is compatible with both B0 gradient encoding and parallel imaging, and so hybrid sequences containing all three spatial encoding approaches are possible.

  5. Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinski, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a soluble chloroplast protein that catalyzes the activation of rubisco, the enzyme that initiates the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle, to catalytic competency. Rca in barley consists of three polypeptides, one of 46- and two of 42-kDa, but the quaternary structure of the protein is not known. The authors have isolated and completely sequenced 8.8 kb of barley genomic DNA containing two, tandemly oriented activase genes (RcaA and RcaB) and three different cDNAs encoding the 42- and 46-kDa Rca polypeptide isoforms. Genomic Southern blot assays indicate that these sequences represent the entire Rca gene family in barley. Pre-mRNAs transcribed from the RcaA gene are alternatively spliced to give mRNAs encoding both 46- (RcaA1) and 42-kDa (RcaA2) Rca isoforms. The RcaB gene encodes a single polypeptide of 42 kDa. Primer extension and northern blot assays indicate that RcaB mRNA is expressed at a level that is 10- to 100-fold lower than RcaA mRNA. Analyses at the mRNA and protein level showed that Rca gene expression is coordinated by that of the rubisco subunits during barley leaf development.

  6. Identification of two metallo- thionein isoforms by molecu-lar cloning of their cDNAs infresh-water fish, crucian carp(Carassius-cuvieri)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Generally, there are two major isoforms of me- tallothionein (MT)in mammals. In this study two cDNAs of metallothionein, MT-A and MT-B, in a fresh-water fish, crucian carp (Carassius cuvieri), were cloned by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The homology of their reading frame is about 92.3%. The sequence analysis of both cDNAs gave the structures of coding regions corresponding to 60 amino acid residues, and the structures of complete 3′-untranslated regions in which a significant difference in the size of their 3′-untranslated regions (130 bp for MT-A and 280 bp for MT-B) exists. The results of amino acid sequenc-ing of both MT-1 and MT-2 purified by HPLC are identical to those deduced from MT cDNA genes, indicating that MT-1 is from MT-A gene and MT-2 is from MT-B gene respec-tively. No blocking in the N-terminal of MT-2 isoform was the first case found in vertebrates, most of which were block-ed by acetylation. These results suggest that there were dif-ferential controls at the transcription level and after transla-tion of these two MT isoforms. And this gives a clue to un-derstand the diversities of their functions.

  7. Sin/cosine encoder interpolation methods: encoder to digital tracking converters for rate and position loop controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Steven T.; Hilkert, J. M.

    2008-04-01

    Pointing and tracking applications usually require relative gimbal angles to be measured for reporting and controlling the line-of-sight angular position. Depending on the application, angular resolution and/or accuracy might jointly or independently determine the angle transducer requirements. In the past decade, encoders have been increasingly taking the place of inductive devices where the measurement of angles over a wide range is required. This is primarily due to the fact that encoders are now achieving very high resolution in smaller sizes than was previously possible. These advances in resolution are primarily due to improved encoder disk and detector technology along with developments in interpolation techniques. Measurement accuracy, on the other hand, is primarily determined by mounting and bearing eccentricity as it is with all angular measurement devices. For very demanding accuracy requirements, some type of calibration of the assembled system may be the only solution, in which case transducer repeatability is paramount. This paper describes a unique encoder-to-digital tracking converter concept for improving interpolation of optical encoders. The new method relies on Fraunhofer diffraction models to correct the non-ideal sin/cos outputs of the encoder detectors. Diffraction model concepts are used in the interpolation filters to predict the phase of non-ideal sin and cosine encoder outputs. The new method also minimizes many of the open loop pre-processing requirements and assumptions that limit interpolation accuracy and rate loop noise performance in ratiometric tracking converter designs.

  8. Structure and function of the DNA ligases encoded by the mammalian LIG3 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Tomkinson, Alan E.; Sallmyr, Annahita

    2013-01-01

    Among the mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases (LIG), the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different cellular functions. Notably, this nuclear gene encodes the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and so is essential for this organelle. In the nucleus, there is significant functional redundancy between DNA ligase IIIα and DNA ligase I in excision repair. In addition, DNA ligase IIIα is essential for DNA replication in the absence of the replicative DNA lig...

  9. PNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambaldo, Claudio; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-encoded chemical libraries along with DNA-encoded libraries have provided a powerful new paradigm for library synthesis and ligand discovery. PNA-encoding stands out for its compatibility with standard solid phase synthesis and the technology has been used to prepare libraries of peptides, heterocycles and glycoconjugates. Different screening formats have now been reported including selection-based and microarray-based methods that have yielded specific ligands against diverse target classes including membrane receptors, lectins and challenging targets such as Hsp70.

  10. Rufus Choate: A Unique Orator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Reed

    Rufus Choate, a Massachusetts lawyer and orator, has been described as a "unique and romantic phenomenon" in America's history. Born in 1799 in Essex, Massachusetts, Choate graduated from Dartmouth College and attended Harvard Law School. Choate's goal was to be the top in his profession. Daniel Webster was Choate's hero. Choate became well…

  11. Uniqueness of PL Minimal Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi NI

    2007-01-01

    Using a standard fact in hyperbolic geometry, we give a simple proof of the uniqueness of PL minimal surfaces, thus filling in a gap in the original proof of Jaco and Rubinstein. Moreover, in order to clarify some ambiguity, we sharpen the definition of PL minimal surfaces, and prove a technical lemma on the Plateau problem in the hyperbolic space.

  12. On the Nagumo uniqueness theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Octavian G. Mustafa; O'Regan, Donal

    2011-01-01

    By a convenient reparametrisation of the integral curves of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE), we are able to improve the conclusions of the recent contribution [A. Constantin, Proc. Japan Acad. {\\bf 86(A)} (2010), 41--44]. In this way, we establish a flexible uniqueness criterion for ODEs without Lipschitz-like nonlinearities.

  13. The Lasso Problem and Uniqueness

    CERN Document Server

    Tibshirani, Ryan J

    2012-01-01

    The lasso is a popular tool for sparse linear regression, especially for problems in which the number of variables p exceeds the number of observations n. But when p>n, the lasso criterion is not strictly convex, and hence it may not have a unique minimum. An important question is: when is the lasso solution well-defined (unique)? We review results from the literature, which show that if the predictor variables are drawn from a continuous probability distribution, then there is a unique lasso solution with probability one, regardless of the sizes of n and p. We also show that this result extends easily to $\\ell_1$ penalized minimization problems over a wide range of loss functions. A second important question is: how can we deal with the case of non-uniqueness in lasso solutions? In light of the aforementioned result, this case really only arises when some of the predictor variables are discrete, or when some post-processing has been performed on continuous predictor measurements. Though we certainly cannot c...

  14. Compressed Encoding for Rank Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Gad, Eyal En; Jiang,; Bruck, Jehoshua

    2011-01-01

    Rank modulation has been recently proposed as a scheme for storing information in flash memories. While rank modulation has advantages in improving write speed and endurance, the current encoding approach is based on the "push to the top" operation that is not efficient in the general case. We propose a new encoding procedure where a cell level is raised to be higher than the minimal necessary subset - instead of all - of the other cell levels. This new procedure leads to a significantly more compressed (lower charge levels) encoding. We derive an upper bound for a family of codes that utilize the proposed encoding procedure, and consider code constructions that achieve that bound for several special cases.

  15. Cell encoding recombinant human erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, A.K.; Withy, R.M.; Zabrecky, J.R.; Masiello, N.C.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes a C127 cell transformed with a recombinant DNA vector. It comprises: a DNA sequence encoding human erythropoietin, the transformed cell being capable of producing N-linked and O-linked glycosylated human erythropoietin.

  16. Self-Organising Stochastic Encoders

    CERN Document Server

    Luttrell, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The processing of mega-dimensional data, such as images, scales linearly with image size only if fixed size processing windows are used. It would be very useful to be able to automate the process of sizing and interconnecting the processing windows. A stochastic encoder that is an extension of the standard Linde-Buzo-Gray vector quantiser, called a stochastic vector quantiser (SVQ), includes this required behaviour amongst its emergent properties, because it automatically splits the input space into statistically independent subspaces, which it then separately encodes. Various optimal SVQs have been obtained, both analytically and numerically. Analytic solutions which demonstrate how the input space is split into independent subspaces may be obtained when an SVQ is used to encode data that lives on a 2-torus (e.g. the superposition of a pair of uncorrelated sinusoids). Many numerical solutions have also been obtained, using both SVQs and chains of linked SVQs: (1) images of multiple independent targets (encod...

  17. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C;

    1993-01-01

    this antigen is a good candidate for development as a vaccine to prevent or control P. carinii infection. We have cloned and sequenced seven related but unique genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of rat P. carinii. Partial amino acid sequencing confirmed the identity of these genes. Based on Southern...... hydrophobic region at the carboxyl terminus. The presence of multiple related msg genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of P. carinii suggests that antigenic variation is a possible mechanism for evading host defenses. Further characterization of this family of genes should allow the development...

  18. Negative affect promotes encoding of and memory for details at the expense of the gist: affect, encoding, and false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storbeck, Justin

    2013-01-01

    I investigated whether negative affective states enhance encoding of and memory for item-specific information reducing false memories. Positive, negative, and neutral moods were induced, and participants then completed a Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) false-memory task. List items were presented in unique spatial locations or unique fonts to serve as measures for item-specific encoding. The negative mood conditions had more accurate memories for item-specific information, and they also had fewer false memories. The final experiment used a manipulation that drew attention to distinctive information, which aided learning for DRM words, but also promoted item-specific encoding. For the condition that promoted item-specific encoding, false memories were reduced for positive and neutral mood conditions to a rate similar to that of the negative mood condition. These experiments demonstrated that negative affective cues promote item-specific processing reducing false memories. People in positive and negative moods encode events differently creating different memories for the same event.

  19. A new opioid peptide predicted from cloned cDNAs from skin of Pachymedusa dacnicolor and Agalychnis annae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechselberger, C; Severini, C; Kreil, G; Negri, L

    1998-06-05

    We have isolated a cDNA encoding a precursor of dermorphin from the skin of Pachymedusa dacnicolor. Besides four copies of this opioid peptide, the deduced sequence also contains the genetic information for a novel peptide Tyr-Ile-Phe-His-Leu-Met-Asp-NH2. This differs from Met-deltorphin by the presence of Ile at position 2. In a related precursor from the skin of Agalychnis annae, the sequence of this peptide is in the 3'-untranslated region of the cloned cDNA. From earlier results we predict that in skin peptides the second residue is D-allo-Ile. We have synthesized this and related peptides with different D-amino acids, and determined their delta agonist activity. The peptide with D-nor-Leu binds with high affinity to delta receptors, while that with D-allo-Ile is about 100 times less active.

  20. Uniqueness theorems in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Knops, Robin John

    1971-01-01

    The classical result for uniqueness in elasticity theory is due to Kirchhoff. It states that the standard mixed boundary value problem for a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic material in equilibrium and occupying a bounded three-dimensional region of space possesses at most one solution in the classical sense, provided the Lame and shear moduli, A and J1 respectively, obey the inequalities (3 A + 2 J1) > 0 and J1>O. In linear elastodynamics the analogous result, due to Neumann, is that the initial-mixed boundary value problem possesses at most one solution provided the elastic moduli satisfy the same set of inequalities as in Kirchhoffs theorem. Most standard textbooks on the linear theory of elasticity mention only these two classical criteria for uniqueness and neglect altogether the abundant literature which has appeared since the original publications of Kirchhoff. To remedy this deficiency it seems appropriate to attempt a coherent description ofthe various contributions made to the study of uniquenes...

  1. 20 years of DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannocci, Luca; Leimbacher, Markus; Wichert, Moreno; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2011-12-28

    The identification of specific binding molecules is a central problem in chemistry, biology and medicine. Therefore, technologies, which facilitate ligand discovery, may substantially contribute to a better understanding of biological processes and to drug discovery. DNA-encoded chemical libraries represent a new inexpensive tool for the fast and efficient identification of ligands to target proteins of choice. Such libraries consist of collections of organic molecules, covalently linked to a unique DNA tag serving as an amplifiable identification bar code. DNA-encoding enables the in vitro selection of ligands by affinity capture at sub-picomolar concentrations on virtually any target protein of interest, in analogy to established selection methodologies like antibody phage display. Multiple strategies have been investigated by several academic and industrial laboratories for the construction of DNA-encoded chemical libraries comprising up to millions of DNA-encoded compounds. The implementation of next generation high-throughput sequencing enabled the rapid identification of binding molecules from DNA-encoded libraries of unprecedented size. This article reviews the development of DNA-encoded library technology and its evolution into a novel drug discovery tool, commenting on challenges, perspectives and opportunities for the different experimental approaches.

  2. Preparation of a subtractive cDNA library enriched in cDNAs which expressed at a high level in cultured senescent human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, H; Hara, E; Tsuyama, N; Oda, K; Ide, T

    1994-03-30

    Subtracted cDNA library was prepared by subtracting [cDNA from young growing SV40-transformed human fibroblasts] from [cDNA from growing SV40-transformed fibroblasts in extended lifespan]. Isolated cDNA clones which expressed at high level in life-extended transformed cells also expressed at high level in normal senescent fibroblasts but did at low level in growing and growth-arrested young cells. Neither fibronectin nor procollagen cDNA was isolated. This cDNA library is useful for isolation of senescent-specific cDNA species which express at high level in normal senescent cells but at low level in growing and growth-arrested young cells, avoiding growth-arrest-specific cDNAs.

  3. Uniqueness and Non-uniqueness in the Einstein Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, H P; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; York, James W.

    2005-01-01

    We examine numerically a sequence of free data for the conformal thin sandwich (CTS) equations representing non-linearly perturbed Minkowski spacetimes. We find only one solution for the standard (four) CTS equations; however, we find {\\em two} distinct solutions for the same free data when the lapse is determined by a fifth elliptic equation arising from specification of the time derivative of the mean curvature. For a given {\\em physical} (conformally scaled) amplitude of the perturbation, the solution for the physical data $g_{ij}, K_{ij}$ nevertheless appears to be unique.

  4. High resolution absolute incremental combined-use encoder; Kobunkaino abusoryuto inkurimentaru ken`yo encoder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-10

    Produced at Fuji Electric Co.,Ltd., on a commercial basis was a high resolution absolute incremental combined-use encoder, which is a serial transmission type with a resolution of 16bit per rotation, as a rotary sensor for a small high performance servo system FALDIC-{alpha} series. Accomplished in this encoder were a high resolution, which greatly improves uneven rotation at low speed and precision in positioning, and miniaturization which is on the top level in the industry, by means of a high performance CPU and a large scale LSI. In addition, less wiring by unique high-speed serial communication was contrived, as were protective functions of all types and intelligent systematization by data holding function. Moreover, a newly structured rotary disk was employed, greatly improving vibration resistance and impact resistance. By using the high resolution absolute incremental combined-use encoder as standard equipment in the servo motor, flexibility is secured in a system for a machine to which the device is applied. (NEDO)

  5. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled.

  6. Theory of multisource crosstalk reduction by phase-encoded statics

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2011-03-01

    Formulas are derived that relate the strength of the crosstalk noise in supergather migration images to the variance of time, amplitude and polarity shifts in encoding functions. A supergather migration image is computed by migrating an encoded supergather, where the supergather is formed by stacking a large number of encoded shot gathers. Analysis reveals that for temporal source static shifts in each shot gather, the crosstalk noise is exponentially reduced with increasing variance of the static shift and the square of source frequency. This is not too surprising because larger time shifts lead to less correlation between traces in different shot gathers, and so should tend to reduce the crosstalk noise. Analysis also reveals that combining both polarity and time statics is a superior encoding strategy compared to using either polarity statics or time statics alone. Signal-to-noise (SNR) estimates show that for a standard migration image and for an image computed by migrating a phase-encoded supergather; here, G is the number of traces in a shot gather, I is the number of stacking iterations in the supergather and S is the number of encoded/blended shot gathers that comprise the supergather. If the supergather can be uniformly divided up into Q unique sub-supergathers, then the resulting SNR of the final image is, which means that we can enhance image quality but at the expense of Q times more cost. The importance of these formulas is that they provide a precise understanding between different phase encoding strategies and image quality. Finally, we show that iterative migration of phase-encoded supergathers is a special case of passive seismic interferometry. We suggest that the crosstalk noise formulas can be helpful in designing optimal strategies for passive seismic interferometry and efficient extraction of Green\\'s functions from simulated supergathers. © 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International © 2011 RAS.

  7. Lithium nephropathy: unique sonographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Salvo, Donald N; Park, Joseph; Laing, Faye C

    2012-04-01

    This case series describes a unique sonographic appearance consisting of numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci seen on renal sonograms of 10 adult patients receiving chronic lithium therapy. Clinically, chronic renal insufficiency was present in 6 and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 2. Sonography showed numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci. Computed tomography in 5 patients confirmed microcysts and microcalcifications, which were fewer in number than on sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging in 2 patients confirmed microcysts in each case. Renal biopsy in 1 patient showed chronic interstitial nephritis, microcysts, and tubular dilatation. The diagnosis of lithium nephropathy should be considered when sonography shows these findings.

  8. Mucormycosis in India: unique features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Singh, Rachna

    2014-12-01

    Mucormycosis remains a devastating invasive fungal infection, with high mortality rates even after active management. The disease is being reported at an alarming frequency over the past decades from India. Indian mucormycosis has certain unique features. Rhino-orbito-cerebral presentation associated with uncontrolled diabetes is the predominant characteristic. Isolated renal mucormycosis has emerged as a new clinical entity. Apophysomyces elegans and Rhizopus homothallicus are emerging species in this region and uncommon agents such as Mucor irregularis and Thamnostylum lucknowense are also being reported. This review focuses on these distinct features of mucormycosis observed in India.

  9. UNIQUE ORAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raphael M. Ottenbrite; ZHAO Ruifeng; Sam Milstein

    1995-01-01

    An oral drug delivery system using proteinoid microspheres is discussed with respect to its unique dependence on pH. It has been found that certain drugs such as insulin and heparin can be encapsulated in proteinoid spheres at stomach pH's (1-3). These spheres also dissemble at intestinal pH's (6-7) releasing the drug for absorption. Using this technique low molecular weight heparin and human growth hormone have been orally delivered successfully to several animal species. Future work has been proposed to study the interaction and binding of the specific drugs with synthesized oligopeptides.

  10. Analysis of unique beta transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eman, B.; Krmpotic, F.; Tadic, D;

    1967-01-01

    The Heidelberg group measurements [For abstr. see Phys. Rev. Nucl. Sci. Vol. 15 (1965)] of unique forbidden transitions have been analysed. It has been found that experimental shape factors can be reproduced only with the induced pseudoscalar form factor d ...-non-conserving tensor form factor b > 0. In the former case they contradict Daniel's results [See abstr. 1966A10720] for 0- rarr 0+ transitions, whereas in the latter they are in disagreement with other known analyses of mu-meson capture, allowed and forbidden transitions. The conclusion appears to be independent...

  11. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    A number of herpes- and poxviruses encode 7TM G-protein coupled receptors most of which clearly are derived from their host chemokine system as well as induce high expression of certain 7TM receptors in the infected cells. The receptors appear to be exploited by the virus for either immune evasion...... in various parts of the viral life cyclus. Most of the receptors encoded by human pathogenic virus are still orphan receptors, i.e. the endogenous ligand is unknown. In the few cases where it has been possible to characterize these receptors pharmacologically, they have been found to bind a broad spectrum...... expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  12. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of human genes encoding three closely related G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao-Hui Song; Bonner, T.I. [NIMH National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Modi, W. [Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Frederick, MD (United States)

    1995-07-20

    Cosmids containing human genes for orphan G protein-coupled receptors, GPR12, GPR6, and GPR3, were isolated using their rat homologs as probes. Previous studies of the mouse and rat cDNAs have shown the receptors to be expressed primarily in brain but have failed to identify their ligands. The three receptor proteins of 334, 363, and 330 amino acids, respectively, are encoded by a single exon in each gene. Excluding the divergent sequences preceding the first transmembrane domain, they have {approximately}60% amino acid identity with each other. Flurorescence in situ hybridization of GPR12, GPR6, and GPR3 localized these three genes to human chromosomal regions 13q12, 6q21, and 1p34.3-p36.1, respectively. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Synaptic encoding of temporal contiguity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srdjan eOstojic

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Often we need to perform tasks in an environment that changes stochastically. In these situations it is important to learn the statistics of sequences of events in order to predict the future and the outcome of our actions. The statistical description of many of these sequences can be reduced to the set of probabilities that a particular event follows another event (temporal contiguity. Under these conditions, it is important to encode and store in our memory these transition probabilities. Here we show that for a large class of synaptic plasticity models, the distribution of synaptic strengths encodes transitions probabilities. Specifically, when the synaptic dynamics depend on pairs of contiguous events and the synapses can remember multiple instances of the transitions, then the average synaptic weights are a monotonic function of the transition probabilities. The synaptic weights converge to the distribution encoding the probabilities also when the correlations between consecutive synaptic modifications are considered. We studied how this distribution depends on the number of synaptic states for a specific model of a multi-state synapse with hard bounds. In the case of bistable synapses, the average synaptic weights are a smooth function of the transition probabilities and the accuracy of the encoding depends on the learning rate. As the number of synaptic states increases, the average synaptic weights become a step function of the transition probabilities. We finally show that the information stored in the synaptic weights can be read out by a simple rate-based neural network. Our study shows that synapses encode transition probabilities under general assumptions and this indicates that temporal contiguity is likely to be encoded and harnessed in almost every neural circuit in the brain.

  14. Characterization and Expression of Genes Encoding Three Small Heat Shock Proteins in Sesamia inferens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Sun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The pink stem borer, Sesamia inferens (Walker, is a major pest of rice and is endemic in China and other parts of Asia. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs encompass a diverse, widespread class of stress proteins that have not been characterized in S. inferens. In the present study, we isolated and characterized three S. inferens genes that encode members of the α-crystallin/sHSP family, namely, Sihsp21.4, Sihsp20.6, and Sihsp19.6. The three cDNAs encoded proteins of 187, 183 and 174 amino acids with calculated molecular weights of 21.4, 20.6 and 19.6 kDa, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the three genes showed strong similarity to sHSPs identified in other lepidopteran insects. Sihsp21.4 contained an intron, but Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 lacked introns. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed that Sihsp21.4 was most strongly expressed in S. inferens heads; Whereas expression of Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 was highest in eggs. The three S. inferens sHSP genes were up-regulated during low temperature stress. In summary, our results show that S. inferens sHSP genes have distinct regulatory roles in the physiology of S. inferens.

  15. A Pin gene families encoding components of auxin efflux carriers in Brassica juncea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the sequence information of Arabidopsis PIN1, two cDNAs encoding PIN homologues fromBrassica juncea, Bjpin2 and Bjpin3, were isolated through cDNA library screening. Bjpin2 and Bjpin3encoded proteins containing 640 and 635 amino acid residues, respectively, which shared 97.5% identities witheach other and were highly homologous to Arabidopsis PIN1, PIN2 and other putative PIN proteins. BjPIN2and BjPIN3 had similar structures as AtPIN proteins. Northern blot analysis indicated that Bjpin2 wasexpressed in stem, leaf and floral tissues, while Bjpin3 was expressed predominantly in stem and hypocotyls.Two promoter fragments of pin genes, Bjpin-X and Bjpin-Z, were isolated by 'genome walking' techniqueusing primers at 5'-end of pin cDNA. Promoter-gus fusion studies revealed the GUS activities driven byBjpin-X were at internal side of xylem and petal; while those driven by Bjpin-Z were detected at leaf vein,epidermal cell and cortex of stem, vascular tissues and anther. Results of the pin genes with differentexpression patterns in B. juncea suggested the presence of a gene family.

  16. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  17. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Einari A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Grapputo, Alessandro; Nordlund, Henri R; Kulomaa, Markku S; Laitinen, Olli H

    2005-03-18

    A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  18. Cloning and sequencing analysis of three amylase cDNAs in the shrimp Penaeus vannamei (Crustacea decapoda): evolutionary aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wormhoudt, A; Sellos, D

    1996-05-01

    In Penaeus vannamei, alpha-amylase is the most important glucosidase and is present as at least two major isoenzymes which have been purified. In order to obtain information on their structure, a hepatopancreas cDNA library constructed in phage lambda-Zap II (Strategene) was screened using a synthetic oligonucleotide based on the amino acid sequence of a V8 staphylococcal protease peptide of P. vannamei alpha-amylase. Three clones were selected: AMY SK 37 (EMBL sequence accession number: X 77318) is the most complete of the analyzed clones and was completely sequenced. It contains the complete cDNA sequence coding for one of the major isoenzymes of shrimp amylase. The deduced amino acid sequence shows the existence of a 511-residue-long pre-enzyme containing a highly hydrophobic signal peptide of 16 amino acids. Northern hybridization of total RNA with the amylase cDNA confirms the size of the messenger at around 1,600 bases. AMY SK 28, which contains the complete mature sequence of amylase, belonged to the same family characterized by a common 3' terminus and presented four amino acid changes. Some other variants of this family were also partially sequenced. AMY SK 20 was found to encode a minor variant of the protein with a different 3' terminus and 57 amino acid changes. Phylogenetic analysis established with the conserved amino acid regions of the (beta/alpha) eight-barrel domain and with the total sequence of P. vannamei showed close evolutionary relationships with mammals (59-63% identity) and with insect alpha-amylase (52-62% identity). The use of conserved sequences increased the level of similarity but it did not alter the ordering of the groupings. Location of the secondary structure elements confirmed the high level of sequence similarity of shrimp alpha-amylase with pig alpha-amylase.

  19. Unique Features of Mobile Commerce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xiaojun; IIJIMA Junichi; HO Sho

    2004-01-01

    While the market potentials and impacts of web-based e-commerce are still in the ascendant, the advances in wireless technologies and mobile networks have brought about a new business opportunity and research attention, what is termed mobile commerce. Commonly, mobile commerce is considered to be another new application of existing web-based e-commerce onto wireless networks, but as an independent business area, mobile commerce has its own advantages and challenges as opposed to traditional e-commerce applications. This paper focuses on exploring the unique features of mobile commerce as. Compared with traditional e-commerce. Also, there are still some limitations arisen in m-commerce in contrast to web-based e-commerce. Finally, current state of mobile commerce in Japan is presented in brief, with an introduction of several cases involving mobile commerce applications in today 's marketplace.

  20. Unique features of space reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    Space reactors are designed to meet a unique set of requirements; they must be sufficiently compact to be launched in a rocket to their operational location, operate for many years without maintenance and servicing, operate in extreme environments, and reject heat by radiation to space. To meet these restrictions, operating temperatures are much greater than in terrestrial power plants, and the reactors tend to have a fast neutron spectrum. Currently, a new generation of space reactor power plants is being developed. The major effort is in the SP-100 program, where the power plant is being designed for seven years of full power, and no maintenance operation at a reactor outlet operating temperature of 1350 K.

  1. The probabilities of unique events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeet S Khemlani

    Full Text Available Many theorists argue that the probabilities of unique events, even real possibilities such as President Obama's re-election, are meaningless. As a consequence, psychologists have seldom investigated them. We propose a new theory (implemented in a computer program in which such estimates depend on an intuitive non-numerical system capable only of simple procedures, and a deliberative system that maps intuitions into numbers. The theory predicts that estimates of the probabilities of conjunctions should often tend to split the difference between the probabilities of the two conjuncts. We report two experiments showing that individuals commit such violations of the probability calculus, and corroborating other predictions of the theory, e.g., individuals err in the same way even when they make non-numerical verbal estimates, such as that an event is highly improbable.

  2. The Evolution of Human Uniqueness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Robert

    2017-01-09

    The human species is an outlier in the natural world. Two million years ago our ancestors were a slightly odd apes. Now we occupy the largest ecological and geographical range of any species, have larger biomass, and process more energy. Usually, this transformation is explained in terms of cognitive ability-people are just smarter than all the rest. In this paper I argue that culture, our ability to learn from each other, and cooperation, our ability to make common cause with large groups of unrelated individuals are the real roots of human uniqueness, and sketch an evolutionary account of how these crucial abilities co-evolved with each other and with other features of our life histories.

  3. Unique properties of Plasmodium falciparum porphobilinogen deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Viswanathan Arun; Arumugam, Rajavel; Gopalakrishnan, Bulusu; Jyothsna, Yeleswarapu Sri; Rangarajan, Pundi N; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2008-01-04

    The hybrid pathway for heme biosynthesis in the malarial parasite proposes the involvement of parasite genome-coded enzymes of the pathway localized in different compartments such as apicoplast, mitochondria, and cytosol. However, knowledge on the functionality and localization of many of these enzymes is not available. In this study, we demonstrate that porphobilinogen deaminase encoded by the Plasmodium falciparum genome (PfPBGD) has several unique biochemical properties. Studies carried out with PfPBGD partially purified from parasite membrane fraction, as well as recombinant PfPBGD lacking N-terminal 64 amino acids expressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells (DeltaPfPBGD), indicate that both the proteins are catalytically active. Surprisingly, PfPBGD catalyzes the conversion of porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen III (UROGEN III), indicating that it also possesses uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) activity, catalyzing the next step. This obviates the necessity to have a separate gene for UROS that has not been so far annotated in the parasite genome. Interestingly, DeltaPfP-BGD gives rise to UROGEN III even after heat treatment, although UROS from other sources is known to be heat-sensitive. Based on the analysis of active site residues, a DeltaPfPBGDL116K mutant enzyme was created and the specific activity of this recombinant mutant enzyme is 5-fold higher than DeltaPfPBGD. More interestingly, DeltaPfPBGDL116K catalyzes the formation of uroporphyrinogen I (UROGEN I) in addition to UROGEN III, indicating that with increased PBGD activity the UROS activity of PBGD may perhaps become rate-limiting, thus leading to non-enzymatic cyclization of preuroporphyrinogen to UROGEN I. PfPBGD is localized to the apicoplast and is catalytically very inefficient compared with the host red cell enzyme.

  4. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management.

  5. 两个东亚钳蝎神经毒素cDNA的克隆和序列分析%Cloning and Characterization of Two Novel cDNAs Encoding Neurotoxins from Chinese Scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch(BmK)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱顺义; 李文鑫; 曾宪春; 蒋达和; 毛歆

    2000-01-01

    构建了东亚钳蝎毒腺组织cDNA文库,用PCR筛选到两个新的神经毒素全长cDNA,其开放阅读框(ORF)包括:信号肽、成熟毒素和/或额外氨基酸序列,它们编码的成熟毒素分别命名为BmαTX9和BmIT(cp)2. 序列分析表明,BmαTX9为抗哺乳动物神经毒素;BmIT(cp)2为痉挛型昆虫毒素. 文章还对东亚钳蝎神经毒素的命名,分类以及进化等问题进行了初步的探讨.

  6. Large-scale analysis of full-length cDNAs from the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivar Micro-Tom, a reference system for the Solanaceae genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Koh; Yano, Kentaro; Suzuki, Ayako; Kawamura, Shingo; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suda, Kunihiro; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Tsugane, Taneaki; Watanabe, Manabu; Ooga, Kazuhide; Torii, Maiko; Narita, Takanori; Shin-I, Tadasu; Kohara, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Takahashi, Hideki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Egusa, Mayumi; Kodama, Motoichiro; Ichinose, Yuki; Kikuchi, Mari; Fukushima, Sumire; Okabe, Akiko; Arie, Tsutomu; Sato, Yuko; Yazawa, Katsumi; Satoh, Shinobu; Omura, Toshikazu; Ezura, Hiroshi; Shibata, Daisuke

    2010-03-30

    The Solanaceae family includes several economically important vegetable crops. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is regarded as a model plant of the Solanaceae family. Recently, a number of tomato resources have been developed in parallel with the ongoing tomato genome sequencing project. In particular, a miniature cultivar, Micro-Tom, is regarded as a model system in tomato genomics, and a number of genomics resources in the Micro-Tom-background, such as ESTs and mutagenized lines, have been established by an international alliance. To accelerate the progress in tomato genomics, we developed a collection of fully-sequenced 13,227 Micro-Tom full-length cDNAs. By checking redundant sequences, coding sequences, and chimeric sequences, a set of 11,502 non-redundant full-length cDNAs (nrFLcDNAs) was generated. Analysis of untranslated regions demonstrated that tomato has longer 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions than most other plants but rice. Classification of functions of proteins predicted from the coding sequences demonstrated that nrFLcDNAs covered a broad range of functions. A comparison of nrFLcDNAs with genes of sixteen plants facilitated the identification of tomato genes that are not found in other plants, most of which did not have known protein domains. Mapping of the nrFLcDNAs onto currently available tomato genome sequences facilitated prediction of exon-intron structure. Introns of tomato genes were longer than those of Arabidopsis and rice. According to a comparison of exon sequences between the nrFLcDNAs and the tomato genome sequences, the frequency of nucleotide mismatch in exons between Micro-Tom and the genome-sequencing cultivar (Heinz 1706) was estimated to be 0.061%. The collection of Micro-Tom nrFLcDNAs generated in this study will serve as a valuable genomic tool for plant biologists to bridge the gap between basic and applied studies. The nrFLcDNA sequences will help annotation of the tomato whole-genome sequence and aid in tomato functional

  7. PHH1, a novel gene from Arabidopsis thaliana that encodes a protein similar to plant blue-light photoreceptors and microbial photolyases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, P D; Batschauer, A; Hays, J B

    1996-11-27

    A cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana similar to microbial photolyase genes, and designated AT-PHH1, was isolated using a photolyase-like cDNA from Sinapsis alba (SA-PHR1) as a probe. Multiple isolations yielded only PHH1 cDNAs, and a few blue-light-receptor CRY1 (HY4) cDNAs (also similar to microbial photolyase genes), suggesting the absence of any other highly similar Arabidopsis genes. The AT-PHH1 and SA-PHR1 cDNA sequences predict 89% identity at the protein level, except for an AT-PHH1 C-terminal extension (111 amino acids), also not seen in microbial photolyases. AT-PHH1 and CRY1 show less similarity (54% p4erein identity), including respective C-terminal extensions that are themselves mostly dissimilar. Analysis of fifteen AT-PHH1 genomic isolates reveals a single gene, with three introns in the coding sequence and one in the 5'-untranslated leader. Full-length AT-PHH1, and both AT-PHH1 and AT-PHH1 delta C-513 (truncated to be approximately the size of microbial photolyase genes) cDNAs, were overexpressed, respectively, in yeast and Escherichia coli mutants hypersensitive to ultraviolet light. The absence of significant effects on resistance suggests either that any putative AT-PHH1 DNA repair activity requires cofactors/chromophores not present in yeast or E. coli, or that AT-PHH1 encodes a blue-light/ultraviolet-A receptor rather than a DNA repair protein.

  8. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-12-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A+ + B- → C reaction-diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction-diffusion-precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm.

  9. Genes encoding novel secreted and transmembrane proteins are temporally and spatially regulated during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Mauricio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Morphogenetic events that shape the Drosophila melanogaster embryo are tightly controlled by a genetic program in which specific sets of genes are up-regulated. We used a suppressive subtractive hybridization procedure to identify a group of developmentally regulated genes during early stages of D. melanogaster embryogenesis. We studied the spatiotemporal activity of these genes in five different intervals covering 12 stages of embryogenesis. Results Microarrays were constructed to confirm induction of expression and to determine the temporal profile of isolated subtracted cDNAs during embryo development. We identified a set of 118 genes whose expression levels increased significantly in at least one developmental interval compared with a reference interval. Of these genes, 53% had a phenotype and/or molecular function reported in the literature, whereas 47% were essentially uncharacterized. Clustering analysis revealed demarcated transcript groups with maximum gene activity at distinct developmental intervals. In situ hybridization assays were carried out on 23 uncharacterized genes, 15 of which proved to have spatiotemporally restricted expression patterns. Among these 15 uncharacterized genes, 13 were found to encode putative secreted and transmembrane proteins. For three of them we validated our protein sequence predictions by expressing their cDNAs in Drosophila S2R+ cells and analyzed the subcellular distribution of recombinant proteins. We then focused on the functional characterization of the gene CG6234. Inhibition of CG6234 by RNA interference resulted in morphological defects in embryos, suggesting the involvement of this gene in germ band retraction. Conclusion Our data have yielded a list of developmentally regulated D. melanogaster genes and their expression profiles during embryogenesis and provide new information on the spatiotemporal expression patterns of several uncharacterized genes. In particular, we

  10. Geometric Hyperplanes: Desargues Encodes Doily

    CERN Document Server

    Saniga, Metod

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that the structure of the generalized quadrangle of order two is fully encoded in the properties of the Desargues configuration. A point of the quadrangle is represented by a geometric hyperplane of the Desargues configuration and its line by a set of three hyperplanes such that one of them is the complement of the symmetric difference of the remaining two and they all share a pair of non-collinear points.

  11. Least-squares reverse time migration of marine data with frequency-selection encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-06-24

    The phase-encoding technique can sometimes increase the efficiency of the least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) by more than one order of magnitude. However, traditional random encoding functions require all the encoded shots to share the same receiver locations, thus limiting the usage to seismic surveys with a fixed spread geometry. We implement a frequency-selection encoding strategy that accommodates data with a marine streamer geometry. The encoding functions are delta functions in the frequency domain, so that all the encoded shots have unique nonoverlapping frequency content, and the receivers can distinguish the wavefield from each shot with a unique frequency band. Because the encoding functions are orthogonal to each other, there will be no crosstalk between different shots during modeling and migration. With the frequency-selection encoding method, the computational efficiency of LSRTM is increased so that its cost is comparable to conventional RTM for the Marmousi2 model and a marine data set recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. With more iterations, the LSRTM image quality is further improved by suppressing migration artifacts, balancing reflector amplitudes, and enhancing the spatial resolution. We conclude that LSRTM with frequency-selection is an efficient migration method that can sometimes produce more focused images than conventional RTM. © 2013 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  12. Vector Encoding in Biochemical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    Encoding of environmental cues via biochemical signaling pathways is of vital importance in the transmission of information for cells in a network. The current literature assumes a single cell state is used to encode information, however, recent research suggests the optimal strategy utilizes a vector of cell states sampled at various time points. To elucidate the optimal sampling strategy for vector encoding, we take an information theoretic approach and determine the mutual information of the calcium signaling dynamics obtained from fibroblast cells perturbed with different concentrations of ATP. Specifically, we analyze the sampling strategies under the cases of fixed and non-fixed vector dimension as well as the efficiency of these strategies. Our results show that sampling with greater frequency is optimal in the case of non-fixed vector dimension but that, in general, a lower sampling frequency is best from both a fixed vector dimension and efficiency standpoint. Further, we find the use of a simple modified Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model qualitatively captures many of our experimental results suggesting that sampling in biochemical networks is based on a few basic components.

  13. Lachesis muta (Viperidae) cDNAs reveal diverging pit viper molecules and scaffolds typical of cobra (Elapidae) venoms: implications for snake toxin repertoire evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Inácio L M; Ching, Ana T C; Carvalho, Eneas; Faria, Fernanda; Nishiyama, Milton Y; Ho, Paulo L; Diniz, Marcelo R V

    2006-06-01

    Efforts to describe toxins from the two major families of venomous snakes (Viperidae and Elapidae) usually reveal proteins belonging to few structural types, particular of each family. Here we carried on an effort to determine uncommon cDNAs that represent possible new toxins from Lachesis muta (Viperidae). In addition to nine classes of typical toxins, atypical molecules never observed in the hundreds of Viperidae snakes studied so far are highly expressed: a diverging C-type lectin that is related to Viperidae toxins but appears to be independently originated; an ohanin-like toxin, which would be the third member of the most recently described class of Elapidae toxins, related to human butyrophilin and B30.2 proteins; and a 3FTx-like toxin, a new member of the widely studied three-finger family of proteins, which includes major Elapidae neurotoxins and CD59 antigen. The presence of these common and uncommon molecules suggests that the repertoire of toxins could be more conserved between families than has been considered, and their features indicate a dynamic process of venom evolution through molecular mechanisms, such as multiple recruitments of important scaffolds and domain exchange between paralogs, always keeping a minimalist nature in most toxin structures in opposition to their nontoxin counterparts.

  14. The gene for a cytoplasmic intermediate filament (IF) protein of the hemichordate Saccoglossus kowalevskii; definition of the unique features of chordate IF proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimek, Alexander; Weber, Klaus

    2002-04-17

    We have isolated full length cDNAs encoding a cytoplasmic intermediate filament (IF) protein of a priapulid (Priapulus caudatus) and of a hemichordate (Saccoglossus kowalevskii) and determined the organisation of the hemichordate gene. As expected, the priapulid protein shows the long coil 1b subdomain and the lamin tail homology segment already known for cytoplasmic IF proteins from 11 other protostomic phyla. Surprisingly, the hemichordate protein follows in domain organisation much more closely the protostomic IF proteins than the chordate IF proteins. Thus, the lack of a lamin tail homology segment together with a deletion of 42 residues in the coil 1b domain is a molecular feature restricted to the chordates. We propose that the known IF subfamilies I to IV developed by gene duplications and sequence drift after the deletion in coil 1b arose at the base of the chordate branch.

  15. UNIQUENESS ON ZERO PRESSURE GAS DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄飞敏; 王振

    2001-01-01

    By introducing a new idea, the authors prove the uniqueness of weak solution of pressureless gases with the large initial data. In particular, uniqueness theorem is obtained in the same functional space as the existence theorem.

  16. The seahorse, the almond, and the night-mare: elaborative encoding during sleep-paralysis hallucinations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Todd A

    2013-12-01

    Llewellyn's proposal that rapid eye movement (REM) dreaming reflects elaborative encoding mediated by the hippocampus ("seahorse") offers an interesting perspective for understanding hallucinations accompanying sleep paralysis (SP; "night-mare"). SP arises from anomalous intrusion of REM processes into waking consciousness, including threat-detection systems mediated by the amygdala ("almond"). Unique aspects of SP hallucinations offer additional prospects for investigation of Llewellyn's theory of elaborative encoding.

  17. Characterization of three transcripts encoding small heat shock proteins expressed in the codling moth, Cydia pomone//a (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen F. Garczynski; Thomas R. Unruh; Christelle Guédot; Lisa G. Neven

    2011-01-01

    Codling moth is a major pest of apples and pears worldwide. Increasing knowledge of how this insect responds to environmental stress will improve field and postharvest control measures used against it. The small heat shock proteins (sHsps) play a major role in cellular responses to environmental stressors. A degenerate oligonucleotide primer,designed against the conserved α-crystallin domain, was used in 3′ rapid amplification of complementary DNA (cDNA) ends reactions to amplify transcripts encoding sHsps expressed in the codling moth cell line, Cp169, subjected to heat shock. Three full-length cDNAs were cloned from Cp169 cells that contained open reading frames encoding sHsps.The cDNA for CpHsp 19.8 was 795 bp encoding 177 amino acids. The cDNA for CpHsp 19.9 was 749 bp encoding 175 amino acids. The cDNA for CpHsp22.2 was 737 bp encoding 192 amino acids. Analysis of the protein sequences of the three CpHsps indicated the presence of 83 amino acids with homology to the α-crystallin domain. For each of the CpHsps, the α-crystallin domain was surrounded by divergent N- and C-terminal regions, consistent with the conserved structural features of sHsps. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, used to determine the expression patterns of each of the sHsps in different developmental stages of codling moth revealed the presence of transcripts in all stages tested. Consistent with characteristics of other sHsps, expression of CpHsp transcripts were greatly enhanced when insects were subjected to heat shock. The results of this research can be used as a guide to study the roles of sHsps in codling moth control using various post-harvest treatments.

  18. On the uniqueness of supersymmetric attractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taniya Mandal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the uniqueness of supersymmetric attractors in four-dimensional N=2 supergravity theories coupled to n vector multiplets. We prove that for a given charge configuration the supersymmetry preserving axion free attractors are unique. We generalise the analysis to axionic attractors and state the conditions for uniqueness explicitly. We consider the example of a two-parameter model and find all solutions to the supersymmetric attractor equations and discuss their uniqueness.

  19. Hall effect encoding of brushless dc motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, C. A.; Furia, T. J.; Goldberg, E. A.; Greene, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    Encoding mechanism integral to the motor and using the permanent magnets embedded in the rotor eliminates the need for external devices to encode information relating the position and velocity of the rotating member.

  20. 77 FR 69393 - Unique Device Identification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 801 RIN 0910-AG31 Unique Device Identification... unique device identification system as required by recent amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and..., FDA published a proposed rule to establish a unique device identification system, as required by...

  1. On chromatic and flow polynomial unique graphs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duan, Yinghua; Wu, Haidong; Yu, Qinglin

    2008-01-01

    ... research on graphs uniquely determined by their chromatic polynomials and more recently on their Tutte polynomials, but rather spotty research on graphs uniquely determined by their flow polynomials or the combination of both chromatic and flow polynomials. This article is an initiation of investigation on graphs uniquely determin...

  2. Drug discovery with DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Fabian; Mannocci, Luca; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2010-09-15

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries represent a novel avenue for the facile discovery of small molecule ligands against target proteins of biological or pharmaceutical importance. Library members consist of small molecules covalently attached to unique DNA fragments that serve as amplifiable identification barcodes. This encoding allows the in vitro selection of ligands at subpicomolar concentrations from large library populations by affinity capture on a target protein of interest, in analogy to established technologies for the selection of binding polypeptides (e.g., antibodies). Different library formats have been explored by various groups, allowing the construction of chemical libraries comprising up to millions of DNA-encoded compounds. Libraries before and after selection have been characterized by PCR amplification of the DNA codes and subsequent relative quantification of library members using high-throughput sequencing. The most enriched compounds have then been further analyzed in biological assays, in the presence or in the absence of linked DNA. This article reviews experimental strategies used for the construction of DNA-encoded chemical libraries, revealing how selection, decoding, and hit validation technologies have been used for drug discovery programs.

  3. [Neurons that encode sound direction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, J L

    In the auditory system, the inner ear breaks down complex signals into their spectral components, and encodes the amplitude and phase of each. In order to infer sound direction in space, a computation on each frequency component of the sound must be performed. Space specific neurons in the owl s inferior colliculus respond only to sounds coming from a particular direction and represent the results of this computation. The interaural time difference (ITD) and interaural level difference (ILD define the auditory space for the owl and are processed in separate neural pathways. The parallel pathways that process these cues merge in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus where the space specific neurons are selective to combinations of ITD and ILD. How do inputs from the two sources interact to produce combination selectivity to ITD ILD pairs? A multiplication of postsynaptic potentials tuned to ITD and ILD can account for the subthreshold responses of these neurons to ITD ILD pairs. Examples of multiplication by neurons or neural circuits are scarce, but many computational models assume the existence of this basic operation. The owl s auditory system uses such operation to create a 2 dimensional map of auditory space. The map of space in the owl s auditory system shows important similarities with representations of space in the cerebral cortex and other sensory systems. In encoding space or other stimulus features, individual neurons appear to possess analogous functional properties related to the synthesis of high order receptive fields.

  4. A Note on Encodings of Phylogenetic Networks of Bounded Level

    CERN Document Server

    Gambette, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Driven by the need for better models that allow one to shed light into the question how life's diversity has evolved, phylogenetic networks have now joined phylogenetic trees in the center of phylogenetics research. Like phylogenetic trees, such networks canonically induce collections of phylogenetic trees, clusters, and triplets, respectively. Thus it is not surprising that many network approaches aim to reconstruct a phylogenetic network from such collections. Related to the well-studied perfect phylogeny problem, the following question is of fundamental importance in this context: When does one of the above collections encode (i.e. uniquely describe) the network that induces it? In this note, we present a complete answer to this question for the special case of a level-1 (phylogenetic) network by characterizing those level-1 networks for which an encoding in terms of one (or equivalently all) of the above collections exists. Given that this type of network forms the first layer of the rich hierarchy of lev...

  5. Cloning and expression profiles of 15 genes encoding WRKY transcription factor in wheat (Triticum aestivem L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hualing Wu; Zhongfu Ni; Yingyin Yao; Ganggang Guo; Qixin Sun

    2008-01-01

    WRKY proteins are involved in various physiological processes, including biotic and abiotic stress responses, hormone responses and development. However, no systematic identification, expression and function analysis of WRKY genes in wheat were reported. In this study, we isolated 15 wheat cDNAs with complete open reading frame (ORF) encoding putative WRKY proteins using in silico cloning. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the 15 wheat WRKY genes belonged to three major WRKY groups. Expression analysis revealed that most genes expressed drastically in leaf, except TaWRKY10 which expressed in crown intensively. Four genes were strongly up-regulated with the senescence of leaves. Eight genes were responsive to low temperature, high temperature, NaCl or PEG treatment. Moreover, differential expression patterns were also observed between wheat hybrid and its parents, and some genes were more responsive to PEG treatment in the hybrid. These results demonstrated that wheat WRKY genes are involved in leaf senescing and abiotic stresses. And the changed expression of these WRKY genes in hybrid might contribute to the heterosis by improving the stress tolerance in hybrids.

  6. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltzius, Jed J W; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R; Apostol, Marcin I; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David

    2009-09-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of beta-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct beta-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  7. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David; (Cornell); (HHMI)

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  8. Dynamical encoding of cursive handwriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Y; Tishby, N

    1994-01-01

    A model-based approach to on-line cursive handwriting analysis and recognition is presented and evaluated. In this model, on-line handwriting is considered as a modulation of a simple cycloidal pen motion, described by two coupled oscillations with a constant linear drift along the line of the writing. By slow modulations of the amplitudes and phase lags of the two oscillators, a general pen trajectory can be efficiently encoded. These parameters are then quantized into a small number of values without altering the writing intelligibility. A general procedure for the estimation and quantization of these cycloidal motion parameters for arbitrary handwriting is presented. The result is a discrete motor control representation of the continuous pen motion, via the quantized levels of the model parameters. This motor control representation enables successful word spotting and matching of cursive scripts. Our experiments clearly indicate the potential of this dynamic representation for complete cursive handwriting recognition.

  9. Genetically Encoded Sensors for Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschle, Karen; Fehr, Marcus; Hilpert, Melanie; Lager, Ida; Lalonde, Sylvie; Looger, Loren L.; Okumoto, Sakiko; Persson, Jörgen; Schmidt, Anja; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Metabolomics, i.e., the multiparallel analysis of metabolite changes occurring in a cell or an organism, has become feasible with the development of highly efficient mass spectroscopic technologies. Functional genomics as a standard tool helped to identify the function of many of the genes that encode important transporters and metabolic enzymes over the past few years. Advanced expression systems and analysis technologies made it possible to study the biochemical properties of the corresponding proteins in great detail. We begin to understand the biological functions of the gene products by systematic analysis of mutants using systematic PTGS/RNAi, knockout and TILLING approaches. However, one crucial set of data especially relevant in the case of multicellular organisms is lacking: the knowledge of the spatial and temporal profiles of metabolite levels at cellular and subcellular levels. Methods We therefore developed genetically encoded nanosensors for several metabolites to provide a basic set of tools for the determination of cytosolic and subcellular metabolite levels in real time by using fluorescence microscopy. Results Prototypes of these sensors were successfully used in vitro and also in vivo, i.e., to measure sugar levels in fungal and animal cells. Conclusions One of the future goals will be to expand the set of sensors to a wider spectrum of substrates by using the natural spectrum of periplasmic binding proteins from bacteria and by computational design of proteins with altered binding pockets in conjunction with mutagenesis. This toolbox can then be applied for four-dimensional imaging of cells and tissues to elucidate the spatial and temporal distribution of metabolites as a discovery tool in functional genomics, as a tool for high-throughput, high-content screening for drugs, to test metabolic models, and to analyze the interplay of cells in a tissue or organ. PMID:15688353

  10. Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory contains selected information on physicians, doctors of Osteopathy, limited licensed practitioners and...

  11. Identification of genes encoding photoconvertible (Class I) water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins from Chenopodium ficifolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Abe, Eriko; Nakayama, Katsumi; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Photoconvertible water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins, called Class I WSCPs, have been detected in Chenopodiaceae, Amaranthaceae and Polygonaceae plant species. To date, Chenopodium album WSCP (CaWSCP) is the only cloned gene encoding a Class I WSCP. In this study, we identified two cDNAs encoding Chenopodium ficifolium Class I WSCPs, CfWSCP1, and CfWSCP2. Sequence analyses revealed that the open reading frames of CfWSCP1 and CfWSCP2 were 585 and 588 bp, respectively. Furthermore, both CfWSCPs contain cystein2 and cystein30, which are essential for the chlorophyll-binding ability of CaWSCP. Recombinant CfWSCP1 and CfWSCP2, expressed in Escherichia coli as hexa-histidine fusion proteins (CfWSCP1-His and CfWSCP2-His), formed inclusion bodies; however, we were able to solubilize these using a buffer containing 8 M urea and then refold them by dialysis. The refolded CfWSCP1-His and CfWSCP2-His could bind chlorophylls and exhibited photoconvertibility, confirming that the cloned CfWSCPs are further examples of Class I WSCPs.

  12. Fungi unearthed: transcripts encoding lignocellulolytic and chitinolytic enzymes in forest soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Kellner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fungi are the main organisms responsible for the degradation of biopolymers such as lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose, and chitin in forest ecosystems. Soil surveys largely target fungal diversity, paying less attention to fungal activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have focused on the organic horizon of a hardwood forest dominated by sugar maple that spreads widely across Eastern North America. The sampling site included three plots receiving normal atmospheric nitrogen deposition and three that received an extra 3 g nitrogen m(2 y(1 in form of sodium nitrate pellets since 1994, which led to increased accumulation of organic matter in the soil. Our aim was to assess, in samples taken from all six plots, transcript-level expression of fungal genes encoding lignocellulolytic and chitinolytic enzymes. For this we collected RNA from the forest soil, reverse-transcribed it, and amplified cDNAs of interest, using both published primer pairs as well as 23 newly developed ones. We thus detected transcript-level expression of 234 genes putatively encoding 26 different groups of fungal enzymes, notably major ligninolytic and diverse aromatic-oxidizing enzymes, various cellulose- and hemicellulose-degrading glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate esterases, enzymes involved in chitin breakdown, N-acetylglucosamine metabolism, and cell wall degradation. Among the genes identified, 125 are homologous to known ascomycete genes and 105 to basidiomycete genes. Transcripts corresponding to all 26 enzyme groups were detected in both control and nitrogen-supplemented plots. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Many of these enzyme groups are known to be important in soil turnover processes, but the contribution of some is probably underestimated. Our data highlight the importance of ascomycetes, as well as basidiomycetes, in important biogeochemical cycles. In the nitrogen-supplemented plots, we have detected no transcript-level gap likely to explain

  13. Characterization of the gene encoding the polymorphic immunodominant molecule, a neutralizing antigen of Theileria parva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toye, P.G.; Metzelaar, M.J.; Wijngaard, P.L.J. [Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Theileria parva, a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite related to Plasmodium spp., causes the disease East Coast fever, an acute and usually fatal lymphoproliferative disorder of cattle in Africa. Previous studies using sera from cattle that have survived infection identified a polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that is expressed by both the infective sporozoite stage of the parasite and the intracellular schizont. Here we show that mAb specific for the PIM Ag can inhibit sporozoite invasion of lymphocytes in vitro. A cDNA clone encoding the PIM Ag of the T. parva (Muguga) stock was obtained by using these mAb in a novel eukaryotic expression cloning system that allows isolation of cDNA encoding cytoplasmic or surface Ags. To establish the molecular basis of the polymorphism of PIM, the cDNA of the PIM Ag from a buffalo-derived T. parva stock was isolated and its sequence was compared with that of the cattle-derived Muguga PIM. The two cDNAs showed considerable identity in both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} regions, but there was substantial sequence divergence in the central regions. Several types of repeated sequences were identified in the variant regions. In the Muguga form of the molecule, there were five tandem repeats of the tetrapeptide, QPEP, that were shown, by transfection of a deleted version of the PIM gene, not to react with several anti-PIM mAbs. By isolating and sequencing the genomic version of the gene, we identified two small introns in the 3{prime} region of the gene. Finally, we showed that polyclonal rat Abs against recombinant PIM neutralize sporozoite infectivity in vitro, suggesting that the PIM Ag should be evaluated for its capacity to immunize cattle against East Coast Fever.

  14. Fungi unearthed: transcripts encoding lignocellulolytic and chitinolytic enzymes in forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Harald; Zak, Donald R; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2010-06-04

    Fungi are the main organisms responsible for the degradation of biopolymers such as lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose, and chitin in forest ecosystems. Soil surveys largely target fungal diversity, paying less attention to fungal activity. Here we have focused on the organic horizon of a hardwood forest dominated by sugar maple that spreads widely across Eastern North America. The sampling site included three plots receiving normal atmospheric nitrogen deposition and three that received an extra 3 g nitrogen m(2) y(1) in form of sodium nitrate pellets since 1994, which led to increased accumulation of organic matter in the soil. Our aim was to assess, in samples taken from all six plots, transcript-level expression of fungal genes encoding lignocellulolytic and chitinolytic enzymes. For this we collected RNA from the forest soil, reverse-transcribed it, and amplified cDNAs of interest, using both published primer pairs as well as 23 newly developed ones. We thus detected transcript-level expression of 234 genes putatively encoding 26 different groups of fungal enzymes, notably major ligninolytic and diverse aromatic-oxidizing enzymes, various cellulose- and hemicellulose-degrading glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate esterases, enzymes involved in chitin breakdown, N-acetylglucosamine metabolism, and cell wall degradation. Among the genes identified, 125 are homologous to known ascomycete genes and 105 to basidiomycete genes. Transcripts corresponding to all 26 enzyme groups were detected in both control and nitrogen-supplemented plots. Many of these enzyme groups are known to be important in soil turnover processes, but the contribution of some is probably underestimated. Our data highlight the importance of ascomycetes, as well as basidiomycetes, in important biogeochemical cycles. In the nitrogen-supplemented plots, we have detected no transcript-level gap likely to explain the observed increased carbon storage, which is more likely due to community changes and

  15. Confabulation in Alzheimer's disease: poor encoding and retrieval of over-learned information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attali, Eve; De Anna, Francesca; Dubois, Bruno; Dalla Barba, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    Patients who confabulate retrieve personal habits, repeated events or over-learned information and mistake them for actually experienced, specific unique events. Although some hypotheses favour a disruption of frontal/executive functions operating at retrieval, the respective involvement of encoding and retrieval processes in confabulation is still controversial. The present study sought to investigate experimentally the involvement of encoding and retrieval processes and the interference of over-learned information in the confabulation of Alzheimer's disease patients. Twenty Alzheimer's disease patients and 20 normal controls encoded and retrieved unknown stories, well-known fairy tales (e.g. Snow White) and modified well-known fairy tales (e.g. Little Red Riding Hood is not eaten by the wolf) under three experimental conditions: (i) full attention at encoding and at retrieval; (ii) divided attention at encoding (i.e. performing an attention demanding secondary task) and full attention at retrieval; (iii) full attention at encoding and divided attention at retrieval. We found that confabulations in Alzheimer's disease patients were more frequent for the modified well-known fairy tales and when encoding was weakened by a concurrent secondary task (61%), compared with the other types of stories and experimental conditions. Confabulations in the modified fairy tales always consisted of elements of the original version of the fairy tale (e.g. Little Red Riding Hood is eaten by the wolf). This is the first experimental evidence showing that poor encoding and over-learned information are involved in confabulation in Alzheimer's disease.

  16. NMDA receptors and memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard G M

    2013-11-01

    It is humbling to think that 30 years have passed since the paper by Collingridge, Kehl and McLennan showing that one of Jeff Watkins most interesting compounds, R-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (d-AP5), blocked the induction of long-term potentiation in vitro at synapses from area CA3 of the hippocampus to CA1 without apparent effect on baseline synaptic transmission (Collingridge et al., 1983). This dissociation was one of the key triggers for an explosion of interest in glutamate receptors, and much has been discovered since that collectively contributes to our contemporary understanding of glutamatergic synapses - their biophysics and subunit composition, of the agonists and antagonists acting on them, and their diverse functions in different networks of the brain and spinal cord. It can be fairly said that Collingridge et al.'s (1983) observation was the stimulus that has led, on the one hand, to structural biological work at the atomic scale describing the key features of NMDA receptors that enables their coincidence function to happen; and, on the other, to work with whole animals investigating the contributions that calcium signalling via this receptor can have on rhythmical activities controlled by spinal circuits, memory encoding in the hippocampus (the topic of this article), visual cortical plasticity, sensitization in pain, and other functions. In this article, I lay out how my then interest in long-term potentiation (LTP) as a model of memory enabled me to recognise the importance of Collingridge et al.'s discovery - and how I and my colleagues endeavoured to take things forward in the area of learning and memory. This is in some respects a personal story, and I tell it as such. The idea that NMDA receptor activation is essential for memory encoding, though not for storage, took time to develop and to be accepted. Along the way, there have been confusions, challenges, and surprises surrounding the idea that activation of NMDA receptors can

  17. A unique dual activity amino acid hydroxylase in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Gaskell

    Full Text Available The genome of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii was found to contain two genes encoding tyrosine hydroxylase; that produces L-DOPA. The encoded enzymes metabolize phenylalanine as well as tyrosine with substrate preference for tyrosine. Thus the enzymes catabolize phenylalanine to tyrosine and tyrosine to L-DOPA. The catalytic domain descriptive of this class of enzymes is conserved with the parasite enzyme and exhibits similar kinetic properties to metazoan tyrosine hydroxylases, but contains a unique N-terminal extension with a signal sequence motif. One of the genes, TgAaaH1, is constitutively expressed while the other gene, TgAaaH2, is induced during formation of the bradyzoites of the cyst stages of the life cycle. This is the first description of an aromatic amino acid hydroxylase in an apicomplexan parasite. Extensive searching of apicomplexan genome sequences revealed an ortholog in Neospora caninum but not in Eimeria, Cryptosporidium, Theileria, or Plasmodium. Possible role(s of these bi-functional enzymes during host infection are discussed.

  18. Uniqueness of time-independent electromagnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Per W.

    1974-01-01

    As a comment on a recent paper by Steele, a more general uniqueness theorem for time-independent fields is mentioned. ©1974 American Institute of Physics......As a comment on a recent paper by Steele, a more general uniqueness theorem for time-independent fields is mentioned. ©1974 American Institute of Physics...

  19. Some Graphs Containing Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, two classes of graphs of arbitrary order are described which contain unique Hamiltonian cycles. All the graphs have mean vertex degree greater than one quarter the order of the graph. The Hamiltonian cycles are detailed, their uniqueness proved and simple rules for the construction of the adjacency matrix of the graphs are given.…

  20. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  1. 78 FR 58785 - Unique Device Identification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... 16, 801, 803, et al. Unique Device Identification System; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78... 0910-AG31 Unique Device Identification System AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final... will substantially reduce existing obstacles to the adequate identification of medical devices used in...

  2. Novelty's effect on memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Gomez, Mauricio; Janenaite, Sigita; Meeter, Martijn

    2015-07-01

    It is often thought that novelty benefits memory formation. However, support for this idea mostly comes from paradigms that are open to alternative explanations. In the present study we manipulated novelty in a word-learning task through task-irrelevant background images. These background images were either standard (presented repeatedly), or novel (presented only once). Two types of background images were used: Landscape pictures and fractals. EEG was also recorded during encoding. Contrary to the idea that novelty aids memory formation, memory performance was not affected by the novelty of the background. In the evoked response potentials, we found evidence of distracting effects of novelty: both the N1 and P3b components were smaller to words studied with novel backgrounds, and the amplitude of the N2b component correlated negatively with subsequent retrieval. We conclude that although evidence from other studies does suggest benefits on a longer time scale, novelty has no instantaneous benefits for learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A note on uniquely (nil clean ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Sahebi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A ring $R$ is uniquely (nil clean in case for any $a\\in R$‎ ‎there exists a uniquely idempotent $e\\in R$ such that $a-e$ is‎ ‎invertible (nilpotent‎. ‎Let‎ ‎$C=\\small\\left(‎‎\\begin{array}{cc}‎‎A & V \\\\‎ ‎W & B‎‎\\end{array}‎‎\\right$‎ ‎be the Morita Context ring‎. ‎We determine conditions under which the rings $A‎, ‎B$‎ ‎are uniquely (nil clean‎. ‎Moreover we show that the center of a uniquely (nil‎‎clean ring is uniquely (nil clean.

  4. Parallel detection of antigen-specific T cell responses by combinatorial encoding of MHC multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Kvistborg, Pia; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch;

    2012-01-01

    -dimensional combinatorial matrix, these eight fluorochromes are combined to generate 28 unique two-color codes. By the use of combinatorial encoding, a large number of different T cell populations can be detected in a single sample. The method can be used for T cell epitope mapping, and also for the monitoring of CD8...

  5. Computational Intelligence and Its Encoding Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Man-dan

    2004-01-01

    The origin and characteristics of computational intelligence, and several typical computational intelligence algorithms such as genetic algorithm and DNA computing are described, and the influence of evolution strategies and convergence properties on the encoding mechanism is discussed. A novel genetic algorithm based on degressive carry number encoding is then proposed. This algorithm uses degressive carry number encoding in the evolutionary process instead of commonly used fixed carry number. Finally a novel encoding mechanism and a new algorithm are proposed, which combine modern computational intelligence with the traditional Chinese methodology.

  6. Computational Intelligence and Its Encoding Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUMan-dan

    2004-01-01

    The origin and characteristics of computational intelligence, and several typical computational intelligence algorithms such as genetic algorithm and DNA computing are described, and the influence of evolution strategies and convergence properties on the encoding mechanism is discussed. A novel genetic algorithm based on degressive carry number encoding is then proposed. This algorithm uses degressive carry number encoding in the evolutionary process instead of commonly used fixed carry number. Finally a novel encoding mechanism and a new algorithm are proposed, which combine modem computational intelligence with the traditional Chinese methodology.

  7. Encoder designed to work in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toop, L.

    2007-05-15

    Dynapar has developed the Acuro AX71 absolute encoder for use on offshore or land-based oil rig operations. It provides feedback on the operation of automated systems such as draw works, racking systems, rotary tables and top drives. By ensuring that automated systems function properly, this encoder responds to a need by the oil and gas industry to keep workers safe and improve efficiency, particularly for operations in rugged situations. The encoder provides feedback from motor systems to controllers, giving information about position and speed of downhole drill bits. This newly developed encoder is better than commonly used incremental encoders which are not precise in strong electrical noise environments. Rather, the absolute encoder uses a different method of reporting to the controller. A digital signal is transmitted constantly as the device operates. It is less susceptible to noise issues. It is highly accurate, tolerant of noise and is not affected by power outages. However, the absolute encoder is generally more delicate in drilling applications with high ambient temperatures and shock levels. Dynapar addressed this issue by developing compact stainless steel housing that is useful for corrosion resistance in marine applications. The AX71 absolute encoder can withstand up to 100 G of mechanical shock and ambient temperatures of up to 60 degrees C. The encoder is ATEX certified without barriers, and offers the high resolution feedback of 4,000 counts of multiturn rotation and 16,000 counts of position. 1 fig.

  8. Isolation and characterisation of laccase cDNAs from meristematic and stem tissues of ryegrass (¤Lolium perenne¤)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, B.; Larsen, K.; Rasmussen, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    is located intracellularly. A genomic clone, gLpLAC5-4, has been isolated and represents the first exon-intron structure and promoter sequence of a plant laccase gene. LpLAC5-6 cDNA encodes a protein of 579 amino acids with an N-terminal signal peptide characteristic of secreted proteins, 13 potential N...

  9. Structure of the gene encoding columbid annexin Icp35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitti, Y S; Horseman, N D

    1991-07-22

    The cp35 gene, encoding an annexin I (AnxI) cropsac 35-kDa protein (cp35) from the pigeon, consists of 13 exons and twelve introns. The borders of exons 2-13 were mapped by comparison with the known cDNA sequence. A 5-kb sequence containing exons 1, 2, and 3, and 1.4 kb of 5'-flanking DNA, is presented. The transcription start point was mapped by S1 nuclease protection. The region of the cp35 mRNA sequence, which we had previously shown to be profoundly different from mammalian anxI, is located in the first half of exon 3. Whereas human anxI is known to be single copy, Southern analysis of pigeon genomic DNA and genomic clones demonstrated multiple anxI genes in the pigeon, diverging significantly in their 5'-termini. Pigeon vimentin, on the other hand, is encoded by a single-copy gene as it is in other birds and mammals. These experiments have demonstrated that the cp35 mRNA is transcribed from its individual gene and is not a product of alternative processing of the pigeon homolog of mammalian anxI. We speculate that the diversification of anxI genes in Columbid birds allowed the recruitment of one of these genes (cp35) for unique regulation by prolactin in the absence of post-translational regulation via residues encoded by exons 2 and 3.

  10. Cellular encoding for interactive evolutionary robotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruau, F.C.; Quatramaran, K.

    1996-01-01

    This work reports experiments in interactive evolutionary robotics. The goal is to evolve an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to control the locomotion of an 8-legged robot. The ANNs are encoded using a cellular developmental process called cellular encoding. In a previous work similar experiments ha

  11. A METHOD OF SHAPE ENCODING AND RETRIEVAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xianglin; Song Lei; Shen Lansun

    2002-01-01

    A method of shape encoding and retrieval is proposed in this letter, which uses centripetal code to encode shape and extracts shape's convex for retrieval. For the rotation invariance and translation invariance of the centripetal code and the normalization of convex,the proposed retrieval method is similarity transform resistant, Experimental results confirm this capability.

  12. The Arabic Diatessaron Project: Digitalizing, Encoding, Lemmatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Lancioni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Arabic Diatessaron Project (henceforth ADP is an international research project in Digital Humanities that aims to collect, digitalise and encode all known manuscripts of the Arabic Diatessaron (henceforth AD, a text that has been relatively neglected in scholarly research. ADP’s final goal is to provide a number of tools that can enable scholars to effectively query, compare and investigate all known variants of the text that will be encoded as far as possible in compliance with the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI guidelines. The paper addresses a number of issues involved in the process of digitalising manuscripts included in the two existing editions (Ciasca 1888 and Marmardji 1935, adding variants in unedited manuscripts, encoding and lemmatising the text. Issues involved in the design of the ADP include presentation of variants, choice of the standard text, applicability of TEI guidelines, automatic translation between different encodings, cross-edition concordances and principles of lemmatisation.

  13. High Blood Pressure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z High Blood Pressure Hypertension Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... Pressure Targets are Different for Very Old Adults High blood pressure (also called hypertension) increases your chance of having ...

  14. Arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: A unique presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F Opalak

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This case demonstrates a unique presentation of AO and highlights the need for CT imaging when a noncommunicating syringx is identified. In addition, surgical decompression can achieve good results when AO is associated with concurrent compressive lesions.

  15. Falls Prevention: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Falls Prevention Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... and Muscle Strengthening Exercises As part of your fall prevention program, you should follow an exercise program ...

  16. Confabulation in healthy aging is related to poor encoding and retrieval of over-learned information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attali, Eve; Dalla Barba, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Normal aging is characterized by deficits that cross multiple cognitive domains including episodic memory and attention. Compared to young adults (YA), older adults (OA) not only show reduction in true memories, but also an increase in false memories. In this study we aim to elucidate how the production of confabulation is influenced by encoding and retrieval processes. We hypothesized that in OA, compared to YA, over-learned information interferes with the recall of specific, unique past episodes and this interference should be more prominent when a concurrent task perturbs the encoding of the episodes to be recalled. We tested this hypothesis using an experimental paradigm in which a group of OA and a group of YA had to recall three different types of story: a previously unknown story, a well-known fairy tale (Snow White), and a modified well-known fairy tale (Little Red Riding Hood is not eaten by the wolf), in three different experimental conditions: (1) free encoding and free retrieval; (2) Divided attention (DA) at encoding and free retrieval; and (3) free encoding and DA at retrieval. Results showed that OA produced significantly more confabulations than YA, particularly, in the recall of the modified fairy tale. Moreover, DA at encoding markedly increased the number of confabulations, whereas DA at retrieval had no effect on confabulation. Our findings reveal the implications of two phenomena in the production of confabulation in normal aging: the effect of poor encoding and the interference of strongly represented, over-learned information in episodic memory recall.

  17. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Nenert

    Full Text Available Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA. All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN. Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  18. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenert, Rodolphe; Allendorfer, Jane B; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2014-01-01

    Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA) with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA). All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions) and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN). Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s) of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  19. Right temporopolar activation associated with unique perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Tomoki; Konishi, Seiki; Jimura, Koji; Chikazoe, Junichi; Nakamura, Noriko; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2008-05-15

    Unique mode of perception, or the ability to see things differently from others, is one of the psychological resources required for creative mental activities. Behavioral studies using ambiguous visual stimuli have successfully induced diverse responses from subjects, and the unique responses defined in this paradigm were observed in higher frequency in the artistic population as compared to the nonartistic population. However, the neural substrates that underlie such unique perception have yet to be investigated. In the present study, ten ambiguous figures were used as stimuli. The subjects were instructed to say what the figures looked like during functional MRI scanning. The responses were classified as "frequent", "infrequent" or "unique" responses based on the appearance frequency of the same response in an independent age- and gender-matched control group. An event-related analysis contrasting unique vs. frequent responses revealed the greatest activation in the right temporal pole, which survived a whole brain multiple comparison. An alternative parametric modulation analysis was also performed to show that potentially confounding perceptual effects deriving from differences in visual stimuli make no significant contribution to this temporopolar activation. Previous neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies have shown the involvement of the temporal pole in perception-emotion linkage. Thus, our results suggest that unique perception is produced by the integration of perceptual and emotional processes, and this integration might underlie essential parts of creative mental activities.

  20. Amygdalar enlargement associated with unique perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Tomoki; Konishi, Seiki; Jimura, Koji; Chikazoe, Junichi; Nakamura, Noriko; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Interference by amygdalar activity in perceptual processes has been reported in many previous studies. Consistent with these reports, previous clinical studies have shown amygdalar volume change in multiple types of psychotic disease presenting with unusual perception. However, the relationship between variation in amygdalar volume in the normal population and the tendency toward unusual or unique perception has never been investigated. To address this issue, we defined an index to represent the tendency toward unique perception using ambiguous stimuli: subjects were instructed to state what the figures looked like to them, and "unique responses" were defined depending on the appearance frequency of the same responses in an age- and gender-matched control group. The index was defined as the ratio of unique responses to total responses per subject. We obtained structural brain images and values of the index from sixty-eight normal subjects. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed a positive correlation between amygdalar volume and the index. Since previous reports have indicated that unique responses were observed at higher frequency in the artistic population than in the nonartistic normal population, this positive correlation suggests that amygdalar enlargement in the normal population might be related to creative mental activity.

  1. Existence and Uniqueness in Shape from Shading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓雁萍; 李价谷

    1997-01-01

    For the image of a smooth surface object fully contained within the field of view and illuminated in and arbitrary direction,this paper discusses the existence and uniqueness o the conditions for solving a shape-from-shading problem under the conditions that the Fourier series expansion of the image intensity contains only zero and first order terms in a polar coordinate system.Three theorems are established,one for the existence and two for the uniqueness of z-axis symmetric shape from shading.

  2. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wogulis, Mark

    2017-04-04

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  3. Chemical Space of DNA-Encoded Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Raphael M; Randolph, Cassie

    2016-07-28

    In recent years, DNA-encoded chemical libraries (DECLs) have attracted considerable attention as a potential discovery tool in drug development. Screening encoded libraries may offer advantages over conventional hit discovery approaches and has the potential to complement such methods in pharmaceutical research. As a result of the increased application of encoded libraries in drug discovery, a growing number of hit compounds are emerging in scientific literature. In this review we evaluate reported encoded library-derived structures and identify general trends of these compounds in relation to library design parameters. We in particular emphasize the combinatorial nature of these libraries. Generally, the reported molecules demonstrate the ability of this technology to afford hits suitable for further lead development, and on the basis of them, we derive guidelines for DECL design.

  4. Genetically encoded tools: bridging the gap between neuronal identity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Ku

    2015-01-21

    Genetically encoded tools are positioned to serve a unique and critical role in bridging the gap between the genetic identity of neurons and their functional properties. However, the use of these tools is limited by our current understanding of cell-type identity. As we make technological advances that focus on capturing functional aspects of neurons such as connectivity, activity, and metabolic states, our understanding of neuronal identity will deepen and may enable the use of genetically encoded tools for modulating disease-specific circuits for therapeutic purposes.

  5. Clustering of polarization-encoded images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallat, Jihad; Collet, Christophe; Takakura, Yoshitate

    2004-01-10

    Polarization-encoded imaging consists of the distributed measurements of polarization parameters for each pixel of an image. We address clustering of multidimensional polarization-encoded images. The spatial coherence of polarization information is considered. Two methods of analysis are proposed: polarization contrast enhancement and a more-sophisticated image-processing algorithm based on a Markovian model. The proposed algorithms are applied and validated with two different Mueller images acquired by a fully polarimetric imaging system.

  6. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lyttleton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. Materials and Methods: We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. Results: We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. Conclusions: All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  7. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  8. Uniqueness vs non-uniqueness in complete connections with modified majority rules

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, J. C. A.; Friedli, S.

    2013-01-01

    We take a closer look at a class of chains with complete connections introduced by Berger, Hoffman and Sidoravicius. Besides giving a sharper description of the uniqueness and non-uniqueness regimes, we show that if the pure majority rule used to fix the dependence on the past is replaced with a function that is Lipschitz at the origin, then uniqueness always holds, even with arbitrarily slow decaying variation.

  9. Neurally Encoding Time for Olfactory Navigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Jun Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurately encoding time is one of the fundamental challenges faced by the nervous system in mediating behavior. We recently reported that some animals have a specialized population of rhythmically active neurons in their olfactory organs with the potential to peripherally encode temporal information about odor encounters. If these neurons do indeed encode the timing of odor arrivals, it should be possible to demonstrate that this capacity has some functional significance. Here we show how this sensory input can profoundly influence an animal's ability to locate the source of odor cues in realistic turbulent environments-a common task faced by species that rely on olfactory cues for navigation. Using detailed data from a turbulent plume created in the laboratory, we reconstruct the spatiotemporal behavior of a real odor field. We use recurrence theory to show that information about position relative to the source of the odor plume is embedded in the timing between odor pulses. Then, using a parameterized computational model, we show how an animal can use populations of rhythmically active neurons to capture and encode this temporal information in real time, and use it to efficiently navigate to an odor source. Our results demonstrate that the capacity to accurately encode temporal information about sensory cues may be crucial for efficient olfactory navigation. More generally, our results suggest a mechanism for extracting and encoding temporal information from the sensory environment that could have broad utility for neural information processing.

  10. In a unique position or squeezed out?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Christensen, Inge

    2009-01-01

    language, they experience that their patients disappear, they are seldom involved, and they lack knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: GPs have few experiences with YA cancer patients, but they have a potentially unique role in general primary cancer care if they develop their vocational vocabulary, relate more...

  11. Uniqueness of meromorphic functions concerning differential polynomials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Lei

    2007-01-01

    Based on a unicity theorem for entire funcitions concerning differential polynomials proposed by M. L. Fang and W. Hong, we studied the uniqueness problem of two meromorphic functions whose differential polynomials share the same 1-point by proving two theorems and their related lemmas. The results extend and improve given by Fang and Hong's theorem.

  12. LCA – Unique and Controversial Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This session will focus on case studies and applications that have a unique or controversial aspect. Some of the most recent topics that seem to have significant interest include: LCA-based product declarations, LCA-based standards, LCA-based labels, alternative energy, agricul...

  13. Marketing the Uniqueness of Small Towns. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Douglas; Hogg, David H.

    The key to marketing a town is determining and promoting the town's "differential advantage" or uniqueness that would make people want to visit or live there. Exercises to help communities gain important insights into the town's competitive edge include a brainstorming session with knowledgeable community members, a visitor questionnaire, a…

  14. The Uniqueness of Speech among Motor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ray

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers evidence that the speech muscles are unique in their genetic, developmental, functional and phenotypical properties. The literature was reviewed using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ComDisDome and other literature-retrieval systems to identify studies reporting on the craniofacial and laryngeal muscles. Particular emphasis was given…

  15. Multicultural Poetry: Voices Unique, yet Universal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webre, Elizabeth C.

    As teachers gravitate more and more to the use of literature and strive to include a range of cultural experiences in their classrooms, the use of poetry from various cultural groups should be considered. Poetry is a very real means of having children see themselves and others as being both unique and yet the same. In considering poetry across…

  16. Tulane Student Designs Unique Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A Louisiana architect has created plans for a unique supplementary learning environment consisting of five circular buildings featuring a planetarium, an indoor display of small animals in their native habitat, an indoor pond, a library, a media center, and an auditorium. (Author/MLF)

  17. Art Libraries: Creating Access to Unique Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Art libraries face similar issues to other types of libraries during the digital transition but have unique twists driven by the needs of their collections. Art library information seekers may possess a sense of what an art library is: a library, set apart, to support the study of art and art history. For art libraries, it is the collection,…

  18. UNIQUENESS OF DIFFERENCE POLYNOMIALS OF MEROMORPHIC FUNCTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永; 祁晓光

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the uniqueness problems of difference polynomials of meromorphic functions and obtain some results which can be viewed as discrete analogues of the results given by Shibazaki. Some examples are given to show the results in this article are best possible.

  19. Unique characteristics of Geneva apple rootstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Geneva® apple rootstock breeding program has been operating since the early 1970’s. It is a unique program in that it had access to important germplasm resources that later became the USDA ARS apple collection in Geneva, NY. This genetic diversity allowed for the achievement of one of the proj...

  20. Unraveling the evolution of uniquely human cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Evan L

    2016-06-07

    A satisfactory account of human cognitive evolution will explain not only the psychological mechanisms that make our species unique, but also how, when, and why these traits evolved. To date, researchers have made substantial progress toward defining uniquely human aspects of cognition, but considerably less effort has been devoted to questions about the evolutionary processes through which these traits have arisen. In this article, I aim to link these complementary aims by synthesizing recent advances in our understanding of what makes human cognition unique, with theory and data regarding the processes of cognitive evolution. I review evidence that uniquely human cognition depends on synergism between both representational and motivational factors and is unlikely to be accounted for by changes to any singular cognitive system. I argue that, whereas no nonhuman animal possesses the full constellation of traits that define the human mind, homologies and analogies of critical aspects of human psychology can be found in diverse nonhuman taxa. I suggest that phylogenetic approaches to the study of animal cognition-which can address questions about the selective pressures and proximate mechanisms driving cognitive change-have the potential to yield important insights regarding the processes through which the human cognitive phenotype evolved.

  1. Uniqueness and Zeros of -Shift Difference Polynomials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kai Liu; Xin-Ling Liu; Ting-Bin Cao

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the zero distributions of -shift difference polynomials of meromorphic functions with zero order, and obtain two theorems that extend the classical Hayman results on the zeros of differential polynomials to -shift difference polynomials. We also investigate the uniqueness problem of -shift difference polynomials that share a common value.

  2. Ipsilateral directional encoding of joystick movements in human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mohit; Gaona, Charles; Roland, Jarod; Anderson, Nick; Freudenberg, Zachary; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2009-01-01

    The majority of Brain Computer Interfaces have relied on signals related to primary motor cortex and the operation of the contralateral limb. Recently, the physiology associated with same-sided (ipsilateral) motor movements has been found to have a unique cortical physiology. This study sets out to assess whether more complex motor movements can be discerned utilizing ipsilateral cortical signals. In this study, three invasively monitored human subjects were recorded while performing a center out joystick task with the hand ipsilateral to the hemispheric subdural grid array. It was found that directional tuning was present in ipsilateral cortex. This information was encoded in both distinct anatomic populations and spectral distributions. These findings support the notion that ipsilateral signals may provide added information for BCI operation in the future.

  3. Associative Encoding and Retrieval Are Predicted by Functional Connectivity in Distinct Hippocampal Area CA1 Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Katherine; Tompary, Alexa

    2014-01-01

    Determining how the hippocampus supports the unique demands of memory encoding and retrieval is fundamental for understanding the biological basis of episodic memory. One possibility proposed by theoretical models is that the distinct computational demands of encoding and retrieval are accommodated by shifts in the functional interaction between the hippocampal CA1 subregion and its input structures. However, empirical tests of this hypothesis are lacking. To test this in humans, we used high-resolution fMRI to measure functional connectivity between hippocampal area CA1 and regions of the medial temporal lobe and midbrain during extended blocks of associative encoding and retrieval tasks. We found evidence for a double dissociation between the pathways supporting successful encoding and retrieval. Specifically, during the associative encoding task, but not the retrieval task, functional connectivity only between area CA1 and the ventral tegmental area predicted associative long-term memory. In contrast, connectivity between area CA1 and DG/CA3 was greater, on average, during the retrieval task compared with the encoding task, and, importantly, the strength of this connectivity significantly correlated with retrieval success. Together, these findings serve as an important first step toward understanding how the demands of fundamental memory processes may be met by changes in the relative strength of connectivity within hippocampal pathways. PMID:25143600

  4. Visually Improved Image Compression by Combining EZW Encoding with Texture Modeling using Huffman Encoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay U. Kale

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a technique for image compression which uses the Wavelet-based Image/Texture Coding Hybrid (WITCH scheme [1] in combination with Huffman encoder. It implements a hybrid coding approach, while nevertheless preserving the features of progressive and lossless coding. The hybrid scheme was designed to encode the structural image information by Embedded Zerotree Wavelet (EZW encoding algorithm [2] and the stochastic texture in a model-based manner and this encoded data is then compressed using Huffman encoder. The scheme proposed here achieves superior subjective quality while increasing the compression ratio by more than a factor of three or even four. With this technique, it is possible to achieve compression ratios as high as 10 to 12 but with some minor distortions in the encoded image.

  5. Mushroom body defect, a gene involved in the control of neuroblast proliferation in Drosophila, encodes a coiled–coil protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhonghui; Prado, Antonio; Melzig, Jörg; Heisenberg, Martin; Nash, Howard A.; Raabe, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Neurogenesis relies on the establishment of the proper number and precisely controlled proliferation of neuroblasts, the neuronal precursor cells. A role for the mushroom body defect (mud) gene in both of these aspects of neuroblast behavior, as well as possible roles in other aspects of fruit fly biology, is implied by phenotypes associated with mud mutations. We have localized mud by determining the sequence change in one point mutant, identifying a predicted ORF affected by the mutation, and showing that an appropriate segment of the genome rescues mud mutant phenotypes. An analysis of mud cDNAs and a survey of mud transcripts by Northern blotting indicate that the gene is subject to differential splicing and is expressed primarily during embryogenesis but also, at lower levels, during subsequent developmental stages in a sexually dimorphic manner. The gene is predicted to encode a polypeptide without obvious homologs but with two prominent structural features, a long coiled coil that constitutes the central core of the protein and a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane domain. PMID:10884435

  6. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Pawar

    Full Text Available The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS. In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding.

  7. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding.

  8. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  9. Immunoselection of cDNAs to avian intestinal calcium binding protein 28K and a novel calmodulin-like protein: assessment of mRNA regulation by the Vitamin D hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangelsdorf, D.J.; Komm, B.S.; McDonnell, D.P.; Pike, J.W.; Haussler, M.R.

    1987-12-15

    Calcium's role in a variety of cellular processes has been well documented. The storage, distribution, and delivery of calcium are regulated by a family of binding proteins including troponin C, calmodulin, parvalbumin, and vitamin D dependent calcium binding protein (CaBP-28), all of which have evolved from a common ancestral gene. To evaluate vitamin D regulation of gene transcription, a CaBP-28 cDNA (767 base pairs) was isolated from a chicken intestine lambdagt11 library utilizing a polyvalent CaBP-28 antibody as a probe. Coincident with the identification of the CaBP-28 cDNA, a group of cDNAs also was isolated (with the anti-CaBP-28 antibody) that demonstrated 84% nucleotide homology and 99% deduced amino acid homology with chicken brain calmodulin (CaM). This new CaM-like cDNA was named neoCaM. There is little nucleotide homology between the CaBP-28 cDNA and neoCaM. The CaBP-28 cDNA hybridizes with three transcripts of 2000, 2900, and 3300 bases which are dramatically induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ (1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/), while the neoCaM cDNA recognizes three distinct (from CaBP-28) transcripts. Two of these mRNAs are 1400 and 1800 bases as described for brain CaM, but another large 4000-base transcript is detected with neoCaM. Neither the CaM nor the neoCaM transcript reveals any modulation by 1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/. Herein, the authors discuss the possible significance of not only the isolation of both cDNAs with a single antibody but also the relation of neoCaM to other well-characterized CaM cDNAs.

  10. Unique device identification system. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to establish a system to adequately identify devices through distribution and use. This rule requires the label of medical devices to include a unique device identifier (UDI), except where the rule provides for an exception or alternative placement. The labeler must submit product information concerning devices to FDA's Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID), unless subject to an exception or alternative. The system established by this rule requires the label and device package of each medical device to include a UDI and requires that each UDI be provided in a plain-text version and in a form that uses automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) technology. The UDI will be required to be directly marked on the device itself if the device is intended to be used more than once and intended to be reprocessed before each use.

  11. Unique Astrophysics in the Lyman Ultraviolet

    CERN Document Server

    Tumlinson, Jason; Kriss, Gerard; France, Kevin; McCandliss, Stephan; Sembach, Ken; Fox, Andrew; Tripp, Todd; Jenkins, Edward; Beasley, Matthew; Danforth, Charles; Shull, Michael; Stocke, John; Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, Christopher; Froning, Cynthia; Green, James; Oliveira, Cristina; Fullerton, Alex; Blair, Bill; Kruk, Jeff; Sonneborn, George; Penton, Steven; Wakker, Bart; Prochaska, Xavier; Vallerga, John; Scowen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is unique and groundbreaking science to be done with a new generation of UV spectrographs that cover wavelengths in the "Lyman Ultraviolet" (LUV; 912 - 1216 Ang). There is no astrophysical basis for truncating spectroscopic wavelength coverage anywhere between the atmospheric cutoff (3100 Ang) and the Lyman limit (912 Ang); the usual reasons this happens are all technical. The unique science available in the LUV includes critical problems in astrophysics ranging from the habitability of exoplanets to the reionization of the IGM. Crucially, the local Universe (z <= 0.1) is entirely closed to many key physical diagnostics without access to the LUV. These compelling scientific problems require overcoming these technical barriers so that future UV spectrographs can extend coverage to the Lyman limit at 912 Ang.

  12. Multiple floating metatarsals: a unique injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trikha Vivek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Concomitant dislocation of the tar-sometatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joints of foot is an extremely rare injury. Such injuries presenting in a single or adjacent dual rays have been described in few cases previously. We describe such an injury in adjacent three metatarsals of a polytrauma patient. These injuries are likely to be missed in the initial assessment of a polytrauma patient. These patients are at risk of an overlooked diagnosis but the consequences of missing this type of injury may be Vivek Trikha*, Tarun Goyal, Amit K Agarwal quite severe. This case is presented in view of its unique-ness along with possible mechanism of injury, the sequence of reduction and follow-up. Knowledge of such injury and its proper management may be useful to the trauma surgeons. Key words: Metatarsal bones; Metatarsophalangeal joint; Wounds and injuries

  13. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early writers conceived the caste system of pre-modern India as something unique to India. An attempt is made to question this application of theory of uniqueness in the case of India.

  14. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early writers conceived the caste system of pre-modern India as something unique to India. An attempt is made to question this application of theory of uniqueness in the case of India.

  15. Uniqueness of entire functions concerning weighted sharing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yao-qiang; MA Chao-wei

    2007-01-01

    The uniqueness problem of entire functions concerning weighted sharing was discussed, and the following theorem was proved. Let f and g be two non-constant entire functions, m, n and k three positive integers, and n>2k+4. If Em(1,(f n)(k))= Em(1,(gn)(k)), then either f (z)=c1ecz and g(z)= c2e-cz, or f =tg, where c, c1 and c2 are three constants satisfying (-1)k(c1c2)n(nc)2k=1, and t is a constant satisfying t n=1. The theorem generalizes the result of Fang [Fang ML, Uniqueness and value sharing of entire functions, Computer & Mathematics with Applications, 2002, 44: 823-831].

  16. Metalworking Techniques Unlock a Unique Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Approached by West Hartford, Connecticut-based Abbot Ball Company, Glenn Research Center agreed to test an intriguing alloy called Nitinol 60 that had been largely unused for a half century. Using powdered metallurgy, the partners developed a method for manufacturing and working with the material, which Abbott Ball has now commercialized. Nitinol 60 provides a unique combination of qualities that make it an excellent material for ball bearings, among other applications.

  17. Mushrooms—Biologically Distinct and Nutritionally Unique

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Miller, Amy Myrdal; Roupas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mushrooms are fungi, biologically distinct from plant- and animal-derived foods (fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein [meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts, and seeds]) that comprise the US Department of Agriculture food patterns operationalized by consumer-focused MyPlate messages. Although mushrooms provide nutrients found in these food groups, they also have a unique nutrient profile. Classified into food grouping systems by their use as a vegetable, mushrooms’ increasing use in main e...

  18. A unique case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khizar

    2009-01-01

    An 18-year-old Asian girl was referred to the nephrology unit with rapidly progressive renal failure. At the age of 15 she was diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus but had defaulted treatment. Her renal functions improved with cyclophosphamide pulse treatment but she continued to have central nervous system vasculitis, gastrointestinal vasculitis and opportunistic infections making her a unique and challenging case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  19. Uniqueness from locality and BCFW shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Rodina, Laurentiu

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a BCFW shift which can be used to recursively build the full Yang-Mills amplitude as a function of polarization vectors. Furthermore, in line with the recent results of arXiv:1612.02797, we conjecture that the Yang-Mills scattering amplitude is uniquely fixed by locality and demanding the usual asymptotic behavior under a sufficient number of shifts. Unitarity therefore emerges from locality and constructability. We prove this statement at the leading order in the soft expansion.

  20. Determination of optimal period of absolute encoders with single track cyclic gray code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张帆; 朱衡君

    2008-01-01

    Low cost and miniaturized rotary encoders are important in automatic and precise production. Presented here is a code called Single Track Cyclic Gray Code (STCGC) that is an image etched on a single circular track of a rotary encoder disk read by a group of even spread reading heads to provide a unique codeword for every angular position and features such that every two adjacent words differ in exactly one component, thus avoiding coarse error. The existing construction or combination methods are helpful but not sufficient in determining the period of the STCGC of large word length and the theoretical approach needs further development to extend the word length. Three principles, such as the seed combination, short code removal and ergodicity examination were put forward that suffice determination of the optimal period for such absolute rotary encoders using STCGC with even spread heads. The optimal periods of STCGC in 3 through 29 bit length were determined and listed.

  1. Challenges in Decomposing Encodings of Verification Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schrammel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern program verifiers use logic-based encodings of the verification problem that are discharged by a back end reasoning engine. However, instances of such encodings for large programs can quickly overwhelm these back end solvers. Hence, we need techniques to make the solving process scale to large systems, such as partitioning (divide-and-conquer and abstraction. In recent work, we showed how decomposing the formula encoding of a termination analysis can significantly increase efficiency. The analysis generates a sequence of logical formulas with existentially quantified predicates that are solved by a synthesis-based program analysis engine. However, decomposition introduces abstractions in addition to those required for finding the unknown predicates in the formula, and can hence deteriorate precision. We discuss the challenges associated with such decompositions and their interdependencies with the solving process.

  2. An information theoretic characterisation of auditory encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Overath

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The entropy metric derived from information theory provides a means to quantify the amount of information transmitted in acoustic streams like speech or music. By systematically varying the entropy of pitch sequences, we sought brain areas where neural activity and energetic demands increase as a function of entropy. Such a relationship is predicted to occur in an efficient encoding mechanism that uses less computational resource when less information is present in the signal: we specifically tested the hypothesis that such a relationship is present in the planum temporale (PT. In two convergent functional MRI studies, we demonstrated this relationship in PT for encoding, while furthermore showing that a distributed fronto-parietal network for retrieval of acoustic information is independent of entropy. The results establish PT as an efficient neural engine that demands less computational resource to encode redundant signals than those with high information content.

  3. Cluster parallel rendering based on encoded mesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Ai-hong; XIONG Hua; PENG Hao-yu; LIU Zhen; SHI Jiao-ying

    2006-01-01

    Use of compressed mesh in parallel rendering architecture is still an unexplored area, the main challenge of which is to partition and sort the encoded mesh in compression-domain. This paper presents a mesh compression scheme PRMC (Parallel Rendering based Mesh Compression) supplying encoded meshes that can be partitioned and sorted in parallel rendering system even in encoded-domain. First, we segment the mesh into submeshes and clip the submeshes' boundary into Runs, and then piecewise compress the submeshes and Runs respectively. With the help of several auxiliary index tables, compressed submeshes and Runs can serve as rendering primitives in parallel rendering system. Based on PRMC, we design and implement a parallel rendering architecture. Compared with uncompressed representation, experimental results showed that PRMC meshes applied in cluster parallel rendering system can dramatically reduce the communication requirement.

  4. The SOD2 gene, encoding a manganese-type superoxide dismutase, is up-regulated during conidiogenesis in the plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, G-C; Hanau, R M; Vaillancourt, L J

    2002-07-01

    The SOD2 gene, encoding a manganese-type superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), was identified from Colletotrichum graminicola among a collection of cDNAs representing genes that are up-regulated during conidiogenesis. The SOD2 gene consists of a 797-bp open reading frame that is interrupted by three introns and is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 208 amino acids. All conserved residues of the MnSOD protein family, including four consensus metal binding domains, are present in the predicted SOD2 protein. However, the predicted protein does not appear to contain a signal peptide that would target it to the mitochondria. Northern hybridizations revealed that expression of the approximately 900-bp SOD2 transcript is closely associated with differentiation of both oval and falcate conidia. Southern analysis indicated that there is only a single copy of the gene. SOD2 disruption strains were morphologically and pathogenically indistinguishable from wild-type strains. The dispensability of the MnSOD enzyme may be due to the activities of two other SOD enzymes, a highly expressed iron-type superoxide dismutase and a much less abundant copper/zinc type, that were also detected in C. graminicola.

  5. Development of Deduced Protein Database Using Variable Bit Binary Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Parvathavarthini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A large amount of biological data is semi-structured and stored in any one the following file formats such as flat, XML and relational files. These databases must be integrated with the structured data available in relational or object-oriented databases. The sequence matching process is difficult in such file format, because string comparison takes more computation cost and time. To reduce the memory storage size of amino acid sequence in protein database, a novel probability-based variable bit length encoding technique has been introduced. The number of mapping of triplet CODON for every amino acid evaluates the probability value. Then, a binary tree has been constructed to assign unique bits of binary codes to each amino acid. This derived unique bit pattern of amino acid replaces the existing fixed byte representation. The proof of reduced protein database space has been discussed and it is found to be reduced between 42.86 to 87.17%. To validate our method, we have collected few amino acid sequences of major organisms like Sheep, Lambda phage and etc from NCBI and represented them using proposed method. The comparison shows that of minimum and maximum reduction in storage space are 43.30% and 72.86% respectively. In future the biological data can further be reduced by applying lossless compression on this deduced data.

  6. Large-scale mapping of transposable element insertion sites using digital encoding of sample identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohl, Daryl M; Freifeld, Limor; Silies, Marion; Hwa, Jennifer J; Horowitz, Mark; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2014-03-01

    Determining the genomic locations of transposable elements is a common experimental goal. When mapping large collections of transposon insertions, individualized amplification and sequencing is both time consuming and costly. We describe an approach in which large numbers of insertion lines can be simultaneously mapped in a single DNA sequencing reaction by using digital error-correcting codes to encode line identity in a unique set of barcoded pools.

  7. Enhanced double patterning decomposition using lines encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled M. Soradi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Double patterning photolithography (DPL is considered one of the best solutions used for enabling 32 nm/22 nm technology. In this paper, we propose a new technique for double patterning post decomposition conflict resolution. The algorithm is based on lines positions encoding followed by code pattern matching. Experimental results show that the usage of encoded patterns decreases the time needed for pattern matching and increases the matching accuracy. The overall manual problem solution time is reduced to about 1%.

  8. Fidelity enhancement by logical qubit encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michael K; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar; Hodges, Jonathan S; Ryan, Colm A; Ditty, Michael J; Laflamme, Raymond; Cory, David G

    2007-11-30

    We demonstrate coherent control of two logical qubits encoded in a decoherence free subspace (DFS) of four dipolar-coupled protons in an NMR quantum information processor. A pseudopure fiducial state is created in the DFS, and a unitary logical qubit entangling operator evolves the system to a logical Bell state. The four-spin molecule is partially aligned by a liquid crystal solvent, which introduces strong dipolar couplings among the spins. Although the system Hamiltonian is never fully specified, we demonstrate high fidelity control over the logical degrees of freedom. In fact, the DFS encoding leads to higher fidelity control than is available in the full four-spin Hilbert space.

  9. Evolution of Parallel Spindles Like genes in plants and highlight of unique domain architecture#

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consiglio Federica M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyploidy has long been recognized as playing an important role in plant evolution. In flowering plants, the major route of polyploidization is suggested to be sexual through gametes with somatic chromosome number (2n. Parallel Spindle1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPS1 was recently demonstrated to control spindle orientation in the 2nd division of meiosis and, when mutated, to induce 2n pollen. Interestingly, AtPS1 encodes a protein with a FHA domain and PINc domain putatively involved in RNA decay (i.e. Nonsense Mediated mRNA Decay. In potato, 2n pollen depending on parallel spindles was described long time ago but the responsible gene has never been isolated. The knowledge derived from AtPS1 as well as the availability of genome sequences makes it possible to isolate potato PSLike (PSL and to highlight the evolution of PSL family in plants. Results Our work leading to the first characterization of PSLs in potato showed a greater PSL complexity in this species respect to Arabidopsis thaliana. Indeed, a genomic PSL locus and seven cDNAs affected by alternative splicing have been cloned. In addition, the occurrence of at least two other PSL loci in potato was suggested by the sequence comparison of alternatively spliced transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis on 20 Viridaeplantae showed the wide distribution of PSLs throughout the species and the occurrence of multiple copies only in potato and soybean. The analysis of PSLFHA and PSLPINc domains evidenced that, in terms of secondary structure, a major degree of variability occurred in PINc domain respect to FHA. In terms of specific active sites, both domains showed diversification among plant species that could be related to a functional diversification among PSL genes. In addition, some specific active sites were strongly conserved among plants as supported by sequence alignment and by evidence of negative selection evaluated as difference between non-synonymous and

  10. Stationary Black Holes: Uniqueness and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr T. Chruściel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of known black-hole solutions to the stationary Einstein equations has been steadily increasing, sometimes in unexpected ways. In particular, it has turned out that not all black-hole-equilibrium configurations are characterized by their mass, angular momentum and global charges. Moreover, the high degree of symmetry displayed by vacuum and electro vacuum black-hole spacetimes ceases to exist in self-gravitating non-linear field theories. This text aims to review some developments in the subject and to discuss them in light of the uniqueness theorem for the Einstein-Maxwell system.

  11. Stationary Black Holes: Uniqueness and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heusler Markus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of known black hole solutions to the stationary Einstein equations has increased in an unexpected way during the last decade. In particular, it has turned out that not all black hole equilibrium configurations are characterized by their mass, angular momentum and global charges. Moreover, the high degree of symmetry displayed by vacuum and electro-vacuum black hole space-times ceases to exist in self-gravitating non-linear field theories. This text aims to review some of the recent developments and to discuss them in the light of the uniqueness theorem for the Einstein-Maxwell system.

  12. Unique double recurrence of cerebral arteriovenous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagm, Alhusain; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ichinose, Shunsuke; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Surgically treated patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are considered cured when the postoperative angiogram proves complete resection. However, despite no residual nidus or early draining vein on postoperative angiogram, rare instances of AVM recurrence have been reported in adults. In this paper, the authors present a case of a 24-year-old woman with asymptomatic double recurrence of her cerebral AVM after angiographically proven complete resection. To the authors' knowledge, this patient represents the first case with double de novo asymptomatic recurrence of Spetzler-Martin grade I AVM. Also, she represents the first case with unique AVM criteria in each recurrence.

  13. A unique variation of superficial palmar arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiji PJ

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a unique variation in the arterial pattern of superficial palmar arch in which it was completed by one of the large terminal branches of radial artery. The origin of the arteria radialis indicis was also peculiar that it was arising from the communicating branch of the radial artery and further reinforced by the first dorsal metacarpal artery that joined it after reaching the volar aspect. Pertinent anatomical knowledge regarding the variations of the palmar arch is significant for the purposes of microvascular repairs and re-implantations.

  14. Type III factors with unique Cartan decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Houdayer, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    We prove that for any free ergodic nonsingular nonamenable action \\Gamma\\ \\actson (X,\\mu) of all \\Gamma\\ in a large class of groups including all hyperbolic groups, the associated group measure space factor $L^\\infty(X) \\rtimes \\Gamma$ has L^\\infty(X) as its unique Cartan subalgebra, up to unitary conjugacy. This generalizes the probability measure preserving case that was established in [PV12]. We also prove primeness and indecomposability results for such crossed products, for the corresponding orbit equivalence relations and for arbitrary amalgamated free products $M_1 *_B M_2$ over a subalgebra B of type I.

  15. Uniqueness of Centauro-type events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, C.R.A.; Barroso, S.L.C.; Beggio, P.C.; Carvalho, A.O. de; Menon, M.J.; Navia, C.E.; Oliveira, R. de; Shibuya, E.H

    2003-07-01

    Analysis to discriminate Centauro events from normal events is made without previous identification of secondary emitted particles. For this purpose their energy and derived quantities like distance from the center of momenta it were mainly used. As a result we found in a sample of (280+87) experimental events only 3 were compatible with 5 Centauro events, but none of them dad a high content of hadrons, characteristic of Centauro events. With this result we are confident about the uniqueness of Centauro events, especially for two events that have vertex directly determined. Comparing with some interaction models features we depict a possible scenario to explain Centauro events.

  16. Uniqueness of the Trautman-Bondi mass

    CERN Document Server

    Chrúsciel, P T; MacCallum, M A H; Chru\\'sciel, Piotr T.; Jezierski, Jacek; Callum, Malcolm A.H. Mac

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that the only functionals, within a natural class, which are monotonic in time for all solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations admitting a smooth ``piece'' of conformal null infinity Scri, are those depending on the metric only through a specific combination of the Bondi `mass aspect' and other next--to--leading order terms in the metric. Under the extra condition of passive BMS invariance, the unique such functional (up to a multiplicative factor) is the Trautman--Bondi energy. It is also shown that this energy remains well-defined for a wide class of `polyhomogeneous' metrics.

  17. Unique supply function equilibrium with capacity constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Paer [Department of Economics, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 513, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-01-15

    Consider a market where producers submit supply functions to a procurement auction with uncertain demand, e.g. an electricity auction. In the Supply Function Equilibrium (SFE), every firm commits to the supply function that maximises expected profit in the one-shot game given the supply functions of competitors. A basic weakness of the SFE is the presence of multiple equilibria. This paper shows that with (i) symmetric producers, (ii) perfectly inelastic demand, (iii) a price cap, and (iv) capacity constraints that bind with a positive probability, there exists a unique, symmetric SFE. (author)

  18. [Celiac disease: an unique autoinmune model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo Sáez, Luis Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is a unique autoimmune disorder, because the environmental precipitant factor is known. It is gluten, the major storage protein of wheat and similar grains. Originally was considered a rare malabsorption syndrome of childhood, but nowadays is recognized a common condition, that affects to 1% of the general population, all over the world', involves to all different races, may be diagnosed at any age, and affects to many organ systems. Therapy for the disease is a gluten-free-diet that must be strict and long-term. This diet cause a total recovery clinical and analytical, with excellent quality of life of patients.

  19. Uniqueness, Self belonging and Intercourse in Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsh, Dr. Marvin / E.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript has ensued from my past studies in biochemistry (PhD, CUNY 1986) and my current endeavors in graduate study in philosophy and anthropology. The current research project began during my period as a graduate student in biochemistry with a professor of classical genetics comment that DNA was unique in the physical world. The paradox presented to relate this notion to existing natural law lead me to evolve and communicate a view that the world itself is a special case of a general...

  20. A unique memory process modulated by emotion underpins successful odor recognition and episodic retrieval in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Lise eSaive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We behaviorally explore the link between olfaction, emotion and memory by testing the hypothesis that the emotion carried by odors facilitates the memory of specific unique events. To investigate this idea, we used a novel behavioral approach inspired by a paradigm developed by our team to study episodic memory in a controlled and as ecological as possible way in humans. The participants freely explored three unique and rich laboratory episodes; each episode consisted of three unfamiliar odors (What positioned at three specific locations (Where within a visual context (Which context. During the retrieval test, which occurred 24 to 72 hours after the encoding, odors were used to trigger the retrieval of the complex episodes. The participants were proficient in recognizing the target odors among distractors and retrieving the visuospatial context in which they were encountered. The episodic nature of the task generated high and stable memory performances, which were accompanied by faster responses and slower and deeper breathing. Successful odor recognition and episodic memory were not related to differences in odor investigation at encoding. However, memory performances were influenced by the emotional content of the odors, regardless of odor valence, with both pleasant and unpleasant odors generating higher recognition and episodic retrieval than neutral odors. Finally, the present study also suggested that when the binding between the odors and the spatio-contextual features of the episode was successful, the odor recognition and the episodic retrieval collapsed into a unique memory process that began as soon as the participants smelled the odors.

  1. Encoded Archival Description as a Halfway Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Elizabeth H.

    2009-01-01

    In the mid 1990s, Encoded Archival Description (EAD) appeared as a revolutionary technology for publishing archival finding aids on the Web. The author explores whether or not, given the advent of Web 2.0, the archival community should abandon EAD and look for something to replace it. (Contains 18 notes.)

  2. 47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... codes shall be retained even with the power removed. (7) Indicator. An aural or visible means that it... levels of the mark or space frequencies. (9) Attention Signal generator. The encoder must provide an attention signal that complies with the following: (i) Tone Frequencies. The audio tones shall have...

  3. Encoding and Decoding Procedures for Arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Babaev

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses an algorithm based on the encoding procedure for representing a set of arrangement elements as a single number. Also the author provides the procedure for the inverse transformation of the code into arrangement elements. In addition the Article includes recommendations on the use of the above procedures in combinatorial algorithms of optimization.

  4. Design Primer for Reed-Solomon Encoders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, M.; Lee, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Design and operation of Reed-Solomon (RS) encoders discussed in document prepared as instruction manual for computer designers and others in dataprocessing field. Conventional and Berlekamp architectures compared. Engineers who equip computer memory chips with burst-error and dropout detection and correction find report especially useful.

  5. Molecular characterization of cytochrome P450 CYP6B47 cDNAs and 5'-flanking sequence from Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): its response to lead stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jialiang; Zhang, Guren; Zhou, Qiang

    2012-05-01

    In insects, P450s are responsible for the oxidative metabolism of structurally diverse endogenous and exogenous compounds including plant allelochemicals and insecticides. A novel full-length P450 cDNA, CYP6B47, was cloned from Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The sequence is 1718 bp in length with an ORF of 1509 bp encoding 503 amino acid residues. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that CYP6B47 belongs to CYP3 clan and second clade of CYP6Bs which contain 11 P450s from Noctuidae. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that CYP6B47 was expressed only in larvae stages and had a high level of transcription in the midgut and fat body. In addition, we cloned a 2141-bp 5'-flanking regions and presented the basal luciferase activities of promoter. We also predicted multiple putative elements for transcription factors binding in the 5'-flanking region. Interestingly, the expression of CYP6B47 significantly increased in the midgut and fat body after lead (Pb) exposure for 5 generations. Larvae tolerance to the alpha-cypermethrin (35% increased in LC(50)) and fenvalerate (52% increased in LC(50)) were improved after pre-exposure to 50 mg/kg Pb. These dates suggested that lead increased tolerance of larvae to insecticides mainly through transcriptional induction of detoxification genes including CYP6B47. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. How Attention Modulates Encoding of Dynamic Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Noga; Shapira-Lichter, Irit; Lerner, Yulia; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir; Ash, Elissa L.

    2016-01-01

    When encoding a real-life, continuous stimulus, the same neural circuits support processing and integration of prior as well as new incoming information. This ongoing interplay is modulated by attention, and is evident in regions such as the prefrontal cortex section of the task positive network (TPN), and in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a hub of the default mode network (DMN). Yet the exact nature of such modulation is still unclear. To investigate this issue, we utilized an fMRI task that employed movies as the encoded stimuli and manipulated attentional load via an easy or hard secondary task that was performed simultaneously with encoding. Results showed increased intersubject correlation (inter-SC) levels when encoding movies in a condition of high, as compared to low attentional load. This was evident in bilateral ventrolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices and the dorsal PCC (dPCC). These regions became more attuned to the combination of the movie and the secondary task as the attentional demand of the latter increased. Activation analyses revealed that at higher load the prefrontal TPN regions were more activated, whereas the dPCC was more deactivated. Attentional load also influenced connectivity within and between the networks. At high load the dPCC was anti-correlated to the prefrontal regions, which were more functionally coherent amongst themselves. Finally and critically, greater inter-SC in the dPCC at high load during encoding predicted lower memory strength when that information was retrieved. This association between inter-SC levels and memory strength suggest that as attentional demands increased, the dPCC was more attuned to the secondary task at the expense of the encoded stimulus, thus weakening memory for the encoded stimulus. Together, our findings show that attentional load modulated the function of core TPN and DMN regions. Furthermore, the observed relationship between memory strength and the modulation of the dPCC points

  7. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles unique cost estimating requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, P.; Apgar, H.; Stukes, S.; Sterk, S.

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), also referred to as drones, are aerial platforms that fly without a human pilot onboard. UAVs are controlled autonomously by a computer in the vehicle or under the remote control of a pilot stationed at a fixed ground location. There are a wide variety of drone shapes, sizes, configurations, complexities, and characteristics. Use of these devices by the Department of Defense (DoD), NASA, civil and commercial organizations continues to grow. UAVs are commonly used for intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR). They are also use for combat operations, and civil applications, such as firefighting, non-military security work, surveillance of infrastructure (e.g. pipelines, power lines and country borders). UAVs are often preferred for missions that require sustained persistence (over 4 hours in duration), or are “ too dangerous, dull or dirty” for manned aircraft. Moreover, they can offer significant acquisition and operations cost savings over traditional manned aircraft. Because of these unique characteristics and missions, UAV estimates require some unique estimating methods. This paper describes a framework for estimating UAV systems total ownership cost including hardware components, software design, and operations. The challenge of collecting data, testing the sensitivities of cost drivers, and creating cost estimating relationships (CERs) for each key work breakdown structure (WBS) element is discussed. The autonomous operation of UAVs is especially challenging from a software perspective.

  8. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  9. Astronomy Outreach for Large and Unique Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, D.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Kendall, J. S.; Dugan, C.

    2013-04-01

    In this session, we discuss different approaches to reaching large audiences. In addition to star parties and astronomy events, the audiences for some of the events include music concerts or festivals, sick children and their families, minority communities, American Indian reservations, and tourist sites such as the National Mall. The goal is to bring science directly to the public—to people who attend astronomy events and to people who do not come to star parties, science museums, or science festivals. These programs allow the entire community to participate in astronomy activities to enhance the public appreciation of science. These programs attract large enthusiastic crowds often with young children participating in these family learning experiences. The public will become more informed, educated, and inspired about astronomy and will also be provided with information that will allow them to continue to learn after this outreach activity. Large and unique audiences often have common problems, and their solutions and the lessons learned will be presented. Interaction with the participants in this session will provide important community feedback used to improve astronomy outreach for large and unique audiences. New ways to expand astronomy outreach to new large audiences will be discussed.

  10. An experiment on Lowest Unique Integer Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Hanaki, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally study Lowest Unique Integer Games (LUIGs) to determine if and how subjects self-organize into different behavioral classes. In a LUIG, N(≥ 3) players submit a positive integer up to M and the player choosing the smallest number not chosen by anyone else wins. LUIGs are simplified versions of real systems such as Lowest/Highest Unique Bid Auctions that have been attracting attention from scholars, yet experimental studies are scarce. Furthermore, LUIGs offer insights into choice patterns that can shed light on the alleviation of congestion problems. Here, we consider four LUIGs with N = { 3 , 4 } and M = { 3 , 4 } . We find that (a) choices made by more than 1/3 of subjects were not significantly different from what a symmetric mixed-strategy Nash equilibrium (MSE) predicts; however, (b) subjects who behaved significantly differently from what the MSE predicts won the game more frequently. What distinguishes subjects was their tendencies to change their choices following losses.

  11. Amygdala neurons differentially encode motivation and reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye, Kay M; Janak, Patricia H

    2007-04-11

    Lesion studies demonstrate that the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) is important for assigning motivational significance to sensory stimuli, but little is known about how this information is encoded. We used in vivo electrophysiology procedures to investigate how the amygdala encodes motivating and reinforcing properties of cues that induce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior. Two groups of rats were trained to respond to a sucrose reward. The "paired" group was trained with a reward-predictive cue, whereas the "unpaired" group was trained with a randomly presented cue. Both groups underwent identical extinction and reinstatement procedures during which the reward was withheld. The proportion of neurons that were phasically cue responsive during reinstatement was significantly higher in the paired group (46 of 100) than in the unpaired group (8 of 112). Cues that induce reward-seeking behavior can do so by acting as incentives or reinforcers. Distinct populations of neurons responded to the cue in trials in which the cue acted as an incentive, triggering a motivated reward-seeking state, or as a reinforcer, supporting continued instrumental responding. The incentive motivation-encoding population of neurons (34 of 46 cue-responsive neurons; 74%) extinguished in temporal agreement with a decrease in the rate of instrumental responding. The conditioned reinforcement-encoding population of neurons (12 of 46 cue-responsive neurons; 26%) maintained their response for the duration of cue-reinforced instrumental responding. These data demonstrate that separate populations of cue-responsive neurons in the BLA encode the motivating or reinforcing properties of a cue previously associated with a reward.

  12. Degradation of Benzene by Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2 and 1YB2 Is Catalyzed by Enzymes Encoded in Distinct Catabolism Gene Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima-Morales, Daiana; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.; Jáuregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2, a benzene and toluene degrader, and Pseudomonas veronii 1YB2, a benzene degrader, have previously been shown to be key players in a benzene-contaminated site. These strains harbor unique catabolic pathways for the degradation of benzene comprising a gene cluster encoding an isopropylbenzene dioxygenase where genes encoding downstream enzymes were interrupted by stop codons. Extradiol dioxygenases were recruited from gene clusters comprising genes encoding a 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase necessary for benzene degradation but typically absent from isopropylbenzene dioxygenase-encoding gene clusters. The benzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase-encoding gene was not clustered with any other aromatic degradation genes, and the encoded protein was only distantly related to dehydrogenases of aromatic degradation pathways. The involvement of the different gene clusters in the degradation pathways was suggested by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. PMID:26475106

  13. An Encoder/Decoder Scheme of OCDMA Based on Waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new encoder/decoder scheme of OCDMA based on waveguide isproposed in this paper. The principle as well as the structure of waveguide encoder/decoder is given. It can be seen that all-optical OCDMA encoder/decoder can be realized by the proposed scheme of the waveguide encoder/decoder. It can also make the OCDMA encoder/decoder integrated easily and the access controlled easily. The system based on this scheme can work under the entirely asynchronous condition.

  14. The core and unique proteins of haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capes Melinda D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the first genome of a halophilic archaeon was sequenced in 2000, biologists have been advancing the understanding of genomic characteristics that allow for survival in the harsh natural environments of these organisms. An increase in protein acidity and GC-bias in the genome have been implicated as factors in tolerance to extreme salinity, desiccation, and high solar radiation. However, few previous attempts have been made to identify novel genes that would permit survival in such extreme conditions. Results With the recent release of several new complete haloarchaeal genome sequences, we have conducted a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis focusing on the identification of unique haloarchaeal conserved proteins that likely play key roles in environmental adaptation. Using bioinformatic methods, we have clustered 31,312 predicted proteins from nine haloarchaeal genomes into 4,455 haloarchaeal orthologous groups (HOGs. We assigned likely functions by association with established COG and KOG databases in NCBI. After identifying homologs in four additional haloarchaeal genomes, we determined that there were 784 core haloarchaeal protein clusters (cHOGs, of which 83 clusters were found primarily in haloarchaea. Further analysis found that 55 clusters were truly unique (tucHOGs to haloarchaea and qualify as signature proteins while 28 were nearly unique (nucHOGs, the vast majority of which were coded for on the haloarchaeal chromosomes. Of the signature proteins, only one example with any predicted function, Ral, involved in desiccation/radiation tolerance in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, was identified. Among the core clusters, 33% was predicted to function in metabolism, 25% in information transfer and storage, 10% in cell processes and signaling, and 22% belong to poorly characterized or general function groups. Conclusion Our studies have established conserved groups of nearly 800 protein clusters present in all

  15. Conditional and Unique Coloring of Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, P Venkata Subba

    2011-01-01

    For integers $k, r > 0$, a conditional $(k,r)$-coloring of a graph $G$ is a proper $k$-coloring of the vertices of $G$ such that every vertex $v$ of degree $d(v)$ in $G$ is adjacent to at least $\\min\\{r, d(v)\\}$ differently colored vertices. Given $r$, the smallest integer $k$ for which $G$ has a conditional $(k,r)$-coloring is called the $r$th order conditional chromatic number $\\chi_r(G)$ of $G$. We give results (exact values or bounds for $\\chi_r(G)$, depending on $r$) related to the conditional coloring of some graphs. We introduce \\emph{unique conditional colorability} and give some related results. (Keywords. cartesian product of graphs; conditional chromatic number; gear graph; join of graphs.)

  16. Developing innovative programs for unique student populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, D A; Caruso, J; Chauncey, D M

    1994-12-01

    Optometric education has been faced with ever-increasing expectations. These include the ability to educate students and practitioners to care for new patient populations, deal with more diverse and complex clinical problems, to be significant participants in the research community and to fulfill leadership positions within the profession. To fulfill this expectation, schools and colleges need to diversify their program offerings to attract and educate unique student populations who come from diverse backgrounds and bring a range of pre-existing knowledge and skills. This paper provides an overview of The New England College of Optometry's efforts in this area and two programs, the "Advanced Standing International Program" and the "Accelerated Doctor of Optometry Degree Program," are examined in detail. An emphasis is placed on outcomes assessment to ensure the programs are fulfilling their purpose and the results of a retrospective analysis of the two programs is provided.

  17. Computational Transition at the Uniqueness Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Sly, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The hardcore model is a model of lattice gas systems which has received much attention in statistical physics, probability theory and theoretical computer science. It is the probability distribution over independent sets $I$ of a graph weighted proportionally to $\\lambda^{|I|}$ with fugacity parameter $\\lambda$. We prove that at the uniqueness threshold of the hardcore model on the $d$-regular tree, approximating the partition function becomes computationally hard on graphs of maximum degree $d$. Specifically, we show that unless NP$=$RP there is no polynomial time approximation scheme for the partition function (the sum of such weighted independent sets) on graphs of maximum degree $d$ for fugacity $\\lambda_c(d) 0$. Weitz produced an FPTAS for approximating the partition function when $0<\\lambda < \\lambda_c(d)$ so this result demonstrates that the computational threshold exactly coincides with the statistical physics phase transition thus confirming the main conjecture of [28]. We further analyze the s...

  18. Organizing the spatially and temporally unique hydrosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghuijs, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Growing anthropogenic activity is quickly changing the hydrosphere. Panta Rhei calls for improved understanding of changing hydrosphere dynamics in their connection with human systems. I argue that progress within the Panta Rhei initiative is strongly limited by the absence of hydrological principles that help to organise our spatially and temporally unique hydrosphere; without guiding principles (e.g. classification systems) hydrology will continue to be a case study dominated science that will have a hard time to efficiently improve understanding, estimation and prediction of human affected systems. Exposing such organising principles should not be considered as a step backwards into the recent PUB decade. Instead, it should be regarded as an exciting scientific challenge that is becoming increasingly relevant now the hydrosphere is quickly changing.

  19. Multiple floating metatarsals: a unique injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vivek Trikha; Tarun Goyal; Amit K Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Concomitant dislocation of the tarsometatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joints of foot is an extremely rare injury.Such injuries presenting in a single or adjacent dual rays have been described in few cases previously.We describe such an injury in adjacent three metatarsals of a polytrauma patient.These injuries are likely to be missed in the initial assessment of a polytrauma patient.These patients are at risk of an overlooked diagnosis but the consequences of missing this type of injury may be quite severe.This case is presented in view of its uniqueness along with possible mechanism of injury,the sequence of reduction and follow-up.Knowledge of such injury and its proper management may be useful to the trauma surgeons.

  20. Hue discrimination, unique hues and naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachy, Romain; Dias, Jérôme; Alleysson, David; Bonnardel, Valérie

    2012-02-01

    The hue discrimination curve (HDC) that characterizes performances over the entire hue circle was determined by using sinusoidally modulated spectral power distributions of 1.5 c/300 nm with fixed amplitude and twelve reference phases. To investigate relationship between hue discrimination and appearance, observers further performed a free color naming and unique hue tasks. The HDC consistently displayed two minima and two maxima; discrimination is optimal at the yellow/orange and blue/magenta boundaries and pessimal in green and in the extra-spectral magenta colors. A linear model based on Müller zone theory correctly predicts a periodical profile but with a phase-opponency (minima/maxima at 180° apart) which is inconsistent with the empirical HDC's profile.

  1. Injectable hydrogels as unique biomedical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2008-08-01

    A concentrated fish soup could be gelled in the winter and re-solled upon heating. In contrast, some synthetic copolymers exhibit an inverse sol-gel transition with spontaneous physical gelation upon heating instead of cooling. If the transition in water takes place below the body temperature and the chemicals are biocompatible and biodegradable, such gelling behavior makes the associated physical gels injectable biomaterials with unique applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering etc. Various therapeutic agents or cells can be entrapped in situ and form a depot merely by a syringe injection of their aqueous solutions at target sites with minimal invasiveness and pain. This tutorial review summarizes and comments on this soft matter, especially thermogelling poly(ethylene glycol)-(biodegradable polyester) block copolymers. The main types of injectable hydrogels are also briefly introduced, including both physical gels and chemical gels.

  2. Fullerenes as unique nanopharmaceuticals for disease treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As unique nanoparticles,fullerenes have attracted much attention due to their unparalleled physical,chemical and biological properties.Various functionalized fullerenes with OH,NH2,COOH,and peptide modifications were developed.It summarized the biological activities of fullerenes derivatives in cancer therapy with high efficiency and low toxicity,as reactive oxygen species scavenger and lipid peroxidation inhibitor,to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus and to suppress bacteria and microbial at low concentration.In addition,the mechanism for fullerene to enter cells and biodistribution of fullerene in vivo was also discussed.This research focuses on the current understanding of fullerenes-based nanomaterials in the potential clinical application as well as biological mechanism of fullerenes and its derivatives in disease therapy.

  3. Detecting beer intake by unique metabolite patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern...... representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1) 18 participants were given one at a time four different test beverages: strong, regular and non-alcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were...... assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e. N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum...

  4. 雌核发育二倍体鲫鲤及其他倍性鱼cdc2基因cDNA全序列克隆及表达%The cloning of cdc2 cDNAs and a comparative study of its expression in different ploidy fishes including the diploid gynogenetic hybrid of red crucian carp × common carp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶敏; 刘少军; 钟欢; 周毅; 宋灿; 张纯; 刘筠

    2013-01-01

    Cdc2(Cyclin Dependent Kinase,namely CDK1)encoded by cdc2 gene and CyclinB combination regulates G2/M transition. To find out molecular mechanism that diploid hybrid fish could produce diploid gamete,the full length cDNAs of cdcl in the third gynogenetic generation(G3) ,red crucian carp( Carassius auratus red var. ) ,triploid crucian carp and allotetraploid were obtained by PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Our data showed that all the cDNAs of cdcl gene in the four different ploidy fishes encode a protein of 302 amino acids containing a domain (PSTAVRE) which combine Cyclins. A high homology of 97. 6% of the Cdc2 protein can be drawn by comparing the amino acid sequences in these four fishes, which indicates the higher conservative function and evolution of Cdc2 protein in these four fishes. A comparative expression pattern of cdcl in early-stage gonads of G3 and different ploidy fishes was carried out by Realtime PCR using specific primers against the same sequences of coding regions in the four fishes. The results showed that the expression of cdcl in the ovary of G3 was higher than those of red crucian carp and triploid crucian carp, while lower than that of allotetraploid, which, at the molecular level, indicates existence of polyploid oogonia in early-stage gonads of G3. The higher expression of cdcl in G3 suggests that consecutive S-phase replication may occur without intervening mitosis, which might be related to the formation mechanisms for the diploid eggs generated by diploid hybrids.%为研究雌核发育二倍体鲫鲤产生二倍体卵子的分子机制,实验采用PCR和cDNA末端快速分离法,克隆获得了雌核发育二倍体鲫鲤第三代(G3)、二倍体红鲫、三倍体湘云鲫和四倍体鲫鲤的细胞周期相关基因——cdc2基因cDNA全序列.结果显示,4种不同倍性鱼cdc2基因均编码含有302个氨基酸蛋白,而且编码的蛋白都含有与其他CDK激酶相当保守的序列PSTAVRE;同源性分析发现,4

  5. Unique features of long non-coding RNA biogenesis and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jeffrey J; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a diverse class of RNAs that engage in numerous biological processes across every branch of life. Although initially discovered as mRNA-like transcripts that do not encode proteins, recent studies have revealed features of lncRNAs that further distinguish them from mRNAs. In this Review, we describe special events in the lifetimes of lncRNAs - before, during and after transcription - and discuss how these events ultimately shape the unique characteristics and functional roles of lncRNAs.

  6. The bacterial magnetosome: a unique prokaryotic organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Brian H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial magnetosome is a unique prokaryotic organelle comprising magnetic mineral crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer. These inclusions are biomineralized by the magnetotactic bacteria which are ubiquitous, aquatic, motile microorganisms. Magnetosomes cause cells of magnetotactic bacteria to passively align and swim along the Earth's magnetic field lines, as miniature motile compass needles. These specialized compartments consist of a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounding magnetic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). The morphology of these membrane-bound crystals varies by species with a nominal magnetic domain size between 35 and 120 nm. Almost all magnetotactic bacteria arrange their magnetosomes in a chain within the cell there by maximizing the magnetic dipole moment of the cell. It is presumed that magnetotactic bacteria use magnetotaxis in conjunction with chemotaxis to locate and maintain an optimum position for growth and survival based on chemistry, redox and physiology in aquatic habitats with vertical chemical concentration and redox gradients. The biosynthesis of magnetosomes is a complex process that involves several distinct steps including cytoplasmic membrane modifications, iron uptake and transport, initiation of crystallization, crystal maturation and magnetosome chain formation. While many mechanistic details remain unresolved, magnetotactic bacteria appear to contain the genetic determinants for magnetosome biomineralization within their genomes in clusters of genes that make up what is referred to as the magnetosome gene island in some species. In addition, magnetosomes contain a unique set of proteins, not present in other cellular fractions, which control the biomineralization process. Through the development of genetic systems, proteomic and genomic work, and the use of molecular and biochemical tools, the functions of a number of magnetosome membrane proteins have been demonstrated and the molecular

  7. A unique deubiquitinase that deconjugates phosphoribosyl-linked protein ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Jiazhang; Yu, Kaiwen; Fei, Xiaowen; Liu, Yao; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Shaw, Jared B.; Puvar, Kedar; Das, Chittaranjan; Liu, Xiaoyun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2017-05-12

    Ubiquitination regulates many aspects of host immunity and thus is a common target for infectious agents. Recent studies revealed that members of the SidE effector family of the bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila attacked several small GTPases associated with the endoplasmic reticulum by a novel ubiquitination mechanism that does not require the E1 and E2 enzymes of the host ubiquitination machinery. Following ubiquitin activation by ADP- ribosylation via a mono-ADP-ribosylation motif, ADP-ribosylated ubiquitin is cleaved by a phosphodiesterasedomainwithinSdeA,whichisconcomitantwiththelinkof phosphoribosylated ubiquitin to serine residues in the substrate. Here we demonstrate that the activity of SidEs is regulated by SidJ, another effector encoded by a gene situated in the locus coding for three members of the SidE family (SdeC, SdeB and SdeA). SidJ functions to remove ubiquitin from SidEs-modified substrates by cleaving the phosphodiester bond that links phosphoribosylated ubiquitin to protein substrates. Further, the deubiquitinase activity of SidJ is essential for its role in L. pneumophila infection. Finally, the activity of SidJ is required for efficiently reducing the abundance of ubiquitinated Rab33b in infected cells within a few hours after bacterial uptake. Our results establish SidJ as a deubiquitinase that functions to impose temporal regulation of the activity of the SidE effectors. The identification of SidJ may shed light on future study of signaling cascades mediated by this unique ubiquitination that also potentially regulates cellular processes in eukaryotic cells.

  8. A unique chromatin signature uncovers early developmental enhancers in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Bajpai, Ruchi; Swigut, Tomek; Brugmann, Samantha A; Flynn, Ryan A; Wysocka, Joanna

    2011-02-10

    Cell-fate transitions involve the integration of genomic information encoded by regulatory elements, such as enhancers, with the cellular environment. However, identification of genomic sequences that control human embryonic development represents a formidable challenge. Here we show that in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), unique chromatin signatures identify two distinct classes of genomic elements, both of which are marked by the presence of chromatin regulators p300 and BRG1, monomethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me1), and low nucleosomal density. In addition, elements of the first class are distinguished by the acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac), overlap with previously characterized hESC enhancers, and are located proximally to genes expressed in hESCs and the epiblast. In contrast, elements of the second class, which we term 'poised enhancers', are distinguished by the absence of H3K27ac, enrichment of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), and are linked to genes inactive in hESCs and instead are involved in orchestrating early steps in embryogenesis, such as gastrulation, mesoderm formation and neurulation. Consistent with the poised identity, during differentiation of hESCs to neuroepithelium, a neuroectoderm-specific subset of poised enhancers acquires a chromatin signature associated with active enhancers. When assayed in zebrafish embryos, poised enhancers are able to direct cell-type and stage-specific expression characteristic of their proximal developmental gene, even in the absence of sequence conservation in the fish genome. Our data demonstrate that early developmental enhancers are epigenetically pre-marked in hESCs and indicate an unappreciated role of H3K27me3 at distal regulatory elements. Moreover, the wealth of new regulatory sequences identified here provides an invaluable resource for studies and isolation of transient, rare cell populations representing early stages of human embryogenesis.

  9. Émission de photons uniques par un atome unique piégé

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darquié, B.; Beugnon, J.; Jones, M. P. A.; Dingjan, J.; Sortais, Y.; Browaeys, A.; Messin, G.; Grangier, P.

    2006-10-01

    En illuminant un atome unique piégé dans une pince optique de taille micrométrique à l'aide d'impulsions lumineuses résonantes d'une durée de 4 ns, nous avons réalisé une source efficace de photons uniques déclenchés, de polarisation bien définie. Nous avons mesuré la fonction d'autocorrélation temporelle en intensité qui met en évidence un dégroupement de photons presque parfait. Une telle source de photons uniques de haut flux possède des applications potentielles pour le traitement de l'information quantique.

  10. Shape-Reprogrammable Polymers: Encoding, Erasing, and Re-Encoding (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SHAPE-REPROGRAMMABLE POLYMERS: ENCODING, ERASING, AND RE-ENCODING (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In- House 5b. GRANT...heating, which leads to the formation of dome structures that resemble the profi le of a 3D Gaussian shape (Supporting Information, Figure S2a–c...S14). By changing the fi lm stretch ratios, various dome shapes can be created (Figure 2 e). In all cases, the buckling direction is towards the

  11. 14 CFR 221.203 - Unique rule numbers required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unique rule numbers required. 221.203... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Electronically Filed Tariffs § 221.203 Unique rule numbers required... bear a unique rule number. (b) The unique rule numbers for the fares specified in this section shall...

  12. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  13. Parameter Estimation of Turbo Code Encoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Teimouri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of reconstruction of a channel code consists of finding out its design parameters solely based on its output. This paper investigates the problem of reconstruction of parallel turbo codes. Reconstruction of a turbo code has been addressed in the literature assuming that some of the parameters of the turbo encoder, such as the number of input and output bits of the constituent encoders and puncturing pattern, are known. However in practical noncooperative situations, these parameters are unknown and should be estimated before applying reconstruction process. Considering such practical situations, this paper proposes a novel method to estimate the above-mentioned code parameters. The proposed algorithm increases the efficiency of the reconstruction process significantly by judiciously reducing the size of search space based on an analysis of the observed channel code output. Moreover, simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is highly robust against channel errors when it is fed with noisy observations.

  14. Bacillus caldolyticus prs gene encoding phosphoribosyldiphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, Britta N.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    The prs gene, encoding phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase, as well as the flanking DNA sequences were cloned and sequenced from the Gram-positive thermophile, Bacillus caldolyticus. Comparison with the homologous sequences from the mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, revealed a gene (gca......D) encoding N-acetylglucosamine-l-phosphate uridyltransferase upstream of prs, and a gene homologous to ctc downstream of prs. cDNA synthesis with a B. caldolyticus gcaD-prs-ctc-specified mRNA as template, followed by amplification utilising the polymerase chain reaction indicated that the three genes are co......-transcribed. Comparison of amino acid sequences revealed a high similarity among PRPP synthases across a wide phylogenetic range. An E. coli strain harbouring the B. caldolyticus prs gene in a multicopy plasmid produced PRPP synthase activity 33-fold over the activity of a haploid B. caldolyticus strain. B. caldolyticus...

  15. Robust macroscopic entanglement without complex encodings

    CERN Document Server

    Chaves, Rafael; Acín, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges for the experimental manipulation and storage of macroscopic entanglement is its fragility under noise. We present a simple recipe for the systematic enhancement of the resistance of multipartite entanglement against any local noise with a privileged direction in the Bloch sphere. For the case of exact local dephasing along any given basis, and for all noise strengths, our prescription grants full robustness: even states whose entanglement decays exponentially with the number of parts are mapped to states whose entanglement is constant. In contrast to previous techniques resorting to complex logical-qubit encodings, such enhancement is attained simply by performing local unitary rotations before the noise acts. The scheme is therefore highly experimentally-friendly, as it brings no overhead of extra physical qubits to encode logical ones. In addition, we show that, apart from entanglement, the resilience of the states as resources for useful practical tasks such as metrology and non...

  16. Asymmetric synthesis using chiral-encoded metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yutthalekha, Thittaya; Wattanakit, Chularat; Lapeyre, Veronique; Nokbin, Somkiat; Warakulwit, Chompunuch; Limtrakul, Jumras; Kuhn, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of chiral compounds is of crucial importance in many areas of society and science, including medicine, biology, chemistry, biotechnology and agriculture. Thus, there is a fundamental interest in developing new approaches for the selective production of enantiomers. Here we report the use of mesoporous metal structures with encoded geometric chiral information for inducing asymmetry in the electrochemical synthesis of mandelic acid as a model molecule. The chiral-encoded mesoporous metal, obtained by the electrochemical reduction of platinum salts in the presence of a liquid crystal phase and the chiral template molecule, perfectly retains the chiral information after removal of the template. Starting from a prochiral compound we demonstrate enantiomeric excess of the (R)-enantiomer when using (R)-imprinted electrodes and vice versa for the (S)-imprinted ones. Moreover, changing the amount of chiral cavities in the material allows tuning the enantioselectivity.

  17. Multichannel Compressive Sensing MRI Using Noiselet Encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Zhang, Jingxin

    2014-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI, and presents a method to design the pulse sequence for the noiselet encoding. This novel encoding scheme is combined with the multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. An empirical RIP a...

  18. Compositional encoding for bounded model checking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun SUN; Yang LIU; Jin Song DONG; Jing SUN

    2008-01-01

    Verification techniques like SAT-based bounded model checking have been successfully applied to a variety of system models. Applying bounded model checking to compositional process algebras is, however, a highly non-trivial task. One challenge is that the number of system states for process algebra models is not statically known, whereas exploring the full state space is computa-tionally expensive. This paper presents a compositional encoding of hierarchical processes as SAT problems and then applies state-of-the-art SAT solvers for bounded model checking. The encoding avoids exploring the full state space for complex systems so as to deal with state space explosion. We developed an automated analyzer which combines complementing model checking tech-niques (I.e., bounded model checking and explicit on-the-fly model checking) to validate system models against event-based temporal properties. The experiment results show the analyzer handles large systems.

  19. DNA-Encoded Dynamic Combinatorial Chemical Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddavide, Francesco V; Lin, Weilin; Lehnert, Sarah; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) explores the thermodynamic equilibrium of reversible reactions. Its application in the discovery of protein binders is largely limited by difficulties in the analysis of complex reaction mixtures. DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) technology allows the selection of binders from a mixture of up to billions of different compounds; however, experimental results often show low a signal-to-noise ratio and poor correlation between enrichment factor and binding affinity. Herein we describe the design and application of DNA-encoded dynamic combinatorial chemical libraries (EDCCLs). Our experiments have shown that the EDCCL approach can be used not only to convert monovalent binders into high-affinity bivalent binders, but also to cause remarkably enhanced enrichment of potent bivalent binders by driving their in situ synthesis. We also demonstrate the application of EDCCLs in DNA-templated chemical reactions.

  20. Genetically Encoded Voltage Indicators in Circulation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Lars; Tian, Qinghai; Kaiser, Elisabeth; Xian, Wenying; Müller, Andreas; Oberhofer, Martin; Ruppenthal, Sandra; Sinnecker, Daniel; Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Moretti, Alessandra; Lipp, Peter

    2015-09-08

    Membrane potentials display the cellular status of non-excitable cells and mediate communication between excitable cells via action potentials. The use of genetically encoded biosensors employing fluorescent proteins allows a non-invasive biocompatible way to read out the membrane potential in cardiac myocytes and other cells of the circulation system. Although the approaches to design such biosensors date back to the time when the first fluorescent-protein based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors were constructed, it took 15 years before reliable sensors became readily available. Here, we review different developments of genetically encoded membrane potential sensors. Furthermore, it is shown how such sensors can be used in pharmacological screening applications as well as in circulation related basic biomedical research. Potentials and limitations will be discussed and perspectives of possible future developments will be provided.

  1. Encoded Dynamical Recoupling with Shaped Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunfan; Lidar, Daniel A.; Pryadko, Leonid P.

    2008-03-01

    Encoded Dynamical Recoupling is a passive error correction techique which can be used to enhance the performance of a quantum error correction code (QECC) against low-frequency component of the thermal bath. The elements of the stabilizer group are used in the decoupling cycle which makes the encoded logic operations fault-tolerant. We studied the effectiveness of this techique both analytically and numerically for several three- and five-qubit codes, with decoupling sequences utilizing either Gaussian or self-refocusing pulse shapes. When logic pulses are intercalated between the decoupling cycles, the technique may be very effective in cancelling constant perturbation terms, but its performance is much weaker against a time-dependent perturbation simulated as a classical correlated noise. The decoupling accuracy can be substantially improved if logic is applied slowly and concurrently with the decoupling, so that a certain adiabaticity condition is satisfied.

  2. Genetically Encoded Voltage Indicators in Circulation Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kaestner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Membrane potentials display the cellular status of non-excitable cells and mediate communication between excitable cells via action potentials. The use of genetically encoded biosensors employing fluorescent proteins allows a non-invasive biocompatible way to read out the membrane potential in cardiac myocytes and other cells of the circulation system. Although the approaches to design such biosensors date back to the time when the first fluorescent-protein based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET sensors were constructed, it took 15 years before reliable sensors became readily available. Here, we review different developments of genetically encoded membrane potential sensors. Furthermore, it is shown how such sensors can be used in pharmacological screening applications as well as in circulation related basic biomedical research. Potentials and limitations will be discussed and perspectives of possible future developments will be provided.

  3. Characterization of the human and rat phospholemman (PLM) cDNAs and localization of the human PLM gene to chromosome 19q13.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L S; Lo, C F; Numann, R; Cuddy, M

    1997-05-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that the phospholemman (PLM), a 72-residue plasma-membrane protein enriched in skeletal muscle and heart, is a major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin and adrenergic stimulation. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of human and rat PLM cDNA from the heart. Both PLM proteins share significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence and structural similarities with the previously published canine PLM and, to a lesser degree, with Na+/K(+)-ATPase gamma subunit, Mat-8 protein, and CHIF protein. Despite the functional diversity, all these proteins are quite small and possess a single transmembrane domain. Human PLM appears to be a unique gene localized on chromosome 19q13.1. The PLM mRNA is widely distributed in human tissues, with the highest expression in skeletal muscle and heart, suggesting a functional role in muscle contraction. Like canine PLM, both human and rat PLM induce a hyperpolarization-activated chloride current when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The high degree of sequence and functional conservation among the mammalian PLM proteins indicates that this gene is conserved throughout evolution.

  4. Population Encoding With Hodgkin-Huxley Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Aurel A

    2010-02-01

    The recovery of (weak) stimuli encoded with a population of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons is investigated. In the absence of a stimulus, the Hodgkin-Huxley neurons are assumed to be tonically spiking. The methodology employed calls for 1) finding an input-output (I/O) equivalent description of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron and 2) devising a recovery algorithm for stimuli encoded with the I/O equivalent neuron(s). A Hodgkin-Huxley neuron with multiplicative coupling is I/O equivalent with an Integrate-and-Fire neuron with a variable threshold sequence. For bandlimited stimuli a perfect recovery of the stimulus can be achieved provided that a Nyquist-type rate condition is satisfied. A Hodgkin-Huxley neuron with additive coupling and deterministic conductances is first-order I/O equivalent with a Project-Integrate-and-Fire neuron that integrates a projection of the stimulus on the phase response curve. The stimulus recovery is formulated as a spline interpolation problem in the space of finite length bounded energy signals. A Hodgkin-Huxley neuron with additive coupling and stochastic conductances is shown to be first-order I/O equivalent with a Project-Integrate-and-Fire neuron with random thresholds. For stimuli modeled as elements of Sobolev spaces the reconstruction algorithm minimizes a regularized quadratic optimality criterion. Finally, all previous recovery results of stimuli encoded with Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with multiplicative and additive coupling, and deterministic and stochastic conductances are extended to stimuli encoded with a population of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons.

  5. Phase modulation pseudocolor encoding ghost imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段德洋; 张路; 杜少将; 夏云杰

    2015-01-01

    We present a ghost imaging scheme that can obtain a good pseudocolor image of black-and-white objects. The essential idea is to use the multi-wavelength thermal light source and the phase modulation pseudocolor encoding technique, which overcomes the disadvantages of other methods involved the spatial filtering. Therefore, the pseudocolor ghost image achieved by this imaging scheme is better than that obtained by other methods in brightness, color, and signal-to-noise ratio.

  6. Encoded libraries of chemically modified peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinis, Christian; Winter, Greg

    2015-06-01

    The use of powerful technologies for generating and screening DNA-encoded protein libraries has helped drive the development of proteins as pharmaceutical ligands. However the development of peptides as pharmaceutical ligands has been more limited. Although encoded peptide libraries are typically several orders of magnitude larger than classical chemical libraries, can be more readily screened, and can give rise to higher affinity ligands, their use as pharmaceutical ligands is limited by their intrinsic properties. Two of the intrinsic limitations include the rotational flexibility of the peptide backbone and the limited number (20) of natural amino acids. However these limitations can be overcome by use of chemical modification. For example, the libraries can be modified to introduce topological constraints such as cyclization linkers, or to introduce new chemical entities such as small molecule ligands, fluorophores and photo-switchable compounds. This article reviews the chemistry involved, the properties of the peptide ligands, and the new opportunities offered by chemical modification of DNA-encoded peptide libraries.

  7. An Intensional Concurrent Faithful Encoding of Turing Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Given-Wilson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The benchmark for computation is typically given as Turing computability; the ability for a computation to be performed by a Turing Machine. Many languages exploit (indirect encodings of Turing Machines to demonstrate their ability to support arbitrary computation. However, these encodings are usually by simulating the entire Turing Machine within the language, or by encoding a language that does an encoding or simulation itself. This second category is typical for process calculi that show an encoding of lambda-calculus (often with restrictions that in turn simulates a Turing Machine. Such approaches lead to indirect encodings of Turing Machines that are complex, unclear, and only weakly equivalent after computation. This paper presents an approach to encoding Turing Machines into intensional process calculi that is faithful, reduction preserving, and structurally equivalent. The encoding is demonstrated in a simple asymmetric concurrent pattern calculus before generalised to simplify infinite terms, and to show encodings into Concurrent Pattern Calculus and Psi Calculi.

  8. Alpbach Summer School - a unique learning experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K.; Aulinas, J.; Clifford, D.; Krejci, D.; Topham, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Alpbach Summer School is a ten-day program that provides a unique opportunity for young european science and engineering students, both undergraduate and graduate, to learn how to approach the entire design process of a space mission. The theme of the 2010 Summer School was "New Space Missions to Understand Climate Change", a current, challenging, very broad and complex topic. The program was established more than 35 years ago and is organised in two interrelated parts: a series of lectures held by renowned experts in the field (in the case of this specific year, climate change and space engineering experts) that provides a technical and scientific background for the workshops that follow, the core of the Summer School. For the workshops the students are split into four international, interdisciplinary teams of about 15 students. In 2010 every team had to complete a number of tasks, four in total: (1) identify climate change research gaps and design a space mission that has not yet been flown or proposed, (2) define the science objectives and requirements of the mission, (3) design a spacecraft that meets the mission requirements, which includes spacecraft design and construction, payload definition, orbit calculations, but also the satellite launch, operation and mission costs and (4) write up a short mission proposal and present the results to an expert review panel. Achieving these tasks in only a few days in a multicultural, interdisciplinary team represents a major challenge for all participants and provides an excellent practical learning experience. Over the course of the program, students do not just learn facts about climate change and space engineering, but scientists also learn from engineers and engineers from scientists. The participants have to deepen their knowledge in an often unfamiliar field, develop organisational and team-work skills and work under pressure. Moreover, teams are supported by team and roving tutors and get the opportunity to

  9. Localization of eight additional genes in the human major histocompatibility complex, including the gene encoding the casein kinase II {beta} subunit (CSNK2B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertella, M.R.; Jones, H.; Thomson, W. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    A wide range of autoimmune and other diseases are known to be associated with the major histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility antigens in the class I and class II regions, but some appear to be more strongly associated with genes in the central 1100-kb class III region, making it important to characterize this region fully for the presence of novel genes. An {approximately}220-kb segment of DNA in the class III region separating the Hsp70 (HSPA1L) and BAT1 (D6S8IE) genes, which was previously known to contain 14 genes. Genomic DNA fragments spanning the gaps between the known genes were used as probes to isolate cDNAs corresponding to five new genes within this region. Evidence from Northern blot analysis and exon trapping experiments that suggested the presence of at least two more new genes was also obtained. Partial cDNA and complete exonic genomic sequencing of one of the new genes has identified it as the casein kinase II{beta} subunit (CSNK2B). Two of the other novel genes lie within a region syntenic to that implicated in susceptibility to experimental allergic orchitis in the mouse, an autoimmune disease of the testis, and represent additional candidates for the Orch-1 locus associated with this disease. In addition, characterization of the 13-kb intergenic gap separating the RD (D6545) and G11 (D6S60E) genes has revealed the presence of a gene encoding a 1246-amino-acid polypeptide that shows significant sequence similarity to the yeast anti-viral Ski2p gene product. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Two Polyketide Synthase-encoding Genes are Required for Biosynthesis of the Polyketide Virulence Factor, T-toxin, by Cochliobolus heterostrophus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Scott E.; Kroken, Scott; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Asvarak, Thipa; Li, Bi-Yu; Shi, Liang; Yoder, Olen C.; Turgeon, Barbara G.

    2006-03-01

    Cochliobolus heterostrophus race T, causal agent of Southern Corn Leaf Blight, requires T-toxin (a family of C35 – C49 polyketides) for high virulence on T-cytoplasm maize. Production of T-toxin is controlled by two unlinked loci, Tox1A and Tox1B, carried on 1.2 Mb of DNA not found in race O, a mildly virulent form of the fungus that does not produce T-toxin, or in any other Cochliobolus spp. or closely related fungus. PKS1, a polyketide synthase (PKS)-encoding gene at Tox1A and DEC1, a decarboxylase-encoding gene at Tox1B, are necessary for T-toxin production. Although there is evidence that additional genes are required for T-toxin production, efforts to clone them have been frustrated because the genes are located in highly repeated, A+T-rich DNA. To overcome this difficulty, Ligation specificity-based Expression Analysis Display (LEAD), a comparative AFLP/gel fractionation/capillary sequencing procedure was applied to cDNAs from a near isogenic pair of race T (Tox1+) and race O (Tox1-) strains. This led to discovery of PKS2, a second PKS-encoding gene that maps at Tox1A and is required for both T-toxin biosynthesis and high virulence to maize. Thus, the carbon chain of each T-toxin family member is likely assembled by action of two PKSs, which produce two polyketides, one of which may act as the starter unit for biosynthesis of the mature T-toxin molecule.

  11. The AD: The unique anti-accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    Slide show by Maximilien Brice. Voice (French only): Jacques Fichet. Content: Paola Catapano, Django Manglunki, CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Unlike other machines whose performance is measured in terms of energy records, AD's uniqueness resides in the fact that it can very effectively decelerate beams. At the hearth of antimatter production at CERN, the AD is making headlines in the world's press. This provides an excellent opportunity for us to retrace its history in images.   var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-0753-kbps-480x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-0480-kbps-384x288-25-fps-audio-128-kbps-48-kHz-stereo.wmv', 'false', 480, 360, 'http://mediaarchive.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2011/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083/CERN-MOVIE-2011-083-posterframe-480x360-at-5-percent.jpg', '1357551', true, '');  

  12. Arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: A unique presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalak, Charles F.; Opalak, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) is a rare disorder that was differentiated from leptomeningeal calcification by Kaufman and Dunsmore in 1971. It generally presents with progressive lower extremity myelopathy. Though the underlying etiology has yet to be fully described, it has been associated with various predisposing factors including vascular malformations, previous intradural surgery, myelograms, and adhesive arachnoiditis. Associated conditions include syringomyelia and arachnoid cyst. The preferred diagnostic method is noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Surgical intervention is still controversial and can include decompression and duroplasty or durotomy. Case Description: The authors report the case of a 62-year-old male with a history of paraplegia who presented with a urinary tract infection and dysautonomia. His past surgical history was notable for a C4–C6 anterior fusion and an intrathecal phenol injection for spasticity. A magnetic resonance image (MR) also demonstrated a T6-conus syringx. At surgery, there was significant ossification of the arachnoid/dura, which was removed. After a drain was placed in the syrinx, there was a significant neurologic improvement. Conclusion: This case demonstrates a unique presentation of AO and highlights the need for CT imaging when a noncommunicating syringx is identified. In addition, surgical decompression can achieve good results when AO is associated with concurrent compressive lesions. PMID:26693389

  13. Unique type of isolated cardiac valvular amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reehana Salma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid deposition in heart is a common occurrence in systemic amyloidosis. But localised valvular amyloid deposits are very uncommon. It was only in 1922 that the cases of valvular amyloidosis were reported. Then in 1980, Goffin et al reported another type of valvular amyloidosis, which he called the dystrophic valvular amyloidosis. We report a case of aortic valve amyloidosis which is different from the yet described valvular amyloidosis. Case presentation A 72 years old gentleman underwent urgent aortic valve replacement. Intraoperatively, a lesion was found attached to the inferior surface of his bicuspid aortic valve. Histopathology examination of the valve revealed that the lesion contained amyloid deposits, identified as AL amyloidosis. The serum amyloid A protein (SAP scan was normal and showed no evidence of systemic amyloidosis. The ECG and echocardiogram were not consistent with cardiac amyloidosis. Conclusion Two major types of cardiac amyloidosis have been described in literature: primary-myelomatous type (occurs with systemic amyolidosis, and senile type(s. Recently, a localised cardiac dystrophic valvular amyloidosis has been described. In all previously reported cases, there was a strong association of localised valvular amyloidosis with calcific deposits. Ours is a unique case which differs from the previously reported cases of localised valvular amyloidosis. In this case, the lesion was not associated with any scar tissue. Also there was no calcific deposit found. This may well be a yet unknown type of isolated valvular amyloidosis.

  14. Unique Ganglioside Recognition Strategies for Clostridial Neurotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Marc A.; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Baldwin, Michael R. (MCW); (UMC)

    2012-03-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin are the causative agents of the paralytic diseases botulism and tetanus, respectively. The potency of the clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) relies primarily on their highly specific binding to nerve terminals and cleavage of SNARE proteins. Although individual CNTs utilize distinct proteins for entry, they share common ganglioside co-receptors. Here, we report the crystal structure of the BoNT/F receptor-binding domain in complex with the sugar moiety of ganglioside GD1a. GD1a binds in a shallow groove formed by the conserved peptide motif E ... H ... SXWY ... G, with additional stabilizing interactions provided by two arginine residues. Comparative analysis of BoNT/F with other CNTs revealed several differences in the interactions of each toxin with ganglioside. Notably, exchange of BoNT/F His-1241 with the corresponding lysine residue of BoNT/E resulted in increased affinity for GD1a and conferred the ability to bind ganglioside GM1a. Conversely, BoNT/E was not able to bind GM1a, demonstrating a discrete mechanism of ganglioside recognition. These findings provide a structural basis for ganglioside binding among the CNTs and show that individual toxins utilize unique ganglioside recognition strategies.

  15. Unique biosynthesis of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    To the best of my knowledge, only 19 cyclic and 8 linear C35 terpenes have been identified to date, and no family name was assigned to this terpene class until recently. In 2011, it was proposed that these C35 terpenes should be called sesquarterpenes. This review highlights the biosynthesis of two kinds of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes) that are produced via cyclization of a linear C35 isoprenoid in Bacillus and Mycobacterium species. In Bacillus species, a new type of terpene cyclase that has no sequence homology with any known terpene synthases, as well as a bifunctional terpene cyclase that biosynthesizes two classes of cyclic terpenes with different numbers of carbons as natural products, have been identified. On the other hand, in Mycobacterium species, the first bifunctional Z-prenyltransferase has been found, but a novel terpene cyclase and a unique polyprenyl reductase remain unidentified. The identification of novel enzyme types should lead to the discovery of many homologous enzymes and their products including novel natural compounds. On the other hand, many enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of natural products have low substrate specificities in vitro. Therefore, to find novel natural products present in organisms, the multifunctionality of enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of natural products should be analyzed.

  16. Condition evaluation of a unique mining site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Junsheng; Chen Frank Y.; Ma Yan; Zhang Siya

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the existing conditions and the stability of a mining site in which the unique features of seismicity, mining activity, hydrological conditions, geological con-ditions, environmental conditions, and future development plans were considered. In particular, the potential subsidence locations near the proposed construction site, the effects of mining boundary profile, and the influence scope of the mining activity on the neighboring areas were investigated using the finite element method. The study results indicate:(1) the overlying sandstone layer to the coal layer is the key to the stability of the mining roof; (2) the broken boundary has the most effect, followed by the arc boundary and linear boundary; (3) the safe distance from the mining boundary should be at least 400 m if the proposed structure is to be built near an active mining site. Other relevant engineering rec-ommendations are also proposed. The concluded results from this study may serve as a guide to other similar sites in the world.

  17. The Large Binocular Telescope azimuth and elevation encoder system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, David S.; Sargent, Tom; Cox, Dan; Rosato, Jerry; Brynnel, Joar G.

    2008-08-01

    A typical high-resolution encoder interpolator relies on careful mechanical alignment of the encoder read-heads and tight electrical tolerances of the signal processing electronics to ensure linearity. As the interpolation factor increases, maintaining these tight mechanical and electrical tolerances becomes impractical. The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is designed to utilize strip-type encoders on the main axes. Because of the very large scale of the telescope, the accumulative length of the azimuth and elevation encoder strips exceeds 80 meters, making optical tape prohibitively expensive. Consequently, the designers of the LBT incorporated the far less expensive Farrand Controls Inductosyn® linear strip encoder to encode the positions of the main axes and the instrument rotators. Since the cycle pitch of these encoders is very large compared to that of optical strip encoders, the interpolation factor must also be large in order to achieve the 0.005 arcsecond encoder resolution as specified. The authors present a description of the innovative DSP-based hardware / software solution that adaptively characterizes and removes common systematic cycle-to-cycle encoder interpolation errors. These errors can be caused by mechanical misalignment, encoder manufacturing flaws, variations in electrical gain, signal offset or cross-coupling of the encoder signals. Simulation data are presented to illustrate the performance of the interpolation algorithm, and telemetry data are presented to demonstrate the actual performance of the LBT main-axis encoder system.

  18. Silent Encoding of Chemical Post-Translational Modifications in Phage-Displayed Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Kitov, Pavel I; Ng, Simon; Kitova, Elena N; Deng, Lu; Klassen, John S; Derda, Ratmir

    2016-01-13

    In vitro selection of chemically modified peptide libraries presented on phage, while a powerful technology, is limited to one chemical post-translational modification (cPTM) per library. We use unique combinations of redundant codons to encode cPTMs with "silent barcodes" to trace multiple modifications within a mixed modified library. As a proof of concept, we produced phage-displayed peptide libraries Ser-[X]4-Gly-Gly-Gly, with Gly and Ser encoded using unique combinations of codons (TCA-[X]4-GGAGGAGGA, AGT-[X]4-GGTGGTGGT, etc., where [X]4 denotes a random NNK library). After separate chemical modification and pooling, mixed-modified libraries can be panned and deep-sequenced to identify the enriched peptide sequence and the accompanying cPTM simultaneously. We panned libraries bearing combinations of modifications (sulfonamide, biotin, mannose) against matched targets (carbonic anhydrase, streptavidin, concanavalin A) to identify desired ligands. Synthesis and validation of sequences identified by deep sequencing revealed that specific cPTMs are significantly enriched in panning against the specific targets. Panning on carbonic anhydrase yielded a potent ligand, sulfonamide-WIVP, with Kd = 6.7 ± 2.1 nM, a 20-fold improvement compared with the control ligand sulfonamide-GGGG. Silent encoding of multiple cPTMs can be readily incorporated into other in vitro display technologies such as bacteriophage T7 or mRNA display.

  19. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  20. Some unique superconductive Properties of Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K. A.

    2013-04-01

    Copper oxides are the only materials that show transition temperatures, Tc, above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, with a maximum Tmc of 162 K under pressure. Their structure is layered, with one to several CuO2 planes, and upon hole doping, their transition temperature follows a dome-shaped curve with a maximum at Tmc. In the underdoped regime, i.e., below Tmc, a pseudogap T* is found, with T* always being larger than Tc, a property unique to the copper oxides [1]. In the superconducting state, Cooper pairs (two holes with antiparallel spins) are formed that exhibit coherence lengths on the order of a lattice distance in the CuO2 plane and one order of magnitude less perpendicular to it. Their macroscopic wave function is parallel to the CuO2 plane near 100% d at their surface, but only 75% d and 25 % s in the bulk, and near 100% s perpendicular to the plane in YBCO. There are two gaps with the same Tc [2]. As function of doping, the oxygen isotope effect is novel and can be quantitatively accounted for by a two-band vibronic theory [3] near Tmc, and underdoped below it till Tc = 0 with by a formula valid for (bi)polarons [4]. These cuprates are intrinsically heterogeneous in a dynamic way. In terms of quasiparticles, Jahn-Teller bipolarons are present at low doping, and aggregate upon cooling [1], so that probably ramified clusters and/or stripes are formed, leading over to a more Fermi-liquid-type behavior at large carrier concentrations above Tmc.

  1. Unique genomic organization of a novel Avipoxvirus detected in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bányai, Krisztián; Palya, Vilmos; Dénes, Béla; Glávits, Róbert; Ivanics, Éva; Horváth, Balázs; Farkas, Szilvia L; Marton, Szilvia; Bálint, Ádám; Gyuranecz, Miklós; Erdélyi, Károly; Dán, Ádám

    2015-10-01

    Avipoxviruses are emerging pathogens affecting over 200 bird species worldwide. Genetic characterization of avipoxviruses is performed by analysis of genomic regions encoding the 4b and DNA polymerase. Whole genome sequence data are limited to a few avipoxvirus isolates. Based on phylogenetic analysis three major genetic clades are distinguished. In this study we report a novel avipoxvirus strain causing skin lesions in domestic turkey. The virus was identified in Hungary during 2011 in a flock of turkey vaccinated against avipoxvirus infection. The genome of the isolated strain, TKPV-HU1124/2011, was uniquely short (∼188.5kbp) and was predicted to encode reduced number of proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of the genes encoding the 4b and DNA polymerase separated TKPV-HU1124/2011 from other turkey origin avipoxviruses and classified it into a new genetic clade. This study permits new insight into the genetic and genomic heterogeneity of avipoxviruses and pinpoints the importance of strain diversity in vaccine efficacy.

  2. Encoding the core electrons with graph concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliani, Lionello

    2004-01-01

    The core electron problem of atoms in chemical graph studies has always been considered as a minor problem. Usually, chemical graphs had to encode just a small set of second row atoms, i.e., C, N, O, and F, thus, graph and, in some cases, pseudograph concepts were enough to "graph" encode the molecules at hand. Molecular connectivity theory, together with its side-branch the electrotopological state, introduced two "ad hoc" algorithms for the core electrons of higher-row atoms based, mainly, on quantum concepts alike. Recently, complete graphs, and, especially, odd complete graphs have been introduced to encode the core electrons of higher-row atoms. By the aid of these types of graphs a double-valued algorithm has been proposed for the valence delta, deltav, of any type of atoms of the periodic table with a principal quantum number n > or =2. The new algorithm is centered on an invariant suggested by the hand-shaking theorem, and the values it gives rise to parallel in some way the values derived by the aid of the two old "quantum" algorithms. A thorough comparative analysis of the newly proposed algorithms has been undertaken for atoms of the group 1A-7A of the periodic table. This comparative study includes the electronegativity, the size of the atoms, the first ionization energy, and the electron affinity. The given algorithm has also been tested with sequential complete graphs, while the even complete graphs give rise to conceptual difficulties. QSAR/QSPR studies do not show a clear-cut preference for any of the two values the algorithm gives rise to, even if recent results seem to prefer one of the two values.

  3. Encoding of the cough reflex in anesthetized guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Brendan J; Mori, Nanako

    2011-02-01

    We have previously described the physiological and morphological properties of the cough receptors and their sites of termination in the airways and centrally in the nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS). In the present study, we have addressed the hypothesis that the primary central synapses of the cough receptors subserve an essential role in the encoding of cough. We found that cough requires sustained, high-frequency (≥8-Hz) afferent nerve activation. We also found evidence for processes that both facilitate (summation, sensitization) and inhibit the initiation of cough. Sensitization of cough occurs with repetitive subthreshold activation of the cough receptors or by coincident activation of C-fibers and/or nTS neurokinin receptor activation. Desensitization of cough evoked by repetitive and/or continuous afferent nerve activation has a rapid onset (nervous system-dependent process. The cough reflex can also be actively inhibited upon activation of other airway afferent nerve subtypes, including slowly adapting receptors and pulmonary C-fibers. The sensitization and desensitization of cough are likely attributable to the prominent, primary, and unique role of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent signaling at the central synapses of the cough receptors. These attributes may have direct relevance to the presentation of cough in disease and for the effectiveness of antitussive therapies.

  4. Neuronal encoding of texture in the whisker sensory pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Arabzadeh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge of sensory systems neuroscience is to quantify brain activity underlying perceptual experiences and to explain this activity as the outcome of elemental neuronal response properties. Rats make extremely fine discriminations of texture by "whisking" their vibrissae across an object's surface, yet the neuronal coding underlying texture sensations remains unknown. Measuring whisker vibrations during active whisking across surfaces, we found that each texture results in a unique "kinetic signature" defined by the temporal profile of whisker velocity. We presented these texture-induced vibrations as stimuli while recording responses of first-order sensory neurons and neurons in the whisker area of cerebral cortex. Each texture is encoded by a distinctive, temporally precise firing pattern. To look for the neuronal coding properties that give rise to texture-specific firing patterns, we delivered horizontal and vertical whisker movements that varied randomly in time ("white noise" and found that the response probabilities of first-order neurons and cortical neurons vary systematically according to whisker speed and direction. We applied the velocity-tuned spike probabilities derived from white noise to the sequence of velocity features in the texture to construct a simulated texture response. The close match between the simulated and real responses indicates that texture coding originates in the selectivity of neurons to elemental kinetic events.

  5. Encoding of Memory in Sheared Amorphous Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Davide; Foffi, Giuseppe; Sastry, Srikanth

    2014-01-01

    We show that memory can be encoded in a model amorphous solid subjected to athermal oscillatory shear deformations, and in an analogous spin model with disordered interactions, sharing the feature of a deformable energy landscape. When these systems are subjected to oscillatory shear deformation, they retain memory of the deformation amplitude imposed in the training phase, when the amplitude is below a "localization" threshold. Remarkably, multiple persistent memories can be stored using such an athermal, noise-free, protocol. The possibility of such memory is shown to be linked to the presence of plastic deformations and associated limit cycles traversed by the system, which exhibit avalanche statistics also seen in related contexts.

  6. Toward Chemical Implementation of Encoded Combinatorial Libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Janda, Kim D.

    1994-01-01

    by existing methodologies. Here we detail the synthesis of several matrices and the necessary chemistry to implement the conceptual scheme. In addition, we disclose how this novel technology permits a controlled ′dendritic" display of the chemical libraries. © 1994 Academic Press. All rights reserved.......The recent application of "combinatorial libraries" to supplement existing drug screening processes might simplify and accelerate the search for new lead compounds or drugs. Recently, a scheme for encoded combinatorial chemistry was put forward to surmount a number of the limitations possessed...

  7. Polynucleotides encoding TRF1 binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a novel telomere associated protein (Trf1-interacting nuclear protein 2 "Tin2") that hinders the binding of Trf1 to its specific telomere repeat sequence and mediates the formation of a Tin2-Trf1-telomeric DNA complex that limits telomerase access to the telomere. Also included are the corresponding nucleic acids that encode the Tin2 of the present invention, as well as mutants of Tin2. Methods of making, purifying and using Tin2 of the present invention are described. In addition, drug screening assays to identify drugs that mimic and/or complement the effect of Tin2 are presented.

  8. The ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-22

    The ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. The pilot phase of the Project is focused on a specified 30 megabases (approximately 1%) of the human genome sequence and is organized as an international consortium of computational and laboratory-based scientists working to develop and apply high-throughput approaches for detecting all sequence elements that confer biological function. The results of this pilot phase will guide future efforts to analyze the entire human genome.

  9. Digitally encoded all-optical sensor multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anjum

    1992-01-01

    A digital, all-optical temperature sensor design concept based on optical sampling and digital encoding is presented. The proposed sensor generates 2M binary digital codewords of length M bits. The codewords are generated serially and, therefore, only a single output fiber line is required. A multiplexing scheme, which minimizes the power requirement per sensor array and facilitates a cost-effective digit regeneration for remote monitoring over long distance, is presented. The sensor arrays are used as building blocks to configure large scale sensor networks based on LAN topologies.

  10. Fractal image encoding based on adaptive search

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kya Berthe; Yang Yang; Huifang Bi

    2003-01-01

    Finding the optimal algorithm between an efficient encoding process and the rate distortion is the main research in fractal image compression theory. A new method has been proposed based on the optimization of the Least-Square Error and the orthogonal projection. A large number of domain blocks can be eliminated in order to speed-up fractal image compression. Moreover, since the rate-distortion performance of most fractal image coders is not satisfactory, an efficient bit allocation algorithm to improve the rate distortion is also proposed. The implementation and comparison have been done with the feature extraction method to prove the efficiency of the proposed method.

  11. Rapidly-Indexing Incremental-Angle Encoder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, Philip R.; Meyer, Wallace W.

    1989-01-01

    Optoelectronic system measures relative angular position of shaft or other device to be turned, also measures absolute angular position after device turned through small angle. Relative angular position measured with fine resolution by optoelectronically counting finely- and uniformly-spaced light and dark areas on encoder disk as disk turns past position-sensing device. Also includes track containing coarsely- and nonuniformly-spaced light and dark areas, angular widths varying in proportion to absolute angular position. This second track provides gating and indexing signal.

  12. The Einstein constraints: uniqueness and non-uniqueness in the conformal thin sandwich approach

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgarte, T W; Pfeiffer, H P; Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Murchadha, Niall \\'{O}; Pfeiffer, Harald P.

    2006-01-01

    We study the appearance of multiple solutions to certain decompositions of Einstein's constraint equations. Pfeiffer and York recently reported the existence of two branches of solutions for identical background data in the extended conformal thin-sandwich decomposition. We show that the Hamiltonian constraint alone, when expressed in a certain way, admits two branches of solutions with properties very similar to those found by Pfeiffer and York. We construct these two branches analytically for a constant-density star in spherical symmetry, but argue that this behavior is more general. In the case of the Hamiltonian constraint this non-uniqueness is well known to be related to the sign of one particular term, and we argue that the extended conformal thin-sandwich equations contain a similar term that causes the breakdown of uniqueness.

  13. Novel encoding methods for DNA-templated chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zheng, Wenlu; Liu, Ying; Li, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    Among various types of DNA-encoded chemical libraries, DNA-templated library takes advantage of the sequence-specificity of DNA hybridization, enabling not only highly effective DNA-templated chemical reactions, but also high fidelity in library encoding. This brief review summarizes recent advances that have been made on the encoding strategies for DNA-templated libraries, and it also highlights their respective advantages and limitations for the preparation of DNA-encoded libraries.

  14. Characterizing the unique photochemical environment in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Gu, D.; Zhao, C.; Huey, L. G.; Stickel, R.; Liao, J.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observational evidence suggests that the atmospheric chemical system over China could be more complex than expected, possibly as a result of the rapid increasing anthropogenic emissions. During the CAREBeijing-2007 Experiment in August of 2007, up to 14 ppbv of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN, CH3C(O)OONO2) and 4.5 ppbv of glyoxal (CHOCHO) were observed, among the highest levels observed in the world in recent years. Elevated nitrous acid (HNO2) (~1.0 ppbv on average) was also observed in the early afternoon despite of the moderate amount of its precursors, i.e. nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO + NO2). We employ a 1-D photochemical model (REAM) to analyze the observations. The results indicate that reactive aromatics are the dominating source of PAN (55%-75%) and glyoxal (90%), and methylglyoxal is the major precursor of peroxy acetyl radical (50%). Downward transport from boundary layer is found to contribute ~50% of the PAN observed at surface. Photolysis of HNO2 is by far the largest primary OH source (more than 50%) throughout the daytime, and yet the fast formation rate of HNO2 inferred from the observations could not be explained by current known mechanisms. Detailed photochemical analysis is conducted to understand the controlling factors for O3 formation. O3 formation chemistry is strongly affected by aromatics and HNO2. By providing a large primary OH source, HNO2 leads to ~25% enhancement of the average O3 production rate, and aromatics contribute ~40% by serving as a major source of RO2 and HO2 radicals. Due to the large abundance of reactive hydrocarbons, O3 formation is generally NOx limited, although the sensitivity is low that a 50% reduction of NOx could only result in less than 25% reduction of the O3 production rate. Future research targeting HNO2 formation mechanism and emission sources of aromatics is necessary for better understanding the unique photochemical environment in China under significant anthropogenic impacts and the regional pollution

  15. Socialization Processes in Encoding and Decoding: Learning Effective Nonverbal Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robert S.; Coats, Erik

    This study examined the relationship of nonverbal encoding and decoding skills to the level of exposure to television. Subjects were children in second through sixth grade. Three nonverbal skills (decoding, spontaneous encoding, and posed encoding) were assessed for each of five emotions: anger, disgust, fear or surprise, happiness, and sadness.…

  16. Self-encoding resin beads of combinatorial library screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Du; Zhao, Yuandi; Cheng, Tongsheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2003-07-01

    The latest self-encoding resin bead is a novel technology for solid phase synthesis combinatorial library screening. A new encode-positional deconvolution strategy which was based on that technology been illustrated compared with positional scanning and iterative strategies. The self-encoding resin beads technology provides an efficient method for improving the high-throughput screening of combinatorial library.

  17. DVB-S2 FEC Encoder: Implementation of DVB-S2 FEC encoder in FPGA

    OpenAIRE

    Myhr, Reidar

    2007-01-01

    This Master Thesis describe how DVB-S2 Forward Error Correction (FEC) encoding can be implemented in hardware like a FPGA. It include the design, simulation, verification and synthesis of a complete encoder for the DVB-S2 FEC system. First the Thesis gives a introduction to the history behind DVB-S2 and the FEC system. It describe shortly the theory behind the error correcting codes used in the FEC, BCH and LDPC codes. To get an effective implementation in hardware it was necessary to studies...

  18. Reading Neural Encodings using Phase Space Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Abarbanel, Henry D I; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Tumer, Evren C.

    2003-01-01

    Environmental signals sensed by nervous systems are often represented in spike trains carried from sensory neurons to higher neural functions where decisions and functional actions occur. Information about the environmental stimulus is contained (encoded) in the train of spikes. We show how to "read" the encoding using state space methods of nonlinear dynamics. We create a mapping from spike signals which are output from the neural processing system back to an estimate of the analog input signal. This mapping is realized locally in a reconstructed state space embodying both the dynamics of the source of the sensory signal and the dynamics of the neural circuit doing the processing. We explore this idea using a Hodgkin-Huxley conductance based neuron model and input from a low dimensional dynamical system, the Lorenz system. We show that one may accurately learn the dynamical input/output connection and estimate with high precision the details of the input signals from spike timing output alone. This form of "...

  19. SEVERAL UNIQUENESS THEOREMS OF ALGEBROID FUNCTIONS ON ANNULI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang TAN

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the uniqueness problem of algebroid functions on an-nuli, we get several uniqueness theorems of algebroid functions on annuli, which extend the Nevanlinna value distribution theory for algebroid functions on annuli.

  20. Existence and uniqueness of positive eigenfunctions for certain eigenvalue systems

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Ru-Ying; Yang, Yi-Min

    2004-01-01

    The existence and uniqueness of eigenvalues and positive eigenfunctions for some quasilinear elliptic systems are considered. Some necessary and sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence and uniqueness of eigenvalues and positive eigenfunctions are given.

  1. EXISTENCE AND UNIQUENESS OF POSITIVE EIGENVALUES FOR CERTAIN EIGENVALUE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Ruying; QIN Yuchun

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we consider certain eigenvalue systems.Imposing some reasonable hypotheses, we prove that theeigenvalue system has a unique eigenvalue with positiveeigenfunctions, and that the eigenfunction is unique upto a scalar multiple.

  2. Uniqueness Problems for Meromorphic Functions that Share Three Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJian-ping

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigate the uniqueness problems for meromorphic functions that share three values CM and proves a uniqueness theorem on this topic which can be used to improve some previous related results.

  3. Piriform spider silk sequences reveal unique repetitive elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David J; Bittencourt, Daniela; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Rech, Elibio L; Lewis, Randolph V

    2010-11-08

    Orb-weaving spider silk fibers are assembled from very large, highly repetitive proteins. The repeated segments contain, in turn, short, simple, and repetitive amino acid motifs that account for the physical and mechanical properties of the assembled fiber. Of the six orb-weaver silk fibroins, the piriform silk that makes the attachment discs, which lashes the joints of the web and attaches dragline silk to surfaces, has not been previously characterized. Piriform silk protein cDNAs were isolated from phage libraries of three species: A. trifasciata , N. clavipes , and N. cruentata . The deduced amino acid sequences from these genes revealed two new repetitive motifs: an alternating proline motif, where every other amino acid is proline, and a glutamine-rich motif of 6-8 amino acids. Similar to other spider silk proteins, the repeated segments are large (>200 amino acids) and highly homogenized within a species. There is also substantial sequence similarity across the genes from the three species, with particular conservation of the repetitive motifs. Northern blot analysis revealed that the mRNA is larger than 11 kb and is expressed exclusively in the piriform glands of the spider. Phylogenetic analysis of the C-terminal regions of the new proteins with published spidroins robustly shows that the piriform sequences form an ortholog group.

  4. The genes pme-1 and pme-2 encode two poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Steve N; Hengartner, Michael O; Desnoyers, Serge

    2002-11-15

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are an expanding, well-conserved family of enzymes found in many metazoan species, including plants. The enzyme catalyses poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, a post-translational modification that is important in DNA repair and programmed cell death. In the present study, we report the finding of an endogenous source of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in total extracts of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Two cDNAs encoding highly similar proteins to human PARP-1 (huPARP-1) and huPARP-2 are described, and we propose to name the corresponding enzymes poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism enzyme 1 (PME-1) and PME-2 respectively. PME-1 (108 kDa) shares 31% identity with huPARP-1 and has an overall structure similar to other PARP-1 subfamily members. It contains sequences having considerable similarity to zinc-finger motifs I and II, as well as with the catalytic domain of huPARP-1. PME-2 (61 kDa) has structural similarities with the catalytic domain of PARPs in general and shares 24% identity with huPARP-2. Recombinant PME-1 and PME-2 display PARP activity, which may partially account for the similar activity found in the worm. A partial duplication of the pme-1 gene with pseudogene-like features was found in the nematode genome. Messenger RNA for pme-1 are 5'-tagged with splice leader 1, whereas those for pme - 2 are tagged with splice leader 2, suggesting an operon-like expression for pme - 2. The expression pattern of pme-1 and pme-2 is also developmentally regulated. Together, these results show that PARP-1 and -2 are conserved in evolution and must have important functions in multicellular organisms. We propose using C. elegans as a model to understand better the functions of these enzymes.

  5. A Variant of GJD2, Encoding for Connexin 36, Alters the Function of Insulin Producing β-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Cigliola

    Full Text Available Signalling through gap junctions contributes to control insulin secretion and, thus, blood glucose levels. Gap junctions of the insulin-producing β-cells are made of connexin 36 (Cx36, which is encoded by the GJD2 gene. Cx36-null mice feature alterations mimicking those observed in type 2 diabetes (T2D. GJD2 is also expressed in neurons, which share a number of common features with pancreatic β-cells. Given that a synonymous exonic single nucleotide polymorphism of human Cx36 (SNP rs3743123 associates with altered function of central neurons in a subset of epileptic patients, we investigated whether this SNP also caused alterations of β-cell function. Transfection of rs3743123 cDNA in connexin-lacking HeLa cells resulted in altered formation of gap junction plaques and cell coupling, as compared to those induced by wild type (WT GJD2 cDNA. Transgenic mice expressing the very same cDNAs under an insulin promoter revealed that SNP rs3743123 expression consistently lead to a post-natal reduction of islet Cx36 levels and β-cell survival, resulting in hyperglycemia in selected lines. These changes were not observed in sex- and age-matched controls expressing WT hCx36. The variant GJD2 only marginally associated to heterogeneous populations of diabetic patients. The data document that a silent polymorphism of GJD2 is associated with altered β-cell function, presumably contributing to T2D pathogenesis.

  6. Cloning and characterization of genes encoding alpha and beta subunits of glutamate-gated chloride channel protein in Cylicocyclus nassatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Ritesh; LePage, Keith T; Kaplan, Ray M

    2006-11-01

    The invertebrate glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) are receptor molecules and targets for the avermectin-milbemycin (AM) group of anthelmintics. Mutations in GluCls are associated with ivermectin resistance in the soil dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Cooperia oncophora. In this study, full-length cDNAs encoding alpha and beta subunits of GluCl were cloned and sequenced in Cylicocyclus nassatus, a common and important cyathostomin nematode parasite of horses. Both genes possess the sequence characteristics typical of GluCls, and phylogenetic analysis confirms that these genes are evolutionarily closely related to GluCls of other nematodes and flies. Complete coding sequences of C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and GluCl-beta were subcloned into pTL1 mammalian expression vector, and proteins were expressed in COS-7 cells. Ivermectin-binding characteristics were determined by incubating COS-7 cell membranes expressing C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and GluCl-beta proteins with [(3)H]ivermectin. In competitive binding experiments, fitting the data to a one site competition model, C. nassatus GluCl-alpha was found to bind [(3)H]ivermectin with a high amount of displaceable binding (IC(50)=208 pM). Compared to the mock-transfected COS-7 cells, the means of [(3)H]ivermectin binding were significantly different for C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and the Haemonchus contortus GluCl (HcGluCla) (p=0.018 and 0.023, respectively) but not for C. nassatus GluCl-beta (p=0.370). This is the first report of orthologs of GluCl genes and in vitro expression of an ivermectin-binding protein in a cyathostomin species. These data suggest the likelihood of a similar mechanism of action of AM drugs in these parasites, and suggest that mechanisms of resistance may also be similar.

  7. Time-Encoded Raman: Fiber-based, hyperspectral, broadband stimulated Raman microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Karpf, Sebastian; Wieser, Wolfgang; Klein, Thomas; Huber, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Raman sensing and Raman microscopy are amongst the most specific optical technologies to identify the chemical compounds of unknown samples, and to enable label-free biomedical imaging with molecular contrast. However, the high cost and complexity, low speed, and incomplete spectral information provided by current technology are major challenges preventing more widespread application of Raman systems. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new method for stimulated Raman spectroscopy and Raman imaging using continuous wave (CW), rapidly wavelength swept lasers. Our all-fiber, time-encoded Raman (TICO-Raman) setup uses a Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser source to achieve a unique combination of high speed, broad spectral coverage (750 cm-1 - 3150 cm-1) and high resolution (0.5 cm-1). The Raman information is directly encoded and acquired in time. We demonstrate quantitative chemical analysis of a solvent mixture and hyperspectral Raman microscopy with molecular contrast of plant cells.

  8. Unique small RNA signatures uncovered in the tammar wallaby genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay James

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small RNAs have proven to be essential regulatory molecules encoded within eukaryotic genomes. These short RNAs participate in a diverse array of cellular processes including gene regulation, chromatin dynamics and genome defense. The tammar wallaby, a marsupial mammal, is a powerful comparative model for studying the evolution of regulatory networks. As part of the genome sequencing initiative for the tammar, we have explored the evolution of each of the major classes of mammalian small RNAs in an Australian marsupial for the first time, including the first genome-scale analysis of the newest class of small RNAs, centromere repeat associated short interacting RNAs (crasiRNAs. Results Using next generation sequencing, we have characterized the major classes of small RNAs, micro (mi RNAs, piwi interacting (pi RNAs, and the centromere repeat associated short interacting (crasi RNAs in the tammar. We examined each of these small RNA classes with respect to the newly assembled tammar wallaby genome for gene and repeat features, salient features that define their canonical sequences, and the constitution of both highly conserved and species-specific members. Using a combination of miRNA hairpin predictions and co-mapping with miRBase entries, we identified a highly conserved cluster of miRNA genes on the X chromosome in the tammar and a total of 94 other predicted miRNA producing genes. Mapping all miRNAs to the tammar genome and comparing target genes among tammar, mouse and human, we identified 163 conserved target genes. An additional nine genes were identified in tammar that do not have an orthologous miRNA target in human and likely represent novel miRNA-regulated genes in the tammar. A survey of the tammar gonadal piRNAs shows that these small RNAs are enriched in retroelements and carry members from both marsupial and tammar-specific repeat classes. Lastly, this study includes the first in-depth analyses of the newly

  9. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Brightest X-ray Cluster Acts as Strong Gravitational Lens Based on exciting new data obtained with the ROSAT X-ray satellite and a ground-based telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, a team of European astronomers [2] has just discovered a very distant cluster of galaxies with unique properties. It emits the strongest X-ray emission of any cluster ever observed by ROSAT and is accompanied by two extraordinarily luminous arcs that represent the gravitationally deflected images of even more distant objects. The combination of these unusual characteristics makes this cluster, now known as RXJ1347.5-1145, a most interesting object for further cosmological studies. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS This strange cluster of galaxies was discovered during the All Sky Survey with the ROSAT X-ray satellite as a moderately intense X-ray source in the constellation of Virgo. It could not be identified with any already known object and additional ground-based observations were therefore soon after performed with the Max-Planck-Society/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. These observations took place within a large--scale redshift survey of X-ray clusters of galaxies detected by the ROSAT All Sky Survey, a so-called ``ESO Key Programme'' led by astronomers from the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera. The main aim of this programme is to identify cluster X-ray sources, to determine the distance to the X-ray emitting clusters and to investigate their overall properties. These observations permitted to measure the redshift of the RXJ1347.5-1145 cluster as z = 0.45, i.e. it moves away from us with a velocity (about 106,000 km/sec) equal to about one-third of the velocity of light. This is an effect of the general expansion of the universe and it allows to determine the distance as about 5,000 million light-years (assuming a Hubble constant of 75 km/sec/Mpc). In other words, we see these

  10. A human RNA polymerase II subunit is encoded by a recently generated multigene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattei Marie-Geneviève

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequences encoding the yeast RNA polymerase II (RPB subunits are single copy genes. Results While those characterized so far for the human (h RPB are also unique, we show that hRPB subunit 11 (hRPB11 is encoded by a multigene family, mapping on chromosome 7 at loci p12, q11.23 and q22. We focused on two members of this family, hRPB11a and hRPB11b: the first encodes subunit hRPB11a, which represents the major RPB11 component of the mammalian RPB complex ; the second generates polypeptides hRPB11bα and hRPB11bβ through differential splicing of its transcript and shares homologies with components of the hPMS2L multigene family related to genes involved in mismatch-repair functions (MMR. Both hRPB11a and b genes are transcribed in all human tissues tested. Using an inter-species complementation assay, we show that only hRPB11bα is functional in yeast. In marked contrast, we found that the unique murine homolog of RPB11 gene maps on chromosome 5 (band G, and encodes a single polypeptide which is identical to subunit hRPB11a. Conclusions The type hRPB11b gene appears to result from recent genomic recombination events in the evolution of primates, involving sequence elements related to the MMR apparatus.

  11. Negative base encoding in optical linear algebra processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlee, C.; Casasent, D.

    1986-01-01

    In the digital multiplication by analog convolution algorithm, the bits of two encoded numbers are convolved to form the product of the two numbers in mixed binary representation; this output can be easily converted to binary. Attention is presently given to negative base encoding, treating base -2 initially, and then showing that the negative base system can be readily extended to any radix. In general, negative base encoding in optical linear algebra processors represents a more efficient technique than either sign magnitude or 2's complement encoding, when the additions of digitally encoded products are performed in parallel.

  12. A naturally occurring Lgr4 splice variant encodes a soluble antagonist useful for demonstrating the gonadal roles of Lgr4 in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Jen Hsu

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (LGR4 promotes the Wnt signaling through interaction with R-spondins or norrin. Using PCR amplification from rat ovarian cDNAs, we identified a naturally occurring Lgr4 splice variant encoding only the ectodomain of Lgr4, which was named Lgr4-ED. Lgr4-ED can be detected as a secreted protein in the extracts from rodent and bovine postnatal gonads, suggesting conservation of Lgr4-ED in mammals. Recombinant Lgr4-ED purified from the conditioned media of transfected 293T cells was found to dose-dependently inhibit the LGR4-mediated Wnt signaling induced by RSPO2 or norrin, suggesting that it is capable of ligand absorption and could have a potential role as an antagonist. Intraperitoneal injection of purified recombinant Lgr4-ED into newborn mice was found to significantly decrease the testicular expression of estrogen receptor alpha and aquaporin 1, which is similar to the phenotype found in Lgr4-null mice. Administration of recombinant Lgr4-ED to superovulated female rats can also decrease the expression of estrogen receptor alpha, aquaporin 1, LH receptor and other key steroidogenic genes as well as bring about the suppression of progesterone production. Thus, these findings suggest that endogenously expressed Lgr4-ED may act as an antagonist molecule and help to fine-tune the R-spondin/norrin-mediated Lgr4-Wnt signaling during gonadal development.

  13. Differential regulation of manganese peroxidases and characterization of two variable MnP encoding genes in the white-rot fungus Physisporinus rivulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, Terhi K; Hildén, Kristiina; Maijala, Pekka; Olsson, Cia; Hatakka, Annele

    2006-12-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) production in the white-rot basidiomycete Physisporinus rivulosus T241i was studied. Separate MnP isoforms were produced in carbon-limited liquid media supplemented with Mn(2+), veratryl alcohol, or sawdust. The isoforms had different pH ranges for the oxidation of Mn(2+) and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol. Although lignin degradation by white-rot fungi is often triggered by nitrogen depletion, MnPs of P. rivulosus were efficiently produced also in the presence of high-nutrient nitrogen, especially in cultures supplemented with veratryl alcohol. Two MnP encoding genes, mnpA and mnpB, were identified, and their corresponding cDNAs were characterized. Structurally, the genes showed marked dissimilarity, and the expression of the two genes implicated quantitative variation and differential regulation in response to manganese, veratryl alcohol, or sawdust. The variability in regulation and properties of the isoforms may widen the operating range for efficient lignin degradation by P. rivulosus.

  14. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Full-Length cDNAs of Food Intake Regulation Factors in Japanese Seabass ( Lateolabrax japonicus)%花鲈摄食调控相关因子全长 cDNA的克隆和序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳; 许恒龙; 薛敏; 王嘉; 吴秀峰; 郑银桦; 韩芳; 张彦娇

    2015-01-01

    本试验采用反转录聚合酶链式反应( RT-PCR)和cDNA末端快速扩增( RACE)技术克隆花鲈( Lateolabrax japonicus)调控摄食因子雷帕霉素靶蛋白( mTOR)、核糖体蛋白S6激酶be-ta-1( S6K1)、神经肽Y前体( NPY precursor)和脑肠肽前体( preproghrelin) cDNA全长序列. 结果显示:花鲈mTOR( GenBank登录号KJ746670) cDNA全长8 296 bp,开放阅读框7 551 bp,编码2 516个氨基酸,预测其分子质量为286.14 ku,与其他物种的相似性为62.0%~98.0%;S6K1 ( GenBank登录号KJ746671) cDNA全长2 232 bp,开放阅读框1 539 bp,编码512个氨基酸,预测其分子质量为56.87 ku,与其他物种的相似性为80.4%~84.9%;NPY precursor( GenBank登录号KJ850326) cDNA全长676 bp,开放阅读框300 bp,编码99 个氨基酸,预测其分子质量为11.26 ku,与其他物种的相似性为 53. 6%~99. 0%;preproghrelin ( GenBank 登录号 KJ850327 ) cDNA全长1 201 bp,开放阅读框324 bp,编码107个氨基酸,预测其分子质量为12.03 ku,与其他物种的相似性为19.6%~85.0%. 花鲈摄食调控因子cDNA全长序列地获得将为进一步研究其摄食调控机理奠定基础.%The full-length cDNAs of food intake regulation factors, including mechanistic target of rapamycin ( mTOR) , ribosomal protein S6 kinase beta-1 ( S6K1) , neuropeptide Y ( NPY) precursor and preproghrelin were cloned from Japanese seabass ( Lateolabrax japonicus) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reac-tion ( RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end ( RACE) methods. The results showed as follows: the full-length mTOR cDNA of Japanese seabass ( GenBank accession No. KJ746670) was 8 296 bp, consisting of an open reading frame ( ORF) of 7 551 bp encoding a polypeptide of 2 516 amino acids with a theoretical molecular weight of 286.14 ku, and shared 62.0% to 98.0% similarity with other species. The full-length S6K1 cDNA of Japanese seabass ( GenBank accession No. KJ746671 ) was 2 232 bp, consisting of an ORF of 1 539 bp encoding a

  15. A method for encoding clinical datasets with SNOMED CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Hue

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade there has been a growing body of literature on how the Systematised Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT can be implemented and used in different clinical settings. Yet, for those charged with incorporating SNOMED CT into their organisation's clinical applications and vocabulary systems, there are few detailed encoding instructions and examples available to show how this can be done and the issues involved. This paper describes a heuristic method that can be used to encode clinical terms in SNOMED CT and an illustration of how it was applied to encode an existing palliative care dataset. Methods The encoding process involves: identifying input data items; cleaning the data items; encoding the cleaned data items; and exporting the encoded terms as output term sets. Four outputs are produced: the SNOMED CT reference set; interface terminology set; SNOMED CT extension set and unencodeable term set. Results The original palliative care database contained 211 data elements, 145 coded values and 37,248 free text values. We were able to encode ~84% of the terms, another ~8% require further encoding and verification while terms that had a frequency of fewer than five were not encoded (~7%. Conclusions From the pilot, it would seem our SNOMED CT encoding method has the potential to become a general purpose terminology encoding approach that can be used in different clinical systems.

  16. Unique core genomes of the bacterial family vibrionaceae: insights into niche adaptation and speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahlke Tim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The criteria for defining bacterial species and even the concept of bacterial species itself are under debate, and the discussion is apparently intensifying as more genome sequence data is becoming available. However, it is still unclear how the new advances in genomics should be used most efficiently to address this question. In this study we identify genes that are common to any group of genomes in our dataset, to determine whether genes specific to a particular taxon exist and to investigate their potential role in adaptation of bacteria to their specific niche. These genes were named unique core genes. Additionally, we investigate the existence and importance of unique core genes that are found in isolates of phylogenetically non-coherent groups. These groups of isolates, that share a genetic feature without sharing a closest common ancestor, are termed genophyletic groups. Results The bacterial family Vibrionaceae was used as the model, and we compiled and compared genome sequences of 64 different isolates. Using the software orthoMCL we determined clusters of homologous genes among the investigated genome sequences. We used multilocus sequence analysis to build a host phylogeny and mapped the numbers of unique core genes of all distinct groups of isolates onto the tree. The results show that unique core genes are more likely to be found in monophyletic groups of isolates. Genophyletic groups of isolates, in contrast, are less common especially for large groups of isolate. The subsequent annotation of unique core genes that are present in genophyletic groups indicate a high degree of horizontally transferred genes. Finally, the annotation of the unique core genes of Vibrio cholerae revealed genes involved in aerotaxis and biosynthesis of the iron-chelator vibriobactin. Conclusion The presented work indicates that genes specific for any taxon inside the bacterial family Vibrionaceae exist. These unique core genes encode

  17. On the Uniqueness of the Canonical Polyadic Decomposition of third-order tensors --- Part II: Uniqueness of the overall decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Domanov, Ignat; De Lathauwer, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Canonical Polyadic (also known as Candecomp/Parafac) Decomposition (CPD) of a higher-order tensor is decomposition in a minimal number of rank-1 tensors. In Part I, we gave an overview of existing results concerning uniqueness and presented new, relaxed, conditions that guarantee uniqueness of one factor matrix. In Part II we use these results for establishing overall CPD uniqueness in cases where none of the factor matrices has full column rank. We obtain uniqueness conditions involving Khat...

  18. Ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy in biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Blood flow speed is an important functional parameter. Doppler ultrasound flowmetry lacks sufficient sensitivity to slow blood flow (several to tens of millimeters per second) in deep tissue. To address this challenge, we developed ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy combining ultrasonic thermal tagging with photoacoustic imaging. Focused ultrasound generates a confined heat source in acoustically absorptive fluid. Thermal waves propagate with the flow and are directly visualized in pseudo color using photoacoustic computed tomography. The Doppler shift is employed to calculate the flow speed. This method requires only acoustic and optical absorption, and thus is applicable to continuous fluid. A blood flow speed as low as 0.24 mm·s−1 was successfully measured. Deep blood flow imaging was experimentally demonstrated under 5-mm-thick chicken breast tissue. PMID:24289689

  19. Radiofrequency encoded angular-resolved light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckley, Brandon W.; Akbari, Najva; Diebold, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    The sensitive, specific, and label-free classification of microscopic cells and organisms is one of the outstanding problems in biology. Today, instruments such as the flow cytometer use a combination of light scatter measurements at two distinct angles to infer the size and internal complexity...... of cells at rates of more than 10,000 per second. However, by examining the entire angular light scattering spectrum it is possible to classify cells with higher resolution and specificity. Current approaches to performing these angular spectrum measurements all have significant throughput limitations...... Encoded Angular-resolved Light Scattering (REALS), this technique multiplexes angular light scattering in the radiofrequency domain, such that a single photodetector captures the entire scattering spectrum from a particle over approximately 100 discrete incident angles on a single shot basis. As a proof...

  20. Visually lossless encoding for JPEG2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Han; Bilgin, Ali; Marcellin, Michael W

    2013-01-01

    Due to exponential growth in image sizes, visually lossless coding is increasingly being considered as an alternative to numerically lossless coding, which has limited compression ratios. This paper presents a method of encoding color images in a visually lossless manner using JPEG2000. In order to hide coding artifacts caused by quantization, visibility thresholds (VTs) are measured and used for quantization of subband signals in JPEG2000. The VTs are experimentally determined from statistically modeled quantization distortion, which is based on the distribution of wavelet coefficients and the dead-zone quantizer of JPEG2000. The resulting VTs are adjusted for locally changing backgrounds through a visual masking model, and then used to determine the minimum number of coding passes to be included in the final codestream for visually lossless quality under the desired viewing conditions. Codestreams produced by this scheme are fully JPEG2000 Part-I compliant.

  1. Schistosome satellite DNA encodes active hammerhead ribozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbeyre, G; Smith, J M; Cedergren, R

    1998-07-01

    Using a computer program designed to search for RNA structural motifs in sequence databases, we have found a hammerhead ribozyme domain encoded in the Smalpha repetitive DNA of Schistosoma mansoni. Transcripts of these repeats are expressed as long multimeric precursor RNAs that cleave in vitro and in vivo into unit-length fragments. This RNA domain is able to engage in both cis and trans cleavage typical of the hammerhead ribozyme. Further computer analysis of S. mansoni DNA identified a potential trans cleavage site in the gene coding for a synaptobrevin-like protein, and RNA transcribed from this gene was efficiently cleaved by the Smalpha ribozyme in vitro. Similar families of repeats containing the hammerhead domain were found in the closely related Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosomatium douthitti species but were not present in Schistosoma japonicum or Heterobilharzia americana, suggesting that the hammerhead domain was not acquired from a common schistosome ancestor.

  2. Mouse redox histology using genetically encoded probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Roma, Leticia P; Sobotta, Mirko C; Rose, Adam J; Diaz, Mauricio Berriel; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Breckwoldt, Michael O; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Herzig, Stephan; Müller-Decker, Karin; Dick, Tobias P

    2016-03-15

    Mapping the in vivo distribution of endogenous oxidants in animal tissues is of substantial biomedical interest. Numerous health-related factors, including diet, physical activity, infection, aging, toxins, or pharmacological intervention, may cause redox changes. Tools are needed to pinpoint redox state changes to particular organs, tissues, cell types, and subcellular organelles. We describe a procedure that preserves the in vivo redox state of genetically encoded redox biosensors within histological tissue sections, thus providing "redox maps" for any tissue and comparison of interest. We demonstrate the utility of the technique by visualizing endogenous redox differences and changes in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, embryonic development, and nutrient starvation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Measurement of transient deformation by color encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, C; Barrientos, B; Blanco, A

    2011-12-05

    We present a method based on color encoding for measurement of transient 3D deformation in diffuse objects. The object is illuminated by structured light that consists of a fringe pattern with cyan fringes embedded in a white background. Color images are registered and information on each color channel is then separated. Surface features appear on the blue channel while fringes on the red channel. The in-plane components of displacement are calculated via digital correlation of the texture images. Likewise, the resulting fringes serve for the measuring of the out-of-plane component. As crossing of information between signals is avoided, the accuracy of the method is high. This is confirmed by a series of displacement measurements of an aluminum plate.

  4. Ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy in biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-11-15

    Blood flow speed is an important functional parameter. Doppler ultrasound flowmetry lacks sufficient sensitivity to slow blood flow (several to tens of millimeters per second) in deep tissue. To address this challenge, we developed ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy combining ultrasonic thermal tagging with photoacoustic imaging. Focused ultrasound generates a confined heat source in acoustically absorptive fluid. Thermal waves propagate with the flow and are directly visualized in pseudo color using photoacoustic computed tomography. The Doppler shift is employed to calculate the flow speed. This method requires only acoustic and optical absorption, and thus is applicable to continuous fluid. A blood flow speed as low as 0.24  mm·s(-1)} was successfully measured. Deep blood flow imaging was experimentally demonstrated under 5-mm-thick chicken breast tissue.

  5. Brain Circuits Encoding Reward from Pain Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratilova, Edita; Atcherley, Christopher; Porreca, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Relief from pain in humans is rewarding and pleasurable. Primary rewards, or reward predictive cues, are encoded in brain reward/motivational circuits. While considerable advances have been made in our understanding of reward circuits underlying positive reinforcement, less is known about the circuits underlying the hedonic and reinforcing actions of pain relief. We review findings from electrophysiological, neuroimaging and behavioral studies supporting the concept that the rewarding effect of pain relief requires opioid signaling in the anterior cingulate cortex, activation of midbrain dopamine neurons and release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. Understanding of circuits that govern the reward of pain relief may allow the discovery of more effective and satisfying therapies for patients with acute and chronic pain. PMID:26603560

  6. Encoding information using Laguerre Gaussian modes over free space turbulence media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Salem, Amine Ben; Dudley, Angela; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient information transmission technique using Laguerre Gaussian (LG) modes. This technique is based on multiplexing and demultiplexing multiple LG modes with different azimuthal and radial components. At the reception, the initially sent modes encoding the information are extracted with high fidelity using a complete decomposition allowing to identify a particular mode from a set of modes within a unique iteration. Importantly, we investigate the effects of the atmospheric turbulence on the proposed communication system. We believe that the proposed technique is promising for high-bit-rate spatial division multiplexing in optical fiber and free space communication systems.

  7. The effect of additional exposure to the unique features in a perceptual learning task can be attributed to a location bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio, Sergio A; Iliescu, Adela F; Bergés, Germán D; Gil, Marta; de Brugada, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that human perceptual learning could be explained in terms of a better memory encoding of the unique features during intermixed exposure. However, it is possible that a location bias could play a relevant role in explaining previous results of perceptual learning studies using complex visual stimuli. If this were the case, the only relevant feature would be the location, rather than the content, of the unique features. To further explore this possibility, we attempted to replicate the results of Lavis, Kadib, Mitchell, and Hall (2011, Experiment 2), which showed that additional exposure to the unique elements resulted in better discrimination than simple intermixed exposure. We manipulated the location of the unique elements during the additional exposure. In one experiment, they were located in the same position as that when presented together with the common element. In another experiment, the unique elements were located in the center of the screen, regardless of where they were located together with the common element. Our results showed that additional exposure only improved discrimination when the unique elements were presented in the same position as when they were presented together with the common element. The results reported here do not provide support for the explanation of the effects of additional exposure of the unique elements in terms of a better memory encoding and instead suggest an explanation in terms of location bias. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Encoding continuous spatial phenomena in GML

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, M. E.; Ledoux, H.

    2009-04-01

    In the discussion about how to model and encode geographic information two meta-models of space exist: the 'object' view and the 'field' view. This difference in conceptual view is also reflected in different data models and encoding formats. Among GIS practitioners, ‘fields' (or ‘coverages') are being used almost exclusively in 2D, while in the geoscience community 3D and higher-dimensional fields are widely used. (Note that the dimensions in oceanographic/atmospheric coverages are not necessarily spatial dimensions, as any parameters (e.g. temperature of the air, or density of water) can be considered a dimension.) While standardisation work in ISO and OGC has led to agreement on how to best encode discrete spatial objects, for the modelling and encoding of continuous ‘fields' there are still a number of open issues. In the presentation we will shortly discuss the current standards related to fields, and look at their shortcomings and potential. In ISO 19123 for example a distinction is made between discrete and continuous coverages, but the difference is not very clear and hard to capture for implementers. As far as encoding is concerned: GML 3.x (ISO 19136) has a discrete coverage data type, but no continuous coverage type. We will then present an alternative solution to model fields, and show how it can be implemented using some parts of GML, but not the ISO/GML coverage type. This alternative data model for fields permits us to represent fields in 2D and 3D, although conceptually it can be easily extended to higher dimensions. Unlike current standards where there is a distinction between discrete and continuous fields/coverages, we argue that a field should always have one - and only one! - value for a given attribute at every location in the spatial domain (be this domain the surface of the Earth, a 3D volume, or even a 4D spatio-temporal hypercube). The principal idea behind the proposed model is that two things are needed to have a coverage: 1. a set

  9. Transcriptional analyses of the region of the equine herpesvirus type 4 genome encoding glycoproteins I and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, A M; Jang, H K; Matsumura, T; Yokoyama, N; Miyazawa, T; Mikami, T

    1999-01-01

    To map the transcripts encoding the equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) glycoproteins I (gI) and E (gE), transcriptional analyses were performed at the right part of the unique short segment of EHV-4 genome. The results revealed that the gI gene is encoded by a 1.6-kb transcript which is 3' coterminal with a 3.0-kb gD mRNA while the gE gene is encoded by two transcripts of 3.5- and 2.4-kb in size. The transcriptional patterns described in this study for the EHV-4 gI and gE are similar to those found in the equivalent region of herpes simplex virus type 1 and feline herpesvirus type 1. Characterization of EHV-4 gI and gE glycoprotein genes may facilitate future studies to define their roles in the EHV-4 infection.

  10. Discovery of TNF inhibitors from a DNA-encoded chemical library based on diels-alder cycloaddition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Fabian; Zhang, Yixin; Scheuermann, Jörg; Schäfer, Juliane; Bühlmann, Peter; Neri, Dario

    2009-10-30

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries are promising tools for the discovery of ligands toward protein targets of pharmaceutical relevance. DNA-encoded small molecules can be enriched in affinity-based selections and their unique DNA "barcode" allows the amplification and identification by high-throughput sequencing. We describe selection experiments using a DNA-encoded 4000-compound library generated by Diels-Alder cycloadditions. High-throughput sequencing enabled the identification and relative quantification of library members before and after selection. Sequence enrichment profiles corresponding to the "bar-coded" library members were validated by affinity measurements of single compounds. We were able to affinity mature trypsin inhibitors and identify a series of albumin binders for the conjugation of pharmaceuticals. Furthermore, we discovered a ligand for the antiapoptotic Bcl-xL protein and a class of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) binders that completely inhibited TNF-mediated killing of L-M fibroblasts in vitro.

  11. A putative gene cluster from a Lyngbya wollei bloom that encodes paralytic shellfish toxin biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troco K Mihali

    Full Text Available Saxitoxin and its analogs cause the paralytic shellfish-poisoning syndrome, adversely affecting human health and coastal shellfish industries worldwide. Here we report the isolation, sequencing, annotation, and predicted pathway of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in the cyanobacterium Lyngbya wollei. The gene cluster spans 36 kb and encodes enzymes for the biosynthesis and export of the toxins. The Lyngbya wollei saxitoxin gene cluster differs from previously identified saxitoxin clusters as it contains genes that are unique to this cluster, whereby the carbamoyltransferase is truncated and replaced by an acyltransferase, explaining the unique toxin profile presented by Lyngbya wollei. These findings will enable the creation of toxin probes, for water monitoring purposes, as well as proof-of-concept for the combinatorial biosynthesis of these natural occurring alkaloids for the production of novel, biologically active compounds.

  12. Modular verification of chemical reaction network encodings via serializability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Matthew R; Stefanovic, Darko; Phillips, Andrew

    2016-06-13

    Chemical reaction networks are a powerful means of specifying the intended behaviour of synthetic biochemical systems. A high-level formal specification, expressed as a chemical reaction network, may be compiled into a lower-level encoding, which can be directly implemented in wet chemistry and may itself be expressed as a chemical reaction network. Here we present conditions under which a lower-level encoding correctly emulates the sequential dynamics of a high-level chemical reaction network. We require that encodings are transactional, such that their execution is divided by a "commit reaction" that irreversibly separates the reactant-consuming phase of the encoding from the product-generating phase. We also impose restrictions on the sharing of species between reaction encodings, based on a notion of "extra tolerance", which defines species that may be shared between encodings without enabling unwanted reactions. Our notion of correctness is serializability of interleaved reaction encodings, and if all reaction encodings satisfy our correctness properties then we can infer that the global dynamics of the system are correct. This allows us to infer correctness of any system constructed using verified encodings. As an example, we show how this approach may be used to verify two- and four-domain DNA strand displacement encodings of chemical reaction networks, and we generalize our result to the limit where the populations of helper species are unlimited.

  13. A human systemic lupus erythematosus-related anti-cardiolipin/single-stranded DNA autoantibody is encoded by a somatically mutated variant of the developmentally restricted 51P1 V[sub H] gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Es, J.H.; Aanstoot, H.; Gmelig-Meyling, F.H.J.; Derksen, R.H.W.M.; Logtenberg, T. (Univ. Hospital Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1992-09-15

    The authors report the Ig H and L chain V region sequences from the cDNAs encoding a monoclonal human IgG anti-cardiolipin/ssDNA autoantibody (R149) derived from a patient with active SLE. Comparison with the germ-line V-gene repertoire of this patient revealed that R149 likely arose as a consequence of an Ag-driven selection process. The Ag-binding portions of the V regions were characterized by a high number of arginine residues, a property that has been associated with anti-dsDNA autoantibodies from lupus-prone mice and patients with SLE. The V[sub H] gene encoding autoantibody R149 was a somatically mutated variant of the 51P1 gene segment, which is frequently associated with the restricted fetal B cell repertoire, malignant CD5 B cells, and natural antibodies. These data suggest that in SLE patients a common antigenic stimulus may evoke anti-DNA and anti-cardiolipin autoantibodies and provide further evidence that a small set of developmentally restricted V[sub H] genes can give rise to disease-associated autoantibodies through Ag-selected somatic mutations. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Cotton GhPOX1 encoding plant class III peroxidase may be responsible for the high level of reactive oxygen species production that is related to cotton fiber elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Wenqian; Qin, Yongmei; Song, Wenqiang; Li, Jun; Zhu, Yuxian

    2009-03-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is involved in plant cell development. In plant, class III peroxidases are heme-containing enzymes encoded by a large multi-gene family participated in the release or consumption of ROS. The specific function of each member of the family is still elusive. Here, we showed that ROS was significantly generated during cotton fiber initiation and elongation, whereas, application of NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and peroxidase inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the wild-type cotton ovule culture significantly suppressed fiber growth, respectively. Their inhibitory effects were caused by the reduction of superoxide radical (O(2)(-)). Ten GhPOX genes (cDNAs) encoding cotton class III peroxidases were isolated, among them eight GhPOX genes were reported for the first time. Microarray analyses indicated that GhPOX1 was the mostly predominantly expressed in fast-elongating cotton fiber cells. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed the transcript level of GhPOX1 was over 400-fold higher in growing fiber cells than in ovules, flowers, roots, stems and leaves. To reveal the role of GhPOX1 in plant development, its Arabidopsis orthologue atpox13 mutant was demonstrated to be defective in branch root development. Taken together, the data suggest that GhPOX1 plays an important role during fiber cell elongation possibly by mediating production of reactive oxygen species.

  15. THE E. RUGE’S AUTHOR’S ENCODING (STUDY OF THE NOVEL «IN ZEITEN DES ABNEHMENDEN LICHTS»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubov' Alekseevna GOLYAKOVA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explored the means capable of bringing to light an implied meaning of the fiction piece, with the novel «In Zeiten des abnehmenden Lichts» by E. Ruge taken for instance. Exploring the author’s encoding made it affordable to elicit and describe the author’s unique way of perceiving actuality and shaping it with words.

  16. Identification and characterization of cDNA clones encoding hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase from tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, M J; Czernic, P; Michael, A; Negrel, J

    1999-08-01

    The sequences of three cDNA clones that include the complete coding region of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (THT) from tobacco are reported. The three cDNAs were isolated by antibody screening of a cDNA expression library produced from poly(A)+RNA purified from tobacco leaves (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Bottom Special), previously infiltrated with an incompatible strain of Ralstonia solanacearum. The identity of these clones was confirmed by the detection of THT activity in extracts of transformed Escherichia coli and by matching the translated polypeptides with tryptic enzyme sequences. cDNA clones tht4 and tht11 differ only by their 5' leader and 3' UTRs and therefore encode the same protein, whereas tht10 and tht11 exhibit 95 and 99% sequence identity at the DNA and deduced amino acid levels, respectively. The three clones encode proteins of 226 amino acids with calculated molecular masses of 26 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequences show no similarity with the sequence of anthranilate hydroxycinnamoyl/benzoyltransferase from Dianthus caryophyllus, the only enzyme exhibiting hydroxycinnamoyltransferase activity to be cloned so far in plants. In contrast, comparison of the THT amino acid sequence with protein sequence databases revealed substantial homology with mammalian diamine acetyltransferases. The THT clones hybridized to a 0.95-kb mRNA from elicited tobacco cell-suspension cultures and also to a mRNA of similar size from wound-healing potato tubers. The messengers for THT were also found to be expressed at relatively high levels in tobacco root tissues. Southern hybridization of tobacco genomic DNA with THT cDNA suggests that several copies of the THT gene occur in the tobacco genome. Inhibition experiments using amino-acid-specific reagents demonstrated that both histidyl and cysteyl residues are required for THT activity. In the course of these experiments THT was also found to be inhibited by (2-hydroxyphenyl) amino sulfinyl

  17. Cloning of two genes encoding Rab7 in Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmacz, Liliana; Wiejak, Jolanta; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2006-01-01

    Rab7 is a small GTPase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of transport from early to late endosomes and lysosomes, phagosome maturation and in lysosomal biogenesis in mammalian cells. It contains conserved and unique sequence elements that mediate its function. Two Rab7 genes, Rab7a (703 bp) and Rab7b (707 bp) were identified in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium by PCR amplification. They contain three short introns of different lengths (28-32 bp) and sequence located at identical positions in both genes. The presence of two Rab7 genes in the Paramecium genome was confirmed by Southern hybridization analysis performed with six different restriction enzymes. Expression of both genes was assessed by Northern blot and RT-PCR. Two transcripts of 1.8 and 2.2 kb were identified by hybridization analysis. The cloned complementary DNAs, both of 618 nucleotides in length, encode polypeptides of 206 amino acids that are 97.6% identical and differ in their C-termini. The predicted protein sequences of Rab7a and Rab7b contain all characteristic domains essential for Rab function: the effector domain (YRATVGADF) and four GTP-binding consensus sequences (GDSGVGKT, WDTAGQ, NKLD, SAK) as well as the prenylation motif (-CC) at the C-terminus indispensable for Rab binding to the membrane. Similarity searches revealed 81.6-82.1% homology of Paramecium Rab7 isoforms to human Rab7 and a lack of an insert typical for the Kinetoplastida - the species that appeared earlier in evolution. Paramecium is the first free-living lower eukaryote in which homologues of Rab7 have been identified that exhibit features similar to those of mammalian Rab7.

  18. A ROBUST ADAPTIVE VIDEO ENCODER BASED ON HUMAN VISUAL MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Hao; Zhang Jiangshan; Zhu Yaoting; Zhu Guangxi

    2003-01-01

    A Robust Adaptive Video Encoder (RAVE) based on human visual model is proposed. The encoder combines the best features of Fine Granularity Scalable (FGS) coding, framedropping coding, video redundancy coding, and human visual model. According to packet loss and available bandwidth of the network, the encoder adjust the output bit rate by jointly adapting quantization step-size instructed by human visual model, rate shaping, and periodically inserting key frame. The proposed encoder is implemented based on MPEG-4 encoder and is compared with the case of a conventional FGS algorithm. It is shown that RAVE is a very efficient robust video encoder that provides improved visual quality for the receiver and consumes equal or less network resource. Results are confirmed by subjective tests and simulation tests.

  19. A ROBUST ADAPTIVE VIDEO ENCODER BASED ON HUMAN VISUAL MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YinHao; ZhangJiangshan

    2003-01-01

    A Robust Adaptive Video Encoder (RAVE) based on human visual model is proposed.The encoder combines the best features of Fine Granularity Scalabla (FGS) coding,frame-dropping coding,video redundancy coding,and human visual model.According to packet loss and available bandwidth of the network,the encoder adjust the output bit rate by jointly adapting quantization step-size instructed by human visual model,rate shaping,and periodically inserting key frame.The proposed encoder is implemented based on MPEG-4 encoder and is compared with the case of a conventional FGS algorithm.It is shown that RAVE is a very efficient robust videl encoder that provides improved visual quality for the receiver and consumes equal or less network resource.Results are confirmed by subjective tests and simulation tests.

  20. Uniqueness of the differential Mueller matrix of uniform homogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlaminck, Vincent; Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2014-06-01

    We show that the differential matrix of a uniform homogeneous medium containing birefringence may not be uniquely determined from its Mueller matrix, resulting in the potential existence of an infinite set of elementary polarization properties parameterized by an integer parameter. The uniqueness depends on the symmetry properties of a special differential matrix derived from the eigenvalue decomposition of the Mueller matrix. The conditions for the uniqueness of the differential matrix are identified, physically discussed, and illustrated in examples from the literature.

  1. Existence and uniqueness theorem for ODE: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Poria, Swarup; Dhiman, Aman

    2016-01-01

    The study of existence and uniqueness of solutions became important due to the lack of general formula for solving nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Compact form of existence and uniqueness theory appeared nearly 200 years after the development of the theory of differential equation. In the article, we shall discuss briefly the differences between linear and nonlinear first order ODE in context of existence and uniqueness of solutions. Special emphasis is given on the Lipschit...

  2. The optimal encodings for biased association in linear associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yee; Dong, Tian Xin; Xu, Zong Ben

    1998-07-01

    In this paper, optimal encoding schemes for linear associative memories are derived for biased association under both the white-noise and colored-noise situations. Analysis and simulation results all show that the biased encodings thus derived are optimal and superior to existing models in their performance. Together with the Wee-Kohonen unbiased encoding, the study settles the optimality issue of linear associative memories and enhances their practicalities.

  3. Theorems on Positive Data: On the Uniqueness of NMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Laurberg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the conditions for which nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF is unique and introduce several theorems which can determine whether the decomposition is in fact unique or not. The theorems are illustrated by several examples showing the use of the theorems and their limitations. We have shown that corruption of a unique NMF matrix by additive noise leads to a noisy estimation of the noise-free unique solution. Finally, we use a stochastic view of NMF to analyze which characterization of the underlying model will result in an NMF with small estimation errors.

  4. Temporal encoding in a nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldworth, Zane N; Dimitrov, Alexander G; Cummins, Graham I; Gedeon, Tomáš; Miller, John P

    2011-05-01

    We examined the extent to which temporal encoding may be implemented by single neurons in the cercal sensory system of the house cricket Acheta domesticus. We found that these neurons exhibit a greater-than-expected coding capacity, due in part to an increased precision in brief patterns of action potentials. We developed linear and non-linear models for decoding the activity of these neurons. We found that the stimuli associated with short-interval patterns of spikes (ISIs of 8 ms or less) could be predicted better by second-order models as compared to linear models. Finally, we characterized the difference between these linear and second-order models in a low-dimensional subspace, and showed that modification of the linear models along only a few dimensions improved their predictive power to parity with the second order models. Together these results show that single neurons are capable of using temporal patterns of spikes as fundamental symbols in their neural code, and that they communicate specific stimulus distributions to subsequent neural structures.

  5. Temporal encoding in a nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zane N Aldworth

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We examined the extent to which temporal encoding may be implemented by single neurons in the cercal sensory system of the house cricket Acheta domesticus. We found that these neurons exhibit a greater-than-expected coding capacity, due in part to an increased precision in brief patterns of action potentials. We developed linear and non-linear models for decoding the activity of these neurons. We found that the stimuli associated with short-interval patterns of spikes (ISIs of 8 ms or less could be predicted better by second-order models as compared to linear models. Finally, we characterized the difference between these linear and second-order models in a low-dimensional subspace, and showed that modification of the linear models along only a few dimensions improved their predictive power to parity with the second order models. Together these results show that single neurons are capable of using temporal patterns of spikes as fundamental symbols in their neural code, and that they communicate specific stimulus distributions to subsequent neural structures.

  6. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Darren L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC, however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential.

  7. Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, E; Mariella Jr., R P; Christian, A T; Gardner, S N; Williams, J M

    2003-11-24

    This report summarizes the work done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding project, part of the Microelectronic Bioprocesses Program at DARPA. The goal of the project was to develop a process by which long (circa 10,000 base-pair) synthetic DNA molecules could be synthesized in a timely and economic manner. During construction of the long molecule, errors in DNA sequence occur during hybridization and/or the subsequent enzymatic process. The work done on this project has resulted in a novel synthesis scheme that we call the parallel pyramid synthesis protocol, the development of a suit of computational tools to minimize and quantify errors in the synthesized DNA sequence, and experimental proof of this technique. The modeling consists of three interrelated modules: the bioinformatics code which determines the specifics of parallel pyramid synthesis for a given chain of long DNA, the thermodynamics code which tracks the products of DNA hybridization and polymerase extension during the later steps in the process, and the kinetics model which examines the temporal and spatial processes during one thermocycle. Most importantly, we conducted the first successful syntheses of a gene using small starting oligomers (tetramers). The synthesized sequence, 813 base pairs long, contained a 725 base pair gene, modified green fluorescent protein (mGFP), which has been shown to be a functional gene by cloning into cells and observing its green fluorescent product.

  8. Method for high-speed Manchester encoded optical signal generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Chi, Nan; Holm-Nielsen, Pablo Villanueva

    2004-01-01

    A method for high-speed Manchester encoded optical signal generation is proposed and demonstrated with a specially configured electro-optical modulator. A 10 Gb/s Manchester encoded optical signal was generated, and its bit-error-ratio (BER) performance was evaluated.......A method for high-speed Manchester encoded optical signal generation is proposed and demonstrated with a specially configured electro-optical modulator. A 10 Gb/s Manchester encoded optical signal was generated, and its bit-error-ratio (BER) performance was evaluated....

  9. Optical position encoder based on four-section diffraction grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherdev, A. Y.; Odinokov, S. B.; Lushnikov, D. S.; Markin, V. V.; Gurylev, O. A.; Shishova, M. V.

    2017-05-01

    Optical position encoder consists of movable coding grating and fixed analyzing grating. Light passing and diffracting through these two gratings creates interference signal on optical detector. Decoding of interference signal phase allows to determinate current position. Known optical position encoders use several accurate adjusted optical channels and detectors to gather several signals with different phase for higher encoder accuracy. We propose to use one optical channel with several-section analyzing diffraction grating for this purpose to simplify optical scheme and adjusting requirements. Optical scheme of position encoder based on four-section analyzing diffraction grating is developed and described in this paper.

  10. Encoding complex values using two DLP spatial light modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Michael F.; Wu, Sih-Ying; Liang, Jinyang

    2013-03-01

    We present a method to encode complex values into three or four quantized complex values for wavefront modulation using two digital micromirror devices (DMDs). This encoding offers advantages to eliminate the twin image or suppress the zero order diffraction as well to improve hologram fidelity. The optical architecture utilizes a Michelson interferometer with a DMD in Littrow configuration replacing the mirrors to combine the two holograms with the desired phase shift. System performance was examined using numerical simulations and experimental measurements to explore different encoding methods for hologram reconstruction. Both ZOD and conjugate image suppression were demonstrated for different encoding schemes.

  11. Encoded cell grating array in anti-counterfeit technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongyu Chen; N. K. Bao; Po S. Chung

    2005-01-01

    @@ The dot matrix hologram (DMH) has been widely used in anti-counterfeiting label. With the same technology and cell array configuration, we can encode to the incidence beam. These codes can be some image matrix grating with different grating gap and different grating orientation. When the multi-level phase diffractive grating is etched, the incidence beam on the cell appears as an encoding image. When the encoded grating and DMH are used in the same label synchronously, the technology of multi-encoded grating array enhances the anti-counterfeit ability.

  12. Improved reader for magnetically-encoded ID cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T. T.

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid demodulator in electronic card reader for magnetically encoded identification cards, accommodates variations in insertion speeds, yet is simpler and less expensive than equivalent all-digital circuits.

  13. Staying cool when things get hot: Emotion regulation modulates neural mechanisms of memory encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet P Hayes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During times of emotional stress, individuals often engage in emotion regulation to reduce the experiential and physiological impact of negative emotions. Interestingly, emotion regulation strategies also influence memory encoding of the event. Cognitive reappraisal is associated with enhanced memory while expressive suppression is associated with impaired explicit memory of the emotional event. However, the mechanism by which these emotion regulation strategies affect memory is unclear. We used event-related fMRI to investigate the neural mechanisms that give rise to memory formation during emotion regulation. Twenty-five participants viewed negative pictures while alternately engaging in cognitive reappraisal, expressive suppression, or passive viewing. As part of the subsequent memory design, participants returned to the laboratory two weeks later for a surprise memory test. Behavioral results showed a reduction in negative affect and a retention advantage for reappraised stimuli relative to the other conditions. Imaging results showed that successful encoding during reappraisal was uniquely associated with greater co-activation of the left inferior frontal gyrus, amygdala and hippocampus, suggesting a possible role for elaborative encoding of negative memories. This study provides neurobehavioral evidence that engaging in cognitive reappraisal is advantageous to both affective and mnemonic processes.

  14. Double image encryption based on phase-amplitude mixed encoding and multistage phase encoding in gyrator transform domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qu; Guo, Qing; Lei, Liang

    2013-06-01

    We present a novel method for double image encryption that is based on amplitude-phase mixed encoding and multistage random phase encoding in gyrator transform (GT) domains. In the amplitude-phase mixed encoding operation, a random binary distribution matrix is defined to mixed encode two primitive images to a single complex-valued image, which is then encrypted into a stationary white noise distribution by the multistage phase encoding with GTs. Compared with the earlier methods that uses fully phase encoding, the proposed method reduces the difference between two primitive images in key space and sensitivity to the GT orders. The primitive images can be recovered exactly by applying correct keys with initial conditions of chaotic system, the GT orders and the pixel scrambling operation. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed scheme has considerably high security level and certain robustness against data loss and noise disturbance.

  15. Genome comparison without alignment using shortest unique substrings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Möller Friedrich

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence comparison by alignment is a fundamental tool of molecular biology. In this paper we show how a number of sequence comparison tasks, including the detection of unique genomic regions, can be accomplished efficiently without an alignment step. Our procedure for nucleotide sequence comparison is based on shortest unique substrings. These are substrings which occur only once within the sequence or set of sequences analysed and which cannot be further reduced in length without losing the property of uniqueness. Such substrings can be detected using generalized suffix trees. Results We find that the shortest unique substrings in Caenorhabditis elegans, human and mouse are no longer than 11 bp in the autosomes of these organisms. In mouse and human these unique substrings are significantly clustered in upstream regions of known genes. Moreover, the probability of finding such short unique substrings in the genomes of human or mouse by chance is extremely small. We derive an analytical expression for the null distribution of shortest unique substrings, given the GC-content of the query sequences. Furthermore, we apply our method to rapidly detect unique genomic regions in the genome of Staphylococcus aureus strain MSSA476 compared to four other staphylococcal genomes. Conclusion We combine a method to rapidly search for shortest unique substrings in DNA sequences and a derivation of their null distribution. We show that unique regions in an arbitrary sample of genomes can be efficiently detected with this method. The corresponding programs shustring (SHortest Unique subSTRING and shulen are written in C and available at http://adenine.biz.fh-weihenstephan.de/shustring/.

  16. Unique organizational and functional features of the cytochrome c maturation system in Shewanella oneidensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Jin

    Full Text Available Shewanella are renowned for their ability to respire on a wide range of electron acceptors, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. In the model species S. oneidensis MR-1, at least 41 genes encode c-type cytochromes that are predicted to be intact, thereby likely functional. Previously, in-frame deletion mutants for 36 of these genes were obtained and characterized. In this study, first we completed the construction of an entire set of c-type cytochrome mutants utilizing a newly developed att-based mutagenesis approach, which is more effective and efficient than the approach used previously by circumventing the conventional cloning. Second, we investigated the cytochrome c maturation (Ccm system in S. oneidensis. There are two loci predicted to encode components of the Ccm system, SO0259-SO0269 and SO0476-SO0478. The former is proven essential for cytochrome c maturation whereas the latter is dispensable. Unlike the single operon organization observed in other γ-proteobacteria, genes at the SO0259-SO0269 locus are uniquely organized into four operons, ccmABCDE, scyA, SO0265, and ccmFGH-SO0269. Functional analysis revealed that the SO0265 gene rather than the scyA and SO0269 genes are relevant to cytochrome c maturation.

  17. Aphis Glycines Virus 2, a Novel Insect Virus with a Unique Genome Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijun Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The invasive soybean aphid, Aphis glycines, is a major pest in soybeans, resulting in substantial economic loss. We analyzed the A. glycines transcriptome to identify sequences derived from viruses of A. glycines. We identified sequences derived from a novel virus named Aphis glycines virus 2 (ApGlV2. The assembled virus genome sequence was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing, conserved domains were characterized, and distribution, and transmission examined. This virus has a positive sense, single-stranded RNA genome of ~4850 nt that encodes three proteins. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp of ApGlV2 is a permuted RdRp similar to those of some tetraviruses, while the capsid protein is structurally similar to the capsid proteins of plant sobemoviruses. ApGlV2 also encodes a larger minor capsid protein, which is translated by a readthrough mechanism. ApGlV2 appears to be widespread in A. glycines populations and to persistently infect aphids with a 100% vertical transmission rate. ApGlV2 is susceptible to the antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway. This virus, with its unique genome structure with both plant- and insect-virus characteristics, is of particular interest from an evolutionary standpoint.

  18. What physics is encoded in Maxwell's equations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosyakov, B. P.

    2005-08-01

    We reconstruct Maxwell's equations showing that a major part of the information encoded in them is taken from topological properties of spacetime, and the residual information, divorced from geometry, which represents the physical contents of electrodynamics, %these equations, translates into four assumptions:(i) locality; (ii) linearity; %of the dynamical law; (iii) identity of the charge-source and the charge-coupling; and (iv) lack of magnetic monopoles. However, a closer inspection of symmetries peculiar to electrodynamics shows that these assumptions may have much to do with geometry. Maxwell's equations tell us that we live in a three-dimensional space with trivial (Euclidean) topology; time is a one-dimensional unidirectional and noncompact continuum; and spacetime is endowed with a light cone structure readable in the conformal invariance of electrodynamics. Our geometric feelings relate to the fact that Maxwell's equations are built in our brain, hence our space and time orientation, our visualization and imagination capabilities are ensured by perpetual instinctive processes of solving Maxwell's equations. People are usually agree in their observations of angle relations, for example, a right angle is never confused with an angle slightly different from right. By contrast, we may disagree in metric issues, say, a colour-blind person finds the light wave lengths quite different from those found by a man with normal vision. This lends support to the view that conformal invariance of Maxwell's equations is responsible for producing our notion of space. Assuming that our geometric intuition is guided by our innate realization of electrodynamical laws, some abnormal mental phenomena, such as clairvoyance, may have a rational explanation.

  19. Olfactory bulb encoding during learning under anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alister U Nicol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neural plasticity changes within the olfactory bulb are important for olfactory learning, although how neural encoding changes support new associations with specific odours and whether they can be investigated under anaesthesia, remain unclear. Using the social transmission of food preference olfactory learning paradigm in mice in conjunction with in vivo microdialysis sampling we have shown firstly that a learned preference for a scented food odour smelled on the breath of a demonstrator animal occurs under isofluorane anaesthesia. Furthermore, subsequent exposure to this cued odour under anaesthesia promotes the same pattern of increased release of glutamate and GABA in the olfactory bulb as previously found in conscious animals following olfactory learning, and evoked GABA release was positively correlated with the amount of scented food eaten. In a second experiment, multiarray (24 electrodes electrophysiological recordings were made from olfactory bulb mitral cells under isofluorane anaesthesia before, during and after a novel scented food odour was paired with carbon disulfide. Results showed significant increases in overall firing frequency to the cued-odour during and after learning and decreases in response to an uncued odour. Analysis of patterns of changes in individual neurons revealed that a substantial proportion (>50% of them significantly changed their response profiles during and after learning with most of those previously inhibited becoming excited. A large number of cells exhibiting no response to the odours prior to learning were either excited or inhibited afterwards. With the uncued odour many previously responsive cells became unresponsive or inhibited. Learning associated changes only occurred in the posterior part of the olfactory bulb. Thus olfactory learning under anaesthesia promotes extensive, but spatially distinct, changes in mitral cell networks to both cued and uncued odours as well as in evoked glutamate and

  20. Olfactory bulb encoding during learning under anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Alister U.; Sanchez-Andrade, Gabriela; Collado, Paloma; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural plasticity changes within the olfactory bulb are important for olfactory learning, although how neural encoding changes support new associations with specific odors and whether they can be investigated under anesthesia, remain unclear. Using the social transmission of food preference olfactory learning paradigm in mice in conjunction with in vivo microdialysis sampling we have shown firstly that a learned preference for a scented food odor smelled on the breath of a demonstrator animal occurs under isofluorane anesthesia. Furthermore, subsequent exposure to this cued odor under anesthesia promotes the same pattern of increased release of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the olfactory bulb as previously found in conscious animals following olfactory learning, and evoked GABA release was positively correlated with the amount of scented food eaten. In a second experiment, multiarray (24 electrodes) electrophysiological recordings were made from olfactory bulb mitral cells under isofluorane anesthesia before, during and after a novel scented food odor was paired with carbon disulfide. Results showed significant increases in overall firing frequency to the cued-odor during and after learning and decreases in response to an uncued odor. Analysis of patterns of changes in individual neurons revealed that a substantial proportion (>50%) of them significantly changed their response profiles during and after learning with most of those previously inhibited becoming excited. A large number of cells exhibiting no response to the odors prior to learning were either excited or inhibited afterwards. With the uncued odor many previously responsive cells became unresponsive or inhibited. Learning associated changes only occurred in the posterior part of the olfactory bulb. Thus olfactory learning under anesthesia promotes extensive, but spatially distinct, changes in mitral cell networks to both cued and uncued odors as well as in evoked glutamate and GABA

  1. Neutron encoded labeling for peptide identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Christopher M; Merrill, Anna E; Bailey, Derek J; Hebert, Alexander S; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J

    2013-05-21

    Metabolic labeling of cells using heavy amino acids is most commonly used for relative quantitation; however, partner mass shifts also detail the number of heavy amino acids contained within the precursor species. Here, we use a recently developed metabolic labeling technique, NeuCode (neutron encoding) stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), which produces precursor partners spaced ~40 mDa apart to enable amino acid counting. We implement large scale counting of amino acids through a program, "Amino Acid Counter", which determines the most likely combination of amino acids within a precursor based on NeuCode SILAC partner spacing and filters candidate peptide sequences during a database search using this information. Counting the number of lysine residues for precursors selected for MS/MS decreases the median number of candidate sequences from 44 to 14 as compared to an accurate mass search alone (20 ppm). Furthermore, the ability to co-isolate and fragment NeuCode SILAC partners enables counting of lysines in product ions, and when the information is used, the median number of candidates is reduced to 7. We then demonstrate counting leucine in addition to lysine results in a 6-fold decrease in search space, 43 to 7, when compared to an accurate mass search. We use this scheme to analyze a nanoLC-MS/MS experiment and demonstrate that accurate mass plus lysine and leucine counting reduces the number of candidate sequences to one for ~20% of all precursors selected, demonstrating an ability to identify precursors without MS/MS analysis.

  2. Uniqueness and existence for bounded boundary value problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehme, J.; Lanz, A.

    2006-01-01

    The existence and uniqueness of solutions for the boundary value problems with general linear point evaluation boundary conditions is established. We assume that f is bounded and that there is uniqueness on a homogeneous problem and on the linear variational problems. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All righ

  3. Existence and Uniqueness of Solution to ODEs: Lipschitz Continuity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swarup Poria; Aman Dhiman

    2017-05-01

    The study of existence and uniqueness of solution of ordinarydifferential equation (ODE) became important due to the lack ofgeneral formula for solving nonlinear ODEs. In this article, weshall discuss briefly about the existence and uniqueness of solutionof a first order ODE. A special emphasis is given on theLipschitz continuous functions in the discussion.

  4. Theorems on Positive Data: On the Uniqueness of NMF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauerberg, Hans; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Pumbley, Mark;

    2008-01-01

    have shown that corruption of a unique NMF matrix by additive noise leads to a noisy estimation of the noise-free unique solution. Finally, we use a stochastic view of NMF to analyze which characterization of the underlying model will result in an NMF with small estimation errors....

  5. Morphological Awareness Uniquely Predicts Young Children's Chinese Character Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride-Chang, Catherine; Shu, Hua; Zhou, Aibao; Wat, Chun Pong; Wagner, Richard K.

    2003-01-01

    Two unique measures of morphological awareness were orally administered to kindergarten and 2nd-grade Hong Kong Chinese children. Both tasks of morphological awareness predicted unique variance in Chinese character recognition in these children, after controlling for age, phonological awareness, speeded naming, speed of processing, and vocabulary.…

  6. Can facial uniqueness be inferred from impostor scores?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutta, A.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2013-01-01

    In Biometrics, facial uniqueness is commonly inferred from impostor similarity scores. In this paper, we show that such uniqueness measures are highly unstable in the presence of image quality variations like pose, noise and blur. We also experimentally demonstrate the instability of a recently

  7. Unique Protein Signature of Circulating Microparticles in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer; Iversen, Line V

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases.......To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases....

  8. Uniqueness of limiting solution to a strongly competing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avetik Arakelyan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We prove a uniqueness for the positive solution to a strongly competing system of Lotka-Volterra type problem in the limiting configuration, when the competition rate tends to infinity. We give an alternate proof of uniqueness based on properties of limiting solutions.

  9. The Uniqueness of Optimal Solution for Linear Programming Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QuanlingWei; HongYan; JunWang

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates an old problem in operations research, the uniqueness of the optimal solution to a linear programming problem. We discuss the problem on a general polyhedron, give some equivalent conditions for uniqueness testing. In addition, we discuss the implementation issues for linear programming based decision making procedures,which motivated this research.

  10. Stress as a mnemonic filter: Interactions between medial temporal lobe encoding processes and post-encoding stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchey, Maureen; McCullough, Andrew M; Ranganath, Charan; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2017-01-01

    Acute stress has been shown to modulate memory for recently learned information, an effect attributed to the influence of stress hormones on medial temporal lobe (MTL) consolidation processes. However, little is known about which memories will be affected when stress follows encoding. One possibility is that stress interacts with encoding processes to selectively protect memories that had elicited responses in the hippocampus and amygdala, two MTL structures important for memory formation. There is limited evidence for interactions between encoding processes and consolidation effects in humans, but recent studies of consolidation in rodents have emphasized the importance of encoding "tags" for determining the impact of consolidation manipulations on memory. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in humans to test the hypothesis that the effects of post-encoding stress depend on MTL processes observed during encoding. We found that changes in stress hormone levels were associated with an increase in the contingency of memory outcomes on hippocampal and amygdala encoding responses. That is, for participants showing high cortisol reactivity, memories became more dependent on MTL activity observed during encoding, thereby shifting the distribution of recollected events toward those that had elicited relatively high activation. Surprisingly, this effect was generally larger for neutral, compared to emotionally negative, memories. The results suggest that stress does not uniformly enhance memory, but instead selectively preserves memories tagged during encoding, effectively acting as mnemonic filter. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Polypeptides having laccase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu

    2017-08-22

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having laccase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Data-driven encoding for quantitative genetic trait prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dan; Wang, Zhanyong; Parida, Laxmi

    2015-01-01

    Given a set of biallelic molecular markers, such as SNPs, with genotype values on a collection of plant, animal or human samples, the goal of quantitative genetic trait prediction is to predict the quantitative trait values by simultaneously modeling all marker effects. Quantitative genetic trait prediction is usually represented as linear regression models which require quantitative encodings for the genotypes: the three distinct genotype values, corresponding to one heterozygous and two homozygous alleles, are usually coded as integers, and manipulated algebraically in the model. Further, epistasis between multiple markers is modeled as multiplication between the markers: it is unclear that the regression model continues to be effective under this. In this work we investigate the effects of encodings to the quantitative genetic trait prediction problem. We first showed that different encodings lead to different prediction accuracies, in many test cases. We then proposed a data-driven encoding strategy, where we encode the genotypes according to their distribution in the phenotypes and we allow each marker to have different encodings. We show in our experiments that this encoding strategy is able to improve the performance of the genetic trait prediction method and it is more helpful for the oligogenic traits, whose values rely on a relatively small set of markers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that discusses the effects of encodings to the genetic trait prediction problem.

  13. Multiple channel secure communication using chaotic system encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    fA new method to encrypt signals using chaotic systems has been developed that offers benefits over conventional chaotic encryption methods. The method simultaneously encodes multiple plaintext streams using a chaotic system; a key is required to extract the plaintext from the chaotic cipertext. A working prototype demonstrates feasibility of the method by simultaneously encoding and decoding multiple audio signals using electrical circuits.

  14. Efficacy of distortion correction on diffusion imaging: comparison of FSL eddy and eddy_correct using 30 and 60 directions diffusion encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruyasu Yamada

    Full Text Available Diffusion imaging is a unique noninvasive tool to detect brain white matter trajectory and integrity in vivo. However, this technique suffers from spatial distortion and signal pileup or dropout originating from local susceptibility gradients and eddy currents. Although there are several methods to mitigate these problems, most techniques can be applicable either to susceptibility or eddy-current induced distortion alone with a few exceptions. The present study compared the correction efficiency of FSL tools, "eddy_correct" and the combination of "eddy" and "topup" in terms of diffusion-derived fractional anisotropy (FA. The brain diffusion images were acquired from 10 healthy subjects using 30 and 60 directions encoding schemes based on the electrostatic repulsive forces. For the 30 directions encoding, 2 sets of diffusion images were acquired with the same parameters, except for the phase-encode blips which had opposing polarities along the anteroposterior direction. For the 60 directions encoding, non-diffusion-weighted and diffusion-weighted images were obtained with forward phase-encoding blips and non-diffusion-weighted images with the same parameter, except for the phase-encode blips, which had opposing polarities. FA images without and with distortion correction were compared in a voxel-wise manner with tract-based spatial statistics. We showed that images corrected with eddy and topup possessed higher FA values than images uncorrected and corrected with eddy_correct with trilinear (FSL default setting or spline interpolation in most white matter skeletons, using both encoding schemes. Furthermore, the 60 directions encoding scheme was superior as measured by increased FA values to the 30 directions encoding scheme, despite comparable acquisition time. This study supports the combination of eddy and topup as a superior correction tool in diffusion imaging rather than the eddy_correct tool, especially with trilinear interpolation, using

  15. What is a "good" encoding of guarded choice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestmann, Uwe

    2000-01-01

    The pi-calculus with synchronous output and mixed-guarded choices is strictly more expressive than the pi-calculus with asynchronous output and no choice. This result was recently proved by C. Palamidessi and, as a corollary, she showed that there is no fully compositional encoding from the former...... into the latter that preserves divergence-freedom and symmetries. This paper argues that there are nevertheless "good" encodings between these calculi. In detail, we present a series of encodings for languages with (1) input-guarded choice, (2) both input and output-guarded choice, and (3) mixed-guarded choice......, and investigate them with respect to compositionality and divergence-freedom. The first and second encoding satisfy all of the above criteria, but various "good" candidates for the third encoding-inspired by an existing distributed implementation-invalidate one or the other criterion, While essentially confirming...

  16. Encoding of multi-alphabet sources by binary arithmetic coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Muling; Oka, Takahumi; Kato, Shigeo; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Naoto

    1998-12-01

    In case of encoding a multi-alphabet source, the multi- alphabet symbol sequence can be encoded directly by a multi- alphabet arithmetic encoder, or the sequence can be first converted into several binary sequences and then each binary sequence is encoded by binary arithmetic encoder, such as the L-R arithmetic coder. Arithmetic coding, however, requires arithmetic operations for each symbol and is computationally heavy. In this paper, a binary representation method using Huffman tree is introduced to reduce the number of arithmetic operations, and a new probability approximation for L-R arithmetic coding is further proposed to improve the coding efficiency when the probability of LPS (Least Probable Symbol) is near 0.5. Simulation results show that our proposed scheme has high coding efficacy and can reduce the number of coding symbols.

  17. Unequally spaced four levels phase encoding in holographic data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Huang, Yong; Lin, Xiao; Cheng, Yabin; Li, Xiaotong; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-12-01

    Holographic data storage system is a candidate for the information recording due to its large storage capacity and high transfer rate. We propose an unequally spaced four levels phase encoding in the holographic data storage system here. Compared with two levels or three levels phase encoding, four levels phase encoding effectively improves the code rate. While more phase levels can further improve code rate, it also puts higher demand for the camera to differentiate the resulting smaller grayscale difference. Unequally spaced quaternary level phases eliminates the ambiguity of pixels with same phase difference relative to reference light compared to equally spaced quaternary levels. Corresponding encoding pattern design with phase pairs as the data element and decoding method were developed. Our encoding improves the code rate up to 0.875, which is 1.75 times of the conventional amplitude method with an error rate of 0.13 % according to our simulation results.

  18. Incidental and intentional encoding in young and elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez-Alanís, Bernarda; Cansino, Selene

    2004-08-06

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in young and elderly adults during the performance of an incidental encoding task (subjects were unexpectedly given a recognition test) followed by an intentional task (subjects expected the recognition test). Both tasks consisted of an encoding stage in which subjects classified words (natural/artificial) and a recognition stage in which they indicated whether the words were old (presented during the encoding stage) or new. In both groups and tasks, the ERPs, during encoding, differed as a function of subsequent recognition: the old words correctly recognized generated greater amplitude potentials than the incorrect ones. The memory processes expressed by these ERPs are preserved in elderly adults, independently of whether the information is incidentally or intentionally encoded.

  19. Efficient Encoding of Watermark Numbers as Reducible Permutation Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Chroni, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In a software watermarking environment, several graph theoretic watermark methods use numbers as watermark values, where some of these methods encode the watermark numbers as graph structures. In this paper we extended the class of error correcting graphs by proposing an efficient and easily implemented codec system for encoding watermark numbers as reducible permutation flow-graphs. More precisely, we first present an efficient algorithm which encodes a watermark number $w$ as self-inverting permutation $\\pi^*$ and, then, an algorithm which encodes the self-inverting permutation $\\pi^*$ as a reducible permutation flow-graph $F[\\pi^*]$ by exploiting domination relations on the elements of $\\pi^*$ and using an efficient DAG representation of $\\pi^*$. The whole encoding process takes O(n) time and space, where $n$ is the binary size of the number $w$ or, equivalently, the number of elements of the permutation $\\pi^*$. We also propose efficient decoding algorithms which extract the number $w$ from the reducible ...

  20. Power-optimal encoding for low-power address bus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presented a novel bus encoding method to reduce the switching activity on address buses and hence reduce power dissipation. Dynamic-sorting encoding (DSE) method reduces the power dissipation of address bus based on the dynamic reordering of the modified offset address bus lines. This method reorders the ten least significant bits of offset address according to the range of offset address, and the optimal sorting pattern is transmitted through the high bits of address bus without the need for redundant bus lines. The experimental results using an instruction set simulator and SPEC2000 benchmarks show that DSE method can reduce signal transitions on the address bus by 88.2%, and the actual overhead of the encoder circuit is estimated after encoder is designed and synthesized in 0.18-μm CMOS technology. The results show that DSE method outperforms the low-power encoding schemes presented in the past.

  1. Existence and uniqueness of positive solutions of semilinear elliptic equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of existence,uniqueness and non-degeneracy of positive solutions of semi-linear elliptic equations.A necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of positive solutions to problems is given.We prove that if the uniqueness and non-degeneracy results are valid for positive solutions of a class of semi-linear elliptic equations,then they are still valid when one perturbs the differential operator a little bit.As consequences,some uniqueness results of positive solutions under the domain perturbation are also obtained.

  2. Existence and uniqueness of positive solutions of semilinear elliptic equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-yi DAI; Yu-xia FU; Yong-geng GU

    2007-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of existence, uniqueness and non-degeneracy of positive solutions of semi-linear elliptic equations. A necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of positive solutions to problems is given. We prove that if the uniqueness and non-degeneracy results are valid for positive solutions of a class of semi-linear elliptic equations, then they are still valid when one perturbs the differential operator a little bit. As consequences, some uniqueness results of positive solutions under the domain perturbation are also obtained.

  3. The Unique Destination Proposition of Eskisehir: Industrial Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yılmaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the transformation of Unique Sales Proposition (USP concept which is one of the most important strategies of advertising history, to the Unique Destination Proposition (UDP for the case of Eskisehir. This study aims to propose industrial heritage as the UDP of Eskisehir by a descriptive approach. Industrial heritage helps Eskisehir destination brand to attain a meaningful, sustainable and distinctive dimension from its competitors. The current industrial heritage samples of Eskisehir were initially evaluated in this context. Subsequently, in the focus of the relation between industrial heritage and tourism, an excursion route and a tour program is suggested including the unique industrial heritage values of Eskisehir.

  4. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    OpenAIRE

    Nordlund Henri R; Grapputo Alessandro; Hytönen Vesa P; Niskanen Einari A; Kulomaa Markku S; Laitinen Olli H

    2005-01-01

    Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Res...

  5. The coelacanth rostral organ is a unique low-resolution electro-detector that facilitates the feeding strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berquist, Rachel M; Galinsky, Vitaly L; Kajiura, Stephen M; Frank, Lawrence R

    2015-03-11

    The cartilaginous and non-neopterygian bony fishes have an electric sense typically comprised of hundreds or thousands of sensory canals distributed in broad clusters over the head. This morphology facilitates neural encoding of local electric field intensity, orientation, and polarity, used for determining the position of nearby prey. The coelacanth rostral organ electric sense, however, is unique in having only three paired sensory canals with distribution restricted to the dorsal snout, raising questions about its function. To address this, we employed magnetic resonance imaging methods to map electrosensory canal morphology in the extant coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae, and a simple dipole 'rabbit ears' antennae model with toroidal gain function to approximate their directional sensitivity. This identified a unique focal region of electrosensitivity directly in front of the mouth, and is the first evidence of a low-resolution electro-detector that solely facilitates prey ingestion.

  6. A unique bivalent binding and inhibition mechanism by the yatapoxvirus interleukin 18 binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Krumm

    Full Text Available Interleukin 18 (IL18 is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation as well as host defense against microbes. Mammals encode a soluble inhibitor of IL18 termed IL18 binding protein (IL18BP that modulates IL18 activity through a negative feedback mechanism. Many poxviruses encode homologous IL18BPs, which contribute to virulence. Previous structural and functional studies on IL18 and IL18BPs revealed an essential binding hot spot involving a lysine on IL18 and two aromatic residues on IL18BPs. The aromatic residues are conserved among the very diverse mammalian and poxviruses IL18BPs with the notable exception of yatapoxvirus IL18BPs, which lack a critical phenylalanine residue. To understand the mechanism by which yatapoxvirus IL18BPs neutralize IL18, we solved the crystal structure of the Yaba-Like Disease Virus (YLDV IL18BP and IL18 complex at 1.75 Å resolution. YLDV-IL18BP forms a disulfide bonded homo-dimer engaging IL18 in a 2∶2 stoichiometry, in contrast to the 1∶1 complex of ectromelia virus (ECTV IL18BP and IL18. Disruption of the dimer interface resulted in a functional monomer, however with a 3-fold decrease in binding affinity. The overall architecture of the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 complex is similar to that observed in the ECTV-IL18BP:IL18 complex, despite lacking the critical lysine-phenylalanine interaction. Through structural and mutagenesis studies, contact residues that are unique to the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 binding interface were identified, including Q67, P116 of YLDV-IL18BP and Y1, S105 and D110 of IL18. Overall, our studies show that YLDV-IL18BP is unique among the diverse family of mammalian and poxvirus IL-18BPs in that it uses a bivalent binding mode and a unique set of interacting residues for binding IL18. However, despite this extensive divergence, YLDV-IL18BP binds to the same surface of IL18 used by other IL18BPs, suggesting that all IL18BPs use a conserved inhibitory mechanism by blocking a putative receptor

  7. Datacube Interoperability, Encoding Independence, and Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Peter; Hirschorn, Eric; Maso, Joan

    2017-04-01

    representations. Further, CIS 1.1 offers a unified model for any kind of regular and irregular grids, also allowing sensor models as per SensorML. Encodings include ASCII formats like GML, JSON, RDF as well as binary formats like GeoTIFF, NetCDF, JPEG2000, and GRIB2; further, a container concept allows mixed representations within one coverage file utilizing zip or other convenient package formats. Through the tight integration with the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE), a lossless "transport" from sensor into coverage world is ensured. The corresponding service model of WCS supports datacube operations ranging from simple data extraction to complex ad-hoc analytics with WPCS. Notably, W3C is working has set out on a coverage model as well; it has been designed relatively independently from the abovementioned standards, but there is informal agreement to link it into the CIS universe (which allows for different, yet interchangeable representations). Particularly interesting in the W3C proposal is the detailed semantic modeling of metadata; as CIS 1.1 supports RDF, a tight coupling seems feasible.

  8. CAG-encoded polyglutamine length polymorphism in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Michael R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expansion of polyglutamine-encoding CAG trinucleotide repeats has been identified as the pathogenic mutation in nine different genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. The majority of individuals clinically diagnosed with spinocerebellar ataxia do not have mutations within known disease genes, and it is likely that additional ataxias or Huntington disease-like disorders will be found to be caused by this common mutational mechanism. We set out to determine the length distributions of CAG-polyglutamine tracts for the entire human genome in a set of healthy individuals in order to characterize the nature of polyglutamine repeat length variation across the human genome, to establish the background against which pathogenic repeat expansions can be detected, and to prioritize candidate genes for repeat expansion disorders. Results We found that repeats, including those in known disease genes, have unique distributions of glutamine tract lengths, as measured by fragment analysis of PCR-amplified repeat regions. This emphasizes the need to characterize each distribution and avoid making generalizations between loci. The best predictors of known disease genes were occurrence of a long CAG-tract uninterrupted by CAA codons in their reference genome sequence, and high glutamine tract length variance in the normal population. We used these parameters to identify eight priority candidate genes for polyglutamine expansion disorders. Twelve CAG-polyglutamine repeats were invariant and these can likely be excluded as candidates. We outline some confusion in the literature about this type of data, difficulties in comparing such data between publications, and its application to studies of disease prevalence in different populations. Analysis of Gene Ontology-based functions of CAG-polyglutamine-containing genes provided a visual framework for interpretation of these genes' functions. All nine known disease genes were involved in DNA

  9. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kyle P; Lamotte D'Incamps, Boris; Zytnicki, Daniel; Ting, Lena H

    2017-09-01

    Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs) of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt) predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening) of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle lengthening conditions

  10. Nonlinear independent component analysis: Existence and uniqueness results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, Aapo; Pajunen, Petteri

    1999-04-01

    The question of existence and uniqueness of solutions for nonlinear independent component analysis is addressed. It is shown that if the space of mixing functions is not limited there exists always an infinity of solutions. In particular, it is shown how to construct parameterized families of solutions. The indeterminacies involved are not trivial, as in the linear case. Next, it is shown how to utilize some results of complex analysis to obtain uniqueness of solutions. We show that for two dimensions, the solution is unique up to a rotation, if the mixing function is constrained to be a conformal mapping together with some other assumptions. We also conjecture that the solution is strictly unique except in some degenerate cases, as the indeterminacy implied by the rotation is essentially similar to estimating the model of linear ICA.

  11. Uniqueness and existence results for ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, J. Angel; Heikkila, Seppo; Pouso, Rodrigo Lopez

    2006-04-01

    We establish some uniqueness and existence results for first-order ordinary differential equations with constant-signed discontinuous nonlinear parts. Several examples are given to illustrate the applicability of our work.

  12. Unique Role of Occupational Therapy in Rehabilitation of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sheet The Unique Role of Occupational Therapy in Rehabilitation of the Hand Hand therapy, a specialty practice area of occupational ... are treated by occupational therapy practitioners specializing in hand rehabilitation. Practitioners who treat clients with conditions of the ...

  13. Novel Manufacturing Process for Unique Mixed Carbide Refractory Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I project will establish the feasibility of an innovative manufacturing process to fabricate a range of unique hafnium/silicon based carbide...

  14. Existence and Uniqueness of Solutions to Random Impulsive Differential Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-jin Wu; Xiao-lin Guo; Song-qing Lin

    2006-01-01

    The existence and uniqueness in mean square of solutions to certain random impulsive differential systems is discussed in this paper. Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, Lipschtiz condition and techniques in stochastic analysis are employed in achieve the desired results.

  15. On the development of uniquely African management theory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the development of uniquely African management theory. ... Indilinga: African Journal of Indigenous Knowledge Systems. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee ...

  16. AN ANALYTICAL APPROACH TO GENERATE UNIQUE SONG SIGNAL (AUSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Kr. Mondal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Embedding uniqueness in characteristics of song signal and accustoming changes of environment is one of the challenging issues for researchers with maintaining its audible quality. Researchers are modifying or manipulating audio signal properties for generating uniqueness in content such a manner that will not vary so much in changed environment or changes can be easily defined due to unique structure of song signal. In this paper, an approach has been made based on defining a symmetric structure of song signal, followed by some secret code embedding in a specified manner will not alter the trade off ratio of embedding/modifying data but provide uniqueness in properties, even retain the properties in changing environment/ format. Therefore, authentication of song signal is easily achieved with these self manipulated properties. A comparative study has been made with similar existing techniques and experimental results are also supported with mathematical formula based on Microsoft WAVE (".wav" stereo sound file.

  17. Unique morphology of dispersed clay particles in a polymer nanocomposite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malwela, T

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This communication reports a unique morphology of dispersed clay particles in a polymer nanocomposite. A nanocomposite of poly[butylene succinate)-co-adipate] (PBSA) with 3 wt% of organically modified montmorillonite was prepared by melt...

  18. UNIQUENESS OF SOLUTIONS FOR SEMICONDUCTOR EQUATIONS WITH AVALANCHE TERM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Jiasheng; Wang Yuanming

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the initial and mixed boundary value problems for the semiconductor equations with avalanche term, the uniqueness of the weak solution for the semiconductor equation has been proved.

  19. High-Efficient Parallel CAVLC Encoders on Heterogeneous Multicore Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Su

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents two high-efficient parallel realizations of the context-based adaptive variable length coding (CAVLC based on heterogeneous multicore processors. By optimizing the architecture of the CAVLC encoder, three kinds of dependences are eliminated or weaken, including the context-based data dependence, the memory accessing dependence and the control dependence. The CAVLC pipeline is divided into three stages: two scans, coding, and lag packing, and be implemented on two typical heterogeneous multicore architectures. One is a block-based SIMD parallel CAVLC encoder on multicore stream processor STORM. The other is a component-oriented SIMT parallel encoder on massively parallel architecture GPU. Both of them exploited rich data-level parallelism. Experiments results show that compared with the CPU version, more than 70 times of speedup can be obtained for STORM and over 50 times for GPU. The implementation of encoder on STORM can make a real-time processing for 1080p @30fps and GPU-based version can satisfy the requirements for 720p real-time encoding. The throughput of the presented CAVLC encoders is more than 10 times higher than that of published software encoders on DSP and multicore platforms.

  20. Small-molecule discovery from DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Ralph E; Dumelin, Christoph E; Liu, David R

    2011-12-01

    Researchers seeking to improve the efficiency and cost effectiveness of the bioactive small-molecule discovery process have recently embraced selection-based approaches, which in principle offer much higher throughput and simpler infrastructure requirements compared with traditional small-molecule screening methods. Since selection methods benefit greatly from an information-encoding molecule that can be readily amplified and decoded, several academic and industrial groups have turned to DNA as the basis for library encoding and, in some cases, library synthesis. The resulting DNA-encoded synthetic small-molecule libraries, integrated with the high sensitivity of PCR and the recent development of ultra high-throughput DNA sequencing technology, can be evaluated very rapidly for binding or bond formation with a target of interest while consuming minimal quantities of material and requiring only modest investments of time and equipment. In this tutorial review we describe the development of two classes of approaches for encoding chemical structures and reactivity with DNA: DNA-recorded library synthesis, in which encoding and library synthesis take place separately, and DNA-directed library synthesis, in which DNA both encodes and templates library synthesis. We also describe in vitro selection methods used to evaluate DNA-encoded libraries and summarize successful applications of these approaches to the discovery of bioactive small molecules and novel chemical reactivity.

  1. Investigation of unique hue setting changes with ageing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenyang Fu; Kaida Xiao; Dimosthenis Karatzas; Sophie Wuerger

    2011-01-01

    Clromatic sensitivity along the protan, deutan, and tritan lines and the loci of the unique hues (red, green,yellow, blue) for a very large sample (n = 185) of colour-normal observers ranging from 18 to 75 years of age are assessed. Visual judgments are obtained under normal viewing conditions using colour patches on self-luminous display under controlled adaptation conditions. Trivector discrimination thresholds show an increase as a function of age along the protan, deutan, and tritan axes, with the largest increase present along the tritan line, less pronounced shifts in unique hue settings are also observed. Based on the chromatic (protan, deutan, tritan) thresholds and using scaled cone signals, we predict the unique hue changes with ageing. A dependency on age for unique red and unique yellow for predicted hue angle is found. We conclude that the chromatic sensitivity deteriorates significantly with age, whereas the appearance of unique hues is much less affected, remaining almost constant despite the known changes in the ocular media.%@@ Clromatic sensitivity along the protan, deutan, and tritan lines and the loci of the unique hues (red, green,yellow, blue) for a very large sample (n = 185) of colour-normal observers ranging from 18 to 75 years of age are assessed.Visual judgments are obtained under normal viewing conditions using colour patches on self-luminous display under controlled adaptation conditions.Trivector discrimination thresholds show an increase as a function of age along the protan, deutan, and tritan axes, with the largest increase present along the tritan line, less pronounced shifts in unique hue settings are also observed.

  2. Euler equation existence, non-uniqueness and mesh converged statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glimm, James; Sharp, David H; Lim, Hyunkyung; Kaufman, Ryan; Hu, Wenlin

    2015-09-13

    We review existence and non-uniqueness results for the Euler equation of fluid flow. These results are placed in the context of physical models and their solutions. Non-uniqueness is in direct conflict with the purpose of practical simulations, so that a mitigating strategy, outlined here, is important. We illustrate these issues in an examination of mesh converged turbulent statistics, with comparison to laboratory experiments.

  3. Limit theorem and uniqueness theorem of backward stochastic differential equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG; Long

    2006-01-01

    This paper establishes a limit theorem for solutions of backward stochastic differential equations (BSDEs). By this limit theorem, this paper proves that, under the standard assumption g(t,y,0)≡0, the generator g of a BSDE can be uniquely determined by the corresponding g-expectation εg; this paper also proves that if a filtration consistent expectation ε can be represented as a g-expectation εg, then the corresponding generator g must be unique.

  4. Generic uniqueness conditions for the canonical polyadic decomposition and INDSCAL

    OpenAIRE

    Domanov, Ignat; De Lathauwer, Lieven

    2014-01-01

    We find conditions that guarantee that a decomposition of a generic third-order tensor in a minimal number of rank-$1$ tensors (canonical polyadic decomposition (CPD)) is unique up to permutation of rank-$1$ tensors. Then we consider the case when the tensor and all its rank-$1$ terms have symmetric frontal slices (INDSCAL). Our results complement the existing bounds for generic uniqueness of the CPD and relax the existing bounds for INDSCAL. The derivation makes use of algebraic geometry. We...

  5. Practical relevance of pattern uniqueness in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, Paul T

    2013-09-10

    Uniqueness being unprovable, it has recently been argued that individualization in forensic science is irrelevant and, probability, as applied for DNA profiles, should be applied for all identifications. Critiques against uniqueness have omitted physical matching, a realistic and tangible individualization that supports uniqueness. Describing case examples illustrating pattern matches including physical matching, it is indicated that individualizations are practically relevant for forensic science as they establish facts on a definitive basis providing firm leads benefitting criminal investigation. As a tenet of forensic identification, uniqueness forms a fundamental paradigm relevant for individualization. Evidence on the indeterministic and stochastic causal pathways of characteristics in patterns available in the related fields of science sufficiently supports the proposition of uniqueness. Characteristics involved in physical matching and matching achieved in patterned evidence existing in the state of nature are not events amenable for counting; instead these are ensemble of visible units occupying the entire pattern area stretching the probability of re-occurrence of a verisimilitude pattern into infinity offering epistemic support to uniqueness. Observational methods are as respectable as instrumental or statistical methods since they are capable of generating results that are tangible and obviously valid as in physical matching. Applying the probabilistic interpretation used for DNA profiles to the other patterns would be unbefitting since these two are disparate, the causal pathways of the events, the loci, in the manipulated DNA profiles being determinable. While uniqueness enables individualizations, it does not vouch for eliminating errors. Instead of dismissing uniqueness and individualization, accepting errors as human or system failures and seeking remedial measures would benefit forensic science practice and criminal investigation.

  6. Denture identification using unique identification authority of India barcode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhindra Mahoorkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, various denture marking systems have been reported in the literature for personal identification. They have been broadly divided into surface marking and inclusion methods. In this technique, patient′s unique identification number and barcode printed in the patient′s Aadhaar card issued by Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI are used as denture markers. This article describes a simple, quick, and economical method for identification of individual.

  7. Unique Measure for Time-Dependent Random Dynamical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Varner, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    This paper proves the uniqueness of measure for the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations under a random kick-force and a time-dependent deterministic force. By extending a result for uniqueness of measure for time-homogeneous Markov processes to the time-inhomogeneous case, it is shown that the measures are exponentially mixing for the 2D Navier-Stokes equations on the sphere.

  8. Wavelength-encoded OCDMA system using opto-VLSI processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljada, Muhsen; Alameh, Kamal

    2007-07-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a 2.5 Gbits/sper user wavelength-encoded optical code-division multiple-access encoder-decoder structure based on opto-VLSI processing. Each encoder and decoder is constructed using a single 1D opto-very-large-scale-integrated (VLSI) processor in conjunction with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array of different Bragg wavelengths. The FBG array spectrally and temporally slices the broadband input pulse into several components and the opto-VLSI processor generates codewords using digital phase holograms. System performance is measured in terms of the autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions as well as the eye diagram.

  9. Comparison between different encoding schemes for synthetic aperture imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    have solved the first problem by building a scanner capable of acquiring data using STAU in real-time. The SNR is increased by using encoded signals, which make it possible to send more energy in the body, while reserving the spatial and contrast resolution. The performance of temporal, spatial...... and spatio-temporal encoding was investigated. Experiments on wire phantom in water were carried out to quantify the gain from the different encodings. The gain in SNR using an FM modulated pulse is 12 dB. The penetration depth of the images was studied using tissue mimicking phantom with frequency dependent...... influence the performance of the STAU....

  10. Integrated source and channel encoded digital communications system design study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, G. K.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the digital communication system for the direct communication links from ground to space shuttle and the links involving the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS). Three main tasks were performed:(1) Channel encoding/decoding parameter optimization for forward and reverse TDRS links,(2)integration of command encoding/decoding and channel encoding/decoding; and (3) modulation coding interface study. The general communication environment is presented to provide the necessary background for the tasks and to provide an understanding of the implications of the results of the studies.

  11. Optimal encoding and decoding of a spin direction

    CERN Document Server

    Bagán, E; Brey, A; Muñoz-Tàpia, R; Tarrach, Rolf

    2001-01-01

    For a system of N spins 1/2 there are quantum states that can encode a direction in an intrinsic way. Information on this direction can later be decoded by means of a quantum measurement. We present here the optimal encoding and decoding procedure using the fidelity as a figure of merit. We compute the maximal fidelity and prove that it is directly related to the largest zeroes of the Legendre and Jacobi polynomials. We show that this maximal fidelity approaches unity quadratically in 1/N. We also discuss this result in terms of the dimension of the encoding Hilbert space.

  12. pENCODE: a plant encyclopedia of DNA elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Amanda K; Niederhuth, Chad E; Ji, Lexiang; Schmitz, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    ENCODE projects exist for many eukaryotes, including humans, but as of yet no defined project exists for plants. A plant ENCODE would be invaluable to the research community and could be more readily produced than its metazoan equivalents by capitalizing on the preexisting infrastructure provided from similar projects. Collecting and normalizing plant epigenomic data for a range of species will facilitate hypothesis generation, cross-species comparisons, annotation of genomes, and an understanding of epigenomic functions throughout plant evolution. Here, we discuss the need for such a project, outline the challenges it faces, and suggest ways forward to build a plant ENCODE.

  13. Nanoporous hard data: optical encoding of information within nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Abel; Law, Cheryl Suwen; Pereira, Taj; Losic, Dusan

    2016-04-01

    Herein, we present a method for storing binary data within the spectral signature of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. A rationally designed multi-sinusoidal anodisation approach makes it possible to engineer the photonic stop band of nanoporous anodic alumina with precision. As a result, the transmission spectrum of these photonic nanostructures can be engineered to feature well-resolved and selectively positioned characteristic peaks across the UV-visible spectrum. Using this property, we implement an 8-bit binary code and assess the versatility and capability of this system by a series of experiments aiming to encode different information within the nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. The obtained results reveal that the proposed nanosized platform is robust, chemically stable, versatile and has a set of unique properties for data storage, opening new opportunities for developing advanced nanophotonic tools for a wide range of applications, including sensing, photonic tagging, self-reporting drug releasing systems and secure encoding of information.Herein, we present a method for storing binary data within the spectral signature of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. A rationally designed multi-sinusoidal anodisation approach makes it possible to engineer the photonic stop band of nanoporous anodic alumina with precision. As a result, the transmission spectrum of these photonic nanostructures can be engineered to feature well-resolved and selectively positioned characteristic peaks across the UV-visible spectrum. Using this property, we implement an 8-bit binary code and assess the versatility and capability of this system by a series of experiments aiming to encode different information within the nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. The obtained results reveal that the proposed nanosized platform is robust, chemically stable, versatile and has a set of unique properties for data storage, opening new opportunities for

  14. A Major Facilitator Superfamily protein encoded by TcMucK gene is not required for cuticle pigmentation, growth and development in Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Seulgi; Noh, Mi Young; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Kramer, Karl J; Arakane, Yasuyuki

    2014-06-01

    Insect cuticle pigmentation and sclerotization (tanning) are vital physiological processes for insect growth, development and survival. We have previously identified several colorless precursor molecules as well as enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and processing to yield the mature intensely colored body cuticle pigments. A recent study indicated that the Bombyx mori (silkmoth) gene, BmMucK, which encodes a protein orthologous to a Culex pipiens quiquefasciatus (Southern house mosquito) cis,cis, muconate transporter, is a member of the "Major Facilitator Superfamily" (MFS) of transporter proteins and is associated with the appearance of pigmented body segments of naturally occurring body color mutants of B. mori. While RNA interference of the BmMucK gene failed to result in any observable phenotype, RNAi using a dsRNA for an orthologous gene from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, was reported to result in molting defects and darkening of the cuticle and some body parts, leading to the suggestion that orthologs of MucK genes may differ in their functions among insects. To verify the role and essentiality of the ortholog of this gene in development and body pigmentation function in T. castaneum we obtained cDNAs for the orthologous gene (TcMucK) from RNA isolated from the GA-1 wild-type strain of T. castaneum. The sequence of a 1524 nucleotides-long cDNA for TcMucK which encodes the putatively full-length protein, was assembled from two overlapping RT-PCR fragments and the expression profile of this gene during development was analyzed by real-time PCR. This cDNA encodes a 55.8 kDa protein consisting of 507 amino acid residues and includes 11 putative transmembrane segments. Transcripts of TcMucK were detected throughout all of the developmental stages analyzed. The function of this gene was explored by injection of two different double-stranded RNAs targeting different regions of the TcMucK gene (dsTcMucKs) into young larvae to down

  15. Photons uniques indiscernables à partir d'une boîte quantique unique dans un cristal photonique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, S.; Varoutsis, S.; Le Gratiet, L.; Lemaître, A.; Sagnes, I.; Raineri, F.; Levenson, A.; Robert-Philip, I.; Abram, I.

    2006-10-01

    Nous avons développé et caractérisé une source de photons uniques basée sur l'émission spontanée d'une boîte quantique unique insérée dans une cavité à bande interdite photonique bidimensionnelle. Ce système nous a d'abord permis de produire des photons uniques, puis des photons uniques indiscernables avec une indiscernabilité supérieure à 70%. L'observation de l'indiscernabilité des photons, impossible sans un raccourcissement important de la durée de vie, met en évidence un effet Purcell supérieur à 25 dans ce système.

  16. Unique Signal mathematical analysis task group FY03 status report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baty, Roy Stuart (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Johnston, Anna Marie; Hart, Elizabeth (Utah State University, Logan, UT); White, Allan (NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA); Cooper, James Arlin

    2003-12-01

    The Unique Signal is a key constituent of Enhanced Nuclear Detonation Safety (ENDS). Although the Unique Signal approach is well prescribed and mathematically assured, there are numerous unsolved mathematical problems that could help assess the risk of deviations from the ideal approach. Some of the mathematics-based results shown in this report are: 1. The risk that two patterns with poor characteristics (easily generated by inadvertent processes) could be combined through exclusive-or mixing to generate an actual Unique Signal pattern has been investigated and found to be minimal (not significant when compared to the incompatibility metric of actual Unique Signal patterns used in nuclear weapons). 2. The risk of generating actual Unique Signal patterns with linear feedback shift registers is minimal, but the patterns in use are not as invulnerable to inadvertent generation by dependent processes as previously thought. 3. New methods of testing pair-wise incompatibility threats have resulted in no significant problems found for the set of Unique Signal patterns currently used. Any new patterns introduced would have to be carefully assessed for compatibility with existing patterns, since some new patterns under consideration were found to be deficient when associated with other patterns in use. 4. Markov models were shown to correspond to some of the engineered properties of Unique Signal sequences. This gives new support for the original design objectives. 5. Potential dependence among events (caused by a variety of communication protocols) has been studied. New evidence has been derived of the risk associated with combined communication of multiple events, and of the improvement in abnormal-environment safety that can be achieved through separate-event communication.

  17. Two Genes Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase Are Present in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Glaser, Philippe; Andersen, Paal S.

    1995-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. Surprisingly, two genes encoding UPRTase activity were cloned from Bacillus subtilis by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The genes were sequenced, and the putative...

  18. The mitochondrial genome encodes abundant small noncoding RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seungil Ro; Hsiu-Yen Ma; Chanjae Park; Nicole Ortogero; Rui Song; Grant W Hennig; Huili Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs identified thus far are all encoded by the nuclear genome.Here,we report that the murine and human mitochondriai genomes encode thousands of small noncoding RNAs,which are predominantly derived from the sense transcripts of the mitochondrial genes (host genes),and we termed these small RNAs mitochondrial genome-encoded small RNAs (mitosRNAs).DICER inactivation affected,but did not completely abolish mitosRNA production.MitosRNAs appear to be products of currently unidentified mitochondrial ribonucleases.Overexpression of mitosRNAs enhanced expression levels of their host genes in vitro,and dysregulated mitosRNA expression was generally associated with aberrant mitochondrial gene expression in vivo.Our data demonstrate that in addition to 37 known mitochondrial genes,the mammalian mitochondrial genome also encodes abundant mitosRNAs,which may play an important regulatory role in the control of mitochondrial gene expression in the cell.

  19. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Lan; Henriksen, Svend Hostgaard Bang

    2016-05-17

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  20. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activitiy and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Duan, Junxin

    2015-12-15

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.