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Sample records for cdna encoding human

  1. Cloning and expression of full-length cDNA encoding human vitamin D receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, A.R.; McDonnell, D.P.; Hughes, M.; Crisp, T.M.; Mangelsdorf, D.J.; Haussler, M.R.; Pike, J.W.; Shine, J.; O' Malley, B.W. (California Biotechnology Inc., Mountain View (USA))

    1988-05-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding the human vitamin D receptor have been isolated from human intestine and T47D cell cDNA libraries. The nucleotide sequence of the 4605-base pair (bp) cDNA includes a noncoding leader sequence of 115 bp, a 1281-bp open reading frame, and 3209 bp of 3{prime} noncoding sequence. Two polyadenylylation signals, AATAAA, are present 25 and 70 bp upstream of the poly(A) tail, respectively. RNA blot hybridization indicates a single mRNA species of {approx} 4600 bp. Transfection of the cloned sequences into COS-1 cells results in the production of a single receptor species indistinguishable from the native receptor. Sequence comparisons demonstrate that the vitamin D receptor belongs to the steroid-receptor gene family and is closest in size and sequence to another member of this family, the thyroid hormone receptor.

  2. Cloning and characterization of human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, J.; Norman, D.K.; Beckmann, R.J.; Long, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor was isolated from two cDNA libraries by two different techniques. Based upon the frequency of positive clones, the abundance of mRNA for protein S is ≅ 0.01%. Blot hybridization of electrophoretically fractionated poly(A) + RNA revealed a major mRNA ≅ 4 kilobases long and two minor forms of ≅ 3.1 and ≅ 2.6 kilobases. One of the cDNA clones contains a segment encoding a 676 amino acid protein S precursor, as well as 108 and 1132 nucleotides of 5' and 3' noncoding sequence, respectively, plus a poly(A) region at the 3' end. The cDNAs are adenosine plus thymidine-rich (60%) except for the 5' noncoding region, where 78% of the nucleotides are guanosine or cytosine. The protein precursor consists of a 41 amino acid leader peptide followed by 635 amino acids corresponding to mature protein S. Comparison of the mature protein region with homologous vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins shows that it is composed of the following domains: an amino-terminal γ-carboxyglutamic acid-rich region of 37 amino acids; a 36 amino acid linker region rich in hydroxy amino acids; four epidermal growth factor-like segments, each ≅ 45 amino acids long; and a 387 amino acid carboxyl-terminal domain of unrecognized structure and unknown function

  3. Characterization of cDNA clones encoding rabbit and human serum paraoxonase: The mature protein retains its signal sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassett, C.; Richter, R.J.; Humbert, R.; Omiecinski, C.J.; Furlong, C.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Chapline, C.; Crabb, J.W. (W.Alton Jones Cell Science Center, Lake Placid, NY (United States))

    1991-10-22

    Serum paraoxonase hydrolyzes the toxic metabolites of a variety of organophosphorus insecticides. High serum paraoxonase levels appear to protect against the neurotoxic effects of organophosphorus substrates of this enzyme. The amino acid sequence accounting for 42% of rabbit paraoxonase was determined. From these data, two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized and used to screen a rabbit liver cDNA library. Human paraoxonase clones were isolated from a liver cDNA library by using the rabbit cDNA as a hybridization probe. Inserts from three of the longest clones were sequenced, and one full-length clone contained an open reading frame encoding 355 amino acids, four less than the rabbit paraoxonase protein. Amino-terminal sequences derived from purified rabbit and human paraoxonase proteins suggested that the signal sequence is retained, with the exception of the initiator methionine residue. Characterization of the rabbit and human paraoxonase cDNA clones confirms that the signal sequences are not processed, except for the N-terminal methionine residue. The rabbit and human cDNA clones demonstrate striking nucleotide and deduced amino acid similarities (greater than 85%), suggesting an important metabolic role and constraints on the evolution of this protein.

  4. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a novel human nuclear phosphoprotein belonging to the WD-40 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Leffers, H; Madsen, Peder

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned and expressed in vaccinia virus a cDNA encoding an ubiquitous 501-amino-acid (aa) phosphoprotein that corresponds to protein IEF SSP 9502 (79,400 Da, pI 4.5) in the master 2-D-gel keratinocyte protein database [Celis et al., Electrophoresis 14 (1993) 1091-1198]. The deduced aa......-134]. The protein contains a nuclear targeting signal (KKKGK), and fractionation of transformed human amnion cells (AMA) in karyoplasts and cytoplasts confirmed that it is predominantly localized in the nucleus. Database searching indicated that IEF SSP 9502 is a putative human homologue of the Saccharomyces...

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel Cut family cDNA that encodes human copper transporter protein CutC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jixi; Ji Chaoneng; Chen Jinzhong; Yang Zhenxing; Wang Yijing; Fei, Xiangwei; Zheng Mei; Gu Xing; Wen Ge; Xie Yi; Mao Yumin

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an essential heavy metal trace element that plays important roles in cell physiology. The Cut family was associated with the copper homeostasis and involved in several important metabolisms, such as uptake, storage, delivery, and efflux of copper. In this study, a novel Cut family cDNA was isolated from the human fetal brain library, which encodes a 273 amino acid protein with a molecular mass of about 29.3 kDa and a calculated pI of 8.17. It was named hCutC (human copper transporter protein CutC). The ORF of hCutC gene was cloned into pQE30 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli M15. The secreted hCutC protein was purified to a homogenicity of 95% by using the Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. RT-PCR analysis showed that the hCutC gene expressed extensively in human tissues. Subcellular location analysis of hCutC-EGFP fusion protein revealed that hCutC was distributed to cytoplasm of COS-7 cells, and both cytoplasm and nucleus of AD293 cells. The results suggest that hCutC may be one shuttle protein and play important roles in intracellular copper trafficking

  6. Cloning of a cDNA encoding chitotriosidase, a human chitinase produced by macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, R. G.; Renkema, G. H.; Strijland, A.; van Zonneveld, A. J.; Aerts, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have recently observed that chitotriosidase, a chitinolytic enzyme, is secreted by activated human macrophages and is markedly elevated in plasma of Gaucher disease patients (Hollak, C. E. M., van Weely, S., van Oers, M. H. J., and Aerts, J. M. F. G. (1994) J. Clin. Invest. 93, 1288-1292). Here,

  7. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding human DNA topoisomerase II and localization of the gene to chromosome region 17q21-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai-Pflugfelder, M.; Liu, L.F.; Liu, A.A.; Tewey, K.M.; Whang-Peng, J.; Knutsen, T.; Huebner, K.; Croce, C.M.; Wang, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping cDNA clones encoding human DNA topoisomerase II were identified by two independent methods. In one, a human cDNA library in phage λ was screened by hybridization with a mixed oligonucleotide probe encoding a stretch of seven amino acids found in yeast and Drosophila DNA topoisomerase II; in the other, a different human cDNA library in a λgt11 expression vector was screened for the expression of antigenic determinants that are recognized by rabbit antibodies specific to human DNA topoisomerase II. The entire coding sequences of the human DNA topoisomerase II gene were determined from these and several additional clones, identified through the use of the cloned human TOP2 gene sequences as probes. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is encoded by a single-copy gene. The location of the gene was mapped to chromosome 17q21-22 by in situ hybridization of a cloned fragment to metaphase chromosomes and by hybridization analysis with a panel of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each retaining a subset of human chromosomes

  8. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenfeld, H.K.; Hershberger, R.J.; Shows, T.B.; Weissman, I.L.

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage λgt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16 + natural killer cells and CD3 + , CD16 - T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. The authors propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells

  9. Increased mRNA expression of a laminin-binding protein in human colon carcinoma: Complete sequence of a full-length cDNA encoding the protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yow, Hsiukang; Wong, Jau Min; Chen, Hai Shiene; Lee, C.; Steele, G.D. Jr.; Chen, Lanbo

    1988-01-01

    Reliable markers to distinguish human colon carcinoma from normal colonic epithelium are needed particularly for poorly differentiated tumors where no useful marker is currently available. To search for markers the authors constructed cDNA libraries from human colon carcinoma cell lines and screened for clones that hybridize to a greater degree with mRNAs of colon carcinomas than with their normal counterparts. Here they report one such cDNA clone that hybridizes with a 1.2-kilobase (kb) mRNA, the level of which is ∼9-fold greater in colon carcinoma than in adjacent normal colonic epithelium. Blot hybridization of total RNA from a variety of human colon carcinoma cell lines shows that the level of this 1.2-kb mRNA in poorly differentiated colon carcinomas is as high as or higher than that in well-differentiated carcinomas. Molecular cloning and complete sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the full-length open reading frame of this 1.2-kb mRNA unexpectedly show it to contain all the partial cDNA sequence encoding 135 amino acid residues previously reported for a human laminin receptor. The deduced amino acid sequence suggests that this putative laminin-binding protein from human colon carcinomas consists of 295 amino acid residues with interesting features. There is an unusual C-terminal 70-amino acid segment, which is trypsin-resistant and highly negatively charged

  10. Identification of a cDNA encoding a parathyroid hormone-like peptide from a human tumor associated with humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, M.; Webb, A.C.; Dreyer, B.E.

    1988-01-01

    Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy is a common paraneoplastic syndrome that appears to be mediated in many instances by a parathyroid hormone-like peptide. Poly(A) + RNA from a human renal carcinoma associated with this syndrome was enriched by preparative electrophoresis and used to construct an enriched cDNA library in phage λgt10. The library was screened with a codon-preference oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of a partial N-terminal amino acid sequence from a human tumor-derived peptide, and a 2.0 kilo-base cDNA was identified. The cDNA encodes a 177 amino acid protein consisting of a 36 amino acid leader sequence and a 141 amino acid mature peptide. The first 13 amino acids of the deduced sequence of the mature peptide display strong homology to human PTH, with complete divergence thereafter. RNA blot-hybridization analysis revealed multiple transcripts in mRNA from tumors associated with the humor syndrome and also in mRNA from normal human keratinocytes. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from humans and rodents revealed a simple pattern compatible with a single-copy gene. The gene has been mapped to chromosome 12

  11. A carboxy-terminally truncated human CPSF6 lacking residues encoded by exon 6 inhibits HIV-1 cDNA synthesis and promotes capsid disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Takanori; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Saito, Hideki; Sakuma, Ryuta; Inagaki, Yoshio; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2013-07-01

    Since HIV-1 replication is modulated at multiple stages by host cell factors, identification and characterization of those host cell factors are expected to contribute to the development of novel anti-HIV therapeutics. Previous studies showed that a C-terminally truncated cytosolic form of cleavage and polyadenylation-specific factor 6 (CPSF6-358) inhibits HIV-1 infection through interference with HIV-1 trafficking to the nucleus. Here we identified and characterized a different configuration of C-terminally truncated human CPSF6 (hCPSF6-375) through cDNA expression cloning coupled with ganciclovir-mediated lethal selection. Notably, hCPSF6-375, but not mouse CPSF6-358 (mCPSF6-358) as previously reported, remarkably interfered with viral cDNA synthesis after HIV-1 infection. Moreover, we found that hCPSF6-375 aberrantly accelerated the disassembly of the viral capsid in target cells, while CPSF6-358 did not. Sequence comparison of CPSF6-375 and CPSF6-358 cDNAs showed a lack of exon 6 and additional coding sequence for 54 amino acid residues in the C terminus of hCPSF6-375. Mutational analyses revealed that the residues encoded by exon 6, but not the C-terminal 54 residues in hCPSF6-375, is responsible for impaired viral cDNA synthesis by hCPSF6-375. This is the first report demonstrating a novel mode of HIV-1 inhibition by truncated forms of CPSF6 that involves rapid capsid disassembly and inhibition of viral cDNA synthesis. These findings could facilitate an increased understanding of viral cDNA synthesis in light of the viral capsid disassembly.

  12. Cloning of a cDNA encoding the human cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate-specific receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlmann, R.; Nagel, G.; Schmidt, B.

    1987-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones for the human cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate-specific receptor have been isolated from a human placenta library in λgt11. The nucleotide sequence of the 2463-base-pair cDNA insert includes a 145-base-pair 5' untranslated region, an open reading frame of 831 base pairs corresponding to 277 amino acids, and a 1487-base-pair 3' untranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence is colinear with that determined by amino acid sequencing of the N-terminus peptide (41 residues) and nine tryptic peptides (93 additional residues). The receptor is synthesized as a precursor with a signal peptide of 20 amino acids. The hydrophobicity profile of the receptor indicates a single membrane-spanning domain, which separates an N-terminal region containing five potential N-glycosylation sites from a C-terminal region lacking N-glycosylation sites. Thus the N-terminal (M/sub r/ = 18,299) and C-terminal (M/sub r/ ≤ 7648) segments of the mature receptor are assumed to be exposed to the extracytosolic and cytosolic sides of the membrane, respectively. Analysis of a panel of somatic cell (mouse-human) hybrids shows that the gene for the receptor is located on human chromosome 12

  13. Cloning of partial cDNA encoding differentiation and tumor-associated mucin glycoproteins expressed by human mammary epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gender, S.J.; Burchell, J.M.; Duhig, T.; Lamport, D.; White, R.; Parker, M.; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J.

    1987-09-01

    Human mammary epithelial cells secrete and express on their cell surfaces complex mucin glycoproteins that are developmentally regulated, tumor-associated, and highly immunogenic. Studies using monoclonal antibodies directed to these glycoproteins suggest that their molecular structures can vary with differentiation stages in the normal gland and in malignancy. To analyze the molecular nature of these glycoproteins, milk mucin was affinity-purifed and deglycosylated with hydrogen fluoride, yielding bands at 68 and 72 kDa on silver-stained gels. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to the stripped core protein were developed and used to screen a lambdagt11 expression library of cDNA made from mRNA of the mammary tumor cell line MCF-7. Seven crossreacting clones were isolated, with inserts 0.1-1.8 kilobases long. RNA blot analysis, using as a probe the 1.8-kilobase insert subcloned in plasmid pUC8 (pMUC10), revealed transcripts of 4.7 and 6.4 kilobases in MCF-7 and T47D mammary tumor cells, whereas normal mammary epithelial cells from pooled milks have additional transcripts. The expression of mRNA correlates with antigen expression as determined by binding of two previously characterized anti-mucin monoclonal antibodies (HMFG-1 and HMFG-2) to seven cell lines. Restriction enzyme analysis detected a restriction fragment length polymorphism when human genomic DNA was digested with EcoRI or HinfI.

  14. Molecular cloning and expression of mouse and human cDNA encoding AES and ESG proteins with strong similarity to Drosophila enhancer of split groucho protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, H; Choudhury, B K; Hou, E W; Li, S S

    1993-08-15

    Mouse and human cDNA encoding AES (amino-terminal enhancer of split) and ESG (enhancer of split groucho) proteins with strong similarity to Drosophila enhancer of split groucho protein were isolated and sequenced. Mouse AES-1 and AES-2 proteins, probably resulting from alternative splicing, contain 202 and 196 amino acids, respectively, while mouse ESG protein consists of 771 amino acids. The amino acid sequences of mouse and human AES proteins were found to exhibit approximately 50% identity to the amino-terminal region of Drosophila groucho, mouse ESG and human transducin-like enhancer of split (TLE) proteins. Mouse AES transcripts of 1.5 kb and 1.2 kb were abundantly expressed in muscle, heart and brain. Human AES transcripts of 1.6 kb and 1.4 kb were predominantly present in muscle, heart and placenta. Mouse ESG (homolog of human TLE 3) transcripts of 3.3 kb and 4.0 kb were found only in testis, while human TLE 1 transcripts of 4.5 kb was more abundant in muscle and placenta compared to heart, brain, lung, liver, kidney and pancreas. Human AES, TLE 1 and TLE 3 genes were mapped to chromosomes 19, 9 and 15, respectively, using human and Chinese hamster hybrid cell lines.

  15. Identification of cDNA encoding an additional α subunit of a human GTP-binding protein: Expression of three αi subtypes in human tissues and cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.; Ang, S.L.; Bloch, D.B.; Bloch, K.D.; Kawahara, Y.; Tolman, C.; Lee, R.; Seidman, J.G.; Neer, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), which mediate hormonal regulation of many membrane functions, are composed of α, β, and γ subunits. The authors have cloned and characterized cDNA from a human T-cell library encoding a form of α i that is different from the human α i subtypes previously reported. α i is the α subunit of a class of G proteins that inhibits adenylate cyclase and regulates other enzymes and ion channels. This cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 354 amino acids and is assigned to encode the α i-3 subtype of G proteins on the basis of its similarity to other α i -like cDNAs and the presence of a predicted site for ADP ribosylation by pertussis toxin. They have determined the expression of mRNA for this and two other subtypes of human α i (α i-1 and α i-2 ) in a variety of human fetal tissues and in human cell lines. All three α i subtypes were present in the tissues tested. However, analysis of individual cell types reveals specificity of α i-1 expression. mRNA for α i-1 is absent in T cells, B cells, and monocytes but is present in other cell lines. The finding of differential expression of α i-1 genes may permit characterization of distinct physiological roles for this α i subunit. mRNA for α i-2 and α i-3 was found in all the primary and transformed cell lines tested. Thus, some cells contain all three α i subtypes. This observation raises the question of how cells prevent cross talk among receptors that are coupled to effectors through such similar α proteins

  16. Cloning of cDNA encoding steroid 11β-hydroxylase (P450c11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, S.C.; Szabo, P.; Vitek, A.; Grzeschik, K.H.; John, M.; White, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have isolated bovine and human adrenal cDNA clones encoding the adrenal cytochrome P-450 specific for 11β-hydroxylation (P450c11). A bovine adrenal cDNA library constructed in the bacteriophage λ vector gt10 was probed with a previously isolated cDNA clone corresponding to part of the 3' untranslated region of the 4.2-kilobase (kb) mRNA encoding P450c11. Several clones with 3.2-kb cDNA inserts were isolated. Sequence analysis showed that they overlapped the original probe by 300 base pairs (bp). Combined cDNA and RNA sequence data demonstrated a continuous open reading frame of 1509 bases. P450c11 is predicted to contain 479 amino acid residues in the mature protein in addition to a 24-residue amino-terminal mitochondrial signal sequence. A bovine clone was used to isolate a homologous clone with a 3.5-kb insert from a human adrenal cDNA library. A region of 1100 bp was 81% homologous to 769 bp of the coding sequence of the bovine cDNA except for a 400-bp segment presumed to be an unprocessed intron. Hybridization of the human cDNA to DNA from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid lines and in situ hybridization to metaphase spreads of human chromosomes localized the gene to the middle of the long arm of chromosome 8. These data should be useful in developing reagents for heterozygote detection and prenatal diagnosis of 11β-hydroxylase deficiency, the second most frequent cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

  17. Molecular cloning of growth hormone encoding cDNA of Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Evans and Long 1921) and the human growth hormone (GH) encoding cDNA was per- haps the first to be isolated and characterized (Li and. Evans 1944). GH, chorionic somatomamotropin (placental lactogen) and prolactin (PRL) are all a family of ...

  18. Cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindan, M.V.; Burelle, M.; Cantin, C.; Kabrie, C.; Labrie, F.; Lachance, Y.; Leblanc, G.; Lefebvre, C.; Patel, P.; Simard, J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss how in order to define the functional domains of the human androgen receptor, complementary DNA (cDNA) clones encoding the human androgen receptor (hAR) have been isolated from a human testis λgtll cDNA library using synthetic oligonnucleotide probes, homologous to segments of the human glucocorticoid, estradiol and progesterone receptors. The cDNA clones corresponding to the human glucocorticoid, estradiol and progesterone receptors were eliminated after cross-hybridization with their respective cDNA probes and/or after restriction mapping of the cDNA clones. The remaining cDNA clones were classified into different groups after analysis by restriction digestion and cross-hybridization. Two of the largest cDNA clones from each group were inserted into an expression vector in both orientations. The linearized plasmids were used as templates in in vitro transcription with T7 RNA polymerase. Subsequent in vitro translation of the purified transcripts in rabbit reticulocyte lysate followed by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) permitted the characterization of the encoded polyeptides. The expressed proteins larger than 30,000 Da were analyzed for their ability to bind tritium-labelled dihydrotestosterone ([ 3 H] DHT) with high affinity and specificity

  19. Cloning of the cDNA for human 12-lipoxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, T.; Hoshiko, S.; Radmark, O.; Samuelsson, B.

    1990-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding 12-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human platelet cDNA library by using a cDNA for human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase as probe for the initial screening. The cDNA had an open reading frame encoding 662 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 75,590. Three independent clones revealed minor heterogeneities in their DNA sequences. Thus, in three positions of the deduced amino acid sequence, there is a choice between two different amino acids. The deduced sequence from the clone plT3 showed 65% identity with human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase and 42% identity with human leukocyte 5-lipoxygenase. The 12-lipoxygenase cDNA recognized a 3.0-kilobase mRNA species in platelets and human erythroleukemia cells (HEL cells). Phorbol 12-tetradecanoyl 13-acetate induced megakaryocytic differentiation of HEL cells and 12-lipoxygenase activity and increased mRNA for 12-lipoxygenase. The identity of the cloned 12-lipoxygenase was assured by expression in a mammalian cell line (COS cells). Human platelet 12-lipoxygenase has been difficult to purify to homogeneity. The cloning of this cDNA will increase the possibilities to elucidate the structure and function of this enzyme

  20. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  1. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  2. Characterization of a cDNA encoding cottonseed catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W; Turley, R B; Trelease, R N

    1990-06-21

    A 1.7 kb cDNA clone was isolated from our lambda gt11 library constructed from poly(A) RNA of 24-h-old cotyledons. The cDNA encodes a full-length catalase peptide (492 amino acid residues). The calculated molecular mass is 56,800, similar to that determined for purified enzyme (57,000 SDS-PAGE). Among higher plant catalases, this cotton catalase shows the highest amino acid sequence identity (85%) to the subunit of homotetrameric maize CAT 1, a developmental counterpart to the homotetrameric CAT A isoform of cotton seeds. Comparison of sequences from cotton, sweet potato, maize CAT 1, and yeast with bovine catalase revealed that the amino acid residues and regions that are involved in catalytic activity and/or required to maintain basic catalase structure, are highly conserved. The C-terminus region, which has the lowest nucleotide sequence identity between plant and mammalian catalases, does not terminate with a tripeptide, S-K/R/H-L, a putative targeting signal for peroxisomal proteins.

  3. Expression analysis of a ''Cucurbita'' cDNA encoding endonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szopa, J.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear matrices of plant cell nuclei display intrinsic nuclease activity which consists in nicking supercoiled DNA. A cDNA encoding a 32 kDa endonuclease has been cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide and deduced amino-acid sequences show high homology to known 14-3-3-protein sequences from other sources. The amino-acid sequence shows agreement with consensus sequences for potential phosphorylation by protein kinase A and C and for calcium, lipid and membrane-binding sites. The nucleotide-binding site is also present within the conserved part of the sequence. By Northern blot analysis, the differential expression of the corresponding mRNA was detected; it was the strongest in sink tissues. The endonuclease activity found on DNA-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coincided with mRNA content and was the highest in tuber. (author). 22 refs, 6 figs

  4. Molecular cloning of growth hormone encoding cDNA of Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A modified rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) strategy has been developed for cloning highly conserved cDNA sequences. Using this modified method, the growth hormone (GH) encoding cDNA sequences of Labeo rohita, Cirrhina mrigala and Catla catla have been cloned, characterized and overexpressed in ...

  5. Molecular cloning of growth hormone encoding cDNA of Indian

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A modified rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) strategy has been developed for cloning highly conserved cDNA sequences. Using this modified method, the growth hormone (GH) encoding cDNA sequences of Labeo rohita, Cirrhina mrigala and Catla catla have been cloned, characterized and overexpressed in ...

  6. Horse cDNA clones encoding two MHC class I genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbis, D.P.; Maher, J.K.; Stanek, J.; Klaunberg, B.A.; Antczak, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    Two full-length clones encoding MHC class I genes were isolated by screening a horse cDNA library, using a probe encoding in human HLA-A2.2Y allele. The library was made in the pcDNA1 vector (Invitrogen, San Diego, CA), using mRNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from a Thoroughbred stallion (No. 0834) homozygous for a common horse MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -B2, -D2; Antczak et al. 1984; Donaldson et al. 1988). The clones were sequenced, using SP6 and T7 universal primers and horse-specific oligonucleotides designed to extend previously determined sequences.

  7. Cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers representing the conserved regions of fish GH sequences the 3′ region of catfish GH cDNA (540 bp) was cloned by random amplification of cDNA ends and the clone was used as a probe to isolate recombinant phages carrying the full-length cDNA sequence. The full-length ...

  8. Cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    317. 2.4 cDNA sequencing and analysis. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned H. fossilis GH. cDNA was determined by Sanger's dideoxy chain termi- nation method, using Perkin Elmer bigdye terminator kit in an ABI Prism 377 automated DNA sequencer. All other computational analysis of the GH cDNA was done using.

  9. Cloning of the mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I and chromosomal location of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koiwai, O; Yasui, Y; Sakai, Y; Watanabe, T; Ishii, K; Yanagihara, S; Andoh, T

    1993-03-30

    The mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I (TopoI) was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of 3512 bp was determined. The cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 767 amino acids (aa), which is 2 aa longer than its human counterpart. Overall aa sequence homology between the mouse and human, and between the mouse and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) sequences was 96% and 42%, respectively. The mouse TopI gene was mapped at position 54.5 on chromosome 2 from linkage analyses of a three-point cross test with Geg, Ada, and a as marker genes.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-29

    Nanjing) co., Ltd. The nucleotide sequences of these primers are as follows: ..... Ebizuka Y (2000). Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA for Glycyrrhiza glabra cycloartenol synthase. Biol. Pharm. Bull. 23(2):231-234.

  11. Molecular cloning and mammalian expression of human beta 2-glycoprotein I cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten; Schousboe, Inger; Boel, Espen

    1991-01-01

    Human β2-glycoprotein (β2gpI) cDNA was isolated from a liver cDNA library and sequenced. The cDNA encoded a 19-residue hydrophobic signal peptide followed by the mature β2gpI of 326 amino acid residues. In liver and in the hepatoma cell line HepG2 there are two mRNA species of about 1.4 and 4.3 kb...

  12. Cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    cell embryo and the expression was monitored continuously. The expression shown here is in developing embryo and freshly hatched fish. The intensity of green colour indicate the strong expression of EGFP in all the tissues of the embryo/fry. The expression of EGPF indicates the co-expression of catfish GH cDNA and the ...

  13. Cloning and characterization of cDNA encoding xyloglucan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... construction and restructuring of xyloglucan cross-links, thereby controlling the mechanical properties of cell wall. We cloned complete cDNA of an ..... are marked by horizontal lines. The conserved cysteine residues (amino acids 220, 229, 274 and 288 in P. glaucum) are marked by vertical blue arrows.

  14. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding human calumenin, expression in Escherichia coli and analysis of its Ca2+-binding activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Liu, X; Madsen, Peder

    1998-01-01

    -terminal signal sequence, 7 EF-hand domains and, at the C-terminus, a HDEF sequence which has been reported to function as retrieval signal to the ER. The calumenin transcript is ubiquitously expressed in human tissue, at high levels in heart, placenta and skeletal muscle, at lower levels in lung, kidney...

  15. Cloning and sequencing of dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus, Coryphaenidae) growth hormone-encoding cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peduel, A D; Elizur, A; Knibb, W

    1994-01-01

    The cDNA encoding the preprotein growth hormone from the dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) has been cloned and sequenced. The cDNA was derived by reverse transcription of RNA from the pituitary of a young fish using the method known as Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). An oligonucleotide primer corresponding to the 5' region of Pagrus major and the universal RACE primer enabled amplification using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The dolphinfish and yellow-tail, Seriola quineqeradiata, are both members of the sub-order Percoidei (Perciforme) and their GH sequences show a high level of homology.

  16. Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utut Widyastuti Suharsono

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine. M. affine can grow well in acid soil with high level of soluble aluminum. One of the important proteins in the detoxifying xenobiotic stress including acid and Al stresses is a multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP encoded by mrp gene. The objective of this research is to isolate and clone the cDNA fragment of MaMrp encoding MRP from M. affine. By reverse transcription, total cDNA had been synthesized from the total RNA as template. The fragment of cDNA MaMrp had been successfully isolated by PCR by using total cDNA as template and mrp primer designed from A. thaliana, yeast, and human. This fragment was successfully inserted into pGEM-T Easy and the recombinant plasmid was successfully introduced into E. coli DH5α. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the lenght of MaMrp fragment is 633 bp encoding 208 amino acids. Local alignment analysis based on nucleotide of mRNA showed that MaMrp fragment is 69% identical to AtMrp1 and 63% to AtMrp from A. thaliana. Based on deduced amino acid sequence, MaMRP is 84% identical to part of AtMRP13, 77% to AtMRP12, and 73% to AtMRP1 from A. thaliana respectively. Alignment analysis with AtMRP1 showed that MaMRP fragment is located in TM1 and NBF1 domains and has a specific amino acid sequence QCKAQLQNMEEE.

  17. Cloning and functional expression of a human pancreatic islet glucose-transporter cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permutt, M.A.; Koranyi, L.; Keller, K.; Lacy, P.E.; Scharp, D.W.; Mueckler, M.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic islet glucose transport is mediated by a high-K m , low-affinity facilitated transporter similar to that expressed in liver. To determine the relationship between islet and liver glucose transporters, liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clone hybridized to mRNA transcripts of the same size in human liver and pancreatic islet RNA. A cDNA library was prepared from purified human pancreatic islet tissue and screened with human liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA. The authors isolated two overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 2600 base pairs, which encode a pancreatic islet protein identical in sequence to that of the putative liver-type glucose-transporter protein. Xenopus oocytes injected with synthetic mRNA transcribed from a full-length cDNA construct exhibited increased uptake of 2-deoxyglucose, confirming the functional identity of the clone. These cDNA clones can now be used to study regulation of expression of the gene and to assess the role of inherited defects in this gene as a candidate for inherited susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNA encoding fibrinolytic enzyme-3 from earthworm Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guo-Qing; Yuan, Xiao-Ling; Shan, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Zhen-Hu; Chen, Jia-Pei; Cong, Yu-Wen

    2004-04-01

    The earthworm fibrinolytic enzyme-3 (EFE-3, GenBank accession No: AY438622), from the earthworm Eisenia foetida, is a component of earthworm fibrinolytic enzymes. In this study, cDNA encoding the EFE-3 was cloned by RT-PCR. The cDNA contained an open reading frame of 741 nucleotides, which encoded a deduced protein of 247 amino acid residues, including signal sequences. EFE-3 showed a high degree of homology to earthworm (Lumbricus rebullus) proteases F-III-1, F-III-2, and bovine trypsin. The recombinant EFE-3 was expressed in E. coli as inclusion bodies, and the gene encoding the native form of EFE-3 was expressed in COS-7 cells in the medium. Both the refolding product of inclusion bodies and the secreted protease could dissolve the artificial fibrin plate.

  19. Sequence of a cDNA encoding turtle high mobility group 1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jifang; Hu, Bi; Wu, Duansheng

    2005-07-01

    In order to understand sequence information about turtle HMG1 gene, a cDNA encoding HMG1 protein of the Chinese soft-shell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) was amplified by RT-PCR from kidney total RNA, and was cloned, sequenced and analyzed. The results revealed that the open reading frame (ORF) of turtle HMG1 cDNA is 606 bp long. The ORF codifies 202 amino acid residues, from which two DNA-binding domains and one polyacidic region are derived. The DNA-binding domains share higher amino acid identity with homologues sequences of chicken (96.5%) and mammalian (74%) than homologues sequence of rainbow trout (67%). The polyacidic region shows 84.6% amino acid homology with the equivalent region of chicken HMG1 cDNA. Turtle HMG1 protein contains 3 Cys residues located at completely conserved positions. Conservation in sequence and structure suggests that the functions of turtle HMG1 cDNA may be highly conserved during evolution. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HMG1 cDNA sequence in any reptilian.

  20. Cloning and Characterization of a cDNA Encoding a Novel Extracellular Peroxidase from Trametes versicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Patrick J.; O’Brien, Margaret M.; Dobson, Alan D. W.

    1999-01-01

    The white rot basidiomycete Trametes versicolor secretes a large number of peroxidases which are believed to be involved in the degradation of polymeric lignin. These peroxidases have been classified previously as lignin peroxidases or manganese peroxidases (MnP). We have isolated a novel extracellular peroxidase-encoding cDNA sequence from T. versicolor CU1, the transcript levels of which are repressed by low concentrations of Mn2+ and induced by nitrogen and carbon but not induced in response to a range of stresses which have been reported to induce MnP expression. PMID:10049906

  1. Gene therapy for bladder pain with gene gun particle encoding pro-opiomelanocortin cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Chou, A-K; Wu, P-C; Chiang, Po-Hui; Yu, T-J; Yang, L-C; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael B

    2003-11-01

    Interstitial cystitis is a bladder hypersensitivity disease associated with bladder pain that has been a major challenge to understand and treat. We hypothesized that targeted and localized expression of endogenous opioid peptide in the bladder could be useful for the treatment of bladder pain. Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) is one of such precursor molecules. In this study we developed a gene gun method for the transfer of POMC cDNA in vivo and investigated its therapeutic effect on acetic acid induced bladder hyperactivity in rats. Human POMC cDNA was cloned into a modified pCMV plasmid and delivered into the bladder wall of adult female rats by direct injection or the gene gun. Three days after gene therapy continuous cystometrograms were performed using urethane anesthesia by filling the bladder (0.08 ml per minute) with saline, followed by 0.3% acetic acid. Bladder immunohistochemical testing was used to detect endorphin after POMC cDNA transfer. The intercontraction interval was decreased after intravesical instillation of acetic acid (73.1% or 68.1% decrease) in 2 control groups treated with saline or the gene gun without POMC cDNA, respectively. However, rats that received POMC cDNA via the gene gun showed a significantly decreased response (intercontraction interval 35% decreased) to acetic acid instillation, whereas this antinociceptive effect was not detected in the plasmid POMC cDNA direct injection group. This effect induced by POMC gene gun treatment was reversed by intramuscular naloxone (1 mg/kg), an opioid antagonist. Increased endorphin immunoreactivity with anti-endorphin antibodies was observed in the bladder of gene gun treated animals. The POMC gene can be transferred in the bladder using the gene gun and increased bladder expression of endorphin can suppress nociceptive responses induced by bladder irritation. Thus, POMC gene gun delivery may be useful for the treatment of interstitial cystitis and other types of visceral pain.

  2. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  3. Isolation and Expression of a cDNA Encoding Methylmalonic Aciduria Type A Protein from Euglena gracilis Z

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio Watanabe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In animals, cobalamin (Cbl is a cofactor for methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM, which utilizes methylcobalamin and 5′-deoxyadenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl, respectively. The cblA complementation class of inborn errors of Cbl metabolism in humans is one of three known disorders that affect AdoCbl synthesis. The gene responsible for cblA has been identified in humans (MMAA as well as its homolog (meaB in Methylobacterium extorquens. Recently, it has been reported that human MMAA plays an important role in the protection and reactivation of MCM in vitro. However, the physiological function of MMAA is largely unknown. In the present study, we isolated the cDNA encoding MMAA from Euglena gracilis Z, a photosynthetic flagellate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA shows 79%, 79%, 79% and 80% similarity to human, mouse, Danio rerio MMAAs and M. extorquens MeaB, respectively. The level of the MCM transcript was higher in Cbl-deficient cultures of E. gracilis than in those supplemented with Cbl. In contrast, no significant differences were observed in the levels of the MMAA transcript under the same two conditions. No significant difference in MCM activity was observed between Escherichia coli that expressed either MCM together with MMAA or expressed MCM alone.

  4. Characterization of a cDNA encoding metallothionein 3 from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Robin H; Turley, Rickie B; Defauw, Sherri L; Steele, Mark

    2005-04-01

    A cDNA encoding metallothionein (MT) was isolated from a library constructed with poly A(+) RNA purified from 48 h etiolated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cotyledons. This cDNA encodes a deduced protein with 63 residues and a molecular weight of 6.3 kDa. The protein has 10 cysteines of which 4 are within the CXXCXCXXXXXC amino-terminus motif and six are within the CXCXXXCXCXXCXC carboxyl-terminus motif characteristic of the type III MT (MT3). The cotton MT3 protein sequence is 76.2, 69.8, 66.7, 60.3 and 33.5% identical to MT3 from Carica papaya, Rubus idaeus, Ribes nigrum, Citrus unshiu, and Gossypium hirsutum type I MT, respectively. A fusion protein was constructed by producing PCR primers for the 5' and 3' ends of the cotton MT3 cDNA and ligating the PCR product inframe at the 3' end of a bacterial glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene in the pGEX3 vector. The 5' PCR primer incorporated a segment of the cotton MT3 noncoding region, resulting in an addition of 9 residues to the MT3 (after Factor Xa digestion site) which increased the size of the expressed protein to 72 residues and 7.6 kDa. Expression of the 7.6 kDa protein in bacteria was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. Induction and accumulation of the GST-MT3 protein began inhibiting bacterial growth after 1 h. Addition of Cu (1 muM to 1 mM), 1 mM cysteine, or 1 mM cystine to the media did not rescue growth. Additionally, this protein was evaluated for its ability to bind Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn in the bacterial expression system. We found that cotton MT3 preferentially binds Cu.

  5. Isolation and sequence analysis of a cDNA clone encoding the fifth complement component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundwall, Åke B; Wetsel, Rick A; Kristensen, Torsten

    1985-01-01

    clone of 1.85 kilobase pairs was isolated. Hybridization of the mixed-sequence probe to the complementary strand of the plasmid insert and sequence analysis by the dideoxy method predicted the expected protein sequence of C5a (positions 1-12), amino-terminal to the anticipated priming site. The sequence......We have used available protein sequence data for the anaphylatoxin (C5a) portion of the fifth component of human complement (residues 19-25) to synthesize a mixed-sequence oligonucleotide probe. The labeled oligonucleotide was then used to screen a human liver cDNA library, and a single candidate cDNA...... obtained further predicted an arginine-rich sequence (RPRR) immediately upstream of the N-terminal threonine of C5a, indicating that the promolecule form of C5 is synthesized with a beta alpha-chain orientation as previously shown for pro-C3 and pro-C4. The C5 cDNA clone was sheared randomly by sonication...

  6. cDNA library construction of two human Demodexspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, DongLing; Wang, RuiLing; Zhao, YaE; Yang, Rui; Hu, Li; Lei, YuYang; Dan, WeiChao

    2017-06-01

    The research of Demodex, a type of pathogen causing various dermatoses in animals and human beings, is lacking at RNA level. This study aims at extracting RNA and constructing cDNA library for Demodex. First, P. cuniculiand D. farinaewere mixed to establish homogenization method for RNA extraction. Second, D. folliculorumand D. breviswere collected and preserved in Trizol, which were mixed with D. farinaerespectively to extract RNA. Finally, cDNA library was constructed and its quality was assessed. The results indicated that for D. folliculorum& D. farinae, the recombination rate of cDNA library was 90.67% and the library titer was 7.50 × 104 pfu/ml. 17 of the 59 positive clones were predicted to be of D. folliculorum; For D. brevis& D. farinae, the recombination rate was 90.96% and the library titer was 7.85 x104 pfu/ml. 40 of the 59 positive clones were predicted to be of D. brevis. Further detection by specific primers demonstrated that mtDNA cox1, cox3and ATP6 detected from cDNA libraries had 96.52%-99.73% identities with the corresponding sequences in GenBank. In conclusion, the cDNA libraries constructed for Demodexmixed with D. farinaewere successful and could satisfy the requirements for functional genes detection.

  7. [The construction of rapid amplification of cDNA ends cDNA libraries from human fetal bone and joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, X; Gong, Y; Liu, Q; Li, J; Chen, B; Guo, C

    2001-02-01

    To construct rapid amplification cDNA ends(RACE) cDNA libraries from human fetal bone and joint and provide resources for isolation of bone- and joint-specific development-related genes. Total RNA of bone and joint were extracted with the modified single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction. The double-stranded end-blunted cDNA were synthesized using TaKaRa's cDNA synthesis kit and ligated to cassette adaptors. All of the cDNA molecules were amplified by a pair of common primers. A protocol for RACE cDNA library construction from bone and joint was established and two RACE cDNA libraries from human fetal bone and joint were successfully constructed. The protocol of RACE cDNA library construction from limited materials proved to be simple and efficient and the library was suitable for RACE to isolate tissue-specific genes.

  8. Identification of a cryptic prokaryotic promoter within the cDNA encoding the 5' end of dengue virus RNA genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Li

    Full Text Available Infectious cDNA clones of RNA viruses are important research tools, but flavivirus cDNA clones have proven difficult to assemble and propagate in bacteria. This has been attributed to genetic instability and/or host cell toxicity, however the mechanism leading to these difficulties has not been fully elucidated. Here we identify and characterize an efficient cryptic bacterial promoter in the cDNA encoding the dengue virus (DENV 5' UTR. Following cryptic transcription in E. coli, protein expression initiated at a conserved in-frame AUG that is downstream from the authentic DENV initiation codon, yielding a DENV polyprotein fragment that was truncated at the N-terminus. A more complete understanding of constitutive viral protein expression in E. coli might help explain the cloning and propagation difficulties generally observed with flavivirus cDNA.

  9. Cloning and expression of a cDNA covering the complete coding region of the P32 subunit of human pre-mRNA splicing factor SF2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned and expressed a cDNA encoding the 32-kDa subunit (P32) of the human pre-mRNA splicing factor, SF2. This cDNA extends beyond the 5'-end of a previously reported cDNA [Krainer et al., Cell 66 (1991) 383-394]. Importantly, our fragment includes an ATG start codon which was absent from...

  10. A cDNA encoding a pRB-binding protein with properties of the transcription factor E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Lees, J A; Vidal, M

    1992-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) plays an important role in the control of cell proliferation, apparently by binding to and regulating cellular transcription factors such as E2F. Here we describe the characterization of a cDNA clone that encodes a protein with properties of E2F. This clone, RBP3...

  11. [CDNA cloning of human leptin and its expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhen-Yu; Fu, Xiao-Min; Jin, Ai-Hua; Cao, Jiang

    2003-07-01

    To clone cDNA of human leptin gene and obtain leptin protein for future study on leptin binding proteins. The cDNA of human leptin with 6 x his-tag was cloned by over-hang extension PCR protocol using human genomic DNA as template, and subcloned into in vitro expression vector pIVEX2.3MCS, and the fusion protein was expressed in vitro by Rapid Translation System (RTS) (RTS500 cycle primer Kit and RTS500 ProteoMaster of Roche company). The apparent molecular weight(19.46 kD) and the immuno-specificity of the fusion protein were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot, and the expressed fusion protein stayed mainly in the supernatant of the reaction mixture in soluble form. This work provides us solid basis for further study on new leptin-associated proteins.

  12. Three human alcohol dehydrogenase subunits: cDNA structure and molecular and evolutionary divergence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, T.; Szeto, S.; Yoshida, A.

    1986-01-01

    Class I human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol:NAD + oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) consists of several homo- and heterodimers of α, β, and γ subunits that are governed by the ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3 loci. The authors previously cloned a full length of cDNA for the β subunit, and the complete sequence of 374 amino acid residues was established. cDNAs for the α and γ subunits were cloned and characterized. A human liver cDNA library, constructed in phage λgt11, was screened by using a synthetic oligonucleotide probe that was matched to the γ but not to the β sequence. Clone pUCADHγ21 and clone pUCADHα15L differed from β cDNA with respect to restriction sites and hybridization with the nucleotide probe. Clone pUCADHγ21 contained an insertion of 1.5 kilobase pairs (kbp) and encodes 374 amino acid residues compatible with the reported amino acid sequence of the γ subunit. Clone pUCADHα15L contained an insertion of 2.4 kbp and included nucleotide sequences that encode 374 amino acid residues for another subunit, the γ subunit. In addition, this clone contained the sequences that encode the COOH-terminal part of the β subunit at its extended 5' region. The amino acid sequences and coding regions of the cDNAs of the three subunits are very similar. A high degree of resemblance is observed also in their 3' noncoding regions. However, distinctive differences exist in the vicinity of the Zn-binding cysteine residue at position 46. Based on the cDNA sequences and the deduced amino acid sequences of the three subunits, their structural and evolutionary relationships are discussed

  13. Toward a cDNA map of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.; Chen, X.N. [Cedars-Sinai Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Adams, M.D.; Venter, J.C. [Institute for Genomic Research, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1995-09-20

    Advances in the Human Genome Project are shaping the strategies for identifying the 50,000-100,000 human genes. High-resolution genetic maps of the human genome combined with sequencing herald an era of rapid regional definition of disease genes. However, only once their chromosomes band location is known will the systematic partial sequencing of thousands of random cDNA clones provide the reagents for the rapid assessment of the genes responsible for the inherited disorders. We now present an approach to the rapid determination of map position and therefore to the creation of a transcribed map of the human genome. Sensitive fluorescence in situ hybridization has been combined with high-resolution chromosome banding and random cDNA sequencing to 41 cDNAs with an average insert size of < 2 kb to single human chromosome bands. The results provide 15 new genes, with database and functional information, as candidates for human disease. These include the large extracellular single-related kinase (HUMERK), the ERK activator kinase (PRKMK1), a new member of the RAS oncogene family, protein phosphotase 2 regulatory subunit B alpha isoform (PPP2R2A), and a novel human gene with very high homology to a plant membrane transport family. Further, an analysis of expressed genes associated with pseudogenes showed that by using these techniques, it is possible to detect accurately the transcribed locus within a multigene or processed pseudogene family in most cases. These findings suggest that direct cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization provides an accurate and rapid approach to the definition of a transcribed map of the human genome. This low-cost, high-resolution (205 Mb) mapping greatly enhances the speed with which these genes can be subsequently assigned to contigs. This assignment provides a necessary first step in understanding the relationship of the genes to both acquired and inherited human diseases. 16 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones for human erythrocyte β-spectrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prchal, J.T.; Morley, B.J.; Yoon, S.H.; Coetzer, T.L.; Palek, J.; Conboy, J.G.; Kan, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    Spectrin is an important structural component of the membrane skeleton that underlies and supports the erythrocyte plasma membrane. It is composed of nonidentical α (M/sub r/ 240,000) and β (M/sub r/ 220,000) subunits, each of which contains multiple homologous 106-amino acid segments. The authors report here the isolation and characterization of a human erythroid-specific β-spectrin cDNA clone that encodes parts of the β-9 through β-12 repeat segments. This cDNA was used as a hybridization probe to assign the β-spectrin gene to human chromosome 14 and to begin molecular analysis of the gene and its mRNA transcripts. RNA transfer blot analysis showed that the reticulocyte β-spectrin mRNA is 7.8 kilobases in length. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA revealed the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) within the β-spectrin gene locus. The isolation of human spectrin cDNA probes and the identification of closely linked RFLPs will facilitate analysis of mutant spectrin genes causing congenital hemolytic anemias associated with quantitative and qualitative spectrin abnormalities

  15. Cloning and sequencing of the cDNA encoding a core protein of the paired helical filament of Alzheimer's disease: Identification as the microtubule-associated protein tau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, M.; Wischik, C.M.; Crowther, R.A.; Walker, J.E.; Klug, A.

    1988-01-01

    Screening of cDNA libraries prepared from the frontal cortex of an Alzheimer's disease patient and from fetal human brain has led to isolation of the cDNA for a core protein of the paired helical filament of Alzheimer's disease. The partial amino acid sequence of this core protein was used to design synthetic oligonucleotide probes. The cDNA encodes a protein of 352 amino acids that contains a characteristic amino acid repeat in its carboxyl-terminal half. This protein is highly homologous to the sequence of the mouse microtubule-associated protein tau and thus constitutes the human equivalent of mouse tau. RNA blot analysis indicates the presence of two major transcripts, 6 and 2 kilobases long, with a wide distribution in normal human brain. Tau protein mRNAs were found in normal amounts in the frontal cortex from patients with Alzheimer's disease. The proof that at least part of tau protein forms a component of the paired helical filament core opens the way to understanding the mode of formation of paired helical filaments and thus, ultimately, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

  16. α/sub i/-3 cDNA encodes the α subunit of G/sub k/, the stimulatory G protein of receptor-regulated K+ channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codina, J.; Olate, J.; Abramowitz, J.; Mattera, R.; Cook, R.G.; Birnbaumer, L.

    1988-01-01

    cDNA cloning has identified the presence in the human genome of three genes encoding α subunits of pertussis toxin substrates, generically called G/sub i/. They are named α/sub i/-1, α/sub i/-2 and α/sub i/-3. However, none of these genes has been functionally identified with any of the α subunits of several possible G proteins, including pertussis toxin-sensitive G/sub p/'s, stimulatory to phospholipase C or A 2 , G/sub i/, inhibitory to adenylyl cyclase, or G/sub k/, stimulatory to a type of K + channels. The authors now report the nucleotide sequence and the complete predicted amino acid sequence of human liver α/sub i/-3 and the partial amino acid sequence of proteolytic fragments of the α subunit of human erythrocyte G/sub k/. The amino acid sequence of the proteolytic fragment is uniquely encoded by the cDNA of α/sub i/-3, thus identifying it as α/sub k/. The probable identity of α/sub i/-1 with α/sub p/ and possible roles for α/sub i/-2, as well as additional roles for α/sub i/-1 and α/sub i/-3 (α/sub k/) are discussed

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of the full-length cDNA encoding the tree shrew (tupaia belangeri) CD28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyan; Yan, Yan; Wang, Sha; Wang, Qinying; Shi, Jian; Shao, Zhanshe; Dai, Jiejie

    2017-11-01

    CD28 is one of the most important co-stimulatory molecules expressed by naive and primed T cells. The tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri), as an ideal animal model for analyzing mechanism of human diseases receiving extensive attentions, demands essential research tools, in particular in the study of cellular markers and monoclonal antibodies for immunological studies. However, little is known about tree shrew CD28 (tsCD28) until now. In this study, a 663 bp of the full-length CD28 cDNA, encoding a polypeptide of 220 amino acids was cloned from tree shrew spleen lymphocytes. The nucleotide sequence of the tsCD28 showed 85%, 76%, and 75% similarities with human, rat, and mouse, respectively, which showed the affinity relationship between tree shrew and human is much closer than between human and rodents. The open reading frame (ORF) sequence of tsCD28 gene was predicted to be in correspondence with the signal sequence, immunoglobulin variable-like (IgV) domain, transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail, respectively.We also analyzed its molecular characteristics with other mammals by using biology software such as Clustal W 2.0 and so forth. Our results showed that tsCD28 contained many features conserved in CD28 genes from other mammals, including conserved signal peptide and glycosylation sites, and several residues responsible for binding to the CD28R, and the tsCD28 amino acid sequence were found a close genetic relationship with human and monkey. The crystal structure and surface charge revealed most regions of tree shrew CD28 molecule surface charges are similar as human. However, compared with human CD28 (hCD28) regions, in some areas, the surface positive charge of tsCD28 was less than hCD28, which may affect antibody binding. The present study is the first report of cloning and characterization of CD28 in tree shrew. This study provides a theoretical basis for the further study the structure and function of tree shrew CD28 and utilize tree shrew as an effective

  18. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of cDNA vaccine encoded antigens by modulation of antigen processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Marit de Groot, A; Andersen, Peter; Ovaa, Huib; Kloetzel, Peter M; Mishto, Michele; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2016-01-01

    Most vaccines are based on protective humoral responses while for intracellular pathogens CD8(+) T cells are regularly needed to provide protection. However, poor processing efficiency of antigens is often a limiting factor in CD8(+) T cell priming, hampering vaccine efficacy. The multistage cDNA

  19. cDNA clone for the alpha-chain of human beta-hexosaminidase: deficiency of alpha-chain mRNA in Ashkenazi Tay-Sachs fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Myerowitz, R; Proia, R L

    1984-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone containing sequences complementary to mRNA encoding the alpha-chain of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase. RNA from a human lung fibroblast strain, IMR90, was enriched for beta-hexosaminidase messenger by polysome immunoselection with antiserum against beta-hexosaminidase A. This preparation was used to construct cDNA recombinant plasmids by the Okayama-Berg vector primer procedure. After transformation of Escherichia coli, 385 ampicillin-resistant colonies...

  20. Characterization of the cDNA encoding bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, osteocalcin and two forms of the protein isolated from bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Yoshiko; Tabata, Shiro; Yamaguchi, Minoru; Ohgushi, Hajime; Yonemasu, Kunio

    2004-07-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding osteocalcin from the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana (bone Gla-protein, BGP) has been isolated, and the complete coding sequence for the 100-amino-acid pre-pro-osteocalcin protein was determined. The amino acid sequence of Rana catesbeiana osteocalcin, especially the mature 49-amino acid sequence, is closer to the mammalian than to the fish, Sparus osteocalcin. Rana mature osteocalcin has a similarity of 67% with human or 59% with rat osteocalcin, and only 42% with fish mature osteocalcin. The 51-amino-acid pre-pro-peptide contains the expected hydrophobic leader sequence and the dibasic Arg-Arg sequence preceding the NH2-terminal Ser of the mature 49-amino-acid Rana osteocalcin. The pro-peptide sequence also contains the expected motif of polar and hydrophobic residues, which targets vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylation of three specific Glu residues at positions 17, 21, and 24 in the mature protein. At the native protein expression levels, extraction from Rana cortical bone in the presence of protease inhibitor cocktail resulted in the isolation of two distinct forms of osteocalcin, P-1 and P-2, with a 3:2 distribution. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and amino acid sequence analysis of the N-terminal domain, we confirmed that P-1 is the intact 49-residue osteocalcin with N-terminal SNLRNAVFG., and that P-2 lacks four amino acids from the N-terminus, (NAVFG.). These results demonstrate the existence of a form of osteocalcin lacking four N-terminal amino acids in Rana bone, and that mature Rana osteocalcins remained highly conserved in their molecular evolution, especially with respect to the conservation of the C-terminal domain (residues 14-49).

  1. Nucleotide sequence of cloned cDNA for human sphingolipid activator protein 1 precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewji, N.N.; Wenger, D.A.; O'Brien, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Two cDNA clones encoding prepro-sphingolipid activator protein 1 (SAP-1) were isolated from a λ gt11 human hepatoma expression library using polyclonal antibodies. These had inserts of ≅ 2 kilobases (λ-S-1.2 and λ-S-1.3) and both were both homologous with a previously isolated clone (λ-S-1.1) for mature SAP-1. The authors report here the nucleotide sequence of the longer two EcoRI fragments of S-1.2 and S-1.3 that were not the same and the derived amino acid sequences of mature SAP-1 and its prepro form. The open reading frame encodes 19 amino acids, which are colinear with the amino-terminal sequence of mature SAP-1, and extends far beyond the predicted carboxyl terminus of mature SAP-1, indicating extensive carboxyl-terminal processing. The nucleotide sequence of cDNA encoding prepro-SAP-1 includes 1449 bases from the assigned initiation codon ATG at base-pair 472 to the stop codon TGA at base-pair 1921. The first 23 amino acids coded after the initiation ATG are characteristic of a signal peptide. The calculated molecular mass for a polypeptide encoded by 1449 bases is ≅ 53 kDa, in keeping with the reported value for pro-SAP-1. The data indicate that after removal of the signal peptide mature SAP-1 is generated by removing an additional 7 amino acids from the amino terminus and ≅ 373 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus. One potential glycosylation site was previously found in mature SAP-1. Three additional potential glycosylation sites are present in the processed carboxyl-terminal polypeptide, which they designate as P-2

  2. [Construction and Identification of the cDNA Expression Library for Human Esophageal Cancer Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Wu, Xiang-Yu; Feng, Lu; Huang, Shang-Ke; Luo, Min-Na; Shao, Shan; Zhao, Xin-Han

    2016-09-01

    To construct a cDNA phage expression library for human esophageal cancer cells. After the total RNA were obtained from esophageal cancer cells, the mRNA were separated with magnetic beads adsorption method, and the single-strand and double-strand cDNA were synthesized through reverse transcription. With the undesirable cDNA fragments removed, the remaining cDNA (linked with Eco R1 aptamer and phosphorylated its 5'end) combined with the carrier of T7 Select10-3b. The recombinant phage were packaged in vitro for preliminary cDNA library. PCR was used to identify the size of inserted cDNA. The constructed original cDNA phage expression library for human esophageal cancer cells was consisted of 2.01×10⁶ pfu/mL bacteriophages with a recombination rate of 100%. The length of the inserted cDNA fragments were range from 300 bp to 1 500 bp. The cDNA phage expression library of human esophageal cell is successfully constructed to meet the currently recognized standards, and can be well used to screen cDNA-cloned genes of human esophageal cancer antigens by serological analysis of recombinantly expressed cDNA clone (SEREX).

  3. Isolation and characterization of full-length cDNA clones coding for cholinesterase from fetal human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prody, C.A.; Zevin-Sonkin, D.; Gnatt, A.; Goldberg, O.; Soreq, H.

    1987-01-01

    To study the primary structure and regulation of human cholinesterases, oligodeoxynucleotide probes were prepared according to a consensus peptide sequence present in the active site of both human serum pseudocholinesterase and Torpedo electric organ true acetylcholinesterase. Using these probes, the authors isolated several cDNA clones from λgt10 libraries of fetal brain and liver origins. These include 2.4-kilobase cDNA clones that code for a polypeptide containing a putative signal peptide and the N-terminal, active site, and C-terminal peptides of human BtChoEase, suggesting that they code either for BtChoEase itself or for a very similar but distinct fetal form of cholinesterase. In RNA blots of poly(A) + RNA from the cholinesterase-producing fetal brain and liver, these cDNAs hybridized with a single 2.5-kilobase band. Blot hybridization to human genomic DNA revealed that these fetal BtChoEase cDNA clones hybridize with DNA fragments of the total length of 17.5 kilobases, and signal intensities indicated that these sequences are not present in many copies. Both the cDNA-encoded protein and its nucleotide sequence display striking homology to parallel sequences published for Torpedo AcChoEase. These finding demonstrate extensive homologies between the fetal BtChoEase encoded by these clones and other cholinesterases of various forms and species

  4. Molecular characterization of a cDNA encoding copper/zinc superoxide dismutase from cultured cells of Manihot esculenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung-Yong; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kwon, Soon-Tae; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2005-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) cDNA, mSOD2, encoding cytosolic copper/zinc SOD (CuZnSOD) cDNA was isolated from suspension-cultured cells of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by cDNA library screening, and its expression was investigated in relation to environmental stress. mSOD2 is 774 bp in length with an open reading frame (ORF) of 152 amino acids, corresponding to a protein of predicted molecular mass 15 kDa and a pI of 5.22. One copy of the mSOD2 gene was found to be present in the cassava genome by Southern analysis using an mSOD2 cDNA-specific probe. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed diverse expression patterns for the mSOD2 gene in various tissues of intact cassava plants, at various stages of the growth in suspension cultures, and in the leaf tissues exposed to different stresses. The mSOD2 gene was highly expressed in suspension-cultured cells and in the stems of intact plants. However, it was expressed at low levels in leaves and roots. During suspension cell growth, the mSOD2 transcript progressively increased during culture. Moreover, the mSOD2 gene in excised cassava leaves responded to various stresses in different ways. In particular, it was highly induced in leaf tissue by several abiotic stresses, including high temperature (37 degrees C), chilling (4 degrees C), methyl viologen (MV) exposure, and wounding treatment. These results indicate that the mSOD2 gene is involved in the antioxidative process triggered by oxidative stress induced by environmental change.

  5. Characterization of a cDNA encoding a 34-kDa Purkinje neuron protein recognized by sera from patients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furneaux, H.M.; Dropcho, E.J.; Barbut, D.; Chen, Yaotseng; Rosenblum, M.K.; Old, L.J.; Posner, J.B. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is a neurological disorder of unknown cause occurring in patients with an identified or occult cancer. An autoimmune etiology is likely since autoantibodies directed against the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum have been found in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of some patients. Two Purkinje cell-specific antigens are recognized by these autoantibodies, a major antigen of 62 kDa (CDR 62, cerebellar degeneration-related 62-kDa protein) and a minor antigen of 34 kDa (CDR 34). Previous studies have described the isolation and characterization of a human cerebellar cDNA that encodes an epitope recognized by sera from patients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. The authors have now established by two independent methods that this gene is uniquely expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and corresponds to the minor antigen CDR 34. This antigen is also expressed in tumor tissue from a patient with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

  6. Isolation of a cDNA encoding a CHH-family peptide from the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, H; Nagasawa, H; Watanabe, T

    2000-05-01

    The crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) peptide family includes four types of neuropeptide in decapod and isopod crustaceans, and the ion-transport peptide in orthopteran insects. To identify a new member of this family in Insecta, a PCR-based search for cDNAs encoding CHH-family peptides was carried out in the silkworm Bombyx mori. A cDNA, named BmCHHL (Bombyx mori CHH-like protein), with an open reading frame of 110 amino acids was isolated. Sequence analyses suggested that the conceptual protein was a precursor of a peptide of 72 amino acids which was amidated at the carboxy terminus. The BmCHHL sequence exhibited significant similarities to members of the CHH family including the orthopteran ion-transport peptide. BmCHHL expression was detected in five or six cells (per hemisphere) in the frontal area of the brain in day 4 fifth instar larvae.

  7. [Cloning and functional characterization of a cDNA encoding isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase involved in taxol biosynthesis in Taxus media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tian; Qiu, Fei; Chen, Min; Lan, Xiao-zhong; Liao, Zhi-hua

    2015-05-01

    Taxol is one of the most potent anti-cancer agents, which is extracted from the plants of Taxus species. Isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IPI) catalyzes the reversible transformation between IPP and DMAPP, both of which are the general 5-carbon precursors for taxol biosynthesis. In the present study, a new gene encoding IPI was cloned from Taxus media (namely TmIPI with the GenBank Accession Number KP970677) for the first time. The full-length cDNA of TmIPI was 1 232 bps encoding a polypeptide with 233 amino acids, in which the conserved domain Nudix was found. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the sequence of TmIPI was highly similar to those of other plant IPI proteins, and the phylogenetic analysis showed that there were two clades of plant IPI proteins, including IPIs of angiosperm plants and IPIs of gymnosperm plants. TmIPI belonged to the clade of gymnosperm plant IPIs, and this was consistent with the fact that Taxus media is a plant species of gymnosperm. Southern blotting analysis demonstrated that there was a gene family of IPI in Taxus media. Finally, functional verification was applied to identify the function of TmIPI. The results showed that biosynthesis of β-carotenoid was enhanced by overexpressing TmIPI in the engineered E. coli strain, and this suggested that TmIPI might be a key gene involved in isoprenoid/terpenoid biosynthesis.

  8. Cloning of human purine-nucleoside phosphorylase cDNA sequences by complementation in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, J M; Caput, D; Williams, S R; Martin, D W

    1983-01-01

    We have obtained cDNA clones that contain the entire coding region of the human purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP; EC 2.4.2.1) mRNA. The cDNA sequences were generated by reverse transcription of PNP-enriched mRNA obtained by immunoadsorption of HeLa cell polyribosomes with monospecific antibody to human PNP. cDNA molecules that were close in length to PNP mRNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and inserted into the Pst I site of the plasmid pBR322. Plasmid DNA from the pooled c...

  9. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a full-length cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Shihfeng; Bishop, D.F.; Desnick, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, is responsible for conversion of the linear tetrapyrrole, hydroxymethylbilane, to the cyclic tetrapyrrole, uroporphyrinogen III. The deficient activity of URO-synthase is the enzymatic defect in the autosomal recessive disorder congenital erythropoietic porphyria. To facilitate the isolation of a full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase, the human erythrocyte enzyme was purified to homogeneity and 81 nonoverlapping amino acids were determined by microsequencing the N terminus and four tryptic peptides. Two synthetic oligonucleotide mixtures were used to screen 1.2 x 10 6 recombinants from a human adult liver cDNA library. Eight clones were positive with both oligonucleotide mixtures. Of these, dideoxy sequencing of the 1.3 kilobase insert from clone pUROS-2 revealed 5' and 3' untranslated sequences of 196 and 284 base pairs, respectively, and an open reading frame of 798 base pairs encoding a protein of 265 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 28,607 Da. The isolation and expression of this full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase should facilitate studies of the structure, organization, and chromosomal localization of this heme biosynthetic gene as well as the characterization of the molecular lesions causing congenital erythropoietic porphyria

  10. cDNA cloning of human DNA topoisomerase I. Catalytic activity of a 67.7-kDa carboxyl-terminal fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Arpa, P.; Machlin, P.S.; Ratrie, H. III; Rothfield, N.F.; Cleveland, D.W.; Earnshaw, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human topoisomerase I were isolated from an expression vector library (λgt11) screened with autoimmune anti-topoisomerase I serum. One of these clones has been expressed as a fusion protein comprised of a 32-kDa fragment of the bacterial TrpE protein linked to 67.7 kDa of protein encoded by the cDNA. Three lines of evidence indicate that the cloned cDNA encodes topoisomerase I. (i) Proteolysis maps of the fusion protein and human nuclear topoisomerase I are essentially identical. (ii) The fusion protein relaxes supercoiled DNA, an activity that can be immunoprecipitated by anti-topoisomerase I serum. (iii) Sequence analysis has revealed that the longest cDNA clone (3645 base pairs) encodes a protein of 765 amino acids that shares 42% identity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae topoisomerase I. The sequence data also show that the catalytically active 67.7-kDa fragment is comprised of the carboxyl terminus

  11. Construction and analysis of SSH cDNA library of human vascular endothelial cells related to gastrocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yong-Bo; Wei, Zhao-Xia; Li, Li; Li, Hang-Sheng; Chen, Hui; Li, Xiao-Wen

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct subtracted cDNA libraries of human vascular endothelial cells (VECs) related to gastrocarcinoma using suppression substractive hybridization (SSH) and to analyze cDNA libraries of gastrocarcinoma and VECs in Cancer Gene Anatomy Project (CGAP) database.

  12. Human platelet/erythroleukemia cell prostaglandin G/H synthase: cDNA cloning, expression, and gene chromosomal assignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, C.D.; Funk, L.B.; Kennedy, M.E.; Pong, A.S.; Fitzgerald, G.A. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Platelets metabolize arachidonic acid to thromboxane A{sub 2}, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor compound. The first step of this transformation is catalyzed by prostaglandin (PG) G/H synthase, a target site for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We have isolated the cDNA for both human platelet and human erythroleukemia cell PGG/H synthase using the polymerase chain reaction and conventional screening procedures. The cDNA encoding the full-length protein was expressed in COS-M6 cells. Microsomal fractions from transfected cells produced prostaglandin endoperoxide derived products which were inhibited by indomethacin and aspirin. Mutagenesis of the serine residue at position 529, the putative aspirin acetylation site, to an asparagine reduced cyclooxygenase activity to barely detectable levels, an effect observed previously with the expressed sheep vesicular gland enzyme. Platelet-derived growth factor and phorbol ester differentially regulated the expression of PGG/H synthase mRNA levels in the megakaryocytic/platelet-like HEL cell line. The PGG/H synthase gene was assigned to chromosome 9 by analysis of a human-hamster somatic hybrid DNA panel. The availability of platelet PGG/H synthase cDNA should enhance our understanding of the important structure/function domains of this protein and it gene regulation.

  13. Molecular cloning of growth hormone encoding cDNA of Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    analysed by FastA module of the GCG package (Genetics. Computers Group, version 9⋅2, Wisconsin University, ..... their genetic relation being only 96–98%, in terms of GH protein sequences. Due to its importance in ... the GH of salmon and seabream contain a Ser and Asn at position 123, but the human GH contains a ...

  14. Molecular cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding a hybrid histidine kinase receptor in tropical periwinkle Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papon, N; Bremer, J; Vansiri, A; Glévarec, G; Rideau, M; Creche, J

    2006-09-01

    Signalling pathways involving histidine kinase receptors (HKRs) are widely used by prokaryotes and fungi to regulate a large palette of biological processes. In plants, HKRs are known to be implicated in cytokinin, ethylene, and osmosensing transduction pathways. In this work, a full length cDNA named CRCIK was isolated from the tropical species CATHARANTHUS ROSEUS (L.) G. Don. It encodes a 1205 amino acid protein that belongs to the hybrid HKR family. The deduced amino acid sequence shows the highest homology with AtHK1, an osmosensing HKR in ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA. In return, CrCIK protein shares very low identity with the other 10 ARABIDOPSIS HKRs. Southern blot analysis indicates that the CRCIK corresponding gene is either present in multiple copies or has very close homologues in the genome of the tropical periwinkle. The gene is widely expressed in the plant. In C. ROSEUS C20D cell suspension, it is slightly induced after exposure to low temperature, pointing to a putative role in cold-shock signal transduction.

  15. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  16. Construction of a T7 Human Lung Cancer cDNA Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao YUE

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Currently, only a limited numbers of tumor markers for non small lung cancer (NSCLC diagnosis, new biomarker, such as serum autoantibody may improve the early detection of lung cancer. Our objective is construction human lung squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma T7 phage display cDNA library from the tissues of NSCLC patients. Methods mRNA was isolated from a pool of total RNA extract from NSCLC tissues obtained from 5 adenocarcinomas and 5 squamous carcinomas, and then mRNA was reverse transcribed into double stranded cDNA. After digestion, the cDNA was inserted into T7Select 10-3 vector. The phage display cDNA library was constructed by package reaction in vitro and plate proliferation. Plaque assay and PCR were used to evaluate the library.Results Two T7 phage display cDNA library were established. Plaque assay show the titer of lung squamas carcinoma library was 1.8×106 pfu, and the adenocarcinoma library was 5×106 pfu. The phage titer of the amplified library were 3.2×1010 pfu/mL and 2.5×1010 pfu/mL. PCR amplification of random plaque show insert ratio were 100% (24/24 in adenocarcinoma library and 95.8% in human lung squamas carcinoma library (23/24. Insert range from 300 bp to 1 500 bp. Conclusion Two phage display cDNA library from NSCLC were constructed.

  17. [Construction of a yeast two-hybrid cDNA library from the human testis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Lu-Ping; Jia, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2012-04-01

    To construct a human testis cDNA library for yeast two-hybrid screening. Human normal testis mRNA was purified from total RNA, and ds cDNA was synthesized and amplified using primers SMART III and CDS III oligo (dT) as the base of recombination. The purified PCR products and linearized plasmid pGADT7-Rec were co-transformed into the competent yeast Y187 and recombined by yeast homologous recombinase in the yeast cells to form an active cyclic plasmid. All the clones growing on the SD/-Leu plates were harvested to constitute a human testis cDNA library. We constructed a human testis cDNA library with high multiplication and adequate capacity, from which 2.0 x 10(6) recombinants were obtained. The amplified PCR fragments were between 0.3 kb and 4.0 kb in length. The yeast two-hybrid cDNA library of human testis was successfully constructed by the Clontech SMART method, which has prepared a ground for further studies on the molecular mechanism of spermatogenesis.

  18. RNAi suppressors encoded by pathogenic human viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Walter; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    RNA silencing or RNAi interference (RNAi) serves as an innate antiviral mechanism in plants, fungi and animals. Human viruses, like plant viruses, encode suppressor proteins or RNAs that block or modulate the RNAi pathway. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which pathogenic human viruses

  19. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of cDNA for human β-glucuronidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, A.; Kyle, J.W.; Miller, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report here the cDNA sequence for human placental β-glucuronidase (β-D-glucuronoside glucuronosohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.31) and demonstrate expression of the human enzyme in transfected COS cells. They also sequenced a partial cDNA clone from human fibroblasts that contained a 153-base-pair deletion within the coding sequence and found a second type of cDNA clone from placenta that contained the same deletion. Nuclease S1 mapping studies demonstrated two types of mRNAs in human placenta that corresponded to the two types of cDNA clones isolated. The NH 2 -terminal amino acid sequence determined for human spleen β-glucuronidase agreed with that inferred from the DNA sequence of the two placental clones, beginning at amino acid 23, suggesting a cleaved signal sequence of 22 amino acids. When transfected into COS cells, plasmids containing either placental clone expressed an immunoprecipitable protein that contained N-linked oligosaccharides as evidenced by sensitivity to endoglycosidase F. However, only transfection with the clone containing the 153-base-pair segment led to expression of human β-glucuronidase activity. These studies provide the sequence for the full-length cDNA for human β-glucuronidase, demonstrate the existence of two populations of mRNA for β-glucuronidase in human placenta, only one of which specifies a catalytically active enzyme, and illustrate the importance of expression studies in verifying that a cDNA is functionally full-length

  20. Isolation of cDNA clones coding for human tissue factor: primary structure of the protein and cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, E.K.; Horton, R.; Bloem, L.

    1987-01-01

    Tissue factor is a membrane-bound procoagulant protein that activates the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation in the presence of factor VII and calcium. λ Phage containing the tissue factor gene were isolated from a human placental cDNA library. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the cDNAs indicates that tissue factor is synthesized as a higher molecular weight precursor with a leader sequence of 32 amino acids, while the mature protein is a single polypeptide chain composed of 263 residues. The derived primary structure of tissue factor has been confirmed by comparison to protein and peptide sequence data. The sequence of the mature protein suggests that there are three distinct domains: extracellular, residues 1-219; hydrophobic, residues 220-242; and cytoplasmic, residues 243-263. Three potential N-linked carbohydrate attachment sites occur in the extracellular domain. The amino acid sequence of tissue factor shows no significant homology with the vitamin K-dependent serine proteases, coagulation cofactors, or any other protein in the National Biomedical Research Foundation sequence data bank (Washington, DC)

  1. A bovine cDNA and a yeast gene (VMA8) encoding the subunit D of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, H; Mandiyan, S; Nelson, N

    1995-01-01

    Subunit D of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) from bovine chromaffin granules was subjected to partial proteolysis and amino acid sequencing. A cDNA encoding this subunit was isolated and sequenced. The predicted open reading frame encodes a protein of 247 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 28,336. Northern blot analysis revealed an mRNA distribution with higher transcript amounts in tissues that are active in secretion. A homologous gene was identified as open reading frame 11 ...

  2. Recovery of avian metapneumovirus subgroup C from cDNA: cross-recognition of avian and human metapneumovirus support proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Buchholz, Ursula J; Samal, Siba K

    2006-06-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) causes an acute respiratory disease in turkeys and is associated with "swollen head syndrome" in chickens, contributing to significant economic losses for the U.S. poultry industry. With a long-term goal of developing a better vaccine for controlling AMPV in the United States, we established a reverse genetics system to produce infectious AMPV of subgroup C entirely from cDNA. A cDNA clone encoding the entire 14,150-nucleotide genome of AMPV subgroup C strain Colorado (AMPV/CO) was generated by assembling five cDNA fragments between the T7 RNA polymerase promoter and the autocatalytic hepatitis delta virus ribozyme of a transcription plasmid, pBR 322. Transfection of this plasmid, along with the expression plasmids encoding the N, P, M2-1, and L proteins of AMPV/CO, into cells stably expressing T7 RNA polymerase resulted in the recovery of infectious AMPV/CO. Characterization of the recombinant AMPV/CO showed that its growth properties in tissue culture were similar to those of the parental virus. The potential of AMPV/CO to serve as a viral vector was also assessed by generating another recombinant virus, rAMPV/CO-GFP, that expressed the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a foreign protein. Interestingly, GFP-expressing AMPV and GFP-expressing human metapneumovirus (HMPV) could be recovered using the support plasmids of either virus, denoting that the genome promoters are conserved between the two metapneumoviruses and can be cross-recognized by the polymerase complex proteins of either virus. These results indicate a close functional relationship between AMPV/CO and HMPV.

  3. [Construction and characterization of a cDNA library from human liver tissue of cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-hong; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Feng; Zhu, Hai-hong; Zhou, Hong-juan; Yao, Hang-ping

    2005-03-01

    To construct a cDNA library from human liver tissue of cirrhosis. The total RNA from human liver tissue of cirrhosis was extracted using Trizol method, and the mRNA was purified using mRNA purification kit. SMART technique and CDSIII/3' primer were used for first-strand cDNA synthesis. Long distance PCR was then used to synthesize the double-strand cDNA that was then digested by proteinase K and Sfi I, and was fractionated by CHOMA SPIN-400 column. The cDNA fragments longer than 0.4 kb were collected and ligated to lambdaTripl Ex2 vector. Then lambda-phage packaging reaction and library amplification were performed. The qualities of both unamplified and amplified cDNA libraries was strictly checked by conventional titer determination. Eleven plaques were randomly picked and tested using PCR with universal primers derived from the sequence flanking the vector. The titers of unamplifed and amplified libraries were 1.03 x 10(6) pfu/ml and 1.36 x 10(9) pfu/ml respectively. The percentages of recombinants from both libraries were 97.24 % in unamplified library and 99.02 % in amplified library. The lengths of the inserts were 1.02 kb in average (36.36 % 1 approximately equals 2 kb and 63.64 % 0.5 approximately equals 1.0 kb). A high quality cDNA library from human liver tissue of cirrhosis was constructed successfully, which can be used for screening and cloning new special genes associated with the occurrence of cirrhosis.

  4. Nucleotide sequence of Phaseolus vulgaris L. alcohol dehydrogenase encoding cDNA and three-dimensional structure prediction of the deduced protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelia, Kassim; Khor, Chin Yin; Shah, Farida Habib; Bhore, Subhash J

    2015-01-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are widely consumed as a source of proteins and natural products. However, its yield needs to be increased. In line with the agenda of Phaseomics (an international consortium), work of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) generation from bean pods was initiated. Altogether, 5972 ESTs have been isolated. Alcohol dehydrogenase (AD) encoding gene cDNA was a noticeable transcript among the generated ESTs. This AD is an important enzyme; therefore, to understand more about it this study was undertaken. The objective of this study was to elucidate P. vulgaris L. AD (PvAD) gene cDNA sequence and to predict the three-dimensional (3D) structure of deduced protein. positive and negative strands of the PvAD cDNA clone were sequenced using M13 forward and M13 reverse primers to elucidate the nucleotide sequence. Deduced PvAD cDNA and protein sequence was analyzed for their basic features using online bioinformatics tools. Sequence comparison was carried out using bl2seq program, and tree-view program was used to construct a phylogenetic tree. The secondary structures and 3D structure of PvAD protein were predicted by using the PHYRE automatic fold recognition server. The sequencing results analysis showed that PvAD cDNA is 1294 bp in length. It's open reading frame encodes for a protein that contains 371 amino acids. Deduced protein sequence analysis showed the presence of putative substrate binding, catalytic Zn binding, and NAD binding sites. Results indicate that the predicted 3D structure of PvAD protein is analogous to the experimentally determined crystal structure of s-nitrosoglutathione reductase from an Arabidopsis species. The 1294 bp long PvAD cDNA encodes for 371 amino acid long protein that contains conserved domains required for biological functions of AD. The predicted deduced PvAD protein's 3D structure reflects the analogy with the crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana s-nitrosoglutathione reductase. Further study is required

  5. Construction of equalized short hairpin RNA library from human brain cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Jingqi; Liu, Li; Lu, Lixia; Gao, Jingxia; Li, Xueli

    2007-02-20

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) library is a powerful new tool for high-throughput loss-of-function genetic screens in mammalian cells. An shRNA library can be constructed from synthetic oligonucleotides or enzymatically cleaved natural cDNA. Here, we describe a new method for constructing equalized shRNA libraries from cDNA. First, enzymatically digested cDNA fragments are equalized by a suppression PCR-based method modified from suppression subtractive hybridization. The efficiency of equalization was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. The fragments are then converted into an shRNA library by a series of enzymatic treatments. With this new technology, we constructed a library from human brain cDNA. Sequence analysis showed that most of the randomly selected clones had inverted repeat sequences converted from different cDNA. After transfecting HEK 293T cells and detecting gene expression, three out of eight clones were demonstrated to significantly inhibit their target genes.

  6. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250...

  7. cDNA sequence of the long mRNA for human glutamine synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoff, M. J.; Geerts, W. J.; Das, A. T.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    Screening a human liver cDNA library in lambda ZAP revealed several clones for the mRNA of glutamine synthase. The longest clone was completely sequenced and consists of a 109 bp 5' untranslated region, a 1119 bp protein coding region, a 1498 bp 3' untranslated region and a poly(A) tract of 12 bp

  8. Construction and characterization of a cDNA library from human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tumor-suppressor gene p53 and its downstream genes consist of a complicated gene network, and the challenge to understand the network is to identify p53 downstream genes. In order to isolate and identify new p53 regulated genes, we constructed and characterized a normalized cDNA library from human brain ...

  9. GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN CDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN cDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSESB.S. Pukazhenthi1, J. C. Rockett2, M. Ouyang3, D.J. Dix2, J.G. Howard1, P. Georgopoulos4, W.J. J. Welsh3 and D. E. Wildt11Department of Reproductiv...

  10. Radioactive cDNA microarray (II): Gene expression profiling of antidepressant treatment by human cDNA microarray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Rhee Hun; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Min Su; Shin, Kyung Ho; Choe, Jae Gol; Kim, Meyoung Kon

    2003-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in primary care, associated with impaired patient functioning and well-being. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a commonly prescribed antidepressant compound. Its action is primarily attributed to selective inhibition of the reuptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the central nervous system. Objectives ; the aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to determine the usefulness for investigation of the transcription profiles in depression patients, and (2) to assess the differences in gene expression profiles between positive response group and negative response groups by fluoxetine treatment. This study included 53 patients with major depression (26 in positive response group with antidepressant treatment, 27 in negative response group with antidepressant treatment), and 53 healthy controls. To examine the difference of gene expression profile in depression patients, radioactive complementary DNA microarrays were used to evaluate changes in the expression of 1,152 genes in total. Using 33p-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signaling. Gene transcription profiles were classified into several categories in accordance with the antidepressant gene-regulation. The gene profiles were significantly up-(22 genes) and down-(16 genes) regulated in the positive response group when compared to the control group. Also, in the negative response group, 35 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated when compared to the control group. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology

  11. Radioactive cDNA microarray (II): Gene expression profiling of antidepressant treatment by human cDNA microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Rhee Hun; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Min Su; Shin, Kyung Ho; Choe, Jae Gol; Kim, Meyoung Kon [College of Medicine, Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Major depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in primary care, associated with impaired patient functioning and well-being. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a commonly prescribed antidepressant compound. Its action is primarily attributed to selective inhibition of the reuptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the central nervous system. Objectives ; the aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to determine the usefulness for investigation of the transcription profiles in depression patients, and (2) to assess the differences in gene expression profiles between positive response group and negative response groups by fluoxetine treatment. This study included 53 patients with major depression (26 in positive response group with antidepressant treatment, 27 in negative response group with antidepressant treatment), and 53 healthy controls. To examine the difference of gene expression profile in depression patients, radioactive complementary DNA microarrays were used to evaluate changes in the expression of 1,152 genes in total. Using 33p-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signaling. Gene transcription profiles were classified into several categories in accordance with the antidepressant gene-regulation. The gene profiles were significantly up-(22 genes) and down-(16 genes) regulated in the positive response group when compared to the control group. Also, in the negative response group, 35 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated when compared to the control group. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology.

  12. Molecular cloning of a cDNA and chromosomal localization of a human theta-class glutathione S-transferase gene (GSTT2) to chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.L.; Baker, R.T.; Board, P.G. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)] [and others

    1995-01-20

    Until recently the Theta-class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were largely overlooked due to their low activity with the model substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and their failure to bind to immobilized glutathione affinity matrices. Little is known about the number of genes in this class. Recently, Pemble et al. reported the cDNA cloning of a human Theta-class GST, termed GSTT1. In this study, we describe the molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding a second human Theta-class GST (GSTT2) from a {lambda}gt11 human liver 5{prime}-stretch cDNA library. The encoded protein contains 244 amino acids and has 78.3% sequence identity with the rat subunit 12 and only 55.0% identity with human GSTT1. GSTT2 has been mapped to chromosome 22 by somatic cell hybrid analysis. The precise position of the gene was localized to subband 22q11.2 by in situ hybridization. The absence of other regions of hybridization suggests that there are no closely related sequences (e.g., reverse transcribed pseudogenes) scattered throughout the genome and that if there are closely related genes, they must be clustered near GSTT2. Southern blot analysis of human DNA digested with BamHI shows that the size of the GSTT2 gene is relatively small, as the coding sequence falls within a 3.6-kb BamHI fragment. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Molecular cloning of the cDNA encoding aspartate aminotransferase from bean root nodules and determination of its role in nodule nitrogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvente, Sonia; Camas, Alberto; Lara, Miguel

    2003-06-01

    A cDNA clone encoding aspartate aminotransferase (PVAAT-2) (EC 2.6.1.1) was isolated from the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris nodule cDNA library. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the full-length cDNA allowed its identification by comparison with sequence databases. The amino acid sequence of the bean PvAAT-2 showed high similarity with the AAT-2 isoforms described in other leguminous plants. The amino-terminal region of the PvAAT-2 contains a sequence, which shares common features of plastid transit peptides. Southern blot analysis showed that the PvAAT-2 clone is encoded by a single gene in the P. vulgaris genome. Analysis of the PvAAT-2 mRNA levels suggests that the expression of this gene is nodule enhanced. The PvAAT-2 transcript is more abundant in nodules with increased synthesis of amides and is down-regulated in conditions where ureides accumulate. When plants were supplemented with ureides or with amides, PvAAT-2 expression was reduced, while it was not affected when plants were treated with allopurinol, an inhibitor of ureide synthesis. On the other hand, the expression of asparagine synthetase (another enzyme involved in the synthesis of amides) is not affected either by ureides or amides. These data suggest a role for AAT-2 in the mechanism involved in the synthesis of nitrogen compounds in bean nodules.

  14. Cloning of a cDNA that encodes farnesyl diphosphate synthase and the blue-light-induced expression of the corresponding gene in the leaves of rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmiya, K; Iwasaki, T; Matsuoka, M; Miyao, M; Yamamoto, N

    1997-02-28

    A cDNA encoding farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), a key enzyme in isoprenoid biosynthesis, was isolated from a cDNA library constructed from mRNA that had been prepared from etiolated rice (Oriza sativa L. variety Nipponbare) seedlings after three hours of illumination by a subtraction method. The putative polypeptide deduced from the 1289 bp nucleotide sequence consisted of 353 amino acids and had a molecular mass of 40 676 Da. The predicted amino acid sequence exhibited high homology to those of FPPS from Arabidopsis (73% to type 1, 72% to type 2) and white lupin (74%). Southern blot analysis showed that the rice genome might contain only one gene for FPPS. The highest level of expression of the gene was demonstrated in leaves by RNA blot analysis. Moreover, light, in particular blue light, effectively enhanced expression of the gene.

  15. Molecular cloning and chromosome mapping of the human gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-Shimer, S.; Johnson, K.A.; Bruskin, A.; Green, N.R.; Hill, D.E.; Lawrence, J.B.; Johnson, C.

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of growth suppressor genes appears to play a major role in the malignant process. To assess whether protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatases function as growth suppressors, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone encoding human protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B for structural and functional characterization. The translation product deduced from the 1,305-nucleotide open reading frame predicts a protein containing 435 amino acids and having a molecular mass of 49,966 Da. The amino-terminal 321 amino acids deduced from the cDNA sequence are identical to the empirically determined sequence of protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B. A genomic clone has been isolated and used in an in situ hybridization to banded metaphase chromosomes to determine that the gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B maps as a single-copy gene to the long arm of chromosome 20 in the region q13.1-q13.2

  16. Molecular characterization of a cDNA encoding vitellogenin in the banana shrimp, Penaeus (Litopenaeus) merguiensis and sites of vitellogenin mRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiriyangkul, Pharima; Utarabhand, Prapaporn

    2006-04-01

    In order to determine the primary structure of banana shrimp, Penaeus merguiensis, vitellogenin (Vg), we previously purified vitellin (Vt) from the ovaries of vitellogenic females, and chemically analyzed the N-terminal amino acid sequence of its 78 kDa subunit. In this study, a cDNA from this species encoding Vg was cloned based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the major 78 kDa subunit of Vt and conserved sequences of Vg/Vt from other crustacean species. The complete nucleotide sequence of Vg cDNA was achieved by RT-PCR and 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approaches. The full-length Vg cDNA consisted of 7,961 nucleotides. The open reading frame of this cDNA encoding a precursor peptide was comprised of 2,586 amino acid residues, with a putative processing site, R-X-K/R-R, recognized by subtilisin-like endoproteases. The deduced amino acid sequence was obtained from the Vg cDNA and its amino acid composition showed a high similarity to that of purified Vt. The deduced primary structure, of P. merguiensis Vg was 91.4% identical to the Vg of Penaeus semisulcatus and was also related to the Vg sequences of six other crustacean species with identities that ranged from 86.9% to 36.6%. In addition, the amino acid sequences corresponding to the signal peptide, N-terminal region and C-terminal region of P. merguiensis Vg were almost identical to the same sequences of the seven other reported crustacean species. Results from RT-PCR analysis showed that Vg mRNA expression was present in both the ovary and hepatopancreas of vitellogenic females but was not detected in other tissues including muscle, heart, and intestine of females or in the hepatopancreas of mature males. These results indicate that the Vg gene may be expressed only by mature P. merguiensis females and that both the ovary and hepatopancreas are possible sites for Vg synthesis in this species of shrimp. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  18. Construction and analysis of SSH cDNA library of human vascular endothelial cells related to gastrocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Bo; Wei, Zhao-Xia; Li, Li; Li, Hang-Sheng; Chen, Hui; Li, Xiao-Wen

    2003-11-01

    To construct subtracted cDNA libraries of human vascular endothelial cells (VECs) related to gastrocarcinoma using suppression substractive hybridization (SSH) and to analyze cDNA libraries of gastrocarcinoma and VECs in Cancer Gene Anatomy Project (CGAP) database. Human VECs related to gastric adenocarcinoma and corresponding normal tissue were separated by magnetic beads coupled with antibody CD31 (Dynabeads CD31). A few amount of total RNA were synthesized and amplified by SMART PCR cDNA Synthesis Kit. Then, using SSH and T/A cloning techniques, cDNA fragments of differentially expressed genes in human VECs of gastric adenocarcinoma were inserted into JM109 bacteria. One hundred positive bacteria clones were randomly picked and identified by colony PCR method. To analyze cDNA libraries of gastrocarcinoma and VECs in CGAP database, the tools of Library Finder, cDNA xProfiler, Digital GENE Expression Displayer (DGED), and Digital Differential Display (DDD) were used. Forward and reverse subtraction cDNA libraries of human VECs related to gastrocarcinoma were constructed successfully with SSH and T/A cloning techniques. Analysis of CGAP database indicated that no appropriate library of VECs related to carcinoma was constructed. Construction of subtraction cDNA libraries of human VECs related to gastrocarcinoma was successful and necessary, which laid a foundation for screening and cloning new and specific genes of VECs related to gastrocarcinoma.

  19. Cloning and characterization of a novel human zinc finger gene, hKid3, from a C2H2-ZNF enriched human embryonic cDNA library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Li; Sun Chong; Qiu Hongling; Liu Hui; Shao Huanjie; Wang Jun; Li Wenxin

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the zinc finger genes involved in human embryonic development, we constructed a C 2 H 2 -ZNF enriched human embryonic cDNA library, from which a novel human gene named hKid3 was identified. The hKid3 cDNA encodes a 554 amino acid protein with an amino-terminal KRAB domain and 11 carboxyl-terminal C 2 H 2 zinc finger motifs. Northern blot analysis indicates that two hKid3 transcripts of 6 and 8.5 kb express in human fetal brain and kidney. The 6 kb transcript can also be detected in human adult brain, heart, and skeletal muscle while the 8.5 kb transcript appears to be embryo-specific. GFP-fused hKid3 protein is localized to nuclei and the ZF domain is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization. To explore the DNA-binding specificity of hKid3, an oligonucleotide library was selected by GST fusion protein of hKid3 ZF domain, and the consensus core sequence 5'-CCAC-3' was evaluated by competitive electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, The KRAB domain of hKid3 exhibits transcription repressor activity when tested in GAL4 fusion protein assay. These results indicate that hKid3 may function as a transcription repressor with regulated expression pattern during human development of brain and kidney

  20. Isolation of cDNA encoding a newly identified major allergenic protein of rye-grass pollen: intracellular targeting to the amyloplast.

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, M B; Hough, T; Theerakulpisut, P; Avjioglu, A; Davies, S; Smith, P M; Taylor, P; Simpson, R J; Ward, L D; McCluskey, J

    1991-01-01

    We have identified a major allergenic protein from rye-grass pollen, tentatively designated Lol pIb of 31kDa and with pI 9.0. A cDNA clone encoding Lol pIb has been isolated, sequenced, and characterized. Lol pIb is located mainly in the starch granules. This is a distinct allergen from Lol pI, which is located in the cytosol. Lol pIb is synthesized in pollen as a pre-allergen with a transit peptide targeting the allergen to amyloplasts. Epitope mapping of the fusion protein localized the IgE...

  1. Identification and Molecular Characterization of the cDNA Encoding Cucumis melo Allergen, Cuc m 3, a Plant Pathogenesis-Related Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Sankian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melon (Cucumis melo allergy is one of the most common food allergies, characterized by oral allergy syndrome. To date, two allergen molecules, Cuc m 1 and Cuc m 2, have been fully characterized in melon pulp, but there are few reports about the molecular characteristics of Cuc m 3. Methods:The Cuc m 3 cDNA has been characterized by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE, which revealed a 456 base-pair (bp fragment encoding a 151-amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 16.97 kDa, and identified 79 and 178 bp untranslated sequences at the 5′ and 3´ ends, respectively. Results: In silico analysis showed strong similarities between Cuc m 3 and other plant pathogen-related protein 1s from cucumber, grape, bell pepper, and tomato. Conclusion: Here we report the identification and characterization of the Cuc m 3 cDNA, which will be utilized for further analyses of structural and allergenic features of this allergen

  2. A single cDNA encodes two isoforms of stathmin, a developmentally regulated neuron-enriched phosphoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doye, V; Soubrier, F; Bauw, G; Boutterin, M C; Beretta, L; Koppel, J; Vandekerckhove, J; Sobel, A

    1989-07-25

    Stathmin, a 19-kDa neuron-enriched soluble phosphoprotein, has been recently proposed as an ubiquitous intracellular relay for the diverse extracellular signals regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and functions through various second messenger pathways (Sobel, A., Boutterin, M.C., Beretta, L., Chneiweiss, H., Doye, V., and peyro-Saint-Paul, H. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 3765-3772). Internal sequences of the protein from rat brain were determined after purification by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electrotransfer onto Immobilon, and in situ proteolysis. Oligonucleotide mixtures based on these sequences were used to clone a cDNA for stathmin from a rat PC12 cell lambda gt 10 library. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals partial homologies with the coiled coil structural regions of several intracellular matrix phosphoproteins. Using this cDNA as a probe, we show that the expression of stathmin mRNA parallels that of the protein during brain ontogenesis, reaching a maximum at the neonatal stage. In vitro translation of the derived cRNA yielded all the known molecular forms of stathmin, namely its alpha and beta isoforms in their unphosphorylated and phosphorylated states. Thus, a single cDNA codes for both biologically relevant isoforms of the protein, indicating that they differ by co- or post-translational modifications.

  3. Molecular cloning of the cDNA encoding follicle-stimulating hormone beta subunit of the Chinese soft-shell turtle Pelodiscus sinensis, and its gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jung-Tsun; Shen, San-Tai; Lin, Yao-Sung; Yu, John Yuh-Lin

    2005-04-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is a member of the pituitary glycoprotein hormone family. These hormones are composed of two dissimilar subunits, alpha and beta. Very little information is available regarding the nucleotide and amino acid sequence of FSHbeta in reptilian species. For better understanding of the phylogenetic diversity and evolution of FSH molecule, we have isolated and sequenced the complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the Chinese soft-shell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis, Family of Trionychidae) FSHbeta precursor molecule by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) methods. The cloned Chinese soft-shell turtle FSHbeta cDNA consists of 602-bp nucleotides, including 34-bp nucleotides of the 5'-untranslated region (UTR), 396-bp of the open reading frame, and 3'-UTR of 206-bp nucleotides. It encodes a 131-amino acid precursor molecule of FSHbeta subunit with a signal peptide of 20 amino acids followed by a mature protein of 111 amino acids. Twelve cysteine residues, forming six disulfide bonds within beta-subunit and two putative asparagine-linked glycosylation sites, are also conserved in the Chinese soft-shell turtle FSHbeta subunit. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Chinese soft-shell turtle FSHbeta shares identities of 97% with Reeves's turtle (Family of Bataguridae), 83-89% with birds, 61-70% with mammals, 63-66% with amphibians and 40-58% with fish. By contrast, when comparing the FSHbeta with the beta-subunits of the Chinese soft-shell turtle luteinizing hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone, the homologies are as low as 38 and 39%, respectively. A phylogenetic tree including reptilian species of FSHbeta subunits, is presented for the first time. Out of various tissues examined, FSHbeta mRNA was only expressed in the pituitary gland and can be up-regulated by gonadotropin-releasing hormone in pituitary tissue culture as estimated by fluorescence real-time PCR analysis.

  4. Characterization of the cDNA encoding a BPI/LBP homologue in venom gland of the hundred-pace snake Deinagkistrodon acutus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianrao HU, Mingfu CAO, Jiong Chen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI and LPS-binding protein (LBP play an important role in host defence. Current evidence shows that BPI/LBP may be widely existed in different cells and tissue types of animals. A full-length cDNA clone encoding a BPI/LBP homologue (dBPI, 1757bp in size, was characterized in venom gland of the hundred-pace snake Deinagkistrodon acutus. Its deduced amino acid sequence of 417 residues had 13.8%–21.5% identity to BPI like 1(BPIL1 and BPI like 3(BPIL3 of other animals. Conserved cysteine residues which are involved in disulfide bond formation between the final strand of the N-terminal beta sheet and the long alpha helix of BPI are identified as Cys146-Cys183 of dBPI. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the BPI/LBP homologues formed five large clusters and dBPI was in a large cluster including BPIL1 and BPIL3. dBPI mRNA shows a tissue specific expression in venom gland. This is the first study to identify the cDNA encoding BPI/LBP homologues from reptiles [Current Zoology 55 (5: –2009].

  5. Integrative annotation of 21,037 human genes validated by full-length cDNA clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Imanishi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The human genome sequence defines our inherent biological potential; the realization of the biology encoded therein requires knowledge of the function of each gene. Currently, our knowledge in this area is still limited. Several lines of investigation have been used to elucidate the structure and function of the genes in the human genome. Even so, gene prediction remains a difficult task, as the varieties of transcripts of a gene may vary to a great extent. We thus performed an exhaustive integrative characterization of 41,118 full-length cDNAs that capture the gene transcripts as complete functional cassettes, providing an unequivocal report of structural and functional diversity at the gene level. Our international collaboration has validated 21,037 human gene candidates by analysis of high-quality full-length cDNA clones through curation using unified criteria. This led to the identification of 5,155 new gene candidates. It also manifested the most reliable way to control the quality of the cDNA clones. We have developed a human gene database, called the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/. It provides the following: integrative annotation of human genes, description of gene structures, details of novel alternative splicing isoforms, non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, subcellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein three-dimensional structure, mapping of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, identification of polymorphic microsatellite repeats within human genes, and comparative results with mouse full-length cDNAs. The H-InvDB analysis has shown that up to 4% of the human genome sequence (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 34 assembly may contain misassembled or missing regions. We found that 6.5% of the human gene candidates (1,377 loci did not have a good protein-coding open reading frame, of which 296 loci are strong candidates for non-protein-coding RNA

  6. Human placental Na+, K+-ATPase α subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue expression, DNA polymorphism, and chromosomal localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, F.F.; Kan, Y.W.; Law, M.L.; Hartz, J.; Kao, F.T.; Blostein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A 2.2-kilobase clone comprising a major portion of the coding sequence of the Na + , K + -ATPase α subunit was cloned from human placenta and its sequence was identical to that encoding the α subunit of human kidney and HeLa cells. Transfer blot analysis of the mRNA products of the Na + , K + -ATPase gene from various human tissues and cell lines revealed only one band (≅ 4.7 kilobases) under low and high stringency washing conditions. The levels of expression in the tissues were intestine > placenta > liver > pancreas, and in the cell lines the levels were human erythroleukemia > butyrate-induced colon > colon > brain > HeLa cells. mRNA was undetectable in reticulocytes, consistent with the authors failure to detect positive clones in a size-selected ( > 2 kilobases) λgt11 reticulocyte cDNA library. DNA analysis revealed by a polymorphic EcoRI band and chromosome localization by flow sorting and in situ hybridization showed that the α subunit is on the short is on the short arm (band p11-p13) of chromosome 1

  7. Transcript level characterization of a cDNA encoding stress regulated NAC transcription factor in the mangrove plant Avicennia marina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, G; Sankararamasubramanian, H M; Narayanan, Jithesh M; Sivaprakash, K R; Parida, Ajay

    2008-10-01

    NAC transcription factors are a family of functionally diverse proteins responsive to biotic and abiotic stresses. A full-length cDNA isolated from the salt stressed mangrove plant Avicennia marina showed high sequence identity to NAC proteins induced upon biotic stress in tomato and potato. The predicted protein sequence had all the highly conserved sub domains characteristic of NAC domain containing proteins. Northern analysis for AmNAC1 expression under tolerable (250 mM) concentration of NaCl revealed up regulation of the transcript after 48 h and higher transcript level after 10 days of treatment. Induction of AmNAC1 after 12h of ABA treatment was similar to the treatment with stressful (500 mM) concentration of NaCl. The results suggest the involvement of AmNAC1 in early salt stress response and long-term adjustment to salt, besides a role for ABA in its expression under salt stress conditions.

  8. Cloning and functional expression of a cDNA encoding stearoyl-ACP Δ9-desaturase from the endosperm of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lingchao; Sun, Ruhao; Liang, Yuanxue; Zhang, Mengdan; Zheng, Yusheng; Li, Dongdong

    2014-10-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is an economically tropical fruit tree with special fatty acid compositions. The stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) plays a key role in the properties of the majority of cellular glycerolipids. In this paper, a full-length cDNA of a stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase, designated CocoFAD, was isolated from cDNA library prepared from the endosperm of coconut (C. nucifera L.). An 1176 bp cDNA from overlapped PCR products containing ORF encoding a 391-amino acid (aa) protein was obtained. The coded protein was virtually identical and shared the homology to other Δ9-desaturase plant sequences (greater than 80% as similarity to that of Elaeis guineensis Jacq). The real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR result indicated that the yield of CocoFAD was the highest in the endosperm of 8-month-old coconut and leaf, and the yield was reduced to 50% of the highest level in the endosperm of 15-month-old coconut. The coding region showed heterologous expression in strain INVSc1 of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). GC-MS analysis showed that the levels of palmitoleic acid (16:1) and oleic acid (18:1) were improved significantly; meanwhile stearic acid (18:0) was reduced. These results indicated that the plastidial Δ9 desaturase from the endosperm of coconut was involved in the biosynthesis of hexadecenoic acid and octadecenoic acid, which was similar with other plants. These results may be valuable for understanding the mechanism of fatty acid metabolism and the genetic improvement of CocoFAD gene in palm plants in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. cDNA cloning, mRNA distribution and heterogeneity, chromosomal location, and RFLP analysis of human osteopontin (OPN)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, M F; Kerr, J M; Termine, J D

    1990-01-01

    A human osteopontin (OP) cDNA was isolated from a library made from primary cultures of human bone cells. The distribution of osteopontin mRNA in human tissues was investigated by Northern analysis and showed that the human message was predominant in cultures of bone cells and in decidua cells is...

  10. Characterization of a human glycoprotein with a potential role in sperm-egg fusion: cDNA cloning, immunohistochemical localization, and chromosomal assignment of the gene (AEGL1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Fujimoto, Seiichiro; Takano, Hiroko [Hokkaido Univ. School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    Acidic epididymal glycoprotein (AEG), thus far identified only in rodents, is one of the sperm surface proteins involved in the fusion of the sperm and egg plasma membranes. In the present study, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding a human glycoprotein related to AEG. Although this protein, designated ARP (AEG-related protein), is not the ortholog of rodent AEG, it resembles AEG in that it is an epididymal secretory glycoprotein that binds to the postacrosomal region of the sperm head. The fact that no AEG mRNA can be detected in the human epididymis suggests that ARP might be the functional counterpart of rodent AEG. The gene encoding ARP (AEGL1) was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to 6p21.1-p21.2. This result indicates that AEGL1 and the mouse gene for AEG are located in the chromosomal segments with conserved syntenies. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  11. From Plant Extract to a cDNA Encoding a Glucosyltransferase Candidate: Proteomics and Transcriptomics as Tools to Help Elucidate Saponin Biosynthesis in Centella asiatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Costa, Fernanda; Barber, Carla J S; Reed, Darwin W; Covello, Patrick S

    2016-01-01

    Centella asiatica (L.) Urban (Apiaceae), a small annual plant that grows in India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, and other parts of Asia, is well-known as a medicinal herb with a long history of therapeutic uses. The bioactive compounds present in C. asiatica leaves include ursane-type triterpene sapogenins and saponins-asiatic acid, madecassic acid, asiaticoside, and madecassoside. Various bioactivities have been shown for these compounds, although most of the steps in the biosynthesis of triterpene saponins, including glycosylation, remain uncharacterized at the molecular level. This chapter describes an approach that integrates partial enzyme purification, proteomics methods, and transcriptomics, with the aim of reducing the number of cDNA candidates encoding for a glucosyltransferase involved in saponin biosynthesis and facilitating the elucidation of the pathway in this medicinal plant.

  12. Isolation of cDNA encoding a newly identified major allergenic protein of rye-grass pollen: intracellular targeting to the amyloplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M B; Hough, T; Theerakulpisut, P; Avjioglu, A; Davies, S; Smith, P M; Taylor, P; Simpson, R J; Ward, L D; McCluskey, J

    1991-01-01

    We have identified a major allergenic protein from rye-grass pollen, tentatively designated Lol pIb of 31kDa and with pI 9.0. A cDNA clone encoding Lol pIb has been isolated, sequenced, and characterized. Lol pIb is located mainly in the starch granules. This is a distinct allergen from Lol pI, which is located in the cytosol. Lol pIb is synthesized in pollen as a pre-allergen with a transit peptide targeting the allergen to amyloplasts. Epitope mapping of the fusion protein localized the IgE binding determinant in the C-terminal domain. Images PMID:1671715

  13. cDNA clone for the alpha-chain of human beta-hexosaminidase: deficiency of alpha-chain mRNA in Ashkenazi Tay-Sachs fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerowitz, R; Proia, R L

    1984-09-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone containing sequences complementary to mRNA encoding the alpha-chain of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase. RNA from a human lung fibroblast strain, IMR90, was enriched for beta-hexosaminidase messenger by polysome immunoselection with antiserum against beta-hexosaminidase A. This preparation was used to construct cDNA recombinant plasmids by the Okayama-Berg vector primer procedure. After transformation of Escherichia coli, 385 ampicillin-resistant colonies were obtained, 44 of which contained inserts in the plasmid DNA. Differential hybridization, with cDNA probes prepared from polysomal RNA enriched or depleted for beta-hexosaminidase messenger, was used to screen the recombinant plasmids for sequences encoding beta-hexosaminidase. One clone, p beta H alpha-1, containing a cDNA insert of approximately equal to 240 base pairs, was identified in this manner. The plasmid hybrid-selected a messenger from placental RNA that programed a translation system to synthesize the alpha-chain of beta-hexosaminidase. p beta H alpha-1 hybridized to an mRNA of approximately equal to 1.9 kilobases in preparations enriched separately in messenger for the alpha-chain or for both alpha- and beta-chains (by polysome immunoselection with antiserum against isolated alpha-chain or against beta-hexosaminidase A, respectively). It did not hybridize to an RNA preparation enriched for messenger of beta-chain by immunoselection with antiserum against beta-hexosaminidase B. The 1.9-kilobase mRNA was observed in poly(A)+ RNA preparations from control fibroblasts and from fibroblasts of a Tay-Sachs patient that synthesize an altered alpha-chain; however, it was not seen in similar preparations from fibroblasts of four Ashkenazi Tay-Sachs patients.

  14. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a cystatin from grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) showing a tissue-specific expression that is modified by germination and abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Rodríguez, Silvia; Guerrero-Rangel, Armando; Melgoza-Villagómez, Claudia; Chagolla-López, Alicia; Delgado-Vargas, Francisco; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma; Sánchez-Hernández, Carla; Délano-Frier, John

    2007-01-01

    A cDNA, encoding a cysteine protease inhibitor (AhCPI), was isolated from an immature seed cDNA library of grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.) and characterized. It encoded a polypeptide of 247 amino acids (aa), including a putative N-terminal signal peptide. Other relevant regions found in its sequence included the G and PW conserved aa motifs, the consensus LARFAV sequence for phytocystatins and the reactive site QVVAG. The predicted aa sequence for AhCPI showed a significant homology to other plant cystatins. Gene expression analyses indicated that AhCPI was constitutively expressed in mature seeds, and gradually decreased during germination. In vegetative tissues, AhCPI was expressed in the radicle and hypocotyls of seedlings and in the stems and roots of young plantlets. Its expression in roots and stems increased substantially in response to water deficit, salinity-, cold- and heat-stress, whereas heat-stress induced a rapid and transient accumulation of AhCPI transcripts in leaves. The results obtained were suggestive of multiple roles for AhCPI in grain amaranth, acting as a regulator of seed germination and as a protective agent against diverse types of abiotic stress, which induced this gene in a tissue- and stress-specific manner. The work herewith described reports a novel, and apparently, single cystatin protein in which, in agreement with other plant model systems, could have a regulatory role in germination, and further expands previous findings linking the accumulation of protease inhibitors, mostly of the serine proteinase type, with protection against (a)biotic stress in A. hypochondriacus.

  15. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a surface antigen of Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula recognized by sera of vassinated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, J.P.; Tom, T.D.; Strand, M.

    1987-01-01

    Spleen cells of mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae were used to produce monoclonal antibodies directed against newly transformed schistosomular surface antigens. One of these monoclonal antibodies recognized a polypeptide of 18 kDa. Binding was measured by radioimmunoassay. This glycoprotein was purified by monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography and a polyclonal antiserum was prepared against it. Immunofluorescence assays showed that the polyclonal antiserum bound to the surface of newly transformed schistosomula and lung-stage organisms but not to the surface of liver-stage and adult worms. Using this polyclonal antiserum we isolated recombinant clones from an adult worm cDNA expression library constructed in λgt11. Clone 654.2 contained an insert of 0.52 kilobase and hybridized to a 1.2-kilobase mRNA species from adult worms. Most importantly, clone 654.2 produced a fusion protein of 125 kDa that was reactive with sera of vaccinated mice that are capable of transferring resistance. This result encourages future vaccination trials with the fusion protein

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the cDNA encoding the precursor of the beta subunit of rat lutropin.

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, W W; Godine, J E; Klein, D R; Chang, A S; Tan, L K; Habener, J F

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequences of cDNAs encoding the precursor of the beta subunit of rat lutropin, a polypeptide hormone that regulates gonadal function, including the development of gametes and the production of steroid sex hormones. The cDNAs were prepared from poly(A)+ RNA derived from the pituitary glands of rats 4 weeks after ovariectomy and were cloned in bacterial plasmids. Bacterial colonies containing transfected plasmids were screened by hybridization with a 32P-labele...

  17. Novel transcripts of human cytomegalovirus clinical strain found by cDNA library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y P; Ruan, Q; Ji, Y H; Wang, N; Li, M L; Qi, Y; He, R; Sun, Z R; Ren, G W

    2011-04-05

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a double-stranded DNA virus with the largest genome (~235 kb) of the known human herpes viruses. The coding potential and transcript structures of most HCMV predicted genes have not been identified. New or unknown genes could exist in clinical strains. The SMART (switching mechanism at 5' end of RNA template of reverse transcriptase) technique was used to construct a full-length cDNA library of an HCMV clinical strain in the late expression phase. Randomly selected clones were sequenced. The sequenced expressed sequence tags were used to identify the expression and transcript structures of some predicted and unpredicted genes of HCMV. The transcripts of the UL99, TRL5/IRL5, UL73 to UL75, UL4, and UL115 genes, which were previously detected, were obtained with full-length structures from this library. Some novel transcripts, including several transcripts of UL/b' genes and three antisense transcripts of UL83, UL87 and UL31 were found. The novel transcripts that were found, particularly the antisense transcripts of UL83, UL87 and UL31, showed that the transcription of HCMV genes is more complex than previously predicted. Our study highlights the usefulness of the full-length cDNA library for discovering new genes and transcripts of HCMV.

  18. The natriuretic peptide/helokinestatin precursor from Mexican beaded lizard (Heloderma horridum) venom: Amino acid sequence deduced from cloned cDNA and identification of two novel encoded helokinestatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chengbang; Yang, Mu; Zhou, Mei; Wu, Yuxin; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Ding, Anwei; Shaw, Chris

    2011-06-01

    Natriuretic peptides are common components of reptile venoms and molecular cloning of their biosynthetic precursors has revealed that in snakes, they co-encode bradykinin-potentiating peptides and in venomous lizards, some co-encode bradykinin inhibitory peptides such as the helokinestatins. The common natriuretic peptide/helokinestatin precursor of the Gila Monster, Heloderma suspectum, encodes five helokinestatins of differing primary structures. Here we report the molecular cloning of a natriuretic peptide/helokinestatin precursor cDNA from a venom-derived cDNA library of the Mexican beaded lizard (Heloderma horridum). Deduction of the primary structure of the encoded precursor protein from this cloned cDNA template revealed that it consisted of 196 amino acid residues encoding a single natriuretic peptide and five helokinestatins. While the natriuretic peptide was of identical primary structure to its Gila Monster (H. suspectum) homolog, the encoded helokinestatins were not, with this region of the common precursor displaying some significant differences to its H. suspectum homolog. The helokinestatin-encoding region contained a single copy of helokinestatin-1, 2 copies of helokinestatin-3 and single copies of 2 novel peptides, (Phe)(5)-helokinestatin-2 (VPPAFVPLVPR) and helokinestatin-6 (GPPFNPPPFVDYEPR). All predicted peptides were found in reverse phase HPLC fractions of the same venom. Synthetic replicates of both novel helokinestatins were found to antagonize the relaxing effect of bradykinin on rat tail artery smooth muscle. Thus lizard venom continues to provide a source of novel biologically active peptides. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. cDNA sequence of human transforming gene hst and identification of the coding sequence required for transforming activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, M.; Yoshida, T.; Miyagawa, K.; Sakamoto, H.; Terada, M.; Sugimura, T.

    1987-01-01

    The hst gene was originally identified as a transforming gene in DNAs from human stomach cancers and from a noncancerous portion of stomach mucosa by DNA-mediated transfection assay using NIH3T3 cells. cDNA clones of hst were isolated from the cDNA library constructed from poly(A) + RNA of a secondary transformant induced by the DNA from a stomach cancer. The sequence analysis of the hst cDNA revealed the presence of two open reading frames. When this cDNA was inserted into an expression vector containing the simian virus 40 promoter, it efficiently induced the transformation of NIH3T3 cells upon transfection. It was found that one of the reading frames, which coded for 206 amino acids, was responsible for the transforming activity

  20. Cloning of a human epididymis-specific mRNA, HE6, encoding a novel member of the seven transmembrane-domain receptor superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, C; Ivell, R; Kirchhoff, C

    1997-04-01

    A novel gene product, HE6, showing homology to the seven transmembrane-domain (Tm7) receptor superfamily, has been cloned by differential screening from a human epididymal cDNA library. The cDNA clone represented an abundant approximately 5-kb mRNA, comprising 0.01% of the cDNA library. Northern blot analysis including various human tissues revealed an epididymis-specific expression. In situ transcript hybridization localized the mRNA within the epithelial cells lining the epididymal duct. Southern blot analysis, employing a fragment encoding part of the amino-terminal extracellular domain as a probe, identified an autosomal single-copy gene in the human genome. Homologous cDNA products showing 90% sequence identity were observed in the epididymides of all mammalian species investigated. A cloning and sequencing strategy, combining approximately 3.7-kb cDNA fragments obtained by conventional cDNA library construction with overlapping 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) fragments, yielded total sequence information of 4.7 kb for the human mRNA. This sequence comprises a long open reading frame of 3.1 kb. A homology search for related sequences revealed highest similarity (25% amino acid identity) with the secretin/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors. The predicted extracellular amino-terminal extension, however, was much longer than in the other members, and showed similarity to highly glycosylated mucin-like cell-surface molecules.

  1. Human synaptonemal complex protein 1 (SCP1): Isolation and characterization of the cDNA and chromosomal localization of the gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuwissen, R.L.J.; Meerts, I.; Heyting, C. [Agricultural Univ., Wageningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Synaptonemal complexes (SCs) are structures that are formed between homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiotic prophase. They consist of two proteinaceous axes, one along each homolog, that are connected along their length by numerous transverse filaments (TFs). The cDNA encoding one major component of TFs of SCs of the rat, rnSCP1, has recently been isolated and characterized. In this paper we describe the isolation and characterization of the cDNA encoding the human protein homologous to rnSCP1, hsSCP1. hsSCP1 and rnSCP1 have 75% amino acid identity. The most prominent structural features and amino acid sequence motifs of rnSCP1 have been conserved in hsSCP1. Most probably, hsSCP1 is functionally homologous to rnSCP1. The hsSCP1 gene was assigned to human chromosome 1p12-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 44 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Isolation and expression of human cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor cDNA clones: Homology to Epstein-Barr virus open reading frame BCRFI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, P.; De Waal-Malefyt, R.; Dang, M.N.; Johnson, K.E.; Kastelein, R.; Fiorentino, D.F.; DeVries, J.E.; Roncarolo, M.G.; Mosmann, T.R.; Moore, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    The authors demonstrated the existence of human cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor (DSIF) [interleukin 10 (IL-10)]. cDNA clones encoding human IL-10 (hIL-10) were isolated from a tetanus toxin-specific human T-cell clone. Like mouse IL-10, hIL-10 exhibits strong DNA and amino acid sequence homology to an open reading frame in the Epstein-Barr virus, BDRFL. hIL-10 and the BCRFI product inhibit cytokine synthesis by activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and by a mouse Th1 clone. Both hIL-10 and mouse IL-10 sustain the viability of a mouse mast cell line in culture, but BCRFI lacks comparable activity in this way, suggesting that BCRFI may have conserved only a subset of hIL-10 activities

  3. Localization of the human fibromodulin gene (FMOD) to chromosome 1q32 and completion of the cDNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the human fibromodulin cDNA and its use to map the gene. For somatic cell hybrids, the generation of the PCR product was concordant with the presence of chromosome 1 and discordant with the presence of all other chromosomes, confirming that the fibromodulin gene is located within region q32 of chromosome 1. The physical mapping of genes is a critical step in the process of identifying which genes may be responsible for various inherited disorders. Specifically, the mapping of the fibromodulin gene now provides the information necessary to evaluate its potential role in genetic disorders of connective tissues. The analysis of previously reported diseases mapped to chromosome 1 reveals two genes located in the proximity of the fibromodulin locus. These are Usher syndrome type II, a recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, and Van der Woude syndrome, a dominant condition associated with abnormalities such as cleft lip and palate and hyperdontia. The genes for both of these disorders have been projected to be localized to 1q32 of a physical map that integrates available genetic linkage and physical data. However, it seems improbable that either of these disorders, exhibiting restricted tissue involvement, could be linked to the fibromodulin gene, given the wide tissue distribution of the encoded proteoglycan, although it remains possible that the relative importance of the quantity and function of the proteoglycan may avry between tissues. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of a human c-fos cDNA into mouse bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, P; Verrier, B; Klein, B; Niccolino, M; Marty, L; Alexandre, C; Piechaczyk, M

    1991-11-01

    A cDNA encoding a complete human c-fos protein was isolated and inserted into two different murine MoMuLV-derived recombinant retroviruses allowing expression of c-fos protein in different cell types. One c-fos-expressing retrovirus, chosen for its ability to express high levels of proteins in fibroblast-like cells, was shown to potentiate long-term cultures of mouse bone marrow stromal cells in vitro and therefore constitutes a potential tool for immortalizing such cells. Moreover, when tested in an in vitro differentiation assay, stromal cells constitutively expressing c-fos favor the granulocyte differentiation of hematopoietic precursors. Interestingly, retroviruses expressing v-src and v-abl oncogenes, included as controls in our experiments, do not produce any detectable effects, whereas those expressing polyoma virus middle T antigen facilitate long-term growth in vitro of stromal cells that favor the macrophage differentiation pathway of bone marrow stem cells. Our observation supports the idea that constitutive expression of some oncogenes, including c-fos and polyoma virus middle T antigen, may influence cytokine production by bone marrow stromal cells.

  5. Cloning and sequence of cDNA encoding 1-aminocyclo- propane-1-carboxylate oxidase in Vanda flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattana Srifah Huehne

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO gene in the final step of ethylene biosynthesis was isolated from ethylene-sensitive Vanda Miss Joaquim flowers. This consists of 1,242 base pairs (bp encoding for 326 amino acid residues. To investigate the specific divergence in orchid ACO sequences, the deduced Vanda ACO was aligned with five other orchid ACOs. The results reveal that the ACO sequences within Doritaenopsis, Phalaenopsis and Vanda show highly conserved and almost 95% identical homology, while the ACOs isolated from Cymbidium, Dendrobium and Cattleya are 8788% identical to Vanda ACO. In addition, the 2-oxoglutarate- Fe(II_oxygenase (Oxy domain of orchid ACOs consists of a higher degree of amino acid conservation than that of the non-haem dioxygenase (DIOX_N domain. The overall homology regions of Vanda ACO are commonly folded into 12 α-helices and 12 β-sheets similar to the three dimensional template-structure of Petunia ACO. This Vanda ACO cloned gene is highly expressed in flower tissue compared with root and leaf tissues. In particular, there is an abundance of ACO transcript accumulation in the column followed by the lip and the perianth of Vanda Miss Joaquim flowers at the fully-open stage.

  6. Gene expression profile analysis in human hepatocellular carcinoma by cDNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Jung; Sung, Young Kwan; Farooq, Mohammad; Kim, Younghee; Im, Sanguk; Tak, Won Young; Hwang, Yoon Jin; Kim, Yang Il; Han, Hyung Soo; Kim, Jung-Chul; Kim, Moon Kyu

    2002-12-31

    We performed gene expression profiling of normal and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) liver tissues using a high-density microarray that contained 3,063 human cDNA. The results of a microarray hybridization experiment from eight different HCC tissues were analyzed and classified by the Cluster program. Among these differentially-expressed genes, the galectin-3, serine/threonine kinase SGK, translation factor eIF-4A, -4B, -3, fibroblast growth factor receptor, and ribosomal protein L35A were up-regulated; the mRNAs of Nip3, decorin, and the insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 were down-regulated in HCC. The differential expression of these genes was further confirmed by an RT-PCR analysis. In addition, our data suggest that the gene expression profile of HCC varies according to the histological types.

  7. Cloning and molecular characterization of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding gene and cDNA from the plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, M D; Rikkerink, E H; Solon, S L; Crowhurst, R N

    1992-12-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gpdA) has been identified from a genomic DNA library prepared from the plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata. Nucleotide sequence data revealed that this gene codes for a putative 338-amino-acid protein encoded by two exons of 129 and 885 bp, separated by an intron 216 bp long. The 5' leader sequence is also spliced by an intron of 156 bp. A cDNA clone was prepared using the polymerase chain reaction, the sequence of which was used to confirm the presence of the intron in the coding sequence and the splicing of the 5' leader sequence. The transcriptional start point (tsp) was mapped at -253 nt from the site of the initiation of translation by primer extension and is adjacent to a 42-bp pyrimidine-rich region. The general structure of the 5' flanking region shows similarities to gpdA from Aspergillus nidulans. The putative protein product is 71-86% identical at the aa level to GPDs from Aspergillus nidulans, Cryphonectria parasitica, Curvularia lunata, Podospora anserina and Ustilago maydis.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding phytochrome A in the non-photosynthetic parasitic plant, Orobanche minor Sm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakulnaleamsai, Chitra; Okazawa, Atsushi; An, Chung-Il; Kajiyama, Shin'ichiro; Fukusaki, Ei'ichiro; Yoneyama, Koichi; Takeuchi, Yasutomo; Kobayashi, Akio

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the isolation and characterization of a phytochrome A (PHYA) homologous cDNA (OmPHYA) in the non-photosynthetic holoparasitic plant Orobanche minor are described. The present findings provide the first report of the presence of a PHYA homolog in the holoparasite. This study found that OmPHYA is of similar size to the other PHYAs of green plants and shows 72, 77, and 77% amino acid sequence identity with PHYA in Arabidopsis, potato, and tobacco respectively. The OmPHYA contains a conserved chromophore attachment cysteine at position 323. Although OmPHYA shows high sequence identity with other PHYAs in green plants, 13 amino acid substitutions located in both the N and C-terminal domains are observed (a total of 26 amino acids). OmPHYA is encoded by a single gene within the O. minor genome. The abundance of the OmPHYA transcript as well as nuclear translocation of OmphyA occurs in a light-dependent manner.

  9. Complementation of a yeast cell cycle mutant by an alfalfa cDNA encoding a protein kinase homologous to p34cdc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, H; Páy, A; Györgyey, J; Bakó, L; Németh, K; Bögre, L; Schweyen, R J; Heberle-Bors, E; Dudits, D

    1991-03-01

    The cdc2 protein kinase plays a central role in control of the eukaryotic cell cycle of animals and yeasts. We have isolated a cDNA clone (cdc2Ms) from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) that is homologous to the yeast cdc2/CDC28 genes. The encoded protein is 64% identical to the yeast and mammalian counterparts and shows all the prominent structural features known from these organisms. Antibody raised against a 16-amino acid synthetic peptide with crossreactivity against p34 proteins recognized a 34-kilodalton protein in extracts of alfalfa cells. When transferred into a fission yeast, the plant cdc2 homolog can complement a temperature-sensitive cdc2 mutant. Northern analysis revealed higher transcript levels in shoots and suspension cultures than in roots. In addition to the dominant transcript of 1.4 kilobases detected in the poly(A)+fraction, 2.5- and 1.2-kilobase transcripts were detected in total RNA preparations from shoots or somatic embryos. Suspension cultures that were induced to form somatic embryos by an auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) showed fluctuations in transcription pattern during the induction period and embryogenesis.

  10. [Cloning and characterization of a novel mouse short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases cDNA mHsdl2#, encoding a protein with a SDR domaid and a SCP2 domain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, J; Li, P; Ji, Ch; Feng, C; Gui, M; Sun, Y; Zhang, J; Zhu, J; Dou, Ch; Gu, Sh

    2005-01-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) play important roles in body's metabolism. We cloned a novel mouse SDR cDNA which encodes a deduced HSD-like protein with a conserved SDR domain and a SCP2 domain. The 1.8 kb cDNA consists of 11 exons and is mapped to mouse chromosome 4B3. The corresponding gene is widely expressed in normal mouse tissues and its expression level in liver increases after inducement with cholesterol food. The predicted mouse HSDL2 protein, which has a peroxisomal target signal, is localized in the cytoplasm of NIH 3T3 cells.

  11. Gene expression of panaxydol-treated human melanoma cells using radioactive cDNA microarrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Joong Youn; Yu, Su Jin; Soh, Jeong Won; Kim, Meyoung Kon

    2001-01-01

    Polyacetylenic alcohols derived from Panax ginseng have been studied to be an anticancer reagent previously. One of the Panax ginseng polyacetylenic alcohols, i.e., panaxydol, has been studied to possess an antiproliferative effect on human melanoma cell line (SK-MEL-1). In ths study, radioactive cDNA microarrays enabled an efficient approach to analyze the pattern of gene expression (3.194 genes in a total) simultaneously. The bioinformatics selection of human cDNAs, which is specifically designed for immunology, apoptosis and signal transduction, were arrayed on nylon membranes. Using with 33 P labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles of our interest including apoptosis, cell proliferation, cell cycle, and signal transduction. Gene expression profiles were also classified into several categories in accordance with the duration of panaxydol treatment. Consequently, the gene profiles of our interest were significantly up (199 genes, > 2.0 of Z-ratio) or down-(196 genes, < 2.0 of Z-ratio) regulated in panaxydol-treated human melanoma cells

  12. Cloning of the human carnitine-acylcarnitine carrier cDNA and identification of the molecular defect in a patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, M.; Iacobazzi, V.; IJlst, L.; Savelkoul, P.; Ruitenbeek, W.; van den Heuvel, L.; Indiveri, C.; Smeitink, J.; Trijbels, F.; Wanders, R.; Palmieri, F.

    1997-01-01

    The carnitine-acylcarnitine carrier (CAC) catalyzes the translocation of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane. We cloned and sequenced the human CAC cDNA, which has an open reading frame of 903 nucleotides. Northern blot studies revealed different expression levels of CAC

  13. Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]|[Kingston General Hospital, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

  14. Cloning and characterization of human very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase cDNA, chromosomal assignment of the gene and identification in four patients of nine different mutations within the VLCAD gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Bross, P; Vianey-Saban, C

    1996-01-01

    Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is one of four straight-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACD) enzymes, which are all nuclear encoded mitochondrial flavoproteins catalyzing the initial step in fatty acid beta-oxidation. We have used the very fast, Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE......) based strategy to obtain the sequence of cDNAs encoding human VLCAD from placenta and fibroblasts. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequence of human VLCAD with those of the other human ACD enzymes revealed extensive sequence homology. Moreover, human VLCAD and human acyl-CoA oxidase showed...... extensive sequence homology corroborating the notion that these genes are evolutionarily related. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from hybrid cell lines was used to localize the VLCAD gene to human chromosome 17p11.2-p11.13105. Using Northern and Western blot analysis to investigate the tissue...

  15. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Showing Altered Expression in Liver Metastases of Human Colorectal Cancers by cDNA Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempei Yanagawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of intensive and increasingly successful attempts to determine the multiple steps involved in colorectal carcinogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for metastasis of colorectal tumors to the liver remain to be clarified. To identify genes that are candidates for involvement in the metastatic process, we analyzed genome-wide expression profiles of 10 primary colorectal cancers and their corresponding metastatic lesions by means of a cDNA microarray consisting of 9121 human genes. This analysis identified 40 genes whose expression was commonly upregulated in metastatic lesions, and 7 that were commonly downregulated. The upregulated genes encoded proteins involved in cell adhesion, or remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Investigation of the functions of more of the altered genes should improve our understanding of metastasis and may identify diagnostic markers and/or novel molecular targets for prevention or therapy of metastatic lesions.

  16. Induction of pigmentation in mouse fibroblasts by expression of human tyrosinase cDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    A distinguishing characteristic of cells of the melanocyte lineage is the expression of the melanosomal enzyme tyrosinase that catalyzes the synthesis of the pigment melanin. A tyrosinase cDNA clone, designated BBTY-1, was isolated from a library constructed from the pigmented TA99+/CF21+ melanoma cell line SK-MEL-19. Expression of BBTY-1 in mouse L929 fibroblasts led to synthesis and expression of active tyrosinase, and, unexpectedly, to stable production of melanin. Melanin was synthesized and stored within membrane-bound vesicles in the cytoplasm of transfected fibroblasts. BBTY-1 detected a 2.4-kb mRNA transcript in nine of nine pigmented, tyrosinase-positive melanoma cell lines. Tyrosinase transcripts of the same size and abundance were detected in a subset (three of eight) of nonpigmented, tyrosinase-negative melanoma cell lines, suggesting that post-transcriptional events are important in regulating tyrosinase activity. Two melanocyte antigens, recognized by mAbs TA99 and CF21, that are specifically located within melanosomes and are coexpressed with tyrosinase activity, did not react with transfected mouse fibroblasts expressing human tyrosinase, supporting the conclusion that these antigenic determinants are distinct from the tyrosinase molecule coded for by BBTY-1. PMID:2499655

  17. Isolation and identification of the human homolog of a new p53-binding protein, Mdmx

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shvarts, A.; Bazuine, M.; Dekker, P.; Ramos, Y. F.; Steegenga, W. T.; Merckx, G.; van Ham, R. C.; van der Houven van Oordt, W.; van der Eb, A. J.; Jochemsen, A. G.

    1997-01-01

    We recently reported the identification of a mouse cDNA encoding a new p53-associating protein that we called Mdmx because of its structural similarity to Mdm2, a well-known p53-binding protein. Here we report the isolation of a cDNA encoding the human homolog of Mdmx. The ORF of the cDNA encodes a

  18. Construction and characterization of a cDNA library from human liver tissue with chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-hong; Chen, Zhi; Yao, Hang-ping; Chen, Feng; Zhu, Hai-hong; Zhou, Hong-juan

    2005-04-01

    To construct a cDNA library from human liver tissue with chronic hepatitis B and check its quality for investigating the expression level of liver tissue infected by hepatitis B virus. This will then be used to find the relevant genes and interesting proteins associated with the development of hepatitis B. The total RNA from liver tissue with chronic hepatitis B was extracted and the mRNA was purified using TRIZOL method. Switching mechanism at 5' end of the RNA transcript (SMART) technique and CDS III/3' primer were used for first-strand cDNA synthesis. Long distance polymerase chain reaction (LD PCR) was then used to synthesize the double-strand cDNA that was then digested by Sfi I and fractionated by CHROMA SPIN-400 column. The longer than 0.4 kb cDNAs were collected and ligated to lambdaTriplEx2 vector. Then lambda phage packaging reaction and library amplification were performed. The qualities of both unamplified and amplified cDNA libraries were strictly checked by conventional titer determination. Fourteen plaques were randomly picked and tested using PCR with universal primers derived from the sequence flanking the vector. The titers of unamplifed and amplified libraries were 1.94 x 10(6) pfu/ml and 1.49 x 10(9) pfu/ml respectively. The percentages of recombinants from both libraries were 98.15% in unamplified library and 98.76% in amplified library. The lengths of the inserts were 1.23 kb in average, 1-2 kb in 64.29%, and 0.5-1.0 kb in 35.71%. A high quality cDNA library from human liver tissue with chronic hepatitis B was successfully constructed.

  19. Construction of a cDNA library from human retinal pigment epithelial cells challenged with rod outer segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaney, D M; Rakoczy, P E; Constable, I J

    1995-05-01

    To study genes expressed by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells during phagocytosis and digestion of rod outer segments (ROS), a complementary (c)DNA library was produced using an in-vitro model. The cDNA library can be used to study molecular changes which contribute to the development of diseases due to a failure in outer segment phagocytosis and digestion by RPE cells. Here we demonstrate a way to study genes and their functions using a molecular biological approach and describing the first step involved in this process, the construction of a cDNA library. Human RPE cells obtained from the eyes of a seven-year-old donor were cultured and challenged with bovine ROS. The culture was harvested and total RNA was extracted. Complementary DNA was transcribed from the messenger (m)RNA and was directionally cloned into the LambdaGEM-4 bacteriophage vector successfully. Some clones were picked and the DNA extracted, to determine the size of the inserts as a measure of the quality of the library. Molecular biology and cell culture are important tools to be used in eye research, especially in areas where tissue is limiting and animal models are not available. We now have a ROS challenged RPE cDNA library which will be used to identify genes responsible for degrading phagocytosed debris within the retinal pigment epithelium.

  20. Molecular characterization of a Leishmania donovani cDNA clone with similarity to human 20S proteasome a-type subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C B; Jørgensen, L; Jensen, A T

    2000-01-01

    Using plasma from patients infected or previously infected with Leishmania donovanii, we isolated a L. donovanii cDNA clone with similarity to the proteasome a-type subunit from humans and other eukaryotes. The cDNA clone, designated LePa, was DNA sequenced and Northern blot analysis of L...

  1. Cloning of cDNAs that encode human mast cell carboxypeptidase A, and comparison of the protein with mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A and rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, D.S.; Gurley, D.S.; Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.; Serafin, W.E.; Sugarbaker, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Human skin and lung mast cells and rodent peritoneal cells contain a carboxypeptidase in their secretory granules. The authors have screened human lung cDNA libraries with a mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) cDNA probe to isolate a near-full-length cDNA that encodes human MC-CPA. The 5' end of the human MC-CPA transcript was defined by direct mRNA sequencing and by isolation and partial sequencing of the human MC-CPA gene. Human MC-CPA is predicted to be translated as a 417 amino acid preproenzyme which includes a 15 amino acid signal peptide and a 94-amino acid activation peptide. The mature human MC-CPA enzyme has a predicted size of 36.1 kDa, a net positive charge of 16 at neutral pH, and 86% amino acid sequence identity with mouse MC-CPA. DNA blot analyses showed that human MC-CPA mRNA is transcribed from a single locus in the human genome. Comparison of the human MC-CPA with mouse MC-CPA and with three rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases shows that these enzymes are encoded by distinct but homologous genes

  2. Isolation and sequence of complementary DNA encoding human extracellular superoxide dismutase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjalmarsson, K.; Marklund, S.L.; Engstroem, A.; Edlund, T.

    1987-01-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) clone from a human placenta cDNA library encoding extracellular superoxide dismutase has been isolated and the nucleotide sequence determined. The cDNA has a very high G + C content. EC-SOD is synthesized with a putative 18-amino acid signal peptide, preceding the 222 amino acids in the mature enzyme, indicating that the enzyme is a secretory protein. The first 95 amino acids of the mature enzyme show no sequence homology with other sequenced proteins and there is one possible N-glycosylation site (Asn-89). The amino acid sequence from residues 96-193 shows strong homology (∼ 50%) with the final two-thirds of the sequences of all know eukaryotic CuZn SODs, whereas the homology with the P. leiognathi CuZn SOD is clearly lower. The ligands to Cu and Zn, the cysteines forming the intrasubunit disulfide bridge in the CuZn SODs, and the arginine found in all CuZn SODs in the entrance to the active site can all be identified in EC-SOD. A comparison with bovine CuZn SOD, the three-dimensional structure of which is known, reveals that the homologies occur in the active site and the divergencies are in the part constituting the subunit contact area in CuZn SOD. Amino acid sequence 194-222 in the carboxyl-terminal end of EC-SOD is strongly hydrophilic and contains nine amino acids with a positive charge. This sequence probably confers the affinity of EC-SOD for heparin and heparan sulfate. An analysis of the amino acid sequence homologies with CuZn SODs from various species indicates that the EC-SODs may have evolved form the CuZn SODs before the evolution of fungi and plants

  3. Succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid transferase (SCOT): Human cDNA and genomic cloning and chromosomal mapping of the human gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassovska-Bratinova, S.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Ste-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Duncan, A. [Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    SCOT (EC 2.8.3.5) mediates the activation and utilization of ketone bodies in extrahepatic tissues, especially brain, heart and kidney. Children with hereditary SCOT deficiency have episodes of severe ketoacidosis. Using a partial human heart SCOT cDNA, hSCOT-G, we detected a single {approximately}3 Kb mRNA in human heart and leukocytes, but not in liver. The length of the mouse SCOT mRNA detected with hSCOT-G in muscle, heart, kidney and brain is {approximately}3 Kb. We mapped the human SCOT gene to chromosome 5p13 by in situ hybridization. To date we have isolated human heart cDNAs spanning 2.9 Kb and including a 1248 bp open reading frame. The 3{prime} nontranslated region of the human SCOT mRNA extends at least 1712 bp, in contrast to the 209 bp sequence reported for pig SCOT cDNA. In one heart cDNA clone we detected a 58 bp insertion 258 bp downstream from the stop codon. We performed RT-PCR using a 5{prime} degenerate-sequence primer designed from the pig SCOT leader peptide sequence and 3{prime} human-specific primers. We obtained a fragment of the expected 320 bp length which strongly hybridizes to an internal oligonucleotide and which we are now characterizing. Human genomic Southern blot analysis with a partial human cDNA as probe suggests that the length of the human SCOT gene is about 40 K. Using hSCOT-G as a probe, we screened a human leukocyte genomic library in EMBL-3 phage and isolated two genomic clones. One of them contains a processed pseudogene. The other contains at least two exons of the human SCOT gene spanning cDNA residues 431 to 734. These findings will be useful for mutation analysis in SCOT-deficient patients.

  4. Human Transcriptome and Chromatin Modifications: An ENCODE Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A decade-long project, led by several international research groups, called the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE, recently released an unprecedented amount of data. The ambitious project covers transcriptome, cistrome, epigenome, and interactome data from more than 1,600 sets of experiments in human. To make use of this valuable resource, it is important to understand the information it represents and the techniques that were used to generate these data. In this review, we introduce the data that ENCODE generated, summarize the observations from the data analysis, and revisit a computational approach that ENCODE used to predict gene expression, with a focus on the human transcriptome and its association with chromatin modifications.

  5. Human α2-HS-glycoprotein: the A and B chains with a connecting sequence are encoded by a single mRNA transcript

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.C.; Bowman, B.H.; Yang, F.

    1987-01-01

    The α 2 -HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) is a plasma protein reported to play roles in bone mineralization and in the immune response. It is composed of two subunits, the A and B chains. Recombinant plasmids containing human cDNA AHSG have been isolated by screening an adult human liver library with a mixed oligonucleotide probe. The cDNA clones containing AHSG inserts span approximately 1.5 kilobase pairs and include the entire AHSG coding sequence, demonstrating that the A and B chains are encoded by a single mRNA transcript. The cDNA sequence predicts an 18-amino-acid signal peptide, followed by the A-chain sequence of AHSG. A heretofore unseen connecting sequence of 40 amino acids was deduced between the A- and B-chain sequences. The connecting sequence demonstrates the unique amino acid doublets and collagen triplets found in the A and B chains; it is not homologous with other reported amino acid sequences. The connecting sequence may be cleaved in a posttranslational step by limited proteolysis before mature AHSG is released into the circulation or may vary in its presence because of alternative processing. The AHSG cDNA was utilized for mapping the AHSG gene to the 3q21→qter region of human chromosome 3. The availability of the AHSG cDNA clone will facilitate the analysis of its genetic control and gene expression during development and bone formation

  6. Human renal carcinoma expresses two messages encoding a parathyroid hormone-like peptide: Evidence for the alternative splicing of a single-copy gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiede, M.A.; Strewler, G.J.; Nissenson, R.A.; Rosenblatt, M.; Rodan, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    A peptide secreted by tumors associated with the clinical syndrome of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy was recently purified from human renal carcinoma cell line 786-0. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this peptide has considerable similarity with those of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and of peptides isolated from human breast and lung carcinoma (cell line BEN). In this study the authors obtained the nucleotide sequence of a 1595-base cDNA complementary to mRNA encoding the PTH-like peptide produced by 786-0 cells. The cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding a leader sequence of 36 amino acids and a 139-residue peptide, in which 8 of the first 13 residues are identical to the N terminus of PTH. Through the first 828 bases the sequence of this cDNA is identical with one recently isolated from a BEN cell cDNA library; however, beginning with base 829 the sequences diverge, shortening the open reading frame by 2 amino acids. Differential RNA blot analysis revealed that 786-0 cells express two major PTH-like peptide mRNAs with different 3' untranslated sequences, one of which hybridizes with the presently described sequence and the other one with that reported for the BEN cell PTH-like peptide cDNA. Primer-extension analysis of 786-0 poly(A) + RNA together with Southern blot analysis of human DNA confirmed the presence of a single-copy gene coding for multiple mRNAs through alternate splicing. In addition, the 3' untranslated sequence of the cDNA described here has significant similarity to the c-myc protooncogene

  7. Identification and complete sequencing of novel human transcripts through the use of mouse orthologs and testis cDNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Elisa N; Pires, Lilian C; Parmigiani, Raphael B

    2004-01-01

    The correct identification of all human genes, and their derived transcripts, has not yet been achieved, and it remains one of the major aims of the worldwide genomics community. Computational programs suggest the existence of 30,000 to 40,000 human genes. However, definitive gene identification...... can only be achieved by experimental approaches. We used two distinct methodologies, one based on the alignment of mouse orthologous sequences to the human genome, and another based on the construction of a high-quality human testis cDNA library, in an attempt to identify new human transcripts within...... the human genome sequence. We generated 47 complete human transcript sequences, comprising 27 unannotated and 20 annotated sequences. Eight of these transcripts are variants of previously known genes. These transcripts were characterized according to size, number of exons, and chromosomal localization...

  8. Identification and validation of human papillomavirus encoded microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Qian

    Full Text Available We report here identification and validation of the first papillomavirus encoded microRNAs expressed in human cervical lesions and cell lines. We established small RNA libraries from ten human papillomavirus associated cervical lesions including cancer and two human papillomavirus harboring cell lines. These libraries were sequenced using SOLiD 4 technology. We used the sequencing data to predict putative viral microRNAs and discovered nine putative papillomavirus encoded microRNAs. Validation was performed for five candidates, four of which were successfully validated by qPCR from cervical tissue samples and cell lines: two were encoded by HPV 16, one by HPV 38 and one by HPV 68. The expression of HPV 16 microRNAs was further confirmed by in situ hybridization, and colocalization with p16INK4A was established. Prediction of cellular target genes of HPV 16 encoded microRNAs suggests that they may play a role in cell cycle, immune functions, cell adhesion and migration, development, and cancer. Two putative viral target sites for the two validated HPV 16 miRNAs were mapped to the E5 gene, one in the E1 gene, two in the L1 gene and one in the LCR region. This is the first report to show that papillomaviruses encode their own microRNA species. Importantly, microRNAs were found in libraries established from human cervical disease and carcinoma cell lines, and their expression was confirmed in additional tissue samples. To our knowledge, this is also the first paper to use in situ hybridization to show the expression of a viral microRNA in human tissue.

  9. Human placental Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue expression, DNA polymorphism, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chehab, F.F.; Kan, Y.W.; Law, M.L.; Hartz, J.; Kao, F.T.; Blostein, R.

    1987-11-01

    A 2.2-kilobase clone comprising a major portion of the coding sequence of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit was cloned from human placenta and its sequence was identical to that encoding the ..cap alpha.. subunit of human kidney and HeLa cells. Transfer blot analysis of the mRNA products of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase gene from various human tissues and cell lines revealed only one band (approx. = 4.7 kilobases) under low and high stringency washing conditions. The levels of expression in the tissues were intestine > placenta > liver > pancreas, and in the cell lines the levels were human erythroleukemia > butyrate-induced colon > colon > brain > HeLa cells. mRNA was undetectable in reticulocytes, consistent with the authors failure to detect positive clones in a size-selected ( > 2 kilobases) lambdagt11 reticulocyte cDNA library. DNA analysis revealed by a polymorphic EcoRI band and chromosome localization by flow sorting and in situ hybridization showed that the ..cap alpha.. subunit is on the short is on the short arm (band p11-p13) of chromosome 1.

  10. Molecular Cloning of a cDNA Encoding for Taenia solium TATA-Box Binding Protein 1 (TsTBP1) and Study of Its Interactions with the TATA-Box of Actin 5 and Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lima, Oscar; García-Gutierrez, Ponciano; Jiménez, Lucía; Zarain-Herzberg, Ángel; Lazzarini, Roberto; Landa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is an essential regulatory transcription factor for the TATA-box and TATA-box-less gene promoters. We report the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA that encodes a Taenia solium TATA-box binding protein 1 (TsTBP1). Deduced amino acid composition from its nucleotide sequence revealed that encodes a protein of 238 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 26.7 kDa, and a theoretical pI of 10.6. The NH2-terminal domain shows no conservation when compared with to pig and human TBP1s. However, it shows high conservation in size and amino acid identity with taeniids TBP1s. In contrast, the TsTBP1 COOH-terminal domain is highly conserved among organisms, and contains the amino acids involved in interactions with the TATA-box, as well as with TFIIA and TFIIB. In silico TsTBP1 modeling reveals that the COOH-terminal domain forms the classical saddle structure of the TBP family, with one α-helix at the end, not present in pig and human. Native TsTBP1 was detected in T. solium cysticerci´s nuclear extract by western blot using rabbit antibodies generated against two synthetic peptides located in the NH2 and COOH-terminal domains of TsTBP1. These antibodies, through immunofluorescence technique, identified the TBP1 in the nucleus of cells that form the bladder wall of cysticerci of Taenia crassiceps, an organism close related to T. solium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from T. solium cysticerci and antibodies against the NH2-terminal domain of TsTBP1 showed the interaction of native TsTBP1 with the TATA-box present in T. solium actin 5 (pAT5) and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Ts2-CysPrx) gene promoters; in contrast, when antibodies against the anti-COOH-terminal domain of TsTBP1 were used, they inhibited the binding of TsTBP1 to the TATA-box of the pAT5 promoter gene.

  11. Studies on the isolation, structural analysis and tissue localization of fetal antigen 1 and its relation to a human adrenal-specific cDNA, pG2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Teisner, Børge; Højrup, Peter

    1993-01-01

    sequence was back-translated into the appropriate degenerate sequence of nucleic acids, fetal antigen 1 could be partially aligned to a 'human adrenal-specific mRNA, pG2'. The indirect immunoperoxidase technique demonstrated fetal antigen 1 in fetal hepatocytes, glandular cells of fetal pancreas...... is encoded by the mRNA defined by the cDNA clone pG2, but definitive sequencing and expression studies of this mRNA have not been achieved. Udgivelsesdato: 1993-Apr...

  12. Identification of "pathologs" (disease-related genes from the RIKEN mouse cDNA dataset using human curation plus FACTS, a new biological information extraction system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Socha Luis A

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major goal in the post-genomic era is to identify and characterise disease susceptibility genes and to apply this knowledge to disease prevention and treatment. Rodents and humans have remarkably similar genomes and share closely related biochemical, physiological and pathological pathways. In this work we utilised the latest information on the mouse transcriptome as revealed by the RIKEN FANTOM2 project to identify novel human disease-related candidate genes. We define a new term "patholog" to mean a homolog of a human disease-related gene encoding a product (transcript, anti-sense or protein potentially relevant to disease. Rather than just focus on Mendelian inheritance, we applied the analysis to all potential pathologs regardless of their inheritance pattern. Results Bioinformatic analysis and human curation of 60,770 RIKEN full-length mouse cDNA clones produced 2,578 sequences that showed similarity (70–85% identity to known human-disease genes. Using a newly developed biological information extraction and annotation tool (FACTS in parallel with human expert analysis of 17,051 MEDLINE scientific abstracts we identified 182 novel potential pathologs. Of these, 36 were identified by computational tools only, 49 by human expert analysis only and 97 by both methods. These pathologs were related to neoplastic (53%, hereditary (24%, immunological (5%, cardio-vascular (4%, or other (14%, disorders. Conclusions Large scale genome projects continue to produce a vast amount of data with potential application to the study of human disease. For this potential to be realised we need intelligent strategies for data categorisation and the ability to link sequence data with relevant literature. This paper demonstrates the power of combining human expert annotation with FACTS, a newly developed bioinformatics tool, to identify novel pathologs from within large-scale mouse transcript datasets.

  13. Production of glycosylated physiologically normal human α1-antitrypsin by mouse fibroblasts modified by insertion of a human α1-antitrypsin cDNA using a retroviral vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garver, R.I. Jr.; Chytil, A.; Karlsson, S.

    1987-01-01

    α 2 -Antitrypsin (α 1 AT) deficiency is a hereditary disorder characterized by reduced serum levels of α 1 AT, resulting in destruction of the lower respiratory tract by neutrophil elastase. As an approach to augment α 1 AT levels in this disorder with physiologically normal human α 1 AT, the authors have integrated a full-length normal human α 1 AT cDNA into the genome of mouse fibroblasts. To accomplish this, the retroviral vector N2 was modified by inserting the simian virus 40 early promoter followed by the α 1 AT cDNA. Southern analysis demonstrated that the intact cDNA was present in the genome of selected clones of the transfected murine fibroblasts psi2 and infected NIH 3T3. The clones produced three mRNA transcripts containing human α 1 AT sequences, secreted an α 1 AT molecule recognized by an anti-human α 1 AT antibody, with the same molecular mass as normal human α 1 AT and that complexed with and inhibited human neutrophil elastase. The psi2 produced α 1 AT was glycosylated, and when infused intravenously into mice, it had a serum half-life similar to normal α 1 AT purified from human plasma and markedly longer than that of nonglycosylated human α 1 AT cDNA-directed yeast-produced α 1 AT. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using a retroviral vector to insert the normal human α 1 AT cDNA into non-α 1 AT-producing cells, resulting in the synthesis and secretion of physiologically normal α 1 AT

  14. Intonational speech prosody encoding in the human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C; Hamilton, L S; Chang, E F

    2017-08-25

    Speakers of all human languages regularly use intonational pitch to convey linguistic meaning, such as to emphasize a particular word. Listeners extract pitch movements from speech and evaluate the shape of intonation contours independent of each speaker's pitch range. We used high-density electrocorticography to record neural population activity directly from the brain surface while participants listened to sentences that varied in intonational pitch contour, phonetic content, and speaker. Cortical activity at single electrodes over the human superior temporal gyrus selectively represented intonation contours. These electrodes were intermixed with, yet functionally distinct from, sites that encoded different information about phonetic features or speaker identity. Furthermore, the representation of intonation contours directly reflected the encoding of speaker-normalized relative pitch but not absolute pitch. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the gibberellin biosynthetic enzyme ent-kaurene synthase B from pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, S; Saito, T; Abe, H; Yamane, H; Murofushi, N; Kamiya, Y

    1996-08-01

    The first committed step in the formation of diterpenoids leading to gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis is the conversion of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP) to ent-kaurene. ent-Kaurene synthase A (KSA) catalyzes the conversion of GGDP to copalyl diphosphate (CDP), which is subsequently converted to ent-kaurene by ent-kaurene synthase B (KSB). A full-length KSB cDNA was isolated from developing cotyledons in immature seeds of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima L.). Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed from the amino acid sequences obtained from the purified protein to amplify a cDNA fragment, which was used for library screening. The isolated full-length cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein, which demonstrated the KSB activity to cyclize [3H]CDP to [3H]ent-kaurene. The KSB transcript was most abundant in growing tissues, but was detected in every organ in pumpkin seedlings. The deduced amino acid sequence shares significant homology with other terpene cyclases, including the conserved DDXXD motif, a putative divalent metal ion-diphosphate complex binding site. A putative transit peptide sequence that may target the translated product into the plastids is present in the N-terminal region.

  16. Human glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT): Localization to 8q24.3, cDNA and genomic sequences, and polymorphic sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohocki, M.M.; Sullivan, L.S.; Daiger, S.P. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Two frequent protein variants of glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) (E.C.2.6.1.2) have been used as genetic markers in humans for more than two decades, although chromosomal mapping of the GPT locus in the 1980s produced conflicting results. To resolve this conflict and develop useful DNA markers for this gene, we isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones of GPT. We have definitively mapped human GPT to the terminus of 8q using several methods. First, two cosmids shown to contain the GPT sequence were derived from a chromosome 8-specific library. Second, by fluorescence in situ hybridization, we mapped the cosmid containing the human GPT gene to chromosome band 8q24.3. Third, we mapped the rat gpt cDNA to the syntenic region of rat chromosome 7. Finally, PCR primers specific to human GPT amplify sequences contained within a {open_quotes}half-YAC{close_quotes} from the long arm of chromosome 8, that is, a YAC containing the 8q telomere. The human GPT genomic sequence spans 2.7 kb and consists of 11 exons, ranging in size from 79 to 243 bp. The exonic sequence encodes a protein of 495 amino acids that is nearly identical to the previously reported protein sequence of human GPT-1. The two polymorphic GPT isozymes are the result of a nucleotide substitution in codon 14. In addition, a cosmid containing the GPT sequence also contains a previously unmapped, polymorphic microsatellite sequence, D8S421. The cloned GPT gene and associated polymorphisms will be useful for linkage and physical mapping of disease loci that map to the terminus of 8q, including atypical vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD1) and epidermolysis bullosa simplex, type Ogna (EBS1). In addition, this will be a useful system for characterizing the telomeric region of 8q. Finally, determination of the molecular basis of the GPT isozyme variants will permit PCR-based detection of this world-wide polymorphism. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Cloning the human lysozyme cDNA: Inverted Alu repeat in the mRNA and in situ hybridization for macrophages and Paneth cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, L.P.; Keshav, S.; Gordon, S.

    1988-01-01

    Lysozyme is a major secretory product of human and rodent macrophages and a useful marker for myelomonocytic cells. Based on the known human lysozyme amino acid sequence, oligonucleotides were synthesized and used as probes to screen a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-treated U937 cDNA library. A full-length human lysozyme cDNA clone, pHL-2, was obtained and characterized. Sequence analysis shows that human lysozyme, like chicken lysozyme, has in 18-amino-acid-long signal peptide, but unlike the chicken lysozyme cDNA, the human lysozyme cDNA has a >1-kilobase-long 3' nontranslated sequence. Interestingly, within this 3' region, an inverted repeat of the Alu family of repetitive sequences was discovered. In RNA blot analyses, DNA probes prepared from pHL-2 can be used to detect lysozyme mRNA not only from human but also from mouse and rat. Moreover, by in situ hybridization, complementary RNA transcripts have been used as probes to detect lysozyme mRNA in mouse macrophages and Paneth cells. This human lysozyme cDNA clone is therefore likely to be a useful molecular probe for studying macrophage distribution and gene expression

  18. Cloning the human lysozyme cDNA: Inverted Alu repeat in the mRNA and in situ hybridization for macrophages and Paneth cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, L.P.; Keshav, S.; Gordon, S.

    1988-09-01

    Lysozyme is a major secretory product of human and rodent macrophages and a useful marker for myelomonocytic cells. Based on the known human lysozyme amino acid sequence, oligonucleotides were synthesized and used as probes to screen a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-treated U937 cDNA library. A full-length human lysozyme cDNA clone, pHL-2, was obtained and characterized. Sequence analysis shows that human lysozyme, like chicken lysozyme, has in 18-amino-acid-long signal peptide, but unlike the chicken lysozyme cDNA, the human lysozyme cDNA has a >1-kilobase-long 3' nontranslated sequence. Interestingly, within this 3' region, an inverted repeat of the Alu family of repetitive sequences was discovered. In RNA blot analyses, DNA probes prepared from pHL-2 can be used to detect lysozyme mRNA not only from human but also from mouse and rat. Moreover, by in situ hybridization, complementary RNA transcripts have been used as probes to detect lysozyme mRNA in mouse macrophages and Paneth cells. This human lysozyme cDNA clone is therefore likely to be a useful molecular probe for studying macrophage distribution and gene expression.

  19. Cloning the human lysozyme cDNA: inverted Alu repeat in the mRNA and in situ hybridization for macrophages and Paneth cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, L P; Keshav, S; Gordon, S

    1988-01-01

    Lysozyme is a major secretory product of human and rodent macrophages and a useful marker for myelomonocytic cells. Based on the known human lysozyme amino acid sequence, oligonucleotides were synthesized and used as probes to screen a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-treated U937 cDNA library. A full-length human lysozyme cDNA clone, pHL-2, was obtained and characterized. Sequence analysis shows that human lysozyme, like chicken lysozyme, has an 18-amino-acid-long signal peptide, but unlike t...

  20. Csa-19, a radiation-responsive human gene, identified by an unbiased two-gel cDNA library screening method in human cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Meltzer, S. J.; Han, L. H.; Zhang, X. F.; Shi, Z. M.; Harrison, G. H.; Abraham, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method was used to identify candidate genes whose expression is altered in cancer cells by ionizing radiation. Transcriptional induction of randomly selected genes in control versus irradiated human HL60 cells was compared. Among several complementary DNA (cDNA) clones recovered by this approach, one cDNA clone (CL68-5) was downregulated in X-irradiated HL60 cells but unaffected by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate, forskolin, or cyclosporin-A. DNA sequencing of the CL68-5 cDNA revealed 100% nucleotide sequence homology to the reported human Csa-19 gene. Northern blot analysis of RNA from control and irradiated cells revealed the expression of a single 0.7-kilobase (kb) messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript. This 0.7-kb Csa-19 mRNA transcript was also expressed in a variety of human adult and corresponding fetal normal tissues. Moreover, when the effect of X- or fission neutron-irradiation on Csa-19 mRNA was compared in cultured human cells differing in p53 gene status (p53-/- versus p53+/+), downregulation of Csa-19 by X-rays or fission neutrons was similar in p53-wild type and p53-null cell lines. Our results provide the first known example of a radiation-responsive gene in human cancer cells whose expression is not associated with p53, adenylate cyclase or protein kinase C.

  1. [ENCODE apophenia or a panglossian analysis of the human genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casane, Didier; Fumey, Julien; Laurenti, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In September 2012, a batch of more than 30 articles presenting the results of the ENCODE (Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements) project was released. Many of these articles appeared in Nature and Science, the two most prestigious interdisciplinary scientific journals. Since that time, hundreds of other articles dedicated to the further analyses of the Encode data have been published. The time of hundreds of scientists and hundreds of millions of dollars were not invested in vain since this project had led to an apparent paradigm shift: contrary to the classical view, 80% of the human genome is not junk DNA, but is functional. This hypothesis has been criticized by evolutionary biologists, sometimes eagerly, and detailed refutations have been published in specialized journals with impact factors far below those that published the main contribution of the Encode project to our understanding of genome architecture. In 2014, the Encode consortium released a new batch of articles that neither suggested that 80% of the genome is functional nor commented on the disappearance of their 2012 scientific breakthrough. Unfortunately, by that time many biologists had accepted the idea that 80% of the genome is functional, or at least, that this idea is a valid alternative to the long held evolutionary genetic view that it is not. In order to understand the dynamics of the genome, it is necessary to re-examine the basics of evolutionary genetics because, not only are they well established, they also will allow us to avoid the pitfall of a panglossian interpretation of Encode. Actually, the architecture of the genome and its dynamics are the product of trade-offs between various evolutionary forces, and many structural features are not related to functional properties. In other words, evolution does not produce the best of all worlds, not even the best of all possible worlds, but only one possible world. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  2. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  3. Cloning of the cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila white gene and mapping to chromosome 21q22.3.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H.; Rossier, C.; Lalioti, M. D.; Lynn, A.; Chakravarti, A.; Perrin, G.; Antonarakis, S. E.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to contribute to the transcript map of human chromosome 21 and the understanding of the pathophysiology of trisomy 21, we have used exon trapping to identify fragments of chromosome 21 genes. Two trapped exons, from pools of chromosome 21-specific cosmids, showed homology to the Drosophila white (w) gene. We subsequently cloned the corresponding cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila w gene (hW) from human retina and fetal brain cDNA libraries. The gene belongs to the ATP-b...

  4. Dynamic encoding of speech sequence probability in human temporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Matthew K; Bouchard, Kristofer E; Tang, Claire; Chang, Edward F

    2015-05-06

    Sensory processing involves identification of stimulus features, but also integration with the surrounding sensory and cognitive context. Previous work in animals and humans has shown fine-scale sensitivity to context in the form of learned knowledge about the statistics of the sensory environment, including relative probabilities of discrete units in a stream of sequential auditory input. These statistics are a defining characteristic of one of the most important sequential signals humans encounter: speech. For speech, extensive exposure to a language tunes listeners to the statistics of sound sequences. To address how speech sequence statistics are neurally encoded, we used high-resolution direct cortical recordings from human lateral superior temporal cortex as subjects listened to words and nonwords with varying transition probabilities between sound segments. In addition to their sensitivity to acoustic features (including contextual features, such as coarticulation), we found that neural responses dynamically encoded the language-level probability of both preceding and upcoming speech sounds. Transition probability first negatively modulated neural responses, followed by positive modulation of neural responses, consistent with coordinated predictive and retrospective recognition processes, respectively. Furthermore, transition probability encoding was different for real English words compared with nonwords, providing evidence for online interactions with high-order linguistic knowledge. These results demonstrate that sensory processing of deeply learned stimuli involves integrating physical stimulus features with their contextual sequential structure. Despite not being consciously aware of phoneme sequence statistics, listeners use this information to process spoken input and to link low-level acoustic representations with linguistic information about word identity and meaning. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357203-12$15.00/0.

  5. Characterization of cDNA for human tripeptidyl peptidase II: The N-terminal part of the enzyme is similar to subtilisin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkinson, B.; Jonsson, A-K

    1991-01-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II is a high molecular weight serine exopeptidase, which has been purified from rat liver and human erythrocytes. Four clones, representing 4453 bp, or 90% of the mRNA of the human enzyme, have been isolated from two different cDNA libraries. One clone, designated A2, was obtained after screening a human B-lymphocyte cDNA library with a degenerated oligonucleotide mixture. The B-lymphocyte cDNA library, obtained from human fibroblasts, were rescreened with a 147 bp fragment from the 5' part of the A2 clone, whereby three different overlapping cDNA clones could be isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence, 1196 amino acid residues, corresponding to the longest open rading frame of the assembled nucleotide sequence, was compared to sequences of current databases. This revealed a 56% similarity between the bacterial enzyme subtilisin and the N-terminal part of tripeptidyl peptidase II. The enzyme was found to be represented by two different mRNAs of 4.2 and 5.0 kilobases, respectively, which probably result from the utilziation of two different polyadenylation sites. Futhermore, cDNA corresponding to both the N-terminal and C-terminal part of tripeptidyl peptidase II hybridized with genomic DNA from mouse, horse, calf, and hen, even under fairly high stringency conditions, indicating that tripeptidyl peptidase II is highly conserved

  6. Cosmid contig and cDNA map of the human chromosome 13q14 region frequently lost in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapanadze, BI; Brodyanskii, VM; Semov, AB; Baranova, AV; Sulimova, GE; Aitova, SS; Udina, IG; Ptitsyna, SN; Salnikova, LE; Chudinov, OS; Borbiev, TE; Kashuba, VV; Gizatullin, R; Zabarovska, [No Value; Zabarovsky, ER; Fedorova, LI; Zelenin, AV; Rasool, O; Grander, D; Einhorn, S; vanEverdink, W; van den Berg, Anke; Buys, C; Corcoran, M; Chapman, RM; Yankovsky, NK

    1997-01-01

    We constructed a fine physical map of human chromosome 13q14 region between D13S1168 and D13S25 loci consisting of cosmid and cDNA clones. This interval had been shown to be in the center of the genome region frequently lost in a human blood malignancy known as B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

  7. Organization of the gene encoding human lysosomal beta-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreau, H; Bonten, E; Zhou, X Y; D'Azzo, A

    1991-09-01

    Human beta-galactosidase precursor mRNA is alternatively spliced into an abundant 2.5-kb transcript and a minor 2.0-kb species. These templates direct the synthesis of the classic lysosomal beta-D-galactosidase enzyme and of a beta-galactosidase-related protein with no enzymatic activity. Mutations in the beta-galactosidase gene result in the lysosomal storage disorders GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio B syndrome. To analyze the genetic lesions underlying these syndromes we have isolated the human beta-galactosidase gene and determined its organization. The gene spans greater than 62.5 kb and contains 16 exons. Promoter activity is located on a 236-bp Pst I fragment which works in a direction-independent manner. A second Pst I fragment of 851 bp located upstream from the first negatively regulates initiation of transcription. The promoter has characteristics of a housekeeping gene with GC-rich stretches and five potential SP1 transcription elements on two strands. We identified multiple cap sites of the mRNA, the major of which maps 53 bp upstream from the translation initiation codon. The portion of the human pre-mRNA undergoing alternative splicing is encoded by exons II-VII. Sequence analysis of equivalent mouse exons showed an identical genomic organization. However, translation of the corresponding differentially spliced murine transcript is interrupted in its reading frame. Thus, the mouse gene cannot encode a beta-galactosidase-related protein in a manner similar to the human counterpart. Differential expression of the murine beta-galactosidase transcript is observed in different mouse tissues.

  8. Cloning of human basic A1, a distinct 59-kDa dystrophin-associated protein encoded on chromosome 8q23-24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, A.H. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yoshida, Mikiharu; Hagiwara, Yasuko; Ozawa, Eijiro [National Institute of Neuroscience, Ogawa Higashi, Kodaira (Japan); Anderson, M.S.; Feener, C.A.; Selig, S. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kunkel, L.M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]|[Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Children`s Hosptial, Boston, MA (United States)

    1994-05-10

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by defects of dystrophin, which forms a part of the membrane cytoskeleton of specialized cells such as muscle. It has been previously shown that the dystrophin-associated protein A1 (59-kDa DAP) is actually a heterogeneous group of phosphorylated proteins consisting of an acidic ({alpha}-A1) and a distinct basic ({beta}-A1) component. Partial peptide sequence of the A1 complex purified from rabbit muscle permitted the design of oligonucleotide probes that were used to isolate a cDNA for one human isoform of A1. This cDNA encodes a basic A1 isoform that is distinct from the recently described syntrophins in Torpedo and mouse and is expressed in many tissues with at least five distinct mRNA species of 5.9, 4.8, 4.3, 3.1, and 1.5 kb. A comparison of the human cDNA sequence with the GenBank expressed sequence tag (EST) data base has identified a relative from human skeletal muscle, EST25263, which is probably a human homologue of the published mouse syntrophin 2. The authors have mapped the human basic component of A1 and EST25263 genes to chromosomes 8q23-24 and 16, respectively.

  9. Cloning and characterization of an Armillaria gallica cDNA encoding protoilludene synthase, which catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of antimicrobial melleolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Benedikt; Heinig, Uwe; Grothe, Torsten; Stadler, Marc; Jennewein, Stefan

    2011-03-04

    Melleolides and related fungal sesquiterpenoid aryl esters are antimicrobial and cytotoxic natural products derived from cultures of the Homobasidiomycetes genus Armillaria. The initial step in the biosynthesis of all melleolides involves cyclization of the universal sesquiterpene precursor farnesyl diphosphate to produce protoilludene, a reaction catalyzed by protoilludene synthase. We achieved the partial purification of protoilludene synthase from a mycelial culture of Armillaria gallica and found that 6-protoilludene was its exclusive reaction product. Therefore, a further isomerization reaction is necessary to convert the 6-7 double bond into the 7-8 double bond found in melleolides. We expressed an A. gallica protoilludene synthase cDNA in Escherichia coli, and this also led to the exclusive production of 6-protoilludene. Sequence comparison of the isolated sesquiterpene synthase revealed a distant relationship to other fungal terpene synthases. The isolation of the genomic sequence identified the 6-protoilludene synthase to be present as a single copy gene in the genome of A. gallica, possessing an open reading frame interrupted with eight introns.

  10. Cloning and Characterization of an Armillaria gallica cDNA Encoding Protoilludene Synthase, Which Catalyzes the First Committed Step in the Synthesis of Antimicrobial Melleolides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Benedikt; Heinig, Uwe; Grothe, Torsten; Stadler, Marc; Jennewein, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Melleolides and related fungal sesquiterpenoid aryl esters are antimicrobial and cytotoxic natural products derived from cultures of the Homobasidiomycetes genus Armillaria. The initial step in the biosynthesis of all melleolides involves cyclization of the universal sesquiterpene precursor farnesyl diphosphate to produce protoilludene, a reaction catalyzed by protoilludene synthase. We achieved the partial purification of protoilludene synthase from a mycelial culture of Armillaria gallica and found that 6-protoilludene was its exclusive reaction product. Therefore, a further isomerization reaction is necessary to convert the 6–7 double bond into the 7–8 double bond found in melleolides. We expressed an A. gallica protoilludene synthase cDNA in Escherichia coli, and this also led to the exclusive production of 6-protoilludene. Sequence comparison of the isolated sesquiterpene synthase revealed a distant relationship to other fungal terpene synthases. The isolation of the genomic sequence identified the 6-protoilludene synthase to be present as a single copy gene in the genome of A. gallica, possessing an open reading frame interrupted with eight introns. PMID:21148562

  11. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding (S)-cis-N-methylstylopine 14-hydroxylase from opium poppy, a key enzyme in sanguinarine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2013-02-15

    Sanguinarine is a benzo[c]phenenthridine alkaloid with potent antimicrobial properties found commonly in plants of the Papaveraceae, including the roots of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). Sanguinarine is formed from the central 1-benzylisoquinoline intermediate (S)-reticuline via the protoberberine alkaloid (S)-scoulerine, which undergoes five enzymatic oxidations and an N-methylation. The first four oxidations from (S)-scoulerine are catalyzed by cytochromes P450, whereas the final conversion involves a flavoprotein oxidase. All but one gene in the biosynthetic pathway from (S)-reticuline to sanguinarine has been identified. In this communication, we report the isolation and characterization of (S)-cis-N-methylstylopine 14-hydroxylase (MSH) from opium poppy based on the transcriptional induction in elicitor-treated cell suspension cultures and root-specific expression of the corresponding gene. Along with protopine 6-hydroxylase, which catalyzes the subsequent and penultimate step in sanguinarine biosynthesis, MSH is a member of the CYP82N subfamily of cytochromes P450. The full-length MSH cDNA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the recombinant microsomal protein was tested for enzymatic activity using 25 benzylisoquinoline alkaloids representing a wide range of structural subgroups. The only enzymatic substrates were the N-methylated protoberberine alkaloids N-methylstylopine and N-methylcanadine, which were converted to protopine and allocryptopine, respectively. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Frequency encoded optical assessment of human retinal physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Michaely, Roland; Bachmann, Adrian; Lassner, Theo; Blatter, Cedric

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate in-vivo functional imaging of the human retina with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography employing frequency encoding of an excitation pattern. The principle is based on projecting a modulated rectangular pattern across the foveal region and acquiring a time series of B-Scans at the same vertical position across the pattern. The idea is to modulate the excitation with a frequency that is distinct from the heartbeat and irregular motion artifacts. Fourier analysis of the time series at each transverse position in the B-scan series allows assessing the retinal response as change in the FDOCT reflectivity signal exactly at the pattern modulation frequency. We observe a change in retinal reflectivity within the region of the outer segment photoreceptor layer exactly at the pattern modulation frequency.

  13. Structure of the human gene encoding the associated microfibrillar protein (MFAP1) and localization to chromosome 15q15-q21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, H.; Chow, M.; Abrams, W.R. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    Microfibrils with a diameter of 10-12 nm, found either in assocation with elastin or independently, are an important component of the extracellular matrix of many tissues. To extend understanding of the proteins composing these microfibrils, the cDNA and gene encoding the human associated microfibril protein (MRAP1) have been cloned and characterized. The coding portion is contained in 9 exons, and the sequence is very homologous to the previously described chick cDNA, but does not appear to share homology or domain motifs with any other known protein. Interestingly, the gene has been localized to chromosome 15q15-q21 by somatic hybrid cell and chromosome in situ analyses. This is the same chromosomal region to which the fibrillin gene, FBN1, known to be defective in the Marfan syndrome, has been mapped. MFAP1 is a candidate gene for heritable diseases affecting microfibrils. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Cloning of a horn fly cDNA, HialphaE7, encoding an esterase whose transcript concentration is elevated in diazinon-resistant flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, F D

    2000-11-01

    Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to clone two esterase cDNAs from a diazinon-resistant field population of horn flies that expresses qualitative and quantitative differences in esterases compared with a susceptible population. The open reading frame from one of the esterase cDNAs, HialphaE7, exhibits substantial amino-acid identity to an esterase associated with diazinon resistance in Lucilia cuprina. RNA Northern blots showed that HialphaE7 mRNA was more abundant in the diazinon-resistant population than the susceptible population. DNA copy number analysis did not reveal major differences in HialphaE7 gene copy number between the two populations. The full-length cDNA to HialphaE7 was cloned and sequenced, and found to contain all of the highly conserved sequence elements associated with carboxyl/cholinesterases. The HialphaE7 homologs in diazinon-resistant strains of L. cuprina and Musca domestica have been shown to possess an amino-acid substitution conferring diazinon hydrolytic activity to the esterase enzyme. This amino-acid substitution was not found in diazinon-resistant horn flies examined by allele-specific PCR. Individual flies from the resistant field population were phenotyped as diazinon-resistant or diazinon-susceptible by topical diazinon application bioassays and total RNA isolated and hybridized to HialphaE7 probe in ribonuclease protection assays. HialphaE7 transcript was expressed at a five-fold higher level in resistant female individual flies than in susceptible female individuals.

  15. Molecular characterization of a Leishmania donovani cDNA clone with similarity to human 20S proteasome a-type subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C B; Jørgensen, L; Jensen, A T

    2000-01-01

    Using plasma from patients infected or previously infected with Leishmania donovanii, we isolated a L. donovanii cDNA clone with similarity to the proteasome a-type subunit from humans and other eukaryotes. The cDNA clone, designated LePa, was DNA sequenced and Northern blot analysis of L...... out of 25 patients with visceral leishmaniasis and four out of 18 patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis contained IgG antibodies which reacted with the purified LePa fusion protein as evaluated in an ELISA. The LePa DNA sequence was inserted into an eukaryotic expression vector and Balb/c mice were...

  16. Efficient cDNA cloning by direct phenotypic correction of a mutant human cell line (HPRT-) using an Epstein-Barr virus derived cDNA expression vector.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B.G.M. Belt; W. Jongmans; J. de Wit (Jan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude); P. van de Putte (Pieter)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractHuman cells are, in general, poor recipients of foreign DNA, which has severely hampered the cloning of genes by direct phenotypic correction of deficient human cell lines after DNA mediated gene transfer. In this communication a methodology is presented which largely circumvents this

  17. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this proposal is to create a cDNA map of the human genome. Mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach will generate 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  18. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z.

    1990-01-01

    We have synthesized 32 P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies

  19. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We have synthesized {sup 32}P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA from flowers of Cynara cardunculus encoding cyprosin (an aspartic proteinase) and its use to study the organ-specific expression of cyprosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, M C; Xue, Z T; Pietrzak, M; Pais, M S; Brodelius, P E

    1994-03-01

    Poly(A)+ RNA isolated from flower buds of Cynara cardunculus has been used to prepare a cDNA library. Screening of the cDNA after expression of cloned DNA with antibodies raised against the large subunit of cyprosin 3 resulted in the isolation of six positive clones. One of these clones (cypro1s; a 1.7 kb Eco RI fragment) codes for cyprosin. The nucleotide sequence contain a 1419 bp open reading frame coding for 473 amino acids (aa) including a putative full-length mature protein (440 aa) and a partial prosequence (33 aa). Cypro1s contains a 162 bp 3' non-coding region followed by a poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence shows high homology to other plant aspartic proteinases. The homology to mammalian and microbial aspartic proteinases is somewhat lower. Plant aspartic proteinases contain an insert of around 100 aa. We are modelling where this plant-specific insert will appear in the structure of cyprosin. Using cypro1s as a probe in northern blot analysis, the expression of cyprosin in developing flowers and other tissues has been studied. The signal on the northern blot increased for RNA samples from early (flower buds 6 mm in length) to later stages of floral development (flower buds up to 40 mm in length). In late stages of floral development (open flowers 50 mm in length and styles from such flowers) no hybridization signal was visualized showing that the synthesis of mRNA encoding the cyprosin starts in early stages of floral development and switches off at maturation of the flower.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. [Construction of a subtracted cDNA library of differentially expressed genes in human normal liver tissue and primary hepatocellular carcinoma tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Xu, X; Han, B; Huang, G; Qian, G; Liang, P; Yang, T

    2001-12-01

    To construct a subtracted cDNA library of differentially expressed genes in human normal liver tissue and primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissue. Using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), a novel technique has been described recently. cDNA fragments of missing or low expressing tumor suppressor genes in HCC tissue were isolated using paracancerous normal liver tissue and HCC tissue as targets. Then these cDNA fragments were directly inserted into T/A cloning vector to set up the subtractive library. Amplification of the library was carried out with transformation of E.coli by high voltage electroperforation. One hundred positive bacteria clones were randomly picked and identified using enzyme restriction method. The amplified library contained more than 4,000 positive bacteria clones. Random analysis of 100 clones with enzyme restriction method showed that all clones contained 200-600 bp inserts. A subtracted cDNA library of differentially expressed genes in human normal liver tissue and HCC tissue is constructed successfully with SSH and T/A cloning techniques. The library is efficient and lays solid foundation for screening and cloning new and specific missing or low expressing tumor suppressor genes of HCC.

  2. [Construction and screening of the subtracted cDNA library of human large cell lung cancer lines with different metastatic potentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Li; Zhou, Qinghua; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Daxing; Ma, Li; Yan, Huiqin; Zhu, Wen; Liu, Hongyu

    2007-06-20

    Screening metastatic-related genes of lung cancer is helpful to understand the molecular mechanisms of lung cancer invasion and metastasis. In order to screen the differential expression genes related to metastasis of lung cancer, we constructed and preliminarily screened the subtracted cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer cell lines with different metastatic potentials in this study. Subtracted cDNA library was constructed in the different metastastic potential cell lines NL9980 and L9981 by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method. The positive clones were preliminarily screened by blue-white colony based on the α-complementary principal, and precisely identified by PCR. The forward and reverse subtracted libraries were screened and identified by dot blot to obtain the clones corresponding to differential expression segments. The subtracted cDNA libraries were successfully constructed in the different metastastic potential cell lines NL9980 and L9981. Three hundred and seven positive clones in the forward subtracted library and 78 positive clones in the reverse subtracted library were obtained by the dot blot method. SSH is proved to be an efficient tool for differential expression gene cloning. The forward and reverse subtracted cDNA libraries of different metastastic potential cell lines are constructed by this method. The differential expression genes related to tumor metastasis might exist in the human large cell lung cancer cell lines with different metastasis potential.

  3. Developmentally regulated expression of a human ''finger'' - containing gene encoded by the 5' half of the ret transforming gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, M.; Inaguma, Y.; Hiai, H.; Hirose, F.

    1988-04-01

    The authors isolated and sequenced a cDNA clone of the human gene encoded by the 5' half of the ret transforming gene. The nucleotide sequence indicates that it encodes a protein with ''finger'' structures which represent putative metal- and nucleic acid-binding domains. Transcriptions of this gene was detected at high levels in a variety of human and rodent tumor cell lines, mouse testis, and embryos. In addition, a unique transcript was observed in testis RNA. When the expression of the unique transcript was examined at different stages of spermatogenesis, a striking increase in mRNA levels accompanied progression from meiotic prophase pachytene spermatocytes to postmeiotic round spermatids. This finger-containing gene may thus function in male germ cell development.

  4. [Construction of anti-sense cDNA library of human breast cancer cells during apoptosis induced by trichostatin A and preliminary screening of essential genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Li; Wang, Bei-Bei; Wu, Peng; Lu, Yun-Ping; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Ma, Ding

    2009-02-24

    To construct an anti-sense cDNA library of human breast cancer cells to screen essential genes with anti-tumor effects on apoptosis of human breast cancer cells induced by trichostatin A. Poly (A)(+)RNA was extracted from human breast cancer cells of the line MCF-7 treated by trichostatin A for 0, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, or 72 h. cDNA were synthesized and inserted reversely into PCEP 4 vector to construct an anti-sense cDNA library. HeLa cells were transfected with the library DNA or blank PCEP 4 vector as control group. All the transfected cells were screened by 200 nmol/L trichostatin A and 200 microg/ml hygromycin B. Screening was stopped when the control cells died. Then the surviving cell clones were amplified and Hirt DNA was extracted. Several expressed sequence tags were thus obtained. The data were analyzed by bioinformatics and interested EST fragment was chosen for preliminary functional screening. An anti-sense cDNA library was constructed containing 2 x 10(6) independent clones with an insert efficiency of more than 90%; DNA sequencing and bioinformatic analysis suggested that the No.27 survival clone was zinc transporter LIV1 showing a strong resistance against trichostatin A-induced apoptosis during functional screening. An anti-sense cDNA library with high quantity and quality has been successfully constructed; LIV1 gene may be one of the essential genes with anti-tumor effects on apoptosis induced by trichostatin A.

  5. High-level expression of human insulin receptor cDNA in mouse NIH 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, J.; Okamoto, A.K.; Thys, R.; Bell, G.I.; Steiner, D.F.; Hofmann, C.A.

    1987-08-01

    In order to develop a simple, efficient system for the high-level expression of human insulin receptors in eukaryotic cells, a full-length human kidney insulin receptor cDNA was inserted into a bovine papilloma virus vector under the control of the mouse metallothionein promoter. After transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with this construct, seven cell lines expressing insulin receptors were isolated; two cell lines had more than 10/sup 6/ receptors per cell. The cell line with the highest /sup 125/I-insulin binding (NIH 3T3 HIR3.5) had 6 x 10/sup 6/ receptors with a K/sub d/ of 10/sup -9/ M. This level was not dependent on exposure to metals but could be increased further to 2 x 10/sup 7/ receptors per cell by addition of sodium butyrate to the culture medium. The ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits had apparent molecular weights of 147,000 and 105,000, respectively (compared to 135,000 and 95,000 in IM-9 human lymphocytes), values identical to those of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of the insulin receptors of nontransformed NIH 3T3 cells. This size difference was due to altered carbohydrate composition, as N-glycanase digestion reduced the apparent receptor subunit size of the transfected cells and IM-9 lymphocytes to identical values. The alteration in N-linked oligosaccharide composition could not be ascribed to differences in the kinetics of posttranslational processing of the insulin receptors, which was comparable to that of other cells studied. The basal rate of glycogen synthesis in the cells overexpressing insulin receptors was increased 4- to 5-fold compared with controls. Low levels of added insulin (0.1 nM) caused a 50% increase in the rate of glycogen synthesis

  6. High-level expression of human insulin receptor cDNA in mouse NIH 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittaker, J.; Okamoto, A.K.; Thys, R.; Bell, G.I.; Steiner, D.F.; Hofmann, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    In order to develop a simple, efficient system for the high-level expression of human insulin receptors in eukaryotic cells, a full-length human kidney insulin receptor cDNA was inserted into a bovine papilloma virus vector under the control of the mouse metallothionein promoter. After transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with this construct, seven cell lines expressing insulin receptors were isolated; two cell lines had more than 10 6 receptors per cell. The cell line with the highest 125 I-insulin binding (NIH 3T3 HIR3.5) had 6 x 10 6 receptors with a K/sub d/ of 10 -9 M. This level was not dependent on exposure to metals but could be increased further to 2 x 10 7 receptors per cell by addition of sodium butyrate to the culture medium. The α and β subunits had apparent molecular weights of 147,000 and 105,000, respectively (compared to 135,000 and 95,000 in IM-9 human lymphocytes), values identical to those of the α and β subunits of the insulin receptors of nontransformed NIH 3T3 cells. This size difference was due to altered carbohydrate composition, as N-glycanase digestion reduced the apparent receptor subunit size of the transfected cells and IM-9 lymphocytes to identical values. The alteration in N-linked oligosaccharide composition could not be ascribed to differences in the kinetics of posttranslational processing of the insulin receptors, which was comparable to that of other cells studied. The basal rate of glycogen synthesis in the cells overexpressing insulin receptors was increased 4- to 5-fold compared with controls. Low levels of added insulin (0.1 nM) caused a 50% increase in the rate of glycogen synthesis

  7. CAG-encoded polyglutamine length polymorphism in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Michael R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expansion of polyglutamine-encoding CAG trinucleotide repeats has been identified as the pathogenic mutation in nine different genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. The majority of individuals clinically diagnosed with spinocerebellar ataxia do not have mutations within known disease genes, and it is likely that additional ataxias or Huntington disease-like disorders will be found to be caused by this common mutational mechanism. We set out to determine the length distributions of CAG-polyglutamine tracts for the entire human genome in a set of healthy individuals in order to characterize the nature of polyglutamine repeat length variation across the human genome, to establish the background against which pathogenic repeat expansions can be detected, and to prioritize candidate genes for repeat expansion disorders. Results We found that repeats, including those in known disease genes, have unique distributions of glutamine tract lengths, as measured by fragment analysis of PCR-amplified repeat regions. This emphasizes the need to characterize each distribution and avoid making generalizations between loci. The best predictors of known disease genes were occurrence of a long CAG-tract uninterrupted by CAA codons in their reference genome sequence, and high glutamine tract length variance in the normal population. We used these parameters to identify eight priority candidate genes for polyglutamine expansion disorders. Twelve CAG-polyglutamine repeats were invariant and these can likely be excluded as candidates. We outline some confusion in the literature about this type of data, difficulties in comparing such data between publications, and its application to studies of disease prevalence in different populations. Analysis of Gene Ontology-based functions of CAG-polyglutamine-containing genes provided a visual framework for interpretation of these genes' functions. All nine known disease genes were involved in DNA

  8. Analysis of cellular responses to aflatoxin B{sub 1} in yeast expressing human cytochrome P450 1A2 using cDNA microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Yingying [Departmental of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Breeden, Linda L. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Fan, Wenhong [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Zhao Lueping [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Eaton, David L. [Departmental of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Zarbl, Helmut [Departmental of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States) and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: hzarbl@fhcrc.org

    2006-01-29

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB{sub 1}) is a potent human hepatotoxin and hepatocarcinogen produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus. In human, AFB{sub 1} is bioactivated by cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, primarily CYP1A2, to the genotoxic epoxide that forms N{sup 7}-guanine DNA adducts. To characterize the transcriptional responses to genotoxic insults from AFB{sub 1}, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered to express human CYP1A2 was exposed to doses of AFB{sub 1} that resulted in minimal lethality, but substantial genotoxicity. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated a dose and time dependent S phase delay under the same treatment conditions, indicating a checkpoint response to DNA damage. Replicate cDNA microarray analyses of AFB{sub 1} treated cells showed that about 200 genes were significantly affected by the exposure. The genes activated by AFB{sub 1}-treatment included RAD51, DUN1 and other members of the DNA damage response signature reported in a previous study with methylmethane sulfonate and ionizing radiation [A.P. Gasch, M. Huang, S. Metzner, D. Botstein, S.J. Elledge, P.O. Brown, Genomic expression responses to DNA-damaging agents and the regulatory role of the yeast ATR homolog Mec1p, Mol. Biol. Cell 12 (2001) 2987-3003]. However, unlike previous studies using highly cytotoxic doses, environmental stress response genes [A.P. Gasch, P.T. Spellman, C.M. Kao, O. Carmel-Harel, M.B. Eisen, G. Storz, D. Botstein, P.O. Brown, Genomic expression programs in the response of yeast cells to environmental changes, Mol. Biol. Cell 11 (2000) 4241-4257] were largely unaffected by our dosing regimen. About half of the transcripts affected are also known to be cell cycle regulated. The most strongly repressed transcripts were those encoding the histone genes and a group of genes that are cell cycle regulated and peak in M phase and early G1. These include most of the known daughter-specific genes. The rapid and coordinated repression of histones and M/G1-specific

  9. Isolation of cDNAs encoding subunit VIb of cytochrome c oxidase and steady-state levels of coxVIb mRNA in different tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taanman, J. W.; Schrage, C.; Ponne, N. J.; Das, A. T.; Bolhuis, P. A.; de Vries, H.; Agsteribbe, E.

    1990-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone specifying the nuclear-encoded subunit VIb of human cytochrome c oxidase (COX) was isolated from a human skeletal muscle cDNA expression library. This was done with antiserum directed against the group of subunits VIa, b and c of bovine heart COX. A potential

  10. [Construction of the suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 before and after transfection with nm23-H1 gene.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sujuan; Feng, Zhihua; Zhu, Wen; Cai, Chunji; Li, Lu; Sun, Liya; Wan, Haisu; Ma, Li; Zhou, Qinghua

    2008-08-20

    It has been proven that nm23-H1 gene is an important metastaticsuppressed gene of lung cancer. In order to screen the differential expression genes related to nm23-H1 , we constructed the suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) in this study, which lay a solid foundation for further screening and cloning metastatic-related genes of nm23-H1. The forward and reverse suppression subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed in the human large cell lung cancer line L9981 before and after transfection with nm23-H1 gene (L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1) by SSH method. The positive clones were preliminarily screened by bluewhite colony, and precisely identified by PCR. The suppression subtractive cDNA libraries were successfully constructed in the human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene (L9981-nm23-H1 and L9981). After the blue-white screening, about three hundred positive clones in the forward subtracted library and four hundred positive clones in the reverse subtracted library were obtained. Ramdom analysis of 96 clones in each library with colony PCR methods showed that 84 clones in the forward subtracted library and 83 clones in the reverse subtracted library contained (300-750) bp inserts. SSH is proved to be an efficient tool for differential expression gene cloning. The forward and reverse suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene (L9981-nm23-H1 and L9981) are successfully constructed by SSH and T/A cloning technology. The expression of nm23-H1 gene in the human large cell lung cancer cell lines may affect the differential expression of some metastatic-related genes.

  11. The gene encoding topoisomerase I from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, K; Kilbey, B

    1995-09-22

    Part of the topoisomerase I (TopoI)-encoding gene from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) was isolated by PCR from cDNA using oligodeoxyribonucleotides modelled on the highly conserved regions of sequence from other species. The entire TopoI gene was obtained by screening a Pf K1 HindIII-EcoRI genomic library in lambda NM1149 with a random-labeled heterologous probe from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae TopoI gene. DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 2520 nt encoding a deduced protein of 839 amino acids (aa) with no detectable introns. The Pf TopoI aa sequence has about 40% identity with most eukaryotic TopoI homologues. The gene is located as a single copy on chromosome 5 and Northern analysis identified a transcript of 3.8 kb.

  12. Hydrodynamic delivery of human IL-15 cDNA increases murine natural killer cell recovery after syngeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barao, Isabel; Alvarez, Maite; Redelman, Doug; Weiss, Jonathan M; Ortaldo, John R; Wiltrout, Robert H; Murphy, William J

    2011-12-01

    Immune deficiency immediately following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) increases susceptibility to opportunistic infections as well as tumor relapse. Natural Killer (NK) cells play important roles in the resistance to virally infected and transformed cells. Interleukin (IL)-15 has been shown to be essential for NK cell development and survival. We administered human (h) IL-15 cDNA (pIL-15) via hydrodynamic delivery to murine recipients undergoing congenic BMT to determine its effects on NK cell reconstitution. Hydrodynamic pIL-15 delivery resulted in high levels of hIL-15 protein in the serum that lasted for several days and then quickly declined. The appearance of hIL-15 was followed by a significant increase of mature donor-derived NK cells within the bone marrow, spleens, and livers of the treated recipients. No accumulation of immature NK cell progenitors was observed. The NK cells from IL-15-treated recipients displayed an activated phenotype and were lytically active toward tumor targets in vitro to a similar degree as did those cells from recipients treated with control plasmid. This suggests that the predominant effect of IL-15 was a quantitative increase in total NK cell numbers and not qualitative changes in NK cell functions. No toxicities or adverse effects were observed. Studies performed in transplanted mice bearing renal carcinoma tumors demonstrated that this mode of hIL-15 gene delivery resulted in increased antitumor responses. These results support the use of cytokine gene transfer-based regimens as a platform to augment NK cell recovery after BMT. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human mitochondrial HMG CoA synthase: Liver cDNA and partial genomic cloning, chromosome mapping to 1p12-p13, and possible role in vertebrate evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (mHS) is the first enzyme of ketogenesis, whereas the cytoplasmic HS isozyme (cHS) mediates an early step in cholersterol synthesis. We here report the sequence of human and mouse liver mHS cDNAs, the sequence of an HS-like cDNA from Caenorhabditis elegans, the structure of a partial human mHS genomic clone, and the mapping of the human mHS gene to chromosome 1p12-p13. the nucleotide sequence of the human mHS cDNA encodes a mature mHS peptide of 471 residues, with a mean amino acid identity of 66.5% with cHS from mammals and chicken. Comparative analysis of all known mHS and cHS protein and DNA sequences shows a high degree of conservation near the N-terminus that decreases progressively toward the C-terminus and suggests that the two isozymes arose from a common ancestor gene 400-900 million years ago. Comparison of the gene structure of mHS and cHS is also consistant with a recent duplication event. We hypothesize that the physiologic result of the HS gene duplication was the appearance of HS within the mitochondria around the time of emergence of early vertebrates, which linked preexisting pathways of beta oxidation and leucine catabolism and created the HMG CoA pathway of ketogenesis, thus providing a lipid-derived energy source for the vertebrate brain. 56 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Complete cDNA sequence of the preproform of human pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A. Evidence for expression in the brain and induction by cAMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaning, Jesper; Oxvig, Claus; Overgaard, Michael Toft

    1996-01-01

    A cDNA that encodes the prepropeptide of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (preproPAPP-A), a putative metalloproteinase, has been cloned and sequenced. PAPP-A is synthesized in the placenta as a 1627-residue precursor preproprotein with a putative 22-residue signal peptide and a highly basic...

  15. Isolation and sequence of a cDNA clone for human tyrosinase that maps at the mouse c-albino locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, B S; Haq, A K; Pomerantz, S H; Halaban, R

    1987-01-01

    Screening of a lambda gt11 human melanocyte cDNA library with antibodies against hamster tyrosinase (monophenol, L-dopa:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.18.1) resulted in the isolation of 16 clones. The cDNA inserts from 13 of the 16 clones cross-hybridized with each other, indicating that they were from related mRNA species. One of the cDNA clones, Pmel34, detected one mRNA species with an approximate length of 2.4 kilobases that was expressed preferentially in normal and malignant melanocytes but not in other cell types. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence showed that the putative human tyrosinase is composed of 548 amino acids with a molecular weight of 62,610. The deduced protein contains glycosylation sites and histidine-rich sites that could be used for copper binding. Southern blot analysis of DNA derived from newborn mice carrying lethal albino deletion mutations revealed that Pmel34 maps near or at the c-albino locus, the position of the structural gene for tyrosinase. Images PMID:2823263

  16. Human visual system automatically encodes sequential regularities of discrete events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Motohiro; Schröger, Erich; Czigler, István; Ohira, Hideki

    2010-06-01

    For our adaptive behavior in a dynamically changing environment, an essential task of the brain is to automatically encode sequential regularities inherent in the environment into a memory representation. Recent studies in neuroscience have suggested that sequential regularities embedded in discrete sensory events are automatically encoded into a memory representation at the level of the sensory system. This notion is largely supported by evidence from investigations using auditory mismatch negativity (auditory MMN), an event-related brain potential (ERP) correlate of an automatic memory-mismatch process in the auditory sensory system. However, it is still largely unclear whether or not this notion can be generalized to other sensory modalities. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of the visual sensory system to the automatic encoding of sequential regularities using visual mismatch negativity (visual MMN), an ERP correlate of an automatic memory-mismatch process in the visual sensory system. To this end, we conducted a sequential analysis of visual MMN in an oddball sequence consisting of infrequent deviant and frequent standard stimuli, and tested whether the underlying memory representation of visual MMN generation contains only a sensory memory trace of standard stimuli (trace-mismatch hypothesis) or whether it also contains sequential regularities extracted from the repetitive standard sequence (regularity-violation hypothesis). The results showed that visual MMN was elicited by first deviant (deviant stimuli following at least one standard stimulus), second deviant (deviant stimuli immediately following first deviant), and first standard (standard stimuli immediately following first deviant), but not by second standard (standard stimuli immediately following first standard). These results are consistent with the regularity-violation hypothesis, suggesting that the visual sensory system automatically encodes sequential

  17. Identification, characterization, and cloning of a complementary DNA encoding a 60-kd house dust mite allergen (Der f 18) for human beings and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Eric; Hunter, Shirley; Stedman, Kim; Dreitz, Steve; Olivry, Thierry; Hillier, Andrew; McCall, Catherine

    2003-07-01

    House dust mites of the Dermatophagoides genus are the most important cause of perennial allergic disease in both humans and companion animals. Although the major mite allergens for humans are proteins of relatively low molecular weight, this is not the case for dogs. Western blotting shows that canine anti-mite IgE responses are directed primarily toward proteins in the molecular weight range of 50 to 120 kd. The objectives of this study were to characterize a D farinae allergen with a molecular weight of approximately 60 kd and to isolate the cDNA coding for this allergen. A protein of apparent molecular weight of 60 kd was identified by Western blotting by using canine serum IgE from house dust mite-sensitized atopic dogs. The protein was purified from homogenized D farinae mite bodies by ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel filtration and cation exchange HPLC. The presence of IgE directed to the 60-kd protein in sera from humans and dogs with dust mite allergy was measured by FcepsilonRIalpha-based ELISA. A cDNA encoding a full-length 60-kd protein was isolated from a D farinae cDNA library by a combination of both PCR amplification and hybridization screening. A panel of mAbs specific for the 60-kd protein was generated and used to localize the protein in whole body sections of D farinae mites. ELISA showed that the purified protein bound IgE in 54% of the sera from patients with D farinae allergy. In addition, the 60-kd protein was able to bind IgE in 57% to 77% of D farinae -sensitized dogs. A cDNA was isolated that encoded a protein of 462 amino acids, consisting of a 25 amino acid signal sequence and a 437 amino acid mature protein. The calculated molecular weight of the mature protein is 50 kd, and the amino acid sequence contains a single N-glycosylation site. A protein database search showed homology with multiple chitinases. A mAb specific for the 60-kd chitinase recognized the allergen in the mite digestive system, but fecal pellets did not

  18. Yeast two-hybrid analysis of a human trabecular meshwork cDNA library identified EFEMP2 as a novel PITX2 interacting protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Moulinath; Sharp, Michael W; Mirzayans, Farideh; Footz, Tim; Huang, Lijia; Birdi, Chanchal; Walter, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the homeobox transcription factor paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) cause Axenfeld-Reiger syndrome (ARS), which is associated with anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) and glaucoma. To understand ARS pathogenesis, it is essential to know the normal functions of PITX2 and the proteins with which PITX2 interacts in the eye. Therefore, we used a unique cDNA library that we created from human trabecular meshwork (TM) primary cells to discover PITX2-interacting proteins (PIPs). A human TM cDNA library was created from primary cells in the ProQuest Two-Hybrid prey vector: pEXP-AD502. Human PITX2A and PITX2C isoforms were used independently as "bait" to identify novel PIPs. A total of 1.25×10⁶ clones were screened by yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) analyses. PIPs obtained from each Y2H experiment were confirmed by yeast retransformation and mammalian co-immunoprecipitation assays. EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 2 (EFEMP2) was identified by both PITX2A and PITX2C isoforms as a novel PIP from Y2H analyses. EFEMP2 is 443 amino acids long with six epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like modules and one fibulin-like module. The PITX2-interaction domain in EFEMP2 lies between the second EGF-like module and the COOH-terminal fibulin-like module. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in COS-7 cells confirmed the interaction between PITX2 and EFEMP2. We discovered EFEMP2 as a novel PITX2-interacting protein. Further, our cDNA library made from human TM primary cells is a unique and effective resource to identify novel interacting proteins for glaucoma and ASD candidates. This resource could be used both for discovery and validation of interactomes identified from in silico analysis.

  19. Cloning and functional analysis of human mTERFL encoding a novel mitochondrial transcription termination factor-like protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yao; Zhou Guangjin; Yu Min; He Yungang; Tang Wei; Lai Jianhua; He Jie; Liu Wanguo; Tan Deyong

    2005-01-01

    Serum plays an important role in the regulation of cell cycle and cell growth. To identify novel serum-inhibitory factors and study their roles in cell cycle regulation, we performed mRNA differential display analysis of U251 cells in the presence or absence of serum and cloned a novel gene encoding the human mitochondrial transcription termination factor-like protein (mTERFL). The full-length mTERFL cDNA has been isolated and the genomic structure determined. The mTERFL gene consists of three exons and encodes 385 amino acids with 52% sequence similarity to the human mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF). However, mTERFL and mTERF have an opposite expression pattern in response to serum. The expression of mTERFL is dramatically inhibited by the addition of serum in serum-starved cells while the mTERF is rather induced. Northern blot analysis detected three mTERFL transcripts of 1.7, 3.2, and 3.5 kb. Besides the 3.2 kb transcript that is unique to skeletal muscle, other two transcripts express predominant in heart, liver, pancreas, and skeletal muscle. Expression of the GFP-mTERFL fusion protein in HeLa cells localized it to the mitochondria. Furthermore, ectopic expression of mTERFL suppresses cell growth and arrests cells in the G1 stage demonstrated by MTT and flow cytometry analysis. Collectively, our data suggest that mTERFL is a novel mTERF family member and a serum-inhibitory factor probably participating in the regulation of cell growth through the modulation of mitochondrial transcription

  20. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human β-amyloid protein precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human β-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development

  1. Encoding of Auditory Temporal Gestalt in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notter, Michael P; Hanke, Michael; Murray, Micah M; Geiser, Eveline

    2018-01-20

    The perception of an acoustic rhythm is invariant to the absolute temporal intervals constituting a sound sequence. It is unknown where in the brain temporal Gestalt, the percept emerging from the relative temporal proximity between acoustic events, is encoded. Two different relative temporal patterns, each induced by three experimental conditions with different absolute temporal patterns as sensory basis, were presented to participants. A linear support vector machine classifier was trained to differentiate activation patterns in functional magnetic resonance imaging data to the 2 different percepts. Across the sensory constituents the classifier decoded which percept was perceived. A searchlight analysis localized activation patterns specific to the temporal Gestalt bilaterally to the temporoparietal junction, including the planum temporale and supramarginal gyrus, and unilaterally to the right inferior frontal gyrus (pars opercularis). We show that auditory areas not only process absolute temporal intervals, but also integrate them into percepts of Gestalt and that encoding of these percepts persists in high-level associative areas. The findings complement existing knowledge regarding the processing of absolute temporal patterns to the processing of relative temporal patterns relevant to the sequential binding of perceptual elements into Gestalt. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Construction of the suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 before and after transfection with nm23-H1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujuan YE

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that nm23-H1 gene is an important metastatic-suppressed gene of lung cancer. In order to screen the differential expression genes related to nm23-H1, we constructed the suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH in this study, which lay a solid foundation for further screening and cloning metastatic-related genes of nm23-H1. Methods The forward and reverse suppression subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed in the human large cell lung cancer line L9981 before and after transfection with nm23-H1 gene (L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1 by SSH method. The positive clones were preliminarily screened by blue-white colony, and precisely identified by PCR. Results The suppression subtractive cDNA libraries were successfully constructed in the human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene (L9981-nm23-H1 and L9981. After the blue-white screening, about three hundred positive clones in the forward subtracted library and four hundred positive clones in the reverse subtracted library were obtained. Ramdom analysis of 96 clones in each library with colony PCR methods showed that 84 clones in the forward subtracted library and 83 clones in the reverse subtracted library contained (300-750 bp inserts. Conclusion SSH is proved to be an efficient tool for differential expression gene cloning. The forward and reverse suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene (L9981-nm23-H1 and L9981 are successfully constructed by SSH and T/A cloning technology. The expression of nm23-H1 gene in the human large cell lung cancer cell lines may affect the differential expression of some metastatic-related genes.

  3. Two putative subunits of a peptide pump encoded in the human major histocompatability complex class 2 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahram, S.; Arnold, D.; Bresnahan, M.; Strominger, J.L.; Spies, T.

    1991-01-01

    The class 2 region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may encode several genes controlling the processing of endogenous antigen and the presentation of peptide epitopes by MHC class 1 molecules to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. A previously described peptide supply factor (PSF1) is a member of the multidrug-resistance family of transporters and may pump cytosolic peptides into the membrane-bound compartment where class 1 molecules assemble. A second transporter gene, PSF2, was identified 10 kilobases (kb) from PSF1, near the class 2 DOB gene. The complete sequences of PSF1 and PSF2 were determined from cDNA clones. The translation products are closely related in sequence and predicted secondary structure. Both contain a highly conserved ATP-binding fold and share 25% homology in a hydrophobic domain with a tentative number of eight membrane-spanning segments. Based on the principle dimeric organization of these two domains in other transporters, PSF1 and PSF2 may function as complementary subunits, independently as homodimers, or both. Taken together with previous genetic evidence, the coregulation of PSF1 and PSF2 by γ interferon and the to-some-degree coordinate transcription of these genes suggest a common role in peptide-loading of class 1 molecules, although a distinct function of PSF2 cannot be ruled out

  4. Human cyclophilin B: A second cyclophilin gene encodes a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase with a signal sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, E.R.; Zydowsky, L.D.; Jin, Mingjie; Baker, C.H.; McKeon, F.D.; Walsh, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report the cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding a second human cyclosporin A-binding protein (hCyPB). Homology analyses reveal that hCyPB is a member of the cyclophilin B (CyPB) family, which includes yeast CyPB, Drosophila nina A, and rat cyclophilin-like protein. This family is distinguished from the cyclophilin A (CyPA) family by the presence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-directed signal sequences. hCyPB has a hydrophobic leader sequence not found in hCyPA, and its first 25 amino acids are removed upon expression in Escherichia coli. Moreover, they show that hCyPB is a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase which can be inhibited by cyclosporin A. These observations suggest that other members of the CyPB family will have similar enzymatic properties. Sequence comparisons of the CyPB proteins show a central, 165-amino acid peptidyl-prolyl isomerase and cyclosprorin A-binding domain, flanked by variable N-terminal and C-terminal domains. These two variable regions may impart compartmental specificity and regulation to this family of cyclophilin proteins containing the conserved core domain. Northern blot analyses show that hCyPB mRNA is expressed in the Jurkat T-cell line, consistent with its possible target role in cyclosporin A-mediated immunosuppression

  5. Determining the Neural Substrate for Encoding a Memory of Human Pain and the Influence of Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Kong, Yazhuo; Eippert, Falk; Tracey, Irene

    2017-12-06

    To convert a painful stimulus into a briefly maintainable construct when the painful stimulus is no longer accessible is essential to guide human behavior and avoid dangerous situations. Because of the aversive nature of pain, this encoding process might be influenced by emotional aspects and could thus vary across individuals, but we have yet to understand both the basic underlying neural mechanisms as well as potential interindividual differences. Using fMRI in combination with a delayed-discrimination task in healthy volunteers of both sexes, we discovered that brain regions involved in this working memory encoding process were dissociable according to whether the to-be-remembered stimulus was painful or not, with the medial thalamus and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex encoding painful and the primary somatosensory cortex encoding nonpainful stimuli. Encoding of painful stimuli furthermore significantly enhanced functional connectivity between the thalamus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). With regards to emotional aspects influencing encoding processes, we observed that more anxious participants showed significant performance advantages when encoding painful stimuli. Importantly, only during the encoding of pain, the interindividual differences in anxiety were associated with the strength of coupling between medial thalamus and mPFC, which was furthermore related to activity in the amygdala. These results indicate not only that there is a distinct signature for the encoding of a painful experience in humans, but also that this encoding process involves a strong affective component. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To convert the sensation of pain into a briefly maintainable construct is essential to guide human behavior and avoid dangerous situations. Although this working memory encoding process is implicitly contained in the majority of studies, the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. Using fMRI in a delayed-discrimination task, we found that the

  6. Encoding the identity and location of objects in human LOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Chen, Yi; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2011-02-01

    We are able to recognize objects independent of their location in the visual field. At the same time, we also keep track of the location of objects to orient ourselves and to interact with the environment. The lateral occipital complex (LOC) has been suggested as the prime cortical region for representation of object identity. However, the extent to which LOC also represents object location has remained debated. In this study we used high-resolution fMRI in combination with multivoxel pattern classification to investigate the cortical encoding of three object exemplars from four different categories presented in two different locations. This approach allowed us to study location-tolerant object information and object-tolerant location information in LOC, both at the level of categories and exemplars. We found evidence for both location-tolerant object information and object-tolerant location information in LOC at the level of categories and exemplars. Our results further highlight the mixing of identity and location information in the ventral visual pathway. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Safety and efficacy of adenovirus-mediated transfer of the human aquaporin-1 cDNA to irradiated parotid glands of non-human primates.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, A C; Baccaglini, L; Fox, P C; O'Connell, Brian C.; Kenshalo, D; Oweisy, H; Hoque, A T; Sun, D; Herscher, L L; Braddon, V R; Delporte, Christine; Baum, Bruce J.

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of a single administration of a recombinant adenovirus encoding human aquaporin-1 (AdhAQP1) to the parotid glands of adult rhesus monkeys. In anticipation of possible clinical use of this virus to correct irradiation damage to salivary glands, AdhAQP1 was administered (at either 2 x 10(9) or 1 x 10(8) plaque-forming units/gland) intraductally to irradiated glands and to their contralateral nonirradiated glands. Radiation (single dose, 10 Gy) signif...

  8. Isolation of the human anionic glutathione S-transferase cDNA and the relation of its gene expression to estrogen-receptor content in primary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscow, J.A.; Townsend, A.J.; Goldsmith, M.E.; Whang-Peng, J.; Vickers, P.J.; Poisson, R.; Legault-Poisson, S.; Myers, C.E.; Cowan, K.H.

    1988-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance in MCF7 human breast cancer cells is associated with overexpression of P-glycoprotein, changes in activities of several detoxication enzymes, and loss of hormone sensitivity and estrogen receptors (ERs). The authors have cloned the cDNA for one of the drug-detoxifying enzymes overexpressed in multidrug-resistant MCF7 cells (Adr R MCF7), the anionic isozyme of glutathione S-transferase (GSTπ). Hybridization with this GSTπ cDNA, GSTπ-1, demonstrated that increased GSTπ activity in Adr R MCF7 cells is associated with overexpression but not with amplification of the gene. They mapped the GSTπ gene to human chromosome 11q13 by in situ hybridization. Since multidrug resistance and GSTπ overexpression are associated with the loss of ERs in Adr R MCF7 cells, they examined several other breast cancer cell lines that were not selected for drug resistance. In each of these cell lines they found an inverse association between GSTπ expression and ER content. They also examined RNA from 21 primary breast cancers and found a similar association between GSTπ expression and ER content in vivo. The finding of similar patterns of expression of a drug-detoxifying enzyme and of ERs in vitro as well as in vivo suggests that ER-negative breast cancer cells may have greater protection against antineoplastic agents conferred by GSTπ than ER-positive tumors

  9. Characterisation of immune responses and protective efficacy in mice after immunisation with Rift Valley Fever virus cDNA constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundkvist Åke

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Affecting both livestock and humans, Rift Valley Fever is considered as one of the most important viral zoonoses in Africa. However, no licensed vaccines or effective treatments are yet available for human use. Naked DNA vaccines are an interesting approach since the virus is highly infectious and existing attenuated Rift Valley Fever virus vaccine strains display adverse effects in animal trials. In this study, gene-gun immunisations with cDNA encoding structural proteins of the Rift Valley Fever virus were evaluated in mice. The induced immune responses were analysed for the ability to protect mice against virus challenge. Results Immunisation with cDNA encoding the nucleocapsid protein induced strong humoral and lymphocyte proliferative immune responses, and virus neutralising antibodies were acquired after vaccination with cDNA encoding the glycoproteins. Even though complete protection was not achieved by genetic immunisation, four out of eight, and five out of eight mice vaccinated with cDNA encoding the nucleocapsid protein or the glycoproteins, respectively, displayed no clinical signs of infection after challenge. In contrast, all fourteen control animals displayed clinical manifestations of Rift Valley Fever after challenge. Conclusion The appearance of Rift Valley Fever associated clinical signs were significantly decreased among the DNA vaccinated mice and further adjustment of this strategy may result in full protection against Rift Valley Fever.

  10. A study into genes encoding longevity in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuningas, Maris

    2007-01-01

    The lifespan of an organism is determined by a complex network of environmental-, genetic- and stochastic factors. Each of these components contributes to the wide variability in lifespan between and within species. In recent years, it has been shown that 20-30 % of human lifespan is under genetic

  11. Neural encoding of saltatory pneumotactile velocity in human glabrous hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuntaek Oh

    Full Text Available Neurons in the somatosensory cortex are exquisitely sensitive to mechanical stimulation of the skin surface. The location, velocity, direction, and adaptation of tactile stimuli on the skin's surface are discriminable features of somatosensory processing, however the representation and processing of dynamic tactile arrays in the human somatosensory cortex are poorly understood. The principal aim of this study was to map the relation between dynamic saltatory pneumatic stimuli at discrete traverse velocities on the glabrous hand and the resultant pattern of evoked BOLD response in the human brain. Moreover, we hypothesized that the hand representation in contralateral Brodmann Area (BA 3b would show a significant dependence on stimulus velocity. Saltatory pneumatic pulses (60 ms duration, 9.5 ms rise/fall were repetitively sequenced through a 7-channel TAC-Cell array at traverse velocities of 5, 25, and 65 cm/s on the glabrous hand initiated at the tips of D2 (index finger and D3 (middle finger and sequenced towards the D1 (thumb. The resulting hemodynamic response was sampled during 3 functional MRI scans (BOLD in 20 neurotypical right-handed adults at 3T. Results from each subject were inserted to the one-way ANOVA within-subjects and one sample t-test to evaluate the group main effect of all three velocities stimuli and each of three different velocities, respectively. The stimulus evoked BOLD response revealed a dynamic representation of saltatory pneumotactile stimulus velocity in a network consisting of the contralateral primary hand somatosensory cortex (BA3b, associated primary motor cortex (BA4, posterior insula, and ipsilateral deep cerebellum. The spatial extent of this network was greatest at the 5 and 25 cm/s pneumotactile stimulus velocities.

  12. Encoding of physics concepts: concreteness and presentation modality reflected by human brain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kevin; She, Hsiao-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Chang; Chou, Wen-Chi; Huang, Li-Yu; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Gramann, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Previous research into working memory has focused on activations in different brain areas accompanying either different presentation modalities (verbal vs. non-verbal) or concreteness (abstract vs. concrete) of non-science concepts. Less research has been conducted investigating how scientific concepts are learned and further processed in working memory. To bridge this gap, the present study investigated human brain dynamics associated with encoding of physics concepts, taking both presentation modality and concreteness into account. Results of this study revealed greater theta and low-beta synchronization in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during encoding of concrete pictures as compared to the encoding of both high and low imageable words. In visual brain areas, greater theta activity accompanying stimulus onsets was observed for words as compared to pictures while stronger alpha suppression was observed in responses to pictures as compared to words. In general, the EEG oscillation patterns for encoding words of different levels of abstractness were comparable but differed significantly from encoding of pictures. These results provide insights into the effects of modality of presentation on human encoding of scientific concepts and thus might help in developing new ways to better teach scientific concepts in class.

  13. Encoding of physics concepts: concreteness and presentation modality reflected by human brain dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Lai

    Full Text Available Previous research into working memory has focused on activations in different brain areas accompanying either different presentation modalities (verbal vs. non-verbal or concreteness (abstract vs. concrete of non-science concepts. Less research has been conducted investigating how scientific concepts are learned and further processed in working memory. To bridge this gap, the present study investigated human brain dynamics associated with encoding of physics concepts, taking both presentation modality and concreteness into account. Results of this study revealed greater theta and low-beta synchronization in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC during encoding of concrete pictures as compared to the encoding of both high and low imageable words. In visual brain areas, greater theta activity accompanying stimulus onsets was observed for words as compared to pictures while stronger alpha suppression was observed in responses to pictures as compared to words. In general, the EEG oscillation patterns for encoding words of different levels of abstractness were comparable but differed significantly from encoding of pictures. These results provide insights into the effects of modality of presentation on human encoding of scientific concepts and thus might help in developing new ways to better teach scientific concepts in class.

  14. GENCODE: the reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J

    2012-09-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers.

  15. GENCODE: The reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L.; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J.

    2012-01-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers. PMID:22955987

  16. Construction of high-quality Caco-2 three-frame cDNA library and its application to yeast two-hybrid for the human astrovirus protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Xin; Liu, Wen-Hui; Zhao, Jian; Jin, Yi-Ming; Sui, Ting-Ting

    2014-09-01

    Human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells are widely used as an in vitro model of the human small intestinal mucosa. Caco-2 cells are host cells of the human astrovirus (HAstV) and other enteroviruses. High quality cDNA libraries are pertinent resources and critical tools for protein-protein interaction research, but are currently unavailable for Caco-2 cells. To construct a three-open reading frame, full length-expression cDNA library from the Caco-2 cell line for application to HAstV protein-protein interaction screening, total RNA was extracted from Caco-2 cells. The switching mechanism at the 5' end of the RNA transcript technique was used for cDNA synthesis. Double-stranded cDNA was digested by Sfi I and ligated to reconstruct a pGADT7-Sfi I three-frame vector. The ligation mixture was transformed into Escherichia coli HST08 premium electro cells by electroporation to construct the primary cDNA library. The library capacity was 1.0×10(6)clones. Gel electrophoresis results indicated that the fragments ranged from 0.5kb to 4.2kb. Randomly picked clones show that the recombination rate was 100%. The three-frame primary cDNA library plasmid mixture (5×10(5)cfu) was also transformed into E. coli HST08 premium electro cells, and all clones were harvested to amplify the cDNA library. To detect the sufficiency of the cDNA library, HAstV capsid protein as bait was screened and tested against the Caco-2 cDNA library by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. A total of 20 proteins were found to interact with the capsid protein. These results showed that a high-quality three-frame cDNA library from Caco-2 cells was successfully constructed. This library was efficient for the application to the Y2H system, and could be used for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing a hippocampal neural prosthetic to facilitate human memory encoding and recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Robert E; Song, Dong; Robinson, Brian S; Fetterhoff, Dustin; Dakos, Alexander S; Roeder, Brent M; She, Xiwei; Wicks, Robert T; Witcher, Mark R; Couture, Daniel E; Laxton, Adrian W; Munger-Clary, Heidi; Popli, Gautam; Sollman, Myriam J; Whitlow, Christopher T; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Berger, Theodore W; Deadwyler, Sam A

    2018-03-28

    We demonstrate here the first successful implementation in humans of a proof-of-concept system for restoring and improving memory function via facilitation of memory encoding using the patient's own hippocampal spatiotemporal neural codes for memory. Memory in humans is subject to disruption by drugs, disease and brain injury, yet previous attempts to restore or rescue memory function in humans typically involved only nonspecific, modulation of brain areas and neural systems related to memory retrieval. We have constructed a model of processes by which the hippocampus encodes memory items via spatiotemporal firing of neural ensembles that underlie the successful encoding of short-term memory. A nonlinear multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) model of hippocampal CA3 and CA1 neural firing is computed that predicts activation patterns of CA1 neurons during the encoding (sample) phase of a delayed match-to-sample (DMS) human short-term memory task. MIMO model-derived electrical stimulation delivered to the same CA1 locations during the sample phase of DMS trials facilitated short-term/working memory by 37% during the task. Longer term memory retention was also tested in the same human subjects with a delayed recognition (DR) task that utilized images from the DMS task, along with images that were not from the task. Across the subjects, the stimulated trials exhibited significant improvement (35%) in both short-term and long-term retention of visual information. These results demonstrate the facilitation of memory encoding which is an important feature for the construction of an implantable neural prosthetic to improve human memory.

  18. Human nuclear respiratory factor 2 alpha subunit cDNA: isolation, subcloning, sequencing, and in situ hybridization of transcripts in normal and monocularly deprived macaque visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, A; Nie, F; Wong-Riley, M

    2000-02-07

    Nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2) has been shown to contribute to the transcriptional regulation of a number of subunits of respiratory chain enzymes, including cytochrome c oxidase (CO). Our recent study demonstrated a parallel distribution of the alpha subunit proteins of NRF-2 (NRF-2 alpha) with CO in the monkey striate cortex, and that it can be regulated by neuronal activity. To determine whether this regulation is at the transcriptional level, the present study examined the expression of NRF-2 alpha mRNA in normal and monocularly deprived adult monkeys. A partial NRF-2 alpha cDNA was isolated from a human brain cDNA library. Sequence analysis revealed that it shared 99% identity with the published sequence from human HeLa cells. Riboprobes of NRF-2 alpha was generated and labeled with digoxigenin-11-UTP for in situ hybridization. The expression pattern of NRF-2 alpha mRNA in the normal striate cortex paralleled that of CO activity. It was highly expressed in layers IVC and VI, which contained high levels of CO, and more densely expressed in puffs of layers II and III than in interpuffs. In monkeys monocularly treated with tetrodotoxin for 1 day to 2 weeks, both NRF-2 alpha expression and CO activity were reduced in deprived ocular dominance columns of the visual cortex and in deprived layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus. These data indicate that, in the normal and visually deprived adult monkeys, NRF-2 alpha is regulated by neuronal activity at the transcriptional level.

  19. Non-interfering effects of active post-encoding tasks on episodic memory consolidation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varma, S.; Takashima, A.; Krewinkel, S.C.; Kooten, M.E. van; Fu, L.; Medendorp, W.P.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Daselaar, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    So far, studies that investigated interference effects of post-learning processes on episodic memory consolidation in humans have only used tasks involving complex and meaningful information. Such tasks require reallocation of general or encoding-specific resources away from consolidation-relevant

  20. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  1. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Final progress report, April 1, 1994--July 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this research is to generate and apply novel technologies to speed completion and integration of the human genome map and sequence with biomedical problems. To do this, techniques were developed and genome-wide resources generated. This includes a genome-wide Mapped and Integrated BAC/PAC Resource that has been used for gene finding, map completion and anchoring, breakpoint definition and sequencing. In the last period of the grant, the Human Mapped BAC/PAC Resource was also applied to determine regions of human variation and to develop a novel paradigm of primate evolution through to humans. Further, in order to more rapidly evaluate animal models of human disease, a BAC Map of the mouse was generated in collaboration with the MTI Genome Center, Dr. Bruce Birren.

  2. Succinyl CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT): Human cDNA cloning, human chromosomal mapping to 5p13, and mutation detection in a SCOT-deficient patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassovska-Bratinova, S.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Gifu Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Succinyl CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT; E.C.2.8.3.5) mediates the rate-determining step of ketolysis in extrahepatic tissues, the esterification of acetoacetate to CoA for use in energy production. Hereditary SCOT deficiency in humans causes episodes of severe ketoacidosis. We obtained human-heart SCOT cDNA clones spanning the entire 1,560-nt coding sequence. Sequence alignment of the human SCOT peptides with other known CoA transferases revealed several conserved regions of potential functional importance. A single {approximately}3.2-kb SCOT mRNA is present in human tissues (heart > leukocytes {much_gt} fibroblasts), but no signal is detectable in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. We mapped the human SCOT locus (OXCT) to the cytogenetic band 5p13 by in situ hybridization. From fibroblasts of a patient with hereditary SCOT deficiency, we amplified and cloned cDNA fragments containing the entire SCOT coding sequence. We found a homozygous C-to-G transversion at nt 848, which changes the Ser 283 codon to a stop codon. This mutation (S283X) is incompatible with normal enzyme function and represents the first documentation of a pathogenic mutation in SCOT deficiency. 45 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Human Cytomegalovirus Encoded Homologs of Cytokines, Chemokines and their Receptors: Roles in Immunomodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, Brian P.; Avdic, Selmir; Slobedman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), the largest human herpesvirus, infects a majority of the world’s population. Like all herpesviruses, following primary productive infection, HCMV establishes a life-long latent infection, from which it can reactivate years later to produce new, infectious virus. Despite the presence of a massive and sustained anti-HCMV immune response, productively infected individuals can shed virus for extended periods of time, and once latent infection is established, it is never cleared from the host. It has been proposed that HCMV must therefore encode functions which help to evade immune mediated clearance during productive virus replication and latency. Molecular mimicry is a strategy used by many viruses to subvert and regulate anti-viral immunity and HCMV has hijacked/developed a range of functions that imitate host encoded immunomodulatory proteins. This review will focus on the HCMV encoded homologs of cellular cytokines/chemokines and their receptors, with an emphasis on how these virus encoded homologs may facilitate viral evasion of immune clearance. PMID:23202490

  4. Human Cytomegalovirus Encoded Homologs of Cytokines, Chemokines and their Receptors: Roles in Immunomodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. McSharry

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, the largest human herpesvirus, infects a majority of the world’s population. Like all herpesviruses, following primary productive infection, HCMV establishes a life-long latent infection, from which it can reactivate years later to produce new, infectious virus. Despite the presence of a massive and sustained anti-HCMV immune response, productively infected individuals can shed virus for extended periods of time, and once latent infection is established, it is never cleared from the host. It has been proposed that HCMV must therefore encode functions which help to evade immune mediated clearance during productive virus replication and latency. Molecular mimicry is a strategy used by many viruses to subvert and regulate anti-viral immunity and HCMV has hijacked/developed a range of functions that imitate host encoded immunomodulatory proteins. This review will focus on the HCMV encoded homologs of cellular cytokines/chemokines and their receptors, with an emphasis on how these virus encoded homologs may facilitate viral evasion of immune clearance.

  5. Human Cytomegalovirus-Encoded Receptor US28 Is Expressed in Renal Allografts and Facilitates Viral Spreading In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lollinga, Wouter T.; de Wit, Raymond H.; Rahbar, Afsar; Vasse, Gwenda F.; Davoudi, Belghis; Diepstra, Arjan; Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; Harmsen, Martin C.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Soderberg-Naucler, Cecilia; van Son, Willem J.; Smit, Martine J.; Sanders, Jan-Stephan; van den Born, Jacob

    BACKGROUND: Renal transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) activation is associated with decreased renal graft function and survival. Human cytomegalovirus encodes several immune modulatory proteins, including the G

  6. Characterization of the in vitro expressed autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of human titin encoded by TTN exons 248-249

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, L. [Biomedical Sciences Program, Kent State University, Kent, OH (United States); McCann, S.; Budde, J.; Sethi, S.; Guidos, M.; Giles, R. [Center for Applied Chemical Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Walker, G.R., E-mail: grwalker@ysu.edu [Center for Applied Chemical Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Biomedical Sciences Program, Kent State University, Kent, OH (United States)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Affinity purification of the autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of titin. {yields} Partial sequence analysis confirms that the peptides is in the I band region of titin. {yields} This region of the human titin shows high degree of homology to mouse titin N2-A. -- Abstract: Autoimmune rippling muscle disease (ARMD) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease associated with myasthenia gravis (MG). Past studies in our laboratory recognized a very high molecular weight skeletal muscle protein antigen identified by ARMD patient antisera as the titin isoform. These past studies used antisera from ARMD and MG patients as probes to screen a human skeletal muscle cDNA library and several pBluescript clones revealed supporting expression of immunoreactive peptides. This study characterizes the products of subcloning the titin immunoreactive domain into pGEX-3X and the subsequent fusion protein. Sequence analysis of the fusion gene indicates the cloned titin domain (GenBank ID: (EU428784)) is in frame and is derived from a sequence of N2-A spanning the exons 248-250 an area that encodes the fibronectin III domain. PCR and EcoR1 restriction mapping studies have demonstrated that the inserted cDNA is of a size that is predicted by bioinformatics analysis of the subclone. Expression of the fusion protein result in the isolation of a polypeptide of 52 kDa consistent with the predicted inferred amino acid sequence. Immunoblot experiments of the fusion protein, using rippling muscle/myasthenia gravis antisera, demonstrate that only the titin domain is immunoreactive.

  7. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding the complete sequence of decay-accelerating factor of human complement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medof, M.E.; Lublin, D.M.; Holers, V.M.; Ayers, D.J.; Getty, R.R.; Leykam, J.F.; Atkinson, J.P.; Tykocinski, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the complement decay-accelerating factor (DAF) were isolated from HeLa and differentiated HL-60 λgt cDNA libraries by screening with a codon preference oligonucleotide corresponding to DAF NH 2 -terminal amino acids 3-14. The composite cDNA sequence showed a 347-amino acid protein preceded by an NH 2 -terminal leader peptide sequence. The translated sequence beginning at the DAF NH 2 terminus encodes four contiguous ≅ 61-amino acid long repetitive units of internal homology. The repetitive regions contain four conserved cysteines, one proline, one glycine, one glycine/alanine, four leucines/isoleucines/valines, one serine, three tyrosines/phenylalanines, and on tryptophan and show striking homology to similar regions previously identified in factor B, C2, C4 binding protein, factor H, C1r, factor XIII, interleukin 2 receptor, and serum β 2 -glycoprotein I. The consensus repeats are attached to a 70-amino acid long segment rich in serine and threonine (potential O-glycosylation sites), which is in turn followed by a stretch of hydrophobic amino acids. RNA blot analysis of HeLa and HL-60 RNA revealed three DAF mRNA species of 3.1, 2.7, and 2.0 kilobases. The results indicate that portions of the DAF gene may have evolved from a DNA element common to the above proteins, that DAF cDNA predicts a COOH-terminal anchoring polypeptide, and that distinct species of DAF message are elaborated in cells

  8. A highly selective CCR2 chemokine agonist encoded by human herpesvirus 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, Hans R; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2003-01-01

    calcium mobilization as efficiently as the endogenous chemokine ligand CCL2 through the CCR2 receptor, whereas the virally encoded chemokine did not affect any of the other 17 human chemokine receptors tested. Mutual cross-desensitization between CCL2 and vCCL4 was demonstrated in the CCR2-transfected...... cells. The affinity of vCCL4 for the CCR2 receptor was 79 nm as determined in competition binding against radioactively labeled CCL2. In the murine pre-B lymphocyte cell line L1.2 stably transfected with the CCR2 receptor, vCCL4 acted as a relatively low potency but highly efficacious chemoattractant...... being equally or more efficacious in causing cell migration than CCL2 and CCL7 and considerably more efficacious than CCL8 and CCL13. It is concluded that human herpesvirus 6 encodes a highly selective and efficacious CCR2 agonist, which will attract CCR2 expressing cells, for example macrophages...

  9. Active Expression of Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator (t-PA) c-DNA from Pulmonary Metastases in the Methylotrophic Yeast Pichia Pastoris KM71H Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Amir Hossein; Soleimani, Mohammad; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Taghinezhad-S, Sedigheh; Keyvani, Hossein

    2017-08-27

    Background: Human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a key protease of the trypsin family. It catalyzes the activation of zymogen plasminogen to the fibrin-degrading proteinase, plasmin, leading to digestion of fibrin clots. The recombinant enzyme produced by recombinant technology issued to dissolve blood clots in treatment of various human diseases such as coronary artery thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Pichia pastoris expression system is a unique system for the production of high level of recombinant proteins. GS115 and KM71H are two kinds of Pichia pastoris strains whilst production of recombinant proteins in these strains is not predictable. The aim of the study was evaluation of t-PA expression in KM71H strains. Methods: In this study, the cDNA of the t-PA gene was amplified by PCR, sequenced and cloned into Pichia pastoris KM71H host strain using pPICZalphaA expression vector that allows methanol-induced expression and secretion of the protein. Results: Dot blotting results confirmed the presence oft-PA in the cell supernatant. Western blotting test revealed the approximate size of 70 KDa for recombinant t-PA. Quantitative ELISA experiment showed 810 μg/L of t-PA in the supernatant samples. Zymography analysis confirmed the proteolytic activity and biological function of the expressed recombinant t-PA. Conclusions: Correspondingly, Pichia pastoris KM71H is an appropriate strain for production of active recombinant protein. Creative Commons Attribution License

  10. A milk protein gene promoter directs the expression of human tissue plasminogen activator cDNA to the mammary gland in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittius, C.W.; Hennighausen, L.; Lee, E.; Westphal, H.; Nicols, E.; Vitale, J.; Gordon, K.

    1988-01-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP) is a major whey protein in mouse milk. Its gene is expressed in the lactating mammary gland and is inducible by steroid and peptide hormones. A series of transgenic mice containing a hybrid gene in which human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) cDNA is under the control of the murine WAP gene promoter had previously been generated. In this study, 21 tissues from lactating and virgin transgenic female mice containing the WAP-tPA hybrid gene were screened for the distribution of murine WAP and human tPA transcripts. Like the endogenous WAP RNA, WAP-tPA RNA was expressed predominantly in mammary gland tissue and appeared to be inducible by lactation. Whereas WAP transcripts were not detected in 22 tissues of virgin mice, low levels of WAP-tPA RNA, which were not modulated during lactation, were found in tongue, kidney, and sublingual gland. These studies demonstrate that the WAP gene promoter can target the expression of a transgene to the mammary gland and that this expression is inducible during lactation

  11. Identification and complete sequencing of novel human transcripts through the use of mouse orthologs and testis cDNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Elisa N; Pires, Lilian C; Parmigiani, Raphael B

    2004-01-01

    The correct identification of all human genes, and their derived transcripts, has not yet been achieved, and it remains one of the major aims of the worldwide genomics community. Computational programs suggest the existence of 30,000 to 40,000 human genes. However, definitive gene identification ......, and a search for protein domains was undertaken based on their putative open reading frames. In silico expression analysis suggests that some of these transcripts are expressed at low levels and in a restricted set of tissues....

  12. cDNA cloning, mRNA distribution and heterogeneity, chromosomal location, and RFLP analysis of human osteopontin (OPN)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, M F; Kerr, J M; Termine, J D

    1990-01-01

    on a region of 4q that is near the centromere. A high-frequency restriction fragment length polymorphism was evident in the DNA from 29 unrelated individuals using the enzyme BglII. Analysis of total genomic DNA by digestion with several restriction enzymes, Southern blotting, and hybridization with the human...

  13. Subsecond dopamine fluctuations in human striatum encode superposed error signals about actual and counterfactual reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Kenneth T; Saez, Ignacio; Lohrenz, Terry; Witcher, Mark R; Laxton, Adrian W; Tatter, Stephen B; White, Jason P; Ellis, Thomas L; Phillips, Paul E M; Montague, P Read

    2016-01-05

    In the mammalian brain, dopamine is a critical neuromodulator whose actions underlie learning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Degeneration of dopamine neurons causes Parkinson's disease, whereas dysregulation of dopamine signaling is believed to contribute to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Experiments in animal models suggest the hypothesis that dopamine release in human striatum encodes reward prediction errors (RPEs) (the difference between actual and expected outcomes) during ongoing decision-making. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging experiments in humans support the idea that RPEs are tracked in the striatum; however, BOLD measurements cannot be used to infer the action of any one specific neurotransmitter. We monitored dopamine levels with subsecond temporal resolution in humans (n = 17) with Parkinson's disease while they executed a sequential decision-making task. Participants placed bets and experienced monetary gains or losses. Dopamine fluctuations in the striatum fail to encode RPEs, as anticipated by a large body of work in model organisms. Instead, subsecond dopamine fluctuations encode an integration of RPEs with counterfactual prediction errors, the latter defined by how much better or worse the experienced outcome could have been. How dopamine fluctuations combine the actual and counterfactual is unknown. One possibility is that this process is the normal behavior of reward processing dopamine neurons, which previously had not been tested by experiments in animal models. Alternatively, this superposition of error terms may result from an additional yet-to-be-identified subclass of dopamine neurons.

  14. Subsecond dopamine fluctuations in human striatum encode superposed error signals about actual and counterfactual reward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Kenneth T.; Saez, Ignacio; Lohrenz, Terry; Witcher, Mark R.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; White, Jason P.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Montague, P. Read

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, dopamine is a critical neuromodulator whose actions underlie learning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Degeneration of dopamine neurons causes Parkinson’s disease, whereas dysregulation of dopamine signaling is believed to contribute to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Experiments in animal models suggest the hypothesis that dopamine release in human striatum encodes reward prediction errors (RPEs) (the difference between actual and expected outcomes) during ongoing decision-making. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging experiments in humans support the idea that RPEs are tracked in the striatum; however, BOLD measurements cannot be used to infer the action of any one specific neurotransmitter. We monitored dopamine levels with subsecond temporal resolution in humans (n = 17) with Parkinson’s disease while they executed a sequential decision-making task. Participants placed bets and experienced monetary gains or losses. Dopamine fluctuations in the striatum fail to encode RPEs, as anticipated by a large body of work in model organisms. Instead, subsecond dopamine fluctuations encode an integration of RPEs with counterfactual prediction errors, the latter defined by how much better or worse the experienced outcome could have been. How dopamine fluctuations combine the actual and counterfactual is unknown. One possibility is that this process is the normal behavior of reward processing dopamine neurons, which previously had not been tested by experiments in animal models. Alternatively, this superposition of error terms may result from an additional yet-to-be-identified subclass of dopamine neurons. PMID:26598677

  15. Human beta 2 chain of laminin (formerly S chain): cDNA cloning, chromosomal localization, and expression in carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Gerecke, D R; Durkin, M E

    1994-01-01

    or other known laminin genes. Immunostaining showed that the beta 2 chain is localized to the smooth muscle basement membranes of the arteries, while the homologous beta 1 chain is confined to the subendothelial basement membranes. The beta 2 chain was found in the basement membranes of ovarian carcinomas...... but not colon carcinomas. These results indicate that the expression of the beta 2 chain gene is tightly regulated in normal human tissues and in disease....

  16. Detection of the human endogenous retrovirus ERV3-encoded Env-protein in human tissues using antibody-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Chen; Atterby, Christina; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Zhang, Wei Wei; Larsson, Erik; Ryan, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) have contributed to human evolution, being expressed in development, normal physiology and disease. A key difficulty in the scientific evaluation of this potential viral contribution is the accurate demonstration of virally expressed protein in specific human cells and tissues. In this study, we have adopted the endogenous retrovirus, ERV3, as our test model in developing a reliable high-capacity methodology for the expression of such endogenous retrovirus-coded protein. Two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to ERV3 Env-encoded protein were generated to detect the corresponding protein expression pattern in specific human cells, tissues and organs. Sampling included normal tissues from 144 individuals ranging from childhood to old age. This included more than forty different tissues and organs and some 216 different cancer tissues representing the twenty commonest forms of human cancer. The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. The potential expression at likely physiological level of the ERV3Env encoded protein in a wide range of human cells, tissues and organs. We found that ERV3 encoded Env protein is expressed at substantive levels in placenta, testis, adrenal gland, corpus luteum, Fallopian tubes, sebaceous glands, astrocytes, bronchial epithelium and the ducts of the salivary glands. Substantive expression was also seen in a variety of epithelial cells as well as cells known to undergo fusion in inflammation and in normal physiology, including fused macrophages, myocardium and striated muscle. This contrasted strongly with the low levels expressed in other tissues types. These findings suggest that this virus plays a significant role in human physiology and may also play a possible role in disease. This technique can now be extended to the study of other HERV genomes within the human chromosomes that may have contributed to

  17. Cloning of pCDNA3-IgG4 and pQE-2-IgG4 human hinge region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to prepare the plasmid construct of pQE-2-IgG4 for peptide expression and pCDNA3-IgG4 for use in intrasplenic immunization in view of monoclonal antibody production. pQE-2 is a prokaryotic expression vector whereas pCDNA3 is a mammalian expression vector. Some methods were ...

  18. Model for a transcript map of human chromosome 21: isolation of new coding sequences from exon and enriched cDNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaspo, M L; Gellen, L; Mott, R; Korn, B; Nizetic, D; Poustka, A M; Lehrach, H

    1995-08-01

    The construction of a transcriptional map for human chromosome 21 requires the generation of a specific catalogue of genes, together with corresponding mapping information. Towards this goal, we conducted a pilot study on a pool of random chromosome 21 cosmids representing 2 Mb of non-contiguous DNA. Exon-amplification and cDNA selection methods were used in combination to extract the coding content from these cosmids, and to derive expressed sequences libraries. These libraries and the source cosmid library were arrayed at high density for hybridisation screening. A strategy was used which related data obtained by multiple hybridisations of clones originating from one library, screened against the other libraries. In this way, it was possible to integrate the information with the physical map and to compare the gene recovery rate of each technique. cDNAs and exons were grouped into bins delineated by EcoRI cosmid fragments, and a subset of 91 cDNAs and 29 exons have been sequenced. These sequences defined 79 non-overlapping potential coding segments distributed in 24 transcriptional units, which were mapped along 21q. Northern blot analysis performed for a subset of cDNAs indicated the existence of a cognate transcript. Comparison to databases indicated three segments matching to known chromosome 21 genes: PFKL, COL6A1 and S100B and six segments matching to unmapped anonymous expressed sequence tags (ESTs). At the translated nucleotide level, strong homologies to known proteins were found with ATP-binding transporters of the ABC family and the dihydroorotase domain of pyrimidine synthetases. These data strongly suggest that bona fide partial genes have been isolated. Several of the newly isolated transcriptional units map to clinically important regions, in particular those involved in Down's syndrome, progressive myoclonus epilepsia and auto-immune polyglandular disease. The study presented here illustrates the complementarity of exon-amplification and cDNA

  19. Comparative metagenomic analysis of plasmid encoded functions in the human gut microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchesi Julian R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known regarding the pool of mobile genetic elements associated with the human gut microbiome. In this study we employed the culture independent TRACA system to isolate novel plasmids from the human gut microbiota, and a comparative metagenomic analysis to investigate the distribution and relative abundance of functions encoded by these plasmids in the human gut microbiome. Results Novel plasmids were acquired from the human gut microbiome, and homologous nucleotide sequences with high identity (>90% to two plasmids (pTRACA10 and pTRACA22 were identified in the multiple human gut microbiomes analysed here. However, no homologous nucleotide sequences to these plasmids were identified in the murine gut or environmental metagenomes. Functions encoded by the plasmids pTRACA10 and pTRACA22 were found to be more prevalent in the human gut microbiome when compared to microbial communities from other environments. Among the most prevalent functions identified was a putative RelBE toxin-antitoxin (TA addiction module, and subsequent analysis revealed that this was most closely related to putative TA modules from gut associated bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes. A broad phylogenetic distribution of RelE toxin genes was observed in gut associated bacterial species (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, but no RelE homologues were identified in gut associated archaeal species. We also provide indirect evidence for the horizontal transfer of these genes between bacterial species belonging to disparate phylogenetic divisions, namely Gram negative Proteobacteria and Gram positive species from the Firmicutes division. Conclusions The application of a culture independent system to capture novel plasmids from the human gut mobile metagenome, coupled with subsequent comparative metagenomic analysis, highlighted the unexpected prevalence of plasmid encoded functions in the gut microbial ecosystem. In

  20. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  1. Roughness Encoding in Human and Biomimetic Artificial Touch: Spatiotemporal Frequency Modulation and Structural Anisotropy of Fingerprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Carrozza

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fingerprints and their curvature in tactile sensing performance is investigated by comparative analysis of different design parameters in a biomimetic artificial fingertip, having straight or curved fingerprints. The strength in the encoding of the principal spatial period of ridged tactile stimuli (gratings is evaluated by indenting and sliding the surfaces at controlled normal contact force and tangential sliding velocity, as a function of fingertip rotation along the indentation axis. Curved fingerprints guaranteed higher directional isotropy than straight fingerprints in the encoding of the principal frequency resulting from the ratio between the sliding velocity and the spatial periodicity of the grating. In parallel, human microneurography experiments were performed and a selection of results is included in this work in order to support the significance of the biorobotic study with the artificial tactile system.

  2. Mutagenesis in sequence encoding of human factor VII for gene therapy of hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kazemi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Current treatment of hemophilia which is one of the most common bleeding disorders, involves replacement therapy using concentrates of FVIII and FIX .However, these concentrates have been associated with viral infections and thromboembolic complications and development of antibodies. "nThe use of recombinant human factor VII (rhFVII is effective  for the treatment of patients with  hemophilia A or B, who develop antibodies ( referred as inhibitors against  replacement therapy , because it induces coagulation independent of FVIII and FIX. However, its short half-life and high cost have limited its use. One potential solution to this problem may be the use of FVIIa gene transfer, which would attain continuing therapeutic levels of expression from a single injection. The aim of this study was to engineer a novel hFVII (human FVII gene containing a cleavage site for the intracellular protease and furin, by PCR mutagenesis "nMethods: The sequence encoding light and heavy chains of hFVII, were amplified by using hFVII/pTZ57R and specific primers, separately. The PCR products were cloned in pTZ57R vector. "nResults and discussion: Cloning was confirmed by restriction analysis or PCR amplification using specific primers and plasmid universal primers. Mutagenesis of sequence encoding light and heavy chain was confirmed by restriction enzyme. "nConclusion: In the present study, it was provided recombinant plasmids based on mutant form of DNA encoding light and heavy chains.  Joining mutant form of DNA encoding light chain with mutant heavy chain led to a new variant of hFVII. This variant can be activated by furin and an increase in the proportion of activated form of FVII. This mutant form of hFVII may be used for gene therapy of hemophilia.

  3. A human RNA polymerase II subunit is encoded by a recently generated multigene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattei Marie-Geneviève

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequences encoding the yeast RNA polymerase II (RPB subunits are single copy genes. Results While those characterized so far for the human (h RPB are also unique, we show that hRPB subunit 11 (hRPB11 is encoded by a multigene family, mapping on chromosome 7 at loci p12, q11.23 and q22. We focused on two members of this family, hRPB11a and hRPB11b: the first encodes subunit hRPB11a, which represents the major RPB11 component of the mammalian RPB complex ; the second generates polypeptides hRPB11bα and hRPB11bβ through differential splicing of its transcript and shares homologies with components of the hPMS2L multigene family related to genes involved in mismatch-repair functions (MMR. Both hRPB11a and b genes are transcribed in all human tissues tested. Using an inter-species complementation assay, we show that only hRPB11bα is functional in yeast. In marked contrast, we found that the unique murine homolog of RPB11 gene maps on chromosome 5 (band G, and encodes a single polypeptide which is identical to subunit hRPB11a. Conclusions The type hRPB11b gene appears to result from recent genomic recombination events in the evolution of primates, involving sequence elements related to the MMR apparatus.

  4. Rapid and Efficient cDNA Library Screening by Self-Ligation ofInverse PCR Products (SLIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Stapleton, Mark; George, Reed A.; Yu, Charles; Wan, Kenneth H.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2005-04-22

    The production of comprehensive cDNA clone collections is an important goal of the human and model organism genome projects. cDNA sequences are used to determine the structures of transcripts, including splice junctions, polyadenylation sites, and 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). cDNA collections are also valuable resources for functional studies of genes and proteins. Expressed Sequence Tag (EST)sequencing is the method of choice for recovering cDNAs representing a majority of the transcripts encoded in a eukaryotic genome. However, EST sequencing samples a library at random, so it realizes diminishing returns as the project progresses. To drive cDNA collections toward completion new methods are needed to recover cDNAs representing specific genes and alternative transcripts, including transcripts with low expression levels. We describe a simple and effective inverse-PCR-based method for screening plasmid libraries to recover intact cDNAs for specific transcripts. We tested the method by screening libraries used in our Drosophila EST projects for 153 transcription factor genes that were not yet represented by full-length cDNAs. We recovered target-specific clones for 104 of the genes: 46 exactly match, 30 improve and 28partially match current gene annotations. Successful application of the screening method depends on cDNA library complexity and quality of the gene models. The approach should be effective for improving cDNA collections for other model organisms and the human. It also provides a simple and rapid method for isolating cDNAs of interest in any system for which plasmid cDNA libraries and complete or partial gene sequences are available.

  5. cDNA cloning of a major allergen from timothy grass (Phleum pratense) pollen; characterization of the recombinant Phl pV allergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrtala, S.; Sperr, W. R.; Reimitzer, I.; van Ree, R.; Laffer, S.; Müller, W. D.; Valent, P.; Lechner, K.; Rumpold, H.; Kraft, D.

    1993-01-01

    We isolated a cDNA encoding a major grass pollen allergen from a timothy grass (Phleum pratense) pollen expression cDNA library using allergic patients' IgE. The complete cDNA encoded an allergen that binds IgE from about 80% of grass pollen-allergic patients. Significant sequence homology was found

  6. Pharmacovirological Impact of an Integrase Inhibitor on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 cDNA Species In Vivo ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffinet, Christine; Allespach, Ina; Oberbremer, Lena; Golden, Pamela L.; Foster, Scott A.; Johns, Brian A.; Weatherhead, Jason G.; Novick, Steven J.; Chiswell, Karen E.; Garvey, Edward P.; Keppler, Oliver T.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials of the first approved integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, have demonstrated a drop in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA loads of infected patients that was unexpectedly more rapid than that with a potent reverse transcriptase inhibitor, and apparently dose independent. These clinical outcomes are not understood. In tissue culture, although their inhibition of integration is well documented, the effects of INIs on levels of unintegrated HIV-1 cDNAs have been variable. Furthermore, there has been no report to date on an INI's effect on these episomal species in vivo. Here, we show that prophylactic treatment of transgenic rats with the strand transfer INI GSK501015 reduced levels of viral integrants in the spleen by up to 99.7%. Episomal two-long-terminal-repeat (LTR) circles accumulated up to sevenfold in this secondary lymphoid organ, and this inversely correlated with the impact on the proviral burden. Contrasting raltegravir's dose-ranging study with HIV patients, titration of GSK501015 in HIV-infected animals demonstrated dependence of the INI's antiviral effect on its serum concentration. Furthermore, the in vivo 50% effective concentration calculated from these data best matched GSK501015's in vitro potency when serum protein binding was accounted for. Collectively, this study demonstrates a titratable, antipodal impact of an INI on integrated and episomal HIV-1 cDNAs in vivo. Based on these findings and known biological characteristics of viral episomes, we discuss how integrase inhibition may result in additional indirect antiviral effects that contribute to more rapid HIV-1 decay in HIV/AIDS patients. PMID:19458008

  7. From PREDs and open reading frames to cDNA isolation: revisiting the human chromosome 21 transcription map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, A; Friedli, M; Henrichsen, C N; Chapot, F; Deutsch, S; Ucla, C; Rossier, C; Lyle, R; Guipponi, M; Antonarakis, S E

    2001-11-01

    A supernumerary copy of human chromosome 21 (HC21) causes Down syndrome. To understand the molecular pathogenesis of Down syndrome, it is necessary to identify all HC21 genes. The first annotation of the sequence of 21q confirmed 127 genes, and predicted an additional 98 previously unknown "anonymous" genes (predictions (PREDs) and open reading frames (C21orfs)), which were foreseen by exon prediction programs and/or spliced expressed sequence tags. These putative gene models still need to be confirmed as bona fide transcripts. Here we report the characterization and expression pattern of the putative transcripts C21orf7, C21orf11, C21orf15, C21orf18, C21orf19, C21orf22, C21orf42, C21orf50, C21orf51, C21orf57, and C21orf58, the GC-rich sequence DNA-binding factor candidate GCFC (also known as C21orf66), PRED12, PRED31, PRED34, PRED44, PRED54, and PRED56. Our analysis showed that most of the C21orfs originally defined by matching spliced expressed sequence tags were correctly predicted, whereas many of the PREDs, defined solely by computer prediction, do not correspond to genuine genes. Four of the six PREDs were incorrectly predicted: PRED44 and C21orf11 are portions of the same transcript, PRED31 is a pseudogene, and PRED54 and PRED56 were wrongly predicted. In contrast, PRED12 (now called C21orf68) and PRED34 (C21orf63) are now confirmed transcripts. We identified three new genes, C21orf67, C21orf69, and C21orf70, not previously predicted by any programs. This revision of the HC21 transcriptome has consequences for the entire genome regarding the quality of previous annotations and the total number of transcripts. It also provides new candidates for genes involved in Down syndrome and other genetic disorders that map to HC21.

  8. BAGE: a new gene encoding an antigen recognized on human melanomas by cytolytic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boël, P; Wildmann, C; Sensi, M L; Brasseur, R; Renauld, J C; Coulie, P; Boon, T; van der Bruggen, P

    1995-02-01

    Several tumor antigens are recognized by autologous cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) on human melanoma MZ2-MEL. Some of them are encoded by genes MAGE-1 and MAGE-3, which are not expressed in normal tissues except in testis. Here, we report the identification of a new gene that codes for another of these antigens. This gene, named BAGE, codes for a putative protein of 43 aa and seems to belong to a family of several genes. The antigen recognized by the autologous CTL consists of BAGE-encoded peptide AARAVFLAL bound to an HLA-Cw 1601 molecule. Gene BAGE is expressed in 22% of melanomas, 30% of infiltrating bladder carcinomas, 10% of mammary carcinomas, 8% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, and 6% of non-small cell lung carcinomas. Like the MAGE genes, it is silent in normal tissues with the exception of testis. Because of its tumor-specific expression, the BAGE-encoded antigen may prove useful for cancer immunotherapy.

  9. TMS interference with primacy and recency mechanisms reveals bimodal episodic encoding in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Iglis; Cappa, Stefano F; Feurra, Matteo; Giovannelli, Fabio; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Bianco, Giovanni; Cincotta, Massimo; Rossi, Simone

    2013-01-01

    A classic finding of the psychology of memory is the "serial position effect." Immediate free recall of a word list is more efficient for items presented early (primacy effect) or late (recency effect), with respect to those in the middle. In an event-related, randomized block design, we interfered with the encoding of unrelated words lists with brief trains of repetitive TMS (rTMS), applied coincidently with the acoustic presentation of each word to the left dorsolateral pFC, the left intraparietal lobe, and a control site (vertex). Interference of rTMS with encoding produced a clear-cut double dissociation on accuracy during immediate free recall. The primacy effect was selectively worsened by rTMS of the dorsolateral pFC, whereas recency was selectively worsened by rTMS of the intraparietal lobe. These results are in agreement with the double dissociation between short-term and long-term memory observed in neuropsychological patients and provide direct evidence of distinct cortical mechanisms of encoding in the human brain.

  10. A brief review on the Human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2013-06-01

    The ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project is an international research consortium that aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. The second phase of the project comprised 1640 datasets from 147 different cell types, yielding a set of 30 publications across several journals. These data revealed that 80.4% of the human genome displays some functionality in at least one cell type. Many of these regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and further form a network or three-dimensional conformation to affect gene expression. These elements are also related to sequence variants associated with diseases or traits. All these findings provide us new insights into the organization and regulation of genes and genome, and serve as an expansive resource for understanding human health and disease. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Encoding of natural sounds at multiple spectral and temporal resolutions in the human auditory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Santoro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging research provides detailed observations of the response patterns that natural sounds (e.g. human voices and speech, animal cries, environmental sounds evoke in the human brain. The computational and representational mechanisms underlying these observations, however, remain largely unknown. Here we combine high spatial resolution (3 and 7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI with computational modeling to reveal how natural sounds are represented in the human brain. We compare competing models of sound representations and select the model that most accurately predicts fMRI response patterns to natural sounds. Our results show that the cortical encoding of natural sounds entails the formation of multiple representations of sound spectrograms with different degrees of spectral and temporal resolution. The cortex derives these multi-resolution representations through frequency-specific neural processing channels and through the combined analysis of the spectral and temporal modulations in the spectrogram. Furthermore, our findings suggest that a spectral-temporal resolution trade-off may govern the modulation tuning of neuronal populations throughout the auditory cortex. Specifically, our fMRI results suggest that neuronal populations in posterior/dorsal auditory regions preferably encode coarse spectral information with high temporal precision. Vice-versa, neuronal populations in anterior/ventral auditory regions preferably encode fine-grained spectral information with low temporal precision. We propose that such a multi-resolution analysis may be crucially relevant for flexible and behaviorally-relevant sound processing and may constitute one of the computational underpinnings of functional specialization in auditory cortex.

  12. Ghrelin modulates encoding-related brain function without enhancing memory formation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, N; Müller, N C J; Tonon, M; Konrad, B N; Pawlowski, M; Kopczak, A; Elbau, I; Uhr, M; Kühn, S; Repantis, D; Ohla, K; Müller, T D; Fernández, G; Tschöp, M; Czisch, M; Steiger, A; Dresler, M

    2016-11-15

    Ghrelin regulates energy homeostasis in various species and enhances memory in rodent models. In humans, the role of ghrelin in cognitive processes has yet to be characterized. Here we show in a double-blind randomized crossover design that acute administration of ghrelin alters encoding-related brain activity, however does not enhance memory formation in humans. Twenty-one healthy young male participants had to memorize food- and non-food-related words presented on a background of a virtual navigational route while undergoing fMRI recordings. After acute ghrelin administration, we observed decreased post-encoding resting state fMRI connectivity between the caudate nucleus and the insula, amygdala, and orbitofrontal cortex. In addition, brain activity related to subsequent memory performance was modulated by ghrelin. On the next day, however, no differences were found in free word recall or cued location-word association recall between conditions; and ghrelin's effects on brain activity or functional connectivity were unrelated to memory performance. Further, ghrelin had no effect on a cognitive test battery comprising tests for working memory, fluid reasoning, creativity, mental speed, and attention. In conclusion, in contrast to studies with animal models, we did not find any evidence for the potential of ghrelin acting as a short-term cognitive enhancer in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structured RNAs in the ENCODE selected regions of the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Washietl, Stefan; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Korbel, Jan O

    2007-01-01

    Functional RNA structures play an important role both in the context of noncoding RNA transcripts as well as regulatory elements in mRNAs. Here we present a computational study to detect functional RNA structures within the ENCODE regions of the human genome. Since structural RNAs in general lack...... with the GENCODE annotation points to functional RNAs in all genomic contexts, with a slightly increased density in 3'-UTRs. While we estimate a significant false discovery rate of approximately 50%-70% many of the predictions can be further substantiated by additional criteria: 248 loci are predicted by both RNAz...

  14. Immunoglobulin γ light-chain-related genes 14.1 and 16.1 are expressed in pre-B cells and may encode the human immunoglobulin ω light-chain protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, G.F.; Evans, R.J.; Stafford-Hollis, J.M.; Korsmeyer, S.J.; McKearn, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Human pre-B cells, which produce immunoglobulin heavy chain but do not produce immunoglobulin light chain, are shown to contain a 1-kilobase transcript homologous to immunoglobulin λ light-chain genes. Detailed analysis of RNA and cDNA clones derived from these transcripts reveals that they originate from the distinct immunoglobulin λ-like genes 14.1/16.1. Sequence analysis of these clones reveals a long open reading frame, beginning with an ATG, capable of encoding a protein of 214 amino acids with an unprocessed molecular weight of 22,944. The C-terminal half of this predicted protein is highly homologous to immunoglobulin λ light-chain joining and constant region protein sequence, while the amino-terminal end does not share homology with variable regions. Antisera raised against a peptide whose sequence was predicted from the 14.1 cDNA sequence identifies a 22-kDa protein in human pre-B cells. Immunoprecipitation of immunoglobulin μ-chain from these pre-B cells with anti-immunoglobulin μ antibody coprecipitates a 22-kDa protein, which is a candidate for the human immunoglobulin ω light-chain protein and may be the protein product of the 14.1/16.1 genes

  15. The gene encoding human glutathione synthetase (GSS) maps to the long arm of chromosome 20 at band 11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.C.; Vaska, V.L.; Ford, J.H. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville (Australia)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    Two forms of glutathione synthetase deficiency have been described. While one form is mild, causing hemolytic anemia, the other more severe form causes 5-oxoprolinuria with secondary neurological involvement. Despite the existence of two deficiency phenotypes, Southern blots hybridized with a glutathione synthetase cDNA suggest that there is a single glutathione synthetase gene in the human genome. Analysis of somatic cell hybrids showed the human glutathione synthetase gene (GSS) to be located on chromosome 20, and this assignment has been refined to subband 20q11.2 using in situ hybridization. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  16. SIGLEC16 encodes a DAP12-associated receptor expressed in macrophages that evolved from its inhibitory counterpart SIGLEC11 and has functional and non-functional alleles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huan; Lakner, Ursula; de Bono, Bernard; Traherne, James A; Trowsdale, John; Barrow, Alexander D

    2008-08-01

    Sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglec) are important components of immune recognition. The organization of Siglec genes in different species is consistent with rapid selection imposed by pathogens. We studied SIGLEC11 genes in human, rodent, dog, cow and non-human primates. The lineages of SIGLEC11 genes in these species have undergone dynamic gene duplication and conversion, forming a potential inhibitory (SIGLEC11)/activating (SIGLEC16) receptor pair in chimpanzee and humans. A cDNA encoding human Siglec-16, currently classed as a pseudogene in the databases (SIGLECP16), is expressed in various cell lines and tissues. A polymorphism screen for the two alleles (wild type and four-base pair deletion, 4bpDelta) of SIGLEC16 found their frequencies to be 50% amongst the UK population. A search for donor sequences for SIGLEC16 revealed a subfamily of activating Siglec with charged transmembrane domains predicted to associate with ITAM-encoding adaptor proteins. In support of this, Siglec-16 was expressed at the cell surface in the presence of DAP12, but not the FcRgamma chain. Using antisera specific to the cytoplasmic tail of Siglec-16, we identified Siglec-16 expression in CD14(+) tissue macrophages and in normal human brain, cancerous oesophagus and lung. This is the first activating human Siglec receptor found to have functional and non-functional alleles within the population.

  17. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene combined with radiation therapy on human lymphoma cells lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wan Jianmei; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Human lymphoma cell lines were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTF. The cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry, and the p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting. The results showed that extrinsic p53 gene have expressed to some degree, but not at high level. The role of inhibition and radiation sensitivity of rAd-p53 was not significant to human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  18. MC148 encoded by human molluscum contagiosum poxvirus is an antagonist for human but not murine CCR8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, H R; Gerstoft, J; Schwartz, T W

    2001-01-01

    The viral CC chemokines MC148, encoded by the poxvirus molluscum contagiosum, and viral macrophage inflammatory protein (vMIP)-I and vMIP-II, encoded by human herpesvirus 8, were probed on the murine CC receptor (CCR) 8 in parallel with human CCR8. In calcium mobilization assays, vMIP-I acted...... as a high-affinity agonist, whereas vMIP-II acted as a low-affinity antagonist on the murine CCR8 as well as the human CCR8. MC148 was found to bind and block responses through the human CCR8 with high affinity, but surprisingly MC148 was unable to bind and block responses through the murine CCR8. Because...... MC148 is the only high-affinity antagonist known to target and be selective for CCR8, MC148 is a valuable tool to decipher the role played by CCR8 in the immune system. This study shows that MC148 could not be used in murine inflammatory models; however, it will be interesting to see whether it can...

  19. Pupillometry as a glimpse into the neurochemical basis of human memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffing, Russell Cohen; Seitz, Aaron R

    2015-04-01

    Neurochemical systems are well studied in animal learning; however, ethical issues limit methodologies to explore these systems in humans. Pupillometry provides a glimpse into the brain's neurochemical systems, where pupil dynamics in monkeys have been linked with locus coeruleus (LC) activity, which releases norepinephrine (NE) throughout the brain. Here, we use pupil dynamics as a surrogate measure of neurochemical activity to explore the hypothesis that NE is involved in modulating memory encoding. We examine this using a task-irrelevant learning paradigm in which learning is boosted for stimuli temporally paired with task targets. We show that participants better recognize images that are paired with task targets than distractors and, in correspondence, that pupil size changes more for target-paired than distractor-paired images. To further investigate the hypothesis that NE nonspecifically guides learning for stimuli that are present with its release, a second procedure was used that employed an unexpected sound to activate the LC-NE system and induce pupil-size changes; results indicated a corresponding increase in memorization of images paired with the unexpected sounds. Together, these results suggest a relationship between the LC-NE system, pupil-size changes, and human memory encoding.

  20. Retrotransposon-Encoded Reverse Transcriptase in the Genesis, Progression and Cellular Plasticity of Human Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinibaldi-Vallebona, Paola; Matteucci, Claudia; Spadafora, Corrado

    2011-01-01

    LINE-1 (Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements) and HERVs (Human Endogenous Retroviruses) are two families of autonomously replicating retrotransposons that together account for about 28% of the human genome. Genes harbored within LINE-1 and HERV retrotransposons, particularly those encoding the reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme, are generally expressed at low levels in differentiated cells, but their expression is upregulated in transformed cells and embryonic tissues. Here we discuss a recently discovered RT-dependent mechanism that operates in tumorigenesis and reversibly modulates phenotypic and functional variations associated with tumor progression. Downregulation of active LINE-1 elements drastically reduces the tumorigenic potential of cancer cells, paralleled by reduced proliferation and increased differentiation. Pharmacological RT inhibitors (e.g., nevirapine and efavirenz) exert similar effects on tumorigenic cell lines, both in culture and in animal models. The HERV-K family play a distinct complementary role in stress-dependent transition of melanoma cells from an adherent, non-aggressive, to a non-adherent, highly malignant, growth phenotype. In synthesis, the retrotransposon-encoded RT is increasingly emerging as a key regulator of tumor progression and a promising target in a novel anti-cancer therapy

  1. The habenula encodes negative motivational value associated with primary punishment in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Rebecca P; Seymour, Ben; Loh, Eleanor; Lutti, Antoine; Dolan, Raymond J; Dayan, Peter; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2014-08-12

    Learning what to approach, and what to avoid, involves assigning value to environmental cues that predict positive and negative events. Studies in animals indicate that the lateral habenula encodes the previously learned negative motivational value of stimuli. However, involvement of the habenula in dynamic trial-by-trial aversive learning has not been assessed, and the functional role of this structure in humans remains poorly characterized, in part, due to its small size. Using high-resolution functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of reinforcement learning, we demonstrate positive habenula responses to the dynamically changing values of cues signaling painful electric shocks, which predict behavioral suppression of responses to those cues across individuals. By contrast, negative habenula responses to monetary reward cue values predict behavioral invigoration. Our findings show that the habenula plays a key role in an online aversive learning system and in generating associated motivated behavior in humans.

  2. Normalizing cDNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Ekaterina A; Shagina, Irina; Barsova, Ekaterina V; Kelmanson, Ilya; Shagin, Dmitry A; Lukyanov, Sergey A

    2010-04-01

    The characterization of rare messages in cDNA libraries is complicated by the substantial variations that exist in the abundance levels of different transcripts in cells and tissues. The equalization (normalization) of cDNA is a helpful approach for decreasing the prevalence of abundant transcripts, thereby facilitating the assessment of rare transcripts. This unit provides a method for duplex-specific nuclease (DSN)-based normalization, which allows for the fast and reliable equalization of cDNA, thereby facilitating the generation of normalized, full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, and enabling efficient RNA analyses. (c) 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Encoding of Touch Intensity But Not Pleasantness in Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Laura K; Laubacher, Claire M; Olausson, Håkan; Wang, Binquan; Spagnolo, Primavera A; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2016-05-25

    Growing interest in affective touch has delineated a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, have cast doubt on the segregation of touch discrimination and affect, suggesting that S1 also encodes affective qualities. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to examine the role of S1 in processing touch intensity and pleasantness. Twenty-six healthy human adults rated brushing on the hand during fMRI. Intensity ratings significantly predicted activation in S1, whereas pleasantness ratings predicted activation only in the anterior cingulate cortex. Nineteen subjects also received inhibitory rTMS over right hemisphere S1 and the vertex (control). After S1 rTMS, but not after vertex rTMS, sensory discrimination was reduced and subjects with reduced sensory discrimination rated touch as more intense. In contrast, rTMS did not alter ratings of touch pleasantness. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. Growing interest in affective touch has identified a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, cast doubt on the separation of touch discrimination and affect. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to demonstrate the representation of touch discrimination and intensity in S1, but the representation of pleasantness in the anterior cingulate cortex, not S1. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. Our study contributes to growing delineation of the affective touch system, a crucial step in understanding its dysregulation in numerous clinical conditions such as autism, eating disorders, depression, and chronic pain. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/365850-11$15.00/0.

  4. Encoding of Touch Intensity But Not Pleasantness in Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubacher, Claire M.; Olausson, Håkan; Wang, Binquan; Spagnolo, Primavera A.; Bushnell, M. Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Growing interest in affective touch has delineated a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, have cast doubt on the segregation of touch discrimination and affect, suggesting that S1 also encodes affective qualities. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to examine the role of S1 in processing touch intensity and pleasantness. Twenty-six healthy human adults rated brushing on the hand during fMRI. Intensity ratings significantly predicted activation in S1, whereas pleasantness ratings predicted activation only in the anterior cingulate cortex. Nineteen subjects also received inhibitory rTMS over right hemisphere S1 and the vertex (control). After S1 rTMS, but not after vertex rTMS, sensory discrimination was reduced and subjects with reduced sensory discrimination rated touch as more intense. In contrast, rTMS did not alter ratings of touch pleasantness. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Growing interest in affective touch has identified a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, cast doubt on the separation of touch discrimination and affect. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to demonstrate the representation of touch discrimination and intensity in S1, but the representation of pleasantness in the anterior cingulate cortex, not S1. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. Our study contributes to growing delineation of the affective touch system, a crucial step in understanding its dysregulation in numerous clinical conditions such as autism, eating disorders, depression, and chronic pain. PMID:27225773

  5. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13420.001 PMID:26880543

  6. Four phosphoproteins with common amino termini are encoded by human cytomegalovirus AD169

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, D.A.; Staprans, S.I.; Spector, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    In this report, the authors identify the proteins encoded by the 2.2-kilobase class of early transcripts arising from a region of the strain AD169 human cytomegalovirus genome (map units 0.682 to 0.713) which contains cell-related sequences. These transcripts, encoded by adjacent EcoRI fragments R and d, have a complex spliced structure with 5' and 3' coterminal ends. Antiserum directed against a synthetic 11-amino-acid peptide corresponding to the predicted amino terminus of the proteins was generated and found to immunoprecipitate four-infected-cell proteins of 84, 50, 43, and 34 kilodaltons. These proteins were phosphorylated and were associated predominantly with the nuclei of infected cells. The 43-kilodalton protein was the most abundant of the four proteins, and its level of expression remained relatively constant throughout the infection. Expression of the other proteins increased as the infection progressed. Pulse-chase analysis failed to show a precursor-product relationship between any of the proteins. A comparison of the [ 35 S]methionine-labeled tryptic peptide maps of the four proteins from infected cells and an in vitro-generated polypeptide derived from the putative first exon showed that all four infected-cell proteins were of viral origin and contained a common amino-terminal region

  7. Segregated encoding of reward-identity and stimulus-reward associations in human orbitofrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Flügge, Miriam Cornelia; Barron, Helen Catharine; Brodersen, Kay Henning; Dolan, Raymond J; Behrens, Timothy Edward John

    2013-02-13

    A dominant focus in studies of learning and decision-making is the neural coding of scalar reward value. This emphasis ignores the fact that choices are strongly shaped by a rich representation of potential rewards. Here, using fMRI adaptation, we demonstrate that responses in the human orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) encode a representation of the specific type of food reward predicted by a visual cue. By controlling for value across rewards and by linking each reward with two distinct stimuli, we could test for representations of reward-identity that were independent of associative information. Our results show reward-identity representations in a medial-caudal region of OFC, independent of the associated predictive stimulus. This contrasts with a more rostro-lateral OFC region encoding reward-identity representations tied to the predicate stimulus. This demonstration of adaptation in OFC to reward specific representations opens an avenue for investigation of more complex decision mechanisms that are not immediately accessible in standard analyses, which focus on correlates of average activity.

  8. The Relationship Between Transcript Expression Levels of Nuclear Encoded (TFAM, NRF1 and Mitochondrial Encoded (MT-CO1 Genes in Single Human Oocytes During Oocyte Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffari Novin M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In some cases of infertility in women, human oocytes fail to mature when they reach the metaphase II (MII stage. Mitochondria plays an important role in oocyte maturation. A large number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, copied in oocytes, is essential for providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP during oocyte maturation. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between transcript expression levels of the mitochondrial encoded gene (MT-CO1 and two nuclear encoded genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM in various stages of human oocyte maturation. Nine consenting patients, age 21-35 years old, with male factors were selected for ovarian stimulation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI procedures. mRNA levels of mitochondrial- related genes were performed by singlecell TaqMan® quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. There was no significant relationship between the relative expression levels in germinal vesicle (GV stage oocytes (p = 0.62. On the contrary, a significant relationship was seen between the relative expression levels of TFAM and NRF1 and the MT-CO1 genes at the stages of metaphase I (MI and MII (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002. A relationship exists between the transcript expression levels of TFAM and NRF1, and MT-CO1 genes in various stages of human oocyte maturation.

  9. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of ribosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RPS16 of eukaryote is a component of the 40S small ribosomal subunit encoded by RPS16 gene and is also a homolog of prokaryotic RPS9. The cDNA and genomic sequence of RPS16 was cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain ...

  10. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpes virus 8 is considered the etiological agent of KS, a highly vascularized neoplasm that is the most common tumor affecting HIV/AIDS patients. The KS-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 open reading frame 74 encodes a constitutively...

  11. Molecular Cloning of cDNA Encoding an Aquaglyceroporin, AQP-h9, in the Japanese Tree Frog, Hyla japonica: Possible Roles of AQP-h9 in Freeze Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Atsushi; Takiya, Yu; Sakamoto, Joe; Shiojiri, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Masakazu; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Okada, Reiko

    2015-06-01

    In order to study the freeze-tolerance mechanism in the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica, wecloned a eDNA encoding aquaporin (AQP) 9 from its liver. The predicted amino acid sequence ofH. japonica AQP9 (AQP-h9) contained six putative transmembrane domains and two conservedAsn-Pro-Aia motifs, which are characteristic of AQPs. A swelling assay using Xenopus laevisoocytes injected with AQP-h9 cRNA showed that AQP-h9 facilitated water and glycerol permeation,confirming its property as an aquaglyceroporin. Subsequently, glycerol concentrations in serumand tissue extracts were compared among tree frogs that were hibernating, frozen, or thawed afterfreezing. Serum glycerol concentration of thawed frogs was significantly higher than that of hibernatingfrogs. Glycerol content in the liver did not change in the freezing experiment, whereas thatin the skeletal muscle was elevated in thawed frogs as compared with hibernating or frozen frogs. Histological examination of the liver showed that erythrocytes aggregated in the sinusoids during hibernation and freezing, and immunoreactive AQP-h9 protein was detected over the erythrocytes. The AQP-h9 labeling was more intense in frozen frogs than in hibernating frogs, but nearly undetectable in thawed frogs. For the skeletal muscle, weak labels for AQP-h9 were observed in the cytoplasm of myocytes of hibernating frogs. AQP-h9 labeling was markedly enhanced by freezing and was decreased by thawing. These results indicate that glycerol may act as a c;:ryoprotectant in H. japonica and that during hibernation, particularly during freezing, AQP-h9 may be involved in glycerol uptake in erythrocytes in the liver and in intracellular glycerol transport in the skeletal muscle cells.

  12. Identification of a conserved cluster of skin-specific genes encoding secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Pierre; Salois, Patrick; St-Amant, Natalie; Gaumond, Marie-Hélène; Lanctôt, Christian

    2004-06-09

    Terminal differentiation of keratinocytes results in the formation of a cornified layer composed of cross-linked intracellular and extracellular material. Using a signal trap expression screening strategy, we have identified four cDNAs encoding secreted proteins potentially involved in this process. One of the cDNAs is identical to the short isoform of suprabasin, a recently described epidermis-specific protein, which is shown here to contain a functional secretory signal. The second cDNA, sk89, encodes a protein of 493 amino acids, rich in glycine and serine residues. The third cDNA encodes a C-terminal fragment of SK89 (amino acids 410-493). It comprises exons 13 to 18 of the sk89 locus but transcription starts at an isoform-specific exon encoding a distinct secretory signal. The fourth cDNA encodes keratinocyte differentiation-associated protein (KDAP), a precursor protein of 102 amino acids. Subcellular localization by immunofluorescence and detection of the tagged proteins by Western blotting confirmed that the four proteins are secreted. Northern analysis and in situ hybridization revealed that expression of the corresponding genes was restricted to the suprabasal keratinocytes of the epidermis. These genes encoding epidermis-specific secreted products are found in a conserved cluster on human chromosome 19q13.12 and on mouse chromosome 7A3.

  13. Cloning of cDNA for a prolactin-inducible protein (PIP) and studies on the hormonal control of PIP gene expression in T47D human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, L.; Myal, Y.; Tsuyuki, D.; Shiu, R.

    1986-01-01

    Recently in this laboratory it was shown that in the human breast cancer cell line T47D, human prolactin of human growth hormone in the presence of hydrocortisone induced the synthesis and secretion of PIP's, a family of proteins which differed only in their degree of glycosylation. This finding represented the first demonstration of an inductin of specific proteins by prolactin in human target cells and has provided us with a unique model in which to study the molecular mechanism of multihormonal actions as well as the possible significance of prolactin in human breast cancer. In order to facilitate their studies the authors cloned PIP cDNA. The strategy chosen and the methods used are described in this article

  14. The Protective Action Encoding of Serotonin Transients in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Rosalyn J; Kishida, Kenneth T; Lohrenz, Terry; Saez, Ignacio; Laxton, Adrian W; Witcher, Mark R; Tatter, Stephen B; Ellis, Thomas L; Phillips, Paul Em; Dayan, Peter; Montague, P Read

    2018-01-03

    The role of serotonin in human brain function remains elusive due, at least in part, to our inability to measure rapidly the local concentration of this neurotransmitter. We used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to infer serotonergic signaling from the striatum of 14 brains of human patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we report these novel measurements and show that they correlate with outcomes and decisions in a sequential investment game. We find that serotonergic concentrations transiently increase as a whole following negative reward prediction errors, while reversing when counterfactual losses predominate. This provides initial evidence that the serotonergic system acts as an opponent to dopamine signaling, as anticipated by theoretical models. Serotonin transients on one trial were also associated with actions on the next trial in a manner that correlated with decreased exposure to poor outcomes. Thus, the fluctuations observed for serotonin appear to correlate with the inhibition of over-reactions and promote persistence of ongoing strategies in the face of short-term environmental changes. Together these findings elucidate a role for serotonin in the striatum, suggesting it encodes a protective action strategy that mitigates risk and modulates choice selection particularly following negative environmental events.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 14 February 2018; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.304.

  15. Power shifts track serial position and modulate encoding in human episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serruya, Mijail D; Sederberg, Per B; Kahana, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    The first events in a series exert a powerful influence on cognition and behavior in both humans and animals. This is known as the law of primacy. Here, we analyze the neural correlates of primacy in humans by analyzing electrocorticographic recordings in 84 neurosurgical patients as they studied and subsequently recalled lists of common words. We found that spectral power in the gamma frequency band (28-100 Hz) was elevated at the start of the list and gradually subsided, whereas lower frequency (2-8 Hz) delta and theta band power exhibited the opposite trend. This gradual shift in the power spectrum was found across a widespread network of brain regions. The degree to which the subsequent memory effect was modulated by list (serial) position was most pronounced in medial temporal lobe structures. These results suggest that globally increased gamma and decreased delta-theta spectral powers reflect a brain state that predisposes medial temporal lobe structures to enhance the encoding and maintenance of early list items.

  16. Cortical networks for encoding near and far space in the non-human primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cléry, Justine; Guipponi, Olivier; Odouard, Soline; Wardak, Claire; Ben Hamed, Suliann

    2018-04-18

    While extra-personal space is often erroneously considered as a unique entity, early neuropsychological studies report a dissociation between near and far space processing both in humans and in monkeys. Here, we use functional MRI in a naturalistic 3D environment to describe the non-human primate near and far space cortical networks. We describe the co-occurrence of two extended functional networks respectively dedicated to near and far space processing. Specifically, far space processing involves occipital, temporal, parietal, posterior cingulate as well as orbitofrontal regions not activated by near space, possibly subserving the processing of the shape and identity of objects. In contrast, near space processing involves temporal, parietal, prefrontal and premotor regions not activated by far space, possibly subserving the preparation of an arm/hand mediated action in this proximal space. Interestingly, this network also involves somatosensory regions, suggesting a cross-modal anticipation of touch by a nearby object. Last, we also describe cortical regions that process both far and near space with a preference for one or the other. This suggests a continuous encoding of relative distance to the body, in the form of a far-to-near gradient. We propose that these cortical gradients in space representation subserve the physically delineable peripersonal spaces described in numerous psychology and psychophysics studies. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. cDNA library preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooiker, Maarten; Xue, Gang-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The construction of full-length cDNA libraries allows researchers to study gene expression and protein interactions and undertake gene discovery. Recent improvements allow the construction of high-quality cDNA libraries, with small amounts of mRNA. In parallel, these improvements allow for the incorporation of adapters into the cDNA, both at the 5' and 3' end of the cDNA. The 3' adapter is attached to the oligo-dT primer that is used by the reverse transcriptase, whereas the 5' adapter is incorporated by the template switching properties of the MMLV reverse transcriptase. This allows directional cloning and eliminates inefficient steps like adapter ligation, phosphorylation, and methylation. Another important step in the construction of high-quality cDNA libraries is the normalization. The difference in the levels of expression between genes might be several orders of magnitude. Therefore, it is essential that the cDNA library is normalized. With a recently discovered enzyme, duplex-specific nuclease, it is possible to normalize the cDNA library, based on the fact that more abundant molecules are more likely to reanneal after denaturation compared to rare molecules.

  18. Normalized cDNA libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  19. Modulation of glutathione peroxidase expression by selenium: effect on human MCF-7 breast cancer cell transfectants expressing a cellular glutathione peroxidase cDNA and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, F F; Esworthy, R S; Akman, S; Doroshow, J H

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the effect of selenium on the expression of a cellular glutathione peroxidase, GSHPx-1, in transfected MCF-7 cells and in doxorubicin-resistant (Adrr) MCF-7 cells. A GSHPx-1 cDNA with a Rous Sarcoma virus promoter was transfected into a human mammary carcinoma cell line, MCF-7, which has very low endogenous cytosolic glutathione (GSH) peroxidase activity and no detectable message. The transfectant with the highest GSH peroxidase activity among the isolates, MCF-7H6, was charac...

  20. Genetically encoded photocrosslinkers locate the high-affinity binding site of antidepressant drugs in the human serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Hall, Lena Sørensen

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in the treatment of depression, the molecular details of antidepressant drug binding are still not fully understood. Here we utilize amber codon suppression in a membrane-bound transporter protein to encode...

  1. Human coronavirus 229E encodes a single ORF4 protein between the spike and the envelope genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, Ronald; Jebbink, Maarten F.; Wilbrink, Berry; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Minor, Philip D.; Franklin, Sally; Berkhout, Ben; Thiel, Volker; van der Hoek, Lia

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The genome of coronaviruses contains structural and non-structural genes, including several so-called accessory genes. All group 1b coronaviruses encode a single accessory protein between the spike and envelope genes, except for human coronavirus (HCoV) 229E. The prototype virus has a

  2. Content-Specific Source Encoding in the Human Medial Temporal Lobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awipi, T.; Davachi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Although the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is known to be essential for episodic encoding, the contributions of individual MTL subregions remain unclear. Data from recognition memory studies have provided evidence that the hippocampus supports relational encoding important for later episodic recollection, whereas the perirhinal cortex has been linked…

  3. Time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing through highly scattering ex vivo human cataractous lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Shen, Yuecheng; Ruan, Haowen; Brodie, Frank L; Wong, Terence T W; Yang, Changhuei; Wang, Lihong V

    2018-01-01

    Normal development of the visual system in infants relies on clear images being projected onto the retina, which can be disrupted by lens opacity caused by congenital cataract. This disruption, if uncorrected in early life, results in amblyopia (permanently decreased vision even after removal of the cataract). Doctors are able to prevent amblyopia by removing the cataract during the first several weeks of life, but this surgery risks a host of complications, which can be equally visually disabling. Here, we investigated the feasibility of focusing light noninvasively through highly scattering cataractous lenses to stimulate the retina, thereby preventing amblyopia. This approach would allow the cataractous lens removal surgery to be delayed and hence greatly reduce the risk of complications from early surgery. Employing a wavefront shaping technique named time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing in reflection mode, we focused 532-nm light through a highly scattering ex vivo adult human cataractous lens. This work demonstrates a potential clinical application of wavefront shaping techniques. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  4. Time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing through highly scattering ex vivo human cataractous lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Shen, Yuecheng; Ruan, Haowen; Brodie, Frank L.; Wong, Terence T. W.; Yang, Changhuei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2018-01-01

    Normal development of the visual system in infants relies on clear images being projected onto the retina, which can be disrupted by lens opacity caused by congenital cataract. This disruption, if uncorrected in early life, results in amblyopia (permanently decreased vision even after removal of the cataract). Doctors are able to prevent amblyopia by removing the cataract during the first several weeks of life, but this surgery risks a host of complications, which can be equally visually disabling. Here, we investigated the feasibility of focusing light noninvasively through highly scattering cataractous lenses to stimulate the retina, thereby preventing amblyopia. This approach would allow the cataractous lens removal surgery to be delayed and hence greatly reduce the risk of complications from early surgery. Employing a wavefront shaping technique named time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing in reflection mode, we focused 532-nm light through a highly scattering ex vivo adult human cataractous lens. This work demonstrates a potential clinical application of wavefront shaping techniques.

  5. A human torque teno virus encodes a microRNA that inhibits interferon signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney P Kincaid

    Full Text Available Torque teno viruses (TTVs are a group of viruses with small, circular DNA genomes. Members of this family are thought to ubiquitously infect humans, although causal disease associations are currently lacking. At present, there is no understanding of how infection with this diverse group of viruses is so prevalent. Using a combined computational and synthetic approach, we predict and identify miRNA-coding regions in diverse human TTVs and provide evidence for TTV miRNA production in vivo. The TTV miRNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II, processed by Drosha and Dicer, and are active in RISC. A TTV mutant defective for miRNA production replicates as well as wild type virus genome; demonstrating that the TTV miRNA is dispensable for genome replication in a cell culture model. We demonstrate that a recombinant TTV genome is capable of expressing an exogenous miRNA, indicating the potential utility of TTV as a small RNA vector. Gene expression profiling of host cells identifies N-myc (and STAT interactor (NMI as a target of a TTV miRNA. NMI transcripts are directly regulated through a binding site in the 3'UTR. SiRNA knockdown of NMI contributes to a decreased response to interferon signaling. Consistent with this, we show that a TTV miRNA mediates a decreased response to IFN and increased cellular proliferation in the presence of IFN. Thus, we add Annelloviridae to the growing list of virus families that encode miRNAs, and suggest that miRNA-mediated immune evasion can contribute to the pervasiveness associated with some of these viruses.

  6. The carboxyl terminus of human cytomegalovirus-encoded 7 transmembrane receptor US28 camouflages agonism by mediating constitutive endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldhoer, Maria; Casarosa, Paola; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2003-01-01

    US28 is one of four 7 transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors encoded by human cytomegalovirus and has been shown to both signal and endocytose in a ligand-independent, constitutively active manner. Here we show that the constitutive activity and constitutive endocytosis properties of US28...... that the cytoplasmic tail domain of US28 per se regulates receptor endocytosis, independent of the signaling ability of the core domain of US28. The constitutive endocytic property of the US28 c-tail was transposable to other 7TM receptors, the herpes virus 8-encoded ORF74 and the tachykinin NK1 receptor (ORF74-US28...

  7. cDNA sequences of two inducible T-cell genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, B.S. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (USA) Guthrie Research Institute, Sayre, PA (USA)); Weissman, S.M. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA))

    1989-03-01

    The authors have previously described a set of human T-lymphocyte-specific cDNA clones isolated by a modified differential screening procedure. Apparent full-length cDNAs containing the sequences of 14 of the 16 initial isolates were sequenced and were found to represent five different species of mRNA; three of the five species were identical to previously reported cDNA sequences of preproenkephalin, T-cell-replacing factor, and a serine esterase, respectively. The other two species, 4-1BB and L2G25B, were inducible sequences found in mRNA from both a cytolytic T-lymphocyte and a helper T-lymphocyte clone and were not previously described in T-cell mRNA; these mRNA sequences encode peptides of 256 and 92 amino acids, respectively. Both peptides contain putative leader sequences. The protein encoded by 4-1BB also has a potential membrane anchor segment and other features also seen in known receptor proteins.

  8. Cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Vikas Anathy1 Thayanithy Venugopal1 Ramanathan Koteeswaran1 Thavamani J Pandian1 Sinnakaruppan Mathavan2. Department of Genetics, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, India; Genome Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 1, ...

  9. Cloning and characterization of cDNA encoding xyloglucan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomass production in plant is directly related to the amount of intercepted solar radiation by the canopy and available water to the plant. Growth and development of leaves, especially under drought condition, is therefore major determinant of crop productivity. Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) plays important role in ...

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fritillaria thunbergii Miq., known as the bulbous plants of the genus fritillaria, produces a large amount of sterols. Homology based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) with degenerate primers designed from the conserved sequences among the known cycloartenol synthase (CAS) resulted in cloning of a CAS from the ...

  11. Splice variants of porcine PPHLN1 encoding periphilin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud Erik; Momeni, Jamal; Farajzadeh, Leila

    2017-01-01

    splice variants hereof. RT-PCR cloning using oligonucleotide primers derived from in silico sequences resulted in three PPHLN1 transcripts: a full-length mRNA and two transcript variant resulting in shorter proteins. The longest encoded periphilin-1, consisting of 373 amino acids, displays a high......The periphilin-1 protein is encoded by the PPHLN1 gene. Periphilin-1 is found in the cornified cell envelope during the terminal differentiation of keratinocyte at the outer layer of epidermis. In the current study we report on the cloning and characterization of the porcine PPHLN1 cDNA and two...... homology to the human periphilin-1 protein coded by the transcript variant 2 (91%). A shorter transcript variant (PPHLN1Sp1) contains a 1065-codon ORF, which is consistent with that of the authentic PPHLN1, but lacks a region of 57 bp spanning exon 7. Hence, the encoded polypeptide periphilin-1Sp1 consists...

  12. Primary structure of a lipoxygenase from barley grain as deduced from its cDNA sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mechelen, J.R. van; Smits, M.; Douma, A.C.; Rouster, J.; Cameron-Mills, V.; Heidekamp, F.; Valk, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    A full length cDNA sequence for a barley grain lipoxygenase was obtained. It includes a 5' untranslated region of 69 nucleotides, an open reading frame of 2586 nucleotides encoding a protein of 862 amino acid residues and a 3' untranslated region of 142 nucleotides. The molecular mass of the encoded

  13. Functional mapping of the neural basis for the encoding and retrieval of human episodic memory using H215O PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Nam, Hyun Woo; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Sang Kun; Jang, Myoung Jin; Ahn, Ji Young; Park, Kwang Suk; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2000-01-01

    Episodic memory is described as an 'autobiographical' memory responsible for storing a record of the events in our lives. We performed functional brain activation study using H 2 1 5O PET to reveal the neural basis of the encoding and the retrieval of episodic memory in human normal volunteers. Four repeated H 2 1 5O PET scans with two reference and two activation tasks were performed on 6 normal volunteers to activate brain areas engaged in encoding and retrieval with verbal materials. Images from the same subject were spatially registered and normalized using linear and nonlinear transformation. Using the means and variances for every condition which were adjusted with analysis of covariance, t-statistic analysis were performed voxel-wise. Encoding of episodic memory activated the opercular and triangular parts of left inferior frontal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex, medial frontal area, cingulate gyrus, posterior middle and inferior temporal gyri, and cerebellum, and both primary visual and visual association areas. Retrieval of episodic memory activated the triangular part of left inferior frontal gyrus and inferior temporal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex and medial temporal ares, and both cerebellum and primary visual and visual association areas. The activations in the opercular part of left inferior frontal gyrus and the right prefrontal cortex meant the essential role of these areas in the encoding and retrieval of episodic memeory. We could localize the neural basis of the encoding and retrieval of episodic memory using H 2 1 5O PET, which was partly consistent with the hypothesis of hemispheric encoding/retrieval asymmetry.=20

  14. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells by simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lough John W

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of lentiviruses to reprogram human somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells could limit their therapeutic usefulness due to the integration of viral DNA sequences into the genome of the recipient cell. Recent work has demonstrated that human iPS cells can be generated using episomal plasmids, excisable transposons, adeno or sendai viruses, mRNA, or recombinant proteins. While these approaches offer an advance, the protocols have some drawbacks. Commonly the procedures require either subcloning to identify human iPS cells that are free of exogenous DNA, a knowledge of virology and safe handling procedures, or a detailed understanding of protein biochemistry. Results Here we report a simple approach that facilitates the reprogramming of human somatic cells using standard techniques to transfect expression plasmids that encode OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, and LIN28 without the need for episomal stability or selection. The resulting human iPS cells are free of DNA integration, express pluripotent markers, and form teratomas in immunodeficient animals. These iPS cells were also able to undergo directed differentiation into hepatocyte-like and cardiac myocyte-like cells in culture. Conclusions Simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors is sufficient to generate human iPS cells from primary fibroblasts that are free of exogenous DNA integrations. This approach is highly accessible and could expand the use of iPS cells in the study of human disease and development.

  15. Effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol administration on human encoding and recall memory function: a pharmacological FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Jager, Gerry; van Hell, Hendrika H; Zuurman, Lineke; Jansma, J Martijn; Mehta, Mitul A; van Gerven, Joop M A; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2012-03-01

    Deficits in memory function are an incapacitating aspect of various psychiatric and neurological disorders. Animal studies have recently provided strong evidence for involvement of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in memory function. Neuropsychological studies in humans have shown less convincing evidence but suggest that administration of cannabinoid substances affects encoding rather than recall of information. In this study, we examined the effects of perturbation of the eCB system on memory function during both encoding and recall. We performed a pharmacological MRI study with a placebo-controlled, crossover design, investigating the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) inhalation on associative memory-related brain function in 13 healthy volunteers. Performance and brain activation during associative memory were assessed using a pictorial memory task, consisting of separate encoding and recall conditions. Administration of THC caused reductions in activity during encoding in the right insula, the right inferior frontal gyrus, and the left middle occipital gyrus and a network-wide increase in activity during recall, which was most prominent in bilateral cuneus and precuneus. THC administration did not affect task performance, but while during placebo recall activity significantly explained variance in performance, this effect disappeared after THC. These findings suggest eCB involvement in encoding of pictorial information. Increased precuneus activity could reflect impaired recall function, but the absence of THC effects on task performance suggests a compensatory mechanism. These results further emphasize the eCB system as a potential novel target for treatment of memory disorders and a promising target for development of new therapies to reduce memory deficits in humans.

  16. A DNMT3B alternatively spliced exon and encoded peptide are novel biomarkers of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailesh Gopalakrishna-Pillai

    Full Text Available A major obstacle in human stem cell research is the limited number of reagents capable of distinguishing pluripotent stem cells from partially differentiated or incompletely reprogrammed derivatives. Although human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs express numerous alternatively spliced transcripts, little attention has been directed at developing splice variant-encoded protein isoforms as reagents for stem cell research. In this study, several genes encoding proteins involved in important signaling pathways were screened to detect alternatively spliced transcripts that exhibited differential expression in pluripotent stem cells (PSCs relative to spontaneously differentiated cells (SDCs. Transcripts containing the alternatively spliced exon 10 of the de novo DNA methyltransferase gene, DNMT3B, were identified that are expressed in PSCs. To demonstrate the utility and superiority of splice variant specific reagents for stem cell research, a peptide encoded by DNMT3B exon 10 was used to generate an antibody, SG1. The SG1 antibody detects a single DNMT3B protein isoform that is expressed only in PSCs but not in SDCs. The SG1 antibody is also demonstrably superior to other antibodies at distinguishing PSCs from SDCs in mixed cultures containing both pluripotent stem cells and partially differentiated derivatives. The tightly controlled down regulation of DNMT3B exon 10 containing transcripts (and exon 10 encoded peptide upon spontaneous differentiation of PSCs suggests that this DNMT3B splice isoform is characteristic of the pluripotent state. Alternatively spliced exons, and the proteins they encode, represent a vast untapped reservoir of novel biomarkers that can be used to develop superior reagents for stem cell research and to gain further insight into mechanisms controlling stem cell pluripotency.

  17. Fast entrainment of human electroencephalogram to a theta-band photic flicker during successful memory encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Theta band power (4-8Hz in the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG is thought to be stronger during memory encoding for subsequently remembered items than for forgotten items. According to simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI measurements, the memory-dependent EEG theta is associated with multiple regions of the brain. This suggests that the multiple regions cooperate with EEG theta synchronization during successful memory encoding. However, a question still remains: What kind of neural dynamic organizes such a memory-dependent global network? In this study, the modulation of the EEG theta entrainment property during successful encoding was hypothesized to lead to EEG theta synchronization among a distributed network. Then, a transient response of EEG theta to a theta-band photic flicker with a short duration was evaluated during memory encoding. In the results, flicker-induced EEG power increased and decreased with a time constant of several hundred milliseconds following the onset and the offset of the flicker, respectively. Importantly, the offset response of EEG power was found to be significantly decreased during successful encoding. Moreover, the offset response of the phase locking index was also found to associate with memory performance. According to computational simulations, the results are interpreted as a smaller time constant (i.e., faster response of a driven harmonic oscillator rather than a change in the spontaneous oscillatory input. This suggests that the fast response of EEG theta forms a global EEG theta network among memory-related regions during successful encoding, and it contributes to a flexible formation of the network along the time course.

  18. Fast entrainment of human electroencephalogram to a theta-band photic flicker during successful memory encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Theta band power (4–8 Hz) in the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) is thought to be stronger during memory encoding for subsequently remembered items than for forgotten items. According to simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements, the memory-dependent EEG theta is associated with multiple regions of the brain. This suggests that the multiple regions cooperate with EEG theta synchronization during successful memory encoding. However, a question still remains: What kind of neural dynamic organizes such a memory-dependent global network? In this study, the modulation of the EEG theta entrainment property during successful encoding was hypothesized to lead to EEG theta synchronization among a distributed network. Then, a transient response of EEG theta to a theta-band photic flicker with a short duration was evaluated during memory encoding. In the results, flicker-induced EEG power increased and decreased with a time constant of several hundred milliseconds following the onset and the offset of the flicker, respectively. Importantly, the offset response of EEG power was found to be significantly decreased during successful encoding. Moreover, the offset response of the phase locking index was also found to associate with memory performance. According to computational simulations, the results are interpreted as a smaller time constant (i.e., faster response) of a driven harmonic oscillator rather than a change in the spontaneous oscillatory input. This suggests that the fast response of EEG theta forms a global EEG theta network among memory-related regions during successful encoding, and it contributes to a flexible formation of the network along the time course. PMID:23730282

  19. Generation of infectious feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) encoding FIV/human immunodeficiency virus chimeric protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Chuan; Torbett, Bruce E; Elder, John H

    2010-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proteases (PRs) share only 23% amino acid identity and exhibit distinct specificities yet have very similar 3-dimensional structures. Chimeric PRs in which HIV residues were substituted in structurally equivalent positions in FIV PR were prepared in order to study the molecular basis of PR specificity. Previous in vitro analyses showed that such substitutions dramatically altered the inhibitor specificity of mutant PRs but changed the rate and specificity of Gag cleavage so that chimeric FIVs were not infectious. Chimeric PRs encoding combinations of the I37V, N55M, M56I, V59I, L97T, I98P, Q99V, and P100N mutations were cloned into FIV Gag-Pol, and those constructs that best approximated the temporal cleavage pattern generated by wild-type FIV PR, while maintaining HIV-like inhibitor specificity, were selected. Two mutations, M56I and L97T, were intolerant to change and caused inefficient cleavage at NC-p2. However, a mutant PR with six substitutions (I37V, N55M, V59I, I98P, Q99V, and P100N) was selected and placed in the context of full-length FIV-34TF10. This virus, termed YCL6, had low-level infectivity ex vivo, and after passage, progeny that exhibited a higher growth rate emerged. The residue at the position of one of the six mutations, I98P, further mutated on passage to either P98H or P98S. Both PRs were sensitive to the HIV-1 PR inhibitors lopinavir (LPV) and darunavir (DRV), as well as to the broad-based inhibitor TL-3, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of 30 to 40 nM, consistent with ex vivo results obtained using mutant FIVs. The chimeras offer an infectivity system with which to screen compounds for potential as broad-based PR inhibitors, define structural parameters that dictate specificity, and investigate pathways for drug resistance development.

  20. Evaluation of JPEG 2000 encoder options: human and model observer detection of variable signals in X-ray coronary angiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yani; Pham, Binh; Eckstein, Miguel P

    2004-05-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the effect of the new still image compression standard JPEG 2000 using nontask based image quality metrics, i.e., peak-signal-to-noise-ratio (PSNR) for nonmedical images. In this paper, the effect of JPEG 2000 encoder options was investigated using the performance of human and model observers (nonprewhitening matched filter with an eye filter, square-window Hotelling, Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling and channelized Hotelling model observer) for clinically relevant visual tasks. Two tasks were investigated: the signal known exactly but variable task (SKEV) and the signal known statistically task (SKS). Test images consisted of real X-ray coronary angiograms with simulated filling defects (signals) inserted in one of the four simulated arteries. The signals varied in size and shape. Experimental results indicated that the dependence of task performance on the JPEG 2000 encoder options was similar for all model and human observers. Model observer performance in the more tractable and computationally economic SKEV task can be used to reliably estimate performance in the complex but clinically more realistic SKS task. JPEG 2000 encoder settings different from the default ones resulted in greatly improved model and human observer performance in the studied clinically relevant visual tasks using real angiography backgrounds.

  1. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the {alpha} receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, D.M.; Rojas, E.; McClain, J. [Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor {alpha} (CNTFR{alpha}). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR{alpha}. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain in encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Linking mathematical modeling with human neuroimaging to segregate verbal working memory maintenance processes from stimulus encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Benjamin S; Brown, Gregory G; Drummond, Sean P A; Turner, Travis H; Mano, Quintino R

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental dissociation for most working memory (WM) theories involves the separation of sensory-perceptual encoding of stimulus information from the maintenance of this information. The present paper reports tests of this separability hypothesis for visually presented pseudowords at both mathematical and neuroimaging levels of analysis. Levels of analysis were linked by two experimental manipulations-visual degradation and pseudoword length variation-that coupled findings from a mathematical modeling study of WM performed in a separate sample to findings from an event-related functional MRI (fMRI) study reported in the present paper. Results from the mathematical modeling study generated parametric signatures of stimulus encoding and WM rehearsal and displacement. These signatures led to specific predictions about neurophysiological responses to study manipulations in a priori regions of interest (ROI). Results demonstrated predicted dissociations of activation signatures in several ROIs. Significant patterns of brain response mirroring the encode signature were observed only during the task encode interval and only in the visual cortex and posterior fusiform gyrus. In contrast, significant brain response mirroring the rehearsal/displacement signature was observed only in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, and supramarginal gyrus. Present findings support the separability hypothesis insofar as brain regions that underlie sensory-perceptual processes demonstrated encode signatures whereas brain regions that support WM maintenance demonstrated the rehearsal/displacement signature. These results also provide evidence for the utility of combining mathematical modeling with fMRI to integrate information across cognitive and neural levels of analysis. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Human adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL), cloning and characterization of full-length cDNA and its isoform, gene structure and molecular basis for ADSL deficiency in six patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmoch, S; Hartmannová, H; Stibůrková, B; Krijt, J; Zikánová, M; Sebesta, I

    2000-06-12

    Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) is a bifunctional enzyme acting in de novo purine synthesis and purine nucleotide recycling. ADSL deficiency is a selectively neuronopathic disorder with psychomotor retardation and epilepsy as leading traits. Both dephosphorylated enzyme substrates, succinylaminoimidazole-carboxamide riboside (SAICAr) and succinyladenosine (S-Ado), accumulate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of affected individuals with S-Ado/SAICAr concentration ratios proportional to the phenotype severity. We studied the disorder at various levels in a group of six patients with ADSL deficiency. We identified the complete ADSL cDNA and its alternatively spliced isoform resulting from exon 12 skipping. Both mRNA isoforms were expressed in all the tissues studied with the non-spliced form 10-fold more abundant. Both cDNAs were expressed in Escherichia coli and functionally characterized at the protein level. The results showed only the unspliced ADSL to be active. The gene consists of 13 exons spanning 23 kb. The promotor region shows typical features of the housekeeping gene. Eight mutations were identified in a group of six patients. The expression studies of the mutant proteins carried out in an attempt to study genotype-phenotype correlation showed that the level of residual enzyme activity correlates with the severity of the clinical phenotype. All the mutant enzymes studied in vitro displayed a proportional decrease in activity against both of their substrates. However, this was not concordant with strikingly different concentration ratios in the CSF of individual patients. This suggests either different in vivo enzyme activities against each of the substrates and/or their different turnover across the CSF-blood barrier, which may be decisive in determining disease severity.

  4. cDNA cloning and mRNA expression of heat shock protein 70 gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the full-length heat shock protein 70 of Tegillarca granosa was cloned from cDNA library by rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE). The open reading frame (ORF) of heat shock protein 70 was 1968 bp, and it encoded a protein of 655 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 71.48 kDa and an ...

  5. Cloning and characterization of human very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase cDNA, chromosomal assignment of the gene and identification in four patients of nine different mutations within the VLCAD gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Bross, P; Vianey-Saban, C

    1996-01-01

    specific distribution of VLCAD mRNA and protein in several human tissues we showed that VLCAD is most abundant in heart and skeletal muscle. This agrees well with the fact that cardiac and muscle symptoms are characteristic for patients with VLCAD deficiency. Northern blot analysis and sequencing of cloned......) based strategy to obtain the sequence of cDNAs encoding human VLCAD from placenta and fibroblasts. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequence of human VLCAD with those of the other human ACD enzymes revealed extensive sequence homology. Moreover, human VLCAD and human acyl-CoA oxidase showed...... extensive sequence homology corroborating the notion that these genes are evolutionarily related. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from hybrid cell lines was used to localize the VLCAD gene to human chromosome 17p11.2-p11.13105. Using Northern and Western blot analysis to investigate the tissue...

  6. A biallelic RFLP of the human. alpha. 2-C4 adrenergic receptor gene (ADRA2RL2) localized on the short arm of chromosome 4 and encoding the putative. alpha. 2B receptor is identified with Bsu 36 L using a 1. 5 kb probe (p ADRA2RL2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeche, M.R.; Berrettini, W.H. (Clinical Neurogenetics Branch, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Regan, J.W. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1989-12-11

    A 1.5 kb Eco RI cDNA fragment representing the human alpha2-C4 adrenergic receptor (AR) gene encoding the putative alpha2B-AR, containing approximately 1270 bp of the coding and 240 bp of the 3{prime}flanking region, inserted into pSP65, was used as a probe (p ADRA2RL2). This clone was obtained by screening a human kidney lambda GT10 cDNA library with the 0.95 kb Pst I restriction fragment derived from the coding block of the gene for the human platelet alpha2-AR. Hybridization of human genomic DNA digested with Bsu 36 I identifies a two allele polymorphism with bands at 12 kb and 5.8 kb. 20 unrelated North American caucasian subjects were evaluated with frequencies of: A allele, 0.45; B allele, 0.55, heterozygosity (obs), 0.5. This alpha2-AR gene has been mapped in a separation effort in 59 CEPH reference pedigrees to the tip of the short arm of chromosome 4 just proximal to GB (4p 16.3) reported to be linked to the Huntingston's disease gene. Codominant inheritance was observed in seven families with two and three generations, respectively. The number of meioses scored was 95.

  7. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Gao, Feng [Durham, NC; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Shaw, George M [Birmingham, AL; Kothe, Denise [Birmingham, AL; Li, Ying Ying [Hoover, AL; Decker, Julie [Alabaster, AL; Liao, Hua-Xin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  8. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of the first nonpeptidergic inverse agonists for the human cytomegalovirus encoded chemokine receptor US28

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, Janneke W; Casarosa, Paola; Menge, Wiro M P B; Kuusisto, Leena M S; van der Goot, Henk; Smit, Martine J; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob

    2005-01-01

    US28 is a human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encoded G-protein-coupled receptor that signals in a constitutively active manner. Recently, we identified 1 [5-(4-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl)-2,2-diphenylpentanenitrile] as the first reported nonpeptidergic inverse agonist for a viral-encoded

  9. THE LRP GENE ENCODING A MAJOR VAULT PROTEIN ASSOCIATED WITH DRUG-RESISTANCE MAPS PROXIMAL TO MRP ON CHROMOSOME-16 - EVIDENCE THAT CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE PLAYS A KEY ROLE IN MRP OR LRP GENE AMPLIFICATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SLOVAK, ML; HO, JP; COLE, SPC; DEELEY, RG; GREENBERGER, L; DEVRIES, EGE; BROXTERMAN, HJ; SCHEFFER, GL; SCHEPER, RJ

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the novel drug resistance gene, LRP (originally termed lung resistance-related protein), was isolated from HT1080/DR4, a 220-fold doxorubicin-resistant human fibrosarcoma cell line which displays a multidrug resistance phenotype and overexpresses the multidrug resistance protein

  10. Nuclear-encoded factors involved in post-transcriptional processing and modification of mitochondrial tRNAs in human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Powell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA encodes twenty-two tRNAs (mt-tRNAs that are necessary for the intraorganellar translation of the thirteen mtDNA-encoded subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Maturation of mt-tRNAs involves 5’ and 3’ nucleolytic excision from precursor RNAs, as well as extensive post-transcriptional modifications. Recent data suggest that over 7 % of all mt-tRNA residues in mammals undergo post-transcriptional modification, with over 30 different modified mt-tRNA positions so far described. These processing and modification steps are necessary for proper mt-tRNA function, and are performed by dedicated, nuclear-encoded enzymes. Recent growing evidence suggests that mutations in these nuclear genes, leading to incorrect maturation of mt-tRNAs, are a cause of human mitochondrial disease. Furthermore, mtDNA mutations in mt-tRNA genes, which may also affect mt-tRNA function, processing and modification, are also frequently associated with human disease. In theory, all pathogenic mt-tRNA variants should be expected to affect only a single process, which is mitochondrial translation, albeit to various extents. However, the clinical manifestations of mitochondrial disorders linked to mutations in mt-tRNAs are extremely heterogeneous, ranging from defects of a single tissue to complex multisystem disorders. This review focuses on the current knowledge of nuclear genes coding for proteins involved in mt-tRNA maturation that have been linked to human mitochondrial pathologies. We further discuss the possibility that tissue specific regulation of mt-tRNA modifying enzymes could play an important role in the clinical heterogeneity observed for mitochondrial diseases caused by mutations in mt-tRNA genes.

  11. Overexpression of BrSAC1 encoding a phosphoinositide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study demonstrates the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding a phosphoinositide phosphatase (PIP) from a stem cell cDNA library of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) seedling. The full length gene (BrSAC1; GenBank accession no., GU434275) contained 1999 base pairs (bp), with an open reading frame of ...

  12. Genome-wide analysis reveals loci encoding anti-macrophage factors in the human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J Dowling

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important human pathogen whose infection biology is still poorly understood. The bacterium is endemic to tropical regions, including South East Asia and Northern Australia, where it causes melioidosis, a serious disease associated with both high mortality and antibiotic resistance. B. pseudomallei is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is able to replicate in macrophages. However despite the critical nature of its interaction with macrophages, few anti-macrophage factors have been characterized to date. Here we perform a genome-wide gain of function screen of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 to identify loci encoding factors with anti-macrophage activity. We identify a total of 113 such loci scattered across both chromosomes, with positive gene clusters encoding transporters and secretion systems, enzymes/toxins, secondary metabolite, biofilm, adhesion and signal response related factors. Further phenotypic analysis of four of these regions shows that the encoded factors cause striking cellular phenotypes relevant to infection biology, including apoptosis, formation of actin 'tails' and multi-nucleation within treated macrophages. The detailed analysis of the remaining host of loci will facilitate genetic dissection of the interaction of this important pathogen with host macrophages and thus further elucidate this critical part of its infection cycle.

  13. Cloning a Chymotrypsin-Like 1 (CTRL-1 Protease cDNA from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunwi Heo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An enzyme in a nematocyst extract of the Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish, caught off the coast of the Republic of Korea, catalyzed the cleavage of chymotrypsin substrate in an amidolytic kinetic assay, and this activity was inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. We isolated the full-length cDNA sequence of this enzyme, which contains 850 nucleotides, with an open reading frame of 801 encoding 266 amino acids. A blast analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed 41% identity with human chymotrypsin-like (CTRL and the CTRL-1 precursor. Therefore, we designated this enzyme N. nomurai CTRL-1. The primary structure of N. nomurai CTRL-1 includes a leader peptide and a highly conserved catalytic triad of His69, Asp117, and Ser216. The disulfide bonds of chymotrypsin and the substrate-binding sites are highly conserved compared with the CTRLs of other species, including mammalian species. Nemopilema nomurai CTRL-1 is evolutionarily more closely related to Actinopterygii than to Scyphozoan (Aurelia aurita or Hydrozoan (Hydra vulgaris. The N. nomurai CTRL1 was amplified from the genomic DNA with PCR using specific primers designed based on the full-length cDNA, and then sequenced. The N. nomurai CTRL1 gene contains 2434 nucleotides and four distinct exons. The 5′ donor splice (GT and 3′ acceptor splice sequences (AG are wholly conserved. This is the first report of the CTRL1 gene and cDNA structures in the jellyfish N. nomurai.

  14. Cloning a Chymotrypsin-Like 1 (CTRL-1) Protease cDNA from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Yunwi; Kwon, Young Chul; Bae, Seong Kyeong; Hwang, Duhyeon; Yang, Hye Ryeon; Choudhary, Indu; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Yum, Seungshic; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Yoon, Won Duk; Kang, Changkeun; Kim, Euikyung

    2016-01-01

    An enzyme in a nematocyst extract of the Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish, caught off the coast of the Republic of Korea, catalyzed the cleavage of chymotrypsin substrate in an amidolytic kinetic assay, and this activity was inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. We isolated the full-length cDNA sequence of this enzyme, which contains 850 nucleotides, with an open reading frame of 801 encoding 266 amino acids. A blast analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed 41% identity with human chymotrypsin-like (CTRL) and the CTRL-1 precursor. Therefore, we designated this enzyme N. nomurai CTRL-1. The primary structure of N. nomurai CTRL-1 includes a leader peptide and a highly conserved catalytic triad of His69, Asp117, and Ser216. The disulfide bonds of chymotrypsin and the substrate-binding sites are highly conserved compared with the CTRLs of other species, including mammalian species. Nemopilema nomurai CTRL-1 is evolutionarily more closely related to Actinopterygii than to Scyphozoan (Aurelia aurita) or Hydrozoan (Hydra vulgaris). The N. nomurai CTRL1 was amplified from the genomic DNA with PCR using specific primers designed based on the full-length cDNA, and then sequenced. The N. nomurai CTRL1 gene contains 2434 nucleotides and four distinct exons. The 5′ donor splice (GT) and 3′ acceptor splice sequences (AG) are wholly conserved. This is the first report of the CTRL1 gene and cDNA structures in the jellyfish N. nomurai. PMID:27399771

  15. Encoding of natural sounds at multiple spectral and temporal resolutions in the human auditory cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santoro, Roberta; Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Goebel, R.; Ugurbil, Kamil; Yacoub, Essa; Formisano, Elia

    Functional neuroimaging research provides detailed observations of the response patterns that natural sounds (e.g. human voices and speech, animal cries, environmental sounds) evoke in the human brain. The computational and representational mechanisms underlying these observations, however, remain

  16. Human TCR-MHC coevolution after divergence from mice includes increased nontemplate-encoded CDR3 diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojing; Poncette, Lucia; Blankenstein, Thomas

    2017-11-06

    For thymic selection and responses to pathogens, T cells interact through their αβ T cell receptor (TCR) with peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on antigen-presenting cells. How the diverse TCRs interact with a multitude of MHC molecules is unresolved. It is also unclear how humans generate larger TCR repertoires than mice do. We compared the TCR repertoire of CD4 T cells selected from a single mouse or human MHC class II (MHC II) in mice containing the human TCR gene loci. Human MHC II yielded greater thymic output and a more diverse TCR repertoire. The complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) length adjusted for different inherent V-segment affinities to MHC II. Humans evolved with greater nontemplate-encoded CDR3 diversity than did mice. Our data, which demonstrate human TCR-MHC coevolution after divergence from rodents, explain the greater T cell diversity in humans and suggest a mechanism for ensuring that any V-J gene combination can be selected by a single MHC II. © 2017 Chen et al.

  17. Functional cloning using pFB retroviral cDNA expression libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felts, Katherine A; Chen, Keith; Zaharee, Kim; Sundar, Latha; Limjoco, Jamie; Miller, Anna; Vaillancourt, Peter

    2002-09-01

    Retroviral cDNA expression libraries allow the efficient introduction of complex cDNA libraries into virtually any mitotic cell type for screening based on gene function. The cDNA copy number per cell can be easily controlled by adjusting the multiplicity of infection, thus cell populations may be generated in which >90% of infected cells contain one to three cDNAs. We describe the isolation of two known oncogenes and one cell-surface receptor from a human Burkitt's lymphoma (Daudi) cDNA library inserted into the high-titer retroviral vector pFB.

  18. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here we report for the first time the cloning of a full-length cDNA encoding GGPPS (Jc-GGPPS) from Jatropha curcas L. The full-length cDNA was 1414 base pair (bp), with an 1110-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 370- amino-acids polypeptide. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Jc-GGPPS is a member of the ...

  19. ChromNet: Learning the human chromatin network from all ENCODE ChIP-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Scott M; Tu, William B; Raught, Brian; Penn, Linda Z; Hoffman, Michael M; Lee, Su-In

    2016-04-30

    A cell's epigenome arises from interactions among regulatory factors-transcription factors and histone modifications-co-localized at particular genomic regions. We developed a novel statistical method, ChromNet, to infer a network of these interactions, the chromatin network, by inferring conditional-dependence relationships among a large number of ChIP-seq data sets. We applied ChromNet to all available 1451 ChIP-seq data sets from the ENCODE Project, and showed that ChromNet revealed previously known physical interactions better than alternative approaches. We experimentally validated one of the previously unreported interactions, MYC-HCFC1. An interactive visualization tool is available at http://chromnet.cs.washington.edu.

  20. De novo prediction of human chromosome structures: Epigenetic marking patterns encode genome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R.; Lieberman Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G.; Onuchic, José N.

    2017-01-01

    Inside the cell nucleus, genomes fold into organized structures that are characteristic of cell type. Here, we show that this chromatin architecture can be predicted de novo using epigenetic data derived from chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We exploit the idea that chromosomes encode a 1D sequence of chromatin structural types. Interactions between these chromatin types determine the 3D structural ensemble of chromosomes through a process similar to phase separation. First, a neural network is used to infer the relation between the epigenetic marks present at a locus, as assayed by ChIP-Seq, and the genomic compartment in which those loci reside, as measured by DNA-DNA proximity ligation (Hi-C). Next, types inferred from this neural network are used as an input to an energy landscape model for chromatin organization [Minimal Chromatin Model (MiChroM)] to generate an ensemble of 3D chromosome conformations at a resolution of 50 kilobases (kb). After training the model, dubbed Maximum Entropy Genomic Annotation from Biomarkers Associated to Structural Ensembles (MEGABASE), on odd-numbered chromosomes, we predict the sequences of chromatin types and the subsequent 3D conformational ensembles for the even chromosomes. We validate these structural ensembles by using ChIP-Seq tracks alone to predict Hi-C maps, as well as distances measured using 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. Both sets of experiments support the hypothesis of phase separation being the driving process behind compartmentalization. These findings strongly suggest that epigenetic marking patterns encode sufficient information to determine the global architecture of chromosomes and that de novo structure prediction for whole genomes may be increasingly possible. PMID:29087948

  1. De novo prediction of human chromosome structures: Epigenetic marking patterns encode genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R; Lieberman Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G; Onuchic, José N

    2017-11-14

    Inside the cell nucleus, genomes fold into organized structures that are characteristic of cell type. Here, we show that this chromatin architecture can be predicted de novo using epigenetic data derived from chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We exploit the idea that chromosomes encode a 1D sequence of chromatin structural types. Interactions between these chromatin types determine the 3D structural ensemble of chromosomes through a process similar to phase separation. First, a neural network is used to infer the relation between the epigenetic marks present at a locus, as assayed by ChIP-Seq, and the genomic compartment in which those loci reside, as measured by DNA-DNA proximity ligation (Hi-C). Next, types inferred from this neural network are used as an input to an energy landscape model for chromatin organization [Minimal Chromatin Model (MiChroM)] to generate an ensemble of 3D chromosome conformations at a resolution of 50 kilobases (kb). After training the model, dubbed Maximum Entropy Genomic Annotation from Biomarkers Associated to Structural Ensembles (MEGABASE), on odd-numbered chromosomes, we predict the sequences of chromatin types and the subsequent 3D conformational ensembles for the even chromosomes. We validate these structural ensembles by using ChIP-Seq tracks alone to predict Hi-C maps, as well as distances measured using 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. Both sets of experiments support the hypothesis of phase separation being the driving process behind compartmentalization. These findings strongly suggest that epigenetic marking patterns encode sufficient information to determine the global architecture of chromosomes and that de novo structure prediction for whole genomes may be increasingly possible. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  2. Monitoring Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes with Genetically Encoded Calcium and Voltage Fluorescent Reporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Shinnawi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The advent of the human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC technology has transformed biomedical research, providing new tools for human disease modeling, drug development, and regenerative medicine. To fulfill its unique potential in the cardiovascular field, efficient methods should be developed for high-resolution, large-scale, long-term, and serial functional cellular phenotyping of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs. To achieve this goal, we combined the hiPSC technology with genetically encoded voltage (ArcLight and calcium (GCaMP5G fluorescent indicators. Expression of ArcLight and GCaMP5G in hiPSC-CMs permitted to reliably follow changes in transmembrane potential and intracellular calcium levels, respectively. This allowed monitoring short- and long-term changes in action-potential and calcium-handling properties and the development of arrhythmias in response to several pharmaceutical agents and in hiPSC-CMs derived from patients with different inherited arrhythmogenic syndromes. Combining genetically encoded fluorescent reporters with hiPSC-CMs may bring a unique value to the study of inherited disorders, developmental biology, and drug development and testing.

  3. Genomic and cDNA cloning of a novel mouse lipoxygenase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems van Dijk, K.; Steketee, K.; Havekes, L.; Frants, R.; Hofker, M.

    1995-01-01

    A novel 12- and 15-lipoxygenase related gene was isolated from a mouse strain 129 genomic phage library in a screen with a human 15-lipoxygenase cDNA probe. The complete genomic sequence revealed 14 exons and 13 introns covering 7.3 kb of DNA. The splice junctions were verified from the cDNA

  4. Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE pilot project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birney, Ewan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Dutta, Anindya

    2007-01-01

    We report the generation and analysis of functional data from multiple, diverse experiments performed on a targeted 1% of the human genome as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE Project. These data have been further integrated and augmented by a number of evolutionary and computational analyses...... modification. Third, a more sophisticated view of chromatin structure has emerged, including its inter-relationship with DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. Finally, integration of these new sources of information, in particular with respect to mammalian evolution based on inter- and intra....... Together, our results advance the collective knowledge about human genome function in several major areas. First, our studies provide convincing evidence that the genome is pervasively transcribed, such that the majority of its bases can be found in primary transcripts, including non...

  5. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  6. Construction of cDNA coding for human von Willebrand factor using antibody probes for colony-screening and mapping of the chromosomal gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, C. L.; de Vries, C. J.; Distel, B.; van Zonneveld, A. J.; van Kessel, A. G.; van Mourik, J. A.; Pannekoek, H.

    1985-01-01

    Von Willebrand Factor (vWF) mRNA was identified in fractionated polyA+ RNA preparations isolated from cultured human endothelial cells. Micro-injection of specific polyA+ RNA fractions in Xenopus laevis oocytes provoked the synthesis of a vWF-like product which could be detected with an

  7. cDNA cloning and transcriptional controlling of a novel low dose radiation-induced gene and its function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Pingkun; Sui Jianli

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To clone a novel low dose radiation-induced gene (LRIGx) and study its function as well as its transcriptional changes after irradiation. Methods: Its cDNA was obtained by DDRT-PCR and RACE techniques. Northern blot hybridization was used to investigate the gene transcription. Bioinformatics was employed to analysis structure and function of this gene. Results: LRIGx cDNA was cloned. The sequence of LRIGx was identical to a DNA clone located in human chromosome 20 q 11.2-12 Bioinformatics analysis predicted an encoded protein with a conserved helicase domain. Northern analysis revealed a ∼8.5 kb transcript which was induced after 0.2 Gy as well as 0.02 Gy irradiation, and the transcript level was increased 5 times at 4 h after 0.2 Gy irradiation. The induced level of LRIGx transcript by 2.0 Gy high dose was lower than by 0.2 Gy. Conclusion: A novel low dose radiation-induced gene has been cloned. It encodes a protein with a conserved helicase domain that could involve in DNA metabolism in the cellular process of radiation response

  8. Human dorsal striatum encodes prediction errors during observational learning of instrumental actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jeffrey C; Dunne, Simon; Furey, Teresa; O'Doherty, John P

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal striatum plays a key role in the learning and expression of instrumental reward associations that are acquired through direct experience. However, not all learning about instrumental actions require direct experience. Instead, humans and other animals are also capable of acquiring instrumental actions by observing the experiences of others. In this study, we investigated the extent to which human dorsal striatum is involved in observational as well as experiential instrumental reward learning. Human participants were scanned with fMRI while they observed a confederate over a live video performing an instrumental conditioning task to obtain liquid juice rewards. Participants also performed a similar instrumental task for their own rewards. Using a computational model-based analysis, we found reward prediction errors in the dorsal striatum not only during the experiential learning condition but also during observational learning. These results suggest a key role for the dorsal striatum in learning instrumental associations, even when those associations are acquired purely by observing others.

  9. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro (Akita Univ. School of Medicine, Akita (Japan)); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Up-regulation of hepatitis C virus replication by human T cell leukemia virus type I-encoded Tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Kawagishi, Kenji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Araki, Hiromasa; Yamaoka, Shoji; Hattori, Toshio; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2007-12-05

    Co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with other blood-borne pathogens such as human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV) is common in highly endemic areas. Clinical evidence showing a correlation between HTLV-I co-infection and rapid progression of HCV-associated liver disease promoted us to investigate the effect of HTLV-I-encoded Tax protein on HCV replication. Reporter assay showed that HCV replicon-encoded luciferase expression was significantly augmented by co-transfection of the Tax-expressing plasmid. Further, HCV RNA replication in replicon cells was increased either by co-culture with cells stably expressing Tax protein (Huhtax) or by culture in the presence of Huhtax-conditioned medium, indicating that Tax could also modulate HCV replication of adjacent cells in a paracrine manner. Additionally, HCV replication in Huhtax exhibited a reduced responsiveness to interferon-alpha-induced antiviral activity. This study demonstrates the facilitation of HCV replication by Tax protein, which may partially account for severer clinical consequences of HCV-related disease in HCV/HTLV co-infected individuals.

  11. Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birney, Ewan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Dutta, Anindya; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R; Margulies, Elliott H; Weng, Zhiping; Snyder, Michael; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Thurman, Robert E; Kuehn, Michael S; Taylor, Christopher M; Neph, Shane; Koch, Christoph M; Asthana, Saurabh; Malhotra, Ankit; Adzhubei, Ivan; Greenbaum, Jason A; Andrews, Robert M; Flicek, Paul; Boyle, Patrick J; Cao, Hua; Carter, Nigel P; Clelland, Gayle K; Davis, Sean; Day, Nathan; Dhami, Pawandeep; Dillon, Shane C; Dorschner, Michael O; Fiegler, Heike; Giresi, Paul G; Goldy, Jeff; Hawrylycz, Michael; Haydock, Andrew; Humbert, Richard; James, Keith D; Johnson, Brett E; Johnson, Ericka M; Frum, Tristan T; Rosenzweig, Elizabeth R; Karnani, Neerja; Lee, Kirsten; Lefebvre, Gregory C; Navas, Patrick A; Neri, Fidencio; Parker, Stephen C J; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Shafer, Anthony; Vetrie, David; Weaver, Molly; Wilcox, Sarah; Yu, Man; Collins, Francis S; Dekker, Job; Lieb, Jason D; Tullius, Thomas D; Crawford, Gregory E; Sunyaev, Shamil; Noble, William S; Dunham, Ian; Denoeud, France; Reymond, Alexandre; Kapranov, Philipp; Rozowsky, Joel; Zheng, Deyou; Castelo, Robert; Frankish, Adam; Harrow, Jennifer; Ghosh, Srinka; Sandelin, Albin; Hofacker, Ivo L; Baertsch, Robert; Keefe, Damian; Dike, Sujit; Cheng, Jill; Hirsch, Heather A; Sekinger, Edward A; Lagarde, Julien; Abril, Josep F; Shahab, Atif; Flamm, Christoph; Fried, Claudia; Hackermüller, Jörg; Hertel, Jana; Lindemeyer, Manja; Missal, Kristin; Tanzer, Andrea; Washietl, Stefan; Korbel, Jan; Emanuelsson, Olof; Pedersen, Jakob S; Holroyd, Nancy; Taylor, Ruth; Swarbreck, David; Matthews, Nicholas; Dickson, Mark C; Thomas, Daryl J; Weirauch, Matthew T; Gilbert, James; Drenkow, Jorg; Bell, Ian; Zhao, XiaoDong; Srinivasan, K G; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ooi, Hong Sain; Chiu, Kuo Ping; Foissac, Sylvain; Alioto, Tyler; Brent, Michael; Pachter, Lior; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso; Choo, Siew Woh; Choo, Chiou Yu; Ucla, Catherine; Manzano, Caroline; Wyss, Carine; Cheung, Evelyn; Clark, Taane G; Brown, James B; Ganesh, Madhavan; Patel, Sandeep; Tammana, Hari; Chrast, Jacqueline; Henrichsen, Charlotte N; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Nagalakshmi, Ugrappa; Wu, Jiaqian; Lian, Zheng; Lian, Jin; Newburger, Peter; Zhang, Xueqing; Bickel, Peter; Mattick, John S; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Weissman, Sherman; Hubbard, Tim; Myers, Richard M; Rogers, Jane; Stadler, Peter F; Lowe, Todd M; Wei, Chia-Lin; Ruan, Yijun; Struhl, Kevin; Gerstein, Mark; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Fu, Yutao; Green, Eric D; Karaöz, Ulaş; Siepel, Adam; Taylor, James; Liefer, Laura A; Wetterstrand, Kris A; Good, Peter J; Feingold, Elise A; Guyer, Mark S; Cooper, Gregory M; Asimenos, George; Dewey, Colin N; Hou, Minmei; Nikolaev, Sergey; Montoya-Burgos, Juan I; Löytynoja, Ari; Whelan, Simon; Pardi, Fabio; Massingham, Tim; Huang, Haiyan; Zhang, Nancy R; Holmes, Ian; Mullikin, James C; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Paten, Benedict; Seringhaus, Michael; Church, Deanna; Rosenbloom, Kate; Kent, W James; Stone, Eric A; Batzoglou, Serafim; Goldman, Nick; Hardison, Ross C; Haussler, David; Miller, Webb; Sidow, Arend; Trinklein, Nathan D; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Barrera, Leah; Stuart, Rhona; King, David C; Ameur, Adam; Enroth, Stefan; Bieda, Mark C; Kim, Jonghwan; Bhinge, Akshay A; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Jun; Yao, Fei; Vega, Vinsensius B; Lee, Charlie W H; Ng, Patrick; Shahab, Atif; Yang, Annie; Moqtaderi, Zarmik; Zhu, Zhou; Xu, Xiaoqin; Squazzo, Sharon; Oberley, Matthew J; Inman, David; Singer, Michael A; Richmond, Todd A; Munn, Kyle J; Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Wallerman, Ola; Komorowski, Jan; Fowler, Joanna C; Couttet, Phillippe; Bruce, Alexander W; Dovey, Oliver M; Ellis, Peter D; Langford, Cordelia F; Nix, David A; Euskirchen, Ghia; Hartman, Stephen; Urban, Alexander E; Kraus, Peter; Van Calcar, Sara; Heintzman, Nate; Kim, Tae Hoon; Wang, Kun; Qu, Chunxu; Hon, Gary; Luna, Rosa; Glass, Christopher K; Rosenfeld, M Geoff; Aldred, Shelley Force; Cooper, Sara J; Halees, Anason; Lin, Jane M; Shulha, Hennady P; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Mousheng; Haidar, Jaafar N S; Yu, Yong; Ruan, Yijun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Green, Roland D; Wadelius, Claes; Farnham, Peggy J; Ren, Bing; Harte, Rachel A; Hinrichs, Angie S; Trumbower, Heather; Clawson, Hiram; Hillman-Jackson, Jennifer; Zweig, Ann S; Smith, Kayla; Thakkapallayil, Archana; Barber, Galt; Kuhn, Robert M; Karolchik, Donna; Armengol, Lluis; Bird, Christine P; de Bakker, Paul I W; Kern, Andrew D; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Martin, Joel D; Stranger, Barbara E; Woodroffe, Abigail; Davydov, Eugene; Dimas, Antigone; Eyras, Eduardo; Hallgrímsdóttir, Ingileif B; Huppert, Julian; Zody, Michael C; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Estivill, Xavier; Bouffard, Gerard G; Guan, Xiaobin; Hansen, Nancy F; Idol, Jacquelyn R; Maduro, Valerie V B; Maskeri, Baishali; McDowell, Jennifer C; Park, Morgan; Thomas, Pamela J; Young, Alice C; Blakesley, Robert W; Muzny, Donna M; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Jiang, Huaiyang; Weinstock, George M; Gibbs, Richard A; Graves, Tina; Fulton, Robert; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Clamp, Michele; Cuff, James; Gnerre, Sante; Jaffe, David B; Chang, Jean L; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Lander, Eric S; Koriabine, Maxim; Nefedov, Mikhail; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Zhu, Baoli; de Jong, Pieter J

    2007-06-14

    We report the generation and analysis of functional data from multiple, diverse experiments performed on a targeted 1% of the human genome as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE Project. These data have been further integrated and augmented by a number of evolutionary and computational analyses. Together, our results advance the collective knowledge about human genome function in several major areas. First, our studies provide convincing evidence that the genome is pervasively transcribed, such that the majority of its bases can be found in primary transcripts, including non-protein-coding transcripts, and those that extensively overlap one another. Second, systematic examination of transcriptional regulation has yielded new understanding about transcription start sites, including their relationship to specific regulatory sequences and features of chromatin accessibility and histone modification. Third, a more sophisticated view of chromatin structure has emerged, including its inter-relationship with DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. Finally, integration of these new sources of information, in particular with respect to mammalian evolution based on inter- and intra-species sequence comparisons, has yielded new mechanistic and evolutionary insights concerning the functional landscape of the human genome. Together, these studies are defining a path for pursuit of a more comprehensive characterization of human genome function.

  12. Human cortical θ during free exploration encodes space and predicts subsequent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Joseph; Plank, Markus; Lynch, Gary; Halgren, Eric; Poizner, Howard

    2013-09-18

    Spatial representations and walking speed in rodents are consistently related to the phase, frequency, and/or amplitude of θ rhythms in hippocampal local field potentials. However, neuropsychological studies in humans have emphasized the importance of parietal cortex for spatial navigation, and efforts to identify the electrophysiological signs of spatial navigation in humans have been stymied by the difficulty of recording during free exploration of complex environments. We resolved the recording problem and experimentally probed brain activity of human participants who were fully ambulant. On each of 2 d, electroencephalography was synchronized with head and body movement in 13 subjects freely navigating an extended virtual environment containing numerous unique objects. θ phase and amplitude recorded over parietal cortex were consistent when subjects walked through a particular spatial separation at widely separated times. This spatial displacement θ autocorrelation (STAcc) was quantified and found to be significant from 2 to 8 Hz within the environment. Similar autocorrelation analyses performed on an electrooculographic channel, used to measure eye movements, showed no significant spatial autocorrelations, ruling out eye movements as the source of STAcc. Strikingly, the strength of an individual's STAcc maps from day 1 significantly predicted object location recall success on day 2. θ was also significantly correlated with walking speed; however, this correlation appeared unrelated to STAcc and did not predict memory performance. This is the first demonstration of memory-related, spatial maps in humans generated during active spatial exploration.

  13. Identification of an active reverse transcriptase enzyme encoded by a human endogenous HERV-K retrovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; Jebbink, M.; Zsíros, J.

    1999-01-01

    Of the numerous endogenous retroviral elements that are present in the human genome, the abundant HERV-K family is distinct because several members are transcriptionally active and coding for biologically active proteins. A detailed phylogeny of the HERV-K family based on the partial sequence of the

  14. Human Dorsal Striatum Encodes Prediction Errors during Observational Learning of Instrumental Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jeffrey C.; Dunne, Simon; Furey, Teresa; O'Doherty, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal striatum plays a key role in the learning and expression of instrumental reward associations that are acquired through direct experience. However, not all learning about instrumental actions require direct experience. Instead, humans and other animals are also capable of acquiring instrumental actions by observing the experiences of…

  15. Human cytomegalovirus-encoded miR-US4-1 promotes cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-04-05

    Apr 5, 2016 ... Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause congenital diseases and opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals. .... The recombinant products were then transformed into E. coli to produce a target pool ..... is not affected by genomic DNA contamination (Chen et al. 2005; Schmittgen et al.

  16. Amino acid 489 is encoded by a mutational "hot spot" on the beta 3 integrin chain: the CA/TU human platelet alloantigen system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; McFarland, J G; Kekomaki, R; Newman, P J

    1993-12-01

    A new platelet alloantigen, termed CA, has recently been implicated in a case of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NATP) in a Filipino family in Canada. Maternal anti-CA serum reacted with glycoprotein (GP) IIIa and maintained its reactivity after removal of high mannose carbohydrate residues from GPIIIa. The monoclonal antibody (MoAb) AP3 partially blocked binding of anti-CA to GPIIIa, suggesting that the CA polymorphism is proximal to the AP3 epitope. Platelet RNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify the region of GPIIIa cDNA that encodes this region of the protein. DNA sequence analysis showed a GA nucleotide substitution at base 1564 that results in an arginine (Arg) (CGG)glutamine (Gln) (CAG) polymorphism in amino acid (AA) 489. Further analysis of PCR-amplified genomic DNA from 27 normal individuals showed that AA 489 is encoded by a mutational "hot spot" of the GPIIIa gene, as three different codons for the wild-type Arg489 of GPIIIa were also found. The codon usage for Arg489 was found to be: CGG (63%), CGA (37%), and CGC (Definition of these new molecular variants of the beta 3 integrin chain should prove valuable in the diagnosis of NATP in these two geographically disparate populations, and it may also provide useful genetic markers for examining other pathologic variations of the GPIIb-IIIa complex.

  17. Replication-defective recombinant Semliki Forest virus encoding GM-CSF as a vector system for rapid and facile generation of autologous human tumor cell vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withoff, S; Glazenburg, KL; van Veen, ML; Kraak, MMJ; Hospers, GAP; Storkel, S; de Vries, EGE; Wischut, J; Daemen, T

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the production of recombinant Semliki Forest virus encoding murine or human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the capacity of these vectors to transduce murine and human tumor cells ex vivo. High-titer stocks (up to 3 x 10(9) particles/ml) of

  18. Selective elimination of high constitutive activity or chemokine binding in the human herpesvirus 8 encoded seven transmembrane oncogene ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Kledal, T N; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2000-01-01

    Open reading frame 74 (ORF74) encoded by human herpesvirus 8 is a highly constitutively active seven transmembrane (7TM) receptor stimulated by angiogenic chemokines, e.g. growth-related oncogene-alpha, and inhibited by angiostatic chemokines e.g. interferon-gamma-inducible protein. Transgenic mice...... and action of chemokines obtained through deletion of 22 amino acids from the N-terminal extension; an ORF74 with high constitutive activity but with selective elimination of stimulatory regulation by angiogenic chemokines obtained through substitution of basic residues at the extracellular ends of TM......-V or TM-VI; and an ORF74 lacking constitutive activity but with preserved ability to be stimulated by agonist chemokines obtained through introduction of an Asp residue on the hydrophobic, presumed membrane-exposed face of TM-II. It is concluded that careful molecular dissection can selectively eliminate...

  19. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding...... "adapter" proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent...... hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types....

  20. Efficient procedure for transferring specific human genes into Chinese hamster cell mutants: interspecific transfer of the human genes encoding leucyl- and asparaginyl-tRNA synthetases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirullo, R.E.; Dana, S.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure for transferring specific human genes into mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell recipients has been developed that does not rely on using calcium phosphate-precipitated high-molecular-weight DNA. Interspecific cell hybrids between human leukocytes and temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster cell mutants with either a thermolabile leucyl-tRNA synthetase or a thermolabile asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase were used as the starting material in these experiments. These hybrids contain only one or a few human chromosomes and require expression of the appropriate human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene to grow at 39 degrees C. Hybrids were exposed to very high doses of gamma-irradiation to extensively fragment the chromosomes and re-fused immediately to the original temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster mutant, and secondary hybrids were isolated at 39 degrees C. Secondary hybrids, which had retained small fragments of the human genome containing the selected gene, were subjected to another round of irradiation, refusion, and selection at 39 degrees C to reduce the amount of human DNA even further. Using this procedure, Chinese hamster cell lines have been constructed that express the human genes encoding either asparaginyl- or leucyl-tRNA synthetase, yet less than 0.1% of their DNA is derived from the human genome, as quantitated by a sensitive dot-blot nucleic acid hybridization procedure

  1. The effect of foot compliance encoded in the windlass mechanism on the energetics of human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seungmoon; LaMontagna, Christopher; Collins, Steven H; Geyer, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    The human foot, which is the part of the body that interacts with the environment during locomotion, consists of rich biomechanical design. One of the unique designs of human feet is the windlass mechanism. In a previous simulation study, we found that the windlass mechanism seems to improve the energy efficiency of walking. To better understand the origin of this efficiency, we here conduct both simulation and experimental studies exploring the influence of foot compliance, which is one of the functionalities that the windlass mechanism embeds, on the energetics of walking. The studies show that walking with compliant feet incurs more energetic costs than walking with stiff feet. The preliminary results suggest that the energy saved by introducing the windlass mechanism does not originate from the compliance it embeds. We speculate that the energy savings of the windlass mechanism are related more to its contribution to reducing the effective foot length in swing than to providing compliance in stance.

  2. Candida albicans orf19.3727 encodes phytase activity and is essential for human tissue damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Wai-Kei Tsang

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a clinically important human fungal pathogen. We previously identified the presence of cell-associated phytase activity in C. albicans. Here, we reveal for the first time, that orf19.3727 contributes to phytase activity in C. albicans and ultimately to its virulence potency. Compared with its wild type counterpart, disruption of C. albicans orf19.3727 led to decreased phytase activity, reduced ability to form hyphae, attenuated in vitro adhesion, and reduced ability to penetrate human epithelium, which are the major virulence attributes of this yeast. Thus, orf19.3727 of C. albicans plays a key role in fungal pathogenesis. Further, our data uncover a putative novel strategy for anti-Candidal drug design through inhibition of phytase activity of this common pathogen.

  3. Encoding of frequency-modulation (FM) rates in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-12-14

    Frequency-modulated sounds play an important role in our daily social life. However, it currently remains unclear whether frequency modulation rates affect neural activity in the human auditory cortex. In the present study, using magnetoencephalography, we investigated the auditory evoked N1m and sustained field responses elicited by temporally repeated and superimposed frequency-modulated sweeps that were matched in the spectral domain, but differed in frequency modulation rates (1, 4, 16, and 64 octaves per sec). The results obtained demonstrated that the higher rate frequency-modulated sweeps elicited the smaller N1m and the larger sustained field responses. Frequency modulation rate had a significant impact on the human brain responses, thereby providing a key for disentangling a series of natural frequency-modulated sounds such as speech and music.

  4. Presence of Glycopeptide-Encoding Plasmids in Enterococcal Isolates from Food and Humans in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migura, Lourdes Garcia; Valenzuela, Antonio Jesus Sanchez; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2011-01-01

    Enterococci and especially glycopeptides-resistant enterococci (GRE) are a growing concern due to their ability to cause infections in hospitals. Transmission of antimicrobial resistance between reservoirs such as animals, meat, and humans are in most cases linked to transmission of mobile genetic...... and animals in Europe and is rarely found in E. faecalis. This article describes the first characterization of MGE from vanA mediated E. faecalis, thus linking this resistance genotype to pheromone responding plasmids....

  5. A multigene family encodes the human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein complex gcII (gp47-52 complex)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gretch, D.R.; Stinski, M.F.; Kari, B.; Gehrz, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    The HXLF (HindIII-X left reading frame) gene family is a group of five genes that share one or two regions of homology and are arranged in tandem within the short unique component of the human cytomegalovirus genome. These genes were cloned into an SP6 expression vector in both the sense and antisense orientations. An abundant 1.62-kilobase (kb) bicistronic mRNA, predicted to originate from HXLF1 and HXLF2, was detected in the cytoplasm of infected human fibroblast cells by Northern (RNA) blot analysis. Less abundant RNAs of 1.0 and 0.8 kb, predicted to originate from the HXLF5 and HXLF2 genes, respectively, were also detected. Monocistronic, bicistronic, and polycistronic RNAs synthesized in vitro by using SP6 polymerase were translated in rabbit reticulocyte lysates with or without canine pancreatic microsomal membranes. The HXLF1 or the HXLF1 and HXLF2 translation products were detected when the above mRNAs were used. The HXLF3, HXLF4, and HXLF5 gene products were not detected by in vitro translation of the SP6-derived polycistronic mRNA. The amino acid composition of gp47-52 purified from virion envelopes has the highest similarity to the predicted amino acid composition of the HXLF1 plus HXLF2 open reading frames, but it is more similar to HXLF2 than to HXLF1. The Northern blot results imply that gp47-52 is synthesized predominantly from the abundant 1.62-kb bicistronic mRNA encoded by the HXLF1 and HXLF2 genes. However, the glycoprotein could also be synthesized by the monocistronic 0.8-kb mRNA encoded by the HXLF2 gene as well as by the mRNAs predicted from the other HXLF genes

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel human kinase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    throughput cDNA sequencing. It encodes a protein of 341 amino acids, which shows 69% identity with the human kinase CLIK1 (AAL99353), which was suggested to be the CLP-36 interacting kinase. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that the ...

  7. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T

    1994-01-01

    -human hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ...... hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types.......Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding...

  8. cDNA, genomic cloning and sequence analysis of ribosomal protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ribosomal protein S4X (RPS4X) is one of the 40S ribosomal proteins encoded by the RPS4X gene. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS4X were cloned successfully from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and touchdown-PCR technology ...

  9. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and analysis of the ribosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ribosomal protein L37A (RPL37A) is a component of 60S large ribosomal subunit encoded by the RPL37A gene, which belongs to the family of ribosomal L37AE proteins, located in the cytoplasm. The complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) and the genomic sequence of RPL37A were cloned successfully from giant ...

  10. cDNA, genomic cloning and sequence analysis of ribosomal protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-13

    Mar 13, 2012 ... Ribosomal protein S4X (RPS4X) is one of the 40S ribosomal proteins encoded by the RPS4X gene. The. cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS4X were cloned successfully from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and touchdown- ...

  11. Identification of human microRNA-like sequences embedded within the protein-encoding genes of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are highly conserved, short (18-22 nts, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by binding to the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs of mRNAs. While numerous cellular microRNAs have been associated with the progression of various diseases including cancer, miRNAs associated with retroviruses have not been well characterized. Herein we report identification of microRNA-like sequences in coding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. RESULTS: Based on our earlier proteomics and bioinformatics studies, we have identified 8 cellular miRNAs that are predicted to bind to the mRNAs of multiple proteins that are dysregulated during HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells in vitro. In silico analysis of the full length and mature sequences of these 8 miRNAs and comparisons with all the genomic and subgenomic sequences of HIV-1 strains in global databases revealed that the first 18/18 sequences of the mature hsa-miR-195 sequence (including the short seed sequence, matched perfectly (100%, or with one nucleotide mismatch, within the envelope (env genes of five HIV-1 genomes from Africa. In addition, we have identified 4 other miRNA-like sequences (hsa-miR-30d, hsa-miR-30e, hsa-miR-374a and hsa-miR-424 within the env and the gag-pol encoding regions of several HIV-1 strains, albeit with reduced homology. Mapping of the miRNA-homologues of env within HIV-1 genomes localized these sequence to the functionally significant variable regions of the env glycoprotein gp120 designated V1, V2, V4 and V5. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that microRNA-like sequences are embedded within the protein-encoding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. Given that the V1 to V5 regions of HIV-1 envelopes contain specific, well-characterized domains that are critical for immune responses, virus neutralization and disease progression, we propose that the newly discovered miRNA-like sequences within the HIV-1 genomes may have evolved to self-regulate survival of the

  12. Tissue-specific expression of the human laminin alpha5-chain, and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 and to distal mouse chromosome 2 near the locus for the ragged (Ra) mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Loechel, F; Mattei, M G

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the function of the laminin alpha5-chain, previously identified in mice, cDNA clones encoding the 953-amino-acid carboxy terminal G-domain of the human laminin alpha5-chain were characterized. Northern blot analysis showed that the laminin alpha5-chain is expressed in human placenta...

  13. Thymosin beta-10 expression in melanoma cell lines and melanocytic lesions: a new progression marker for human cutaneous melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterman, M. A.; van Muijen, G. N.; Ruiter, D. J.; Bloemers, H. P.

    1993-01-01

    When screening a subtraction library for sequences that were specifically expressed in highly metastatic human melanoma cell lines, a cDNA clone was isolated encoding thymosin beta-10. We found that expression of thymosin beta-10 mRNA was associated with metastatic behavior of various human melanoma

  14. Cloning and sequencing of complete τ-crystallin cDNA from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    length τ-crystallin cDNA from crocodilian lens and α-enolase from other tissues. ... human (Acc. No. NM_001428). The sequences were used to construct a phylogenetic tree depicting gene lineage, using the clustering program DNAML.

  15. Partial Correction of Psoriasis upon Genetic Knock-Down of Human TNF-α by Lentivirus-Encoded shRNAs in a Xenograft Mouse Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Maria; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia

    characteristics of human psoriasis skin. Blockade of TNF- function with specific inhibitors at the protein level has resulted in a rapid clinical improvement in psoriasis patients, demonstrating that TNF- inhibition offers a promising therapy of psoriasis. Whether TNF- -encoding RNA is a valid therapeutic target...... taken three weeks after injection. qPCR-based measurements of TNF- mRNA in skin treated with lentiviral vector-encoded TNF- shRNA demonstrated a 50% reduction in the level of TNF- mRNA. Most interestingly, the epidermal thickness of the human psoriatic plaques was reduced relative to mice treated...

  16. Construction of yeast surface-displayed cDNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Using yeast display, heterologous protein fragments can be efficiently displayed at high copy levels on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall. Yeast display can be used to screen large expressed protein libraries for proteins or protein fragments with specific binding properties. Recently, yeast surface-displayed cDNA libraries have been constructed and used to identify proteins that bind to various target molecules such as peptides, small molecules, and antibodies. Because yeast protein expression pathways are similar to those found in mammalian cells, human protein fragments displayed on the yeast cell wall are likely to be properly folded and functional. Coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting, yeast surface-displayed cDNA libraries potentially allow the selection of protein fragments or domains with affinity for any soluble molecule that can be fluorescently detected. In this report, we describe protocols for the construction and validation of yeast surface-displayed cDNA libraries using preexisting yeast two-hybrid cDNA libraries as a starting point.

  17. Functional Null Mutations of MSRB3 Encoding Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase Are Associated with Human Deafness DFNB74

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zubair M.; Yousaf, Rizwan; Lee, Byung Cheon; Khan, Shaheen N.; Lee, Sue; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Husnain, Tayyab; Rehman, Atteeq Ur; Bonneux, Sarah; Ansar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Van Camp, Guy; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B.; Riazuddin, Saima

    2011-01-01

    The DFNB74 locus for autosomal-recessive, nonsyndromic deafness segregating in three families was previously mapped to a 5.36 Mb interval on chromosome 12q14.2-q15. Subsequently, we ascertained five additional consanguineous families in which deafness segregated with markers at this locus and refined the critical interval to 2.31 Mb. We then sequenced the protein-coding exons of 18 genes in this interval. The affected individuals of six apparently unrelated families were homozygous for the same transversion (c.265T>G) in MSRB3, which encodes a zinc-containing methionine sulfoxide reductase B3. c.265T>G results in a substitution of glycine for cysteine (p.Cys89Gly), and this substitution cosegregates with deafness in the six DFNB74 families. This cysteine residue of MSRB3 is conserved in orthologs from yeast to humans and is involved in binding structural zinc. In vitro, p.Cys89Gly abolished zinc binding and MSRB3 enzymatic activity, indicating that p.Cys89Gly is a loss-of-function allele. The affected individuals in two other families were homozygous for a transition mutation (c.55T>C), which results in a nonsense mutation (p.Arg19X) in alternatively spliced exon 3, encoding a mitochondrial localization signal. This finding suggests that DFNB74 deafness is due to a mitochondrial dysfunction. In a cohort of 1,040 individuals (aged 53–67 years) of European ancestry, we found no association between 17 tagSNPs for MSRB3 and age-related hearing loss. Mouse Msrb3 is expressed widely. In the inner ear, it is found in the sensory epithelium of the organ of Corti and vestibular end organs as well as in cells of the spiral ganglion. Taken together, MSRB3-catalyzed reduction of methionine sulfoxides to methionine is essential for hearing. PMID:21185009

  18. Novel mutations in genes encoding subcortical maternal complex proteins may cause human embryonic developmental arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueqian; Song, Di; Mykytenko, Dmytro; Kuang, Yanping; Lv, Qifeng; Li, Bin; Chen, Biaobang; Mao, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yao; Zukin, Valery; Mazur, Pavlo; Mu, Jian; Yan, Zheng; Zhou, Zhou; Li, Qiaoli; Liu, Suying; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Sang, Qing; Sun, Zhaogui; Dong, Xi; Wang, Lei

    2018-03-21

    Successful human reproduction initiates from normal gamete formation, fertilization and early embryonic development. Abnormalities in any of these steps will lead to infertility. Many infertile patients undergo several failures of IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles, and embryonic developmental arrest is a common phenotype in cases of recurrent failure of IVF/ICSI attempts. However, the genetic basis for this phenotype is poorly understood. The subcortical maternal complex (SCMC) genes play important roles during embryonic development, and using whole-exome sequencing novel biallelic mutations in the SCMC genes TLE6, PADI6 and KHDC3L were identified in four patients with embryonic developmental arrest. A mutation in TLE6 was found in a patient with cleaved embryos that arrested on day 3 and failed to form blastocysts. Two patients with embryos that arrested at the cleavage stage had mutations in PADI6, and a mutation in KHDC3L was found in a patient with embryos arrested at the morula stage. No mutations were identified in these genes in an additional 80 patients. These findings provide further evidence for the important roles of TLE6, PADI6 and KHDC3L in embryonic development. This work lays the foundation for the genetic diagnosis of patients with recurrent IVF/ICSI failure. Copyright © 2018 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halaban, R.; Moellmann, G.

    1990-01-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (B lt /B lt ) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the B lt mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation

  20. A new splice variant of the major subunit of human asialoglycoprotein receptor encodes a secreted form in hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is composed of two polypeptides, designated H1 and H2. While variants of H2 have been known for decades, the existence of H1 variants has never been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified two splice variants of ASGPR H1 transcripts, designated H1a and H1b, in human liver tissues and hepatoma cells. Molecular cloning of ASGPR H1 variants revealed that they differ by a 117 nucleotide segment corresponding to exon 2 in the ASGPR genomic sequence. Thus, ASGPR variant H1b transcript encodes a protein lacking the transmembrane domain. Using an H1b-specific antibody, H1b protein and a functional soluble ASGPR (sASGPR composed of H1b and H2 in human sera and in hepatoma cell culture supernatant were identified. The expression of ASGPR H1a and H1b in Hela cells demonstrated the different cellular loctions of H1a and H1b proteins at cellular membranes and in intracellular compartments, respectively. In vitro binding assays using fluorescence-labeled sASGPR or the substract ASOR revealed that the presence of sASGPR reduced the binding of ASOR to cells. However, ASOR itself was able to enhance the binding of sASGPR to cells expressing membrane-bound ASGPR. Further, H1b expression is reduced in liver tissues from patients with viral hepatitis. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that two naturally occurring ASGPR H1 splice variants are produced in human hepatocytes. A hetero-oligomeric complex sASGPR consists of the secreted form of H1 and H2 and may bind to free substrates in circulation and carry them to liver tissue for uptake by ASGPR-expressing hepatocytes.

  1. [Screening of phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid microdomains 1 (PAG1) by cDNA microarray and influence of overexpression of PAG1 on biologic behavior of human metastatic prostatic cancer cell line in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-juan; Wang, Yue-wei; Xie, Zhi-gang; You, Jiang-feng; Wang, Jie-liang; Cui, Xiang-lin; Pei, Fei; Zheng, Jie

    2010-02-01

    To screen for novel gene(s) associated with tumor metastasis, and to investigate the effect of overexpression of phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid microdomains 1 (PAG1) on the biological behaviors of human prostatic cancer cell line PC-3M-1E8 in vitro. Four cDNA microarrays were constructed using cDNA library of prostatic cancer cells PC-3M-1E8 (high metastatic potential), PC-3M-2B4 (low metastatic potential), lung cancer cells PG-BE1 (high metastatic potential)and PG-LH7 (low metastatic potential)to screen genes which were differentially expressed according to their different metastatic properties. From a battery of differentially expressed genes, PAG1, which was markedly downregulated in both high metastatic sublines of PC-3M and PG was chosen for further investigation. Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to confirm the gene expression of PAG1 at mRNA and protein levels. Full-length coding sequence of human PAG1 was subcloned into plasmid pcDNA3.0 and the recombinant plasmids were stably transfected into PC-3M-1E8. The cell proliferation ability, anchorage-independent growth, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis rates and invasive ability were detected by MTT, and in addition, soft agar colony formation, flow cytometry analysis and matrigel invasion assay using Boyden chamber were also carried out respectively. All experiments contained pcDNA3.0-PAG1-transfected clones, vector transfected clones and non-transfected parental cells. A total of 327 differentially expressed genes were obtained between the high and low metastatic sublines of PC-3M cells, including 123 upregulated and 204 downregulated genes in PC-3M-1E8. A total of 281 genes, including 167 upregulated and 114 downregulated genes were obtained in PG-BE1 cells. Nine genes were simultaneously downregulated and 8 genes were upregulated in both high metastatic cell lines of PC-3M and PG. The expression of PAG1 at mRNA and protein level were decreased in the high metastatic subline PC-3M-1

  2. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie van de Wall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV targeting human papillomavirus (HPV. Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7 via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus.

  3. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wall, Stephanie; Walczak, Mateusz; van Rooij, Nienke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2015-01-01

    The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV) targeting human papillomavirus (HPV). Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7) via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus. PMID:26343186

  4. Asymmetric right/left encoding of emotions in the human subthalamic nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renana eEitan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Emotional processing is lateralized to the non-dominant brain hemisphere. However, there is no clear spatial model for lateralization of emotional domains in the basal ganglia. The subthalamic nucleus (STN, an input structure in the basal ganglia network, plays a major role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD. This role is probably not limited only to the motor deficits of PD, but may also span the emotional and cognitive deficits commonly observed in PD patients. Beta oscillations (12-30Hz, the electrophysiological signature of PD, are restricted to the dorsolateral part of the STN that corresponds to the anatomically defined sensorimotor STN. The more medial, more anterior and more ventral parts of the STN are thought to correspond to the anatomically defined limbic and associative territories of the STN. Surprisingly, little is known about the electrophysiological properties of the non-motor domains of the STN, nor about electrophysiological differences between right and left STNs.In this study, microelectrodes were utilized to record the STN spontaneous spiking activity and responses to vocal non-verbal emotional stimuli during deep brain stimulation (DBS surgeries in human PD patients. The oscillation properties of the STN neurons were used to map the dorsal oscillatory and the ventral non-oscillatory regions of the STN. Emotive auditory stimulation evoked activity in the ventral non-oscillatory region of the right STN. These responses were not observed in the left ventral STN or in the dorsal regions of either the right or left STN. Therefore, our results suggest that the ventral non-oscillatory regions are asymmetrically associated with non-motor functions, with the right ventral STN associated with emotional processing. These results suggest that DBS of the right ventral STN may be associated with beneficial or adverse emotional effects observed in PD patients and may relieve mental symptoms in other neurological and

  5. cDNA cloning and mRNA expression of cat and dog Cdkal1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sako T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ichiro Yamamoto, Shingo Ishikawa, Li Gebin, Hiroshi Takemitsu, Megumi Fujiwara, Nobuko Mori, Yutaka Hatano, Tomoko Suzuki, Akihiro Mori, Nobuhiro Nakao, Koh Kawasumi, Toshinori Sako, Toshiro AraiLaboratory of Veterinary Biochemistry, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: The cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulatory subunit–associated protein 1–like 1 (CDKAL1 gene encodes methylthiotransferase, and the gene contains risk variants for type 2 diabetes in humans. In this study, we performed complementary DNA cloning for Cdkal1 in the cat and dog and characterized the tissue expression profiles of its messenger RNA. Cat and dog Cdkal1 complementary DNA encoded 576 and 578 amino acids, showing very high sequence homology to mammalian CDKAL1 (>88.4%. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that Cdkal1 messenger RNA is highly expressed in smooth muscle and that tissue distribution of Cdkal1 is similar in cats and dogs. Genotyping analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism for cat Cdkal1 revealed that obese cats had different tendencies from normal cats. These findings suggest that the cat and dog Cdkal1 gene is highly conserved among mammals and that cat Cdkal1 may be a candidate marker for genetic diagnosis of obesity.Keywords: cat, dog, Cdkal1, obese, cDNA cloning, Q-PCR

  6. Nucleotide sequence of a cDNA for branched chain acyltransferase with analysis of the deduced protein structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, K.B.; Litwer, S.; Bradford, A.P.; Aitken, A.; Danner, D.J.; Yeaman, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence was determined for a 1.6-kilobase human cDNA putative for the branched chain acyltransferase protein of the branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex. Translation of the sequence reveals an open reading frame encoding a 315-amino acid protein of molecular weight 35,759 followed by 560 bases of 3'-untranslated sequence. Three repeats of the polyadenylation signal hexamer ATTAAA are present prior to the polyadenylate tail. Within the open reading frame is a 10-amino acid fragment which matches exactly the amino acid sequence around the lipoate-lysine residue in bovine kidney branched chain acyltransferase, thus confirming the identity of the cDNA. Analysis of the deduced protein structure for the human branched chain acyltransferase revealed an organization into domains similar to that reported for the acyltransferase proteins of the pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes. This similarity in organization suggests that a more detailed analysis of the proteins will be required to explain the individual substrate and multienzyme complex specificity shown by these acyltransferases

  7. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on the growth and radiotherapeutic sensitivity of human lymphoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Methods: Human lymphoma cell lines Raji and Daudi were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTT. The p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting, and p53 mRNA was detected by BT-PCB. Results: The MTT results showed that the inhibitory effect and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 on human lymphoma cell lines were not obvious [Raji: (27.5±4.1)%; Daudi: (28.1±1.6)%]. The results of Western blotting and BT-PCB showed that extrinsic p53 protein and p53 mRNA were expressed to some degree, but not at high-level. In addition, the results didn't demonstrate obvious radiosensitivity enhancement. Conclusions: The role of inhibition and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 was not significant on human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  8. Machine learning classifier for identification of damaging missense mutations exclusive to human mitochondrial DNA-encoded polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Navarro, Antonio; Gaudioso-Simón, Andrés; Álvarez-Jarreta, Jorge; Montoya, Julio; Mayordomo, Elvira; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2017-03-07

    Several methods have been developed to predict the pathogenicity of missense mutations but none has been specifically designed for classification of variants in mtDNA-encoded polypeptides. Moreover, there is not available curated dataset of neutral and damaging mtDNA missense variants to test the accuracy of predictors. Because mtDNA sequencing of patients suffering mitochondrial diseases is revealing many missense mutations, it is needed to prioritize candidate substitutions for further confirmation. Predictors can be useful as screening tools but their performance must be improved. We have developed a SVM classifier (Mitoclass.1) specific for mtDNA missense variants. Training and validation of the model was executed with 2,835 mtDNA damaging and neutral amino acid substitutions, previously curated by a set of rigorous pathogenicity criteria with high specificity. Each instance is described by a set of three attributes based on evolutionary conservation in Eukaryota of wildtype and mutant amino acids as well as coevolution and a novel evolutionary analysis of specific substitutions belonging to the same domain of mitochondrial polypeptides. Our classifier has performed better than other web-available tested predictors. We checked performance of three broadly used predictors with the total mutations of our curated dataset. PolyPhen-2 showed the best results for a screening proposal with a good sensitivity. Nevertheless, the number of false positive predictions was too high. Our method has an improved sensitivity and better specificity in relation to PolyPhen-2. We also publish predictions for the complete set of 24,201 possible missense variants in the 13 human mtDNA-encoded polypeptides. Mitoclass.1 allows a better selection of candidate damaging missense variants from mtDNA. A careful search of discriminatory attributes and a training step based on a curated dataset of amino acid substitutions belonging exclusively to human mtDNA genes allows an improved

  9. [Construction of cDNA expression library of unfed female Haemaphysalis longicornis and immuno-screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Hui-ping; Liu, Guang-yuan; Zhang, Lin; Gong, Zhen-li; Xie, Jun-ren; Tian, Zhan-cheng; Wang, Lu; Jia, Ning

    2009-02-28

    To construct a cDNA expression library from unfed female tick Haemaphysalis longicornis for screening and cloning potential antigenic genes. Total RNA was isolated from unfed female ticks, mRNA was purified and a library of oligo (dT) -primed cDNA with added directional EcoR I /Hind III linkers was constructed from the purified mRNA. The constructed cDNA was ligated to the EcoR I /Hind III arms of the lambda SCREEN vector. Pure phage stocks were harvested by plaque purification and converted to plasmid subclones by plating phage on host strain BM25.8. Recombinant plasmids that were subcloned to E. coli BM25.8 were isolated and transformed into E. coli JM109. Recombinant plasmids abstracted from JM109 were identified by PCR and sequencing. The recombinant phage DNA was packaged by using phage-marker packaging extracts, resulting in a primary cDNA library with a size of 1.8 x 10(6) pfu. Data showed 100% of the library were recombinant and the titer of the amplified library was 2.4 x 10(9) pfu/ml. Forty-two clones of encoding immunodominant antigens were obtained from the cDNA library. Sequence analysis revealed 12 unique cDNA sequences and the encoded putative proteins showed similarities to H. longicornis tropomyosin mRNA, Rhipicephalus annulatus unknown larval protein mRNA, chromosome 2R of Drosophila melanogaster, mitochondrial DNA of H. flava, clones HqL09 unkown mRNA and Hq05 mRNA of H. qinghaiensis, and myosin alkali light chain protein mRNA. The cDNA expression library from unfed female H. longicornis was successfully constructed and screening of protective genes may provide candidate antigens of the tick.

  10. Mouse tetranectin: cDNA sequence, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibaraki, K; Kozak, C A; Wewer, U M

    1995-01-01

    regulation, mouse tetranectin cDNA was cloned from a 16-day-old mouse embryo library. Sequence analysis revealed a 992-bp cDNA with an open reading frame of 606 bp, which is identical in length to the human tetranectin cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology to the human cDNA with 76...... in human. Although additional minor bands of 1.5 and 3.3 kb were found in Northern blots, RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) analysis failed to provide evidence that these minor bands are products of the tetranectin gene. Finally, the genetic map location for this gene, Tna...

  11. Mouse tetranectin: cDNA sequence, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibaraki, K; Kozak, C A; Wewer, U M

    1995-01-01

    regulation, mouse tetranectin cDNA was cloned from a 16-day-old mouse embryo library. Sequence analysis revealed a 992-bp cDNA with an open reading frame of 606 bp, which is identical in length to the human tetranectin cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology to the human cDNA with 76......(s) of tetranectin. The sequence analysis revealed a difference in both sequence and size of the noncoding regions between mouse and human cDNAs. Northern analysis of the various tissues from mouse, rat, and cow showed the major transcript(s) to be approximately 1 kb, which is similar in size to that observed...

  12. CC and CX3C chemokines differentially interact with the N terminus of the human cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casarosa, Paola; Waldhoer, Maria; LiWang, Patricia J

    2005-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the causative agent of life-threatening systemic diseases in immunocompromised patients as well as a risk factor for vascular pathologies, like atherosclerosis, in immunocompetent individuals. HCMV encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), referred to as US28...

  13. 3D Shape-Encoded Particle Filter for Object Tracking and Its Application to Human Body Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chellappa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a nonlinear state estimation approach using particle filters, for tracking objects whose approximate 3D shapes are known. The unnormalized conditional density for the solution to the nonlinear filtering problem leads to the Zakai equation, and is realized by the weights of the particles. The weight of a particle represents its geometric and temporal fit, which is computed bottom-up from the raw image using a shape-encoded filter. The main contribution of the paper is the design of smoothing filters for feature extraction combined with the adoption of unnormalized conditional density weights. The “shape filter” has the overall form of the predicted 2D projection of the 3D model, while the cross-section of the filter is designed to collect the gradient responses along the shape. The 3D-model-based representation is designed to emphasize the changes in 2D object shape due to motion, while de-emphasizing the variations due to lighting and other imaging conditions. We have found that the set of sparse measurements using a relatively small number of particles is able to approximate the high-dimensional state distribution very effectively. As a measures to stabilize the tracking, the amount of random diffusion is effectively adjusted using a Kalman updating of the covariance matrix. For a complex problem of human body tracking, we have successfully employed constraints derived from joint angles and walking motion.

  14. 3D Shape-Encoded Particle Filter for Object Tracking and Its Application to Human Body Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chellappa R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a nonlinear state estimation approach using particle filters, for tracking objects whose approximate 3D shapes are known. The unnormalized conditional density for the solution to the nonlinear filtering problem leads to the Zakai equation, and is realized by the weights of the particles. The weight of a particle represents its geometric and temporal fit, which is computed bottom-up from the raw image using a shape-encoded filter. The main contribution of the paper is the design of smoothing filters for feature extraction combined with the adoption of unnormalized conditional density weights. The "shape filter" has the overall form of the predicted 2D projection of the 3D model, while the cross-section of the filter is designed to collect the gradient responses along the shape. The 3D-model-based representation is designed to emphasize the changes in 2D object shape due to motion, while de-emphasizing the variations due to lighting and other imaging conditions. We have found that the set of sparse measurements using a relatively small number of particles is able to approximate the high-dimensional state distribution very effectively. As a measures to stabilize the tracking, the amount of random diffusion is effectively adjusted using a Kalman updating of the covariance matrix. For a complex problem of human body tracking, we have successfully employed constraints derived from joint angles and walking motion.

  15. Cloning and expression of a novel human profilin variant, profilin II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Madsen, Peder; Andersen, A H

    1993-01-01

    We have isolated a 1.7 kbp cDNA encoding a 140 amino acid protein (15.1 kDa, pI 5.91) with a high sequence similarity (62%) to human profilin (profilin I). We have termed this variant profilin II. Northern blot analysis showed that profilin II is highly expressed in brain, skeletal muscle...

  16. Human and mouse mitochondrial orthologs of bacterial ClpX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corydon, T J; Wilsbech, M; Jespersgaard, C

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the cDNA sequence and exon/intron structure of the human CLPX gene encoding a human ortholog of the E. coli ClpX chaperone and protease subunit. The CLPX gene comprises 14 exons and encodes a 633-amino acid-long precursor polypeptide. The polypeptide contains an N-terminal puta......We have determined the cDNA sequence and exon/intron structure of the human CLPX gene encoding a human ortholog of the E. coli ClpX chaperone and protease subunit. The CLPX gene comprises 14 exons and encodes a 633-amino acid-long precursor polypeptide. The polypeptide contains an N......-terminal putative mitochondrial transit peptide, and expression of a full-length ClpX cDNA tagged at its C-terminus (Myc-His) shows that the polypeptide is transported into mitochondria. FISH analysis localized the CLPX gene to human Chromosome (Chr) 15q22.1-22.32. This localization was refined by radiation hybrid...... variability between mouse ClpX cDNAs from different strains. Alignment of the human and mouse ClpX amino acid sequences with ClpX sequences from other organisms shows that they display the typical modular organization of domains with one AAA(+) domain common to a large group of ATPases and several other...

  17. The human homolog of S. cerevisiae CDC27, CDC27 Hs, is encoded by a highly conserved intronless gene present in multiple copies in the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devor, E.J.; Dill-Devor, R.M. [Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City (United States)

    1994-09-01

    We have obtained a number of unique sequences via PCR amplification of human genomic DNA using degenerate primers under low stringency (42{degrees}C). One of these, an 853 bp product, has been identified as a partial genomic sequence of the human homolog of the S. cerevisiae CDC27 gene, CDC27Hs (GenBank No. U00001). This gene, reported by Turgendreich et al. is also designated EST00556 from Adams et al. We have undertaken a more detailed examination of our sequence, MCP34N, and have found that: 1. the genomic sequence is nearly identical to CDC27Hs over its entire 853 bp length; 2. an MCP34N-specific PCR assay of several non-human primate species reveals amplification products in chimpanzee and gorilla genomes having greater than 90% sequence identity with CDC27Hs; and 3. an MCP34N-specific PCR assay of the BIOS hybrid cell line panel gives a discordancy pattern suggesting multiple loci. Based upon these data, we present the following initial characterization: 1. the complete MCP34N sequence identity with CDC27Hs indicates that the latter is encoded by an intronless gene; 2. CDC27Hs is highly conserved among higher primates; and 3. CDC27Hs is present in multiple copies in the human genome. These characteristics, taken together with those initially reported for CDC27Hs, suggest that this is an old gene that carries out an important but, as yet, unknown function in the human brain.

  18. Soluble forms of tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNF-Rs). The cDNA for the type I TNF-R, cloned using amino acid sequence data of its soluble form, encodes both the cell surface and a soluble form of the receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nophar, Y; Kemper, O; Brakebusch, C

    1990-01-01

    the extracellular domain of the type I TNF-R matches the COOH-terminal sequence of TBPI. Amino acid sequences in the extracellular domain also fully match other sequences found in TBPI. On the other hand, amino acid sequences in the soluble form of the type II TNF-R (TBPII), while indicating a marked homology...... found to have effects characteristic of TNF, including stimulating phosphorylation of specific cellular proteins. Oligonucleotide probes designed on the basis of the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of TBPI were used to clone the cDNA for the structurally related cell surface type 1 TNF-R. It is notable...... that although this receptor can signal the phosphorylation of cellular proteins, it appears from its amino acid sequence to be devoid of intrinsic protein kinase activity. The extracellular domain of the receptor is composed of four internal cysteine-rich repeats, homologous to structures repeated four times...

  19. Cloning and Sequencing of Protein Kinase cDNA from Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. C. Neale

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases (PKs play critical roles in signal transduction and activation of lymphocytes. The identification of PK genes provides a tool for understanding mechanisms of immunotoxic xenobiotics. As part of a larger study investigating persistent organic pollutants in the harbor seal and their possible immunomodulatory actions, we sequenced harbor seal cDNA fragments encoding PKs. The procedure, using degenerate primers based on conserved motifs of human protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs, successfully amplified nine phocid PK gene fragments with high homology to human and rodent orthologs. We identified eight PTKs and one dual (serine/threonine and tyrosine kinase. Among these were several PKs important in early signaling events through the B- and T-cell receptors (FYN, LYN, ITK and SYK and a MAP kinase involved in downstream signal transduction. V-FGR, RET and DDR2 were also expressed. Sequential activation of protein kinases ultimately induces gene transcription leading to the proliferation and differentiation of lymphocytes critical to adaptive immunity. PKs are potential targets of bioactive xenobiotics, including persistent organic pollutants of the marine environment; characterization of these molecules in the harbor seal provides a foundation for further research illuminating mechanisms of action of contaminants speculated to contribute to large-scale die-offs of marine mammals via immunosuppression.

  20. Evidence for the existence of multiple heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the human glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groffen, Alexander J A; Hop, Frank W H; Tryggvason, Karl; Dijkman, Henri; Assmann, Karel J M; Veerkamp, Jacques H.; Monnens, Leo A H; Van Den Heuvel, Lambert P W J

    1997-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are essential components of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) carrying a strong anionic charge. A well- characterized extracellular HSPG is perlecan, ubiquitously expressed in basement membranes. A cDNA construct encoding domains I and II of human perlecan

  1. Screening a cDNA Library for Protein–Protein Interactions Directly in Planta[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lan-Ying; Wu, Fu-Hui; Hsu, Chen-Tran; Shen, Shu-Chen; Yeh, Hsuan-Yu; Liao, De-Chih; Fang, Mei-Jane; Liu, Nien-Tze; Yen, Yu-Chen; Dokládal, Ladislav; Sýkorová, Eva; Gelvin, Stanton B.; Lin, Choun-Sea

    2012-01-01

    Screening cDNA libraries for genes encoding proteins that interact with a bait protein is usually performed in yeast. However, subcellular compartmentation and protein modification may differ in yeast and plant cells, resulting in misidentification of protein partners. We used bimolecular fluorescence complementation technology to screen a plant cDNA library against a bait protein directly in plants. As proof of concept, we used the N-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein– or nVenus-tagged Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirE2 and VirD2 proteins and the C-terminal extension (CTE) domain of Arabidopsis thaliana telomerase reverse transcriptase as baits to screen an Arabidopsis cDNA library encoding proteins tagged with the C-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein. A library of colonies representing ∼2 × 105 cDNAs was arrayed in 384-well plates. DNA was isolated from pools of 10 plates, individual plates, and individual rows and columns of the plates. Sequential screening of subsets of cDNAs in Arabidopsis leaf or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 protoplasts identified single cDNA clones encoding proteins that interact with either, or both, of the Agrobacterium bait proteins, or with CTE. T-DNA insertions in the genes represented by some cDNAs revealed five novel Arabidopsis proteins important for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. We also used this cDNA library to confirm VirE2-interacting proteins in orchid (Phalaenopsis amabilis) flowers. Thus, this technology can be applied to several plant species. PMID:22623495

  2. Generation of cDNA expression libraries enriched for in-frame sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C A; Benzer, S

    1997-03-18

    Bacterial cDNA expression libraries are made to reproduce protein sequences present in the mRNA source tissue. However, there is no control over which frame of the cDNA is translated, because translation of the cDNA must be initiated on vector sequence. In a library of nondirectionally cloned cDNAs, only some 8% of the protein sequences produced are expected to be correct. Directional cloning can increase this by a factor of two, but it does not solve the frame problem. We have therefore developed and tested a library construction methodology using a novel vector, pKE-1, with which translation in the correct reading frame confers kanamycin resistance on the host. Following kanamycin selection, the cDNA libraries contained 60-80% open, in-frame clones. These, compared with unselected libraries, showed a 10-fold increase in the number of matches between the cDNA-encoded proteins made by the bacteria and database protein sequences. cDNA sequencing programs will benefit from the enrichment for correct coding sequences, and screening methods requiring protein expression will benefit from the enrichment for authentic translation products.

  3. [Construction of cDNA expression library of salivary gland from Boophilus microplus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhan-Cheng; Liu, Guang-Yuan; Xie, Jun-Ren; Gong, Zhen-Li

    2008-10-30

    Total RNA were isolated from salivary gland dissected from partially engorged Boophilus microplus. The mRNA was purified. A library of oligo (dT)-primed cDNA with added directional EcoR I/Hind III linkers was constructed from the purified mRNA. The constructed cDNA was ligated to the EcoR I/Hind III arms of the lambda SCREEN vector. The recombinant phage DNA was packaged by phage-marker packaging extracts, resulting in a primary cDNA library with a size of 1.38x10(6) PFU. Data showed 100% of the library were recombinant and the titer of the amplified library was 2x10(9) PFU/ml. A partial cDNA encoding cytochrome oxidase C subunit II of B. microplus was screened from the expression library with rabbit serum against B. microplus salivary gland proteins. The results is suggested that the cDNA expression library has been constructed.

  4. Functional mapping of the neural basis for the encoding and retrieval of human episodic memory using H{sub 2}{sup 15}O PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Nam, Hyun Woo; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Sang Kun; Jang, Myoung Jin; Ahn, Ji Young; Park, Kwang Suk; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-01

    Episodic memory is described as an 'autobiographical' memory responsible for storing a record of the events in our lives. We performed functional brain activation study using H{sub 2}{sup 1}5O PET to reveal the neural basis of the encoding and the retrieval of episodic memory in human normal volunteers. Four repeated H{sub 2}{sup 1}5O PET scans with two reference and two activation tasks were performed on 6 normal volunteers to activate brain areas engaged in encoding and retrieval with verbal materials. Images from the same subject were spatially registered and normalized using linear and nonlinear transformation. Using the means and variances for every condition which were adjusted with analysis of covariance, t-statistic analysis were performed voxel-wise. Encoding of episodic memory activated the opercular and triangular parts of left inferior frontal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex, medial frontal area, cingulate gyrus, posterior middle and inferior temporal gyri, and cerebellum, and both primary visual and visual association areas. Retrieval of episodic memory activated the triangular part of left inferior frontal gyrus and inferior temporal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex and medial temporal ares, and both cerebellum and primary visual and visual association areas. The activations in the opercular part of left inferior frontal gyrus and the right prefrontal cortex meant the essential role of these areas in the encoding and retrieval of episodic memeory. We could localize the neural basis of the encoding and retrieval of episodic memory using H{sub 2}{sup 1}5O PET, which was partly consistent with the hypothesis of hemispheric encoding/retrieval asymmetry.

  5. Expression and human chromosomal localization to 17q25 of the growth-regulated gene encoding the mitochondrial ribosomal protein MRPL12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marty, L.; Fort, P. [Institut de Genetique Moleculaire, Montpellier (France); Taviaux, S. [INSERM, Montpellier (France)

    1997-05-01

    Mitochondrial activity requires the expression of nuclear genes, whose products are part of multiproteic complexes leading to ATP production and delivery. We recently characterized a growth-activated mRNA encoding the human mitochondrial ribosomal MRPL12 protein, which is thought to act as a translational regulator of mitochondrial mRNAs. We show here that MRPL12 mRNA expression is enhanced in growth-stimulated cells as a result of transcriptional activation, a feature lost in transformed cell lines. MRPL12 mRNA is highly expressed in the colon, in which a reduction in mitochondrial activity was shown to be associated with tumor formation. The human MRPL12 protein is encoded by a unique gene located on chromosome 17 (q25-qter). As no predisposition to colon cancer linked to this chromosomal region was hitherto reported, the MRPL12 gene might be involved in the process of differentiation of colonic epithelial cells. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  6. PCR-based cDNA library construction: general cDNA libraries at the level of a few cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Belyavsky, A; Vinogradova, T; Rajewsky, K

    1989-01-01

    A procedure for the construction of general cDNA libraries is described which is based on the amplification of total cDNA in vitro. The first cDNA strand is synthesized from total RNA using an oligo(dT)-containing primer. After oligo(dG) tailing the total cDNA is amplified by PCR using two primers complementary to oligo(dA) and oligo(dG) ends of the cDNA. For insertion of the cDNA into a vector a controlled trimming of the 3' ends of the cDNA by Klenow enzyme was used. Starting from 10 J558L ...

  7. Human cytomegalovirus resistance to deoxyribosylindole nucleosides maps to a transversion mutation in the terminase subunit-encoding gene UL89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Brian G; Phan, Quang; Hall, Ellie D; Breitenbach, Julie M; Borysko, Katherine Z; Kamil, Jeremy P; Townsend, Leroy B; Drach, John C

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection can cause severe illnesses, including encephalopathy and mental retardation, in immunocompromised and immunologically immature patients. Current pharmacotherapies for treating systemic HCMV infections include ganciclovir, cidofovir, and foscarnet. However, long-term administration of these agents can result in serious adverse effects (myelosuppression and/or nephrotoxicity) and the development of viral strains with reduced susceptibility to drugs. The deoxyribosylindole (indole) nucleosides demonstrate a 20-fold greater activity in vitro (the drug concentration at which 50% of the number of plaques was reduced with the presence of drug compared to the number in the absence of drug [EC50] = 0.34 μM) than ganciclovir (EC50 = 7.4 μM) without any observed increase in cytotoxicity. Based on structural similarity to the benzimidazole nucleosides, we hypothesize that the indole nucleosides target the HCMV terminase, an enzyme responsible for packaging viral DNA into capsids and cleaving the DNA into genome-length units. To test this hypothesis, an indole nucleoside-resistant HCMV strain was isolated, the open reading frames of the genes that encode the viral terminase were sequenced, and a G766C mutation in exon 1 of UL89 was identified; this mutation resulted in an E256Q change in the amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein. An HCMV wild-type strain, engineered with this mutation to confirm resistance, demonstrated an 18-fold decrease in susceptibility to the indole nucleosides (EC50 = 3.1 ± 0.7 μM) compared to that of wild-type virus (EC50 = 0.17 ± 0.04 μM). Interestingly, this mutation did not confer resistance to the benzimidazole nucleosides (EC50 for wild-type HCMV = 0.25 ± 0.04 μM, EC50 for HCMV pUL89 E256Q = 0.23 ± 0.04 μM). We conclude, therefore, that the G766C mutation that results in the E256Q substitution is unique for indole nucleoside resistance and distinct from previously discovered substitutions

  8. Identification of Human N-Myristoylated Proteins from Human Complementary DNA Resources by Cell-Free and Cellular Metabolic Labeling Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamitsu, Emi; Otsuka, Motoaki; Haebara, Tatsuki; Yano, Manami; Matsuzaki, Kanako; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Moriya, Koko; Utsumi, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    To identify physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins, 90 cDNA clones predicted to encode human N-myristoylated proteins were selected from a human cDNA resource (4,369 Kazusa ORFeome project human cDNA clones) by two bioinformatic N-myristoylation prediction systems, NMT-The MYR Predictor and Myristoylator. After database searches to exclude known human N-myristoylated proteins, 37 cDNA clones were selected as potential human N-myristoylated proteins. The susceptibility of these cDNA clones to protein N-myristoylation was first evaluated using fusion proteins in which the N-terminal ten amino acid residues were fused to an epitope-tagged model protein. Then, protein N-myristoylation of the gene products of full-length cDNAs was evaluated by metabolic labeling experiments both in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system and in transfected human cells. As a result, the products of 13 cDNA clones (FBXL7, PPM1B, SAMM50, PLEKHN, AIFM3, C22orf42, STK32A, FAM131C, DRICH1, MCC1, HID1, P2RX5, STK32B) were found to be human N-myristoylated proteins. Analysis of the role of protein N-myristoylation on the intracellular localization of SAMM50, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, revealed that protein N-myristoylation was required for proper targeting of SAMM50 to mitochondria. Thus, the strategy used in this study is useful for the identification of physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins from human cDNA resources.

  9. Interferon-gamma up-regulates a unique set of proteins in human keratinocytes. Molecular cloning and expression of the cDNA encoding the RGD-sequence-containing protein IGUP I-5111

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Leffers, H; Madsen, Peder

    1993-01-01

    AMP (Bt2cAMP), dibutyryl cGMP (Bt2cGMP)] and compounds known to affect keratinocytes [4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), retinoic acid, Ca2+, dexamethasone, lipopolysaccharides, foetal calf serum]. Protein IGUP I-5111 was selected for further studies as its level is affected by simian-virus-40...

  10. Purification, cDNA Cloning, and Developmental Expression of the Nodule-Specific Uricase from Phaseolus vulgaris L. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Federico; Campos, Francisco; Padilla, Jaime; Bonneville, Jean-Marc; Enríquez, Consuelo; Caput, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Nodule-specific uricase (uricase II) from Phaseolus vulgaris L. was purified to homogeneity by chromatographic methods. Purification data indicated that uricase II is approximately 2% of the total soluble protein from mature nodules. Specific antiserum was raised and used to determine the developmental expression and for immunoselection of polysomes. Uricase II was antigenically detected early in nodule development, 2 to 3 days before nitrogen fixation. Uricase-encoding cDNA clones were isolated by hybridizing a nodule-specific pUC9 cDNA library with labeled mRNA from immunoselected polysomes and a 35,000 molecular weight uricase II-encoding cDNA from soybean. An homologous clone (pNF-UR07) was used to assess the expression pattern of the specific transcript during development. Northern-blot analysis indicated that uricase II mRNA is exclusively expressed in nodule tissue. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665575

  11. Construction of sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries using low input of total environmental metatranscriptomic RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Rajiv Kumar; Barbi, Florian; Ziller, Antoine; Luis, Patricia; Marmeisse, Roland; Reddy, M Sudhakara; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Background: Construction of high quality cDNA libraries from the usually low amounts of eukaryotic mRNA extracted from environmental samples is essential in functional metatranscriptomics for the selection of functional, full-length genes encoding proteins of interest. Many of the inserts in libraries constructed by standard methods are represented by truncated cDNAs due to premature stoppage of reverse transcriptase activity and preferential cloning of short cDNAs. Results: We report here a ...

  12. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  13. Mapping the Binding Site for Escitalopram and Paroxetine in the Human Serotonin Transporter Using Genetically Encoded Photo-Cross-Linkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Bang-Andersen, Benny

    2017-01-01

    amber codon suppression in hSERT to encode the photo-cross-linking unnatural amino acid p-azido-l-phenylalanine into the suggested high- and low-affinity binding sites. We then employ UV-induced cross-linking with azF to map the binding site of escitalopram and paroxetine, two prototypical selective...

  14. Growth hormone and prolactin in Andrias davidianus: cDNA cloning, tissue distribution and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Meng, Zining; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xiaochun; Lu, Danqi; Huang, Junhai; Lin, Haoran

    2010-01-15

    The Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus) is one of the largest and 'living fossil' species of amphibian. To obtain genetic information for this species, the cDNAs encoding growth hormone (adGH) and prolactin (adPRL) were cloned from a pituitary cDNA library. The isolated adGH cDNA consisted of 864 bp and encoded a propeptide of 215 amino acids, while the cDNA of adPRL was 1106 bp in length and encoded a putative peptide of 229 amino acids. Expression of the GH and PRL mRNA was only detected in the pituitary. Phylogenetic analyses were performed based on the isolated pituitary hormone sequences using maximum parsimony and neighbor-joining algorithms. The clustering results are similar to that based on the morphological characteristics or the rRNA genes, which indicate that the two orders (Anura and Caudata) of amphibian were monophyletic, and that A. davidianus was diverged early in the Caudate clade. These results indicated that both the GH and PRL sequence might be useful to study the phylogenies of relatively moderate evolved groups.

  15. Heterologous expression of laccase cDNA from Ceriporiopsis subvermispora yields copper-activated apoprotein and complex isoform patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis F. Larrondo; Marcela Avila; Loreto Salas; Dan Cullen; Rafael Vicuna

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of genomic clones encoding a putative laccase in homokaryon strains of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora led to the identification of an allelic variant of the previously described lcs-1 gene. A cDNA clone corresponding to this gene was expressed in Aspergillus nidulans and in Aspergillus niger. Enzyme assays and Western blots showed that both hosts secreted active...

  16. Cloning and functional characterization of a testicular TSH receptor cDNA from the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vischer, H F; Bogerd, J.

    A cDNA encoding a putative thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (cfTSH-R) was cloned from the testis of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus). The cfTSH-R showed the highest amino acid sequence identity with the TSH-Rs of other fish species. In addition, an insertion of approximately 50 amino

  17. Specific detection of neuronal cell bodies: in situ hybridization with a biotin-labelled neurofilament cDNA probe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Liesi; J-P. Julien (Jean-Pierre); P. Vilja; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); L. Rechardt

    1986-01-01

    textabstractWe have used a biotinylated, 300-nucleotide cDNA probe which encodes the 68,000 MW neurofilament protein to detect neurofilament-specific mRNA in situ. The neurofilament message specifically demonstrates the neuronal cell bodies, in contrast to the usual antibody staining which detects

  18. Isolation of a human tissue-type plasminogen-activator genomic DNA clone and its expression in mouse L-cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Brown (Morris); A.W.R. Tyrrell; C.G. Chapman; J.E. Carey (Janet); D.M. Glover; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); I. Dodd; J.H. Robinson

    1985-01-01

    textabstractWe have isolated a cDNA clone corresponding to a substantial portion of the human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) protein. It encodes almost all of the protein B chain and part of the 3' untranslated region. We have used this clone to screen bacteriophage lambda and cosmid

  19. An anti-tumor protein produced by Trichinella spiralis and identified by screening a T7 phage display library, induces apoptosis in human hepatoma H7402 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichinella spiralis infection confers effective resistance to tumor cell expansion. In this study, a T7 phage cDNA display library was constructed to express genes encoded by T. spiralis. Organic phase multi-cell screening was used to sort through candidate proteins in a transfected human chronic m...

  20. Construction and characterization of a normalized cDNA library.

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, M B; Bonaldo, M F; Jelene, P; Su, L; Lawton, L; Efstratiadis, A

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a simple procedure based on reassociation kinetics that can reduce effectively the high variation in abundance among the clones of a cDNA library that represent individual mRNA species. For this normalization, we used as a model system a library of human infant brain cDNAs that were cloned directionally into a phagemid vector and, thus, could be easily converted into single-stranded circles. After controlled primer extension to synthesize a short complementary strand on each...

  1. Isolation and characterization of the murine alpha-L-iduronidase cDNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, L.A.; Zhang, H. Nasir, J. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) are a group of disorders caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-L-iduronidase. The characterization of the human gene and the identification of mutations underlying MPS I in humans has led to the delineation of the molecular basis of this disorder. Model systems are now needed for the evaluation and development of therapeutics for this disorder. Both canine and feline models for MPS type I have been described but only the canine gene has been isolated and characterized. We report here the cloning and expression of the murine alpha-L-iduronidase cDNA. The murine cDNA was obtained by screening a mouse liver cDNA library with a probe from the human cDNA. The full length murine cDNA is 3120 base pairs in length and thus is considerably larger than both the human and canine transcripts. The increase in size is due to a 1.2 kb 3{prime} untranslated region in the murine cDNA that contains a CA dinucleotide repeat. Within the coding region the murine cDNA shows sequences. At the protein level the murine protein shows 77% similarity with the human protein and 75% similarity with the canine protein. There are significant differences in both the start and stop sites with the murine protein 9 amino acids shorter at both the N terminal signal peptide region and the C terminus. Expression of the murine cDNA in COS-1 cells resulted in a 20 fold increase in intracellular alpha-L-iduronidase activity as well as the detection of considerable enzyme activity in the culture medium. Comparison of the reported missense mutations underlying MPS I in humans (A75T, H82P, R89Q, L218P, P533R, Q310X, T366P) has shown conservation of these amino acid residues in the murine protein. The isolation of the murine iduronidase cDNA will now allow for the development of a murine model for MPS I.

  2. Spatially conserved regulatory elements identified within human and mouse Cd247 gene using high-throughput sequencing data from the ENCODE project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pundhir, Sachin; Hannibal, Tine Dahlbæk; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner

    2014-01-01

    . In this study, we have utilized the wealth of high-throughput sequencing data produced during the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project to identify spatially conserved regulatory elements within the Cd247 gene from human and mouse. We show the presence of two transcription factor binding sites......The Cd247 gene encodes for a transmembrane protein important for the expression and assembly of TCR/CD3 complex on the surface of T lymphocytes. Down-regulation of CD247 has functional consequences in systemic autoimmunity and has been shown to be associated with Type 1 Diabetes in NOD mouse......, supported by histone marks and ChIP-seq data, that specifically have features of an enhancer and a promoter, respectively. We also identified a putative long non-coding RNA from the characteristically long first intron of the Cd247 gene. The long non-coding RNA annotation is supported by manual annotations...

  3. Solution structure of the complex between poxvirus-encoded CC chemokine inhibitor vCCI and human MIP-1β

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li; DeRider, Michele; McCornack, Milissa A.; Jao, Chris; Isern, Nancy G.; Ness, Traci; Moyer, Richard; Liwang, Patricia J.

    2006-09-19

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) comprise a large family of proteins that recruit and activate leukocytes, giving chemokines a major role in both the immune response and inflammation-related diseases. The poxvirus-encoded viral CC chemokine inhibitor (vCCI) binds to many CC chemokines with high affinity, acting as a potent inhibitor of chemokine action. We have used heteronuclear multidimensional NMR to determine the first structure of an orthopoxvirus vCCI in complex with a human CC chemokine MIP-1β. vCCI binds to the chemokine with 1:1 stoichiometry, using residues from its β-sheet II to interact with the a surface of MIP-1β that includes the N-terminus, the following residues in the so-called N-loop20’s region, and the 40’s loop. This structure reveals a general strategy of vCCI for selective chemokine binding, as vCCI appears to interact most stronglyinteracts most directly with residues that are conserved among a subset of CC chemokines, but are not conservednot among the other chemokine subfamilies. This structure reveals a general strategy of vCCI for selective chemokine binding. Chemokines play critical roles in the immune system, causing chemotaxis of a variety of cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as mediating cell homing and immune system development 1(Baggiolini 2001). To date, about 50 chemokines have been identified, and these small proteins (7-14 kDa) are believed to function by binding with endothelial or matrix glycosaminoglycans to form a concentration gradient that is then sensed by high affinity, 7-transmembrane domain G-protein coupled chemokine receptors on the surface of immune cells surface. The chemokine system is critical for host defense in healthy individuals, butand can also lead to diseases including asthma, arthritis, and atherosclerosis in the case of malfunction, often due to inappropriate inflammation and subsequent tissue damage 2(Gerard and Rollins 2001). There are four subfamilies of chemokines, CC

  4. Electroporated Antigen-Encoding mRNA Is Not a Danger Signal to Human Mature Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hoyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For therapeutic cancer vaccination, the adoptive transfer of mRNA-electroporated dendritic cells (DCs is frequently performed, usually with monocyte-derived, cytokine-matured DCs (moDCs. However, DCs are rich in danger-sensing receptors which could recognize the exogenously delivered mRNA and induce DC activation, hence influencing the DCs’ immunogenicity. Therefore, we examined whether electroporation of mRNA with a proper cap and a poly-A tail of at least 64 adenosines had any influence on cocktail-matured moDCs. We used 16 different RNAs, encoding tumor antigens (MelanA, NRAS, BRAF, GNAQ, GNA11, and WT1, and variants thereof. None of those RNAs induced changes in the expression of CD25, CD40, CD83, CD86, and CD70 or the secretion of the cytokines IL-8, IL-6, and TNFα of more than 1.5-fold compared to the control condition, while an mRNA encoding an NF-κB-activation protein as positive control induced massive secretion of the cytokines. To determine whether mRNA electroporation had any effect on the whole transcriptome of the DCs, we performed microarray analyses of DCs of 6 different donors. None of 60,000 probes was significantly different between mock-electroporated DCs and MelanA-transfected DCs. Hence, we conclude that no transcriptional programs were induced within cocktail-matured DCs by electroporation of single tumor-antigen-encoding mRNAs.

  5. KLONING cDNA HORMON PERTUMBUHAN DARI IKAN GURAME (Osphronemus gouramy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estu Nugroho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian mengenai kloning cDNA pengkode hormon pertumbuhan ikan gurame telah dilakukan. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk memperoleh sekuens DNA komplemen hormon pertumbuhan sebagai langkah awal dalam rangka pengembangan teknologi rekayasa genetik ikan gurame. Empat buah kelenjar hifopisa ikan gurame digunakan sebagai bahan bakunya dan dilakukan proses ekstraksi RNA total dari kelenjar hipofisa, dilanjutkan dengan sintesis cDNA, amplifikasi PCR, purifikasi fragmen DNA dari gel, ligasi produk PCR dengan vektor kloning, transformasi dan inkubasi bakteri, seleksi koloni bakteri putih, isolasi plasmid, dan sekuensing. Hasil sekuensing menunjukkan bahwa panjang produk amplifikasi PCR adalah 843 bp yang menyandikan 204 asam amino residu dan mengandung sekuens-sekuens yang konserf untuk gen hormon pertumbuhan (GH. Analisis homologi menunjukkan kesamaan sekuens hasil isolasi antara 52,4%--97,6% dengan gen GH ikan lainnya, dengan persentase homologi tertinggi adalah dengan ikan sepat. Dengan demikian dapat disimpulkan bahwa sekuens hasil isolasi merupakan sekuens gen GH. Dari hasil analisis sekuens terlihat bahwa gen GH ikan gurame secara evolusi adalah konserf. Research on cDNA cloning encoded the gouramy growth hormone was conducted. The aim of the research was to get complementary DNA, cDNA, sequences of growth hormone as an initial step to develop genetic engineering of gouramy fish. Four pituitary glands of the gouramy were taken and then processed with total RNA extraction, and continued with cDNA synthesis, PCR amplification, DNA fragment purification from the gel, PCR product legation with cloning vector, transformation and incubation of bacteria, white colony bacteria selection, plasmid isolation and sequencing analysis. Sequencing result showed that the amplified PCR product length had 834 bp, encoding 204 amino acid residue and contained conserve sequence for GH (growth hormone gen. Homolog analysis showed sequence similarity of

  6. Common genetic variation in the human FNDC5 locus, encoding the novel muscle-derived 'browning' factor irisin, determines insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Staiger

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recently, the novel myokine irisin was described to drive adipose tissue 'browning', to increase energy expenditure, and to improve obesity and insulin resistance in high fat-fed mice. Here, we assessed whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the FNDC5 locus, encoding the irisin precursor, contribute to human prediabetic phenotypes (overweight, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired insulin release. METHODS: A population of 1,976 individuals was characterized by oral glucose tolerance tests and genotyped for FNDC5 tagging SNPs. Subgroups underwent hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps, magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy, and intravenous glucose tolerance tests. From 37 young and 14 elderly participants recruited in two different centres, muscle biopsies were obtained for the preparation of human myotube cultures. RESULTS: After appropriate adjustment and Bonferroni correction for the number of tested variants, SNPs rs16835198 and rs726344 were associated with in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity. Via interrogation of publicly available data from the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium, rs726344's effect on insulin sensitivity was replicated. Moreover, novel data from human myotubes revealed a negative association between FNDC5 expression and appropriately adjusted in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity in young donors. This finding was replicated in myotubes from elderly men. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: This study provides evidence that the FNDC5 gene, encoding the novel myokine irisin, determines insulin sensitivity in humans. Our gene expression data point to an unexpected insulin-desensitizing effect of irisin.

  7. Common genetic variation in the human FNDC5 locus, encoding the novel muscle-derived 'browning' factor irisin, determines insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Harald; Böhm, Anja; Scheler, Mika; Berti, Lucia; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Machicao, Fausto; Fritsche, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Weigert, Cora; Krook, Anna; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the novel myokine irisin was described to drive adipose tissue 'browning', to increase energy expenditure, and to improve obesity and insulin resistance in high fat-fed mice. Here, we assessed whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FNDC5 locus, encoding the irisin precursor, contribute to human prediabetic phenotypes (overweight, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired insulin release). A population of 1,976 individuals was characterized by oral glucose tolerance tests and genotyped for FNDC5 tagging SNPs. Subgroups underwent hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps, magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy, and intravenous glucose tolerance tests. From 37 young and 14 elderly participants recruited in two different centres, muscle biopsies were obtained for the preparation of human myotube cultures. After appropriate adjustment and Bonferroni correction for the number of tested variants, SNPs rs16835198 and rs726344 were associated with in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity. Via interrogation of publicly available data from the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium, rs726344's effect on insulin sensitivity was replicated. Moreover, novel data from human myotubes revealed a negative association between FNDC5 expression and appropriately adjusted in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity in young donors. This finding was replicated in myotubes from elderly men. This study provides evidence that the FNDC5 gene, encoding the novel myokine irisin, determines insulin sensitivity in humans. Our gene expression data point to an unexpected insulin-desensitizing effect of irisin.

  8. Cloning and expression of the receptor for human urokinase plasminogen activator, a central molecule in cell surface, plasmin dependent proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan, A.L.; Cubellis, M.V.; Masucci, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    , and therefore the capacity of cells to migrate and invade neighboring tissues. We have isolated a 1.4 kb cDNA clone coding for the entire human uPAR. An oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the N-terminal sequence of the purified protein was used to screen a cDNA library made from SV40 transformed human......, a size very close to that of the cloned cDNA. Expression of the uPAR cDNA in mouse cells confirms that the clone is complete and expresses a functional uPA binding protein, located on the cell surface and with properties similar to the human uPAR. Caseinolytic plaque assay, immunofluorescence analysis...... fibroblasts [Okayama and Berg (1983) Mol. Cell Biol., 3, 280-289]. The cDNA encodes a protein of 313 amino acids, preceded by a 21 residue signal peptide. A hydrophobicity plot suggests the presence of a membrane spanning domain close to the C-terminus. The cDNA hybridizes to a 1.4 kb mRNA from human cells...

  9. The human genome encodes ten alpha-crystallin-related small heat shock proteins: HspB1-10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappé, G.; Franck, E.; Verschuure, P.; Boelens, W.C.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Jong, de W.W.

    2003-01-01

    To obtain an inventory of all human genes that code for alpha-crystallin-related small heat shock proteins (sHsps), the databases available from the public International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) and the private Celera human genome project were exhaustively searched. Using the human

  10. Diverse patterns of T-cell response against multiple newly identified human Y chromosome-encoded minor histocompatibility epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofran, Yishai; Kim, Haesook T; Brusic, Vladimir; Blake, Loren; Mandrell, Michael; Wu, Catherine J; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Bellucci, Roberto; Keskin, Derin B; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Ritz, Jerome

    2010-03-01

    Donor T cells respond to minor histocompatibility antigens (mHA), resulting in both graft-versus-host disease and graft versus leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Because relatively few mHAs are known, we developed a new approach to predict and subsequently validate candidate mHA. We developed an algorithm based on genetic disparities between Y chromosome-encoded and X chromosome-encoded proteins and known requirements for binding to HLA class I molecules to predict Y chromosome-derived, HLA A*0201-restricted peptides (HY) and ranked peptides based on potential immunogenicity. We evaluated T-cell responses to 41 candidate peptides in 28 male recipients with female donors (FM), 22 male recipients with male donors (MM), and 26 normal individuals. All patients and donors were HLA A*0201 positive. Thirteen peptides derived from five proteins elicited significantly greater T-cell responses in FM patients compared with MM patients and in normal females compared with normal males. Six peptides were more immunogenic than the only previously known HLA A*0201-restricted Y-encoded mHA. Twenty-seven of 28 FM patients responded to at least one HY peptide, but despite a common Y chromosome mismatch and expression of HLA A*0201, each patient responded to a unique set of peptides. Novel HLA A*0201-restricted HY epitopes can be predicted and validated in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Highly diverse patterns of T-cell response against these epitopes have been identified. Prospective monitoring of responses to large panels of immunogenic peptides can facilitate the identification of clinically relevant targets of graft-versus-host disease and graft versus leukemia.

  11. The stress kit: A new method based on competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to quantify the expression of human αB-crystallin, Hsp27, and Hsp60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bajramović, J.J.; Geutskens, S.B.; Bsibsi, M.; Boot, M.; Hassankhan, R.; Verhulst, K.C.; Noort, J.M. van

    2000-01-01

    We describe a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction method for the semiquantitative detection of mRNAs encoding the human heat shock proteins αβ-crystallin, Hsp27, and Hsp60. The method involves the coamplification of cellular mRNA-derived cDNA with a dilution series of a competitor

  12. Primary structure of the human follistatin precursor and its genomic organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimasaki, Shunichi; Koga, Makoto; Esch, F.

    1988-01-01

    Follistatin is a single-chain gonadal protein that specifically inhibits follicle-stimulating hormone release. By use of the recently characterized porcine follistatin cDNA as a probe to screen a human testis cDNA library and a genomic library, the structure of the complete human follistatin precursor as well as its genomic organization have been determined. Three of eight cDNA clones that were sequenced predicted a precursor with 344 amino acids, whereas the remaining five cDNA clones encoded a 317 amino acid precursor, resulting from alternative splicing of the precursor mRNA. Mature follistatins contain four contiguous domains that are encoded by precisely separated exons; three of the domains are highly similar to each other, as well as to human epidermal growth factor and human pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor. The genomic organization of the human follistatin is similar to that of the human epidermal growth factor gene and thus supports the notion of exon shuffling during evolution

  13. The insect metalloproteinase inhibitor gene of the lepidopteran Galleria mellonella encodes two distinct inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedde, Marianne; Weise, Christoph; Nuck, Rolf; Altincicek, Boran; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The insect metalloproteinase inhibitor (IMPI) from the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella, represents the first and to date only specific inhibitor of microbial metalloproteinases reported from animals. Here, we report on the characterization including carbohydrate analysis of two recombinant constructs encoded by impi cDNA either upstream or downstream of the furin cleavage site identified. rIMPI-1, corresponding to native IMPI purified from hemolymph, is encoded by the N-terminal part of the impi sequence, whereas rIMPI-2 is encoded by its C-terminal part. rIMPI-1 is glycosylated at N48 with GlcNAc2Man3, showing fucosylation to different extents. Similarly, rIMPI-2 is glycosylated at N149 with GlcNAc2Man3, but is fully fucosylated. rIMPI-1 represents a promising template for the design of second-generation antibiotics owing to its specific activity against thermolysin-like metalloproteinases produced by human pathogenic bacteria such as Vibrio vulnificus. In contrast, rIMPI-2 does not inhibit bacterial metalloproteinases, but is moderately active against recombinant human matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Both microbial metalloproteinases and MMPs induce expression of the impi gene when injected into G. mellonella larvae. These findings provide evidence that the impi gene encodes two distinct inhibitors, one inhibiting microbial metalloproteinases and contributing to innate immunity, the other putatively mediating regulation of endogenous MMPs during metamorphosis.

  14. Cloning, expression and characterisation of a novel gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cloning, expression and characterisation of a novel gene encoding a chemosensory protein from Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) ... The BtabCSP amino acid residues deduced from the respective full-length cDNA shares four conserved cysteine motifs with known CSPs from other insects. Homology ...

  15. Purification, characterization, cDNA cloning, and expression of a xyloglucan endoglucanase from Geotrichum sp. M128.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Katsuro; Mitsuishi, Yasushi

    2004-02-27

    A novel xyloglucan-specific endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (XEG), xyloglucanase, with a molecular mass of 80 kDa and a pI of 4.8, was isolated from the fungus Geotrichum sp. M128. It was found to be an endoglucanase active toward xyloglucan and not active toward carboxymethylcellulose, Avicel, or barley 1,3-1,4-beta-glucan. Analysis of the precise substrate specificity using various xyloglucan oligosaccharide structures revealed that XEG has at least four subsites (-2 to +2) and specifically recognizes xylose branching at the +1 and +2 sites. The full-length cDNA encoding XEG was cloned and sequenced. It consists of a 2436-bp open reading frame encoding a 776-amino acid protein. From its deduced amino acid sequence, XEG can be classified as a family 74 glycosyl hydrolase. The cDNA encoding XEG was then expressed in Escherichia coli, and enzymatically active recombinant XEG was obtained.

  16. Glucuronidation of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38) by the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases encoded at the UGT1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciotti, M; Basu, N; Brangi, M; Owens, I S

    1999-06-24

    7-Ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38) is a very promising anticancer drug used for the treatment of metastatic colonrectal cancer. SN-38 is the active metabolite of irinotecan, a semisynthetic anticancer drug derived from 20(S)camptothecin. In this study, we examined the potential for each of the UGT1-encoded isoforms (UGT1A1 and UGT1A3 through UGT1A10) to glucuronidate SN-38. The amount of specific protein for each isoform was determined by Western blot analysis. Although UGT1A1 was previously shown to metabolize this drug, the results of this study show that UGT1A7 glucuronidates this chemical at a 9- to 21-fold higher level at pH 6. 4 and pH 7.6, respectively, than that by UGT1A1. The activity of UGT1A7 is from 8.4- to 19-fold higher at pH 6.4 and 12- to 40-fold higher at pH 7.6 than that by the other 7 UGT1 encoded isoforms. UGT1A7 glucuronidates SN-38 with an apparent Km of 5 microM. Hence, the distribution of this isoform in the gastrointestinal tract has the potential to impact the effectiveness of this chemotherapeutic agent. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. cDNA sequence quality data - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project cDNA sequence quality data Data detail Data name cDNA sequence quality... data DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00838-003 Description of data contents Phred's quality score. P...tion Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us cDNA sequence quality

  18. Dissemination of plasmid-encoded AmpC β-lactamases in antimicrobial resistant Salmonella serotypes originating from humans, pigs and the swine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelara, Shivaramu; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2014-09-17

    The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the inter-serovar exchange of AmpC β-lactamase conferring plasmids isolated from humans, pigs and the swine environment. Plasmids isolated from a total of 21 antimicrobial resistant (AMR) Salmonella isolates representing human clinical cases (n=6), pigs (n=6) and the swine farm environment (n=9) were characterized by replicon typing and restriction digestion, inter-serovar transferability by conjugation, and presence of AmpC β-lactamase enzyme encoding gene blaCMY-2 by southern hybridization. Based on replicon typing, the majority (17/21, 81%) of the plasmids belonged to the I1-Iγ Inc group and were between 70 and 103kb. The potential for inter-serovar plasmid transfer was further confirmed by the PCR detection of AMR genes on the plasmids isolated from trans-conjugants. Plasmids from Salmonella serovars Anatum, Ouakam, Johannesburg and Typhimurium isolated from the same cohort of pigs and their environment and S. Heidelberg from a single human clinical isolate had identical plasmids based on digestion with multiple restriction enzymes (EcoRI, HindIII and PstI) and southern blotting. We demonstrated likely horizontal inter-serovar exchange of plasmid-encoding AmpC β-lactamases resistance among MDR Salmonella serotypes isolated from pigs, swine farm environment and clinical human cases. This study provides valuable information on the role of the swine farm environment and by extension other livestock farm environments, as a potential reservoir of resistant bacterial strains that potentially transmit resistance determinants to livestock, in this case, swine, humans and possibly other hosts by horizontal exchange of plasmids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of the enhanced bone regenerative capacity of human periodontal ligament stem cells engineered to express the gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Im-Hee; Lee, Si-Ho; Jun, Choong-Man; Oh, Namsik; Yun, Jeong-Ho

    2014-08-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) are considered an appropriate cell source for therapeutic strategies. The aims of this study were to investigate the sustainability of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) secretion and the bone regenerative capacity of hPDLSCs that had been genetically modified to express the gene encoding BMP2 (BMP2). hPDLSCs isolated from healthy third molars were transduced using replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus (rAd) encoding BMP2 (hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2), and the cellular characteristics and osteogenic potentials of hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 were analyzed both in vitro and in vivo. hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 successfully secreted BMP2, formed colonies, and expressed immunophenotypes similar to their nontransduced counterparts. As to their osteogenic potential, hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 formed greater mineralized nodules and exhibited significantly higher levels of expression of BMP2 and the gene encoding alkaline phosphatase, and formed more and better quality bone than other hPDLSC-containing or recombinant human BMP2-treated groups, being localized at the initial site until 8 weeks. The findings of the present study demonstrate that hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 effectively promote osteogenesis not only in vitro but also in vivo. The findings also suggest that hPDLSCs can efficiently carry and deliver BMP2, and that hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 could be used in an attractive novel therapeutic approach for the regeneration of deteriorated bony defects.

  20. Gammaretroviral vector encoding a fluorescent marker to facilitate detection of reprogrammed human fibroblasts during iPSC generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasimhachar Srinivasakumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are becoming mainstream tools to study mechanisms of development and disease. They have a broad range of applications in understanding disease processes, in vitro testing of novel therapies, and potential utility in regenerative medicine. Although the techniques for generating iPSCs are becoming more straightforward, scientists can expend considerable resources and time to establish this technology. A major hurdle is the accurate determination of valid iPSC-like colonies that can be selected for further cloning and characterization. In this study, we describe the use of a gammaretroviral vector encoding a fluorescent marker, mRFP1, to not only monitor the efficiency of initial transduction but also to identify putative iPSC colonies through silencing of mRFP1 gene as a consequence of successful reprogramming.

  1. cDNA sequencing improves the detection of P53 missense mutations in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szybka, Malgorzata; Kordek, Radzislaw; Zakrzewska, Magdalena; Rieske, Piotr; Pasz-Walczak, Grazyna; Kulczycka-Wojdala, Dominika; Zawlik, Izabela; Stawski, Robert; Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Liberski, Pawel P

    2009-01-01

    Recently published data showed discrepancies beteween P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing in glioblastomas. We hypothesised that similar discrepancies may be observed in other human cancers. To this end, we analyzed 23 colorectal cancers for P53 mutations and gene expression using both DNA and cDNA sequencing, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. We found P53 gene mutations in 16 cases (15 missense and 1 nonsense). Two of the 15 cases with missense mutations showed alterations based only on cDNA, and not DNA sequencing. Moreover, in 6 of the 15 cases with a cDNA mutation those mutations were difficult to detect in the DNA sequencing, so the results of DNA analysis alone could be misinterpreted if the cDNA sequencing results had not also been available. In all those 15 cases, we observed a higher ratio of the mutated to the wild type template by cDNA analysis, but not by the DNA analysis. Interestingly, a similar overexpression of P53 mRNA was present in samples with and without P53 mutations. In terms of colorectal cancer, those discrepancies might be explained under three conditions: 1, overexpression of mutated P53 mRNA in cancer cells as compared with normal cells; 2, a higher content of cells without P53 mutation (normal cells and cells showing K-RAS and/or APC but not P53 mutation) in samples presenting P53 mutation; 3, heterozygous or hemizygous mutations of P53 gene. Additionally, for heterozygous mutations unknown mechanism(s) causing selective overproduction of mutated allele should also be considered. Our data offer new clues for studying discrepancy in P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing analysis

  2. Characterization of splice variants of the genes encoding human mitochondrial HMG-CoA lyase and HMG-CoA synthase, the main enzymes of the ketogenesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puisac, Beatriz; Ramos, Mónica; Arnedo, María; Menao, Sebastián; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Teresa-Rodrigo, María Esperanza; Pié, Angeles; de Karam, Juan Carlos; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Giménez, Ignacio; Ramos, Feliciano J; Casals, Nuria; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Hegardt, Fausto G; Pié, Juan

    2012-04-01

    The genes HMGCS2 and HMGCL encode the two main enzymes for ketone-body synthesis, mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase and HMG-CoA lyase. Here, we identify and describe possible splice variants of these genes in human tissues. We detected an alternative transcript of HMGCS2 carrying a deletion of exon 4, and two alternative transcripts of HMGCL with deletions of exons 5 and 6, and exons 5, 6 and 7, respectively. All splice variants maintained the reading frame. However, Western blot studies and overexpression measurements in eukaryotic or prokaryotic cell models did not reveal HL or mHS protein variants. Both genes showed a similar distribution of the inactive variants in different tissues. Surprisingly, the highest percentages were found in tissues where almost no ketone bodies are synthesized: heart, skeletal muscle and brain. Our results suggest that alternative splicing might coordinately block the two main enzymes of ketogenesis in specific human tissues.

  3. Monitoring Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes with Genetically Encoded Calcium and Voltage Fluorescent Reporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shinnawi, Rami; Huber, Irit; Maizels, Leonid; Shaheen, Naim; Gepstein, Amira; Arbel, Gil; Tijsen, Anke J.; Gepstein, Lior

    2015-01-01

    The advent of the human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology has transformed biomedical research, providing new tools for human disease modeling, drug development, and regenerative medicine. To fulfill its unique potential in the cardiovascular field, efficient methods should be

  4. Common Genetic Variation in the Human FNDC5 Locus, Encoding the Novel Muscle-Derived ‘Browning’ Factor Irisin, Determines Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Harald; Böhm, Anja; Scheler, Mika; Berti, Lucia; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Machicao, Fausto; Fritsche, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Weigert, Cora; Krook, Anna; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Recently, the novel myokine irisin was described to drive adipose tissue ‘browning’, to increase energy expenditure, and to improve obesity and insulin resistance in high fat-fed mice. Here, we assessed whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FNDC5 locus, encoding the irisin precursor, contribute to human prediabetic phenotypes (overweight, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired insulin release). Methods A population of 1,976 individuals was characterized by oral glucose tolerance tests and genotyped for FNDC5 tagging SNPs. Subgroups underwent hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps, magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy, and intravenous glucose tolerance tests. From 37 young and 14 elderly participants recruited in two different centres, muscle biopsies were obtained for the preparation of human myotube cultures. Results After appropriate adjustment and Bonferroni correction for the number of tested variants, SNPs rs16835198 and rs726344 were associated with in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity. Via interrogation of publicly available data from the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium, rs726344’s effect on insulin sensitivity was replicated. Moreover, novel data from human myotubes revealed a negative association between FNDC5 expression and appropriately adjusted in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity in young donors. This finding was replicated in myotubes from elderly men. Conclusions/interpretation This study provides evidence that the FNDC5 gene, encoding the novel myokine irisin, determines insulin sensitivity in humans. Our gene expression data point to an unexpected insulin-desensitizing effect of irisin. PMID:23637927

  5. Molecular cloning of the feline thymus and activation-regulated chemokine cDNA and its expression in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Sadatoshi; Okayama, Taro; Ohmori, Keitaro; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2003-02-01

    Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is a member of CC chemokine and plays an essential role in recruitment of CC chemokine receptor 4 positive Th2 cells to allergic lesion. To investigate the association of TARC in allergic inflammation of cats, a TARC cDNA was cloned from feline thymus by RT-PCR with 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The feline TARC clone contained a full length open reading frame encoding 99 amino acids which shared 80.8%, 72.5%, 65.6% and 67.8% homology with dog, human, mouse and rat homologues, respectively. Expression of TARC mRNA was detected not only in thymus but also in spleen, lung, lymph node, kidney, small intestine, colon and skin of the normal cat tissues examined. Furthermore, it was found that TARC mRNA was strongly expressed in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque. The present results demonstrated that TARC might be involved in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic plaque in cats.

  6. Cloning a cDNA for the lysosomal alpha-glucosidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KONINGS, A.; HUPKES, P.; Versteeg, R.; Grosveld, G.; Reuser, A.; Galjaard, H.

    1984-01-01

    Messenger RNA was isolated from monkey testes and size-fractionated on sucrose gradients. In vitro translation of these mRNA fractions resulted in nascent, labeled alpha-glucosidase that could be precipitated with anti human alpha-glucosidase antiserum. A cDNA library was constructed from the most

  7. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of growth hormone cDNA of Neotropical freshwater fish Pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeth Silva Pinheiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available RT-PCR was used for amplifying Piaractus mesopotamicus growth hormone (GH cDNA obtained from mRNA extracted from pituitary cells. The amplified fragment was cloned and the complete cDNA sequence was determined. The cloned cDNA encompassed a sequence of 543 nucleotides that encoded a polypeptide of 178 amino acids corresponding to mature P. mesopotamicus GH. Comparison with other GH sequences showed a gap of 10 amino acids localized in the N terminus of the putative polypeptide of P. mesopotamicus. This same gap was also observed in other members of the family. Neighbor-joining tree analysis with GH sequences from fishes belonging to different taxonomic groups placed the P. mesopotamicus GH within the Otophysi group. To our knowledge, this is the first GH sequence of a Neotropical characiform fish deposited in GenBank.

  8. Modulating and Measuring Intracellular H2O2 Using Genetically Encoded Tools to Study Its Toxicity to Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beijing K; Stein, Kassi T; Sikes, Hadley D

    2016-12-16

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H 2 O 2 play paradoxical roles in mammalian physiology. It is hypothesized that low, baseline levels of H 2 O 2 are necessary for growth and differentiation, while increased intracellular H 2 O 2 concentrations are associated with pathological phenotypes and genetic instability, eventually reaching a toxic threshold that causes cell death. However, the quantities of intracellular H 2 O 2 that lead to these different responses remain an unanswered question in the field. To address this question, we used genetically encoded constructs that both generate and quantify H 2 O 2 in a dose-response study of H 2 O 2 -mediated toxicity. We found that, rather than a simple concentration-response relationship, a combination of intracellular concentration and the cumulative metric of H 2 O 2 concentration multiplied by time (i.e., the area under the curve) determined the occurrence and level of cell death. Establishing the quantitative relationship between H 2 O 2 and cell toxicity promotes a deeper understanding of the intracellular effects of H 2 O 2 specifically as an individual reactive oxygen species, and it contributes to an understanding of its role in various redox-related diseases.

  9. A novel member of the interferon receptor family complements functionality of the murine interferon gamma receptor in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmi, S; Böhni, R; Stark, G; Di Marco, F; Aguet, M

    1994-03-11

    Expression of the human interferon gamma receptor (IFN-gamma R) in mouse cells is not sufficient to confer biological responsiveness to human IFN-gamma and vice versa. An additional species-specific component is required for signal transduction. We identified this cofactor by expression cloning in simian COS cells stably transfected with the nonfunctional murine IFN-gamma R and a IFN-gamma-inducible reporter construct encoding the human Tac antigen (interleukin-2 receptor alpha chain, CD25). A cDNA clone was obtained that, upon stable transfection, rendered human HEp-2 cells expressing the murine IFN-gamma R fully responsive to murine IFN-gamma. This cDNA encodes a novel 332 amino acid type I transmembrane protein that belongs to the IFN receptor family and that we designate IFN-gamma R beta chain.

  10. Improved coverage of cDNA-AFLP by sequential digestion of immobilized cDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlovsky Petr

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background cDNA-AFLP is a transcriptomics technique which does not require prior sequence information and can therefore be used as a gene discovery tool. The method is based on selective amplification of cDNA fragments generated by restriction endonucleases, electrophoretic separation of the products and comparison of the band patterns between treated samples and controls. Unequal distribution of restriction sites used to generate cDNA fragments negatively affects the performance of cDNA-AFLP. Some transcripts are represented by more than one fragment while other escape detection, causing redundancy and reducing the coverage of the analysis, respectively. Results With the goal of improving the coverage of cDNA-AFLP without increasing its redundancy, we designed a modified cDNA-AFLP protocol. Immobilized cDNA is sequentially digested with several restriction endonucleases and the released DNA fragments are collected in mutually exclusive pools. To investigate the performance of the protocol, software tool MECS (Multiple Enzyme cDNA-AFLP Simulation was written in Perl. cDNA-AFLP protocols described in the literatur and the new sequential digestion protocol were simulated on sets of cDNA sequences from mouse, human and Arabidopsis thaliana. The redundancy and coverage, the total number of PCR reactions, and the average fragment length were calculated for each protocol and cDNA set. Conclusion Simulation revealed that sequential digestion of immobilized cDNA followed by the partitioning of released fragments into mutually exclusive pools outperformed other cDNA-AFLP protocols in terms of coverage, redundancy, fragment length, and the total number of PCRs. Primers generating 30 to 70 amplicons per PCR provided the highest fraction of electrophoretically distinguishable fragments suitable for normalization. For A. thaliana, human and mice transcriptome, the use of two marking enzymes and three sequentially applied releasing enzymes for each

  11. Characterization of the gene encoding component C3 of the complement system from the spider Loxosceles laeta venom glands: Phylogenetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myamoto, D T; Pidde-Queiroz, G; Pedroso, A; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, R M; van den Berg, C W; Tambourgi, D V

    2016-09-01

    A transcriptome analysis of the venom glands of the spider Loxosceles laeta, performed by our group, in a previous study (Fernandes-Pedrosa et al., 2008), revealed a transcript with a sequence similar to the human complement component C3. Here we present the analysis of this transcript. cDNA fragments encoding the C3 homologue (Lox-C3) were amplified from total RNA isolated from the venom glands of L. laeta by RACE-PCR. Lox-C3 is a 5178 bps cDNA sequence encoding a 190kDa protein, with a domain configuration similar to human C3. Multiple alignments of C3-like proteins revealed two processing sites, suggesting that Lox-C3 is composed of three chains. Furthermore, the amino acids consensus sequences for the thioester was found, in addition to putative sequences responsible for FB binding. The phylogenetic analysis showed that Lox-C3 belongs to the same group as two C3 isoforms from the spider Hasarius adansoni (Family Salcitidae), showing 53% homology with these. This is the first characterization of a Loxosceles cDNA sequence encoding a human C3 homologue, and this finding, together with our previous finding of the expression of a FB-like molecule, suggests that this spider species also has a complement system. This work will help to improve our understanding of the innate immune system in these spiders and the ancestral structure of C3. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. NCYM, a Cis-antisense gene of MYCN, encodes a de novo evolved protein that inhibits GSK3β resulting in the stabilization of MYCN in human neuroblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Suenaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of pre-existing genes has long been thought of as the major mode of new gene generation. Recently, de novo gene birth from non-genic DNA was found to be an alternative mechanism to generate novel protein-coding genes. However, its functional role in human disease remains largely unknown. Here we show that NCYM, a cis-antisense gene of the MYCN oncogene, initially thought to be a large non-coding RNA, encodes a de novo evolved protein regulating the pathogenesis of human cancers, particularly neuroblastoma. The NCYM gene is evolutionally conserved only in the taxonomic group containing humans and chimpanzees. In primary human neuroblastomas, NCYM is 100% co-amplified and co-expressed with MYCN, and NCYM mRNA expression is associated with poor clinical outcome. MYCN directly transactivates both NCYM and MYCN mRNA, whereas NCYM stabilizes MYCN protein by inhibiting the activity of GSK3β, a kinase that promotes MYCN degradation. In contrast to MYCN transgenic mice, neuroblastomas in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice were frequently accompanied by distant metastases, behavior reminiscent of human neuroblastomas with MYCN amplification. The NCYM protein also interacts with GSK3β, thereby stabilizing the MYCN protein in the tumors of the MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice. Thus, these results suggest that GSK3β inhibition by NCYM stabilizes the MYCN protein both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the survival of MYCN transgenic mice bearing neuroblastoma was improved by treatment with NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor shown to destabilize MYCN via GSK3β activation. In contrast, tumors caused in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice showed chemo-resistance to the drug. Collectively, our results show that NCYM is the first de novo evolved protein known to act as an oncopromoting factor in human cancer, and suggest that de novo evolved proteins may functionally characterize human disease.

  13. Mutations in HYAL2, Encoding Hyaluronidase 2, Cause a Syndrome of Orofacial Clefting and Cor Triatriatum Sinister in Humans and Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggenthaler, Martina M A; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Hasan, S Naimul; Cross, Harold E; Mark, Brian; Harlalka, Gaurav V; Patton, Michael A; Ishida, Miho; Behr, Elijah R; Sharma, Sanjay; Zahka, Kenneth; Faqeih, Eissa; Blakley, Brian; Jackson, Mike; Lees, Melissa; Dolinsky, Vernon; Cross, Leroy; Stanier, Philip; Salter, Claire; Baple, Emma L; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Crosby, Andrew H; Triggs-Raine, Barbara; Chioza, Barry A

    2017-01-01

    Orofacial clefting is amongst the most common of birth defects, with both genetic and environmental components. Although numerous studies have been undertaken to investigate the complexities of the genetic etiology of this heterogeneous condition, this factor remains incompletely understood. Here, we describe mutations in the HYAL2 gene as a cause of syndromic orofacial clefting. HYAL2, encoding hyaluronidase 2, degrades extracellular hyaluronan, a critical component of the developing heart and palatal shelf matrix. Transfection assays demonstrated that the gene mutations destabilize the molecule, dramatically reducing HYAL2 protein levels. Consistent with the clinical presentation in affected individuals, investigations of Hyal2-/- mice revealed craniofacial abnormalities, including submucosal cleft palate. In addition, cor triatriatum sinister and hearing loss, identified in a proportion of Hyal2-/- mice, were also found as incompletely penetrant features in affected humans. Taken together our findings identify a new genetic cause of orofacial clefting in humans and mice, and define the first molecular cause of human cor triatriatum sinister, illustrating the fundamental importance of HYAL2 and hyaluronan turnover for normal human and mouse development.

  14. Whole genome sequencing of Escherichia coli encoding blaNDM isolated from humans and companion animals in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Companion animals are a source of zoonotic infections and especially important considering the potential of companion animals to harbor antibiotic resistant pathogens. In this study, blaNDM positive Escherichia coli from companion animals, humans, and the environment from Mansoura, Egypt were charac...

  15. Effects of ¿9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration on human encoding and recall memory function: a pharmacological fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossong, M.G.; Jager, G.; Hell, van H.H.; Zuurman, L.; Jansma, J.M.; Mehta, M.A.; Gerven, van J.; Kahn, R.S.; Ramsey, N.F.

    2012-01-01

    Deficits in memory function are an incapacitating aspect of various psychiatric and neurological disorders. Animal studies have recently provided strong evidence for involvement of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in memory function. Neuropsychological studies in humans have shown less convincing

  16. Nasal application of HSV encoding human preproenkephalin blocks craniofacial pain in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meidahl, Anders Christian Nørgaard; Tzabazis

    2017-01-01

    pain using nasal application of a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based vector expressing human proenkephalin (SHPE) to target the trigeminal ganglia. Mild TBI was induced in rats by the use of a modified fluid percussion model. Two days after mild TBI, following the development of facial mechanical...

  17. Assignment of human beta-galactosidase-A gene to 3p21.33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, T; Yamanouchi, Y

    1993-10-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio syndrome type B (MPS IVB) are inherited lyosomal storage disorders associated with deficiency of beta-galactosidase-A (beta GALA) activity. A recombinant plasmid containing a biotinylated cDNA (2.4-kb insert) encoding human beta GALA was used to localize the enzyme locus by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The human beta GALA gene was assigned to 3p21.33 by FISH.

  18. Cloning, expression, and mapping of GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase cDNA from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Li-Ping; Li, Han-Xia; Ouyang, Bo; Zhang, Jun-Hong; Ye, Zhi-Biao

    2006-08-01

    GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP, EC 2.7.7.22) catalyzes the synthesis of GDP-D-mannose and represents the first committed step in plant ascorbic acid biosynthesis. Using potato GMP cDNA sequence as a querying probe, 65 highly homologous tomato ESTs were obtained from dbEST of GenBank and the putative cDNA sequence of tomato GMP was assembled. The full-length GMP cDNA of tomato was cloned by RACE-PCR with primers designed according to the assembled cDNA sequence. The full-length cDNA sequence contained a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 1,086 bp, which encoded 361 amino acid residues. This gene was designated as LeGMP (GenBank accession No. AY605668). Homology analysis of LeGMP showed a 96% identity with potato GMP and the deduced amino acid showed 99%, 97%, 91% and 89% homology with GMP from potato, tobacco, alfalfa and Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that LeGMP was constitutively expressed in roots, stems, leaves, flowers and fruits of tomato; but the expression levels varied. LeGMP was mapped to 3-D using 75 tomato introgression lines (ILs), each containing a single homozygous RFLP-defined chromosome segment from the green-fruited species Lycopersicon pennellii.

  19. A High Performance Platform Based on cDNA Display for Efficient Synthesis of Protein Fusions and Accelerated Directed Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimuddin, Mohammed; Kubo, Tai

    2016-02-08

    We describe a high performance platform based on cDNA display technology by developing a new modified puromycin linker-oligonucleotide. The linker consists of four major characteristics: a "ligation site" for hybridization and ligation of mRNA by T4 RNA ligase, a "puromycin arm" for covalent linkage of the protein, a "polyadenosine site" for a longer puromycin arm and purification of protein fusions (optional) using oligo-dT matrices, and a "reverse transcription site" for the formation of stable cDNA protein fusions whose cDNA is covalently linked to its encoded protein. The linker was synthesized by a novel branching strategy and provided >8-fold higher yield than previous linkers. This linker enables rapid and highly efficient ligation of mRNA (>90%) and synthesis of protein fusions (∼ 50-95%) in various cell-free expression systems. Overall, this new cDNA display method provides 10-200 fold higher end-usage fusions than previous methods and benefits higher diversity libraries crucial for directed protein/peptide evolution. With the increased efficiency, this system was able to reduce the time for one selection cycle to cDNA display method. A three-finger protein library was evolved to isolate superior nanomolar range binding candidates for vascular endothelial growth factor. This method is expected to provide a beneficial impact to accelerated drug discovery and proteome analysis.

  20. The human subthalamic nucleus encodes the subjective value of reward and the cost of effort during decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zénon, Alexandre; Duclos, Yann; Carron, Romain; Witjas, Tatiana; Baunez, Christelle; Régis, Jean; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Peter; Eusebio, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    -frequency neuronal activity in the subthalamic nucleus may encode the information required to make cost-benefit comparisons, rather than signal conflict. The link between these neural responses and behaviour was stronger under dopamine replacement therapy. Our findings are consistent with the view that Parkinson's disease symptoms may be caused by a disruption of the processes involved in balancing the value of actions with their associated effort cost. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Genomic organization and mapping of the gene (SLC25A19) encoding the human mitochondrial deoxynucleotide carrier (DNC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobazzi, V; Ventura, M; Fiermonte, G; Prezioso, G; Rocchi, M; Palmieri, F

    2001-01-01

    The deoxynucleotide carrier (DNC) transports deoxynucleotides into mitochondria and is therefore essential for mtDNA synthesis. The human DNC gene (SLC25A19) spans about 16.5 kb and consists of nine exons with the translation start site in exon 4. It is located on chromosome 17q25.3. Three transcripts, which differ in their 5' ends and are generated by alternative splicing, have been identified. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Promotion of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation of Procathepsin D by Human Herpesvirus 8-Encoded Viral Interleukin-6

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Daming; Nicholas, John

    2015-01-01

    The interleukin-6 homologue (viral interleukin-6 [vIL-6]) of human herpesvirus 8 is implicated in viral pathogenesis due to its proproliferative, inflammatory, and angiogenic properties, effected through gp130 receptor signaling. In primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells, vIL-6 is expressed latently and is essential for normal cell growth and viability. This is mediated partly via suppression of proapoptotic cathepsin D (CatD) via cocomplexing of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized CatD p...

  3. Functional mutation of SMAC/DIABLO, encoding a mitochondrial proapoptotic protein, causes human progressive hearing loss DFNA64.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing; Zhu, Yuhua; He, Sudan; Lu, Yanping; Chen, Jing; Han, Bing; Petrillo, Marco; Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O; Yang, Shiming; Dai, Pu; Zhai, Suoqiang; Han, Dongyi; Zhang, Michael Q; Li, Wei; Liu, Xuezhong; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Yuan, Huijun

    2011-07-15

    SMAC/DIABLO is a mitochondrial proapoptotic protein that is released from mitochondria during apoptosis and counters the inhibitory activities of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, IAPs. By linkage analysis and candidate screening, we identified a heterozygous SMAC/DIABLO mutation, c.377C>T (p.Ser126Leu, refers to p.Ser71Leu in the mature protein) in a six-generation Chinese kindred characterized by dominant progressive nonsyndromic hearing loss, designated as DFNA64. SMAC/DIABLO is highly expressed in human embryonic ears and is enriched in the developing mouse inner-ear hair cells, suggesting it has a role in the development and homeostasis of hair cells. We used a functional study to demonstrate that the SMAC/DIABLO(S71L) mutant, while retaining the proapoptotic function, triggers significant degradation of both wild-type and mutant SMAC/DIABLO and renders host mitochondria susceptible to calcium-induced loss of the membrane potential. Our work identifies DFNA64 as the human genetic disorder associated with SMAC/DIABLO malfunction and suggests that mutant SMAC/DIABLO(S71L) might cause mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a set of multiplex PCRs for detection of genes encoding cell wall-associated proteins in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates from dogs, humans and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phumthanakorn, Nathita; Chanchaithong, Pattrarat; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius commonly colonizes the skin of dogs, whilst nasal carriage may occur in humans who are in contact with dogs or the environment of veterinary hospitals. Genes encoding cell wall-associated (CWA) proteins have been described in Staphylococcus aureus but knowledge of their occurrence in S. pseudintermedius is still limited. The aim of the study was to develop a method to detect S. pseudintermedius surface protein genes (sps) encoding CWA proteins, and to examine the distribution of the genes in isolates from different sources. Four multiplex PCR assays (mPCR) were developed for detection of 18 sps genes, with 4-5 genes detected per mPCR. These were applied to 135 S. pseudintermedius isolates from carriage sites (n=35) and infected sites (n=35) in dogs, from the nasal cavity of humans (n=25), and from the environment of a veterinary hospital (n=40). The mPCRs were shown to detect all 18 known sps genes, and no discrepancies were found between uniplex and mPCR results. The mPCRs could detect at least 1pg/μl of DNA template. A total of 23 sps gene profiles were found among the 135 isolates, with diverse gene combinations. Only spsD, spsF, spsI, spsO, spsP, and spsQ were not detected in all isolates. spsP and spsQ were more frequently detected in the canine isolates from infected sites than from carriage sites. This finding suggests that these two genes may play a role in pathogenicity, whereas the presence of the 12 sps genes may contribute to adherence function at all surfaces where carriage occurs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of an HIV-based cDNA expression cloning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, Marc; Tidwell, Jennie K; Donehower, Lawrence A; Sutton, Richard E

    2003-07-01

    Expression cloning of cDNAs is a powerful tool with which to identify genes based on their specific functional properties. Here we describe the development of a cDNA library transfer system based on the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV). This system represents an improvement over current oncoretroviral cDNA expression systems in terms of target cell range and the inclusion of a selectable marker. By use of a simple packaging system, we were able to produce high-titer vector stocks from HIV vector-based cDNA libraries and demonstrate highly efficient cDNA expression cloning in three model experiments. First, HOS TK(-) cells, which are null for thymidine kinase (TK) expression, were transduced with an HIV-based cDNA library derived from primary human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) and functionally selected for TK expression. In a second experiment, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-1-deficient (HPRT(-)) fibroblasts were transduced with a T cell (PM1) line-derived cDNA library and selected for HPRT expression. Both TK (frequency 1 in 5.0 x 10(4)) and HPRT (frequency 1 in 2.0 x 10(4)) cDNAs were readily isolated from these HIV-based cDNA libraries. As a third example, we demonstrated the ability of this vector system to allow functional cDNA library screens to be performed in primary, mitotically inactive cell types. Using senescent HFFs as a target cell population, we were able to isolate SV40 large T antigen cDNA-containing clones (frequency 1 in 2.5 x 10(4)) based on their ability to overcome the senescence-induced block to cell proliferation. Thus, this system can be used to clone relatively low-abundance cDNAs based upon their expression. Because of the ability of HIV-based vectors to transduce primary and nondividing cells efficiently, this vector system will further broaden the range of cell types in which expression cloning studies can be performed.

  6. Cloning of a cDNA for steroid sulfatase: frequent occurrence of gene deletions in patients with recessive X chromosome-linked ichthyosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifas, J.M.; Morley, B.J.; Oakey, R.E.; Kan, Y.W.; Epstein, E.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A human steroid sulfatase cDNA 2.4 kilobases long was isolated from a human placental λ gt11 cDNA expression library. The library was screened with monospecific rabbit antibodies elicited by injection of steroid sulfatase protein purified from human placentas. Hybridization of the cDNA with EcoRI-digested genomic DNA indicated that patients from 14 of 15 apparently unrelated families have gross deletions of the gene for steroid sulfatase. One patient had genomic DNA fragments that were identical to those from normal individuals, indicating the absence of any major deletions as the cause of his lack of steroid sulfatase enzyme activity

  7. Cloning of a cDNA for steroid sulfatase: frequent occurrence of gene deletions in patients with recessive X chromosome-linked ichthyosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonifas, J.M.; Morley, B.J.; Oakey, R.E.; Kan, Y.W.; Epstein, E.J. Jr.

    1987-12-01

    A human steroid sulfatase cDNA 2.4 kilobases long was isolated from a human placental lambda gt11 cDNA expression library. The library was screened with monospecific rabbit antibodies elicited by injection of steroid sulfatase protein purified from human placentas. Hybridization of the cDNA with EcoRI-digested genomic DNA indicated that patients from 14 of 15 apparently unrelated families have gross deletions of the gene for steroid sulfatase. One patient had genomic DNA fragments that were identical to those from normal individuals, indicating the absence of any major deletions as the cause of his lack of steroid sulfatase enzyme activity.

  8. Construction of small RNA cDNA libraries for deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng; Meyers, Blake C; Green, Pamela J

    2007-10-01

    Small RNAs (21-24 nucleotides) including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are potent regulators of gene expression in both plants and animals. Several hundred genes encoding miRNAs and thousands of siRNAs have been experimentally identified by cloning approaches. New sequencing technologies facilitate the identification of these molecules and provide global quantitative expression data in a given biological sample. Here, we describe the methods used in our laboratory to construct small RNA cDNA libraries for high-throughput sequencing using technologies such as MPSS, 454 or SBS.

  9. An intact SAM-dependent methyltransferase fold is encoded by the human endothelin-converting enzyme-2 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tempel, W.; Wu, H.; Dombrovsky, L.; Zeng, H.; Loppnau, P.; Zhu, H.; Plotnikov, A.N.; Bochkarev, A.; (Toronto)

    2010-08-17

    A recent survey of protein expression patterns in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) has identified ece2 (chromosome: 3; Locations: 3q27.1) as the most significantly downregulated gene within the tested group. ece2 encodes endothelin-converting enzyme ECE2, a metalloprotease with a role in neuropeptide processing. Deficiency in the highly homologous ECE1 has earlier been linked to increased levels of AD-related {beta}-amyloid peptide in mice, consistent with a role for ECE in the degradation of that peptide. Initially, ECE2 was presumed to resemble ECE1, in that it comprises a single transmembrane region of {approx}20 residues flanked by a small amino-terminal cytosolic segment and a carboxy-terminal lumenar peptidase domain. The carboxy-terminal domain has significant sequence similarity to both neutral endopeptidase, for which an X-ray structure has been determined, and Kell blood group protein. After their initial discovery, multiple isoforms of ECE1 and ECE2 were discovered, generated by alternative splicing of multiple exons. The originally described ece2 transcript, RefSeq NM{_}174046, contains the amino-terminal cytosolic portion followed by the transmembrane region and peptidase domain (Fig. 1, isoform B). Another ece2 transcript, available from the Mammalian Gene Collection under MGC2408 (Fig. 1, isoform C), RefSeq accession NM{_}032331, is predicted to be translated into a 255 residue peptide with low but detectable sequence similarity to known S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases (SAM-MTs), such as the hypothetical protein TT1324 from Thermus thermophilis, PDB code 2GS9, which shares 30% amino acid sequence identity with ECE2 over 138 residues of the sequence. Intriguingly, another 'elongated' ece2 transcript (Fig. 1, isoform A) (RefSeq NM{_}014693) contains an amino-terminal portion of the putative SAM-MT domain, the transmembrane domain, and the protease domain. This suggests the possibility for coexistence of

  10. Recent positive selection has acted on genes encoding proteins with more interactions within the whole human interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisi, Pierre; Alvarez-Ponce, David; Pybus, Marc; Fares, Mario A; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Laayouni, Hafid

    2015-04-02

    Genes vary in their likelihood to undergo adaptive evolution. The genomic factors that determine adaptability, however, remain poorly understood. Genes function in the context of molecular networks, with some occupying more important positions than others and thus being likely to be under stronger selective pressures. However, how positive selection distributes across the different parts of molecular networks is still not fully understood. Here, we inferred positive selection using comparative genomics and population genetics approaches through the comparison of 10 mammalian and 270 human genomes, respectively. In agreement with previous results, we found that genes with lower network centralities are more likely to evolve under positive selection (as inferred from divergence data). Surprisingly, polymorphism data yield results in the opposite direction than divergence data: Genes with higher centralities are more likely to have been targeted by recent positive selection during recent human evolution. Our results indicate that the relationship between centrality and the impact of adaptive evolution highly depends on the mode of positive selection and/or the evolutionary time-scale. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Genomic sequence and organization of two members of a human lectin gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitt, M.A.; Barondes, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced the genomic DNA encoding a human dimeric soluble lactose-binding lectin. The gene has four exons, and its upstream region contains sequences that suggest control by glucocorticoids, heat (environmental) shock, metals, and other factors. They have also isolated and sequenced three exons of the gene encoding another human putative lectin, the existence of which was first indicated by isolation of its cDNA. Comparisons suggest a general pattern of genomic organization of members of this lectin gene family

  12. Molecular cloning of cDNA for lysenin, a novel protein in the earthworm Eisenia foetida that causes contraction of rat vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizawa, Y; Kubo, T; Kobayashi, H; Nakajima, T; Natori, S

    1997-05-20

    Lysenin, which causes contraction of rat vascular smooth muscle, is a protein that was isolated from the earthworm Eisenia foetida. A cDNA encoding lysenin was isolated by use of a partial cDNA probe that had been generated by the PCR with a primer designed by reference to an internal peptide sequence of lysenin. This clone had an ORF encoding 297 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA revealed the absence of any significant homology to those of previously characterized vasoactive substances. The recombinant lysenin was produced in Escherichia coli. This protein and native lysenin isolated from the earthworm had similar contractive activities when tested on rat aorta. Northern blot analysis of the RNA from various tissues of the earthworm indicated that lysenin is produced by the coelomocytes.

  13. Acetylcholinesterase of the Sand Fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli): cDNA Sequence, Baculovirus Expression, and Biochemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    and domestic animals around the world are affected by leishmaniasis, a disease caused by various species of flagellated protozoans in the genus...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Background: Millions of people and domestic animals around the world are affected by...nucleotides, [GenBank: DQ898276]) respectively, as well as to other arthropod AChEs. The P. papatasi AChE cDNA ORF encodes a 710-amino acid protein

  14. Construction of sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries using low input of total environmental metatranscriptomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajiv Kumar; Barbi, Florian; Ziller, Antoine; Luis, Patricia; Marmeisse, Roland; Reddy, M Sudhakara; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence

    2014-09-03

    Construction of high quality cDNA libraries from the usually low amounts of eukaryotic mRNA extracted from environmental samples is essential in functional metatranscriptomics for the selection of functional, full-length genes encoding proteins of interest. Many of the inserts in libraries constructed by standard methods are represented by truncated cDNAs due to premature stoppage of reverse transcriptase activity and preferential cloning of short cDNAs. We report here a simple and cost effective technique for preparation of sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries from as low as three microgram of total soil RNA dominated by ribosomal and bacterial RNA. cDNAs synthesized by a template switching approach were size-fractionated by two dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis prior to PCR amplification and cloning. Effective size selection was demonstrated by PCR amplification of conserved gene families specific of each size class. Libraries of more than one million independent inserts whose sizes ranged between one and four kb were thus produced. Up to 80% of the insert sequences were homologous to eukaryotic gene sequences present in public databases. A simple and cost effective technique has been developed to construct sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries from environmental samples. This technique will facilitate expression cloning of environmental eukaryotic genes and contribute to a better understanding of basic biological and/or ecological processes carried out by eukaryotic microbial communities.

  15. Molecular cloning and expression of a transformation-sensitive human protein containing the TPR motif and sharing identity to the stress-inducible yeast protein STI1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Leffers, H; Madsen, Peder

    1992-01-01

    A transformation-sensitive human protein (IEF SSP 3521) that is 2-fold up-regulated in SV40-transformed MRC-5 fibroblasts has been purified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, microsequenced, and cDNA cloned using oligodeoxyribonucleotides. The 2.1-kilobase cDNA encodes a 543-amino acid protein...... transformed cells. Immunofluorescence studies using a polyclonal antibody raised against the purified protein revealed that the antigen is present mainly in the nucleus of SV40 transformed MRC-5 fibroblasts, while it localizes to the Golgi apparatus and small vesicles in their normal counterparts...

  16. Identification of the major structural and nonstructural proteins encoded by human parvovirus B19 and mapping of their genes by procaryotic expression of isolated genomic fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotmore, S.F.; McKie, V.C.; Anderson, L.J.; Astell, C.R.; Tattersall, P.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma from a child with homozygous sickle-cell disease, sampled during the early phase of an aplastic crisis, contained human parvovirus B19 virions. Plasma taken 10 days later (during the convalescent phase) contained both immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against two viral polypeptides with apparent molecular weights for 83,000 and 58,000 which were present exclusively in the particulate fraction of the plasma taken during the acute phase. These two protein species comigrated at 110S on neutral sucrose velocity gradients with the B19 viral DNA and thus appear to constitute the viral capsid polypeptides. The B19 genome was molecularly cloned into a bacterial plasmid vector. Two expression constructs containing B19 sequences from different halves of the viral genome were obtained, which directed the synthesis, in bacteria, of segments of virally encoded protein. These polypeptide fragments were then purified and used to immunize rabbits. Antibodies against a protein sequence specified between nucleotides 2897 and 3749 recognized both the 83- and 58-kilodalton capsid polypeptides in aplastic plasma taken during the acute phase and detected similar proteins in the similar proteins in the tissues of a stillborn fetus which had been infected transplacentally with B19. Antibodies against a protein sequence encoded in the other half of the B19 genome (nucleotides 1072 through 2044) did not react specifically with any protein in plasma taken during the acute phase but recognized three nonstructural polypeptides of 71, 63, and 52 kilodaltons present in the liver and, at lower levels, in some other tissues of the transplacentally infected fetus

  17. Identification of the major structural and nonstructural proteins encoded by human parvovirus B19 and mapping of their genes by procaryotic expression of isolated genomic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotmore, S.F.; McKie, V.C.; Anderson, L.J.; Astell, C.R.; Tattersall, P.

    1986-11-01

    Plasma from a child with homozygous sickle-cell disease, sampled during the early phase of an aplastic crisis, contained human parvovirus B19 virions. Plasma taken 10 days later (during the convalescent phase) contained both immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against two viral polypeptides with apparent molecular weights for 83,000 and 58,000 which were present exclusively in the particulate fraction of the plasma taken during the acute phase. These two protein species comigrated at 110S on neutral sucrose velocity gradients with the B19 viral DNA and thus appear to constitute the viral capsid polypeptides. The B19 genome was molecularly cloned into a bacterial plasmid vector. Two expression constructs containing B19 sequences from different halves of the viral genome were obtained, which directed the synthesis, in bacteria, of segments of virally encoded protein. These polypeptide fragments were then purified and used to immunize rabbits. Antibodies against a protein sequence specified between nucleotides 2897 and 3749 recognized both the 83- and 58-kilodalton capsid polypeptides in aplastic plasma taken during the acute phase and detected similar proteins in the similar proteins in the tissues of a stillborn fetus which had been infected transplacentally with B19. Antibodies against a protein sequence encoded in the other half of the B19 genome (nucleotides 1072 through 2044) did not react specifically with any protein in plasma taken during the acute phase but recognized three nonstructural polypeptides of 71, 63, and 52 kilodaltons present in the liver and, at lower levels, in some other tissues of the transplacentally infected fetus.

  18. Human neuronal encoding of English syntactic violations as revealed by both L1 and L2 speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Mikio; Ferrari, Paul; Roberts, Timothy P L

    2004-09-23

    Our previous study [M. Kubota, P. Ferrari, T.P.L. Roberts, Magnetoencephalography detection of early syntactic processes in humans: comparison between L1 speakers and L2 learners, Neurosci. Lett. 353 (2003) 107-110] showed that an early syntactic response was elicited in first language (L1) speakers for within-phrase, but not across-phrase violations, implying that there may exist a continuum of neuronal error gravity. Such an early component was not elicited by second-language (L2) learners. The current auditory study investigated whether two types of different syntactic violations regarding noun-phrase raising (NP-raising) and case-filter constructions would elicit a prominent early syntactic component in each hemisphere for both L1 and advanced L2 speakers of English. Neuromagnetic fields were recorded, using a dual 37-channel gradiometer system. A prominent component, peaking at approximately 150 ms post-onset, was observed in both hemispheres of two groups in response to NP-raising induced violations, but not case-filter violations. The findings imply that L1 and L2 speakers have similar neuronal mechanisms subserving syntactic processing of such violations.

  19. Molecular Cloning, Sequencing, and Heterologous Expression of the vaoA Gene from Penicillium simplicissimum CBS 170.90 Encoding Vanillyl-Alcohol Oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, Jacques A.E.; Sánchez-Torres, Paloma; Wagemaker, Matthé J.M.; Fraaije, Marco W.; Berkel, Willem J.H. van; Visser, Jaap

    1998-01-01

    The cDNA encoding vanillyl-alcohol oxidase (EC 1.1.3.7) was selected from a cDNA library constructed from mRNA isolated from Penicillium simplicissimum CBS 170.90 grown on veratryl alcohol by immunochemical screening. The vaoA-cDNA nucleotide sequence revealed an open reading frame of 1680 base

  20. Safety and efficacy of a xenogeneic DNA vaccine encoding for human tyrosinase as adjunctive treatment for oral malignant melanoma in dogs following surgical excision of the primary tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosenbaugh, Deborah A; Leard, A Timothy; Bergman, Philip J; Klein, Mary K; Meleo, Karri; Susaneck, Steven; Hess, Paul R; Jankowski, Monika K; Jones, Pamela D; Leibman, Nicole F; Johnson, Maribeth H; Kurzman, Ilene D; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a vaccine containing plasmid DNA with an insert encoding human tyrosinase (ie, huTyr vaccine) as adjunctive treatment for oral malignant melanoma (MM) in dogs. 111 dogs (58 prospectively enrolled in a multicenter clinical trial and 53 historical controls) with stage II or III oral MM (modified World Health Organization staging scale, I to IV) in which locoregional disease control was achieved. 58 dogs received an initial series of 4 injections of huTyr vaccine (102 μg of DNA/injection) administered transdermally by use of a needle-free IM vaccination device. Dogs were monitored for adverse reactions. Surviving dogs received booster injections at 6-month intervals thereafter. Survival time for vaccinates was compared with that of historical control dogs via Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for the outcome of death. Kaplan-Meier analysis of survival time until death attributable to MM was determined to be significantly improved for dogs that received the huTyr vaccine, compared with that of historical controls. However, median survival time could not be determined for vaccinates because dogs as adjunctive treatment for oral MM. Response to DNA vaccination in dogs with oral MM may be useful in development of plasmid DNA vaccination protocols for human patients with similar disease.

  1. Discovery of highly potent and selective small molecule ADAMTS-5 inhibitors that inhibit human cartilage degradation via encoded library technology (ELT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongfeng; O'Keefe, Heather; Davie, Christopher P; Lind, Kenneth E; Acharya, Raksha A; Franklin, G Joseph; Larkin, Jonathan; Matico, Rosalie; Neeb, Michael; Thompson, Monique M; Lohr, Thomas; Gross, Jeffrey W; Centrella, Paolo A; O'Donovan, Gary K; Bedard, Katie L Sargent; van Vloten, Kurt; Mataruse, Sibongile; Skinner, Steven R; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Carpenter, Tiffany Y; Shearer, Todd W; Clark, Matthew A; Cuozzo, John W; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Morgan, Barry A

    2012-08-23

    The metalloprotease ADAMTS-5 is considered a potential target for the treatment of osteoarthritis. To identify selective inhibitors of ADAMTS-5, we employed encoded library technology (ELT), which enables affinity selection of small molecule binders from complex mixtures by DNA tagging. Selection of ADAMTS-5 against a four-billion member ELT library led to a novel inhibitor scaffold not containing a classical zinc-binding functionality. One exemplar, (R)-N-((1-(4-(but-3-en-1-ylamino)-6-(((2-(thiophen-2-yl)thiazol-4-yl)methyl)amino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)pyrrolidin-2-yl)methyl)-4-propylbenzenesulfonamide (8), inhibited ADAMTS-5 with IC(50) = 30 nM, showing >50-fold selectivity against ADAMTS-4 and >1000-fold selectivity against ADAMTS-1, ADAMTS-13, MMP-13, and TACE. Extensive SAR studies showed that potency and physicochemical properties of the scaffold could be further improved. Furthermore, in a human osteoarthritis cartilage explant study, compounds 8 and 15f inhibited aggrecanase-mediated (374)ARGS neoepitope release from aggrecan and glycosaminoglycan in response to IL-1β/OSM stimulation. This study provides the first small molecule evidence for the critical role of ADAMTS-5 in human cartilage degradation.

  2. Identification of human genes involved in cellular responses to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular studies of gene encoding the p68 helicase in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menaa, F.

    2003-12-01

    Cells submitted to genotoxic factors -like IR- activate several and important mechanisms such as repair, cell cycle arrest or 'apoptosis' to maintain genetic integrity. So, the damaged cells will induce many and different genes. The human transcriptome analysis by 'SSH' method in a human breast carcinoma cell line MCF7 γ-irradiated versus not irradiated, allowed to identify about one hundred genes. Among of these genes, we have focused our study on a radio-induced gene encoding the p68 helicase. In the conditions of irradiation used, our results show that the kinetic and the regulation of this gene expression differs between the nature of radiations used. Indeed, in γ-irradiated mammalian cells, ATM, a protein kinase activated by DSB and IR, is required to induce quickly P68 gene via the important transcription factor p53 stabilized by IR. In the case of UVC-irradiated cells, the P68 gene induction is late and the intracellular signalling pathway that lead to this induction is independent from the p53 protein. Finally, we show that the p68 protein under-expression is responsible for an increased radiosensitivity of MCF7 cells. Consequently, we can postulate that the p68 protein is involved in cellular responses to radiations to reduce the increased radiosensitivity of cells exposed to γ-rays. (author)

  3. Bacillus caldolyticus prs gene encoding phosphoribosyldiphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, Britta N.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    The prs gene, encoding phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase, as well as the flanking DNA sequences were cloned and sequenced from the Gram-positive thermophile, Bacillus caldolyticus. Comparison with the homologous sequences from the mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, revealed a gene (gca......D) encoding N-acetylglucosamine-l-phosphate uridyltransferase upstream of prs, and a gene homologous to ctc downstream of prs. cDNA synthesis with a B. caldolyticus gcaD-prs-ctc-specified mRNA as template, followed by amplification utilising the polymerase chain reaction indicated that the three genes are co......-transcribed. Comparison of amino acid sequences revealed a high similarity among PRPP synthases across a wide phylogenetic range. An E. coli strain harbouring the B. caldolyticus prs gene in a multicopy plasmid produced PRPP synthase activity 33-fold over the activity of a haploid B. caldolyticus strain. B. caldolyticus...

  4. Promotion of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation of Procathepsin D by Human Herpesvirus 8-Encoded Viral Interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daming; Nicholas, John

    2015-08-01

    The interleukin-6 homologue (viral interleukin-6 [vIL-6]) of human herpesvirus 8 is implicated in viral pathogenesis due to its proproliferative, inflammatory, and angiogenic properties, effected through gp130 receptor signaling. In primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells, vIL-6 is expressed latently and is essential for normal cell growth and viability. This is mediated partly via suppression of proapoptotic cathepsin D (CatD) via cocomplexing of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized CatD precursor, pro-CatD (pCatD), and vIL-6 with the previously uncharacterized ER membrane protein vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 variant 2 (VKORC1v2). vIL-6 suppression of CatD occurs also during reactivated productive replication in PEL cells and is likely to contribute to proreplication functions of vIL-6. Here, we report that vIL-6 suppresses CatD through vIL-6, VKORC1v2, and pCatD association with components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery. In transfected cells, expression of vIL-6 along with CatD led to proteasome-dependent (inhibitor-sensitive) decreases in CatD levels and the promotion of pCatD polyubiquitination. Depletion of particular ERAD-associated isomerases, lectins, and translocon components, including ERAD E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, diminished suppression of CatD by vIL-6. Coprecipitation assays identified direct or indirect interactions of VKORC1v2, vIL-6, and pCatD with translocon proteins (SEL1L and/or HRD1) and ERAD-associated lectins OS9 and XTP3-B. Endogenous CatD expression in PEL cells was increased by depletion of ERAD components, and suppression of CatD by vIL-6 overexpression in PEL cells was dependent on HRD1. Our data reveal a new mechanism of ER-localized vIL-6 activity and further characterize VKORC1v2 function. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), unlike cellular IL-6 proteins, is secreted inefficiently and sequestered mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), from where it can signal through the gp

  5. cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visfatin was a newly identified adipocytokine, which was involved in various physiologic and pathologic processes of organisms. The cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of silver Prussian carp visfatin were described in this report. The silver Prussian carp visfatin cDNA cloned from the liver was ...

  6. cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... Visfatin was a newly identified adipocytokine, which was involved in various physiologic and pathologic processes of organisms. The cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of silver Prussian carp visfatin were described in this report. The silver Prussian carp visfatin. cDNA cloned ...

  7. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of one of the human glutamate receptor genes

    OpenAIRE

    Puckett, Carmie; Gomez, Christopher M.; Korenberg, Julie R.; Tung, Howard; Meier, Timothy J.; Chen, Xiao Ning; Hood, Leroy

    1991-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the mammalian brain and are classified on the basis of their activation by different agonists. The agonists kainate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxasolepropionic acid define a class of glutamate receptors termed kainate receptors. We have isolated and sequenced a human glutamate receptor (GluHI) cDNA and determined the chromosomal localization of its gene. The DNA sequence of GluHI would encode a 907-am...

  8. A chromosome-centric human proteome project (C-HPP) to characterize the sets of proteins encoded in chromosome 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suli; Im, Hogune; Bairoch, Amos; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Chen, Rui; Deutsch, Eric W; Dalton, Stephen; Fenyo, David; Fanayan, Susan; Gates, Chris; Gaudet, Pascale; Hincapie, Marina; Hanash, Samir; Kim, Hoguen; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lundberg, Emma; Mias, George; Menon, Rajasree; Mu, Zhaomei; Nice, Edouard; Paik, Young-Ki; Uhlen, Mathias; Wells, Lance; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Yan, Fangfei; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yue; Snyder, Michael; Omenn, Gilbert S; Beavis, Ronald C; Hancock, William S

    2013-01-04

    We report progress assembling the parts list for chromosome 17 and illustrate the various processes that we have developed to integrate available data from diverse genomic and proteomic knowledge bases. As primary resources, we have used GPMDB, neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, Human Protein Atlas (HPA), and GeneCards. All sites share the common resource of Ensembl for the genome modeling information. We have defined the chromosome 17 parts list with the following information: 1169 protein-coding genes, the numbers of proteins confidently identified by various experimental approaches as documented in GPMDB, neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and HPA, examples of typical data sets obtained by RNASeq and proteomic studies of epithelial derived tumor cell lines (disease proteome) and a normal proteome (peripheral mononuclear cells), reported evidence of post-translational modifications, and examples of alternative splice variants (ASVs). We have constructed a list of the 59 "missing" proteins as well as 201 proteins that have inconclusive mass spectrometric (MS) identifications. In this report we have defined a process to establish a baseline for the incorporation of new evidence on protein identification and characterization as well as related information from transcriptome analyses. This initial list of "missing" proteins that will guide the selection of appropriate samples for discovery studies as well as antibody reagents. Also we have illustrated the significant diversity of protein variants (including post-translational modifications, PTMs) using regions on chromosome 17 that contain important oncogenes. We emphasize the need for mandated deposition of proteomics data in public databases, the further development of improved PTM, ASV, and single nucleotide variant (SNV) databases, and the construction of Web sites that can integrate and regularly update such information. In addition, we describe the distribution of both clustered and scattered sets of protein families on the

  9. Molecular cloning of lupin leghemoglobin cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konieczny, A; Jensen, E O; Marcker, K A

    1987-01-01

    Poly(A)+ RNA isolated from root nodules of yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus, var. Ventus) has been used as a template for the construction of a cDNA library. The ds cDNA was synthesized and inserted into the Hind III site of plasmid pBR 322 using synthetic Hind III linkers. Clones containing sequences...... specific for nodules were selected by differential colony hybridization using 32P-labeled cDNA synthesized either from nodule poly(A)+ RNA or from poly(A)+ RNA of uninfected root as probes. Among the recombinant plasmids, the cDNA gene for leghemoglobin was identified. The protein structure derived from...... its nucleotide sequence was consistent with known amino acid sequence of lupin Lb II. The cloned lupin Lb cDNA hybridized to poly(A)+ RNA from nodules only, which is in accordance with the general concept, that leghemoglobin is expressed exclusively in nodules. Udgivelsesdato: 1987-null...

  10. Structural and biochemical properties of cloned and expressed human and rat steroid 5α-reductases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, S.; Russell, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    The microsomal enzyme steroid 5α-reductase is responsible for the conversion of testosterone into the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone. In man, this steroid acts on a variety of androgen-responsive target tissues to mediate such diverse endocrine processes as male sexual differentiation in the fetus and prostatic growth in men. Here we describe the isolation, structure, and expression of a cDNA encoding the human steroid 5α-reductase. A rat cDNA was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human prostate cDNA library. A 2.1-kilobase cDNA was identified and DNA sequence analysis indicated that the human steroid 5α-reductase was a hydrophobic protein of 259 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 29,462. A comparison of the human and rat protein sequences revealed a 60% identity. Transfection of expression vectors containing the human and rat cDNAs into simian COS cells resulted in the synthesis of high levels of steroid 5α-reductase enzyme activity. Both enzymes expressed in COS cells showed similar substrate specificities for naturally occurring steroid hormones. However, synthetic 4-azasteroids demonstrated marked differences in their abilities to inhibit the human and rat steroid 5α-reductases

  11. [Construction of chicken embryo fibroblasts cDNA expression library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Gao, Yu-long; Gao, Hong-lei; Wang, Xiao-mei; Xu, Xiu-hong

    2007-06-01

    Chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) is a primary cellular material to research the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Constructing the cDNA expression library of CEF is the foundation to research cell tropism and find cell receptors of IBDV from CEF. In order to achieve that purpose, a high-quality cDNA expression library of CEF was constructed by Gateway technology, which could avoid using the restriction enzyme for cloning to solve technical limitation of roution method. The mRNA was extracted from chicken embryonic fibroblast. Moreover, single-strand cDNA and double-strand cDNA were synthesized by using biotin-conjugated Oligo (dT) primer in turn. The double-strand cDNA was ligated Adapter and then purified by the cDNA Size Fractionation Columns. After BP recombination reaction, a cDNA entry library was constructed with a titer of 1 x 10(6) cfu/mL, total clones of 1.2 x 10(7) cfu and an average insertion size of about 2243 bp. After LR recombination reaction, the cDNA entry library was transformed into expression library which took on a titer of 5 x 10(5) cfu/mL, total clones of 5.5 x 10(6) cfu and an average insertion size of about 2411bp. The results indicate that the constructed cDNA expression library performs a remarkable high value in both recombination rate and library coverage. As a result, the cDNA expression library, with its good quality, may facilitate to identify the receptors associated with the resistance against IBDV in chicken embryonic fibroblast and to cast new light on the mechanism of cellular tropism. Moreover, it may also provide data of chicken embryonic fibroblast in transcription level and may be helpful to study its biological functions.

  12. Two distinct genes for ADP/ATP translocase are expressed at the mRNA level in adult human liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houldsworth, J.; Attardi, G.

    1988-01-01

    Several clones hybridizing with a bovine ADP/ATP translocase cDNA were isolated from an adult human liver cDNA library in the vector pEX1. DNA sequence analysis revealed that these clones encode two distinct forms of translocase. In particular, two clones specifying the COOH-end-proximal five-sixths of the protein exhibit a 9% amino acid sequence divergence and totally dissimilar 3' untranslated regions. One of these cDNAs is nearly identical in sequence to an ADP/ATP translocase clone (hp2F1) recently isolated from a human fibroblast cDNA library with three amino acid changes and a few differences in the 3' untranslated region. Another clone isolated from the pEX1 library contains a reading frame encoding the remaining, NH 2 -end-proximal, 37 amino acids of the translocase. This sequence differs significantly (14% amino acid sequence divergence) from the corresponding segment of hp2F1, and the 5' untranslated regions of the two clones are totally dissimilar. RNA transfer hybridization experiments utilizing the clones isolated from the pEX1 library revealed the presence in HeLa cells of three distinct mRNA species. The pattern of hybridization and the sizes of these mRNAs suggest a greater complexity of organization and expression of the ADP/ATP translocase genes in human cells than indicated by the analysis of the cDNA clones

  13. Identification and cloning of a gamma 3 subunit splice variant of the human GABA(A) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, C F; Christjansen, K N; Hastrup, S; Hartvig, L

    2000-05-31

    cDNA sequences encoding two forms of the GABA(A) gamma 3 receptor subunit were cloned from human hippocampus. The nucleotide sequences differ by the absence (gamma 3S) or presence (gamma 3L) of 18 bp located in the presumed intracellular loop between transmembrane region (TM) III and IV. The extra 18 bp in the gamma 3L subunit generates a consensus site for phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC). Analysis of human genomic DNA encoding the gamma 3 subunit reveals that the 18 bp insert is contiguous with the upstream proximal exon.

  14. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  15. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  16. Phosphorylation of transcriptional regulators in the retinoblastoma protein pathway by UL97, the viral cyclin-dependent kinase encoded by human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahori, Satoko; Kalejta, Robert F

    2017-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes a viral cyclin-dependent kinase (v-CDK), the UL97 protein. UL97 phosphorylates Rb, p107 and p130, thereby inactivating all three retinoblastoma (Rb) family members. Rb proteins function through regulating the activity of transcription factors to which they bind. Therefore, we examined whether the UL97-mediated regulation of the Rb tumor suppressors also extended to their binding partners. We observed that UL97 phosphorylates LIN52, a component of p107- and p130-assembled transcriptionally repressive DREAM complexes that control transcription during the G0/G1 phases, and the Rb-associated E2F3 protein that activates transcription through G1 and S phases. Intriguingly, we also identified FoxM1B, a transcriptional regulator during the S and G2 phases, as a UL97 substrate. This survey extends the influence of UL97 beyond simply the Rb proteins themselves to their binding partners, as well as past the G1/S transition into later stages of the cell cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Construction and characterization of a full-length cDNA library for the wheat stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xianming

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Puccinia striiformis is a plant pathogenic fungus causing stripe rust, one of the most important diseases on cereal crops and grasses worldwide. However, little is know about its genome and genes involved in the biology and pathogenicity of the pathogen. We initiated the functional genomic research of the fungus by constructing a full-length cDNA and determined functions of the first group of genes by sequence comparison of cDNA clones to genes reported in other fungi. Results A full-length cDNA library, consisting of 42,240 clones with an average cDNA insert of 1.9 kb, was constructed using urediniospores of race PST-78 of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici. From 196 sequenced cDNA clones, we determined functions of 73 clones (37.2%. In addition, 36 clones (18.4% had significant homology to hypothetical proteins, 37 clones (18.9% had some homology to genes in other fungi, and the remaining 50 clones (25.5% did not produce any hits. From the 73 clones with functions, we identified 51 different genes encoding protein products that are involved in amino acid metabolism, cell defense, cell cycle, cell signaling, cell structure and growth, energy cycle, lipid and nucleotide metabolism, protein modification, ribosomal protein complex, sugar metabolism, transcription factor, transport metabolism, and virulence/infection. Conclusion The full-length cDNA library is useful in identifying functional genes of P. striiformis.

  18. Construction and characterization of a full-length cDNA library for the wheat stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Peng; Wang, Meinan; Chen, Xianming; Campbell, Kimberly Garland

    2007-06-04

    Puccinia striiformis is a plant pathogenic fungus causing stripe rust, one of the most important diseases on cereal crops and grasses worldwide. However, little is know about its genome and genes involved in the biology and pathogenicity of the pathogen. We initiated the functional genomic research of the fungus by constructing a full-length cDNA and determined functions of the first group of genes by sequence comparison of cDNA clones to genes reported in other fungi. A full-length cDNA library, consisting of 42,240 clones with an average cDNA insert of 1.9 kb, was constructed using urediniospores of race PST-78 of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici. From 196 sequenced cDNA clones, we determined functions of 73 clones (37.2%). In addition, 36 clones (18.4%) had significant homology to hypothetical proteins, 37 clones (18.9%) had some homology to genes in other fungi, and the remaining 50 clones (25.5%) did not produce any hits. From the 73 clones with functions, we identified 51 different genes encoding protein products that are involved in amino acid metabolism, cell defense, cell cycle, cell signaling, cell structure and growth, energy cycle, lipid and nucleotide metabolism, protein modification, ribosomal protein complex, sugar metabolism, transcription factor, transport metabolism, and virulence/infection. The full-length cDNA library is useful in identifying functional genes of P. striiformis.

  19. Virtual Northern analysis of the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan H Hurowitz

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We applied the Virtual Northern technique to human brain mRNA to systematically measure human mRNA transcript lengths on a genome-wide scale.We used separation by gel electrophoresis followed by hybridization to cDNA microarrays to measure 8,774 mRNA transcript lengths representing at least 6,238 genes at high (>90% confidence. By comparing these transcript lengths to the Refseq and H-Invitational full-length cDNA databases, we found that nearly half of our measurements appeared to represent novel transcript variants. Comparison of length measurements determined by hybridization to different cDNAs derived from the same gene identified clones that potentially correspond to alternative transcript variants. We observed a close linear relationship between ORF and mRNA lengths in human mRNAs, identical in form to the relationship we had previously identified in yeast. Some functional classes of protein are encoded by mRNAs whose untranslated regions (UTRs tend to be longer or shorter than average; these functional classes were similar in both human and yeast.Human transcript diversity is extensive and largely unannotated. Our length dataset can be used as a new criterion for judging the completeness of cDNAs and annotating mRNA sequences. Similar relationships between the lengths of the UTRs in human and yeast mRNAs and the functions of the proteins they encode suggest that UTR sequences serve an important regulatory role among eukaryotes.

  20. TCOF1 gene encodes a putative nucleolar phosphoprotein that exhibits mutations in Treacher Collins Syndrome throughout its coding region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Carol A.; Chiang, Lydia C.; Paznekas, William A.; Sharma, Mridula; Musy, Maurice M.; Ashley, Jennifer A.; Lovett, Michael; Jabs, Ethylin W.

    1997-01-01

    Treacher Collins Syndrome (TCS) is the most common of the human mandibulofacial dysostosis disorders. Recently, a partial TCOF1 cDNA was identified and shown to contain mutations in TCS families. Here we present the entire exon/intron genomic structure and the complete coding sequence of TCOF1. TCOF1 encodes a low complexity protein of 1,411 amino acids, whose predicted protein structure reveals repeated motifs that mirror the organization of its exons. These motifs are shared with nucleolar trafficking proteins in other species and are predicted to be highly phosphorylated by casein kinase. Consistent with this, the full-length TCOF1 protein sequence also contains putative nuclear and nucleolar localization signals. Throughout the open reading frame, we detected an additional eight mutations in TCS families and several polymorphisms. We postulate that TCS results from defects in a nucleolar trafficking protein that is critically required during human craniofacial development. PMID:9096354

  1. TCOF1 gene encodes a putative nucleolar phosphoprotein that exhibits mutations in Treacher Collins Syndrome throughout its coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, C A; Chiang, L C; Paznekas, W A; Sharma, M; Musy, M M; Ashley, J A; Lovett, M; Jabs, E W

    1997-04-01

    Treacher Collins Syndrome (TCS) is the most common of the human mandibulofacial dysostosis disorders. Recently, a partial TCOF1 cDNA was identified and shown to contain mutations in TCS families. Here we present the entire exon/intron genomic structure and the complete coding sequence of TCOF1. TCOF1 encodes a low complexity protein of 1,411 amino acids, whose predicted protein structure reveals repeated motifs that mirror the organization of its exons. These motifs are shared with nucleolar trafficking proteins in other species and are predicted to be highly phosphorylated by casein kinase. Consistent with this, the full-length TCOF1 protein sequence also contains putative nuclear and nucleolar localization signals. Throughout the open reading frame, we detected an additional eight mutations in TCS families and several polymorphisms. We postulate that TCS results from defects in a nucleolar trafficking protein that is critically required during human craniofacial development.

  2. Molecular cloning of lupin leghemoglobin cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konieczny, A; Jensen, E O; Marcker, K A

    1987-01-01

    Poly(A)+ RNA isolated from root nodules of yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus, var. Ventus) has been used as a template for the construction of a cDNA library. The ds cDNA was synthesized and inserted into the Hind III site of plasmid pBR 322 using synthetic Hind III linkers. Clones containing sequences...... its nucleotide sequence was consistent with known amino acid sequence of lupin Lb II. The cloned lupin Lb cDNA hybridized to poly(A)+ RNA from nodules only, which is in accordance with the general concept, that leghemoglobin is expressed exclusively in nodules. Udgivelsesdato: 1987-null...

  3. Generation of longer 3' cDNA fragments from massively parallel signature sequencing tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Paula M; Chen, Jianjun; Carraro, Dirce M; Wang, San Ming; Camargo, Anamaria A

    2004-07-06

    Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) is a powerful technique for genome-wide gene expression analysis, which, similar to SAGE, relies on the production of short tags proximal to the 3'end of transcripts. A single MPSS experiment can generate over 10(7) tags, providing a 10-fold coverage of the transcripts expressed in a human cell. A significant fraction of MPSS tags cannot be assigned to known transcripts (orphan tags) and are likely to be derived from transcripts expressed at very low levels (approximately 1 copy per cell). In order to explore the potential of MPSS for the characterization of the human transcriptome, we have adapted the GLGI protocol (Generation of Longer cDNA fragments from SAGE tags for Gene Identification) to convert MPSS tags into their corresponding 3' cDNA fragments. GLGI-MPSS was applied to 83 orphan tags and 41 cDNA fragments were obtained. The analysis of these 41 fragments allowed the identification of novel transcripts, alternative tags generated from polymorphic and alternatively spliced transcripts, as well as the detection of artefactual MPSS tags. A systematic large-scale analysis of the genome by MPSS, in combination with the use of GLGI-MPSS protocol, will certainly provide a complementary approach to generate the complete catalog of human transcripts.

  4. Generation of longer 3′ cDNA fragments from massively parallel signature sequencing tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Paula M.; Chen, Jianjun; Carraro, Dirce M.; Wang, San Ming; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2004-01-01

    Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) is a powerful technique for genome-wide gene expression analysis, which, similar to SAGE, relies on the production of short tags proximal to the 3′end of transcripts. A single MPSS experiment can generate over 107 tags, providing a 10-fold coverage of the transcripts expressed in a human cell. A significant fraction of MPSS tags cannot be assigned to known transcripts (orphan tags) and are likely to be derived from transcripts expressed at very low levels (∼1 copy per cell). In order to explore the potential of MPSS for the characterization of the human transcriptome, we have adapted the GLGI protocol (Generation of Longer cDNA fragments from SAGE tags for Gene Identification) to convert MPSS tags into their corresponding 3′ cDNA fragments. GLGI-MPSS was applied to 83 orphan tags and 41 cDNA fragments were obtained. The analysis of these 41 fragments allowed the identification of novel transcripts, alternative tags generated from polymorphic and alternatively spliced transcripts, as well as the detection of artefactual MPSS tags. A systematic large-scale analysis of the genome by MPSS, in combination with the use of GLGI-MPSS protocol, will certainly provide a complementary approach to generate the complete catalog of human transcripts. PMID:15247327

  5. cDNA cloning of the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein, bamacan: a five domain structure including coiled-coil motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, R R; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    obtained cDNA clones encoding the entire bamacan core protein of Mr = 138 kD, which reveal a five domain, head-rod-tail configuration. The head and tail are potentially globular, while the central large rod probably forms coiled-coil structures, with one large central and several very short interruptions....../translation product from a full-length bamacan cDNA. The unusual structure of this proteoglycan is indicative of specific functional roles in basement membrane physiology, commensurate with its distinct expression in development and changes in disease models....

  6. Cancer-associated loss of TARSH gene expression in human primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Kunihiko; Shimada, Junichi; Uekawa, Natsuko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Maruyama, Mitsuo; Fushiki, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    We have previously identified mouse Tarsh as one of the cellular senescence-related genes and showed the loss of expression of TARSH mRNA in four human lung cancer cell lines. TARSH is a presumptive signal transduction molecule interacting with NESH, which is implicated to have some roles in lung cancer metastasis. The amplification of complete ORF-encoding TARSH cDNA was done with reverse transcription-PCR. Northern blotting was carried out using TARSH cDNA probes. To clarify the relationship between TARSH and lung cancer, we quantified TARSH mRNA expression in 15 human lung cancer cell lines and 32 primary non-small cell lung cancers. We first determined the complete ORF-encoding cDNA sequence which is expressed in the human lung. On the Northern hybridization analysis, TARSH was strongly expressed in the human lung. The expression of TARSH mRNA is remarkably downregulated in all the lung cancer cell lines examined. Furthermore, TARSH expression was significantly low in all of the tumor specimens when compared to the expression in corresponding non-neoplastic lung tissue specimens. The cancer-associated transcriptional inactivation of TARSH suggests that TARSH could be used as a biomarker for lung cancer development as well as a molecular adjunct for lung carcinogenesis in human.

  7. Molecular cloning and protein structure of a human blood group Rh polypeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherif-Zahar, B.; Bloy, C.; Le Van Kim, C.; Blanchard, D.; Bailly, P.; Hermand, P.; Salmon, C.; Cartron, J.P.; Colin, Y.

    1990-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding a human blood group Rh polypeptide were isolated from a human bone marrow cDNA library by using a polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA fragment encoding the known common N-terminal region of the Rh proteins. The entire primary structure of the Rh polypeptide has been deduced from the nucleotide sequence of a 1384-base-pair-long cDNA clone. Translation of the open reading frame indicates that the Rh protein is composed of 417 amino acids, including the initiator methionine, which is removed in the mature protein, lacks a cleavable N-terminal sequence, and has no consensus site for potential N-glycosylation. The predicted molecular mass of the protein is 45,500, while that estimated for the Rh protein analyzed in NaDodSO 4 /polyacrylamide gels is in the range of 30,000-32,000. These findings suggest either that the hydrophobic Rh protein behaves abnormally on NaDodSO 4 gels or that the Rh mRNA may encode a precursor protein, which is further matured by a proteolytic cleavage of the C-terminal region of the polypeptide. Hydropathy analysis and secondary structure predictions suggest the presence of 13 membrane-spanning domains, indicating that the Rh polypeptide is highly hydrophobic and deeply buried within the phospholipid bilayer. These results suggest that the expression of the Rh gene(s) might be restricted to tissues or cell lines expressing erythroid characters

  8. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries.

  9. Screening of cDNA libraries on glass slide microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Dave K; Crampton, Bridget G; Hein, Ingo; Vos, Wiesner

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative screening method was developed to evaluate the quality of cDNA libraries constructed by suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) or other enrichment techniques. The SSH technique was adapted to facilitate screening of the resultant library on a small number of glass slide microarrays. A simple data analysis pipeline named SSHscreen using "linear models for microarray data" (limma) functions in the R computing environment was developed to identify clones in the cDNA libraries that are significantly differentially expressed, and to determine if they were rare or abundant in the original treated sample. This approach facilitates the choice of clones from the cDNA library for further analysis, such as DNA sequencing, Northern blotting, RT-PCR, or detailed expression profiling using a custom cDNA microarray. Furthermore, this strategy is particularly useful for studies of nonmodel organisms for which there is little genome sequence information.

  10. Sequence of the human glycogen-associated regulatory subunit of type 1 protein phosphatase and analysis of its coding region and mRNA level in muscle from patients with NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y H; Hansen, L; Chen, Min

    1994-01-01

    . In previous studies, we have failed to reveal mutations in the coding regions of the muscle-specific glycogen synthase gene and the three genes that encode the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) as frequent causes of insulin resistance. Because the glycogen-associated regulatory subunit...... of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 G-subunit) plays a key role in the insulin stimulation of glycogen synthesis and the activity of PP1 is decreased in insulin-resistant subjects, we have now cloned the human G-subunit cDNA to search for abnormalities in the corresponding gene (designated PPP1R3 in the human...... genome nomenclature) in patients with NIDDM. The human cDNA was isolated from a skeletal muscle cDNA library and was found to encode a 126-kDa protein, which shows 73% amino acid identity to the rabbit PP1 G-subunit. The human G-subunit cDNA from 30 insulin-resistant NIDDM patients was analyzed...

  11. Cloning, expression, and chromosome mapping of human galectin-7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H; Flint, T

    1995-01-01

    The galectins are a family of beta-galactoside-binding proteins implicated in modulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Here we report the cloning and expression of a novel member of this family (galectin-7) that correspond to IEF (isoelectric focusing) 17 (12,700 Da; pI, 7.6) in the human...... keratinocyte protein data base, and that is strikingly down-regulated in SV40 transformed keratinocytes (K14). The cDNA was cloned from a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library using degenerated oligodeoxyribonucleotides back-translated from an IEF 17 peptide sequence. The protein encoded by the galectin-7 clone......-galactoside interaction are conserved. Galectin-7 was partially externalized to the medium by keratinocytes although it has no typical secretion signal peptide. Immunoblotting as well as immunofluorescence analysis of human tissues with a specific galectin-7 antibody revealed a narrow distribution of the protein which...

  12. Constructing and detecting a cDNA library for mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Zhao, YaE; Cheng, Juan; Yang, YuanJun; Li, Chen; Lu, ZhaoHui

    2015-10-01

    RNA extraction and construction of complementary DNA (cDNA) library for mites have been quite challenging due to difficulties in acquiring tiny living mites and breaking their hard chitin. The present study is to explore a better method to construct cDNA library for mites that will lay the foundation on transcriptome and molecular pathogenesis research. We selected Psoroptes cuniculi as an experimental subject and took the following steps to construct and verify cDNA library. First, we combined liquid nitrogen grinding with TRIzol for total RNA extraction. Then, switching mechanism at 5' end of the RNA transcript (SMART) technique was used to construct full-length cDNA library. To evaluate the quality of cDNA library, the library titer and recombination rate were calculated. The reliability of cDNA library was detected by sequencing and analyzing positive clones and genes amplified by specific primers. The results showed that the RNA concentration was 836 ng/μl and the absorbance ratio at 260/280 nm was 1.82. The library titer was 5.31 × 10(5) plaque-forming unit (PFU)/ml and the recombination rate was 98.21%, indicating that the library was of good quality. In the 33 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of P. cuniculi, two clones of 1656 and 1658 bp were almost identical with only three variable sites detected, which had an identity of 99.63% with that of Psoroptes ovis, indicating that the cDNA library was reliable. Further detection by specific primers demonstrated that the 553-bp Pso c II gene sequences of P. cuniculi had an identity of 98.56% with those of P. ovis, confirming that the cDNA library was not only reliable but also feasible.

  13. Construction and characterization of a normalized cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, M B; Bonaldo, M F; Jelene, P; Su, L; Lawton, L; Efstratiadis, A

    1994-09-27

    We have developed a simple procedure based on reassociation kinetics that can reduce effectively the high variation in abundance among the clones of a cDNA library that represent individual mRNA species. For this normalization, we used as a model system a library of human infant brain cDNAs that were cloned directionally into a phagemid vector and, thus, could be easily converted into single-stranded circles. After controlled primer extension to synthesize a short complementary strand on each circular template, melting and reannealing of the partial duplexes at relatively low C0t, and hydroxyapatite column chromatography, unreassociated circles were recovered from the flow through fraction and electroporated into bacteria, to propagate a normalized library without a requirement for subcloning steps. An evaluation of the extent of normalization has indicated that, from an extreme range of abundance of 4 orders of magnitude in the original library, the frequency of occurrence of any clone examined in the normalized library was brought within the narrow range of only 1 order of magnitude.

  14. A downstream polyadenylation element in human papillomavirus type 16 L2 encodes multiple GGG motifs and interacts with hnRNP H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Daniel; Fay, Joanna; Lambkin, Helen; Schwartz, Stefan

    2005-07-01

    Production of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) virus particles is totally dependent on the differentiation-dependent induction of viral L1 and L2 late gene expression. The early polyadenylation signal in HPV-16 plays a major role in the switch from the early to the late, productive stage of the viral life cycle. Here, we show that the L2 coding region of HPV-16 contains RNA elements that are necessary for polyadenylation at the early polyadenylation signal. Consecutive mutations in six GGG motifs located 174 nucleotides downstream of the polyadenylation signal resulted in a gradual decrease in polyadenylation at the early polyadenylation signal. This caused read-through into the late region, followed by production of the late mRNAs encoding L1 and L2. Binding of hnRNP H to the various triple-G mutants correlated with functional activity of the HPV-16 early polyadenylation signal. In addition, the polyadenylation factor CStF-64 was also found to interact specifically with the region in L2 located 174 nucleotides downstream of the early polyadenylation signal. Staining of cervix epithelium with anti-hnRNP H-specific antiserum revealed high expression levels of hnRNP H in the lower layers of cervical epithelium and a loss of hnRNP H production in the superficial layers, supporting a model in which a differentiation-dependent down regulation of hnRNP H causes a decrease in HPV-16 early polyadenylation and an induction of late gene expression.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded latent membrane protein 1 impairs G2 checkpoint in human nasopharyngeal epithelial cells through defective Chk1 activation.

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    Wen Deng

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common cancer in Southeast Asia, particularly in southern regions of China. EBV infection is closely associated with NPC and has long been postulated to play an etiological role in the development of NPC. However, the role of EBV in malignant transformation of nasopharyngeal epithelial cells remains enigmatic. The current hypothesis of NPC development is that premalignant nasopharyngeal epithelial cells harboring genetic alterations support EBV infection and expression of EBV genes induces further genomic instability to facilitate the development of NPC. The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 is a well-documented EBV-encoded oncogene. The involvement of LMP1 in human epithelial malignancies has been implicated, but the mechanisms of oncogenic actions of LMP1, particularly in nasopharyngeal cells, are unclear. Here we observed that LMP1 expression in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells impaired G2 checkpoint, leading to formation of unrepaired chromatid breaks in metaphases after γ-ray irradiation. We further found that defective Chk1 activation was involved in the induction of G2 checkpoint defect in LMP1-expressing nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Impairment of G2 checkpoint could result in loss of the acentrically broken chromatids and propagation of broken centric chromatids in daughter cells exiting mitosis, which facilitates chromosome instability. Our findings suggest that LMP1 expression facilitates genomic instability in cells under genotoxic stress. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved in LMP1-induced genomic instability in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells will shed lights on the understanding of role of EBV infection in NPC development.

  16. Real-Time Imaging of the Bacillithiol Redox Potential in the Human Pathogen Staphylococcus aureus Using a Genetically Encoded Bacilliredoxin-Fused Redox Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Vu Van; Harms, Manuela; Müller, Marret; Huyen, Nguyen Thi Thu; Hamilton, Chris J; Hochgräfe, Falko; Pané-Farré, Jan; Antelmann, Haike

    2017-05-20

    Bacillithiol (BSH) is utilized as a major thiol-redox buffer in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Under oxidative stress, BSH forms mixed disulfides with proteins, termed as S-bacillithiolation, which can be reversed by bacilliredoxins (Brx). In eukaryotes, glutaredoxin-fused roGFP2 biosensors have been applied for dynamic live imaging of the glutathione redox potential. Here, we have constructed a genetically encoded bacilliredoxin-fused redox biosensor (Brx-roGFP2) to monitor dynamic changes in the BSH redox potential in S. aureus. The Brx-roGFP2 biosensor showed a specific and rapid response to low levels of bacillithiol disulfide (BSSB) in vitro that required the active-site Cys of Brx. Dynamic live imaging in two methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) USA300 and COL strains revealed fast and dynamic responses of the Brx-roGFP2 biosensor under hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) stress and constitutive oxidation of the probe in different BSH-deficient mutants. Furthermore, we found that the Brx-roGFP2 expression level and the dynamic range are higher in S. aureus COL compared with the USA300 strain. In phagocytosis assays with THP-1 macrophages, the biosensor was 87% oxidized in S. aureus COL. However, no changes in the BSH redox potential were measured after treatment with different antibiotics classes, indicating that antibiotics do not cause oxidative stress in S. aureus. Conclusion and Innovation: This Brx-roGFP2 biosensor catalyzes specific equilibration between the BSH and roGFP2 redox couples and can be applied for dynamic live imaging of redox changes in S. aureus and other BSH-producing Firmicutes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 835-848.

  17. The TFG-TEC fusion gene created by the t(3;9) translocation in human extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas encodes a more potent transcriptional activator than TEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bobae; Jun, Hee Jung; Kim, Ah-young; Kim, Sol; Choi, JeeHyun; Kim, Jungho

    2012-08-01

    The t(3;9)(q11-q12;q22) translocation associated with human extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas results in a chimeric molecule in which the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the TFG (TRK-fused gene) is fused to the TEC (Translocated in Extraskeletal Chondrosarcoma) gene. Little is known about the biological function of TFG-TEC. Because the NTDs of TFG-TEC and TEC are structurally different, and the TFG itself is a cytoplasmic protein, the functional consequences of this fusion in extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas were examined. The results showed that the chimeric gene encoded a nuclear protein that bound DNA with the same sequence specificity as the parental TEC protein. Comparison of the transactivation properties of TFG-TEC and TEC indicated that the former has higher transactivation activity for a known target reporter containing TEC-binding sites. Additional reporter assays for TFG (NTD) showed that the TGF (NTD) of TFG-TEC induced a 12-fold increase in the activation of luciferase from a reporter plasmid containing GAL4 binding sites when fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4, indicating that the TFG (NTD) of the TFG-TEC protein has intrinsic transcriptional activation properties. Finally, deletion analysis of the functional domains of TFG (NTD) indicated that the PB1 (Phox and Bem1p) and SPYGQ-rich region of TFG (NTD) were capable of activating transcription and that full integrity of TFG (NTD) was necessary for full transactivation. These results suggest that the oncogenic effect of the t(3;9) translocation may be due to the TFG-TEC chimeric protein and that fusion of the TFG (NTD) to the TEC protein produces a gain-of-function chimeric product.

  18. The ENCODE project: missteps overshadowing a success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Sean R

    2013-04-08

    Two clichés of science journalism have now played out around the ENCODE project. ENCODE's publicity first presented a misleading "all the textbooks are wrong" narrative about noncoding human DNA. Now several critiques of ENCODE's narrative have been published, and one was so vitriolic that it fueled "undignified academic squabble" stories that focused on tone more than substance. Neither story line does justice to our actual understanding of genomes, to ENCODE's results, or to the role of big science in biology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High-Throughput Plasmid cDNA Library Screening

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    Wan, Kenneth H.; Yu, Charles; George, Reed A.; Carlson, JosephW.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Svirskas, Robert; Stapleton, Mark; Celniker, SusanE.

    2006-05-24

    Libraries of cDNA clones are valuable resources foranalysing the expression, structure, and regulation of genes, as well asfor studying protein functions and interactions. Full-length cDNA clonesprovide information about intron and exon structures, splice junctionsand 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). Open reading frames (ORFs)derived from cDNA clones can be used to generate constructs allowingexpression of native proteins and N- or C-terminally tagged proteins.Thus, obtaining full-length cDNA clones and sequences for most or allgenes in an organism is critical for understanding genome functions.Expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing samples cDNA libraries at random,which is most useful at the beginning of large-scale screening projects.However, as projects progress towards completion, the probability ofidentifying unique cDNAs via EST sequencing diminishes, resulting in poorrecovery of rare transcripts. We describe an adapted, high-throughputprotocol intended for recovery of specific, full-length clones fromplasmid cDNA libraries in five days.

  20. Identification of breast cancer-restricted antigens by antibody screening of SKBR3 cDNA library using a preselected patient's serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forti, Stefania; Scanlan, Matthew J; Invernizzi, Annamaria; Castiglioni, Fabio; Pupa, Sandro; Agresti, Roberto; Fontanelli, Rosanna; Morelli, Daniele; Old, Lloyd J; Pupa, Serenella M; Ménard, Sylvie

    2002-06-01

    Screening of a breast cancer cDNA library from SKBR3 human breast cancer cells by SEREX (serological analysis of cDNA expression library) using a preselected serum from a breast cancer patient revealed 13 genes, two of which, INT-MI-1 and INT-MI-2, encode novel gene products, while the remaining 11 genes and their products are identical with or highly homologous to known GenBank entries. Immunoscreening of the 13 clones using 20 allogeneic sera from breast cancer patients and 20 samples from age- and gender-matched healthy donors showed that lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A), lactate dehydrogenase-B (LDH-B), fibulin-1, and thyroid hormone-binding protein (THBP) were recognized principally by the breast cancer patient sera, indicating the immunogenicity of these molecules in vivo. The other antigens were similarly recognized by normal and patients sera, and thus not tumor-restricted immunologically. RT-PCR analysis revealed strong expression of fibulin-1 in tumor cell lines and surgical specimen whereas in the same experimental conditions, normal tissues scored negative. Also THBP expression was found in various tumors whereas in normal tissues, its expression is restricted to the testis and, at lower levels, in ovary, liver, and spleen. In contrast, LDH-A and LDH-B were ubiquitously expressed in normal and tumor tissues, with LDH-B levels considerably lower and heterogeneous in normal samples compared to those expressed in tumor cell lines. The differential expression of fibulin-1 between the normal tissues and breast carcinoma cell lines (5/6) and surgical specimens (5/6) suggests the possible involvement of the overexpression of this extracellular matrix-associated glycoprotein in the pathogenesis of this neoplasm.