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Sample records for cdms ii results

  1. Global interpretation of direct Dark Matter searches after CDMS-II results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2009-12-01

    We perform a global fit to data from Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiments, including the recent CDMS-II results. We discuss possible interpretations of the DAMA annual modulation signal in terms of spin-independent and spin-dependent DM-nucleus interactions, both for elastic and inelastic scattering. We find that for the spin-dependent inelastic scattering off protons a good fit to all data is obtained. We present a simple toy model realizing such a scenario. In all the remaining cases the DAMA allowed regions are disfavored by other experiments or suffer from severe fine tuning of DM parameters with respect to the galactic escape velocity. Finally, we also entertain the possibility that the two events observed in CDMS-II are an actual signal of elastic DM scattering, and we compare the resulting CDMS-II allowed regions to the exclusion limits from other experiments.

  2. Results from a Low-Energy Analysis of the CDMS II Germanium Data

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Z; Arrenberg, S; Bailey, C N; Balakishiyeva, D; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cooley, J; Cushman, P; Daal, M; DeJongh, F; Dragowsky, M R; Duong, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fritts, M; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hertel, S A; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Kamaev, O; Kiveni, M; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moore, D; Nelson, H; Ogburn, R W; Phipps, A; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Ramberg, E; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tarka, M; Wikus, P; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2010-01-01

    We report results from a reanalysis of data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Data taken between October 2006 and September 2008 using eight germanium detectors are reanalyzed with a lowered, 2 keV recoil-energy threshold, to give increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below ~10 GeV/c^2. This analysis provides stronger constraints than previous CDMS II results for WIMP masses below 9 GeV/c^2 and excludes parameter space associated with possible low-mass WIMP signals from the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  3. Silicon Detector Results from the First Five-Tower Run of CDMS II

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Arrenberg, S; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Borgland, A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Dejongh, F; Di Stefano, P C F; Silva, E Do Couto E; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fox, J; Fritts, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, R H; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kim, P; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Lopez-Asamar, E; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nadeau, P; Nelson, R H; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Sundqvist, K M; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhan, J

    2013-01-01

    We report results of a search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with the Si detectors of the CDMS II experiment. This report describes a blind analysis of the first data taken with CDMS II's full complement of detectors in 2006-2007. Results from this exposure using the Ge detectors have already been presented. We observed no candidate WIMP-scattering events in an exposure of 55.9 kg-days before analysis cuts. These data set an upper limit of 1.7x10-41 cm2 on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of a 10 GeV/c2 WIMP; this limit improves to 8.3x10-42 cm2 in combination with previous Si data from this installation. These data exclude parameter space for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering that is relevant to recent searches for low-mass WIMPs.

  4. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) Experiment: First Results from the Soudan Mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Clarence Leeder [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2004-09-01

    There is an abundance of evidence that the majority of the mass of the universe is in the form of non-baryonic non-luminous matter that was non-relativistic at the time when matter began to dominate the energy density. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, are attractive cold dark matter candidates because they would have a relic abundance today of ~0.1 which is consistent with precision cosmological measurements. WIMPs are also well motivated theoretically. Many minimal supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model have WIMPs in the form of the lightest supersymmetric partner, typically taken to be the neutralino. The CDMS II experiment searches for WIMPs via their elastic scattering off of nuclei. The experiment uses Ge and Si ZIP detectors, operated at <50 mK, which simultaneously measure the ionization and athermal phonons produced by the scattering of an external particle. The dominant background for the experiment comes from electromagnetic interactions taking place very close to the detector surface. Analysis of the phonon signal from these interactions makes it possible to discriminate them from interactions caused by WIMPs. This thesis presents the details of an important aspect of the phonon pulse shape analysis known as the ''Lookup Table Correction''. The Lookup Table Correction is a position dependent calibration of the ZIP phonon response which improves the rejection of events scattering near the detector surface. The CDMS collaboration has recently commissioned its experimental installation at the Soudan Mine. This thesis presents an analysis of the data from the first WIMP search at the Soudan Mine. The results of this analysis set the world's lowest exclusion limit making the CDMS II experiment at Soudan the most sensitive WIMP search to this date.

  5. Dark Matter Search Results Using the Silicon Detectors of CDMS II

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Arrenberg, S; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Dejongh, F; Silva, E Do Couto E; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fox, J; Fritts, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, R H; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kim, P; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nadeau, P; Nelson, R H; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Sundqvist, K M; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2013-01-01

    We report results of a search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with the silicon (Si) detectors of the CDMS II experiment. A blind analysis of data from eight Si detectors, with a total raw exposure of 140.2 kg-days, revealed three WIMP-candidate events with a final surface-event background estimate of 0.41 (-0.08 +0.20)(stat.) (-0.24 +0.28) (syst.). Other known backgrounds from neutrons and 206Pb are limited to < 0.13 and < 0.08 events at the 90% confidence level, respectively. These data place a 90% upper confidence limit on the WIMP-nucleon cross section of 2.4E-41 cm^2 at a WIMP mass of 10 GeV/c^2. Simulations indicate a 5.4% probability that a statistical fluctuation of the known backgrounds would produce three or more events in the signal region. A profile likelihood ratio test that includes the measured recoil energies of the three events gives a 0.19% probability for the known-background-only hypothesis when tested against the alternative WIMP+background hypothesis. The highest li...

  6. The CDMS II data acquisition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, D.A.; /Fermilab; Burke, S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Cooley, J.; /Southern Methodist U.; Crisler, M.; /Fermilab; Cushman, P.; /Minnesota U.; DeJongh, F.; /Fermilab; Duong, L.; /Minnesota U.; Ferril, R.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Golwala, S.R.; /Caltech; Hall, J.; /Fermilab; Holmgren, D.; /Fermilab /Texas A-M

    2011-01-01

    The Data Acquisition System for the CDMS II dark matter experiment was designed and built when the experiment moved to its new underground installation at the Soudan Lab. The combination of remote operation and increased data load necessitated a completely new design. Elements of the original LabView system remained as stand-alone diagnostic programs, but the main data processing moved to a VME-based system with custom electronics for signal conditioning, trigger formation and buffering. The data rate was increased 100-fold and the automated cryogenic system was linked to the data acquisition. A modular server framework with associated user interfaces was implemented in Java to allow control and monitoring of the entire experiment remotely.

  7. Advancing the Search for Dark Matter: from CDMS II to SuperCDMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Scott A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    An overwhelming proportion of the universe (83% by mass) is composed of particles we know next to nothing about. Detecting these dark matter particles directly, through hypothesized weak-force-mediated recoils with nuclear targets here on earth, could shed light on what these particles are, how they relate to the standard model, and how the standard model ts within a more fundamental understanding. This thesis describes two such experimental eorts: CDMS II (2007-2009) and SuperCDMS Soudan (ongoing). The general abilities and sensitivities of both experiments are laid out, placing a special emphasis on the detector technology, and how this technology has evolved from the rst to the second experiment. Some topics on which I spent signicant eorts are described here only in overview (in particular the details of the CDMS II analysis, which has been laid out many times before), and some topics which are not described elsewhere are given a somewhat deeper treatment. In particular, this thesis is hopefully a good reference for those interested in the annual modulation limits placed on the low-energy portion of the CDMS II exposure, the design of the detectors for SuperCDMS Soudan, and an overview of the extremely informative data these detectors produce. It is an exciting time. The technology I've had the honor to work on the past few years provides a wealth of information about each event, more so than any other direct detection experiment, and we are still learning how to optimally use all this information. Initial tests from the surface and now underground suggest this technology has the background rejection abilities necessary for a planned 200kg experiment or even ton-scale experiment, putting us on the threshold of probing parameter space orders of magnitude from where the eld currently stands.

  8. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fritts, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Graham, M; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nelson, R H; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS~II) experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from $^{210}$Pb decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. We confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

  9. Search for inelastic dark matter with the CDMS II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Z; Arrenberg, S; Bailey, C N; Balakishiyeva, D; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cooley, J; Silva, E do Couto e; Cushman, P; Daal, M; DeJongh, F; Di Stefano, P; Dragowsky, M R; Duong, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fox, J; Fritts, M; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hertel, S A; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Kamaev, O; Kiveni, M; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Liu, S; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moore, D; Nelson, H; Ogburn, R W; Phipps, A; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Ramberg, E; Rau, W; Razeti, M; Reisetter, A; Resch, R; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tarka, M; Wikus, P; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2010-01-01

    Results are presented from a reanalysis of the entire five-tower data set acquired with the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, with an exposure of 969 kg-days. The analysis window was extended to a recoil energy of 150 keV, and an improved surface-event background-rejection cut was defined to increase the sensitivity of the experiment to the inelastic dark matter (IDM) model. Three dark matter candidates were found between 25 keV and 150 keV. The probability to observe three or more background events in this energy range is 11%. Due to the occurrence of these events the constraints on the IDM parameter space are slightly less stringent than those from our previous analysis, which used a narrower energy window of 10-100 keV.

  10. Search for lightly ionizing particles using CDMS-II data and fabrication of CDMS detectors with improved homogeneity in properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e/3. While this is a well established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge quantization phenomenon is lacking. On the other hand, there exist numerous theoretical models that naturally allow for existence of particles with fractional electromagnetic charge. These particles, if existing, hint towards existence of physics beyond the standard model. Multiple high energy, optical, cosmological and astrophysical considerations restrict the allowable mass-charge parameter space for these fractional charges. Still, a huge unexplored region remains. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II), located at Soudan mines in northern Minnesota, employs germanium and silicon crystals to perform direct searches for a leading candidate to dark matter called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Alternately, the low detection threshold allows search for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent with corresponding \\signatures" resulting from the passage of a fractionally charged particle. In this dissertation, the CDMS-II data is analyzed to search for LIPs, with an expected background of 0.078 0.078 events. No candidate events are observed, allowing exclusion of new parameter space for charges between e/6 and e/200.

  11. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Thomas James [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed e ective ducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection su cient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125 - 128 were analyzed for the rst time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel \\mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have signi cant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them di cult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent ducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for mid- to low

  12. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallows, Scott Mathew [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for \\background- free" operation of CDMS II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space.

  13. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-10-31

    CDMS II data from the five-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to ~5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/c2. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and six events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of 1.8×10-44 and 1.18×10-41 at 90% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/c2 WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/c2 WIMPs.

  14. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Asai, M; Balakishiyeva, D; Barker, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Calkins, R; Cerdeño, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jardin, D; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Lukens, P; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Toback, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wilson, J S; Wright, D H; Yang, X; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    CDMS II data from the 5-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector WIMP-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to $\\sim$5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/$c^2$. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and 6 events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of $1.8 \\times 10^{-44}$ and $1.18 \\times 10 ^{-41}$ cm$^2$ at 90\\% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/$c^2$ WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/$c^2$ WIMPs.

  15. Sterile neutrino dark matter, CDMS-II and a light Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Queiroz, F S; da Silva, P S Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    We add a singlet right handed neutrino plus a charged and a neutral singlet scalars to the standard model. This extension includes a discrete symmetry such that we obtain a heavy sterile neutrino which couples only to the electron and the new scalars. In this sense the singlet neutrino does not mix with ordinary ones and thus has no effect on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. However, such sterile neutrino can be in equilibrium with electroweak particles in the early Universe due to its couplings to electrons and also because the Higgs boson mixes with the singlet scalars. We obtain that the sterile neutrino constitutes a dark matter candidate and analyze its direct detection in the light of current experiments. Our results show that if such a sterile neutrino is realized in nature, and CDMS-II experiment confirms its positive signal, dark matter demands a rather light Higgs boson with new Physics at some 500 GeV scale.

  16. Comparing the Predictions of two Mixed Neutralino Dark Matter Models with the Recent CDMS II Candidate Events

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, D P

    2010-01-01

    We consider two optimally mixed neutralino dark matter models, based on nonuniversal gaugino masses, which were recently proposed by us to achieve WMAP compatible relic density over a large part of the MSSM parameter space. We compare the resulting predictions for the spin-independent DM scattering cross-section with the recent CDMS II data, assuming the possibility of the two reported candidate events being signal events. For one model the predicted cross-section agrees with the putative signal over a small part of the parameter space, while for the other the agreement holds over the entire WMAP compatible parameter space of the model.

  17. Background Characterization and Discrimination in the Final Analysis of the CDMS II Phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritts, Matthew C. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is designed to detectWeakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in the Milky Way halo. The phase known as CDMS II was performed in the Soudan Underground Laboratory. The final set of CDMS II data, collected in 2007-8 and referred to as Runs 125-8, represents the largest exposure to date for the experiment. We seek collisions between WIMPs and atomic nuclei in disk-shaped germanium and silicon detectors. A key design feature is to keep the rate of collisions from known particles producing WIMP-like signals very small. The largest category of such background is interactions with electrons in the detectors that occur very close to one of the faces of the detector. The next largest category is collisions between energetic neutrons that bypass the experimental shielding and nuclei in the detectors. Analytical efforts to discriminate these backgrounds and to estimate the rate at which such discrimination fails have been refined and improved throughout each phase of CDMS. Next-generation detectors for future phases of CDMS require testing at cryogenic test facilities. One such facility was developed at the University of Minnesota in 2007 and has been used continuously since then to test detectors for the next phase of the experiment, known as SuperCDMS.

  18. Search for annual modulation in low-energy CDMS-II data

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Z; Anderson, A J; Arrenberg, S; Bailey, C N; Balakishiyeva, D; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cooley, J; Cushman, P; Daal, M; DeJongh, F; Di Stefano, P C F; Dragowsky, M R; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fox, J; Fritts, M; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Kamaev, O; Kiveni, M; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Liu, S; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moore, D C; Nelson, H; Ogburn, R W; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D; Serfass, B; Speller, D; Sundqvist, K M; Tarka, M; Thakur, R B; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2012-01-01

    We report limits on annual modulation of the low-energy event rate from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Such a modulation could be produced by interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses ~10 GeV/c^2. We find no evidence for annual modulation in the event rate of veto-anticoincident single-detector interactions consistent with nuclear recoils, and constrain the magnitude of any modulation to 98% confidence. For events consistent with electron recoils, no significant modulation is observed for either single- or multiple-detector interactions in the 3.0-7.4 keVee range.

  19. A Search for WIMP Dark Matter Using an Optimized Chi-square Technique on the Final Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment (CDMS II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manungu Kiveni, Joseph [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This dissertation describes the results of a WIMP search using CDMS II data sets accumulated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Results from the original analysis of these data were published in 2009; two events were observed in the signal region with an expected leakage of 0.9 events. Further investigation revealed an issue with the ionization-pulse reconstruction algorithm leading to a software upgrade and a subsequent reanalysis of the data. As part of the reanalysis, I performed an advanced discrimination technique to better distinguish (potential) signal events from backgrounds using a 5-dimensional chi-square method. This dataanalysis technique combines the event information recorded for each WIMP-search event to derive a backgrounddiscrimination parameter capable of reducing the expected background to less than one event, while maintaining high efficiency for signal events. Furthermore, optimizing the cut positions of this 5-dimensional chi-square parameter for the 14 viable germanium detectors yields an improved expected sensitivity to WIMP interactions relative to previous CDMS results. This dissertation describes my improved (and optimized) discrimination technique and the results obtained from a blind application to the reanalyzed CDMS II WIMP-search data.

  20. A dark-matter search using the final CDMS II dataset and a novel detector of surface radiocontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Zeeshan [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence from galaxies, galaxy clusters, and cosmological scales suggests that ~85% of the matter of our universe is invisible. The missing matter, or "dark matter" is likely composed of non-relativistic, non-baryonic particles, which have very rare interactions with baryonic matter and with one another. Among dark matter candidates, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are particularly well motivated. In the early universe, thermally produced particles with weak-scale mass and interactions would `freeze out’ at the correct density to be dark matter today. Extensions to the Standard Model of particle physics, such as Supersymmetry, which solve gauge hierarchy and coupling unification problems, naturally provide such particles. Interactions of WIMPs with baryons are expected to be rare, but might be detectable in low-noise detectors. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment uses ionization- and phonon- sensitive germanium particle detectors to search for such interactions. CDMS detectors are operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, within a shielded environment to lower cosmogenic and radioactive background. The combination of phonon and ionization signatures from the detectors provides excellent residual-background rejection. This dissertation presents improved techniques for phonon calibration of CDMS II detectors and the analysis of the final CDMS II dataset with 612 kg-days of exposure. We set a limit of 3.8x10$^{-}$44 cm$^{2}$ on WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross section for a WIMP mass of 70 GeV/c$^{2}$. At the time this analysis was published, these data presented the most stringent limits on WIMP scattering for WIMP masses over 42 GeV/c$^{2}$, ruling out previously unexplored parameter space. Next-generation rare-event searches such as SuperCDMS, COUPP, and CLEAN will be limited in sensitivity, unless they achieve stringent control of the surface radioactive contamination on their detectors. Low

  1. Supersymmetric model for dark matter and baryogenesis motivated by the recent CDMS result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Dutta, Bhaskar; Mohapatra, Rabindra N; Sinha, Kuver

    2013-08-02

    We discuss a supersymmetric model for cogenesis of dark and baryonic matter where the dark matter (DM) has mass in the 8-10 GeV range as indicated by several direct detection searches, including most recently the CDMS experiment with the desired cross section. The DM candidate is a real scalar field. Two key distinguishing features of the model are the following: (i) in contrast with the conventional weakly interacting massive particle dark matter scenarios where thermal freeze-out is responsible for the observed relic density, our model uses nonthermal production of dark matter after reheating of the Universe caused by moduli decay at temperatures below the QCD phase transition, a feature which alleviates the relic overabundance problem caused by small annihilation cross section of light DM particles and (ii) baryogenesis occurs also at similar low temperatures from the decay of TeV scale mediator particles arising from moduli decay. A possible test of this model is the existence of colored particles with TeV masses accessible at the LHC.

  2. Effective scalar four-fermion interaction for Ge-phobic exothermic dark matter and the CDMS-II Silicon excess

    CERN Document Server

    Scopel, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We discuss within the framework of effective four-fermion scalar interaction the phenomenology of a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) Dirac Dark Matter candidate which is exothermic (i.e. is metastable and interacts with nuclear targets down-scattering to a lower-mass state) and $Ge$-phobic (i.e. whose couplings to quarks violate isospin symmetry leading to a suppression of its cross section off Germanium targets). We discuss the specific example of the CDMS-II Silicon three-candidate effect showing that a region of the parameter space of the model exists where WIMP scatterings can explain the excess in compliance with other experimental constraints, while at the same time the Dark Matter particle can have a thermal relic density compatible with observation. In this scenario the metastable state $\\chi$ and the lowest-mass one $\\chi^{\\prime}$ have approximately the same density in the present Universe and in our Galaxy, but direct detection experiments are only sensitive to the down-scatters of $\\chi$...

  3. Validation of Phonon Physics in the CDMS Detector Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, K A; Anderson, A J; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Cabrera, B; Cherry, M; Silva, E Do Couto E; Cushman, P; Doughty, T; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Kim, P; Mirabolfathi, N; Novak, L; Partridge, R; Pyle, M; Reisetter, A; Resch, R; Sadoulet, B; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tomada, A

    2011-01-01

    The SuperCDMS collaboration is a dark matter search effort aimed at detecting the scattering of WIMP dark matter from nuclei in cryogenic germanium targets. The CDMS Detector Monte Carlo (CDMS-DMC) is a simulation tool aimed at achieving a deeper understanding of the performance of the SuperCDMS detectors and aiding the dark matter search analysis. We present results from validation of the phonon physics described in the CDMS-DMC and outline work towards utilizing it in future WIMP search analyses.

  4. Time Evolution of Electric Fields in CDMS Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Leman, S W; Brink, P L; Cabrera, B; Chagani, H; Cherry, M; Cushman, P; Silva, E Do Couto E; Doughty, T; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Pyle, M; Reisetter, A; Resch, R; Sadoulet, B; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tomada, A; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2011-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) utilizes large mass, 3" diameter x 1" thick target masses as particle detectors. The target is instrumented with both phonon and ionization sensors, the later providing a $\\sim$1 V cm$^{-1}$ electric field in the detector bulk. Cumulative radiation exposure which creates $\\sim 200\\times 10^6$ electron-hole pairs is sufficient to produce a comparable reverse field in the detector thereby degrading the ionization channel performance. To study this, the existing CDMS detector Monte Carlo has been modified to allow for an event by event evolution of the bulk electric field, in three spatial dimensions. Our most resent results and interpretation are discussed.

  5. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogburn, IV, Reuben Walter [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have

  6. A Search for WIMPs with the First Five-Tower Data from CDMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Z; Arrenberg, S; Attisha, M J; Bailey, C N; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Beaty, J; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Burke, S; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cooley, J; Cushman, P; De Jongh, F; Dragowsky, M R; Duong, L; Emes, J; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fritts, M; Gaitskell, R J; Golwala, S R; Grant, D R; Hall, J; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hertel, S; Holmgren, D; Huber, M E; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Nelson, H; Novak, L; Ogburn, R W; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Ramberg, E; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schmitt, R; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Sirois, A; Sundqvist, K M; Tarka, M; Tomada, A; Wang, G; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A

    2008-01-01

    We report first results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment running with its full complement of 30 cryogenic particle detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. This report is based on the analysis of data from 15 Ge detectors (3.75 kg) acquired between October 2006 and July 2007 for an effective exposure of 121.3 kg-d (averaged over recoil energies 10--100 keV, weighted for a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) mass of 60 GeV/c^2). A blind analysis, incorporating improved techniques for rejecting surface events and estimating background leakage into the signal region, resulted in zero observed events. This analysis sets an upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 6.6x10^{-44} cm^2 (4.6x10^{-44} cm^2 when combined with previous CDMS data) at the 90% confidence level for a WIMP mass of 60 GeV/c^2. By excluding new parameter space for WIMP dark matter with masses above 42 GeV/c^2 this work significantly restricts some of the favored supersymmetric mode...

  7. Analysis of the low-energy electron-recoil spectrum of the CDMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Z; Arrenberg, S; Bailey, C N; Balakishiyeva, D; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Beaty, J; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cooley, J; Cushman, P; De Jongh, F; Dragowsky, M R; Duong, L; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fritts, M; Golwala, S R; Grant, D R; Hall, J; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hertel, S; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Kamaev, O; Kiveni, M; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Moore, D; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Nelson, H; Ogburn, R W; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Ramberg, E; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Wang, G; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A

    2009-01-01

    We report on the analysis of the low-energy electron-recoil spectrum from the CDMS II experiment using data with an exposure of 443.2 kg-days. The analysis provides details on the observed counting rate and possible background sources in the energy range of 2 - 8.5 keV. We find no significant excess in the counting rate above background, and compare this observation to the recent DAMA results. In the framework of a conversion of a dark matter particle into electromagnetic energy, our 90% confidence level upper limit of 0.246 events/kg/day at 3.15 keV is lower than the total rate above background observed by DAMA by 8.9$\\sigma$. In absence of any specific particle physics model to provide the scaling in cross section between NaI and Ge, we assume a Z^2 scaling. With this assumption the observed rate in DAMA differs from the upper limit in CDMS by 6.8$\\sigma$. Under the conservative assumption that the modulation amplitude is 6% of the total rate we obtain upper limits on the modulation amplitude a factor of ~2...

  8. Prototyping an Active Neutron Veto for SuperCDMS

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  9. Prototyping an Active Neutron Veto for SuperCDMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calkins, Robert [Southern Methodist U.; Loer, Ben [Fermilab

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  10. Prototyping an active neutron veto for SuperCDMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-01

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  11. Geneva University: Dark matter Search with the CDMS experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Wednesday 21 September 2011 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium “ Dark matter Search with the CDMS experiment ” Par Dr. Sebastian Arrenberg, Université de Zürich The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment (CDMS) employs a total of 30 germanium and silicon detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their scattering from the target nuclei. Previous CDMS results, released in December 2009, set the world leading limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section above WIMP masses of ~50 GeV/c2 assuming elastic scattering.  In a subsequent analysis we investigated the inelastic dark matter scenario which was proposed to reconcile the disagreement between the results of DAMA/LIBRA and other existing dark matter searc...

  12. Testing and Characterization of SuperCDMS Dark Matter Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shank, Benjamin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) relies on collection of phonons and charge carriers in semiconductors held at tens of milliKelvin as handles for detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). This thesis begins with a brief overview of the direct dark matter search (Chapter 1) and SuperCDMS detectors (Chapter 2). In Chapter 3, a 3He evaporative refrigerator facility is described. Results from experiments performed in-house at Stanford to measure carrier transport in high-purity germanium (HPGe) crystals operated at sub-Kelvin temperatures are presented in Chapter 4. Finally, in Chapter 5 a new numerical model and a time-domain optimal filtering technique are presented, both developed for use with superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TESs), that provide excellent event reconstruction for single particle interactions in detectors read out with superconducting W-TESs coupled to energy-collecting films of Al. This thesis is not intended to be read straight through. For those new to CDMS or dark matter searches, the first two chapters are meant to be a gentle introduction for experimentalists. They are by no means exhaustive. The remaining chapters each stand alone, with different audiences.

  13. Search for axions with the CDMS experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Z; Akerib, D S; Arrenberg, S; Bailey, C N; Balakishiyeva, D; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Beaty, J; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cooley, J; Cushman, P; Dejongh, F; Dragowsky, M R; Duong, L; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fritts, M; Golwala, S R; Grant, D R; Hall, J; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hertel, S; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Kamaev, O; Kiveni, M; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Moore, D; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Nelson, H; Ogburn, R W; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Ramberg, E; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tarka, M; Wang, G; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A

    2009-10-02

    We report on the first axion search results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. An energy threshold of 2 keV for electron-recoil events allows a search for possible solar axion conversion into photons or local galactic axion conversion into electrons in the germanium crystal detectors. The solar axion search sets an upper limit on the Primakov coupling g(agammagamma) of 2.4x10(-9) GeV-1 at the 95% confidence level for an axion mass less than 0.1 keV/c2. This limit benefits from the first precise measurement of the absolute crystal plane orientations in this type of experiment. The galactic axion search analysis sets a world-leading experimental upper limit on the axioelectric coupling g(aee) of 1.4x10(-12) at the 90% confidence level for an axion mass of 2.5 keV/c2.

  14. Search for Low-Mass WIMPs with SuperCDMS

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Asai, M; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Beaty, J; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cherry, M; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; DeVaney, D; Di Stefano, P C F; Silva, E Do Couto E; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Hansen, S; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hines, B A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kenany, S; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Nelson, R H; Novak, L; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Platt, M; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Resch, R W; Ricci, Y; Ruschman, M; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schmitt, R L; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Tomada, A; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    We report a first search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) using the background rejection capabilities of SuperCDMS. An exposure of 577 kg-days was analyzed for WIMPs with mass < 30 GeV/c2, with the signal region blinded. Eleven events were observed after unblinding. We set an upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section of 1.2e-42 cm2 at 8 GeV/c2. This result is in tension with WIMP interpretations of recent experiments and probes new parameter space for WIMP-nucleon scattering for WIMP masses < 6 GeV/c2.

  15. Low-Mass Dark Matter Search Results and Radiogenic Backgrounds for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepin, Mark David [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    An ever-increasing amount of evidence suggests that approximately one quarter of the energy in the universe is composed of some non-luminous, and hitherto unknown, “dark matter”. Physicists from numerous sub-fields have been working on and trying to solve the dark matter problem for decades. The common solution is the existence of some new type of elementary particle with particular focus on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). One avenue of dark matter research is to create an extremely sensitive particle detector with the goal of directly observing the interaction of WIMPs with standard matter. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) project operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003–2015, under the CDMS II and SuperCDMS Soudan experiments, with this goal of directly detecting dark matter. The next installation, SuperCDMS SNOLAB, is planned for near-future operation. The reason the dark-matter particle has not yet been observed in traditional particle physics experiments is that it must have very small cross sections, thus making such interactions extremely rare. In order to identify these rare events in the presence of a background of known particles and interactions, direct detection experiments employ various types and amounts of shielding to prevent known backgrounds from reaching the instrumented detector(s). CDMS utilized various gamma and neutron shielding to such an effect that the shielding, and other experimental components, themselves were sources of background. These radiogenic backgrounds must be understood to have confidence in any WIMP-search result. For this dissertation, radiogenic background studies and estimates were performed for various analyses covering CDMS II, SuperCDMS Soudan, and SuperCDMS SNOLAB. Lower-mass dark matter t c2 inent in the past few years. The CDMS detectors can be operated in an alternative, higher-biased, mode v to decrease their energy thresholds and correspondingly increase their sensitivity

  16. Combined Limits on WIMPs from the CDMS and EDELWEISS Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    CDMS,; Armengaud, E; Arrenberg, S; Augier, C; Bailey, C N; Balakishiyeva, D; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Benoît, A; Bergé, L; Blümer, J; Brink, P L; Broniatowski, A; Bruch, T; Brudanin, V; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Censier, B; Chapellier, M; Chardin, G; Charlieux, F; Cooley, J; Coulter, P; Cox, G A; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Defay, X; De Jesus, M; DeJongh, F; Di Stefano, P C F; Dolgorouki, Y; Domange, J; Dumoulin, L; Dragowsky, M R; Eitel, K; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Filosofov, D; Fourches, N; Fox, J; Fritts, M; Gascon, J; Gerbier, G; Gironnet, J; Golwala, S R; Gros, M; Hall, J; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Henry, S; Hertel, S A; Hervé, S; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Juillard, A; Kamaev, O; Kiveni, M; Kluck, H; Kos, M; Kozlov, V; Kraus, H; Kudryavtsev, V A; Leman, S W; Liu, S; Loaiza, P; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Marnieros, S; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moore, D; Nadeau, P; Navick, X-F; Nelson, H; Nones, C; Ogburn, R W; Olivieri, E; Pari, P; Pattavina, L; Paul, B; Phipps, A; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Robinson, M; Rozov, S; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Sanglard, V; Schmidt, B; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Seitz, D N; Semikh, S; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tarka, M; Torrento-Coello, A S; Vagneron, L; Verdier, M -A; Walker, R J; Wikus, P; Yakushev, E; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2011-01-01

    The CDMS and EDELWEISS collaborations have combined the results of their direct searches for dark matter using cryogenic germanium detectors. The total data set represents 614 kg.d equivalent exposure. A straightforward method of combination was chosen for its simplicity before data were exchanged between experiments. The results are interpreted in terms of limits on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section. For a WIMP mass of 90 GeV/c^2, where this analysis is most sensitive, a cross-section of 3.3 x 10^{-44} cm^2 is excluded at 90% CL. At higher WIMP masses, the combination improves the individual limits, by a factor 1.6 above 700 GeV/c^2. Alternative methods of combining the data provide stronger constraints for some ranges of WIMP masses and weaker constraints for others.

  17. MRI characteristics are predictive for CDMS in monofocal, but not in multifocal patients with a clinically isolated syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Jessica M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To diagnose multiple sclerosis (MS, evidence for dissemination in space and time is required. There is no clear definition on how symptoms and signs of a patient indicate clinical dissemination in space. To provide a uniform approach on this subject, a clinical classification system was described recently differentiating patients with mono- and multifocal clinical presentation. Here we assess the predictive value of clinically defined dissemination in space at first presentation for time to clinically definite MS (CDMS. Methods Four hundred and sixty-eight patients with a first episode suggestive of MS were classified as clinically mono- or multifocal by two neurologists blinded to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI results. These patients were part of the BENEFIT study in which 292 patients were randomized to interferon beta-1b (IFNB-1b and 176 to placebo. By using Kaplan-Meier statistics the risk for CDMS was studied in mono- and multifocal patients of the placebo group, both with and without taking into account MRI measures of potential prognostic relevance. Results Time to CDMS was similar in monofocal and multifocal patients. In monofocal patients, the risk for CDMS over 2 years was significantly higher when ≥ 9 T2 lesions or at least one Gd-enhancing lesion were present at the first event or 3 or 6 months after the first event. In patients with multifocal presentation, these MRI measures had no significant added value in predicting time to CDMS. Conclusion These data indicate that a carefully performed neurological assessment of symptoms and signs, combined with lesions on MRI, is important for defining the risk of conversion to CDMS. Trial Registration The Benefit trial has been registered under NCT00185211 http://www.clinicaltrials.gov

  18. ATLAS Run II Exotics Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    While Standard Model is in a good shape especially after Higgs boson discovery, there are a lot of questions beyond SM. The ATLAS detector is performing about 50 Exotics searches addressed these questions. This talk is discussing some of them with datasets collected during the 2015-2016 LHC run from 3 fb^-1 to 18 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV centre of mass energy . Results on searches for resonances decaying into vector boson or fermions, for vector like quarks, for dark matter, and for other new phenomena using these data will be presented.

  19. New LUX and PandaX-II Results Illuminating the Simplest Higgs-Portal Dark Matter Models

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Direct searches for dark matter (DM) by the LUX and PandaX-II Collaborations employing xenon-based detectors have recently come up with the most stringent limits to date on the elastic scattering of DM off nucleons. For Higgs-portal scalar DM models, the new results have precluded any possibility of accommodating low-mass DM as suggested by the DAMA and CDMS II Si experiments utilizing other target materials, even after invoking isospin-violating DM interactions with nucleons. In the simplest model, SM+D, which is the standard model plus a real scalar singlet named darkon acting as the DM candidate, the LUX and PandaX-II limits rule out DM masses from 5 GeV to about 330 GeV, except a small range around the resonant point at half of the Higgs mass where the interaction cross-section is near the neutrino-background floor. In the THDMII+D, which extends the SM+D by the addition of another Higgs doublet, the region excluded in the SM+D by the direct searches can be recovered due to suppression of the DM effective...

  20. Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with SuperCDMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, Alan J.; Asai, M.; balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Beaty, John; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cherry, M.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; DeVaney, D.; DeStefano, PC F.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Hansen, S.; Harris, Harold R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hines, B. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kenany, S.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, M.; Moffatt, R. A.; Nelson, R. H.; Novak, L.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Platt, M.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Resch, R. W.; Ricci, Y.; Ruschman, M.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schmitt, R.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, A.; Seitz, D.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Tomada, A.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-06-01

    We report a first search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) using the background rejection capabilities of SuperCDMS. An exposure of 577 kg-days was analyzed for WIMPs with mass < 30 GeV/c2, with the signal region blinded. Eleven events were observed after unblinding. We set an upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section of 1:2 10-42cm2 at 8 GeV/c2. This result is in tension with WIMP interpretations of recent experiments and probes new parameter space for WIMP-nucleon scattering for WIMP masses < 6 GeV/c2.

  1. Thermal conductance measurements of bolted copper joints for SuperCDMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R.; Tatkowski, Greg; Ruschman, M.; Golwala, S. R.; Kellaris, N.; Daal, M.; Hall, Jeter C.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2015-09-01

    Joint thermal conductance testing has been undertaken for bolted copper to copper connections from 60 mK to 26 K. This testing was performed to validate an initial design basis for the SuperCDMS experiment, where a dilution refrigerator will be coupled to a cryostat via multiple bolted connections. Copper used during testing was either gold plated or passivated with citric acid to prevent surface oxidation. Results obtained are well fit by a power law regression of joint thermal conductance to temperature and match well with data collected during a literature review.

  2. Projected sensitivity of the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Aramaki, T.; Arnquist, I.; Baker, W.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cartaro, C.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fritts, M.; Gerbier, G.; Ghaith, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hong, Z.; Hoppe, E.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Iyer, V.; Jardin, D.; Jastram, A.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kubik, A.; Kurinsky, N. A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Mast, N.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Poudel, S.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Roberts, A.; Robinson, A. E.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Serfass, B.; Speller, D.; Stein, M.; Street, J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Toback, D.; Underwood, R.; Villano, A. N.; von Krosigk, B.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, X.

    2017-04-07

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB will be a next-generation experiment aimed at directly detecting low-mass (< 10 GeV/c$^2$) particles that may constitute dark matter by using cryogenic detectors of two types (HV and iZIP) and two target materials (germanium and silicon). The experiment is being designed with an initial sensitivity to nuclear recoil cross sections ~ 1 x 10$^{-43}$ cm$^2$ for a dark matter particle mass of 1 GeV/c$^2$, and with capacity to continue exploration to both smaller masses and better sensitivities. The phonon sensitivity of the HV detectors will be sufficient to detect nuclear recoils from sub-GeV dark matter. A detailed calibration of the detector response to low energy recoils will be needed to optimize running conditions of the HV detectors and to interpret their data for dark matter searches. Low-activity shielding, and the depth of SNOLAB, will reduce most backgrounds, but cosmogenically produced $^{3}$H and naturally occurring $^{32}$Si will be present in the detectors at some level. Even if these backgrounds are x10 higher than expected, the science reach of the HV detectors would be over three orders of magnitude beyond current results for a dark matter mass of 1 GeV/c$^2$. The iZIP detectors are relatively insensitive to variations in detector response and backgrounds, and will provide better sensitivity for dark matter particle masses (> 5 GeV/c$^2$). The mix of detector types (HV and iZIP), and targets (germanium and silicon), planned for the experiment, as well as flexibility in how the detectors are operated, will allow us to maximize the low-mass reach, and understand the backgrounds that the experiment will encounter. Upgrades to the experiment, perhaps with a variety of ultra-low-background cryogenic detectors, will extend dark matter sensitivity down to the "neutrino floor", where coherent scatters of solar neutrinos become a limiting background.

  3. Parallelizing Climate Data Management System, version 3 (CDMS3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, D.; Williams, D. N.; Painter, J.; Doutriaux, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Climate Data Management System is an object-oriented data management system, specialized for organizing multidimensional, gridded data used in climate analyses for data observation and simulation. The basic unit of computation in CDMS3 is the variable, which consist of a multidimensional array that represents climate information in four dimensions corresponding to: time, pressure levels, latitudes, and longitudes. As model become more precise in their computation, the volume of data generated becomes bigger and difficult to handle due to the limit of computational resources. Model today can produce data a time frequency of one hourly, three hourly, or six hourly for spatial footprint close to satellite data used run models. The amount of time for scientists to analyze the data and retrieve useful information is more and more unmanageable. Parallelizing libraries such as CMDS3 would ease the burden of working with such big datasets. Multiple approaches of parallelizing are possible. The most obvious one is embarrassingly parallel or pleasingly parallel programming where each computer node processes one file at a time. A more challenging approach is to send a piece of the data to each node for computation and each node will save the results at its right place in a file as a slab of data. This is possible with Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). A final approach would be the use of Open Multi-Processing API (OpenMP) where a master thread is split in multiple threads for different sections of the main code. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. This poster bring to light each benefit of these methods and seek to find an optimal solution to compute climate data analyses in a efficient fashion using one or a mixtures of these parallelized methods.

  4. The CDMS view on molecular data needs of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Holger S P; Stutzki, J; Schlemmer, S

    2013-01-01

    The catalog section of the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, contains mostly rotational transition frequencies, with auxiliary information, of molecules observable in space. The frequency lists are generated mostly from critically evaluated laboratory data employing established Hamiltonian models. The CDMS has been online publicly for more than 12 years, e.g., via the short-cut http://www.cdms.de. Initially constructed as ascii tables, its inclusion into a database environment within the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC, http://www.vamdc.eu) has begun in June 2008. A test version of the new CDMS is about to be released. The CDMS activities have been part of the extensive laboratory spectroscopic investigations in Cologne. Moreover, these activities have also benefit from collaborations with other laboratory spectroscopy groups as well as with astronomers. We will provide some basic information on the CDMS and its participation in the VAMDC project. In addition, some recent dete...

  5. Projected Sensitivity of the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Aramaki, T; Arnquist, I; Baker, W; Barker, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Calkins, R; Cartaro, C; Cerdeño, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fritts, M; Gerbier, G; Ghaith, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hong, Z; Hoppe, E; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Iyer, V; Jardin, D; Jastram, A; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kubik, A; Kurinsky, N A; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Lukens, P; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Mast, N; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Mendoza, J D Morales; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Poudel, S; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Roberts, A; Robinson, A E; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Serfass, B; Speller, D; Stein, M; Street, J; Tanaka, H A; Toback, D; Underwood, R; Villano, A N; von Krosigk, B; Welliver, B; Wilson, J S; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, X; Zhao, X

    2016-01-01

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB will be a next-generation experiment aimed at directly detecting low-mass ( 5 GeV/c$^2$). The mix of detector types (HV and iZIP), and targets (germanium and silicon), planned for the experiment, as well as flexibility in how the detectors are operated, will allow us to maximize the low-mass reach, and understand the backgrounds that the experiment will encounter. Upgrades to the experiment, perhaps with a variety of ultra-low-background cryogenic detectors, will extend dark matter sensitivity down to the "neutrino floor", where coherent scatters of solar neutrinos become a limiting background.

  6. Dark Left-Right Model: CDMS, LHC, etc

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Ernest

    2010-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle interactions is extended to include fermion doublets (n,e)_R transforming under the gauge group SU(2)_R such that n is a Dirac scotino (dark-matter fermion), with odd R parity. Based on recent CDMS data, it is shown how this new dark left-right model (DLRM2) favors a Z' gauge boson at around 1 or 2 TeV and be observable at the LHC. The new W_R gauge bosons may also contribute significantly to lepton-flavor-changing processes such as mu to e gamma and mu-e conversion in a nucleus or muonic atom.

  7. The journal of irreproducible results II

    CERN Document Server

    Scherr, George H

    1997-01-01

    Compilation of offbeat science papers from the Journal of Irreproducible Results, including: Emotion in the Rat Face; Foamy Beer; Cooking with Potential Energy; The Large-Cake Cutting Problem; Siamese Twinning in Gummy Bears; much more.

  8. Astronomical optical interferometry, II: Astrophysical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankov S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical interferometry is entering a new age with several ground- based long-baseline observatories now making observations of unprecedented spatial resolution. Based on a great leap forward in the quality and quantity of interferometric data, the astrophysical applications are not limited anymore to classical subjects, such as determination of fundamental properties of stars; namely, their effective temperatures, radii, luminosities and masses, but the present rapid development in this field allowed to move to a situation where optical interferometry is a general tool in studies of many astrophysical phenomena. Particularly, the advent of long-baseline interferometers making use of very large pupils has opened the way to faint objects science and first results on extragalactic objects have made it a reality. The first decade of XXI century is also remarkable for aperture synthesis in the visual and near-infrared wavelength regimes, which provided image reconstructions from stellar surfaces to Active Galactic Nuclei. Here I review the numerous astrophysical results obtained up to date, except for binary and multiple stars milliarcsecond astrometry, which should be a subject of an independent detailed review, taking into account its importance and expected results at microarcsecond precision level. To the results obtained with currently available interferometers, I associate the adopted instrumental settings in order to provide a guide for potential users concerning the appropriate instruments which can be used to obtain the desired astrophysical information.

  9. Biomass gasification: field monitoring results (Part II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendis, M.S.; Stassen, H.E.M.; Stiles, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    This paper continues the review of gasifier monitoring results by presenting details from units in Vanuatu and in Mali. A presentation of all the data in a summarised form is made and the advantages and dangers of installation evaluation based on data in such a form are highlighted. Values, typical

  10. Simulations of Noise in Phase-Separated Transition-Edge Sensors for SuperCDMS

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, A J; Pyle, M; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; McCarthy, K; Doughty, T; Cherry, M; Young, B

    2011-01-01

    We briefly review a simple model of superconducting-normal phase-separation in transition-edge sensors in the SuperCDMS experiment. After discussing some design considerations relevant to the TES in the detectors, we study noise sources in both the phase-separated and phase-uniform cases. Such simulations are valuable for optimizing the critical temperature and TES length of future SuperCDMS detectors.

  11. Some recent results from CLEO II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kass, R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    The CLEO experiment has been operating for several years now collecting e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation data at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance (E{sub cm} {approx} 10.6 GeV). The accumulated event sample contains several million B{anti B} and {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} pairs. These data are used to explore rare b, c, and {tau} decays. In this report, several recent CLEO results in the area of B-meson and {tau} decay are presented. The topics covered include: penguin decays of B-mesons, measurement of exclusive b {r_arrow} u semileptonic transitions, {tau} decays with an {eta} in the final state, precision measurement of the Michel parameters in leptonic {tau} decay, and a search for lepton number violation using {tau}`s. 39 refs., 26 figs.

  12. A low-threshold analysis of CDMS shallow-site data

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Bolozdynya, A I; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Chang, C L; Clarke, R M; Cooley, J; Crisler, M B; Cushman, P; DeJongh, F; Dixon, R; Driscoll, D D; Filippini, J; Funkhouser, S; Gaitskell, R J; Golwala, S R; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Kamat, S; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Meunier, P; Mirabolfathi, N; Moore, D; Nam, S W; Nelson, H; Ogburn, R W; Qiu, X; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Savage, C; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Shutt, T A; Wang, G; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A

    2010-01-01

    Data taken during the final shallow-site run of the first tower of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) detectors have been reanalyzed with improved sensitivity to small energy depositions. Four ~224 g germanium and two ~105 g silicon detectors were operated at the Stanford Underground Facility (SUF) between December 2001 and June 2002, yielding 118 live days of raw exposure. Three of the germanium and both silicon detectors were analyzed with a new low-threshold technique, making it possible to lower the germanium and silicon analysis thresholds down to the actual trigger thresholds of ~1 keV and ~2 keV, respectively. Limits on the spin-independent cross section for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) to elastically scatter from nuclei based on these data exclude interesting parameter space for WIMPs with masses below 9 GeV/c^2. Under standard halo assumptions, these data partially exclude parameter space favored by interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments' data as WIMP signals...

  13. First Results of The Konkoly Blazhko Survey II

    CERN Document Server

    Sódor, Á; Molnár, L; Szeidl, B; Hurta, Zs; Bakos, G Á; Hartman, J; Béky, B; Noyes, R W; Sasselov, D; Mazeh, T; Bartus, J; Belucz, B; Hajdu, G; Kővári, Zs; Kun, E; Nagy, I; Posztobányi, K; Smitola, P; Vida, K

    2012-01-01

    The two parts of the Konkoly Blazhko Survey (KBS I and II) are introduced. The most important preliminary findings of the second part are presented in comparison to the results of the first part. Two interesting cases of very strong modulation from the KBS II are also shown.

  14. Overview of TJ-II flexible heliac results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascasibar, E. E-mail: enrique.ascasibar@ciemat.es; Alejaldre, C.; Alonso, J.; Almoguera, L.; Baciero, A.; Balbin, R.; Blaumoser, M.; Botija, J.; Branas, B.; Cal, E. de la; Cappa, A.; Castellano, J.; Carrasco, R.; Castejon, F.; Cepero, J.R.; Cremy, C.; Doncel, J.; Eguilior, S.; Estrada, T.; Fernandez, A.; Fuentes, C.; Garcia, A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Guasp, J.; Herranz, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Jimenez, J.A.; Kirpitchev, I.; Krivenski, V.; Labrador, I.; Lapayese, F.; Likin, K.; Liniers, M.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Lopez-Sanchez, A.; Luna, E. de la; Martin, R.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Medrano, M.; Mendez, P.; McCarthy, K.J.; Medina, F.; Milligen, B. van; Ochando, M.; Pacios, L.; Pastor, I.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Pena, A. de la; Portas, A.; Qin, J.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.; Romero, J.; Salas, A.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, J.; Tabares, F.; Tafalla, D.; Tribaldos, V.; Vega, J.; Zurro, B

    2001-10-01

    The TJ-II is a four period, low magnetic shear stellarator, with high degree of configuration flexibility (rotational transform from 0.9 to 2.5) which has been operating in Madrid since 1998 (R=1.5 m, a<0.22 m, B{sub 0}=1 T, P{sub ECRH}{<=}600 kW, P{sub NBI}{<=}3 MW under installation). This paper reviews the main technical aspects of the TJ-II heliac as well as the principal physics results obtained in the most recent TJ-II experimental campaign carried out in 2000.

  15. Selected results from the Mark II at SPEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharre, D.L.

    1980-06-01

    Recent results on radiative transitions from the psi(3095), charmed meson decay, and the Cabibbo-suppressed decay tau ..-->.. K* ..nu../sub tau/ are reviewed. The results come primarily from the Mark II experiment at SPEAR, but preliminary results from the Crystal Ball experiment on psi radiative transitions are also discussed.

  16. Dedicated Searches for Low and High Mass Wimps with the SuperCDMS Soudan iZIP Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welliver, Bradford [Florida State U.

    2016-01-01

    behind SuperCDMS Soudan, the numerous tasks involved in a low-mass search and the rst iZIP array science results with these new detectors, as well as the developments towards a high-mass search result.

  17. Recent results from the Mark II detector at SPEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan Dorfan

    1979-11-01

    Recent results rom the Mark II Detector at SPEAR are presented. These include measurements of the decays tau/sup -/ ..-->.. rho/sup -/..nu../sub tau/ and tau/sup -/ ..-->.. K*/sup -/(890)..nu../sub tau/, observation of direct photons at the psi, inclusive proton and ..lambda.. production and measurements of charmed baryon and charmed meson decays.

  18. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, in the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Christian P.; Schlemmer, Stephan; Schilke, Peter; Stutzki, Jürgen; Müller, Holger S. P.

    2016-09-01

    The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, was founded 1998 to provide in its catalog section line lists of mostly molecular species which are or may be observed in various astronomical sources (usually) by radio astronomical means. The line lists contain transition frequencies with qualified accuracies, intensities, quantum numbers, as well as further auxiliary information. They have been generated from critically evaluated experimental line lists, mostly from laboratory experiments, employing established Hamiltonian models. Separate entries exist for different isotopic species and usually also for different vibrational states. As of December 2015, the number of entries is 792. They are available online as ascii tables with additional files documenting information on the entries. The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC, was founded more than 5 years ago as a common platform for atomic and molecular data. This platform facilitates exchange not only between spectroscopic databases related to astrophysics or astrochemistry, but also with collisional and kinetic databases. A dedicated infrastructure was developed to provide a common data format in the various databases enabling queries to a large variety of databases on atomic and molecular data at once. For CDMS, the incorporation in VAMDC was combined with several modifications on the generation of CDMS catalog entries. Here we introduce related changes to the data structure and the data content in the CDMS. The new data scheme allows us to incorporate all previous data entries but in addition allows us also to include entries based on new theoretical descriptions. Moreover, the CDMS entries have been transferred into a mySQL database format. These developments within the VAMDC framework have in part been driven by the needs of the astronomical community to be able to deal efficiently with large data sets obtained with the Herschel Space Telescope or, more recently, with the Atacama Large

  19. ARAC results from phase II of the European tracer experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, J.C.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1997-07-01

    A comparison is provided of the results of calculations by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) during two phases of the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX). In phase I of ETEX, participants generated predictions in real time of the concentration of inert tracer gases released from a site in Western France. Each participating group based their predictions on the meteorological data they had available. In phase II, all participants were required to recalculate predictions based on the same meteorological data, which was generated and supplied by the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). ARAC used ECMWF data and also made additional changes to its model configuration,, with the result that ARAC`s accuracy during phase II was much better than for phase I. Experiments described in this paper examine the effect of each of these changes, and show that each change contributed to the improvement.

  20. Results on QCD Physics from the CDF-II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliarone, C.; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-12-01

    In this paper the authors review a selection of recent results obtained, in the area of QCD physics, from the CDF-II experiment that studies p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. All results shown correspond to analysis performed using the Tevatron Run II data samples. In particular they will illustrate the progress achieved and the status of the studies on the following QCD processes: jet inclusive production, using different jet clustering algorithm, W({yields} e{nu}{sub e}) + jets and Z({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, {gamma} + b-jet production, dijet production in double pomeron exchange and finally exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} production. No deviations from the Standard Model have been observed so far.

  1. Simulations, Diagnostics and Recent Results of the VISA II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Andonian, G; Pellegrini, C; Reiche, S; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G

    2005-01-01

    The VISA II experiment entails use of a chirped beam to drive a high gain SASE FEL. The output radiation is diagnosed with a modified frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) technique. Sextupoles are implemented to correct the lonigtudinal aberrations affecting the high energy spread chirped beam during transport to the undulator. The double differential energy spectrum is measured with a pair of slits and a set of gratings. In this paper, we report on start-to-end simulations, radiation diagnostics, as well as intial experimental results; experimental methods are described.

  2. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  3. Ionization Readout Electronics for SuperCDMS SNOLAB Employing a HEMT Front-End

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, R.

    2014-09-01

    The SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment seeks to deploy 200 kg of cryogenic Ge detectors employing phonon and ionization readout to identify dark matter interactions. One of the design challenges for the experiment is to provide amplification of the high impedance ionization signal while minimizing power dissipation and noise. This paper describes the design and expected performance of the ionization readout being developed for an engineering model of the SuperCDMS SNOLAB Ge Tower System. The readout features the use of a low-noise HEMT front end transistor operating at 4 K to achieve a power dissipation of 100 W per channel, local grounding to minimize noise injection, and biasing circuitry that allows precise control of the HEMT operating point.

  4. Eight Pulse Performance of DARHT Axis II - Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, Martin E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-08

    The DARHT-II accelerator produces a 1.65-kA, 17-MeV beam in a 1600-ns pulse. Standard operation of the DARHT Axis II accelerator involves extracting four short pulses from the 1.6 us long macro-pulse produced by the LIA. The four short pulses are extracted using a fast kicker in combination with a quadrupole septum magnet and then transported for several meters to a high-Z material target for conversion to x-rays for radiography. The ability of the DARHT Axis 2 kicker to produce more than the standard four pulse format has been previously demonstrated. This capability was developed to study potential risks associated with beam transport during an initial commissioning phase at low energy (8 MeV) and low current (1.0 kA).The ability of the kicker to deliver more than four pulses to the target has been realized for many years. This note describes the initial results demonstrating this capability.

  5. A modified detector concept for SuperCDMS: The HiZIP and its charge performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Kedar Mohan [Queen' s U.

    2013-01-01

    SuperCDMS (Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) is a leading direct dark mat-ter search experiment which uses solid state detectors (Ge crystals) at milliKelvintemperatures to look for nuclear recoils caused by dark matter interactions in the de-tector. `Weakly Interacting Massive Particles' (WIMPs) are the most favoured darkmatter candidate particles. SuperCDMS, like many other direct dark matter searchexperiments, primarily looks for WIMPs. The measurement of both the ionizationand the lattice vibration (phonon) signals from an interaction in the detector allow itto discriminate against electron recoils which are the main source of background forWIMP detection.SuperCDMS currently operates about 9 kg of Ge detectors at the Soudan under-ground lab in northern Minnesota. In its next phase, SuperCDMS SNOLAB plansto use 100-200 kg of target mass (Ge) which would allow it to probe more of theinteresting and and as of yet unexplored parameter space for WIMPs predicted bytheoretical models. The SuperCDMS Queen's Test Facility is a detector test facilitywhich is intended to serve as detector testing and detector research and developmentpurposes for the SuperCDMS experiment.A modifed detector called the HiZIP (Half-iZIP), which is reduced in complex-ity in comparison to the currently used iZIP (interleaved Z-sensitive Ionization and Phonon mediated) detectors, is studied in this thesis. The HiZIP detector designalso serves to discriminate against background from multiple scatter events occurringclose to the surfaces in a single detector. Studies carried out to compare the surfaceevent leakage in the HiZIP detector using limited information from iZIP data takenat SuperCDMS test facility at UC Berkley produce a highly conservative upper limitof 5 out of 10,000 events at 90% condence level. This upper limit is the best amongmany different HiZIP congurations that were investigated and is comparable to theupper limit calculated for an HiZIP detector in the same way

  6. Measurement of SQUID noise levels for SuperCDMS SNOLAB detectors - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Maxwell [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-27

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB is a second generation direct dark matter search. In the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, detectors are able to pick up from signals from dark matter nuclear recoil interactions which occur inside the bulk of the detectors. These interactions produce both phonon and charge signals. HEMTs read out charge signals whereas TES are used to detect phonon signals which are then read out by SQUID amplifiers. SQUID amplifiers must add negligible noise to the TES intrinsic noise which has been previously measured and is approximately 50pA/√Hz down to 100Hz for ease of signal distinguishability in dark matter nuclear interactions. The intrinsic noise level of the SQUID was tested in the SLAC 300mK fridge and determined to provide adequately low levels of noise with a floor of approximately 3pA/√Hz. Furthermore, a 10x amplifier was tested for addition of extraneous noise. This noise was investigated with and without this amplifier, and it was found that it did not add a significant amount of noise to the intrinsic SQUID noise.

  7. W. K. H. Panofsky Prize Talk: The Search for WIMP Dark Matter: CDMS Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Blas

    2013-04-01

    As described in the accompanying talk by Bernard Sadoulet, the CDMS (cryogenic dark matter search) program has succeeded in pushing down by several orders of magnitude the sensitivity in the search for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting particles or WIMPs. In this talk we describe the technology that has enabled the CDMS detectors made of Ge and Si crystals to discriminate on an event by event basis electron recoils (most backgrounds from gammas) from nuclear recoils (the expected WIMP signal and neutrons). This rejection is accomplished by simultaneously measuring the ionization (electrons and holes in the semiconductor) and the phonons (lattice heat). To achieve the phonon measurement, the crystals are cooled to 0.05 K which allows the use of ultra low noise superconducting circuits. The phonon energy is collected at the surface of the crystals using Al films which absorb athermal phonons and produce quasiparticle excitations from the dissociated Cooper pairs. These excitations diffuse until the are trapped in superconducting tungsten transition edge sensors (TESs). The major advance of voltage biased TESs which are self biased in their transition region through negative feedback has been adopted very successfully for xray spectroscopy, gamma ray spectroscopy and CMB (cosmic microwave background) instruments. The most recent advance detectors called iZIPs (interleaved z-dependent ionization and phonon) provide a large improvement in surface electron rejection and remove that background for the next 200 kg Ge experiment and even for future ton scale experiments.

  8. A Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redi, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-27

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this Letter, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage-assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for ten live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV/c2.

  9. Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-01

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this paper, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage- assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for 10 live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of 170 eVee (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV/c2.

  10. CDMSlite: A Search for Low-Mass WIMPs using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Asai, M; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nadeau, P; Nelson, R H; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this paper, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage- assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for 10 live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of 170 eVee (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV/c2.

  11. W.K.H. Panofsky Prize Talk: The Search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particle Dark Matter: Science Motivation and CDMS strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoulet, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    For the last 25 years, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) have remained one of the favored candidates to explain the ubiquitous dark matter in the universe. We will review the generic aspects of this class of models, and describe the complementarity between three observational approaches: the direct detection of terrestrial interactions of the halo WIMPs, the search for WIMP annihilation products in the cosmos and the attempt to produce these particles at the Large Hadron Collider. After a rapid review of the current status of these three searches, we will focus on the experimental strategy pursued by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search as one of the leading direct detection effort in the world. We will conclude with the CDMS results obtained so far, in particular for low mass dark matter particles. In an accompanying talk, Blas Cabrera will describe the basic technology that we are using and the promise of our new generation of detectors.

  12. Compound dislocation models (CDMs) for volcano deformation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.; Lundgren, Paul R.; Prats-Iraola, Pau

    2017-02-01

    Volcanic crises are often preceded and accompanied by volcano deformation caused by magmatic and hydrothermal processes. Fast and efficient model identification and parameter estimation techniques for various sources of deformation are crucial for process understanding, volcano hazard assessment and early warning purposes. As a simple model that can be a basis for rapid inversion techniques, we present a compound dislocation model (CDM) that is composed of three mutually orthogonal rectangular dislocations (RDs). We present new RD solutions, which are free of artefact singularities and that also possess full rotational degrees of freedom. The CDM can represent both planar intrusions in the near field and volumetric sources of inflation and deflation in the far field. Therefore, this source model can be applied to shallow dikes and sills, as well as to deep planar and equidimensional sources of any geometry, including oblate, prolate and other triaxial ellipsoidal shapes. In either case the sources may possess any arbitrary orientation in space. After systematically evaluating the CDM, we apply it to the co-eruptive displacements of the 2015 Calbuco eruption observed by the Sentinel-1A satellite in both ascending and descending orbits. The results show that the deformation source is a deflating vertical lens-shaped source at an approximate depth of 8 km centred beneath Calbuco volcano. The parameters of the optimal source model clearly show that it is significantly different from an isotropic point source or a single dislocation model. The Calbuco example reflects the convenience of using the CDM for a rapid interpretation of deformation data.

  13. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, in the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Christian P; Schilke, Peter; Stutzki, Jürgen; Müller, Holger S P

    2016-01-01

    The CDMS was founded 1998 to provide in its catalog section line lists of molecular species which may be observed in various astronomical sources using radio astronomy. The line lists contain transition frequencies with qualified accuracies, intensities, quantum numbers, as well as further auxilary information. They have been generated from critically evaluated experimental line lists, mostly from laboratory experiments, employing established Hamiltonian models. Seperate entries exist for different isotopic species and usually also for different vibrational states. As of December 2015, the number of entries is 792. They are available online as ascii tables with additional files documenting information on the entries. The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre was founded more than 5 years ago as a common platform for atomic and molecular data. This platform facilitates exchange not only between spectroscopic databases related to astrophysics or astrochemistry, but also with collisional and kinetic databases...

  14. Radon Mitigation for the SuperCDMS-SNOLAB Dark Matter Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Joseph; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Experiments that seek to detect very rare processes, such as interactions of the dark matter particles thought to make up 85% of the mass of the universe, may suffer background interactions from radon daughters that have plated out onto detector surfaces. To reduce these backgrounds, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom was built at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology. Cleanroom air is supplied by an optimized vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system that has achieved a > 300 × reduction from an input activity of 58.6 +/- 0.7 Bq/m3 to a cleanroom activity of 0.13 +/- 0.06 Bq/m3. Expected backgrounds due to radon daughters for the SuperCDMS dark matter search will be presented.

  15. Addition theorems for spin spherical harmonics: II. Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzas, Antonio O, E-mail: abouzas@mda.cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, CINVESTAV-IPN, Carretera Antigua a Progreso Km. 6, Apdo. Postal 73 ' Cordemex' , Merida 97310, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2011-04-22

    Based on the results of part I (2011 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44 165301), we obtain the general form of the addition theorem for spin spherical harmonics and give explicit results in the cases involving one spin-s' and one spin-s spherical harmonics with s', s = 1/2, 1, 3/2, and |s' - s| = 0, 1. We also obtain a fully general addition theorem for one scalar and one tensor spherical harmonic of arbitrary rank. A variety of bilocal sums of ordinary and spin spherical harmonics are given in explicit form, including a general explicit expression for bilocal spherical harmonics.

  16. Planck 2015 results: II. Low Frequency Instrument data processings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.;

    2016-01-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release...

  17. Marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico - II. Model results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Mark J.; Yu, Yunke [Center for Energy Studies, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    In the second part of this two-part article on marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico, we estimate the number of committed assets in water depth less than 1000 ft that are expected to be marginal over a 60-year time horizon. We compute the expected quantity and value of the production and gross revenue streams of the gulf's committed asset inventory circa. January 2007 using a probabilistic model framework. Cumulative hydrocarbon production from the producing inventory is estimated to be 1056 MMbbl oil and 13.3 Tcf gas. Marginal production from the committed asset inventory is expected to contribute 4.1% of total oil production and 5.4% of gas production. A meta-evaluation procedure is adapted to present the results of sensitivity analysis. Model results are discussed along with a description of the model framework and limitations of the analysis. (author)

  18. Tokamak elongation: how much is too much? II Numerical results

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jungpyo; Freidberg, Jeffrey P

    2015-01-01

    The analytic theory presented in Paper I is converted into a form convenient for numerical analysis. A fast and accurate code has been written using this numerical formulation. The results are presented by first defining a reference set of physical parameters based on experimental data from high performance discharges. Numerically obtained scaling relations of maximum achievable elongation versus inverse aspect ratio are obtained for various values of poloidal beta, wall radius and feedback capability parameter in ranges near the reference values. It is also shown that each value of maximum elongation occurs at a corresponding value of optimized triangularity, whose scaling is also determined as a function of inverse aspect ratio. The results show that the theoretical predictions of maximum elongation are slightly higher than experimental observations for high performance discharges as measured by high average pressure. The theoretical optimized triangularity values are noticeably lower. We suggest that the e...

  19. Strong Lens Time Delay Challenge: II. Results of TDC1

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Kai; Marshall, Phil; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Rumbaugh, Nick; Dobler, Gregory; Aghamousa, Amir; Bonvin, Vivien; Courbin, Frederic; Hojjati, Alireza; Jackson, Neal; Kashyap, Vinay; Kumar, S Rathna; Linder, Eric; Mandel, Kaisey; Meng, Xiao-Li; Meylan, Georges; Moustakas, Leonidas A; Prabhu, Tushar P; Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Shafieloo, Arman; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Stalin, Chelliah S; Tak, Hyungsuk; Tewes, Malte; van Dyk, David

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of the first strong lens time delay challenge. The motivation, experimental design, and entry level challenge are described in a companion paper. This paper presents the main challenge, TDC1, which consisted in analyzing thousands of simulated light curves blindly. The observational properties of the light curves cover the range in quality obtained for current targeted efforts (e.g. COSMOGRAIL) and expected from future synoptic surveys (e.g. LSST), and include "evilness" in the form of simulated systematic errors. 7 teams participated in TDC1, submitting results from 78 different method variants. After a describing each method, we compute and analyze basic statistics measuring accuracy (or bias) $A$, goodness of fit $\\chi^2$, precision $P$, and success rate $f$. For some methods we identify outliers as an important issue. Other methods show that outliers can be controlled via visual inspection or conservative quality control. Several methods are competitive, i.e. give $|A|<0.03$, $P&...

  20. First results of the Auroral Turbulance II rocket experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielides, M.A.; Ranta, A.; Ivchenco, N.;

    1999-01-01

    was to study the fine structure of an active auroral arc. Ground based observations were done by a chain all-sky cameras, a photometer and a magnetometer at Poker Flat. The satellite coverage was obtained by POLAR UV imager and GOES 8 and 9 magnetometer. The three point measurement allows the distinction...... of spatial and temporal variations. The first results of the magnetic, [1,2], electric and particle data analysis are compared with optical observations [2] of auroral structures....

  1. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the [open quotes]sources[close quotes] and [open quotes]targets[close quotes] requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  2. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the {open_quotes}sources{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}targets{close_quotes} requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  3. STRONG LENS TIME DELAY CHALLENGE. II. RESULTS OF TDC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Kai [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Treu, Tommaso [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Marshall, Phil [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, P.O. Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Rumbaugh, Nick [Department of Physics, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Dobler, Gregory [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Aghamousa, Amir [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Bonvin, Vivien; Courbin, Frederic; Meylan, Georges [EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Hojjati, Alireza [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Jackson, Neal [University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kashyap, Vinay; Mandel, Kaisey [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rathna Kumar, S.; Prabhu, Tushar P. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Linder, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Meng, Xiao-Li [Department of Statistics, Harvard University, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Romero-Wolf, Andrew [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 169-506, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); and others

    2015-02-10

    We present the results of the first strong lens time delay challenge. The motivation, experimental design, and entry level challenge are described in a companion paper. This paper presents the main challenge, TDC1, which consisted of analyzing thousands of simulated light curves blindly. The observational properties of the light curves cover the range in quality obtained for current targeted efforts (e.g., COSMOGRAIL) and expected from future synoptic surveys (e.g., LSST), and include simulated systematic errors. Seven teams participated in TDC1, submitting results from 78 different method variants. After describing each method, we compute and analyze basic statistics measuring accuracy (or bias) A, goodness of fit χ{sup 2}, precision P, and success rate f. For some methods we identify outliers as an important issue. Other methods show that outliers can be controlled via visual inspection or conservative quality control. Several methods are competitive, i.e., give |A| < 0.03, P < 0.03, and χ{sup 2} < 1.5, with some of the methods already reaching sub-percent accuracy. The fraction of light curves yielding a time delay measurement is typically in the range f = 20%-40%. It depends strongly on the quality of the data: COSMOGRAIL-quality cadence and light curve lengths yield significantly higher f than does sparser sampling. Taking the results of TDC1 at face value, we estimate that LSST should provide around 400 robust time-delay measurements, each with P < 0.03 and |A| < 0.01, comparable to current lens modeling uncertainties. In terms of observing strategies, we find that A and f depend mostly on season length, while P depends mostly on cadence and campaign duration.

  4. Planck 2015 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Ballardini, M; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Basak, S; Battaglia, P; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Castex, G; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Christensen, P R; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschet, C; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; Lindholm, V; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oppermann, N; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Peel, M; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renzi, A; Rocha, G; Romelli, E; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vassallo, T; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; Wilkinson, A; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places in which our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. We refer to other related papers where more detailed descriptions on the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.

  5. Planck 2015 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. For the first time, we present LFI maps in Stokes Q and U polarization. We refer to other related papers where more detailed descriptions of the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.

  6. CRESST-II phase 2. First results and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandhagen, Christian [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: CRESST-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The CRESST (Cryogenic Rare Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers) experiment, located in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) in Italy, aims at the direct detection of Dark Matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The simultaneous measurement of phonons and scintillation light produced in cryogenic detectors consisting of CaWO{sub 4} crystals is used to discriminate radioactive backgrounds from a possible WIMP signal. First results from the ongoing measurement campaign using a single upgraded detector module with a low threshold of ∼600 eV are presented. We discuss the prospects of the full dataset with a planned exposure of about 500 kg days. Finally the plans for a future upgrade are outlined.

  7. Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey (BOKS) II: Early Variability Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Feldmeier, J.; von Braun, K.; Everett, M.; Mihos, C.; Harding, P.; Knox, C.; Sherry, W.; Lee, T.; Ciardi, D.; Rudick, C.; Proctor, M.; van Belle, G.

    2006-12-01

    We present preliminary results for the photometric time-series data obtained with the BOKS survey (see BOKS I poster Feldmeier et al.). The BOKS survey covers about 1 square degree in the constellation of Cygnus. We obtained nearly 2000 SDSS r-band images spanning a total time period of 39 days. Each point source in our BOKS survey is also present in the single epoch, 7-color photometric survey catalogue being produced by the NASA Discovery program Kepler mission. Light curves of approximately 60,000 point sources, spanning r=14 to 20, are examined and discussed. We will present variability demographics for the BOKS survey including characterization of the light curves into variable classes based on type, color, amplitude, and any extra-solar planet transit candidates.

  8. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics on the lattice: II. Exact results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Baumgartner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of supersymmetric field theories with spontaneously broken supersymmetry require in addition to the ultraviolet regularisation also an infrared one, due to the emergence of the massless Goldstino. The intricate interplay between ultraviolet and infrared effects towards the continuum and infinite volume limit demands careful investigations to avoid potential problems. In this paper – the second in a series of three – we present such an investigation for N=2 supersymmetric quantum mechanics formulated on the lattice in terms of bosonic and fermionic bonds. In one dimension, the bond formulation allows to solve the system exactly, even at finite lattice spacing, through the construction and analysis of transfer matrices. In the present paper we elaborate on this approach and discuss a range of exact results for observables such as the Witten index, the mass spectra and Ward identities.

  9. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics on the lattice: II. Exact results

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgartner, David

    2015-01-01

    Simulations of supersymmetric field theories with spontaneously broken supersymmetry require in addition to the ultraviolet regularisation also an infrared one, due to the emergence of the massless Goldstino. The intricate interplay between ultraviolet and infrared effects towards the continuum and infinite volume limit demands careful investigations to avoid potential problems. In this paper -- the second in a series of three -- we present such an investigation for ${\\cal N}=2$ supersymmetric quantum mechanics formulated on the lattice in terms of bosonic and fermionic bonds. In one dimension, the bond formulation allows to solve the system exactly, even at finite lattice spacing, through the construction and analysis of transfer matrices. In the present paper we elaborate on this approach and discuss a range of exact results for observables such as the Witten index, the mass spectra and Ward identities.

  10. Magnetically Controlled Spasmodic Accretion during Star Formation. II. Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of the late accretion phase of the evolution of an axisymmetric, isothermal magnetic disk surrounding a forming star has been formulated in a companion paper. The ``central sink approximation'' is used to circumvent the problem of describing the evolution inside the opaque central region for densities greater than 1011 cm-3 and radii smaller than a few AU. Only the electrons are assumed to be attached to the magnetic field lines, and the effects of both negatively and positively charged grains are accounted for. After a mass of 0.1 Msolar accumulates in the central cell (forming star), a series of magnetically driven outflows and associated outward-propagating shocks form in a quasi-periodic fashion. As a result, mass accretion onto the protostar occurs in magnetically controlled bursts. We refer to this process as spasmodic accretion. The shocks propagate outward with supermagnetosonic speeds. The period of dissipation and revival of the outflow decreases in time, as the mass accumulated in the central sink increases. We evaluate the contribution of ambipolar diffusion to the resolution of the magnetic flux problem of star formation during the accretion phase, and we find it to be very significant albeit not sufficient to resolve the entire problem yet. Ohmic dissipation is completely negligible in the disk during this phase of the evolution. The protostellar disk is found to be stable against interchange-like instabilities, despite the fact that the mass-to-flux ratio has temporary local maxima.

  11. Magnetically Controlled Spasmodic Accretion During Star Formation. II. Results

    CERN Document Server

    Tassis, K; Tassis, Konstantinos; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    2004-01-01

    The problem of the late accretion phase of the evolution of an axisymmetric, isothermal magnetic disk surrounding a forming star has been formulated in a companion paper. The "central sink approximation" is used to circumvent the problem of describing the evolution inside the opaque central region for densities greater than 10^11 cm^-3 and radii smaller than a few AUs. Only the electrons are assumed to be attached to the magnetic field lines, and the effects of both negatively and positively charged grains are accounted for. After a mass of 0.1 solar mass accumulates in the central cell (forming star), a series of magnetically driven outflows and associated outward propagating shocks form in a quasi-periodic fashion. As a result, mass accretion onto the protostar occurs in magnetically controlled bursts. We refer to this process as spasmodic accretion. The shocks propagate outward with supermagnetosonic speeds. The period of dissipation and revival of the outflow decreases in time, as the mass accumulated in ...

  12. Recent results of high p(T) physics at the CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, Soushi; /Okayama U.

    2005-02-01

    The Tevatron Run II program has been in progress since 2001. The CDF experiment has accumulated roughly five times as much data as did Run I, with much improved detectors. Preliminary results from the CDF experiment are presented. The authors focus on recent high p{sub T} physics results in the Tevatron Run II program.

  13. Results of Cesar II critical facility with low enriched fuel balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlet, G.; Guerange, J.; Laponche, B.; Morier, F.; Neef, R.D.; Bock, H.J.; Kring, F.J.; Scherer, W.

    1972-06-15

    The Cesar facility has been transformed to load in its center a pebble bed fuel. This new Cesar assembly is called Cesar II. The program for the measurements with HTR type fuel balls is managed under a cooperation between physicists of CEA/CADARACHE and KFA/JUELICH. A description of the measuring zones of Cesar II and of the experimental results is given.

  14. Phonon-Based Position Determination in SuperCDMS iZIP Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, A J

    2014-01-01

    SuperCDMS is currently operating a 10-kg array of cryogenic germanium detectors in the Soudan underground laboratory to search for weakly interacting massive particles, a leading dark matter candidate. These detectors, known as iZIPs, measure ionization and athermal phonons from particle interactions with sensors on both sides of a Ge crystal. The ionization signal can be used to efficiently tag events at high radius and near the top and bottoms surfaces, where diminished charge collection can cause events to mimic WIMP-induced nuclear recoils. Using calibration data taken with a 210Pb source underground at Soudan, we demonstrate rejection of surface events of (4.5 +/- 0.9) x 10^-4 with 46% acceptance of nuclear recoils using the phonon signal only. We also show with 133Ba calibration data underground that the phonon channels can efficiently identify events near the sidewall. This phonon-based approach can also be extended to lower energies than the ionization-based position reconstruction.

  15. Low-mass right-handed sneutrino dark matter: SuperCDMS and LUX constraints and the Galactic Centre gamma-ray excess

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdeno, D G; Robles, S

    2014-01-01

    Recent results from direct and indirect searches for dark matter (DM) have motivated the study of particle physics models that can provide weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the mass range 1-50 GeV. Viable candidates for light WIMP DM must fulfil stringent constraints. On the one hand, the observation at the LHC of a Higgs boson with Standard Model properties set an upper bound on the coupling of light DM particles to the Higgs, thereby making it difficult to reproduce the correct relic abundance. On the other hand, the recent results from direct searches in the CDMSlite, SuperCDMS and LUX experiments have set upper constraints on the DM scattering cross section. In this paper, we investigate the viability of light right-handed sneutrino DM in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Model (NMSSM) in the light of these constraints. To this aim, we have carried out a scan in the NMSSM parameter space, imposing experimental bounds on the Higgs sector and low-energy observables, such as the muon anomalous...

  16. First Results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment at the Deep Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandic, Vuk [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-06-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to search for dark matter in the form of the Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). For this purpose, CDMS uses detectors based on crystals of Ge and Si, operated at the temperature of 20 mK, and providing a two-fold signature of an interaction: the ionization and the athermal phonon signals. The two signals, along with the passive and active shielding of the experimental setup, and with the underground experimental sites, allow very effective suppression and rejection of different types of backgrounds. This dissertation presents the commissioning and the results of the first WIMP-search run performed by the CDMS collaboration at the deep underground site at the Soudan mine in Minnesota. We develop different methods of suppressing the dominant background due to the electron-recoil events taking place at the detector surface and we apply these algorithms to the data set. These results place the world's most sensitive limits on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent elastic-scattering cross-section. Finally, they examine the compatibility of the supersymmetric WIMP-models with the direct-detection experiments (such as CDMS) and discuss the implications of the new CDMS result on these models.

  17. The CDF-II tau physics program triggers, tau ID and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Pagliarone et al.

    2003-11-03

    The study of processes containing {tau} leptons in the final state will play an important role at Tevatron Run II. Such final states will be relevant both for electroweak studies and measurements as well as in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. The present paper discusses the physics opportunities and challenges related to the implementation of new set of triggers able to select events containing tau candidates in the final state. They illustrate, in particular, the physics capabilities for a variety of new physics scenarios such as supersymmetry (SUSY), SUSY with Rp-parity violation, with Bilinear parity violation or models with the violation of lepton flavor. Finally, they present the first Run II results obtained using some of the described tau triggers.

  18. Preliminary 6 month results from the Argus II epiretinal prosthesis feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humayun, Mark S; Dorn, Jessy D; Ahuja, Ashish K; Caspi, Avi; Filley, Eugene; Dagnelie, Gislin; Salzmann, Joël; Santos, Arturo; Duncan, Jacque; daCruz, Lyndon; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Eliott, Dean; McMahon, Matthew J; Greenberg, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    The Argus II 60 channel epiretinal prosthesis has been developed in order to provide partial restoration of vision to subjects blinded from outer retinal degenerative disease. To date the device has been implanted in 21 subjects as part of a feasibility study. In 6 month post-implantation door finding and line tracking orientation and mobility testing, subjects have shown improvements of 86% and 73%, respectively, for system on vs. system off. In high-contrast Square Localization tests using a touch screen monitor 87% of tested subjects performed significantly better with the system on compared with off. These preliminary results show that the Argus II system provides some functional vision to blind subjects.

  19. [Functional results after proximal row carpectomy (PRC) in patients with SNAC-/SLAC-wrist stage II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, S; Germann, G; Dragu, A; Tränkle, M; Sauerbier, M

    2005-04-01

    The proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is a motion preserving procedure which creates a new joint without arthrosis. It is a frequently used procedure in stage II of a posttraumatic degenerative arthrosis of the wrist after scaphoid nonunion or scapholunate ligament instability (SNAC-/SLAC-wrist). In this retrospective analysis the functional postoperative results of this operation are compared in light of a homogenous indication (SNAC-/SLAC-wrist stage II). In 38 patients PRC was performed for a stage II SNAC- (n = 29) or SLAC-wrist (n = 9) between June 1994 and March 2002. Postoperative examination included range of motion and grip strength. Pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS 0 - 100). The DASH questionnaire (disability of the arm, shoulder and hand) was used to evaluate the disabilities in activities of daily living (ADL). Thirty patients (79 %) with a mean age of 39 years (23 - 59) were evaluated with a mean follow-up of 27 months (6 - 100). Mean extension and flexion of the wrist reached 75 degree which was 57 % of the contralateral hand. Mean radial and ulnar deviation was 33 degree corresponding with 52 % of the contralateral hand. The average grip strength was 50 % of the unaffected side. The postoperative DASH score was 27.4. Pain with strenuous activity was reduced by 40 %, resting pain by 77 %. Three patients showed radiological signs of a radiocapitate arthrosis, one patient needed conversion into a complete wrist arthrodesis. Our results are in concordance with the literature. However, our follow-up time is relatively short and we cannot make any conclusion about the long-term outcome. PRC is a technically straightforward procedure for treatment of carpal collapse. For stage II of the SNAC-/SLAC-wrist we consider the resection of the proximal carpal row an alternative procedure to the midcarpal arthrodesis particularly in patients who require less grip strength and when a shorter postoperative immobilization is reasonable.

  20. Recent results from LEPS and prospects of LEPS II at SPring-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niiyama M.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available SPring-8/LEPS is a GeV photon beam facility for hadron physics. The linearly polarized photon beam is produced by backward-Compton scattering of laser photons from 8 GeV electrons. We have studied photoproduction of hadrons which contain strange quarks. In this article, firstly, we report one of the recent results from LEPS, the κ(800 meson search in the γp → K*0Σ+ reaction. Secondly, the status of the construction of a new GeV photon beam line LEPS II is described.

  1. Dark Matter Search Results from the Commissioning Run of PandaX-II

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Andi; Cui, Xiangyi; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yunhua; Fang, Deqing; Fu, Changbo; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Gong, Haowei; Hu, Shouyang; Huang, Xingtao; Ji, Xiangdong; Ju, Yonglin; Lei, Siao; Li, Shaoli; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xinglong; Liang, Hao; Lin, Qing; Liu, Huaxuan; Liu, Jianglai; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Ma, Yugang; Mao, Yajun; Ni, Kaixuan; Pushkin, Kirill; Ren, Xiangxiang; Schubnell, Michael; Shen, Manbin; Shi, Fang; Stephenson, Scott; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jiming; Wang, Meng; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Xuming; Wang, Zhou; Wu, Shiyong; Xiao, Mengjiao; Xie, Pengwei; Yan, Binbin; Yang, Yong; Yue, Jianfeng; Zeng, Xionghui; Zhang, Hongguang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Huanqiao; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Xiaopeng

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a search for WIMPs from the commissioning run of the PandaX-II experiment located at the China Jinping underground Laboratory. A WIMP search data set with an exposure of 306$\\times$19.1 kg-day was taken, while its dominant $^{85}$Kr background was used as the electron recoil calibration. No WIMP candidates are identified, and a 90\\% upper limit is set on the spin-independent elastic WIMP-nucleon cross section with a lowest excluded cross section of 2.97$\\times$10$^{-45}$~cm$^2$ at a WIMP mass of 44.7~GeV/c$^2$.

  2. Recent Results from and Future Plans for the VISA II SASE FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Andonian, Gerard; Babzien, Marcus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Boscolo, Ilario; Cialdi, Simone; Ferrario, Massimo; Flacco, Alessandro Federico; Frigola, Pedro; Huang, Jung Y; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Murokh, Alex; Palumbo, Luigi; Pellegrini, Claudio; Reiche, Sven; Rosenzweig, James E; Travish, Gil; Vicario, Carlo; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2005-01-01

    As the promise of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FEL) comes close to realization, the creation and diagnosis of ultra-short pulses is of great relevance in the SASE FEL (Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission) community. The VISA II (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) experiment entails the use of a chirped electron beam to drive a high gain SASE FEL at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in Brookhaven National Labs (BNL). The resulting ultra-short pulses will be diagnosed using an advanced FROG (Frequency Resolved Optical Gating) technique, as well as a double differential spectrum (angle/wavelength) diagnostic. Implementation of sextupole corrections to the longitudinal aberrations affecting the high energy-spread chirped beam during transport to the VISA undulator is studied. Start-to-end simulations, including radiation diagnostics, are discussed. Initial experimental results involving a highly chirped beam transported without sextupole correction, the resulting high gain lasing, and computational analysis are...

  3. The HIT-II Spherical Torus: Physics and Key Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, A. J.; Hamp, W. T.; Izzo, V. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.

    2004-11-01

    Discharges in the HIT-II spherical torus device [Redd et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2006 (2002)] can be driven by either Ohmic or Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) current drive. A new CHI operating regime has been explored, with toroidal plasma currents of up to 350 kA, I_p/I_TF ratios of up to 1.2, and internal probing data which may demonstrate the formation of a closed-flux core. The key to acheiving these results is the magnetic field shear in the CHI injector region, with a minimum shear necessary for current build-up. Ohmic plasma performance has also improved, with peak currents up to 300 kA, with and without transient CHI startup. The CHI startup technique [Raman et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2565 (2004)] provides more robust discharges, with a wider operating space and more efficient use of the transformer Volt-seconds, than unassisted Ohmic. Finally, CHI can be used to enhance an Ohmic plasma current without significantly degrading the quality of the discharge. Results will be presented for each HIT--II operating regime, including empirical performance scalings and applicable parametric operating spaces.

  4. Treatment results in women with clinical stage I and pathologic stage II endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobsen, J J; Schutter, E M; Meerwaldt, J H; Van Der Palen, J; Van Der Sijde, R; Ten Cate, L N

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report survival and results of therapy and possible prognostic factors in women with pathologic stage II endometrial carcinoma. Forty-two patients with pathologic stage II endometrial carcinoma were treated at the department of Radiation Oncology of the Medisch Spectrum Twente between 1987 and 1998. All patients received external radiotherapy following standard surgical procedures and no adjuvant systemic therapy was given. From the 42 patients 21 had a pathologic stage IIA and 21 stage IIB. The median follow-up was 62 months. The overall recurrence rate was 21.5% (9/42). Seven patients had distant metastasis, of which three also had locoregional recurrence, vaginal vault and/or pelvic. The presence of myometrial invasion (> (1/2)) and/or lymph-angioinvasion showed a significant relation with distant metastasis (P = 0.017). Stage IIB showed more recurrences, 33% (7/21). There was a significant different 5-year disease specific survival for stage IIA and IIB, respectively, 95% and 74% (P = 0.0311). Patients with a differentiation grade 3 and stage IIB showed a significantly poorer (P = 0.003) 5-year survival of 48.6% (P = 0.003). Results obtained in the present series of patients are in accordance with the literature. The present treatment policy seems justified, except for patients with pathologic stage IIB and grade 3, in which a more aggressive treatment should be considered.

  5. Results of FY 2001 feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactor cycle system phase-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Maeda, Fumio; Sato, Kazujiro; Ieda, Yoshiaki; Funasaka, Hideyuki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Reactor (FR) Cycle System Phase-II were commenced on April 1, 2001, in order to select a few promising candidate concepts for commercialization from the candidate concepts of the FR system and fuel cycle system which were screened in Phase-I, and to present an outline plan for Phase-III onward. In FY 2001, which was the first year of Phase-II, the results of Phase-I and the plan for Phase-II were evaluated as appropriate by The R and D Project Evaluation Committee. With regard to the sodium-cooled medium-scale modular reactor and lead-bismuth cooled modular reactor, economical targets are expected to be achieved. In terms of the gas-cooled reactor, the helium gas-cooled reactor (coated particle fuel type and dispersion fuel type) was screened as a candidate concept. For the reprocessing system, a feasibility of the process for the crystallization method on the advanced aqueous method was confirmed. With regard to the oxide electrowinning method, the technological feasibility of MOX electrowinning co-precipitation was confirmed. In terms of the metal electrowinning method, the possibility of system rationalization was confirmed by Pu recovery testing at liquid Cd cathode. For the fuel fabrication system, in terms of the pelletizing method, the ease of remote-controlled fabrication of low-decontamination TRU fuels was confirmed, and in terms of the vibration compaction method, the packing density is expected to be satisfied as regards the design requirement. With regard to the casting method, the operation parameters of the injection casting technology, which were satisfied to slug specification requirements, were grasped by engineering-scale testing. (author)

  6. First-year Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Results: Hubble Diagram and Cosmological Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Richard; Cinabro, David; Vanderplas, Jake; Frieman, Joshua A; Marriner, John; Davis, Tamara M; Dilday, Benjamin; Holtzman, Jon; Jha, Saurabh; Lampeitl, Hubert; Sako, Masao; Smith, Mathew; Zheng, Chen; Nichol, Robert C; Bassett, Bruce; Bender, Ralf; Depoy, Darren L; Doi, Mamoru; Elson, Ed; Filippenko, Alex V; Foley, Ryan J; Garnavich, Peter M; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Ketzeback, William; Kollatschny, W; Konishi, Kohki; Marshall, Jennifer L; McMillan, Russet J; Miknaitis, Gajus; Morokuma, Tomoki; M"ortsell, Edvard; Pan, Kaike; Prieto, Jose Luis; Richmond, Michael W; Riess, Adam G; Romani, Roger; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Takanashi, Naohiro; Tokita, Kouichi; van der Heyden, Kurt; Wheeler, J C; Yasuda, Naoki; York, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements of the Hubble diagram for 103 Type Ia supernovae (SNe) with redshifts 0.04 < z < 0.42, discovered during the first season (Fall 2005) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. These data fill in the redshift "desert" between low- and high-redshift SN Ia surveys. We combine the SDSS-II measurements with new distance estimates for published SN data from the ESSENCE survey, the Supernova Legacy Survey, the Hubble Space Telescope, and a compilation of nearby SN Ia measurements. Combining the SN Hubble diagram with measurements of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the SDSS Luminous Red Galaxy sample and with CMB temperature anisotropy measurements from WMAP, we estimate the cosmological parameters w and Omega_M, assuming a spatially flat cosmological model (FwCDM) with constant dark energy equation of state parameter, w. For the FwCDM model and the combined sample of 288 SNe Ia, we find w = -0.76 +- 0.07(stat) +- 0.11(syst), Omega_M = 0.306 +- 0.019(stat) +- 0.023...

  7. Results on charmed baryons and mesons from the SLAC-LBL Mark II detector at SPEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhaber, G.

    1979-01-01

    Results from the SLAC-LBL Mark II detector at SPEAR are presented. A few of the very recent results are emphasized, namely: (1) The observation of charmed baryons; a signal ..lambda../sub c/ ..-->.. pK/sup -/..pi../sup +/ and the charge conjugate of that channel, anti ..lambda../sub c/ ..-->.. anti pK/sup +/..pi../sup -/ are now established. Some evidence also exists for other channels, K/sub S/p, ..lambda pi../sup +/, etc. (2) The study of charmed mesons. Here some new hadronic decay modes are mentioned, and the Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes. (3) The D/sup +/ - D/sup 0/ lifetime ratio; evidence is presented that the D/sup +/ has a longer lifetime than the D/sup 0/ by about a factor of three, although the statistical error is fairly large on this number.

  8. ONLINE PORNOGRAPHY AND SEXUALITY: SOME RESULTS OF EU KIDS ONLINE SURVEY II IN THE ROMANIAN CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALENTINA MARINESCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article intends to analyze the exposure of Romanian children and teens to sexually explicit message and the so-called „sexting” activities they perform in the online environment. The main research topic to which we try to find some answers is: are young people more exposed to risks because they view sexually explicit content online and send sexual messages to others? Our results validate the risk migration hypothesis, the blurring boundaries between the online and offline worlds enabling the migration of risk from the real world to the internet and the reverse. At the same time, the date of EU Kinds Online II validate the vulnerability hypothesis, according to which the harm declared by the children following the exposure to sexually explicit images and the receiving the sexual messages is the result of their socio-demographic vulnerabilities

  9. Results on light dark matter particles with a low-threshold CRESST-II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angloher, G.; Iachellini, N.F.; Hauff, D.; Kiefer, M.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Wuestrich, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bento, A. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica, Coimbra (Portugal); Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Gorla, P.; Pagliarone, C.; Schaeffner, K. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Defay, X.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Muenster, A.; Potzel, W.; Schoenert, S.; Trinh Thi, H.H.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Zoeller, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Erb, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Walther-Meissner-Institut fuer Tieftemperaturforschung, Garching (Germany); Guetlein, A.; Kluck, H.; Schieck, J.; Tuerkoglu, C. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien (Austria); Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Wien (Austria); Jochum, J.; Loebell, J.; Strandhagen, C.; Uffinger, M.; Usherov, I. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Reindl, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The CRESST-II experiment uses cryogenic detectors to search for nuclear recoil events induced by the elastic scattering of dark matter particles in CaWO{sub 4} crystals. Given the low energy threshold of our detectors in combination with light target nuclei, low mass dark matter particles can be probed with high sensitivity. In this letter we present the results from data of a single detector module corresponding to 52 kg live days. A blind analysis is carried out. With an energy threshold for nuclear recoils of 307 eV we substantially enhance the sensitivity for light dark matter. Thereby, we extend the reach of direct dark matter experiments to the sub- GeV/c{sup 2} region and demonstrate that the energy threshold is the key parameter in the search for low mass dark matter particles. (orig.)

  10. Results on low mass WIMPs using an upgraded CRESST-II detector

    CERN Document Server

    Angloher, G; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Erb, A; Feilitzsch, F v; Iachellini, N Ferreiro; Gorla, P; Gütlein, A; Hauff, D; Huff, P; Jochum, J; Kiefer, M; Kister, C; Kluck, H; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J -C; Loebell, J; Münster, A; Petricca, F; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Reindl, F; Roth, S; Rottler, K; Sailer, C; Schäffner, K; Schieck, J; Schmaler, J; Scholl, S; Schönert, S; Seidel, W; Sivers, M v; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Strauss, R; Tanzke, A; Uffinger, M; Ulrich, A; Usherov, I; Wüstrich, M; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Zöller, A

    2014-01-01

    The CRESST-II cryogenic dark matter search aims for the detection of WIMPs via elastic scattering off nuclei in CaWO$_4$ crystals. We present results from a low-threshold analysis of a single upgraded detector module. This module efficiently vetoes low energy backgrounds induced by $\\alpha$-decays on inner surfaces of the detector. With an exposure of 29.35 kg live days collected in 2013 we set a limit on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering which probes a new region of parameter space for WIMP masses below 3 GeV/c$^2$, previously not covered in direct detection searches. A possible excess over background discussed for the previous run (from 2009 to 2011) is not confirmed.

  11. Results on light dark matter particles with a low-threshold CRESST-II detector

    CERN Document Server

    Angloher, G; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Defay, X; Erb, A; Feilitzsch, F v; Iachellini, N Ferreiro; Gorla, P; Gütlein, A; Hauff, D; Jochum, J; Kiefer, M; Kluck, H; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J C; Loebell, J; Münster, A; Pagliarone, C; Petricca, F; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Reindl, F; Schäffner, K; Schieck, J; Schönert, S; Seidel, W; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Strauss, R; Tanzke, A; Thi, H H Trinh; Türkoğlu, C; Uffinger, M; Ulrich, A; Usherov, I; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Wüstrich, M; Zöller, A

    2015-01-01

    The CRESST-II experiment uses cryogenic detectors to search for nuclear recoil events induced by the elastic scattering of dark matter particles in CaWO$_4$ crystals. Given the low energy threshold of our detectors in combination with light target nuclei, low mass dark matter particles can be probed with high sensitivity. In this letter we present the results from data of a single detector module corresponding to 52 kg live days. A blind analysis is carried out. With an energy threshold for nuclear recoils of 307 eV we substantially enhance the sensitivity for light dark matter. Thereby, we extend the reach of direct dark matter experiments to the sub-region and demonstrate that the energy threshold is the key parameter in the search for low mass dark matter particles.

  12. MICRON-SCALE LASER-WIRE AT THE ATF-II AT KEK COMMISSIONING AND RESULTS

    CERN Document Server

    Nevay, L J; Walczak, R; Blair, G A; Boogert, S; Deacon, L C; Karataev, P; Aryshev, A; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J

    2011-01-01

    We present the first results from the commissioning of the upgraded laser-wire experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF-II) at KEK. A new laser transport line and beam diagnostics were used to collide 150 mJ, 167 ps long laser pulses with 1.28 GeV, 30 ps long electron bunches to measure the vertical transverse size. Additionally, a new detector was installed with a reduced area for lower background. Initial scans showing a convoluted beam size of 18.4 ± 0.4 μm were used to tune the electron beam optics and reduce this down to 8.0 ± 0.3 μm. Laser pulse energy and charge dependency were investigated showing a linear relationship in both with a minimum laser energy of 20 mJ required for adequate signal to make a laser-wire scan.

  13. Dark Matter Results from First 98.7-day Data of PandaX-II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Andi; Cui, Xiangyi; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yunhua; Fang, Deqing; Fu, Changbo; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Gong, Haowei; Hu, Shouyang; Huang, Xingtao; Ji, Xiangdong; Ju, Yonglin; Lei, Siao; Li, Shaoli; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xinglong; Liang, Hao; Lin, Qing; Liu, Huaxuan; Liu, Jianglai; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Ma, Yugang; Mao, Yajun; Ni, Kaixuan; Ren, Xiangxiang; Schubnell, Michael; Shen, Manbin; Shi, Fang; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jiming; Wang, Meng; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Xuming; Wang, Zhou; Wu, Shiyong; Xiao, Xiang; Xie, Pengwei; Yan, Binbin; Yang, Yong; Yue, Jianfeng; Zeng, Xionghui; Zhang, Hongguang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Huanqiao; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Xiaopeng

    2016-01-01

    We report the WIMP dark matter search results using the first physics-run data of the PandaX-II 500 kg liquid xenon dual-phase time-projection chamber, operating at the China JinPing Underground Laboratory. No dark matter candidate is identified above background. In combination with the data set during the commissioning run, with a total exposure of 3.3$\\times10^4$ kg-day,the most stringent limit to the spin-independent interaction between the ordinary and WIMP dark matter is set for a range of dark matter mass between 3.5 and 1000 GeV/c$^2$. The best upper limit on the scattering cross section is found $2.5\\times 10^{-46}$ cm$^2$ for the WIMP mass 40 GeV/c$^2$ at 90% confidence level.

  14. Results and prospects of axion searches with the OSQAR and ALPS II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schott, Matthias; Weinsheimer, Christoph [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Axion and axion-like particles (ALPs) are well motivated hypothetical Spin-0 bosons, naturally arising in many extensions of the Standard Model. At first introduced to solve the strong-CP problem by breaking an additional U(1) Pecci-Quinn symmetry, meanwhile several astrophysical observations hint to the ALPs sector as well. In so called Light-Shining-through-Wall (LSW) experiments the effective diphoton vertex inherent to Axions and ALPs is exploited for direct searches. High power laser beams traversing strong magnetic fields are used to create and annihilate ALPs making them accessible in laboratory setups. In this talk the latest results of the of the OSQAR experiment (CERN) are presented as well as prospects of near future enhancements by the ALPS II (DESY) experiment aiming for an improved sensitivity of 3 orders of magnitude.

  15. Results on two-photon interactions from Mark II at SPEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.

    1979-10-01

    Preliminary results on two-photon interactions from the SLAC-LBL Mark II magnetic detector at SPEAR are presented. The cross section for eta' production by the reaction e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. e/sup +/e/sup -/ eta' has been measured over the beam energy range from 2 to 4 GeV. The radiative width GAMMA/sub ..gamma gamma../(eta') has been determined to be 5.8 +- 1.1 keV (+- 20% systematic uncertainty). Upper limits on the radiative widths of the f(1270), and A/sub 2/(1310) and f'(1515) mesons have been determined.

  16. Elastodynamic analysis of a gear pump. Part II: Meshing phenomena and simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.; Rivola, A.

    2010-10-01

    A non-linear lumped kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps is presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machines. Two main sources of noise and vibration can be considered: pressure and gear meshing. Fluid pressure distribution on gears, which is time-varying, is computed and included as a resultant external force and torque acting on the gears. Parametric excitations due to time-varying meshing stiffness, the tooth profile errors (obtained by a metrological analysis), the backlash effects between meshing teeth, the lubricant squeeze and the possibility of tooth contact on both lines of action were also included. Finally, the torsional stiffness and damping of the driving shaft and the non-linear behaviour of the hydrodynamic journal bearings were also taken into account. Model validation was carried out on the basis of experimental data concerning case accelerations and force reactions. The model can be used in order to analyse the pump dynamic behaviour and to identify the effects of modifications in design and operation parameters, in terms of vibration and dynamic forces. Part I is devoted to the calculation of the gear eccentricity in the steady-state condition as result of the balancing between mean pressure loads, mean meshing force and bearing reactions, while in Part II the meshing phenomena are fully explained and the main simulation results are presented.

  17. Preliminary Results from the PrimEx-II experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparian, Ashot [NCA& T, Greensboro, NC; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Properties of the neutral pion, as the lightest hadron in Nature, are most sensitive to the basic symmetries and their partial breaking effects in the theory of the strong interaction (QCD). In particular, the po →gg decay width is primarily defined by the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking effect (chiral anomaly) in QCD. The next order corrections to the anomaly have been shown to be small and are known to a 1% precision level. The PrimEx Collaboration at JLab has developed and performed two Primakoff type experiments to measure the po →gg decay width with a similar precision. The published result from the PrimEx-I experiment, G(p0 →gg ) = 7.82±0.14 (stat.)±0.17 (syst.) eV, was a factor of two more precise than the average value quoted in PDG-2010 [1]. The second experiment was performed in 2010 with a goal of 1.4% total uncertainty to address the next-to-leading-order theory calculations. The preliminary results from the PrimEx-II experiment are presented and discussed in this note.

  18. Beam line I411 at MAX II--performance and first results

    CERN Document Server

    Baessler, M; Jurvansuu, M; Feifel, R; Forsell, J O; Tarso-Fonseca, P D; Kivimaeki, A; Sundin, S; Sorensen, S L; Nyholm, R; Bjoerneholm, O; Aksela, S; Svensson, S

    2001-01-01

    We report on the characteristics and first results from the soft X-ray beam line I411, based on an undulator at the third generation synchrotron facility MAX II, Sweden. The beam line is designed for high-resolution, angle-resolved electron spectroscopy on gases, liquids and solids. Main components are the modified SX700 monochromator and the end station, both of which were previously used at beam line 51 at MAX I. The end station is equipped with a rotatable SES-200 hemispherical electron-analyser. Before the end station, a one-metre section is reserved for exchangeable experimental set-ups. The usable photon energy range is 50-1500 eV and the photon flux is two orders of magnitudes higher compared to beam line 51. At 400 eV a resolving power of about 5700 in the first order of the monochromator grating could be obtained. In gas phase, a total electron energy resolution of 16 meV has been achieved. Detailed results on the undulator performance, flux, photon and electron energy resolution as well as some tech...

  19. Alignment of the CMS Tracker: Latest Results from LHC Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Mittag, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    The all-silicon design of the tracking system of the CMS experiment provides excellent measurements of charged-particle tracks and an efficient tagging of jets. Conditions of the CMS tracker changed repeatedly during the 2015/2016 shutdown and the 2016 data-taking period. Still the true position and orientation of each of the 15\\,148 silicon strip and 1440 silicon pixel modules need to be known with high precision for all intervals. The alignment constants also need to be promptly re-adjusted each time the state of the CMS magnet is changed between 0\\,T and 3.8\\,T. Latest Run-II results of the CMS tracker alignment and resolution performance are presented, which are obtained using several millions of reconstructed tracks from collision and cosmic-ray data of 2016. The geometries and the resulting performance of physics observables are carefully validated. In addition to the offline alignment, an online procedure has been put in place which continuously monitors movements of the pixel high-level structures and...

  20. Trimodality therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma: Results from an EORTC phase II multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.Y. van Schil (Paul); P. Baas (Paul); R.M. Gaafar (Rabab); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F. Van De Pol (Francien); B. Hasane (B.); H.M. Klomp (Houke); A.M. Abdelrahman (A.); J. Welche (J.); J.P. van Meerbeeck (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC; protocol 08031) phase II trial investigated the feasibility of trimodality therapy consisting of induction chemotherapy followed by extrapleural pneumonectomy and post-operative radiotherapy in patients with malignant

  1. Resonant Frequency Control For the PIP-II Injector Test RFQ: Control Framework and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, A. L. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Bowring, D.; Chase, B. E.; Edelen, J. P.; Nicklaus, D.; Steimel, J.

    2016-12-16

    For the PIP-II Injector Test (PI-Test) at Fermilab, a four-vane radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is designed to accelerate a 30-keV, 1-mA to 10-mA, H- beam to 2.1 MeV under both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) RF operation. The available headroom of the RF amplifiers limits the maximum allowable detuning to 3 kHz, and the detuning is controlled entirely via thermal regulation. Fine control over the detuning, minimal manual intervention, and fast trip recovery is desired. In addition, having active control over both the walls and vanes provides a wider tuning range. For this, we intend to use model predictive control (MPC). To facilitate these objectives, we developed a dedicated control framework that handles higher-level system decisions as well as executes control calculations. It is written in Python in a modular fashion for easy adjustments, readability, and portability. Here we describe the framework and present the first control results for the PI-Test RFQ under pulsed and CW operation.

  2. Management of Class I and Class II Amalgam Restorations with Localized Defects: Five-Year Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Martin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of dental restorations has been the traditional treatment for defective restorations. This five-year prospective clinical trial evaluated amalgam restorations with localized defects that were treated by means of repair or refurbishing. Fifty-two patients (50% female and 50% male, mean age 28.3±18.1 years, range 18–80 with 160 class I and class II defective restorations were included. The study focused on the application of two minimally invasive treatments for localized restoration defects and compared these with no treatment and total replacement as negative and positive controls, respectively. Restorations were assessed by two calibrated examiners according to modified U.S. Public Health Service criteria, including marginal adaptation, anatomic form, secondary caries, and roughness. At five years, recall was examined in 45 patients with 108 restorations (67.5%. The results suggest that repair treatment is as effective as total replacement of restorations with localized defects, reducing biological costs to the patient and providing new tools to the clinician. Refinishing restoration is a useful treatment for localized anatomic form defects.

  3. A new aberration-corrected, energy-filtered LEEM/PEEM instrument II. Operation and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, R.M., E-mail: rtromp@us.ibm.com [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Hannon, J.B. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Wan, W. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 80R0114, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Berghaus, A.; Schaff, O. [SPECS GmbH, Voltastrasse 5, D-13355 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    In Part I we described a new design for an aberration-corrected Low Energy Electron Microscope (LEEM) and Photo Electron Emission Microscope (PEEM) equipped with an in-line electron energy filter. The chromatic and spherical aberrations of the objective lens are corrected with an electrostatic electron mirror that provides independent control of the chromatic and spherical aberration coefficients C{sub c} and C{sub 3}, as well as the mirror focal length. In this Part II we discuss details of microscope operation, how the microscope is set up in a systematic fashion, and we present typical results. - Highlights: ► The C{sub c} and C{sub 3} aberrations of a LEEM/PEEM instrument are corrected with an electrostatic electron mirror. ► The mirror provides independent control over C{sub c}, C{sub 3} and focal length in close agreement with theory. ► A detailed alignment procedure for the corrected microscope is given. ► Novel methods to measure C{sub c} and C{sub 3} of the objective lens and the mirror are presented. ► We demonstrate a record spatial resolution of 2 nm.

  4. Bioinstrumentation for evaluation of workload in payload specialists: results of ASSESS II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Hans M.; Herrmann, Reinhold; Winget, Charles M.

    1980-11-01

    ASSESS II‡Acronym for Airborne Science/Spacelab Experiments System Simulation. was a cooperative NASA-ESA project which consisted of a detailed simulation of Spacelab operations using the NASA Ames Research Center CV-990 aircraft laboratory. The Medical Experiment reported on in this paper was part of the complex payload consisting of 11 different experiments. Its general purpose was to develop a technology, possibly flown on board of Spacelab, and enabling the assessment of workload through evaluating changes of circadian rhythmicity, sleep disturbances and episodical or cumulative stress. As parameters the following variables were measured: Rectal temperature, ECG, sleep-EEG and -EOG, the urinary excretion of hormones and electrolytes. The results revealed evidence that a Spacelab environment, as simulated in ASSESS II, will lead to internal dissociation of circadian rhythms, to sleep disturbances and to highly stressful working conditions. Altogether these effects will impose considerable workload upon Payload Specialists. It is suggested that an intensive pre-mission system simulation will reduce these impairments to a reasonable degree. The bioinstrumentation applied in this experiment proved to be a practical and reliable tool in assessing the objectives of the study.

  5. Cataloging of the Digitized POSS-II, and Some Initial Scientific Results From It

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G; Gal, R R; Pahre, M A; Scaramella, R; Longo, G

    1996-01-01

    We are conducting an effort to catalog all sources detected in the digitized POSS-II (DPOSS). This is now becoming an international collaboration including Caltech and the Observatories of Rome and Naples (project CRONA). There are also ongoing extensive CCD calibration efforts at Palomar. The resulting Palomar-Norris Sky Catalog (PNSC) is expected to contain > 5 x 10^7 galaxies, and > 2 x 10^9 stars, in 3 colors (photographic JFN bands, calibrated to CCD gri system), down to the limiting magnitude equivalent of B approx 22 mag. The star-galaxy classification is accurate to 90 - 95% down to the equivalent of B approx 21 mag. The catalog will be made available to the community via computer networks or other suitable media, probably in installments, as soon as scientific validation and quality checks are completed and the funding allows it. Analysis and manipulation software will also be freely available. A great variety of scientific projects will be possible with this vast new data base, including studies of ...

  6. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation: Phase II Results of a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.

    2013-11-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. The Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3), which operated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23, was established to verify the accuracy of these simulation tools [1]. This work was then extended under the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project under IEA Wind Task 30 [2]. Both of these projects sought to verify the accuracy of offshore wind turbine dynamics simulation tools (or codes) through code-to-code comparison of simulated responses of various offshore structures. This paper describes the latest findings from Phase II of the OC4 project, which involved the analysis of a 5-MW turbine supported by a floating semisubmersible. Twenty-two different organizations from 11 different countries submitted results using 24 different simulation tools. The variety of organizations contributing to the project brought together expertise from both the offshore structure and wind energy communities. Twenty-one different load cases were examined, encompassing varying levels of model complexity and a variety of metocean conditions. Differences in the results demonstrate the importance and accuracy of the various modeling approaches used. Significant findings include the importance of mooring dynamics to the mooring loads, the role nonlinear hydrodynamic terms play in calculating drift forces for the platform motions, and the difference between global (at the platform level) and local (at the member level) modeling of viscous drag. The results from this project will help guide development and improvement efforts for these tools to ensure that they are providing the accurate information needed to support the design and

  7. BIOBEHAVIORAL PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE: Results from the INSPIRE-II Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, James A.; Smith, Patrick J.; Durheim, Michael; Mabe, Stephanie; Emery, Charles F.; Martinu, Tereza; Diaz, Philip T.; Babyak, Michael; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Palmer, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the prognostic value of select biobehavioral factors in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a secondary analysis of participants from the INSPIRE-II trial. Methods Three hundred twenty six outpatients with COPD underwent assessments of pulmonary function, physical activity, body mass index, inflammation, pulmonary symptoms, depression, and pulmonary quality of life, and were followed for up to 5.4 years for subsequent clinical events. The prognostic value of each biobehavioral factor, considered individually and combined, also was examined in the context of existing Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2011 risk stratification. Results Sixty-nine individuals experienced a hospitalization or died over a mean follow-up time period of 2.4 (interquartile range = 1.6) years. GOLD classification was associated with an increased risk of clinical events (HR = 2.72 [95% CI 1.63, 4.54], per stage); Six Minute Walk (HR = 0.50 [0.34, 0.73] per 500 feet), total steps (HR = 0.82 [0.71, 0.94] per 1,000 steps), hsC-reactive protein (HR = 1.44 [1.01, 2.06] per 4.5 mg/L), depression (HR = 1.12 [1.01, 1.25] per 4 points), and pulmonary quality of life (HR = 1.73 [1.14, 2.63] per 25 points) were each predictive over and above the GOLD assessment. However, only GOLD group and Six Minute Walk were predictive of all-cause mortality and COPD hospitalization when all biobehavioral variables were included together in a multivariable model. Conclusion Biobehavioral factors provide added prognostic information over and above measures of COPD severity in predicting adverse events in patients with COPD. PMID:26780299

  8. Ageing and health status in adults with intellectual disabilities: results of the European POMONA II study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveman, M.; Perry, J.; Salvador-Carulla, L.; Walsh, P.N.; Kerr, M.; Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H.M.J. van; Hove, G. van; Berger, D.M.; Azema, B.; Buono, S.; Cara, A.C.; Germanavicius, A.; Linehan, C.; Maatta, T.; Tossebro, J.; Weber, G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: POMONA II was a European Commission public health-funded project. The research questions in this article focus on age-specific differences relating to environmental and lifestyle factors, and the 17 medical conditions measured by the POMONA Checklist of Health Indicators (P15). METHOD: T

  9. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per Zier;

    2013-01-01

    al, N Engl J Med 2012;367:1187). Compared with bicalutamide in nonclinical studies, enzalutamide had higher androgen receptor– binding affinity, prevented nuclear translocation, showed no DNA binding, and induced apoptosis (Tran et al, Science 2009;324:787). In contrast to previous phase II and III...

  10. REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE II STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T

    2008-11-21

    Twenty five glass compositions were selected for a Phase II study to assess the potential for reducing the conservatism in the nepheline discriminator. The glass compositions were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the liquidus temperature model was used to restrict the glass compositions so that they could all be melted at the same temperature. The nepheline discriminator was used to force the glass compositions into regions where nepheline formation was predicted to occur. The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized for crystallization and chemical durability after both quenching and slow cooling. Chemical analysis showed that the fabricated glasses met the target compositions. Nepheline was identified in one of the quenched glasses and several of the CCC glasses. There was no clear relationship between the types of crystallization that occurred in a particular glass and its location on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} ternary diagram. A partitioning algorithm was used to identify trends in crystallization behavior based on glass composition. Generally, for the CCC glasses MnO influenced the crystallization of spinels and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} influenced the crystallization of nepheline. Measured durability responses varied from acceptable to unacceptable depending on the glass composition and type and extent of crystallization that occurred. It was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator at this time. It is recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where acceptable glasses are predicted to be

  11. Target echo strength modelling at FOI, including results from the BeTSSi II workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Östberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the target echo strength (TS) modelling capacity at the Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI) is presented. The modelling methods described range from approximate ones, such as raytracing and Kirchhoff approximation codes, to high accuracy full field codes including boundary integral equation methods and finite elements methods. Illustrations of the applicability of the codes are given for a few simple cases tackled during the BeTTSi II (Benchmark Target Echo Strength Simulation) workshop held in Kiel 2014.

  12. Results of site validation experiments. Volume II. Supporting documents 5 through 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains the following supporting documents: Summary of Geologic Mapping of Underground Investigations; Logging of Vertical Coreholes - ''Double Box'' Area and Exploratory Drift; WIPP High Precision Gravity Survey; Basic Data Reports for Drillholes, Brine Content of Facility Internal Strata; Mineralogical Content of Facility Interval Strata; Location and Characterization of Interbedded Materials; Characterization of Aquifers at Shaft Locations; and Permeability of Facility Interval Strate.

  13. The response of an equatorial ocean to simple wind stress patterns. I - Model formulation and analytic results. II - Numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    A time-dependent, primitive equation, beta plane model that is two-dimensional in the horizontal has been developed to model wind-driven equatorial ocean circulation. A simple vertical structure consisting of two layers above the thermocline with the same constant density permits a steady-state undercurrent in the model. An analytical study of the linear dynamics of the model suggests that the addition of inertial effects is needed to simulate the undercurrent properly. Also, both linear and nonlinear dynamics of the model are investigated numerically. Such nonlinear response to wind stress as a strong eastward equatorial undercurrent and an intense eastward 'countercurrent' at three deg N are noted in the numerical results.

  14. QGSJET-II: physics, recent improvements, and results for air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostapchenko S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of high energy hadronic and nuclear interactions by the QGSJET-II generator is discussed. Recent updates related to the treatment of nonlinear effects inthe interaction dynamics and to the model calibration with new LHC data are described. A special attention is devoted to the predictions of the new model version forcharacteristics of extensive air showers initiated by high energy cosmic rays. In particular, an improved description of charge exchange processes in pion collisionsis discussed and the respective enhancement of the shower muon content is analyzed.

  15. Oral fingolimod (FTY720) in multiple sclerosis: two-year results of a phase II extension study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, P; Comi, G; Montalban, X;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the results of a 24-month extension of a phase II trial assessing the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of the once-daily oral sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulator, fingolimod (FTY720), in relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: In the randomized, double-blind, pla...

  16. Tubal sterilization and breast cancer incidence: results from the cancer prevention study II nutrition cohort and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Patel, Alpa V; Sun, Juzhong; Teras, Lauren R; Gapstur, Susan M

    2013-03-15

    Tubal sterilization is a common form of contraception in the United States and is hypothesized to be associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. However, prior observational studies have reported inconsistent results. We investigated the association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk among 77,249 postmenopausal, cancer-free women in the Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II) Nutrition Cohort, enrolled in 21 states in the United States during 1992-1993. During 15 years of follow-up through June 30, 2007, 4,084 invasive breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. A meta-analysis including the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort results with other published results from 4 case-control studies and 3 prospective studies was conducted to provide a summary estimate for the association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk. In the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort, tubal sterilization was not associated with breast cancer incidence (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.20). Associations stratified by year of tubal sterilization, age, and time since surgery were also null. The meta-analysis also found no association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk (odds ratio = 0.97, 95% confidence interval: 0.84, 1.09). Tubal sterilization does not appear to be associated with breast cancer risk.

  17. Evaluation of LLTR Series II test A-2 results. [Large Leak Test Rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whipple, J C; Shoopak, B F; Chen, K; Fan, C K; Odegaard, T K

    1980-07-01

    Series II Test A-2 employed a double-ended (DEG) tube rupture 122'' above the lower end of the LLTI shroud under typical evaporator startup conditions. The leak site was located 2'' below Spacer No. 4 at the same location as Test A-lb which employed nitrogen as the inert non-reactive injection fluid. The test yielded peak pressures of 375 psig in the leak site region and 485 psig at the upper tubesheet approximately 10 ms and 12 ms, respectively, after tube rupture. Higher peak temperatures (approx. 2200/sup 0/F) were measured in this test than during Series I sodium-water reaction testing (peak temperatures measured during Series were about 1900/sup 0/F maximum). These high peak temperatures occurred in Test A-2 long after the tube rupture (approx. 8 seconds) and did not contribute to the acoustic peak pressures produced in the first few milliseconds.

  18. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  19. Postprocedural CT for perivertebral cement leakage in percutaneous vertebroplasty is not necessary - results from VERTOS II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venmans, Alexander; Klazen, Caroline A.; Rooij, Willem Jan van; Lohle, Paul N. [St. Elisabeth Ziekenhuis Tilburg, Department of Radiology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Vries, Jolanda de [St. Elisabeth Ziekenhuis Tilburg, Department of Medical Psychology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Mali, Willem P. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    During percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV), perivertebral cement leakage frequently occurs. There is some concern that cement deposits may migrate towards the lungs via the veins during follow-up. We used baseline and follow-up computed tomography (CT) to assess the incidence and extend of late cement migration in a large consecutive patient cohort. VERTOS II is a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing PV with conservative therapy for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). Patients assigned to PV had baseline postprocedural CT scans of the treated vertebral bodies. After a mean follow-up of 22 months, 54 of 78 patients (69%) had follow-up CT. CT scans were analyzed and compared for perivertebral venous, discal, and soft tissue leakage. Perivertebral cement leakage occurred in 64 of 80 treated vertebrae (80%; 95% CI, 70% to 87%). All patients remained asymptomatic. Perivertebral venous leakage was present in 56 vertebrae (88%), mostly in the anterior external venous plexus (46 of 56, 82%). Discal leakage occurred in 22 of 64 vertebrae (34%) and soft tissue leakage in two of 64 (4%). Mean injected cement volume in vertebrae with leakage was higher (4.5 versus 3.7 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.04). Follow-up CT scan showed unchanged perivertebral cement leakages without late cement migration. Perivertebral cement leaks during PV for OVCFs occurred frequently in the VERTOS II trial. Cement leakage occurred more frequently with higher injected volumes. However, all patients remained asymptomatic, and late cement migration during follow-up did not occur. Standard postprocedural CT of the treated vertebral body in PV is not necessary. (orig.)

  20. Formulation, computation and improvement of steady state security margins in power systems. Part II: Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echavarren, F.M.; Lobato, E.; Rouco, L.; Gomez, T. [School of Engineering of Universidad Pontificia Comillas, C/Alberto Aguilera, 23, 28015 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    A steady state security margin for a particular operating point can be defined as the distance from this initial point to the secure operating limits of the system. Four of the most used steady state security margins are the power flow feasibility margin, the contingency feasibility margin, the load margin to voltage collapse, and the total transfer capability between system areas. This is the second part of a two part paper. Part I has proposed a novel framework of a general model able to formulate, compute and improve any steady state security margin. In Part II the performance of the general model is validated by solving a variety of practical situations in modern real power systems. Actual examples of the Spanish power system will be used for this purpose. The same computation and improvement algorithms outlined in Part I have been applied for the four security margins considered in the study, outlining the convenience of defining a general framework valid for the four of them. The general model is used here in Part II to compute and improve: (a) the power flow feasibility margin (assessing the influence of the reactive power generation limits in the Spanish power system), (b) the contingency feasibility margin (assessing the influence of transmission and generation capacity in maintaining a correct voltage profile), (c) the load margin to voltage collapse (assessing the location and quantity of loads that must be shed in order to be far away from voltage collapse) and (d) the total transfer capability (assessing the export import pattern of electric power between different areas of the Spanish system). (author)

  1. Modelling and observation of transionospheric propagation results from ISIS II in preparation for ePOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Gillies

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP is scheduled to be launched as part of the Cascade Demonstrator Small-Sat and Ionospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE satellite in early 2008. A Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI on ePOP will receive HF transmissions from various ground-based transmitters. In preparation for the ePOP mission, data from a similar transionospheric experiment performed by the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS II satellite has been studied. Prominent features in the received 9.303-MHz signal were periodic Faraday fading of signal intensity at rates up to 13 Hz and a time of arrival delay between the O- and X-modes of up to 0.8 ms. Both features occurred when the satellite was above or south of the Ottawa transmitter. Ionospheric models for ray tracing were constructed using both International Reference Ionosphere (IRI profiles and local peak electron density values from ISIS ionograms. Values for fade rate and differential mode delay were computed and compared to the values observed in the ISIS II data. The computed values showed very good agreement to the observed values of both received signal parameters when the topside sounding foF2 values were used to scale IRI profiles, but not when strictly modelled IRI profiles were used. It was determined that the primary modifier of the received signal parameters was the foF2 density and not the shape of the profile. This dependence was due to refraction, at the 9.303-MHz signal frequency, causing the rays to travel larger distances near the peak density where essentially all the mode splitting occurred. This study should assist in interpretation of ePOP RRI data when they are available.

  2. Visualization on supercomputing platform level II ASC milestone (3537-1B) results from Sandia.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geveci, Berk (Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Fabian, Nathan; Marion, Patrick (Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2010-09-01

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia portion of the ASC Level II Visualization on the platform milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratories. This milestone contains functionality required for performing visualization directly on a supercomputing platform, which is necessary for peta-scale visualization. Sandia's contribution concerns in-situ visualization, running a visualization in tandem with a solver. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors(GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the performance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. Scientific simulation on parallel supercomputers is traditionally performed in four

  3. Minor physical anomalies in bipolar I and bipolar II disorders - Results with the Méhes Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berecz, Hajnalka; Csábi, Györgyi; Jeges, Sára; Herold, Róbert; Simon, Maria; Halmai, Tamás; Trixler, Dániel; Hajnal, András; Tóth, Ákos Levente; Tényi, Tamás

    2017-03-01

    Minor physical anomalies (MPAs) are external markers of abnormal brain development, so the more common appearence of these signs among bipolar I and bipolar II patients can confirm the possibility of a neurodevelopmental deficit in these illnesses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the rate and topological profile of minor physical anomalies in patients with bipolar I and - first in literature - with bipolar II disorders compared to matched healthy control subjects. Using a list of 57 minor physical anomalies (the Méhes Scale), 30 bipolar I and 30 bipolar II patients, while as a comparison 30 matched healthy control subjects were examined. Significant differences were detected between the three groups comparing the total number of minor physical anomalies, minor malformations and phenogenetic variants and in the cases of the ear and the mouth regions. The individual analyses of the 57 minor physical anomalies by simultaneous comparison of the three groups showed, that in the cases of furrowed tongue and high arched palate were significant differences between the three groups. The results can promote the concept, that a neurodevelopmental deficit may play a role in the etiology of both bipolar I and bipolar II disorders.

  4. Interview-based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L; Meisel, Zachary F; Choo, Esther K; Garro, Aris C; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow Guthrie, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research.

  5. Results from 730 kg days of the CRESST-II Dark Matter Search

    CERN Document Server

    Angloher, G; Bavykina, I; Bento, A; Bucci, C; Ciemniak, C; Deuter, G; von Feilitzsch, F; Hauff, D; Huff, P; Isaila, C; Jochum, J; Kiefer, M; Kimmerle, M; Lanfranchi, J -C; Petricca, F; Pfister, S; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Reindl, F; Roth, S; Rottler, K; Sailer, C; Schäffner, K; Schmaler, J; Scholl, S; Seidel, W; von Sivers, M; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Strauß, R; Tanzke, A; Usherov, I; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Zöller, A

    2011-01-01

    The CRESST-II cryogenic Dark Matter search, aiming at detection of WIMPs via elastic scattering off nuclei in CaWO$_4$ crystals, completed 730 kg days of data taking in 2011. We present the data collected with eight detector modules, each with a two-channel readout; one for a phonon signal and the other for coincidently produced scintillation light. The former provides a precise measure of the energy deposited by an interaction, and the ratio of scintillation light to deposited energy can be used to discriminate different types of interacting particles and thus to distinguish possible signal events from the dominant backgrounds. Sixty-seven events are found in the acceptance region where a WIMP signal in the form of low energy nuclear recoils would be expected. We estimate background contributions to this observation from four sources: 1) "leakage" from the e/\\gamma-band 2) "leakage" from the \\alpha-particle band 3) neutrons and 4) Pb-206 recoils from Po-210 decay. Using a maximum likelihood analysis, we find...

  6. Results of the phase II study of photodynamic therapy in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaka, Chimori; Kato, Harubumi; Okunaka, Tetsuya; Hayata, Yoshihiro

    1994-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) utilizing Photofrin has proven to be an effective modality used in the treatment of solid tumors. In particular, it can be applied via endoscopy to lesions developing in luminal organs. A phase II study was conducted for submission to the Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare. In this protocol an excimer dye laser was used to deliver 630 nm light via a quartz fiber passed through an endoscopic working channel two days subsequent to i.v. injection of photosensitizer. In this study, 98 patients with superficial cancer of various organs were treated. Of these, 88 patients could be evaluated, including 33 with roentgenographically occult lung cancer, 10 with esophageal cancer, 24 with gastric cancer, 18 with cervical cancer and three with bladder cancer. Complete remission as evaluated endoscopically, pathologically, and cytologically was obtained in 83 out of 98 (84.7). There was no serious complication except mild skin photosensitivity, which was seen in four patients. It was concluded that PDT can be efficacious in the treatment of superficial cancers and that complete remission can be achieved when suitable photoradiation conditions are met.

  7. Design and test of an extremely high resolution Timing Counter for the MEG II experiment: preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    De Gerone, M; Ootani, W; Uchiyama, Y; Nishimura, M; Shirabe, S; Cattaneo, P W; Rossella, M

    2013-01-01

    The design and tests of Timing Counter elements for the upgrade of the MEG experiment, MEG II,is presented. The detector is based on several small plates of scintillator with a Silicon PhotoMultipliers dual-side readout. The optimisation of the single counter elements (SiPMs, scintillators, geometry) is described. Moreover, the results obtained with a first prototype tested at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) are presented.

  8. HSDP II Drill Core: Preliminary Rock Strength Results and Implications to Flank Stability, Mauna Kea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, N.; Watters, R. J.; Schiffman, P.

    2004-12-01

    Selected portions of the 3-km HSDP II core were tested to provide unconfined rock strength data from hyaloclastite alteration zones and pillow lavas. Though the drilling project was not originally intended for strength purpose, it is believed the core can provide unique rock strength insights into the flank stability of the Hawaiian Islands. The testing showed that very weak rock exists in the hyaloclastite abundant zones in the lower 2-km of the core with strength dependent on the degree of consolidation and type of alteration. Walton and Schiffman identified three zones of alteration, an upper incipient alteration zone (1080-1335m), a smectitic zone (1405-1573m) and a lower palagonitic zone from about 1573 m to the base of the core. These three zones were sampled and tested together with pillow lava horizons for comparison. Traditional cylindrical core was not available as a consequence of the entire core having been split lengthwise for archival purposes. Hence, point load strength testing was utilized which provides the unconfined compressive strength on irregular shaped samples. The lowest unconfined strengths were recorded from incipient alteration zones with a mean value of 9.5 MPa. Smectitic alteration zones yielded mean values of 16.4 MPa, with the highest measured alteration strengths from the palagonite zones with a mean value of 32.1 MPa. As anticipated, the highest strengths were from essentially unaltered lavas with a mean value of 173 MPa. Strength variations of between one to two orders of magnitude were identified in comparing the submarine hyaloclastite with the intercalated submarine lavas. The weakest zones within the hyaloclastites may provide horizons for assisting flank collapse by serving as potential thrust zones and landslide surfaces.

  9. Corneal topography measurement by means of radial shearing interference: Part II - experiment results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garncarz, Beata E.; Kowalik, Waldemar W.; Kasprzak, Henryk T.

    The method of the measurement of the corneal topography was worked out. This measurement system uses an interferometer based on radial shearing. This paper presents the preliminary results of the experiments. The results are compared with other methods.

  10. The Modern U.S. High School Astronomy Course, Its Status and Makeup II: Additional Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumenaker, Larry

    2009-01-01

    A postal survey of high school astronomy teachers strongly confirms many results of an earlier electronic survey. Additional and new results include a measure of the level of inquiry (more structured inquiry and teacher-led) in the classroom as well as data showing that more emphasis is given to traditional topics than to contemporary astronomy…

  11. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01

    rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition (¼” lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and ¼” lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

  12. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results: AEROSOL PROFILES IN AEROCOM II GCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffi, Brigitte [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Schulz, Michael [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Bréon, François-Marie [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Dentener, Frank [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Steensen, Birthe Marie [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Griesfeller, Jan [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Winker, David [NASA Langley Research Center, MS/475, Hampton Virginia USA; Balkanski, Yves [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Bauer, Susanne E. [Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, New York New York USA; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York New York USA; Bellouin, Nicolas [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading UK; Berntsen, Terje [Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo Norway; Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Bian, Huisheng [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore Country Maryland USA; Chin, Mian [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Diehl, Thomas [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Easter, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ghan, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Hauglustaine, Didier A. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Iversen, Trond [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo Norway; Kirkevåg, Alf [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Liu, Xiaohong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at University of Wyoming, Laramie Wyoming USA; Lohmann, Ulrike [ETH-Zentrum, Zürich Switzerland; Myhre, Gunnar [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Rasch, Phil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Seland, Øyvind [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Skeie, Ragnhild B. [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Steenrod, Stephen D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Stier, Philip [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford UK; Tackett, Jason [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton Virginia USA; Takemura, Toshihiko [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka Japan; Tsigaridis, Kostas [Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, New York New York USA; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York New York USA; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Now at National Institute for Agronomic Research, Thiverval-Grignon France; Yoon, Jinho [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju Korea; Zhang, Kai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg Germany

    2016-06-27

    The ability of eleven models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model inter-comparison initiative (AeroCom II) is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded dataset of aerosol extinction profiles built on purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 sub-continental regions show that five models improved whereas three degraded in reproducing the Zα 0-6 km mean extinction height diagnostic, which is computed over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models’ performance remains highly variable, it has generally improved in terms of inter-regional diversity and seasonality. The biases in Zα 0-6 km have notably decreased in the U.S. and European industrial and downwind maritime regions, whereas the timing of the Zα 0-6 km peak season has improved for all but two models. However, most of the models now show a Zα 0-6 km underestimation over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα 0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the (changes in the) the performance of the individual models and for the inter-model diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties that can contribute to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  13. MYH11 mutations result in a distinct vascular pathology driven by insulin-like growth factor 1 and angiotensin II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Papke, Christina L.; Scherer, Steve; Liu, Yaozhong; Presley, Caroline; Guo, Dongchuan; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.; Brasier, Allan R.; Vick, G. Wesley; Marian, A.J.; Raman, C.S.; Buja, L. Maximilian; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2010-01-01

    Non-syndromic thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAADs) are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner in ~20% of cases. Familial TAAD is genetically heterogeneous and four loci have been mapped for this disease to date, including a locus at 16p for TAAD associated with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). The defective gene at the 16p locus has recently been identified as the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific myosin heavy chain gene (MYH11). On sequencing MYH11 in 93 families with TAAD alone and three families with TAAD/PDA, we identified novel mutations in two families with TAAD/PDA, but none in families with TAAD alone. Histopathological analysis of aortic sections from two individuals with MYH11 mutations revealed SMC disarray and focal hyperplasia of SMCs in the aortic media. SMC hyperplasia leading to significant lumen narrowing in some of the vessels of the adventitia was also observed. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was upregulated in mutant aortas as well as explanted SMCs, but no increase in transforming growth factor-β expression or downstream targets was observed. Enhanced expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme and markers of Angiotensin II (Ang II) vascular inflammation (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α and β) were also found. These data suggest that MYH11 mutations are likely to be specific to the phenotype of TAAD/PDA and result in a distinct aortic and occlusive vascular pathology potentially driven by IGF-1 and Ang II. PMID:17666408

  14. Results of simultaneous combination therapy with radiation and chemotherapeutics in stage I. II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yutaka

    1989-01-01

    From October 1973 through August 1986, 100 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (Male 61, Female 39, Mean age 56 yr) were treated in our department. Diffuse large cell type was the most predominant histologic type (63 patients). There were 29 Stage I, 45 Stage II, 14 Stage III and 12 Stage IV patients. Since Aug. 1981, simultaneous therapy combinations involving radiation and chemotherapeutic techniques in Stage I,II patients were used. Complication such as leucopenia, mucositis and fever were encounterd occasionally, but the therapy was completed when the administration of drugs had been stopped for a few weeks. Treatment results of combination therapy were quite excellent compared to previous ones; 5 year survival was 100% vs 67% in Stage I (not significant) and 92% vs 44% in Stage II (p<0.01). As for radiologic examination for staging, it was concluded that CT-scans, lymphography, /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and GI study are indispensable, bone scintigraphy is desirable and liver-spleen scitigraphy is not necessary.

  15. CITIZENS INVOLVEMENT IN PUBLIC DECISIONS: BETWEEN NORMATIVE FRAMEWORK AND ACTUAL FINDINGS (II - RESEARCH RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolozsi Lucia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Local communities’ needs must be addressed by an effective, loyal and transparent action of local institutions in the direction of ensuring participation of the citizens in undertaking decisions concerning that particular community. It is therefore necessary a good communication with the citizens of the local public institutions, and a proper and adequate information of citizens. After presenting in our previous research the main theoretical contributions in the theory of participatory democracy in local governance institutions, but also some practical considerations, including results and restrictions concerning how they are actually implemented in the Romanian public institutions, this paper focuses on presenting and analysing the results of our own researches. We present the results of the research carried out during 2014 on investigationg relevant concerning the public governance in local administration, and particularly in this paper how local administration facilitates the involvement of citizens in decision-making process and their participation in debating the main community issues.

  16. Spectral reflectance and emittance of particulate materials. I - Theory. II - Application and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. G.; Aronson, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The sizes, shapes, and complex refractive indices of particles are calculated in a study of the IR spectral reflectance of a semiinfinite medium composed of irregular particles of different materials. Geometric optics techniques with corrections for additional absorption due to particle edges and asperities is used in scattering and absorption calculations for particles larger than the wavelength. A Lorentz-Lorenz model is used to derive the averaged complex index of the medium, assuming that its individual particles are ellipsoids. Experimental results obtained on a Michelson interferometer for the spectral emittance of particulate mineral materials are compared with theoretical results. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results suggests the applicability, in remote IR spectroscopy, of the theoretical concepts applied in this study.

  17. Gemcitabine and irinotecan as first-line therapy for carcinoma of unknown primary: results of a multicenter phase II trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shernan G Holtan

    Full Text Available Metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP has a very poor prognosis, and no standard first-line therapy currently exists. Here, we report the results of a phase II study utilizing a combination of gemcitabine and irinotecan as first-line therapy. Treatment was with gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2 and irinotecan 75 mg/m(2 weekly times four on a six week cycle (Cohort I. Due to excessive toxicity, the dose and schedule were modified as follows: gemcitabine 750 mg/m(2 and irinotecan 75 mg/m(2 given weekly times three on a four week cycle (Cohort II. The primary endpoint was the confirmed response rate (CR + PR. Secondary endpoints consisted of adverse events based upon the presence or absence of the UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A1*28 (UGT1A1*28 polymorphism, time to progression, and overall survival. Thirty-one patients were enrolled with a median age of 63 (range: 38-94, and 26 patients were evaluable for efficacy. Significant toxicity was observed in Cohort 1, characterized by 50% (7/14 patients experiencing a grade 4+ adverse event, but not in cohort II. The confirmed response rate including patients from both cohorts was 12% (95% CI: 2-30%, which did not meet the criteria for continued enrollment. Overall median survival was 7.2 months (95% CI: 4.0 to 11.6 for the entire cohort but notably longer in cohort II than in cohort I (9.3 months (95% CI: 4.1 to 12.1 versus 4.0 months (95% CI: 2.2 to 15.6. Gemcitabine and irinotecan is not an active combination when used as first line therapy in patients with metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary. Efforts into developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches remain important for improving the outlook for this heterogeneous group of patients.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00066781.

  18. PHYSICS RESULTS OF THE NSLS-II LINAC FRONT END TEST STAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliller R. P.; Gao, F.; Yang, X.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Piel, C

    2012-05-20

    The Linac Front End Test Stand (LFETS) was installed at the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) in the fall of 2011 in order to test the Linac Front End. The goal of these tests was to test the electron source against the specifications of the linac. In this report, we discuss the results of these measurements and the effect on linac performance.

  19. Recent lattice results on finite temerature and density QCD, part II

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, F

    2007-01-01

    We discuss recent progress in studies of QCD thermodynamics with almost physical light quark masses and a physical value of the strange quark mass. We summarize results on the transition temperature in QCD and analyze the relation between deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration.

  20. Anisotropy of the microwave sky at 90 GHz results from Python II

    CERN Document Server

    Ruhl, J E; Platt, S R; Kovács, J; Novák, G S

    1995-01-01

    We report on additional observations of degree scale anisotropy at 90~GHz from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica. Observations during the first season with the Python instrument yielded a statistically significant sky signal; in this paper we report the confirmation of that signal with data taken in the second year, and on results from an interleaving set of fields.

  1. Anisotropy of the Microwave Sky at 90 GHz: Results from Python II

    OpenAIRE

    Ruhl, J. E.; Dragovan, M.; Platt, S. R.; Kovac, J.; Novak, G.

    1995-01-01

    We report on additional observations of degree scale anisotropy at 90~GHz from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica. Observations during the first season with the Python instrument yielded a statistically significant sky signal; in this paper we report the confirmation of that signal with data taken in the second year, and on results from an interleaving set of fields.

  2. SuperCDMS SNOLAB Low-Mass Detectors: Ultra-Sensitive Phonon Calorimeters for a Sub-GeV Dark Matter Search

    CERN Document Server

    Kurinsky, Noah; Partridge, Richard; Cabrera, Blas; Pyle, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We present the technical design for the SuperCDMS high-voltage, low-mass dark matter detectors, designed to be sensitive to dark matter down to 300 MeV/$c^2$ in mass and resolve individual electron-hole pairs from low-energy scattering events in high-purity Ge and Si crystals. In this paper we discuss some of the studies and technological improvements which have allowed us to design such a sensitive detector, including advances in phonon sensor design and detector simulation. With this design we expect to achieve better than 10 eV (5 eV) phonon energy resolution in our Ge (Si) detectors, and recoil energy resolution below 1eV by exploiting Luke-Neganov phonon generation of charges accelerated in high fields.

  3. Understanding Active Galactic Nuclei using near-infrared high angular resolution polarimetry II: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F.; Grosset, L.; Goosmann, R.; Gratadour, D.; Rouan, D.; Clénet, Y.; Pelat, D.; Rojas Lobos, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    In this second research note of a series of two, we present the first near-infrared results we obtained when modeling Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Our first proceedings showed the comparison between the MontAGN and STOKES Monte Carlo codes. Now we use our radiative transfer codes to simulate the polarization maps of a prototypical, NGC 1068-like, type-2 radio-quiet AGN. We produced high angular resolution infrared (1 μm) polarization images to be compared with recent observations in this wavelength range. Our preliminary results already show a good agreement between the models and observations but cannot account for the peculiar linear polarization angle of the torus such as observed. tet{Gratadour2015} found a polarization position angle being perpendicular to the bipolar outflows axis. Further work is needed to improve the models by adding physical phenomena such as dichroism and clumpiness.

  4. White Dwarf - Red Dwarf Systems Resolved with the Hubble Space Telescope. II. Full Snapshot Survey Results

    CERN Document Server

    Farihi, J; Wachter, S

    2010-01-01

    {Abrigded} Results are presented for a Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys high-resolution imaging campaign of 90 white dwarfs with known or suspected low mass stellar and substellar companions. Of the 72 targets which remain candidate and confirmed white dwarfs with near-infrared excess, 43 are spatially resolved into two or more components, and a total of 12 systems are potentially triples. There is a possible, slight deficit of earlier spectral types (bluer colors) among the spatially unresolved companions, exactly the opposite of expectations if significant mass is transferred to the companion during the common envelope phase. Using the best available distance estimates, the low mass companions to white dwarfs exhibit a bimodal distribution in projected separation. This result supports the hypothesis that during the giant phases of the white dwarf progenitor, any unevolved companions either migrate inward to short periods of hours to days, or outward to periods of hundreds to thousands of y...

  5. Conceptual design and systems analysis of photovoltaic systems. Volume II. Study results. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirpich, A.

    1977-03-19

    This investigation of terrestrial PV systems considered the technical and economic feasibility for systems in three size categories: a small system of about 12 kW peak output for on-site residential use; a large 1500 MW central power plant contributing to the bulk energy of a utility system power grid; and an intermediate size system of about 250 kW for use on public or commercial buildings. In each category, conceptual designs were developed, performance was analyzed for a range of climatic regions, economic analyses were performed, and assessments were made of pertinent institutional issues. The report consists of three volumes. Volume I contains a Study Summary of the major study results. This volume contains the detailed results pertaining to on-site residential photovoltaic systems, central power plant photovoltaic systems, and intermediate size systems applied to commercial and public buildings. Volume III contains supporting appendix material. (WHK)

  6. Understanding Active Galactic Nuclei using near-infrared high angular resolution polarimetry II: Preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, F; Goosmann, R; Gratadour, D; Rouan, D; Clénet, Y; Pelat, D; Lobos, P Andrea Rojas

    2016-01-01

    In this second research note of a series of two, we present the first near-infrared results we obtained when modeling Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Our first proceedings showed the comparison between the MontAGN and STOKES Monte Carlo codes. Now we use our radiative transfer codes to simulate the polarization maps of a prototypical, NGC 1068-like, type-2 radio-quiet AGN. We produced high angular resolution infrared (1 micron) polarization images to be compared with recent observations in this wavelength range. Our preliminary results already show a good agreement between the models and observations but cannot account for the peculiar linear polarization angle of the torus such as observed. Gratadour et al. 2015 found a polarization position angle being perpendicular to the bipolar outflows axis. Further work is needed to improve the models by adding physical phenomena such as dichroism and clumpiness.

  7. Global optimization of truss topology with discrete bar areas-Part II: Implementation and numerical results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achtziger, Wolfgang; Stolpe, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    -and-bound search all have the same feasible set and differ from each other only in the objective function. This is one reason for making the resulting branch-and-bound method very efficient. The paper closes with several large-scale numerical examples. These examples are, to the knowledge of the authors, by far...... we use the theory developed in Part I to design a convergent nonlinear branch-and-bound method tailored to solve large-scale instances of the original discrete problem. The problem formulation and the needed theoretical results from Part I are repeated such that this paper is self-contained. We focus...... on the implementation details but also establish finite convergence of the branch-and-bound method. The algorithm is based on solving a sequence of continuous non-convex relaxations which can be formulated as quadratic programs according to the theory in Part I. The quadratic programs to be treated within the branch...

  8. DUMAND II: String 1 deployment, initial operation, results and system retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, P. K. F.; Dumand Collaboration

    1995-06-01

    We summarize the deployment of the first string of 24 optical detector modules with its data and command processing and transmission system, the junction box with its precision sonar and video systems, and the laying of the 36 km twelve-fiber electro-optical cable to shore. Results from the initial operation are discussed as well as the successful retrieval of string 1 for servicing.

  9. Binaural detection with narrowband and wideband reproducible noise maskers: II. Results for rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ling; Early, Susan J.; Mason, Christine R.; Idrobo, Fabio; Harrison, J. Michael; Carney, Laurel H.

    2002-01-01

    Binaural detection with narrowband and wideband noise maskers was examined by using a Pavlovian-conditioned eyeblink response in rabbits. The target was a tone at 500 Hz, and the maskers were ten individual noise samples having one of two bandwidths, 200 Hz (410 Hz to 610 Hz) or 2900 Hz (100 Hz to 3 kHz). The narrowband noise maskers were created by filtering the wideband noise maskers such that the two sets of maskers had identical spectra in the 200-Hz frequency region surrounding the tone. The responses across the set of noise maskers were compared across bandwidths and across interaural configurations (N0S0 and N0Sπ). Responses across the set of noise waveforms were not strongly correlated across bandwidths; this result is inconsistent with models for binaural detection that depend only upon the narrow band of energy centered at the frequency of the target tone. Responses were correlated across interaural configurations for the wideband masker condition, but not for the narrowband masker. All of these results were consistent with the companion study of human listeners [Evilsizer et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 336-345 (2002)] and with the results of human studies of binaural detection that used only wideband [Gilkey et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 78, 1207-1219 (1985)] or narrowband [Isabelle and Colburn, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 89, 352-259 (1991)] individual noise maskers.

  10. Risk Factor to Chronic Disease no Transmitted In Cienfuegos, Cuba 2010. Preliminaries results of CARMEN II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Benet Rodríguez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Cuba, the monitoring of them is an important element to alert health care system on its evolution. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of four of the most important risk factors for these diseases during the preliminary data of the second survey of Cienfuegos CARMEN project, with emphasis on the differences with the first survey results. Method: Preliminary results of the second CARMEN survey are presented, corresponding to the first (847 cases measured integrally from a probabilitic and representative sample of the adult population of Cienfuegos City. Studied variables included: hypertension; obesity, measured by the body mass index, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Results: 33.7% of interviewed persons were smokers, slightly lower than the first measurement, obesity BMI> = 30 kg/m2 was 18.8%, almost 8% higher than the baseline survey, the arterial hypertension to 35.5% and diabetes mellitus to 6.8%, both well above the measurement of 2001-2002. Conclusions: the risk factors discussed show that the problem after improving over the past 10 years, and generally worsens the values are much higher than those observed during the first measurement CARMEN.

  11. Automatic Virtual Entity Simulation of Conceptual Design Results-Part II:Symbolic Scheme Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-tong; WANG Yu-xin

    2014-01-01

    The development of new products of high quality, low unit cost, and short lead time to market are the key elements required for any enterprise to obtain a competitive advantage. This part of the paper presents a methodology to automatically simulate the conceptual design results in the virtual entity form. To the identified basic mechanisms, their kinematic analysis is carried out by matching basic Barranov trusses, and their virtual entities are modeled based on feature-based technique and encapsulated as one design object. Based on the structures of the basic mechanisms and their connections, a space layout to the mechanical system corresponding to the symbolic scheme is then fulfilled. With the preset-assembly approach, all parts in the mechanical system are put onto proper positions where the constraint equations are met according to the space layout results. In this way, the virtual entity assembly model of the mechanical system relative to the symbolic scheme is set up. The approach presented in this paper can not only obtain innovative conceptual conceptual design results, but also can evaluate their performances under 3-D enviroment efficently.

  12. Performance and first physics results of the SVT trigger at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Vila

    2003-12-03

    For the first time in a hadron collider, a novel trigger processor, the Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT), allows to select the long-lived heavy flavor particles by cutting on the track impact parameter with a precision similar to that of the offline reconstruction. Triggering on displaced tracks has enriched the B-physics program by enhancing the B yields of the lepton-based triggers and opened up full hadronic triggering at CDF. After a first commissioning period, the SVT is fully operational, performing very closely to its design capabilities. System performance and first physics results based on SVT selected data samples are presented.

  13. Comments on "First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search"

    CERN Document Server

    Dahl, C E; Lippincott, W H

    2011-01-01

    The SIMPLE Collaboration has reported results from their superheated C2ClF5 droplet detectors, including a description of acoustic discrimination between \\alpha decays and nuclear recoils. Our concern is that the events in the neutron calibration data and the events identified as neutrons in the physics data are not drawn from the same parent distribution. This fact calls into question the identification of the background events as neutrons, the use of the calibration data to define the acceptance of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils, and the observation of discrimination against \\alpha's.

  14. Initial results with time series forecasting of TJ-II heliac waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, G., E-mail: gonzalo.farias@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso (Chile); Dormido-Canto, S. [Departamento de Informática y Automática, UNED, Madrid (Spain); Vega, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión. CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Díaz, N. [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-10-15

    This article discusses about how to apply forecasting techniques to predict future samples of plasma signals during a discharge. One application of the forecasting could be to detect in real time anomalous behaviors in fusion waveforms. The work describes the implementation of three prediction techniques; two of them based on machine learning methods such as artificial neural networks and support vector machines for regression. The results have shown that depending on the temporal horizon, the predictions match the real samples in most cases with an error less than 5%, even more the forecasting of five samples ahead can reach accuracy over 90% in most signals analyzed.

  15. Influence of a stationary magnetic field on water relations in lettuce seeds. Part II: experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, F G; Pascual, L A; Fundora, I A

    2001-12-01

    An experimental study on water absorption by lettuce seeds previously treated in a stationary magnetic field of 0-10 mT is presented. A significant increase in the rate with which the seeds absorb water is observed in the interval 0-10 mT of magnetic treatment. An increment in the total mass of absorbed water in this interval is also observed. These results are consistent with the reports on the increase of germination rate of the seeds, and the theoretical calculation of the variations induced by magnetic fields in the ionic currents across the cellular membrane. The fields originate in changes in the ionic concentration and thus in the osmotic pressure which regulates the entrance of water to the seeds. The good correlation between the theoretical approach and experimental results provides strong evidence that the magnetic field alters the water relations in seeds, and this effect may be the explanation of the reported alterations in germination rate of seeds by the magnetic field.

  16. Stress-strain characteristics of materials at high strain rates. Part II. Experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripperger, E. A. [Texas. Univ., Austin, TX (US). Structural Mechanics Research Lab.

    1958-08-29

    These two reports were issued separately, but are cataloged as a unit. A photoelectric method for measuring displacements during high-velocity impacts is described. The theory of the system is discussed in detail, and a prototype system which was built and tested is described. The performance of the prototype system is evaluated by comparing the results which it gives with results obtained by other methods of measurement. The system was found capable of a resolution of at least 0.01 inches. static and dynamic stress-strain characteristics of seven high polymers, polyethylene, teflon, nylon, tenite M, tenite H, polystyrene, and saran, plus three metals, lead, copper, and aluminum, are described and compared by means of stress-strain curves and photographs. Data are also presented which show qualitatively the effects produced on stress-strain characteristics by specimen configuration, temperature, and impact velocity. It is shown that there is a definite strain-rate effect for all these materials except polystyrene. The effect is one of an apparent stiffening of the material with increasing strain rate, which is similar to the effect produced by lowering the temperature. The stress-strain measurements are examined critically, inconsistencies are pointed out, and possible sources of error suggested. Values of yield stress, modulus of elasticity and energy absorption for all materials (except copper and aluminum), specimen configurations, temperatures, and impact velocities included in the investigation are tabulated.

  17. Structural damage identification using multifunctional Bragg grating sensors: II. Damage detection results and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Daniel C.; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian

    2006-10-01

    Damage detection is an important issue in structural health monitoring. Lamb waves are the most widely used acousto-ultrasonic guided waves for damage detection. This paper gives the results of experiments carried out to study the identification of damage using Bragg grating sensors as ultrasonic receivers of Lamb waves. The experiments involve a rectangular aluminium plate. Damage was introduced into the plate by drilling a hole into the centre of the plate. In order to obtain different severity of damage, the hole diameter was increased step by step. Several signal processing tools are presented and then applied to the Lamb wave signals in order to find a parameter that corresponds to the severity of damage. The parameter that serves as the damage index has to have small cross-sensitivity to other physical parameters, e.g. temperature. Therefore, additional experiments have been carried out to study the temperature dependence of the Lamb wave signals. In order to determine the influence of the temperature on the damage detection results, the cross-sensitivity is studied within this paper.

  18. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R.N.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P.D.; McCord, T.B.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R.M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper (Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/F continua at 0.55 ??m, 1.822 ??m and 3.547 ??m, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  19. Post-processing V&V level II ASC milestone (2360) results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, Elmer; Karelitz, David B.; Brunner, Thomas A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Weirs, V. Gregory; Shead, Timothy M.

    2007-09-01

    The 9/30/2007 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2360) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include loading of edge and face data on an Exodus mesh, run-time computation of an exact solution to a verification problem, delivery of results data from the server to the client, computation of an integral-based error metric, simultaneous loading of simulation and test data, and comparison of that data using visual and quantitative methods. The capabilities were tested extensively by performing a typical ALEGRA HEDP verification task. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including completion of a verification task on a 13 million element mesh.

  20. Saturation of the f-mode instability in neutron stars: II. Applications and results

    CERN Document Server

    Pnigouras, Pantelis

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results on the saturation of the f-mode instability in neutron stars, due to nonlinear mode coupling. Emission of gravitational waves drives the f-mode (fundamental mode) unstable in fast-rotating, newborn neutron stars. The initial growth phase of the mode is followed by its saturation, because of energy leaking to other modes of the star. The saturation point determines the strain of the generated gravitational-wave signal, which can then be used to extract information about the neutron star equation of state. The parent (unstable) mode couples via parametric resonances with pairs of daughter modes, with the triplets' evolution exhibiting a rich variety of behaviors. We study both supernova- and merger-derived neutron stars, simply modeled as polytropes in a Newtonian context, and show that the parent may couple to many different daughter pairs during the star's evolution through the instability window, with the saturation amplitude changing by orders of magnitude.

  1. Radial-Velocity Fitting Challenge. II. First results of the analysis of the data set

    CERN Document Server

    Dumusque, X; Damasso, M; Diaz, R; Gregory, P C; Hara, N C; Hatzes, A; Rajpaul, V; Tuomi, M; Aigrain, S; Anglada-Escude, G; Bonomo, A S; Boue, G; Dauvergne, F; Frustagli, G; Giacobbe, P; Haywood, R D; Jones, H R A; Pinamonti, M; Poretti, E; Rainer, M; Segransan, D; Sozzetti, A; Udry, S

    2016-01-01

    Radial-velocity (RV) signals induce RV variations an order of magnitude larger than the signal created by the orbit of Earth-twins, thus preventing their detection. The goal of this paper is to compare the efficiency of the different methods used to deal with stellar signals to recover extremely low-mass planets despite. However, because observed RV variations at the m/s precision level or below is a combination of signals induced by unresolved orbiting planets, by the star, and by the instrument, performing such a comparison using real data is extremely challenging. To circumvent this problem, we generated simulated RV measurements including realistic stellar and planetary signals. Different teams analyzed blindly those simulated RV measurements, using their own method to recover planetary signals despite stellar RV signals. By comparing the results obtained by the different teams with the planetary and stellar parameters used to generate the simulated RVs, it is therefore possible to compare the efficiency ...

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 16H ANNULUS SAMPLES PART II: LEACHING RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M.; Reboul, S.

    2012-06-19

    The closure of Tank 16H will require removal of material from the annulus of the tank. Samples from Tank 16H annulus were characterized and tested to provide information to evaluate various alternatives for removing the annulus waste. The analysis found all four annulus samples to be composed mainly of Si, Na, and Al and lesser amounts of other elements. The XRD data indicate quartz (SiO{sub 2}) and sodium aluminum nitrate silicate hydrate (Na{sub 8}(Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O) as the predominant crystalline mineral phases in the samples. The XRD data also indicate the presence of crystalline sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}), sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}), gibbsite (Al(OH){sub 3}), hydrated sodium bicarbonate (Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O), and muscovite (KAl{sub 2}(AlSi{sub 3}O{sub 10})(OH){sub 2}). Based on the weight of solids remaining at the end of the test, the water leaching test results indicate 20-35% of the solids dissolved after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of water at 45 C. The chemical analysis of the leachates and the XRD results of the remaining solids indicate sodium salts of nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and possibly carbonate/bicarbonate make up the majority of the dissolved material. The majority of these salts were dissolved in the first water contact and simply diluted with each subsequent water contact. The water leaching removed large amounts of the uranium in two of the samples and approximately 1/3 of the {sup 99}Tc from all four samples. Most of the other radionuclides analyzed showed low solubility in the water leaching test. The oxalic acid leaching test result indicate approximately 34-47% of the solids in the four annulus samples will dissolve after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of acid to solids at 45 C. The same sodium salts found in the water leaching test comprise the majority of dissolved material in the oxalic acid leaching test. However, the oxalic acid was

  3. Carbide Type Influence on Tribological Properties of Hard Faced Steel Layer Part II- Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lazic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented a preceding procedure that should be conducted in order to successfully regenerate damaged forging dies by the hard facing process. After the tool damage types identification, as well as their causes, we have chosen the procedure and the parameters of hard facing that we further corrected by conducting the test hard facings on models. Thus, we were able to relate the experimental results outputs with the repair technology, taking as a criterion the quality of the surface layers wear resistance such as friction coefficient and width of hard faced zone, hardness and its distribution in cross section, then microstructure of characteristic of hard faced zones, etc. This research points out significancy of tribological properties of certain types of carbides and their effects on metal matrix, in which carbides are embedded. Our tribological investigations have shown that the working life of the hard faced tool can be longer than that of the new tool.

  4. WEATHER ON OTHER WORLDS. II. SURVEY RESULTS: SPOTS ARE UBIQUITOUS ON L AND T DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metchev, Stanimir A. [The University of Western Ontario, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 1151 Richmond Avenue, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Heinze, Aren [Stony Brook University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, 100 Nicolls Road, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Apai, Dániel [The University of Arizona, Department of Astronomy, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Flateau, Davin [The University of Arizona, Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Radigan, Jacqueline [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Burgasser, Adam [University of California San Diego, Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, 9500 Gilman Drive, Mail Code 0424, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS-245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Artigau, Étienne [Université de Montréal, Département de Physique and Observatoire du Mont Mégantic, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Plavchan, Peter [Missouri State University, Department of Physics, Astronomy and Materials Science, 901 South National Avenue, Springfield, MO 65897 (United States); Goldman, Bertrand, E-mail: smetchev@uwo.ca [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, 69117, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    We present results from the Weather on Other Worlds Spitzer Exploration Science program to investigate photometric variability in L and T dwarfs, usually attributed to patchy clouds. We surveyed 44 L3-T8 dwarfs, spanning a range of J – K{sub s} colors and surface gravities. We find that 14/23 (61%{sub −20%}{sup +17%}, 95% confidence) of our single L3-L9.5 dwarfs are variable with peak-to-peak amplitudes between 0.2% and 1.5%, and 5/16 (31%{sub −17%}{sup +25%}) of our single T0-T8 dwarfs are variable with amplitudes between 0.8% and 4.6%. After correcting for sensitivity, we find that 80%{sub −27%}{sup +20%} of L dwarfs vary by ≥0.2%, and 36%{sub −17%}{sup +26%} of T dwarfs vary by ≥0.4%. Given viewing geometry considerations, we conclude that photospheric heterogeneities causing >0.2% 3-5 μm flux variations are present on virtually all L dwarfs, and probably on most T dwarfs. A third of L dwarf variables show irregular light curves, indicating that L dwarfs may have multiple spots that evolve over a single rotation. Also, approximately a third of the periodicities are on timescales >10 hr, suggesting that slowly rotating brown dwarfs may be common. We observe an increase in the maximum amplitudes over the entire spectral type range, revealing a potential for greater temperature contrasts in T dwarfs than in L dwarfs. We find a tentative association (92% confidence) between low surface gravity and high-amplitude variability among L3-L5.5 dwarfs. Although we can not confirm whether lower gravity is also correlated with a higher incidence of variables, the result is promising for the characterization of directly imaged young extrasolar planets through variability.

  5. Cosmic Shear Results from the Deep Lens Survey. II. Full Cosmological Parameter Constraints from Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony; Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Michael D.; Schmidt, Samuel; Wittman, David

    2016-06-01

    We present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitude {r}{lim}˜ 27 (5σ ), is designed as a precursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing \\gt 10 deg2 cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9 yr results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives {{{Ω }}}m={0.293}-0.014+0.012, {σ }8={0.833}-0.018+0.011, {H}0={68.6}-1.2+1.4 {\\text{km s}}-1 {{{Mpc}}}-1, and {{{Ω }}}b=0.0475+/- 0.0012 for ΛCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ˜50%. When we do not assume flatness for ΛCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint {{{Ω }}}k=-{0.010}-0.015+0.013 from the DLS+WMAP9 combination, which, however, is not well constrained when WMAP9 is used alone. The dark energy equation-of-state parameter w is tightly constrained when baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) data are added, yielding w=-{1.02}-0.09+0.10 with the DLS+WMAP9+BAO joint probe. The addition of supernova constraints further tightens the parameter to w=-1.03+/- 0.03. Our joint constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also with the predictions of a ΛCDM universe.

  6. The Lyman alpha reference sample. II. Hubble space telescope imaging results, integrated properties, and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Duval, Florent; Sandberg, Andreas; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger [Department of Astronomy, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Adamo, Angela [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schaerer, Daniel [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31000 Toulouse (France); Verhamme, Anne; Orlitová, Ivana [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, 51 Chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Otí-Floranes, Héctor [Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Departamento de Astrofísica, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada (Spain); Cannon, John M.; Pardy, Stephen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Atek, Hakim [Laboratoire dAstrophysique, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Observatoire, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Kunth, Daniel [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, CNRS and UPMC, 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Laursen, Peter [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Herenz, E. Christian, E-mail: matthew@astro.su.se [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-02-10

    We report new results regarding the Lyα output of galaxies, derived from the Lyman Alpha Reference Sample, and focused on Hubble Space Telescope imaging. For 14 galaxies we present intensity images in Lyα, Hα, and UV, and maps of Hα/Hβ, Lyα equivalent width (EW), and Lyα/Hα. We present Lyα and UV radial light profiles and show they are well-fitted by Sérsic profiles, but Lyα profiles show indices systematically lower than those of the UV (n ≈ 1-2 instead of ≳ 4). This reveals a general lack of the central concentration in Lyα that is ubiquitous in the UV. Photometric growth curves increase more slowly for Lyα than the far ultraviolet, showing that small apertures may underestimate the EW. For most galaxies, however, flux and EW curves flatten by radii ≈10 kpc, suggesting that if placed at high-z only a few of our galaxies would suffer from large flux losses. We compute global properties of the sample in large apertures, and show total Lyα luminosities to be independent of all other quantities. Normalized Lyα throughput, however, shows significant correlations: escape is found to be higher in galaxies of lower star formation rate, dust content, mass, and nebular quantities that suggest harder ionizing continuum and lower metallicity. Six galaxies would be selected as high-z Lyα emitters, based upon their luminosity and EW. We discuss the results in the context of high-z Lyα and UV samples. A few galaxies have EWs above 50 Å, and one shows f{sub esc}{sup Lyα} of 80%; such objects have not previously been reported at low-z.

  7. Radial-velocity fitting challenge. II. First results of the analysis of the data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumusque, X.; Borsa, F.; Damasso, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Gregory, P. C.; Hara, N. C.; Hatzes, A.; Rajpaul, V.; Tuomi, M.; Aigrain, S.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Bonomo, A. S.; Boué, G.; Dauvergne, F.; Frustagli, G.; Giacobbe, P.; Haywood, R. D.; Jones, H. R. A.; Laskar, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Ségransan, D.; Sozzetti, A.; Udry, S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Radial-velocity (RV) signals arising from stellar photospheric phenomena are the main limitation for precise RV measurements. Those signals induce RV variations an order of magnitude larger than the signal created by the orbit of Earth-twins, thus preventing their detection. Aims: Different methods have been developed to mitigate the impact of stellar RV signals. The goal of this paper is to compare the efficiency of these different methods to recover extremely low-mass planets despite stellar RV signals. However, because observed RV variations at the meter-per-second precision level or below is a combination of signals induced by unresolved orbiting planets, by the star, and by the instrument, performing such a comparison using real data is extremely challenging. Methods: To circumvent this problem, we generated simulated RV measurements including realistic stellar and planetary signals. Different teams analyzed blindly those simulated RV measurements, using their own method to recover planetary signals despite stellar RV signals. By comparing the results obtained by the different teams with the planetary and stellar parameters used to generate the simulated RVs, it is therefore possible to compare the efficiency of these different methods. Results: The most efficient methods to recover planetary signals take into account the different activity indicators, use red-noise models to account for stellar RV signals and a Bayesian framework to provide model comparison in a robust statistical approach. Using the most efficient methodology, planets can be found down to K/N= Kpl/RV_{rms×√{Nobs}=5} with a threshold of K/N = 7.5 at the level of 80-90% recovery rate found for a number of methods. These recovery rates drop dramatically for K/N smaller than this threshold. In addition, for the best teams, no false positives with K/N > 7.5 were detected, while a non-negligible fraction of them appear for smaller K/N. A limit of K/N = 7.5 seems therefore a safe

  8. Delivering high-quality family planning services in crisis-affected settings II: results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Dora Ward; Rattan, Jesse; Huang, Shuyuan; Noznesky, Elizabeth

    2015-02-04

    An estimated 43 million women of reproductive age experienced the effects of conflict in 2012. Already vulnerable from the insecurity of the emergency, women must also face the continuing risk of unwanted pregnancy but often are unable to obtain family planning services. The ongoing Supporting Access to Family Planning and Post-Abortion Care (SAFPAC) initiative, led by CARE, has provided contraceptives, including long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), to refugees, internally displaced persons, and conflict-affected resident populations in Chad, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Djibouti, Mali, and Pakistan. The project works through the Ministry of Health in 4 key areas: (1) competency-based training, (2) supply chain management, (3) systematic supervision, and (4) community mobilization to raise awareness and shift norms related to family planning. This article presents data on program results from July 2011 to December 2013 from the 5 countries. Project staff summarized monthly data from client registers using hard-copy forms and recorded the data electronically in Microsoft Excel for compilation and analysis. The initiative reached 52,616 new users of modern contraceptive methods across the 5 countries, ranging from 575 in Djibouti to 21,191 in Chad. LARCs have predominated overall, representing 61% of new modern method users. The percentage of new users choosing LARCs varied by country: 78% in the DRC, 72% in Chad, and 51% in Mali, but only 29% in Pakistan. In Djibouti, those methods were not offered in the country through SAFPAC during the period discussed here. In Chad, the DRC, and Mali, implants have been the most popular LARC method, while in Pakistan the IUD has been more popular. Use of IUDs, however, has comprised a larger share of the method mix over time in all 4 of these countries. These results to date suggest that it is feasible to work with the public sector in fragile, crisis-affected states to deliver a wide range of quality

  9. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey: II. Results of Precursor Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Giovanelli, R; Kent, B R; Perillat, P; Catinella, B; Hoffman, G L; Momjian, E; Rosenberg, J L; Saintonge, A; Spekkens, K; Stierwalt, S; Brosch, N; Masters, K L; Springob, C M; Karachentsev, I D; Karachentseva, V E; Koopmann, R A; Müller, E; Van Driel, W; Van Zee, L; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Kent, Brian R.; Perillat, Philip; Catinella, Barbara; Momjian, Emmanuel; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Saintonge, Amelie; Spekkens, Kristine; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Brosch, Noah; Masters, Karen L.; Springob, Christopher M.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Karachentseva, Valentina E.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Muller, Erik; Driel, Wim van; Zee, Liese van

    2005-01-01

    In preparation for the full Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA extragalactic HI survey, precursor observations were carried out in Aug--Sep 2004 with the 7-beam Arecibo L-band feed array (ALFA) receiver system and the WAPP spectral processors. While these observations were geared mainly at testing and debugging survey strategy, hardware and software, approximately 36 hours of telescope time yielded science--quality data. From those observations, an initial list of 730 tentative detections of varying degree of reliability was extracted. Ninety--eight high signal-to-noise candidates were deemed to be bona fide HI line detections. To test our ability to discriminate cosmic signals from RFI and noise, 165 candidates ranging in reliability likelihood were re--observed with the single beam L--band wide system at Arecibo in Jan--Feb 2005. Of those, 41% were confirmed as real. We present the results of both the ALFA and single beam observations for the sample of 166 confirmed HI sources, as well as our assessment of their opti...

  10. Statistics of dark matter substructure - II. Comparison of model with simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Frank C.; Jiang, Fangzhou

    2016-05-01

    We compare subhalo mass and velocity functions obtained from different simulations with different subhalo finders among each other, and with predictions from the new semi-analytical model presented in Paper I. We find that subhalo mass functions (SHMFs) obtained using different subhalo finders agree with each other at the level of ˜20 per cent, but only at the low-mass end. At the massive end, subhalo finders that identify subhaloes based purely on density in configuration space dramatically underpredict the subhalo abundances by more than an order of magnitude. These problems are much less severe for subhalo velocity functions (SHVFs), indicating that they arise from issues related to assigning masses to the subhaloes, rather than from detecting them. Overall the predictions from the semi-analytical model are in excellent agreement with simulation results obtained using the more advanced subhalo finders that use information in six-dimensional phase-space. In particular, the model accurately reproduces the slope and host-mass-dependent normalization of both the subhalo mass and velocity functions. We find that the SHMFs and SHVFs have power-law slopes of 0.86 and 2.77, respectively, significantly shallower than what has been claimed in several studies in the literature.

  11. Plasmon-soliton waves in planar slot waveguides: II. Results for stationary waves and stability analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Walasik, Wiktor; Renversez, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    We describe the results of the two methods we developed to calculate the stationary nonlinear solutions in one-dimensional plasmonic slot waveguides made of a finite-thickness nonlinear dielectric core surrounded by metal regions. These two methods are described in detail in the preceding article [Walasik et al., submitted]. For symmetric waveguides, we provide the nonlinear dispersion curves obtained using the two methods and compare them. We describe the well known low-order modes and the higher-modes that were not described before. All the modes are classified into two families: modes with and without nodes. We also compare nonlinear modes with nodes with the linear modes in similar linear slot waveguides with a homogeneous core. We recover the symmetry breaking Hopf bifurcation of the first symmetric nonlinear mode toward an asymmetric mode and we show that one of the higher modes also exhibits a bifurcation. We study the behavior of the bifurcation of the fundamental mode as a function of the permittivit...

  12. Linear stability of ideal MHD configurations. II. Results for stationary equilibrium configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaerel, T.; Keppens, R.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we continue exploring the consequences of the general equation of motion (EOM) governing all Lagrangian perturbations ξ about a time-dependent, ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) configuration, which includes self-gravity, external gravity, pressure gradients, compressibility, inertial effects, and anisotropic Lorentz force. We here address the specific case of MHD stability for 3D stationary equilibria, where the perturbed EOM features a symmetric operator F and an antisymmetric Doppler-Coriolis operator v . ∇ . For this case, we state and prove the general properties for the solutions ξ of the governing dynamical system. For axisymmetric perturbations about axisymmetric equilibria with purely toroidal, or purely poloidal magnetic fields, specific stability theorems can be formulated. We derive a useful integral expression for the quadratic quantity given by the inner product ⟨ ξ , F [ ξ ] ⟩ . For deriving stability statements on MHD states where self-gravity is involved as well, we provide an upper bound on the perturbed self-gravitational energy associated with the displacement ξ . The resulting expression elucidates the role of potentially stabilizing versus destabilizing contributions and shows the role of gravity, entropy gradients, velocity shear, currents, Lorentz forces, inertia, and pressure gradients in offering many routes to unstable behavior in flowing gases and plasmas. These have historically mostly been studied for static v = 0 configurations, looking at stability of exactly force-balanced states, or by assuming stationarity similar to our approach here (i.e., ∂ t ≡ 0 for the state we perturb), but typically in combination with some reduced dimensionality on the configuration of interest (translational or axisymmetry). We show that in these limits, we find and generalize expressions well-known from, e.g., the study of ideal MHD stability of tokamak plasmas or from Schwarzschild's criteria controlling convection in

  13. Parenteral nutrition support for patients with pancreatic cancer. Results of a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riess Hanno

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cachexia is a common problem in patients (pts suffering from upper gastrointestinal cancer. In addition, most of these patients suffer from malabsorption and stenosis of the gastrointestinal tract due to their illness. Various methods of supplementary nutrition (enteral, parenteral are practised. In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC, phase angle, determined by bio-electrical impedance analysis (BIA, seems to be a survival predictor. The positive influence of BIA determinate predictors by additional nutrition is currently under discussion. Methods To examine the impact of additional parenteral nutrition (APN we assessed outpatients suffering from APC and progressive cachexia. The assessment based on the BIA method. Assessment parameters were phase angle, ECM/BCM index (ratio of extracellular mass to body cell mass, and BMI (body mass index. Patients suffering from progressive weight loss in spite of additional enteral nutritional support were eligible for the study. Results Median treatment duration in 32 pts was 18 [8-35] weeks. Response evaluation showed a benefit in 27 pts (84% in at least one parameter. 14 pts (43.7% improved or stabilised in all three parameters. The median ECM/BCM index was 1.7 [1.11-3.14] at start of APN and improved down to 1.5 [1.12-3.36] during therapy. The median BMI increased from 19.7 [14.4-25.9] to 20.5 [15.4-25.0]. The median phase angle improved by 10% from 3.6 [2.3-5.1] to 3.9 [2.2-5.1]. Conclusions We demonstrated the positive impact of APN on the assessed parameters, first of all the phase angle, and we observed at least a temporary benefit or stabilisation of the nutritional status in the majority of the investigated patients. Based on these findings we are currently investigating the impact of APN on survival in a larger patient cohort. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00919659

  14. Influence of the steric effect of flexible isomeric phenylenediacetic acids on the resultant lead(II) coordination polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yunlong; Zhao, Yanqing; Yang, Guo-Ping, E-mail: ygp@nwu.edu.cn; Guo, Yanjun; Wang, Yao-Yu, E-mail: wyaoyu@nwu.edu.cn; Shi, Qi-Zhen

    2015-03-15

    To study the steric effect of the flexible dicarboxylate ligands on the resultant formations of coordination polymers (CPs), four new Pb{sup II} CPs [Pb(1,2-pda)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (1), [Pb(1,3-pda)]{sub n}·nH{sub 2}O (2), [Pb{sub 2}(1,4-pda){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}·2nH{sub 2}O (3a and 3b) have been produced by the isomeric phenylenediacetic acids (H{sub 2}pda). The X-ray crystallography study reveals that CP 1 is a two-dimensional (2D) 4-connected sql (4{sup 4}.6{sup 2}) network via the weak Pb···O interactions built on 1D chain-like structure. CP 2 crystallizes in orthorhombic system with chiral space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, showing a 4-connected sra (4{sup 2}.6{sup 3}.8) framework where a left-handed helical motif is formed by Pb{sup II} ions and trans-1,3-pda ligands. More interestingly, CPs 3a and 3b are two true 3D polymorphs and have the different morphology. Topologically, the framework of 3a exhibits a 4-connected lon 6{sup 6} motif, while that of 3b is a (4,6)-connected fsh (4{sup 3}.6{sup 3}){sub 2}(4{sup 6}.6{sup 6}.8{sup 3}) net. It is found that the three isomeric pda anions display the various coordination fashions in four CPs. The different structural arrangements show that the steric effect of the isomeric H{sub 2}pda tectons has a positive role in directing the final products of Pb{sup II} CPs. Also, the fluorescent properties of the CPs were studied in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Four new Pb{sup II}-based CPs have been produced by the isomeric phenylenediacetic acids (H{sub 2}pda). The different structural arrangements show that the steric effect of the isomeric H{sub 2}pda tectons has a positive role in directing the final products of Pb{sup II} CPs. Also, the fluorescent properties of the CPs were studied in the solid state at room temperature. - Highlights: • Four Pb{sup II}-based coordination polymers were produced by phenylenediacetic acids. • The crystal and topological structures of the

  15. Role of Postoperative Radiotherapy for Stage I/II/III Thymic Tumor - Results of the ChART Retrospective Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianwen LIU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT for thymic tumor is still controversial. The object of the study is to evaluate the role of PORT for stage I/II/III thymic tumor. Methods The database of Chinese Alliance of Research for Thymomas (ChART was retrieved for patients with stage I/II/III thymic tumor who underwent surgical therapy without neoajuvant therapy between 1994 and 2012. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were performed. Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the hazard ratio for death. Results 1,546 stage I/II/III patients were identified from ChART database. Among these patients, 649 (41.98% underwent PORT. PORT was associated with gender, histologic type (World Health Organization, WHO, surgical extent, complete resection, Masaoka stage and adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-yr and 10-yr overall survival (OS rates and disease-free survival (DFS rate for patients underwent surgery followed by PORT were 90% and 80%, 81% and 63%, comparing with 96% and 95%, 92% and 90% for patients underwent surgery alone (P=0.001, P<0.001 respectively. In univariate analysis, age, histologic type (WHO, Masaoka stage, completeness of resection, and PORT were associated with OS. Multivariable analysis showed that histologic type (WHO(P=0.001, Masaoka stage (P=0.029 and completeness of resection (P=0.003 were independently prognostic factors of OS. In univariate analysis, gender, myasthenia gravis, histologic type (WHO, Masaoka stage, surgical approach, PORT and completeness of resection were associated with DFS. Multivariable analysis showed that histologic type (WHO (P<0.001, Masaoka stage (P=0.005 and completeness of resection (P=0.006 were independently prognostic factors of DFS. Subgroup analysis showed that patients with incomplete resection underwent PORT achieved the better OS and DFS (P=0.010, 0.017, respectively. However, patients with complete resection underwent PORT had the worse OS and DFS (P<0.001, P<0

  16. Preliminary Research Results for the Generation and Diagnostics of High Power Ion Beams on FLASH II Accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨海亮; 邱爱慈; 孙剑锋; 何小平; 汤俊萍; 王海洋; 李洪玉; 李静雅; 任书庆; 欧阳小平; 张国光

    2004-01-01

    The preliminary experimental results of the generation and diagnostics of high power ion beams on FLASH II accelerator are reported. The high-power ion beams presently are being produced in a pinched diode. The method for enhancing the ratio of ion to electron current is to increase the electron residing time by pinching the electron flow. Furthermore, electron beam pinching can be combined with electron reflexing to achieve ion beams with even higher efficiency and intensity. The anode plasma is generated by anode foil bombarded with electronand anode foil surface flashover. In recent experiments on FLASH II accelerator, ion beams have been produced with a current of 160 kA and anen ergy of 500 keV corresponding to an ion beam peak power of about 80 GW. The ion number ard current of high power ion beams were determined by monitoring delayed radioactivity from nuclear reactions induced in a 12C target by the proton beams. The prompt γ-rays and diode bremsstrahlung X-rays were measured with a PIN semi-conductor detector and a plastic scintillator detector. The current density distribution of ion beam were measured with a biased ion collector array. The ion beams were also recorded with a CR-39 detector.

  17. Dark Matter Results from First 98.7 Days of Data from the PandaX-II Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andi; Xiao, Mengjiao; Cui, Xiangyi; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yunhua; Fang, Deqing; Fu, Changbo; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Gong, Haowei; Guo, Xuyuan; Han, Ke; Hu, Shouyang; Huang, Xingtao; Ji, Xiangdong; Ju, Yonglin; Lei, Siao; Li, Shaoli; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xinglong; Liang, Hao; Lin, Qing; Liu, Huaxuan; Liu, Jianglai; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Ma, Yugang; Mao, Yajun; Ni, Kaixuan; Ren, Xiangxiang; Schubnell, Michael; Shen, Manbin; Shi, Fang; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jimin; Wang, Meng; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Xuming; Wang, Zhou; Wu, Shiyong; Xiao, Xiang; Xie, Pengwei; Yan, Binbin; Yang, Yong; Yue, Jianfeng; Zeng, Xionghui; Zhang, Hongguang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Huanqiao; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Xiaopeng

    2016-09-16

    We report the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter search results using the first physics-run data of the PandaX-II 500 kg liquid xenon dual-phase time-projection chamber, operating at the China JinPing underground laboratory. No dark matter candidate is identified above background. In combination with the data set during the commissioning run, with a total exposure of 3.3×10^{4}  kg day, the most stringent limit to the spin-independent interaction between the ordinary and WIMP dark matter is set for a range of dark matter mass between 5 and 1000  GeV/c^{2}. The best upper limit on the scattering cross section is found 2.5×10^{-46}  cm^{2} for the WIMP mass 40  GeV/c^{2} at 90% confidence level.

  18. Measurement of hydrogen, helium, carbon and oxygen cosmic ray primaries: Preliminary results from the CREAM II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mognet, S. A. Isaac

    The direct measurement of the energy spectrum and composition of the incoming cosmic-ray flux at multi-TeV energies is of great interest. A feature located somewhere between 1000-10,000 TeV in the all-particle spectrum, referred to as the 'knee' characterized by a steepening of the power-law flux, has been observed by ground-based detectors for many years. It is believed to be related to an upper limit or change in efficiency of the Galactic accelerators of cosmic rays and/or properties of the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Presented here is a preliminary analysis of the flux of primary H, He, C and O cosmic-ray species measured using the CREAM II instrument. This analysis is conducted using the Penn State-built Timing Charge Detector, distinct from other charge detectors used in alternative published CREAM II results. The second Antarctic flight of the CREAM instrument had a ~ 28 day flight in the 2005-2006 Antarctic flight season. The instrument was launched on December 16 th 2005 from Williams Field near McMurdo Station, Antarctica. The analysis presented here used events collected throughout the flight to calibrate the charge response of the Timing Charge Detector. High-energy events collected during the entire flight time (except for the first ~ 3.5 days which were used for high-voltage tuning) are also analyzed here. Also presented in this thesis is a novel optical simulation of the Timing Charge Detector used in the various flights of the CREAM instrument. The model suggests fundamental limitations on the timing resolution of the detector arising purely from photon propagation physics in the scintillation and light- guide elements.

  19. Estimated physical activity in Bavaria, Germany, and its implications for obesity risk: Results from the BVS-II Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Günther

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adequate physical activity (PA is considered as a key factor in the fight against the obesity epidemic. Therefore, detailed description of the actual PA and its components in the population is necessary. Additionally, this study aims to investigate the association between PA and obesity risk in a representative population sample in Bavaria, Germany. Methods Data from 893 participants (age 13–80 years of the Bavarian Food Consumption Survey II (BVS II were used. In each participant, three computer-based 24-hour recalls were conducted by telephone assessing type and duration of PA in the domains occupation, sports, other strenuous leisure time activities (of mostly moderate intensity as well as TV/PC use in leisure time and duration of sleeping. After assigning metabolic equivalents (METs to each activity, estimates of energy expenditure (MET*h and total daily PA level (PALest. were calculated. In a subgroup of adults (n = 568 with anthropometric measurements logistic regression models were used to quantify the impact of PA on obesity risk. Results Estimated average PA in women and men was 38.5 ± 5.0 and 40.6 ± 9.3 MET*h/d, respectively, corresponding to PALest. values of 1.66 ± 0.22 and 1.75 ± 0.40. Obese subjects showed lower energy expenditure in the categories sports, occupation, and sleeping, while the time spent with TV/PC during leisure time was highest. This is confirmed in logistic regression analyses revealing a statistically significant association between obesity and TV/PC use during leisure time, while sports activity was inversely related to obesity risk. Overall, less than 1/3 of the study participants reached the recommended PAL of ≥ 1.75. Subjects within the recommended range of PA had an about 60 % (odds ratio = 0.43; 95% CI: 0.21–0.85 reduced risk of obesity as compared to inactive subjects with a PALest. Conclusion Based on the results of short-term PA patterns, a major part of the Bavarian adult

  20. Clinical practice of defibrillator implantation after myocardial infarction: impact of implant time: results from the PreSCD II Registry†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völler, Heinz; Kamke, Wolfram; Klein, Helmut U.; Block, Michael; Reibis, Rona; Treusch, Sven; Contzen, Klaus; Wegscheider, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Aims Current guidelines recommend implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with the reduced left ventricular function (LVEF ≤30%) not earlier than 40 days after myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of the prospective Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death II (PreSCD II) registry was to investigate the clinical practice of ICD therapy in post-MI patients and to assess the impact on survival. Methods and results 10 612 consecutive patients (61 ± 12 years, 76% male) were enrolled 4 weeks or later after MI in 19 cardiac rehabilitation centres in Germany from December 2002 to May 2005. All patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤40% (n = 952) together with a randomly selected group of patients with preserved left ventricular function (n = 1106) were followed for 36 months. Cox proportional hazard models were used to correlate ICD implantation and survival with baseline characteristics. Of all patients studied, 75.9% were enrolled within 4–8 weeks, 10.7% more than 1 year after MI. Pre-specified Group 1 with an LVEF ≤30% consisted of 269 patients (2.5%), Group 2 with LVEF 31–40% of 727 patients (6.9%), and Group 3 with LVEF >40% of 1148 randomly selected patients from the cohort of 9616 patients with preserved LV function. After 36 months, only 142 patients (6.9%) had received an ICD; 82 (31.7%) of Group 1, 49 (7%) of Group 2, and 11 (1%) in Group 3. The ICD was implanted in 47% of all patients within 1 year after their index MI. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients were predominantly characterized by low ejection fraction, but also by several other independent risk factors. Patients who received an ICD had an adjusted 44% lower mortality (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% confidence intervals 0.32–1.01; P = 0.053) than comparable patients without ICD therapy. All cause mortality of ICD recipients was significantly lower if the ICD was implanted later than 11 months after acute

  1. Rotor Wake Vortex Definition: Initial Evaluation of 3-C PIV Results of the Hart-II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; vanderWall, Berend; Richard, Hughes; Raffel, Markus; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Lim, Joon W.; Yu, Yung H.; Tung, Chee

    2002-01-01

    An initial evaluation is made of extensive three-component (3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements within the wake across a rotor disk plane. The model is a 40 percent scale BO-105 helicopter main rotor in forward flight simulation. This study is part of the HART II test program conducted in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). Included are wake vortex field measurements over the advancing and retreating sides of the rotor operating at a typical descent landing condition important for impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Also included are advancing side results for rotor angle variations from climb to steep descent. Using detailed PIV vector maps of the vortex fields, methods of extracting key vortex parameters are examined and a new method was developed and evaluated. An objective processing method, involving a center-of-vorticity criterion and a vorticity 'disk' integration, was used to determine vortex core size, strength, core velocity distribution characteristics, and unsteadiness. These parameters are mapped over the rotor disk and offer unique physical insight for these parameters of importance for rotor noise and vibration prediction.

  2. Melphalan, lenalidomide and dexamethasone for the treatment of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis: results of a phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchorawala, Vaishali; Patel, Jaymin M; Sloan, J Mark; Shelton, Anthony C; Zeldis, Jerome B; Seldin, David C

    2013-05-01

    We report results of a phase II trial of combination of melphalan, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone for the treatment of immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis. The primary objectives were tolerability and hematologic response rate; secondary objectives were organ responses and survival. Treatment protocol consisted of melphalan 5 mg/m(2)/day for four days, lenalidomide 10 mg/day for 21 days and dexamethasone 20-40 mg once a week every 28 days for a total of 12 cycles. Sixteen subjects were enrolled of whom 14 completed at least 3 cycles and were evaluable for response. Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced by 88% (n=14), the most common being myelosuppression (n=7). Dose reductions occurred in 85% (n=12 of 14) of subjects. Hematologic partial and complete responses were achieved by 43% (n=6 of 14) and 7% (n=1 of 14), respectively. The median overall survival has not been reached and median progression-free survival is 24 months. In conclusion, this combination is associated with significant myelosuppression leading to dose modifications and producing minor hematologic responses in AL amyloidosis. http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00679367.

  3. Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies -- an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) -- II: First Results on NGC 4631

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Judith; Benjamin, R A; Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; English, Jayanne; Heald, George; Henriksen, Richard N; Johnson, Megan; Krause, Marita; Li, Jiang-Tao; Miskolczi, Arpad; Mora, Silvia Carolina; Murphy, E J; Oosterloo, Tom; Porter, Troy A; Rand, Richard J; Saikia, D J; Schmidt, Philip; Strong, A W; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Q Daniel; Wiegert, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    We present the first results from the CHANG-ES survey, a new survey of 35 edge-on galaxies to search for both in-disk as well as extra-planar radio continuum emission. The motivation and science case for the survey are presented in a companion paper (Paper I). In this paper (Paper II), we outline the observations and data reduction steps required for wide-band calibration and mapping of EVLA data, including polarization, based on C-array test observations of NGC 4631. With modest on-source observing times (30 minutes at 1.5 GHz and 75 minutes at 6 GHz for the test data) we have achieved best rms noise levels of 22 and 3.5 $\\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ at 1.5 GHz and 6 GHz, respectively. New disk-halo features have been detected, among them two at 1.5 GHz that appear as loops in projection. We present the first 1.5 GHz spectral index map of NGC 4631 to be formed from a single wide-band observation in a single array configuration. This map represents tangent slopes to the intensities within the band centered at 1.5 GHz, ...

  4. First-Year Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Results: Constraints on Non-Standard Cosmological Models

    CERN Document Server

    Sollerman, J; Davis, T M; Blomqvis, M; Bassett, B; Becker, A C; Cinabro, D; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frieman, J; Garnavich, P; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Miquel, R; Nichol, R C; Richmond, M W; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Vanderplas, J T; Wheeler, J C

    2009-01-01

    We use the new SNe Ia discovered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey together with additional supernova datasets as well as observations of the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations to constrain cosmological models. This complements the analysis presented by Kessler et al. in that we discuss and rank a number of the most popular non-standard cosmology scenarios. When this combined data-set is analyzed using the MLCS2k2 light-curve fitter, we find that more exotic models for cosmic acceleration provide a better fit to the data than the Lambda-CDM model. For example, the flat DGP model is ranked higher by our information criteria tests than the standard model. When the dataset is instead analyzed using the SALT-II light-curve fitter, the standard cosmological constant model fares best. Our investigation also includes inhomogeneous Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models. While our LTB models can be made to fit the supernova data as well as any other model, the extra parameters they require are not...

  5. Upper crustal structure from the Santa Monica Mountains to the Sierra Nevada, Southern California: Tomographic results from the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment, Phase II (LARSE II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, W.J.; Fuis, G.S.; Ryberg, T.; Okaya, D.A.; Clayton, R.W.; Davis, P.M.; Prodehl, C.; Murphy, J.M.; Langenheim, V.E.; Benthien, M.L.; Godfrey, N.J.; Christensen, N.I.; Thygesen, K.; Thurber, C.H.; Simila, G.; Keller, Gordon R.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) collected refraction and low-fold reflection data along a 150-km-long corridor extending from the Santa Monica Mountains northward to the Sierra Nevada. This profile was part of the second phase of the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE II). Chief imaging targets included sedimentary basins beneath the San Fernando and Santa Clarita Valleys and the deep structure of major faults along the transect, including causative faults for the 1971 M 6.7 San Fernando and 1994 M 6.7 Northridge earthquakes, the San Gabriel Fault, and the San Andreas Fault. Tomographic modeling of first arrivals using the methods of Hole (1992) and Lutter et al. (1999) produces velocity models that are similar to each other and are well resolved to depths of 5-7.5 km. These models, together with oil-test well data and independent forward modeling of LARSE II refraction data, suggest that regions of relatively low velocity and high velocity gradient in the San Fernando Valley and the northern Santa Clarita Valley (north of the San Gabriel Fault) correspond to Cenozoic sedimentary basin fill and reach maximum depths along the profile of ???4.3 km and >3 km , respectively. The Antelope Valley, within the western Mojave Desert, is also underlain by low-velocity, high-gradient sedimentary fill to an interpreted maximum depth of ???2.4 km. Below depths of ???2 km, velocities of basement rocks in the Santa Monica Mountains and the central Transverse Ranges vary between 5.5 and 6.0 km/sec, but in the Mojave Desert, basement rocks vary in velocity between 5.25 and 6.25 km/sec. The San Andreas Fault separates differing velocity structures of the central Transverse Ranges and Mojave Desert. A weak low-velocity zone is centered approximately on the north-dipping aftershock zone of the 1971 San Fernando earthquake and possibly along the deep projection of the San Gabriel Fault. Modeling of gravity data, using

  6. Conditional deletion of nonmuscle myosin II-A in mouse tongue epithelium results in squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Mary Anne; Saleh, Anthony D; Brinster, Lauren R; Cheng, Hui; Chen, Zhong; Cornelius, Shaleeka; Liu, Chengyu; Ma, Xuefei; Van Waes, Carter; Adelstein, Robert S

    2015-09-15

    To investigate the contribution of nonmuscle myosin II-A (NM II-A) to early cardiac development we crossed Myh9 floxed mice and Nkx2.5 cre-recombinase mice. Nkx2.5 is expressed in the early heart (E7.5) and later in the tongue epithelium. Mice homozygous for deletion of NM II-A (A(Nkx)/A(Nkx)) are born at the expected ratio with normal hearts, but consistently develop an invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue (32/32 A(Nkx)/A(Nkx)) as early as E17.5. To assess reproducibility a second, independent line of Myh9 floxed mice derived from a different embryonic stem cell clone was tested. This second line also develops SCC indistinguishable from the first (15/15). In A(Nkx)/A(Nkx) mouse tongue epithelium, genetic deletion of NM II-A does not affect stabilization of TP53, unlike a previous report for SCC. We attribute the consistent, early formation of SCC with high penetrance to the role of NM II in maintaining mitotic stability during karyokinesis.

  7. The Normal-incidence Vacuum-ultraviolet Spectrometer for the TJ-II and First Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, K.J.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2002-07-01

    A normal-incidence spectrometer, operating in the extreme-ultraviolet and ultraviolet wavelength regions, has been commissioned for the TJ-II stellarator. The instrument has been custom built by McPherson, Chelmsford, MA, and has several unique features and accessories that are described here. The instrument and CCD detector has been tested and calibrated, and its performance evaluated, using spectral lines from glow discharges and a RF excited flow lamp. Finally, the first spectra collected with the instrument of TJ-II plasmas are presented and a preliminary estimation of an oxygen ion temperature is made. (Author) 23 refs.

  8. The Joint Logistics-over-the-Shore (LOTS) Test and Evaluation Report. Volume II. Analysis of Test Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-05

    II with one minor exception in the case of two privately owned U.S. ships requisitioned during the 1958 Lebanon crisis .2 For the Korean conflict ships...system the barge-TCDF has a critica ! deployment weakness due to its size and weight and it is sea state sensitive. However, it is highly productive in

  9. Neoadjuvant capecitabine combined with standard radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Mature results of a phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunst, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Rudat, V. [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany); Wulf, J. [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany); Budach, W. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Hoelscher, T. [Technical Univ., Dresden (Germany); Reese, T. [Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Mose, S.; Roedel, C. [Univ. of Frankfurt (Germany); Zuehlke, H. [Paul Gerhard Hospital, Wittenberg (Germany); Hinke, A. [WiSP GmbH, Langenfeld (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    Purpose: the objective of this expanded phase II trial was to confirm the safety results of the preceding phase I study and establish the efficacy of neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy with capecitabine in rectal cancer in a multicenter setting. Patients and methods: 96 patients (63% male, age 34-81 years) with advanced rectal cancer (cT3-4 or cN+) from seven university centers in Germany were recruited. All were to receive a total irradiation dose of 50.4-55.8 Gy with conventional fractions. Capecitabine was given at an oral dosage of 825 mg/m{sup 2} bid on each day of the radiotherapy period with the first daily dose applied 2 h before irradiation, followed by surgery 6 weeks later. Results: most of the patients suffered from an advanced primary tumor (cT3: 57%, cT4: 40%) with lymph node involvement in 60%. After neoadjuvant treatment, with a mean of 99% of the scheduled radiation dose actually delivered, a clinical response rate of 68% (95% confidence interval: 57-78%) was observed. Out of 87 evaluable patients undergoing surgery, a sphincter-preserving procedure could be performed in 51% and RO resection in 94%. A pathologically complete response was achieved in six patients (7%, 95% confidence interval: 3-14%). The comparison of initial diagnosis and pathologic findings showed a downstaging in 61%. Acute toxicity with > 5% incidence of NCI (National Cancer Institute) grade {>=} 3 included lymphopenia (12%), leukopenia (6%), and diarrhea (7%). Mild to moderate hand-foot syndrome occurred in 12% only. After a median follow-up of 48 months, the 5-year overall survival and tumor control data were, with regard to patient selection, in the expected range with an overall survival of 65%, a relapse-free survival of 47%, and a local recurrence rate after 5 years of 17%. Conclusion: the data clearly confirm that capecitabine is an adequate substitute for 5-fluorouracil in preoperative chemoradiation of rectal cancer with a favorable safety profile. (orig.)

  10. Synthesis and characterisation of estrogenic carriers for cytotoxic Pt(II) fragments: biological activity of the resulting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabano, Elisabetta; Cassino, Claudio; Bonetti, Samuele; Prandi, Cristina; Colangelo, Donato; Ghiglia, Annalisa; Osella, Domenico

    2005-10-07

    This paper describes the synthesis and the spectroscopic characterisation of cis-dichloro[N-(4-(17alpha-ethynylestradiolyl)-benzyl)-ethylenediamine]platinum(II) and cis-diamino[2-(4-(17alpha-ethynylestradiolyl)-benzoylamino)-malonato]platinum(II). These complexes were synthesised in good yield according to multi-step procedures based on the classical and non-classical Sonogashira coupling reaction, respectively. These compounds retain an acceptable degree of relative binding affinity (RBA) for the alpha form of estrogen receptor. Combined treatment of breast cancer cell lines, namely hormone-sensitive MCF-7 and hormone-insensitive MDA-MB-231 cell lines, indicates that these compounds maintain agonistic activity so that the potential advantage in vehiculation of the cytotoxic moiety by means of the receptor system is counteracted by the proliferative effect of the estrogenic component of the entire molecule, especially at low concentrations.

  11. Micron Size Laser-Wire System at the ATF Extraction Line, Recent Results and ATF-II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Blair, G A; Boorman, G; Bosco, A; Deacon, L; Karataev, P; Howell, D; Nevay, L J; Corner, L; Delerue, N; Foster, B; Gannaway, F; Newman, M; Senanayake, R; Walczak, R; Hayano, H; Aryshev, A; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J

    2010-01-01

    The KEK Accelerator test facility (ATF) extraction line laser-wire system has been upgraded last year allowing the measurement of micron scale transverse size electron beams. The most recent measurements using the upgraded system are presented. The ATF-II extraction line design call for the major upgrade of the existing laser-wire system. We report on the hardware upgrades, including the major hardware upgrades to the laser transport, the laser beam diagnostics line, and the mechanical control systems.

  12. Clinical and angiographic results with the NIR stent: First International NIR Endovascular Stent Study (FINESS-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutsch, Wolfgang; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Colombo, Antonio; Macaya, Carlos; Guermonprez, Jean-Leon; Grip, Lars; Hamburger, Jaap; Umans, Victor; Gotsman, Mervyn; Almagor, Yaron; Morice, Marie-Claude; Garcia, Eulogio; Chevalier, Bernard; Erbel, Raimund; Cobaugh, Michael; Morel, Marie-Angèle; Serruys, Patrick W

    2000-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Although safety and efficacy of the NIR trade mark stent have been reported, the long-term angiographic and clinical outcomes have yet to be investigated. The FINESS-II study (First International NIR Endovascular Stent Study) was designed to assess the procedural safety of single 9 and 16 mm NIR stent implantation, the six-month restenosis rate and finally the six- and 12-month clinical outcome of patients treated with this novel coronary stent. METHODS: Patients with angina and a single de novo lesion in a native coronary artery of >3 and 50% diameter stenosis criterion at six month follow-up was 19% (26/136). At 12 months, the event-free survival rate was 83% (two deaths, one Q-wave and three non-Q-wave myocardial infarctions, four bypass surgery and 17 target lesion revascularizations), while 87% of the patients were free of angina pectoris. CONCLUSION: the outcome of the FINESS-II trial is comparable to those observed in previous stent trials (Benestent II), indicating that the coronary NIR stent is safe and effective as a primary device for the treatment of native coronary artery lesions in patients with (un)stable angina pectoris.

  13. WIMP-Search Results from the Second CDMSlite Run

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Aramaki, T; Asai, M; Baker, W; Balakishiyeva, D; Barker, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Calkins, R; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Ghaith, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jardin, D; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Lukens, P; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Mast, N; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Mendoza, J D Morales; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Roberts, A; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Toback, D; Underwood, R; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wilson, J S; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg days, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. A fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded for WIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/$c^2$.

  14. Effect of recombinant alpha interferon on NK and ADCC function in lung cancer patients: results from a phase II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, P; Hokland, M; Olesen, B K

    1985-01-01

    During a phase II trial of recombinant IFN-alpha given in doses of 50 X 10(6) units/m2 three times per week to lung cancer patients, 13 patients were evaluated longitudinally in NK and ADCC assays and in immunofluorescence tests enumerating the number of cells reactive with the new N901 NK...... that this decrease might be attributable to either an exhaustion phenomenon or to an induction of a refractory state of peripheral blood NK cells. When measuring ADCC activity, increases in lytic activity were seen only in patients in whom they could be attributed to non-IgG-dependent (NK-like) mechanisms...

  15. Smoking cessation intervention within the framework of a lung cancer screening program: preliminary results and clinical perspectives from the "Cosmos-II" Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippo, Lococo; Principe, Rosastella; Cesario, Alfredo; Apolone, Giovanni; Carleo, Francesco; Ialongo, Pasquale; Veronesi, Giulia; Cardillo, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Data coming from the literature investigating the effectiveness and interaction between smoking cessation (SC) and lung cancer screening (LCScr) are still sparse and inconsistent. Herein, we report the preliminary results from the ongoing lung cancer screening trial ("Cosmos-II") focusing our analysis on the inter-relationship between the SC program and the LCScr.

  16. BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Zn-65 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 65Zn for the BARC (India) with linked results for the CCRI(II)-K2.Zn-65 comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michotte, C.; Ratel, G.; Courte, S.; Joseph, L.

    2015-01-01

    A new participation in the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Zn-65 comparison has been added to the previous results. A link has been made to the CCRI(II)-K2.Zn-65 comparison held in 2003 through the measurement of all ampoules of the K2 comparison in the International Reference System (SIR) at the BIPM before dispatch to the participants. This has produced a revised value for the key comparison reference value (KCRV), calculated using the power-moderated weighted mean. Six NMIs used the K2 comparison to update their degrees of equivalence. The degrees of equivalence between each equivalent activity measured in the SIR and the KCRV have been calculated and the results are given in the form of a table for the remaining two NMIs in the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Zn-65 comparison and the 17 other participants in the CCRI(II)-K2.Zn-65 comparison. A graphical presentation is also given. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. Food consumption of adults in Germany: results of the German National Nutrition Survey II based on diet history interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Thorsten; Krems, Carolin; Moon, Kilson; Brombach, Christine; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2015-05-28

    The second German National Nutrition Survey (NVS II) aimed to evaluate food consumption and other aspects of nutritional behaviour of a representative sample of the German population, using a modular design with three different dietary assessment methods. To assess usual food consumption, 15,371 German speaking subjects 14-80 years of age completed a diet history interview between November 2005 and November 2006. With reference to the guidelines of the German Nutrition Society (DGE), NVS II observed that the German population did not eat enough foods of plant origin, especially vegetables and consumed too much of meat and meat products. While generally similar food consumption is observed in other European countries, consumption of bread, fruit juices/nectars and beer is higher in Germany. On average, men consumed two times more meat and soft drinks as well as six times more beer than women did, whereas the consumption of vegetables, fruit as well as herbal/fruit tea was higher in women. Older participants showed a lower consumption of meat, fruit juice/nectars, soft drinks and spirits as well as a higher consumption of fish, vegetables, fruit, and herbal/fruit tea than adolescents and younger adults did. There are also differences in food consumption with regard to socio-economic status (SES). Persons with higher SES consumed more vegetables, fruit, fish, water, coffee/tea and wine, while persons with lower SES consumed more meat and meat products, soft drinks and beer. In general, the food consumption of women, the elderly and the higher SES group tends to be closer to the official dietary guidelines in Germany.

  18. Validation of WIMS-AECL/(MULTICELL)/RFSP system by the results of phase-B test at Wolsung-II unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, In Seob; Min, Byung Joo; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    The object of this study is the validation of WIMS-AECL lattice code which has been proposed for the substitution of POWDERPUFS-V(PPV) code. For the validation of this code, WIMS-AECL/(MULTICELL)/RFSP (lattice calculation/(incremental cross section calculation)/core calculation) code system has been used for the Post-Simulation of Phase-B physics Test at Wolsung-II unit. This code system had been used for the Wolsong-I and Point Lepraeu reactors, but after a few modifications of WIMS-AECL input values for Wolsong-II, the results of WIMS-AECL/RFSP code calculations are much improved to those of the old ones. Most of the results show good estimation except moderator temperature coefficient test. And the verification of this result must be done, which is one of the further work. 6 figs., 15 tabs. (Author)

  19. A measurement of the TPMU - PROBA II Microsatellite Instrument and its comparison with the SWARM Langmuir Probes results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Katerina; Hruska, Frantisek; Truhlik, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    This contribution deals with the long-term measurement of the floating potential (FP) and the electron temperature (Te) provided by the Thermal Plasma Measurement Unit (TPMU) scientific instrument on-board the PROBA II microsatellite. The device is working with limitations of scientific measurements caused very probably by installed on-board software. This brings lower data volume as it was planned. Affected are the ion measurement and partially the electron temperature measurement. We present comparisons of the TPMU long-term measurement of the FP and the Te with the Te and the FP SWARM Langmuir Probes measured data. We implement the method of stochastic comparison of the probability distribution between measurements of FP and Te of both instruments to recognize seasonal and solar activity similarities. The analysis is performed for all seasons of the period from the years 2013 - 2015 for the Equatorial region, North and South hemisphere. The data are divided into the three groups by the geographical latitude to the Nothern hemisphere (lat>15'), the Southern hemisphere (latreflect also changes of the Kp index. Changes over the solar cycle are also visible. The main TPMU goal is the validation and testing of new design of the instrument which is necessary for possible applications of TPMU design for future scientific missions.

  20. [Genetic history of Aleuts of the Komandor islands from results of analyzing variability of class II HLA genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volod'ko, N V; Derbeneva, O A; Uinuk-ool, T S; Sukernik, R I

    2003-12-01

    Variability of the HLA class II genes (alleles of the DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 loci) was investigated in a sample of Aleuts of the Commanders (n = 31), whose ancestors inhabited the Commander Islands for many thousand years. Among 19 haplotypes revealed in Aleuts of the Commanders, at most eight were inherited from the native inhabitants of the Commander Islands. Five of these haplotypes (DRB1*0401-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0301, DRB1*1401-DQA1*0101-DQB1*0503, DRB1*0802-DQA1*0401-DQB1*0402, DRB1*1101-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301, and DRB1*1201-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301) were typical of Beringian Mongoloids, i.e., Coastal Chukchi and Koryaks, as well as Siberian and Alaskan Eskimos. Genetic contribution of the immigrants to the genetic pool of proper Aleuts constituted about 52%. Phylogenetic analysis based on Transberingian distribution of the DRB1 allele frequencies favored the hypothesis on the common origin of Paleo-Aleuts, Paleo-Eskimos, and the Indians from the northwestern North America, whose direct ancestors survived in Beringian/southwestern Alaskan coastal refugia during the late Ice Age.

  1. Long-term results of a phase II trial of lenalidomide plus prednisone therapy for patients with myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihara, Dai; Masarova, Lucia; Newberry, Kate J; Maeng, Hoyoung; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-09-01

    Lenalidomide, with or without prednisone, is an active therapy for patients with myelofibrosis (MF). We provide an update of a phase II study of lenalidomide plus prednisone in patients with MF, after median follow up of 9 years. Forty patients were enrolled in the study and all patients were evaluable for response. Response to the treatment was reevaluated using IWG response criteria published in 2013: quality of response improved over time and overall response rate was 35%. Response in splenomegaly was seen in 39% of patients and anemia response in 32%. The median time to treatment failure (TTF) in all patients was 8.2 months and the median duration of response was 34.6 months. Response was highly durable in some patients: six patients (15%) had TTF for more than 60 months (5 years) and three patients are still on the treatment beyond 109 months (9 years). Complete and partial responses were seen in one and five patients, respectively, but achieving deeper response was not necessary for the response to be durable. New clinical studies are needed to explore safe and well tolerated lenalidomide-based combination strategies for patients with MF.

  2. [The results of combined ozone therapy using in complex treatment of soft tissues infections in patients with diabetes mellitus type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnik, Iu S; Salmina, A B; Tepliakova, O V; Drobushevskaia, A I; Pozhilenkova, E A; Morgun, A V; Shapran, M V; Kovalenko, A O

    2015-01-01

    Levels of interleukins-6, 8, 10, TNF-alpha and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were examined in peripheral blood of 60 patients with diabetes mellitus type II and soft tissues infections. It was revealed the elevated levels of proinflammatory (IL-6, 8), anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines and basic fibroblast growth factor at the time of admission. Application of combined ozone therapy including ozonated autohemotherapy and superficial management of wounds with ozone-oxygen mixture resulted in significant decrease of IL-6, 8, 10 production and high level of bFGF on blood serum. Thus effective local bactericidal impact of ozone in combination with normalization of proinflammatory cytokines levels and preserved high level of bFGF in peripheral blood provide better results of wound healing process in patients with diabetes mellitus type II.

  3. [Selection of a statistical model for the evaluation of the reliability of the results of toxicological analyses. II. Selection of our statistical model for the evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antczak, K; Wilczyńska, U

    1980-01-01

    Part II presents a statistical model devised by the authors for evaluating toxicological analyses results. The model includes: 1. Establishment of a reference value, basing on our own measurements taken by two independent analytical methods. 2. Selection of laboratories -- basing on the deviation of the obtained values from reference ones. 3. On consideration of variance analysis, t-student's test and differences test, subsequent quality controls and particular laboratories have been evaluated.

  4. Simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy in esophageal carcinoma. Early results of a phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wei-Wei [Fudan University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Zheng-Fei; Zhao, Kuai-Le; Mao, Jing-Fang; Wu, Kai-Liang; Yang, Huan-Jun; Fan, Min; Zhao, Sen [Fudan University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai (China); Fu, Xiao-Long [Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai (China); Fudan University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai (China); Welsh, James [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The safety and efficacy of using simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) for patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were evaluated in a single-institution phase II setting. Between June 2007 and October 2009, 45 patients underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy (n = 27) or radiotherapy alone (n = 18). Two planning target volumes (PTV) were defined for the SIB: PTV{sub C} and PTV{sub G}, with prescribed doses of 50.4 Gy to the PTV{sub C} (1.8 Gy/fraction) and 63 Gy to the PTV{sub G} (2.25 Gy/fraction), both given in 28 fractions. At a median follow-up interval of 20.3 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 42.2 and 40.7 %, respectively. The median overall survival time was 21 months; locoregional control rates were 83.3 % at 1 year and 67.5 % at 3 years. According to CTCAE (version 3.0) criteria, none of the patients developed grade 4-5 toxicity. The most common grade 2 and 3 radiation-related toxicity was radiation esophagitis, occurring in 64 % of all patients (but only 13 % as grade 3). No patient developed grade > 2 pulmonary complications. SIB-IMRT is a feasible therapeutic approach for esophageal carcinoma patients and provides encouraging locoregional control with a low toxicity profile. Further investigations should focus on dose escalation and optimization of the combination with systemic therapies. (orig.) [German] Die Wirksamkeit und Effektivitaet einer intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie mit einem simultan integrierten Boost (SIB-IMRT) fuer Patienten mit Oesophaguskarzinom wurde in einer Single-Institution-Phase-II-Studie bewertet. Zwischen Juni 2007 und Oktober 2009 wurden 45 Patienten mit einer simultanen Radiochemotherapie (n = 27) oder einer alleinigen Strahlentherapie (n = 18) behandelt. Zwei Planungszielvolumen (PTV) wurden fuer die SIB definiert: PTV{sub C} und PTV{sub G}, mit vorgeschriebenen Dosen von 50,4 Gy fuer PTV{sub C} (1,8 Gy/Fraktion) und 63 Gy

  5. Zic deficiency in the cortical marginal zone and meninges results in cortical lamination defects resembling those in type II lissencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Masaharu; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Aruga, Jun

    2008-04-30

    The formation of the highly organized cortical structure depends on the production and correct placement of the appropriate number and types of neurons. The Zic family of zinc-finger transcription factors plays essential roles in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitors in the medial forebrain and the cerebellum. Examination of the expression of Zic genes demonstrated that Zic1, Zic2, and Zic3 were expressed by the progenitor cells in the septum and cortical hem, the sites of generation of the Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells. Immunohistochemical studies have revealed that Zic proteins were abundantly expressed in the meningeal cells and that the majority of the CR cells distributed in the medial and dorsal cortex also expressed Zic proteins in the mid-late embryonic and postnatal cortical marginal zones. During embryonic cortical development, Zic1/Zic3 double-mutant and hypomorphic Zic2 mutant mice showed a reduction in the number of CR cells in the rostral cortex, whereas the cell number remained unaffected in the caudal cortex. These mutants also showed mislocalization of the CR cells and cortical lamination defects, resembling the changes noted in type II (cobblestone) lissencephaly, throughout the brain. In the Zic1/3 mutant, reduced proliferation of the meningeal cells was observed before the thinner and disrupted organization of the pial basement membrane (BM) with reduced expression of the BM components and the meningeal cell-derived secretory factor. These defects correlated with the changes in the end feet morphology of the radial glial cells. These findings indicate that the Zic genes play critical roles in cortical development through regulating the proliferation of meningeal cells and the pial BM assembly.

  6. Integrated boost IMRT with FET-PET-adapted local dose escalation in glioblastomas. Results of a prospective phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piroth, M.D.; Pinkawa, M.; Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain] (and others)

    2012-04-15

    Dose escalations above 60 Gy based on MRI have not led to prognostic benefits in glioblastoma patients yet. With positron emission tomography (PET) using [{sup 18}F]fluorethyl-L-tyrosine (FET), tumor coverage can be optimized with the option of regional dose escalation in the area of viable tumor tissue. In a prospective phase II study (January 2008 to December 2009), 22 patients (median age 55 years) received radiochemotherapy after surgery. The radiotherapy was performed as an MRI and FET-PET-based integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The prescribed dose was 72 and 60 Gy (single dose 2.4 and 2.0 Gy, respectively) for the FET-PET- and MR-based PTV-FET{sub (72 Gy)} and PTV-MR{sub (60 Gy)}. FET-PET and MRI were performed routinely for follow-up. Quality of life and cognitive aspects were recorded by the EORTC-QLQ-C30/QLQ Brain20 and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), while the therapy-related toxicity was recorded using the CTC3.0 and RTOG scores. Median overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 14.8 and 7.8 months, respectively. All local relapses were detected at least partly within the 95% dose volume of PTV-MR{sub (60 Gy)}. No relevant radiotherapy-related side effects were observed (excepted alopecia). In 2 patients, a pseudoprogression was observed in the MRI. Tumor progression could be excluded by FET-PET and was confirmed in further MRI and FET-PET imaging. No significant changes were observed in MMSE scores and in the EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-Brain20 questionnaires. Our dose escalation concept with a total dose of 72 Gy, based on FET-PET, did not lead to a survival benefit. Acute and late toxicity were not increased, compared with historical controls and published dose-escalation studies. (orig.)

  7. The possibility to increase the rated output as a result of index tests performed in Iron Gates II- Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novac, D; Pantelimon, D [Hidroelectrica - SH Portile de Fier, Str. I.G. Bibicescu Nr.2, Drobeta Turnu Severin, RO - 220103 (Romania); Popescu, E, E-mail: dragos.novac@hidroelectrica.r [Hidroelectrica Bucuresti, Str. C-tin Nacu Nr.3, Bucuresti, RO - 020995 (Romania)

    2010-08-15

    The Index Tests have been used for many years to obtain the optimized cam correlation between wicket gates and runner blades for double regulated turbines (Kaplan, bulb). The cam is based on homologous model tests and is verified by site measurements, as model tests generally do not reproduce the exact intake configuration. Index Tests have also a considerable importance for checking of the relative efficiency curve of all type of turbines and can demonstrate if the prototype efficiency curve at plant condition has the shape expected from the test of the homologues model. During the Index Tests measurements the influence of all losses at multiple points of turbine operation can be proved. This publication deals with an overview on the Index Tests made after modernization of large bulb units in Iron Gates II - Romania. These field tests, together with the comparative, fully homologous tests for the new hydraulic shape of the runner blades have confirmed the smooth operational behavior and the guaranteed performance. Over the whole 'guaranteed operating range' for H = 8m, the characteristic of the Kaplan curve (enveloping curve to the propeller curves), agreed very well to the predicted efficiency curve from the hydraulic prototype hill chart. The new cam correlation have been determined for different head and realised in the governor, normally based on model tests. The guaranteed, maximum turbine output for H = 7,8m is specified with 32, 5 MW. The maximum measured turbine output during the Index Tests on cam operation was 35,704 MW at the net head of 7,836 m. This corresponds to 35,458 MW for the specified head H= 7, 8 m. All these important improvements ensure a significant increase of annual energy production without any change of the civil construction and without increasing the runner diameter. Also the possibility to increase the turbine rated output is evident.

  8. Clinical results of Hi-tech Knee II total knee arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid athritis: 5- to 12-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamanaka Hajime

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a common form of treatment to relieve pain and improve function in cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Good clinical outcomes have been reported with a variety of TKA prostheses. The cementless Hi-Tech Knee II cruciate-retaining (CR-type prosthesis, which has 6 fins at the anterior of the femoral component, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL retention, flat-on-flat surface component geometry, all-polyethylene patella, strong initial fixation by the center screw of the tibial base plate, 10 layers of titanium alloy fiber mesh, and direct compression molded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE, is appropriate for TKA in the Japanese knee. The present study was performed to evaluate the clinical results of primary TKA in RA using the cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis. Materials and methods We performed 32 consecutive primary TKAs using cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis in 31 RA patients. The average follow-up period was 8 years 3 months. Clinical evaluations were performed according to the American Knee Society (KS system, knee score, function score, radiographic evaluation, and complications. Results The mean postoperative maximum flexion angle was 115.6°, and the KS knee score and function score improved to 88 and 70 after surgery, respectively. Complications, such as infection, occurred in 1 patient and revision surgery was performed. There were no cases of loosening in this cohort, and prosthesis survival rate was 96.9% at 12 years postoperatively. Conclusion These results suggest that TKA using the cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis is a very effective form of treatment in RA patients at 5 to 12 years postoperatively. Further long-term follow-up studies are required to determine the ultimate utility of this type of prosthesis.

  9. Extending market activities for a distribution company in hourly-ahead energy and reserve markets-Part II: Numerical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashhour, M., E-mail: m.mashhour@ee.kntu.ac.i [Electrical Engineering Department of K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 16315-1355 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golkar, M.A., E-mail: Golkar@kntu.ac.i [The Electrical Engineering Department of K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 16315-1355 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghaddas-Tafreshi, S.M., E-mail: tafreshi@eetd.kntu.ac.i [Electrical Engineering Department of K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 16315-1355 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The present work is to show the application and implementation of the algorithms and models proposed in part I. It also represents the simulation results of (a) extracting a lumped financial model (the aggregated model) of the distribution system with distributed generations (DGs) and interruptible loads (ILs), (b) distribution company's (DISCO's) process of decision-making, based on the created financial model, on allocating its generating capability for internal usage and proposing to the hourly-ahead energy and reserve markets, and (c) a profit-based network reconfiguration methodology that increases the DISCO's technical ability and directs its financial affairs towards more profitable transactions in the upcoming markets. The function of the algorithms used for detecting unfeasible configurations, namely loop path and/or isolated part in the network are shown and well exemplified. Influential factors in DISCO's generating capability and in the coefficients of DISCO's internal cost function (ICF) are investigated. The present study substantiates the ICF-based optimization method by comparing the relevant results with the results obtained based on the use of total cost function (TCF). Several scenarios on market prices of energy and reserve and on the contingency probability factor pertaining to the real-time generation in reserve market are considered. Simulation results indicate that getting more economical benefits, DISCO may necessarily play different roles in the market and change the network configuration, at different hours.

  10. Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies : An EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES). II. First Results on NGC 4631

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irwin, Judith; Beck, Rainer; Benjamin, R. A.; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; English, Jayanne; Heald, George; Henriksen, Richard N.; Johnson, Megan; Krause, Marita; Li, Jiang-Tao; Miskolczi, Arpad; Mora, Silvia Carolina; Murphy, E. J.; Oosterloo, Tom; Porter, Troy A.; Rand, Richard J.; Saikia, D. J.; Schmidt, Philip; Strong, A. W.; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Q. Daniel; Wiegert, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    We present the first results from the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies—an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES), a new survey of 35 edge-on galaxies to search for both in-disk and extraplanar radio continuum emission. CHANG-ES is exploiting the new wide-band, multi-channel capabilities of the Karl G. Jansky Very

  11. Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies: An EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES). II. First Results on NGC 4631

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irwin, Judith; Beck, Rainer; Benjamin, R. A.; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; English, Jayanne; Heald, George; Henriksen, Richard N.; Johnson, Megan; Krause, Marita; Li, Jiang-Tao; Miskolczi, Arpad; Mora, Silvia Carolina; Murphy, E. J.; Oosterloo, Tom; Porter, Troy A.; Rand, Richard J.; Saikia, D. J.; Schmidt, Philip; Strong, A. W.; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Q. Daniel; Wiegert, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    We present the first results from the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies—an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES), a new survey of 35 edge-on galaxies to search for both in-disk and extraplanar radio continuum emission. CHANG-ES is exploiting the new wide-band, multi-channel capabilities of the Karl G. Jansky Very

  12. Survey results of corroding problems at biological treatment plants, Stage II Protection of concrete - State of the Art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Ylva (CBI, Boraas (Sweden)); Henriksson, Gunilla (SP, Boraas (Sweden))

    2011-07-01

    A pilot study on the degradation and corrosion of concrete in biological treatment plants was conducted in 2009/2010 in a Waste Refinery Project WR-27 'Survey results of corroding problems at biological treatment plants'. The results showed that the concrete does not have sufficient resistance in the current aggressive plant environment. Furthermore, it is stated that some form of surface protection system is needed to ensure the good performance of concrete constructions, and that the system must withstand the aggressive environment and the traffic that occurs on site. Consequently, a new study was proposed in order to develop specifications for surface protection of concrete in aggressive food waste environments. Results from that study are presented in this report. The report includes various types of waterproofing/protection coating for concrete in biological treatment plants. A number of proposals from the industry are presented in the light of results from project WR-27, i.e., the materials must, among other things, withstand the aggressive leachate from waste food at temperatures up to 70 deg C, and some degree of wear. Some systems are compared in terms of technical material properties as reported by the manufacturer. It turns out that different testing methods were used, and the test results are thus generally not directly comparable. A proposal for a test program has been developed, focusing on chemical resistance and wear resistance. A test solution corresponding to leachate is specified. Laboratory tests for verification of the proposed methodology and future requirements are proposed, as well as test sites and follow-up in the field

  13. Design of a digital beam attenuation system for computed tomography. Part II. Performance study and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Mistretta, Charles A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1550 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to present a performance study of the digital beam attenuator (DBA) for implementing fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) using a simulation framework developed to model the incorporation of the DBA into an existing CT system. Additionally, initial results will be presented using a prototype DBA and the realization of the prototype will be described. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental use of a device capable of modulating x-ray fluence as a function of fan angle using a CT geometry. Methods: To realize FFMCT, the authors propose to use a wedge design in which one wedge is held stationary and another wedge is moved over the stationary wedge. Due to the wedge shape, the composite thickness of the two wedges changes as a function of the amount of overlap between the wedges. This design allows for the wedges to modulate the photon fluence incident onto a patient. Using a simulation environment, the effect of changing the number of wedges has on dose, scatter, detector dynamic range, and noise uniformity is explored. Experimental results are presented using a prototype DBA having ten Fe wedges and a c-arm CT system geometry. The experimental DBA results are compared to non-DBA scans using scatter and detector dynamic range as metrics. Both flat field and bowtie filtered CT acquisitions were simulated for comparison with the DBA. Results: Numerical results suggest that substantial gains in noise uniformity and scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) can be obtained using only seven wedges. After seven wedges, the decrease in noise ununiformity and SPR falls off at a lower rate. Simulations comparing CT acquisitions between flat field, bowtie enabled, and DBA CT acquisitions suggest DBA-FFMCT can reduce dose relative to flat field CT by Almost-Equal-To 3 times. A bowtie filter under the same imaging conditions was shown to only allow a dose reduction of 1.65 times. Experimentally, a 10 wedge DBA prototype result showed

  14. Does bisphenol A induce superfeminization in Marisa cornuarietis? Part II: toxicity test results and requirements for statistical power analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Valery E; Aufderheide, John; Warbritton, Ryan; van der Hoeven, Nelly; Caspers, Norbert

    2007-03-01

    This study presents results of the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on adult egg production, egg hatchability, egg development rates and juvenile growth rates in the freshwater gastropod, Marisa cornuarietis. We observed no adult mortality, substantial inter-snail variability in reproductive output, and no effects of BPA on reproduction during 12 weeks of exposure to 0, 0.1, 1.0, 16, 160 or 640 microg/L BPA. We observed no effects of BPA on egg hatchability or timing of egg hatching. Juveniles showed good growth in the control and all treatments, and there were no significant effects of BPA on this endpoint. Our results do not support previous claims of enhanced reproduction in Marisa cornuarietis in response to exposure to BPA. Statistical power analysis indicated high levels of inter-snail variability in the measured endpoints and highlighted the need for sufficient replication when testing treatment effects on reproduction in M. cornuarietis with adequate power.

  15. Polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids. II. Results for 58 B- and C-type objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; Cañada-Assandri, M.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: We present results of a polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids at Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito (CASLEO), San Juan, Argentina. The aims of this survey are to increase the database of asteroid polarimetry, to estimate diversity in polarimetric properties of asteroids that belong to different taxonomic classes, and to search for objects that exhibit anomalous polarimetric properties. Methods: The data were obtained with the Torino and CASPROF polarimeters at the 2.15m telescope. The Torino polarimeter is an instrument that allows simultaneous measurement of polarization in five different bands, and the CASPROF polarimeter is a two-hole aperture polarimeter with rapid modulation. Results: The survey began in 2003, and up to 2009 data on a sample of more than 170 asteroids were obtained. In this paper the results for 58 B- and C-type objects are presented, most of them polarimetrically observed for the first time. Using these data we find phase-polarization curves and polarimetric parameters for these taxonomic classes. Based on observations carried out at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.Tables 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/539/A115

  16. Results of the 4th scientific workshop of the ECCO (Group II): markers of intestinal fibrosis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Florian; de Bruyn, Jessica R; Pham, Bao Tung; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Annese, Vito; Higgins, Peter D R; Magro, Fernando; Dotan, Iris

    2014-10-01

    The fourth scientific workshop of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organization (ECCO) focused on intestinal fibrosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The objective was to better understand basic mechanisms and markers of intestinal fibrosis as well as to suggest new therapeutic targets to prevent or treat fibrosis. The results of this workshop are presented in three separate manuscripts. This section describes markers of fibrosis in IBD, identifies unanswered questions in the field and provides a framework for future studies addressing the unmet needs in the field of intestinal fibrosis.

  17. AN ATTEMPT TO DETERMINE THE RELATION BETWEEN HUCUL HORSES CONFORMATION ASSESSMENT, MOVEMENT AND COURAGE TEST RESULTS PART II. MARE FAMILIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga TOPCZEWSKA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to determine the relationship between evaluation of conformation and motion indicators and results of the Huculs’ path and also to ascertain the courage (basic and elimination of Hucul horses with their classification into mare families being taken account of. The scores of 116 horses presented for the evaluation of their exterior (championship breeding were analyzed. The assessment covered the type, body conformation, movement in walk and trot as well as overall impression and preparedness for the exhibition. Measurements of length of steps, frequency and rate of the walk and trot were performed during the tests for courage. The estimated correlation coefficients exhibited the existence of some interesting trends i.e., there was positive correlation between values for type, body conformation, movement in walk and trot and the length of steps in walk and trot in individuals representing most of mare families. The reverse was the case with horses from the Sroczka and Wyderka families. Amongst the Wrona, however, negative correlations between the grade for walk and frequency of steps in walk was observed while that of between the result of path and utility tests was positive.

  18. Inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR in advanced pancreatic cancer: results of two phase II studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yujian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway is constitutively activated in pancreatic cancer and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR kinase is an important mediator for its signaling. Our recent in vitro studies suggest that prolonged exposure of pancreatic cancer cells to mTOR inhibitors can promote insulin receptor substrate-PI3K interactions and paradoxically increase Akt phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression in pancreatic cancer cells (negative feedback loop. The addition of erlotinib to rapamycin can down-regulate rapamycin-stimulated Akt and results in synergistic antitumor activity with erlotinib in preclinical tumor models. Methods Two studies prospectively enrolled adult patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1, adequate hematologic, hepatic and renal parameters and measurable disease. In Study A, temsirolimus was administered intravenously at 25 mg weekly. In Study B, everolimus was administered orally at 30 mg weekly and erlotinib was administered at 150 mg daily. The primary endpoint in both studies was overall survival at 6 months. Secondary endpoints included time to progression, progression-free survival, overall survival, response rate, safety and toxicity. Pretreatment tumor biopsies were analyzed by immunofluorescence and laser scanning cytometry for the expression of pmTOR/mTOR, pAkt/Akt, pErk/Erk, pS6, p4EBP-1 and PTEN. Results Five patients enrolled in Study A; Two patients died within a month (rapid disease progression and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. One patient developed dehydration and another developed asthenia. Sixteen patients enrolled in Study B.: 12 males, all ECOG PS = 1. Median cycles = 1 (range 1-2. Grade 4 toxicity: hyponatremia (n = 1, Grade 3: diarrhea (n = 1, cholangitis (n = 3, hyperglycemia (n = 1, fatigue (n = 1. Grade 2: pneumonia (n = 2, dehydration (n = 2, nausea (n = 2, neutropenia (n = 1, mucositis (n = 2

  19. CONTINUUM HALOS IN NEARBY GALAXIES: AN EVLA SURVEY (CHANG-ES). II. FIRST RESULTS ON NGC 4631

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, Judith; Henriksen, Richard N. [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Beck, Rainer; Krause, Marita; Mora, Silvia Carolina; Schmidt, Philip [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121, Bonn (Germany); Benjamin, R. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater, 800 West Main St., Whitewater, WI 53190 (United States); Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Miskolczi, Arpad [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); English, Jayanne [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Heald, George; Oosterloo, Tom [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Johnson, Megan [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Greenbank, WV 24944 (United States); Li, Jiang-Tao [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Murphy, E. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Porter, Troy A. [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Rand, Richard J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, 800 Yale Boulevard, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Saikia, D. J. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Pune University Campus, Post Bag 3, Pune 411 007 (India); Strong, A. W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Walterbos, Rene, E-mail: irwin@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: henriksn@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: twiegert@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: rbeck@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: mkrause@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: cmora@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); and others

    2012-08-15

    We present the first results from the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies-an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES), a new survey of 35 edge-on galaxies to search for both in-disk and extraplanar radio continuum emission. CHANG-ES is exploiting the new wide-band, multi-channel capabilities of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (i.e., the Expanded Very Large Array or EVLA) with observations in two bands centered at 1.5 and 6 GHz in a variety of array configurations with full polarization. The motivation and science case for the survey are presented in a companion paper (Paper I). These first results are based on C-array test observations in both observing bands of the well-known radio halo galaxy, NGC 4631. In this paper, we outline the observations and the data reduction steps that are required for wide-band calibration and mapping of EVLA data, including polarization. With modest on-source observing times (30 minutes at 1.5 GHz and 75 minutes at 6 GHz for the test data), we have achieved best rms noise levels of 22 and 3.5 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} at 1.5 GHz and 6 GHz, respectively. New disk-halo features have been detected, among them two at 1.5 GHz that appear as loops in projection. We present the first 1.5 GHz spectral index map of NGC 4631 to be formed from a single wide-band observation in a single array configuration. This map represents tangent slopes to the intensities within the band centered at 1.5 GHz, rather than fits across widely separated frequencies as has been done in the past and is also the highest spatial resolution spectral index map yet presented for this galaxy. The average spectral index in the disk is {alpha}-bar{sub 1.5GHz} = -0.84 {+-} 0.05 indicating that the emission is largely non-thermal, but a small global thermal contribution is sufficient to explain a positive curvature term in the spectral index over the band. Two specific star-forming regions have spectral indices that are consistent with thermal emission. Polarization results (uncorrected for

  20. Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies: An EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES). II. First Results on NGC 4631

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Judith; Beck, Rainer; Benjamin, R. A.; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; English, Jayanne; Heald, George; Henriksen, Richard N.; Johnson, Megan; Krause, Marita; Li, Jiang-Tao; Miskolczi, Arpad; Mora, Silvia Carolina; Murphy, E. J.; Oosterloo, Tom; Porter, Troy A.; Rand, Richard J.; Saikia, D. J.; Schmidt, Philip; Strong, A. W.; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Q. Daniel; Wiegert, Theresa

    2012-08-01

    We present the first results from the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies—an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES), a new survey of 35 edge-on galaxies to search for both in-disk and extraplanar radio continuum emission. CHANG-ES is exploiting the new wide-band, multi-channel capabilities of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (i.e., the Expanded Very Large Array or EVLA) with observations in two bands centered at 1.5 and 6 GHz in a variety of array configurations with full polarization. The motivation and science case for the survey are presented in a companion paper (Paper I). These first results are based on C-array test observations in both observing bands of the well-known radio halo galaxy, NGC 4631. In this paper, we outline the observations and the data reduction steps that are required for wide-band calibration and mapping of EVLA data, including polarization. With modest on-source observing times (30 minutes at 1.5 GHz and 75 minutes at 6 GHz for the test data), we have achieved best rms noise levels of 22 and 3.5 μJy beam-1 at 1.5 GHz and 6 GHz, respectively. New disk-halo features have been detected, among them two at 1.5 GHz that appear as loops in projection. We present the first 1.5 GHz spectral index map of NGC 4631 to be formed from a single wide-band observation in a single array configuration. This map represents tangent slopes to the intensities within the band centered at 1.5 GHz, rather than fits across widely separated frequencies as has been done in the past and is also the highest spatial resolution spectral index map yet presented for this galaxy. The average spectral index in the disk is \\bar{\\alpha }_{1.5 \\,GHz} =-0.84+/- 0.05 indicating that the emission is largely non-thermal, but a small global thermal contribution is sufficient to explain a positive curvature term in the spectral index over the band. Two specific star-forming regions have spectral indices that are consistent with thermal emission. Polarization results (uncorrected for internal

  1. Saturn’s icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P. D.; McCord, T. B.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R. M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-04-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper ( Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/ F continua at 0.55 μm, 1.822 μm and 3.547 μm, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  2. Reaction Matrix Calculations in Neutron Matter with Alternating-Layer-Spin Structure under π0 Condensation. II ---Numerical Results---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiya, K.; Tamagaki, R.

    1981-10-01

    Results obtained by applying a formulation based on the reaction matrix theory developed in I are given. Calculations by making use of a modified realistic potential, the Reid soft-core potential with the OPEP-part enhanced due to the isobar (Δ)-mixing, show that the transition to the [ALS] phase of quasi-neutrons corresponding to a typical π0 condensation occurs in the region of (2 ˜ 3) times the nuclear density. The most important ingredients responsible for this transition are the growth of the attractive 3P2 + 3F2 contribution mainly from the spin-parallel pairs in the same leyers and the reduction of the repulsive 3P1 contribution mainly from the spin-antiparallel pairs in the nearest layers; these mainfest themselves as the [ALS]-type localization develops. Properties of the matter under the new phase thus obtained such as the shape of the Fermi surface and the effective mass are discussed.

  3. Barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases (BORA-Release). Part II: Results from a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklet, Snorre; Vinnem, Jan Erik; Aven, Terje

    2006-09-21

    This paper presents results from a case study carried out on an offshore oil and gas production platform with the purpose to apply and test BORA-Release, a method for barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases. A description of the BORA-Release method is given in Part I of the paper. BORA-Release is applied to express the platform specific hydrocarbon release frequencies for three release scenarios for selected systems and activities on the platform. The case study demonstrated that the BORA-Release method is a useful tool for analysing the effect on the release frequency of safety barriers introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases, and to study the effect on the barrier performance of platform specific conditions of technical, human, operational, and organisational risk influencing factors (RIFs). BORA-Release may also be used to analyse the effect on the release frequency of risk reducing measures.

  4. The \\^G Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Civilizations with Large Energy Supplies. II. Framework, Strategy, and First Result

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, J T; Sigurðsson, S; Povich, M S; Mullan, B

    2014-01-01

    We describe the framework and strategy of the \\^G infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although Gaia will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a "zeroth order" null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can...

  5. Toxicity and survival results of a phase II study investigating the role of postoperative chemoradioimmunotherapy for gastric adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bese, N.S.; Yildirim, A.; Oeber, A. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul Univ., Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Bueyuekuenal, E.; Oezgueroglu, M.; Demir, G.; Mandel, N.M.; Demirelli, F.; Serdengecti, S. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology Section, Istanbul Univ., Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-10-01

    Background and purpose: to investigate the role of postoperative concomitant chemoradioimmunotherapy in gastric adenocarcinoma patients. Patients and methods: 59 pateints, who underwent total or subtotal gastrectomy, with lymph node involvement, positive microscopic surgical margins or serosal involvement were included in the study. Radiotherapy started concomitantly with chemotherapy and levamisole. Extended-field radiotherapy was given to gastric bed and regional lymphatics via two anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior fields. A total dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions with a fraction size of 1.8 Gy was planned. In 28 patients (48%) with positive surgical margins a 10-Gy boost dose was given to the anastomosis site. An adjuvant i.v. bolus of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/day 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was administered concomitantly during the first 3 days and at the 20th day of irradiation. After completion of radiotherapy, i.v. boluses of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/day 5-FU and 25 mg/m{sup 2}/day rescuvorin were continued for 6 months once a week. Levamisole 40 mg/day orally was started at the 1st day of radiotherapy and also continued for 6 months. Median follow-up was 37 months (7-112 months). Results: median survival was 23 months. Overall 3- and 5-year survival rates amounted to 35% and 14%, respectively. Median survival of the patients with positive surgical margins was 22 months. The 3- and 5-year locoregional control rates were 59% and 55%, respectively. The most common toxicity was upper gastrointestinal system toxicity, which was observed in 42 patients (71%). Four patients (7%) died on account of early toxic effects, and six (10%) could not complete treatment. Conclusion: although 48% of the study population involved patients with microscopic residual disease, the survival results as a whole were satisfactory. However, due to high toxicity, radiotherapy must be delivered with the most proper techniques along with adequate nutrition and supportive care. (orig.)

  6. The self-preserving size distribution theory. II. Comparison with experimental results for Si and Si3N4 aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Petrus J; Tuinman, Ilse L; Marijnissen, Jan C M; Friedlander, Sheldon K; Scarlett, B

    2002-04-15

    The gas to particle synthesis route is a relatively clean and efficient manner for the production of high-quality ceramic powders. These powders can be subsequently sintered in any wanted shape. The modeling of these production systems is difficult because several mechanisms occur in parallel. From theoretical considerations it can be determined, however, that coagulation and sintering are dominant mechanisms as far as shape and size of the particles are considered. In part I of this article an extensive theoretical analysis was given on the self-preserving size distribution theory for power law particles. In this second part, cumulative particle size distributions of silicon and silicon nitride agglomerates, produced in a laser reactor, were determined from TEM pictures and compared to the distributions calculated from this self-preserving theory for power law particles. The calculated distributions were in fair agreement with the measured results, especially at the high end of the distributions. Calculated and measured particle growth rates were also in fair agreement. Using the self-preserving theory an analysis was made on the distribution of annealed silicon agglomerates, of interest in applications to nanoparticle technology.

  7. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for primary and secondary intrapulmonary tumors. First results of a phase I/II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst-Stecken, A.; Sauer, R.; Grabenbauer, G. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany); Lambrecht, U.; Mueller, R. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany); Div. of Medical Physics, Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and side effects of dose escalation in hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hfSRT) for intrapulmonary tumors with the Novalis trademark system (BrainLAB AG, Heimstetten, Germany). Patients and methods: from 07/2003 to 01/2005, 21 patients/39 tumors were treated with 5 x 7 Gy (n = 21; total dose 35 Gy) or 5 x 8 Gy (n = 18; total dose 40 Gy). There were three cases of primary lung cancer, the remainder were metastases. Median gross tumor volume (GTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were 2.89 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.15-67.94 cm{sup 3}) and 25.75 cm{sup 3} (range, 7.18-124.04 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Results: rates of complete remission, partial remission, no change, and progressive disease were 51%, 33%, 3%, and 13%, respectively. No grade 4 toxicity occurred, nearly all patients had grade 1 initially. One grade 3 toxicity, i.e., dyspnea, was documented for a period of 6 months after therapy. Radiosurgery quality assurance guidelines could be met. Conclusion: hfSRT of primary and secondary lung tumors using a schedule of five fractions at 7-8 Gy each was well tolerated. Further dose escalation is planned. (orig.)

  8. Offshore code comparison collaboration continuation within IEA Wind Task 30: Phase II results regarding a floating semisubmersible wind system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Amy; Jonkman, Jason M.; Vorpahl, Fabian;

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools (or codes) that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, mooring dynamics, and founda......Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools (or codes) that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, mooring dynamics......, participants used an assortment of simulation codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating semisubmersible in 200 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted...... in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants’ codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling....

  9. the Ĝ infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies. II. Framework, strategy, and first result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J. T.; Griffith, R. L.; Sigurdsson, S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Povich, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, 3801 West Temple Avenue, Pomona, CA 91768 (United States); Mullan, B. [Blue Marble Space Institution of Science, P.O. Box 85561, Seattle, WA 98145-1561 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We describe the framework and strategy of the Ĝ infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although GAIA will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a zeroth order null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can extend our methodology to smaller waste heat luminosities, and potentially entirely rule out (or detect) both Kardashev Type III civilizations and new physics that allows for unlimited 'free' energy generation.

  10. Gaseous time projection chambers for rare event detection: Results from the T-REX project. II. Dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Irastorza, I G; Castel, J; Cebrián, S; Dafni, T; Galán, J; García, J A; Garza, J G; Gómez, H; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Luzón, G; Mirallas, H; Ruiz, E; Seguí, L; Tomás, A

    2015-01-01

    As part of the T-REX project, a number of R&D and prototyping activities have been carried out during the last years to explore the applicability of Micromegas-read gaseous TPCs in rare event searches like double beta decay (DBD), axion research and low-mass WIMP searches. While in the companion paper we focus on DBD, in this paper we focus on the results regarding the search for dark matter candidates, both axions and WIMPs. Small ultra-low background Micromegas detectors are used to image the x-ray signal expected in axion helioscopes like CAST at CERN. Background levels as low as $0.8\\times 10^{-6}$ c keV$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ have already been achieved in CAST while values down to $\\sim10^{-7}$ c keV$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ have been obtained in a test bench placed underground in the Laboratorio Subterr\\'aneo de Canfranc. Prospects to consolidate and further reduce these values down to $\\sim10^{-8}$ c keV$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$will be described. Such detectors, placed at the focal point of x-ray te...

  11. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation within IEA Wind Task 30: Phase II Results Regarding a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.; Qvist, J.; Froyd, L.; Chen, X.; Azcona, J.; Uzungoglu, E.; Guedes Soares, C.; Luan, C.; Yutong, H.; Pengcheng, F.; Yde, A.; Larsen, T.; Nichols, J.; Buils, R.; Lei, L.; Anders Nygard, T.; et al.

    2014-03-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools (or codes) that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project, which operates under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 30. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of simulation codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating semisubmersible in 200 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants? codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  12. Effective representation of amide III, II, I, and A modes on local vibrational modes: Analysis of ab initio quantum calculation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Seungsoo

    2016-10-01

    The Hamiltonian matrix for the first excited vibrational states of a protein can be effectively represented by local vibrational modes constituting amide III, II, I, and A modes to simulate various vibrational spectra. Methods for obtaining the Hamiltonian matrix from ab initio quantum calculation results are discussed, where the methods consist of three steps: selection of local vibrational mode coordinates, calculation of a reduced Hessian matrix, and extraction of the Hamiltonian matrix from the Hessian matrix. We introduce several methods for each step. The methods were assessed based on the density functional theory calculation results of 24 oligopeptides with four different peptide lengths and six different secondary structures. The completeness of a Hamiltonian matrix represented in the reduced local mode space is improved by adopting a specific atom group for each amide mode and reducing the effect of ignored local modes. The calculation results are also compared to previous models using C=O stretching vibration and transition dipole couplings. We found that local electric transition dipole moments of the amide modes are mainly bound on the local peptide planes. Their direction and magnitude are well conserved except amide A modes, which show large variation. Contrary to amide I modes, the vibrational coupling constants of amide III, II, and A modes obtained by analysis of a dipeptide are not transferable to oligopeptides with the same secondary conformation because coupling constants are affected by the surrounding atomic environment.

  13. The OmegaWhite Survey for short period variable stars - II. An overview of results from the first four years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, R.; Ramsay, G.; Macfarlane, S.; Groot, P. J.; Woudt, P. A.; Dhillon, V.; Jeffery, C. S.; Marsh, T.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.

    2016-11-01

    OmegaWhite is a wide-field, high cadence, synoptic survey targeting fields in the southern Galactic plane, with the aim of discovering short period variable stars. Our strategy is to take a series of 39 s exposures in the g band of a 1 deg2 of sky lasting 2 h using the OmegaCAM wide field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). We give an overview of the initial 4 yr of data which covers 134 deg2 and includes 12.3 million light curves. As the fields overlap with the VLT Survey Telescope Hα Photometric Survey of the Galactic plane and Bulge (VPHAS+), we currently have ugriHα photometry for ˜1/3 of our fields. We find that a significant fraction of the light curves have been affected by the diffraction spikes of bright stars sweeping across stars within a few dozen of pixels over the two hour observing time interval due to the alt-az nature of the VST. We select candidate variable stars using a variety of variability statistics, followed by a manual verification stage. We present samples of several classes of short period variables, including: an ultra compact binary, a DQ white dwarf, a compact object with evidence of a 100 min rotation period, three CVs, one eclipsing binary with an 85 min period, a symbiotic binary which shows evidence of a 31 min photometric period, and a large sample of candidate δ Sct type stars including one with a 9.3 min period. Our overall goal is to cover 400 deg2, and this study indicates we will find many more interesting short period variable stars as a result.

  14. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevâg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Åyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The ability of 11 models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model intercomparison initiative (AeroCom II), is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded data set of aerosol extinction profiles built for this purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 subcontinental regions show that five models improved, whereas three degraded in reproducing the interregional variability in Zα0-6 km, the mean extinction height diagnostic, as computed from the CALIOP aerosol profiles over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models' performance remains highly variable, the simulation of the timing of the Zα0-6 km peak season has also improved for all but two models from AeroCom Phase I to Phase II. The biases in Zα0-6 km are smaller in all regions except Central Atlantic, East Asia, and North and South Africa. Most of the models now underestimate Zα0-6 km over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the performance and evolution of the individual models and for the intermodel diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties contributing to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  15. Treatment with pentosan polysulphate in patients with MPS I: results from an open label, randomized, monocentric phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennermann, Julia B; Gökce, Seyfullah; Solyom, Alexander; Mengel, Eugen; Schuchman, Edward H; Simonaro, Calogera M

    2016-11-01

    Current treatment options for MPS I have limited effects on some organs, including the skeletal system. In MPS animal models pentosan polysulphate (PPS) reduces the concentrations of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in tissues and body fluids and improves cartilaginous and osseous pathologies. The goals of this study were to investigate primarily the safety and secondary the clinical effects, concerning mobility and pain, of PPS treatment in MPS I patients. Four MPS I-Hurler-Scheie/-Scheie patients aged 35.6 ± 6.4 years with one male were included in the study. All patients were on enzyme replacement therapy since 9.45 ± 3.75 years. PPS was applied subcutaneously in two patients with 1 mg/kg and in two patients with 2 mg/kg, weekly for 12 weeks and then biweekly for 12 weeks. The 24-week treatment with PPS was well tolerated by all patients. Urinary GAG concentrations were reduced from 4.13 ± 1.17 at baseline to 2.69 ± 0.36 mg/mmol creatinine after 24-week treatment with 1 mg/kg PPS, and from 6.71 ± 0.62 to 2.65 ± 0.09 mg/mmol creatinine with 2 mg/kg PPS. An improvement in range of motion was noted in three out of four patients. The pain intensity score was reduced from 4.5 ± 1.77 at baseline to 1.8 ± 0.47 after 24-week treatment with 1 mg/kg PPS; patients with 2 mg/kg PPS already had minimal pain at the start of the study. In conclusion, PPS treatment in a small number of adult MPS I patients was well tolerated and resulted in a significant reduction of urinary GAG excretion and in an improvement of joint mobility and pain.

  16. Natural history and role of radiation in patients with supratentorial and infratentorial WHO grade II ependymomas: results from a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizer, Ayal A; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Nguyen, Paul L; Macdonald, Shannon M; Yock, Torunn I; Tarbell, Nancy J; Shih, Helen A; Loeffler, Jay S; Oh, Kevin S

    2013-12-01

    Patients with World Health Organization (WHO) grade II supratentorial ependymomas are commonly observed after gross total resection (GTR), although supporting data are limited. We sought to characterize the natural history of such tumors. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify 112 patients ages 0-77 diagnosed with WHO grade II ependymomas between 1988 and 2007, of whom 63 (56 %) and 49 (44 %) had supratentorial and infratentorial primaries, respectively. Inclusion criteria were strict to ensure patient homogeneity. Of 33 patients with supratentorial tumors after GTR, 18 (55 %) received adjuvant radiation therapy and 15 (45 %) did not. Ependymoma-specific mortality (ESM) was the primary endpoint. With a median follow up of 4.5 years, only 1 of 33 patients with supratentorial ependymoma died of their disease after GTR; the 5-year estimate of ESM in this population was 3.3 % (95 % CI 0.2-14.8 %). Among patients with infratentorial ependymomas after GTR, the 5-year estimate of ESM was 8.7 % (95 % CI 1.4-24.6 %). In patients with subtotally resected tumors, 5-year estimates of ESM in patients with supratentorial and infratentorial primaries were 20.1 % (95 % CI 8.0-36.2 %) and 12.3 % (95 % CI 2.9-28.8 %), respectively. Among the whole cohort, on both univariable and multivariable regression, extent of resection was predictive of ESM, while tumor location and use of radiation were not. After GTR, patients with WHO grade II supratentorial ependymomas have a very favorable natural history with low associated cancer-specific mortality. Observation, with radiation reserved as a salvage option, may be a reasonable postoperative strategy in this population.

  17. POISSON project - I - Emission lines as accretion tracers in Young Stellar Objects: results from observations of Chamaleon I and II sources

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniucci, S; Nisini, B; Giannini, T; Lorenzetti, D; Eisloeffel, J; Bacciotti, F; Cabrit, S; Garatti, A Caratti o; Dougados, C; Ray, T

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of LR optical-NIR spectra (0.6-2.4 um) of a sample 47 YSOs in the ChaI and II star-forming clouds. These data are part of the POISSON project (Protostellar Optical-Infrared Spectral Survey on NTT). The aim is to determine the accretion luminosity (Lacc) and mass accretion rate (Macc) of the sources through the analysis of the detected emission features. We also aim at verifying the reliability and consistency of the existing empirical relationships connecting emission line luminosity and Lacc. We employ five tracers (OI-6300A, Ha, CaII-8542A, Pab, and Brg) to derive the accretion luminosity. The tracers provide Lacc values showing different scatters when plotted as a function of L*. The Brg seems the most reliable, since it gives the minimum Lacc dispersion over the entire range of L*, whereas the other tracers provide much more scattered Lacc values, not expected for the homogeneous sample we are observing. The comparison between Lacc(Brg) and Lacc obtained from the oth...

  18. A Comparison of the Solar Cycle Signature in Vertical Ozone and Temperature Profiles Seen by SAGE II With Coupled Chemistry-Climate Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodeker, G. E.; Austin, J.; Zawodny, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    Solar variability is known to affect the Earth's climate. However, the exact mechanisms whereby small changes in extra-terrestrial solar irradiance over the 11 year solar cycle affect the climate are poorly understood. One of the primary objectives of the SOLar Impacts on Climate and the Environment (SOLICE) project is to assess the impact of solar variability on stratospheric ozone, radiative forcing and surface UV using coupled chemistry-climate models. Comparisons of model results and observations are expected to advance understanding of the mechanisms of solar-climate links. Global vertical ozone profiles (version 6.1) from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II), together with co-located NCEP/NCAR temperature profiles, have been examined for the solar cycle signature from October 1984 to June 2001 as a function of altitude/pressure and latitude. In addition to solar cycle forcing, ozone concentrations and temperatures may also be influenced by the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO), volcanic eruptions, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), tropopause height variations, and the solar zenith angle (time of day) at the measurement location [Bodeker et al., JGR, vol. 103, 28661-28681, 1998]. These confounding effects must be eliminated before the solar cycle signal can be quantitatively identified. Two different approaches have been used: 1) Outside of volcanically perturbed periods, the QBO is expected to be the largest source of variability. Ozone and temperature profiles are sorted according to the phase of the QBO before profile differences between solar maximum and minimum are calculated. 2) A regression model, incorporating all forcings as basis functions, is applied to the ozone and temperature profiles and the amplitude of the solar cycle basis function is extracted. These results are compared with output from the UMETRAC (Unified Model with Eulerian TRansport And Chemistry) coupled chemistry-climate model.

  19. Anterior single odontoid screw placement for type II odontoid fractures: our modified surgical technique and initial results in a cohort study of 15 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakomi, Sunil; Tamrakar, Karuna; Chaudhary, Pramod Kumar; Bhattarai, Binod

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Anterior odontoid screw fixation for type II odontoid fracture is the ideal management option. However in the context of unavailability of an O-arm or neuro-navigation and poor images from the available C-arm may be an obstacle to ideal trajectory and placement of the odontoid screw. We herein detail  our surgical technique so as to ensure a correct trajectory and subsequent good fusion in Type II odontoid fractures. This may be advantageous  in clinical set ups lacking state of the art facilities.  Methods and Results: In this cohort study we included 15 consecutive patients who underwent anterior odontoid screw placement. We routinely dissect the longus colli to completely visualize the entire width of C3 body. We then perform a median C2-C3 disectomy followed by creating a gutter in the superior end of C3 body. We then guide the Kirchsner (K) wire purchasing adequate anterior cortex of C2. Rest of the procedure follows the similar steps as described for odontoid screw placement. We achieved 100% correct trajectory and screw placement in our study. There were no instances of screw break out, pull out or nonunion. There was one patient mortality following myocardial infarction in our study. Conclusion: Preoperative imaging details, proper patient positioning, meticulous dissection, thorough anatomical knowledge and few added surgical nuances are the cornerstones in ideal odontoid screw placement. This may be pivotal in managing  patients in developing nations having rudimentary neurosurgical set up. PMID:27990259

  20. Effect of adjunctive benzodiazepines on clinical outcomes in lithium- or quetiapine-treated outpatients with bipolar I or II disorder: Results from the Bipolar CHOICE trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, William V.; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Ketter, Terence A.; Brody, Benjamin D.; Kinrys, Gustavo; Kemp, David E.; Shelton, Richard C.; McElroy, Susan L.; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Kocsis, James H.; McInnis, Melvin G.; Friedman, Edward S.; Singh, Vivek; Tohen, Mauricio; Bowden, Charles L.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Thase, Michael E.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Rabideau, Dustin J.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Kamali, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the longer-term effects of adjunctive benzodiazepines on symptom response during treatment in patients with bipolar disorders. Methods The study sample consisted of 482 patients with bipolar I or II disorder enrolled in a 6-month, randomized, multi-site comparison of lithium- and quetiapine-based treatment. Changes in clinical measures (BISS total and subscales, CGI-BP, and CGI-Efficacy Index) were compared between participants who did and did not receive benzodiazepine treatment at baseline or during follow-up. Selected outcomes were also compared between patients who did and did not initiate benzodiazepines during follow-up using stabilized inverse probability weighted analyses. Results Significant improvement in all outcome measures occurred within each benzodiazepine exposure group. Benzodiazepine users (at baseline or during follow-up) experienced significantly less improvement in BISS total, BISS irritability, and CGI-BP scores than did benzodiazepine non-users. There were no significant differences in these measures between patients who did and did not initiate benzodiazepines during follow-up in the weighted analyses. There was no significant effect of benzodiazepine use on any outcome measure in patients with comorbid anxiety or substance use disorders. Limitations This is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized effectiveness trial that was not designed to address differential treatment response according to benzodiazepine use. Conclusions Adjunctive benzodiazepines may not significantly affect clinical outcome in lithium- or quetiapine-treated patients with bipolar I or II disorder over 6 months, after controlling for potential confounding factors. PMID:24751304

  1. Telomerase-pulsed dendritic cells: preclinical results and outcome of a clinical phase I/II trial in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmiedel, Alexandra

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Therapeutic vaccination with dendritic cells (DC showed promising results in first clinical trials in cases of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT could be a potential target because it is detectable in more than 85% of human tumors including RCC. Design: 10 patients with progressive metastatic RCC were enrolled in a clinical phase I/II trial using DC pulsed with hTERT-peptide. Beside toxicity and feasibility aspects, a complex immune monitoring including in vitro data were evaluated. In addition to detection of tumor-specific effector cells we investigated their functionality like IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. Results: The vaccine was well tolerated. Two patients showed a mixed response (MR and one patient a stable disease (SD. Interestingly, responders showed cytotoxic activity already before start of therapy and there was a significant increase in cytotoxic activity of effector cells from all responders (SD and MR patients after the first vaccination. In contrast non-responders showed no cytotoxic activity before and during treatment. Therefore, cytotoxic activity might be used as a predictive marker in the future. Tetramer staining detected higher amounts of tumor-specific cytotoxic cells in responding patients compared to non-responders. Also, responders possessed increasing amounts of IFN-γ producing immunological effector cells. Conclusion: Telomerase-pulsed DC could enhance a tumor-specific immune response against RCC.

  2. Commissioning and first light results of an L'-band vortex coronagraph with the Keck II adaptive optics NIRC2 science instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femenía Castellá, Bruno; Serabyn, Eugene; Mawet, Dimitri; Absil, Olivier; Wizinowich, Peter; Matthews, Keith; Huby, Elsa; Bottom, Michael; Campbell, Randy; Chan, Dwight; Carlomagno, Brunella; Cetre, Sylvain; Defrère, Denis; Delacroix, Christian; Gomez Gonzalez, Carlos; Jolivet, Aïssa; Karlsson, Mikael; Lanclos, Kyle; Lilley, Scott; Milner, Steven; Ngo, Henry; Reggiani, Maddalena; Simmons, Julia; Tran, Hien; Vargas Catalan, Ernesto; Wertz, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    On March 2015 an L'-band vortex coronagraph based on an Annular Groove Phase Mask made up of a diamond sub-wavelength grating was installed on NIRC2 as a demonstration project. This vortex coronagraph operates in the L' band not only in order to take advantage from the favorable star/planet contrast ratio when observing beyond the K band, but also to exploit the fact that the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) system delivers nearly extreme adaptive optics image quality (Strehl ratios values near 90%) at 3.7μm. We describe the hardware installation of the vortex phase mask during a routine NIRC2 service mission. The success of the project depends on extensive software development which has allowed the achievement of exquisite real-time pointing control as well as further contrast improvements by using speckle nulling to mitigate the effect of static speckles. First light of the new coronagraphic mode was on June 2015 with already very good initial results. Subsequent commissioning nights were interlaced with science nights by members of the VORTEX team with their respective scientific programs. The new capability and excellent results so far have motivated the VORTEX team and the Keck Science Steering Committee (KSSC) to offer the new mode in shared risk mode for 2016B.

  3. Efficacy of a rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with suboptimal response to standard treatment: Results of a phase II, multicenter noncomparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, Ygal; Paintaud, Gilles; Azoulay, Elie; Poullin, Pascale; Galicier, Lionel; Desvignes, Céline; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Peltier, Julie; Mira, Jean-Paul; Pène, Frédéric; Presne, Claire; Saheb, Samir; Deligny, Christophe; Rousseau, Alexandra; Féger, Frédéric; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-12-01

    The standard four-rituximab infusions treatment in acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) remains empirical. Peripheral B cell depletion is correlated with the decrease in serum concentrations of anti-ADAMTS13 and associated with clinical response. To assess the efficacy of a rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion, 24 TTP patients were enrolled in this prospective multicentre single arm phase II study and then compared to patients from a previous study. Patients with a suboptimal response to a plasma exchange-based regimen received two infusions of rituximab 375 mg m(-2) within 4 days, and a third dose at day +15 of the first infusion if peripheral B cells were still detectable. Primary endpoint was the assessment of the time required to platelet count recovery from the first plasma exchange. Three patients died after the first rituximab administration. In the remaining patients, the B cell-driven treatment hastened remission and ADAMTS13 activity recovery as a result of rapid anti-ADAMTS13 depletion in a similar manner to the standard four-rituximab infusions schedule. The 1-year relapse-free survival was also comparable between both groups. A rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion is feasible and provides comparable results than with the four-rituximab infusions schedule. This regimen could represent a new standard in TTP. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00907751). Am. J. Hematol. 91:1246-1251, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

    2012-03-30

    source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in

  5. INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

    2012-03-30

    source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in

  6. The National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC): Results from Phase I and Scientific Opportunities in Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Barbara L.; Tolunay, H. Eser; Basson, Craig T.; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Holmes, Kathryn; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Hendershot, Tabitha; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Devereux, Richard B.; Dietz, Harry C.; Song, Howard; Ringer, Danny; Mitchell, Megan; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Ravekes, William; Menashe, Victor; Eagle, Kim A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetically triggered thoracic aortic conditions (GenTAC) represent an important problem for patients and their families. Accordingly, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) established the first phase of its national GenTAC Registry in 2006. Enrollment and Diagnoses Between 2007 and 2010, six enrolling centers established the GenTAC I Registry consisting of 2,046 patients [(Marfan syndrome 576 (28.2%); bicuspid aortic valve disease 504 (24.6%), aneurysm or dissection age <50 years 369 (18%), and others.] Biologic samples for DNA analyses (WBC’s or saliva) are available in 97% and stored plasma is available in 60% of enrollees. Results Initial scientific inquiry using the GenTAC Registry has included validation studies of genetic causes for aortic syndromes, potential usefulness of TGFB blood levels in Marfan subjects, and current surgical approaches to ascending aortic conditions. Future Opportunity GenTAC II will allow biannual follow-up of GenTAC I enrollees for up to nine years, enrollment of an additional 1,500 subjects, further integration of imaging findings with clinical and genetic data through utilization of an imaging core lab, important validation of phenotype-genotype correlations through a phenotyping core lab, and integration of a scientific advisory committee to help define the full range and depth of the Registry’s scientific capabilities. The registry resources are available to the external scientific community through an application process accessible at https://gentac.rti.org. PMID:21982653

  7. Hypofractionated High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Multi-Institutional Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonteyne, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.fonteyne@uzgent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Soete, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Rappe, Bernard [Department of Urology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Storme, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Arcangeli, Giorgio [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To report late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical and clinical outcomes, and overall survival after hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Three institutions included 113 patients with T1 to T3N0M0 PC in a phase II study. Patients were treated with 56 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks. Late toxicity was scored using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria extended with additional symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Results: The incidence of late GI and GU toxicity was low. The 3-year actuarial risk of developing late GU and GI toxicity of grade {>=}2 was 13% and 8% respectively. Five-year biochemical non-evidence of disease (bNED) was 94%. Risk group, T stage, and deviation from planned hormone treatment were significant predictive factors for bNED. Deviation from hormone treatment remained significant in multivariate analysis. Five-year clinical non evidence of disease and overall survival was 95% and 91% respectively. No patient died from PC. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose radiation therapy is a valuable treatment option for patients with PC, with excellent biochemical and clinical outcome and low toxicity.

  8. QUIJOTE Scientific Results. II. Polarisation Measurements of the Microwave Emission in the Galactic molecular complexes W43 and W47 and supernova remnant W44

    CERN Document Server

    Génova-Santos, R; Peláez-Santos, A; Poidevin, F; Rebolo, R; Vignaga, R; Artal, E; Harper, S; Hoyland, R; Lasenby, A; Martínez-González, E; Piccirillo, L; Tramonte, D; Watson, R A

    2016-01-01

    We present Q-U-I JOint TEnerife (QUIJOTE) intensity and polarisation maps at 10-20 GHz covering a region along the Galactic plane 24result from 210 h of data, have a sensitivity in polarisation of ~40 muK/beam and an angular resolution of ~1 deg. Our intensity data are crucial to confirm the presence of anomalous microwave emission (AME) towards the two molecular complexes W43 (22-sigma) and W47 (8-sigma). We also detect at high significance (6-sigma) AME associated with W44, the first clear detection of this emission towards a SNR. The new QUIJOTE polarisation data, in combination with WMAP, are essential to: i) Determine the spectral index of the synchrotron emission in W44, beta_sync=-0.62+/-0.03 in good agreement with the value inferred from the intensity spectrum once a free-free component is included in the fit. ii) Trace the change in the polarisation angle associated with Faraday rotation in the direction of W44 with rotation measure -404+/-49 rad/m2. And iii)...

  9. Carcinogenicity of residual fuel oils by nonbiological laboratory methods: annotated bibliography. Part I. Laboratory methods of analysis. Part II. Analysis results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichorz, R. S.

    1976-04-09

    Recent emphases have been directed by Federal government regulatory agencies and other research groups on the carcinogenic effects of certain aromatic hydrocarbon components in naturally occurring petroleum products. These are used in plant operations, and underline the importance of evaluating environments. Since Rocky Flats Plant uses large quantities of fuel oil, the author was prompted to undertake a search of the chemical literature. Articles and accounts of studies were reviewed on nonbiological laboratory methods for determining the carcinogenicity of residual fuel oils and related high-boiling petroleum fractions. The physical and chemical methods involve the separation or measurement (or both) of polynuclear aromatic constituents which generally are responsible for the carcinogenic effects. Thus, the author suggests that the total carcinogenic activity of any petroleum product may not be due to a specific potent carcinogen, but rather to the cumulative effect of several individually weak carcinogens. The literature search is presented as an annotated bibliography, current as of January 1, 1975, and includes significant parts of the studies along with the total number of other references found when the citation was examined in its entirety. Part I deals with laboratory chemical and physical methods of determining carcinogenicity or polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (or both) in residual fuel oils and contains ten entries. Part II includes the results of testing specific fuel oils for carcinogenic constituents and contains eleven entries. An author index and subject categories are included.

  10. Coastal hydrodynamics, geomorphology and sedimentary environments of two major Javanese river deltas. Program and preliminary results from the Snellius-II expedition (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, P.; Tiktanata

    River outflow, sediment transport, depositional processes and facies, as well as delta morphology of the rivers Solo and Porong (East Java, Indonesia) have been studied in detail during the Indonesian-Dutch Snellius II expedition (1984-1985). The humid tropical climate of Java in combination with the mountainous relief and the presence of easily erodible volcanic soils in relation to an intensive agriculture, results in a tremendous soil erosion and denudation rates are extremely high. Since river flow in the dry season is strongly reduced, sediment transport is mainly restricted to the wet season. Every wet season large volumes of sediment are carried towards the sea and the surplus of sediment in the coastal zone has resulted in the formation of two major river deltas. The Solo delta, a single-delta, is made up of one straight major channel with only few and small natural crevasses. Prominent natural levees are present; a consequence of the fact that in the wet season maximum outflow of the river coincides with high water. The development of this delta is considered to be a direct response to the high outflow velocities of the river, the huge mudload in the wet season and the low current and wave action. The Porong delta is a half-circular, lobate delta with a multidistributary network of channels which resulted in a regular distribution of sediment. A small part of the delivered sediments in both deltas escapes to sea and is seized by offshore, monsoon-induced coastal currents. The monsoon-type climate has a significant influence on depositional processes by determining river regime and sediment transport, by modifying river outflow and generating a coastal drift of water and suspended sediments.

  11. Continuous 7-Days-A-Week External Beam Irradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Final Results of the Phase I/II Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkies, Krystyna, E-mail: kserkies@wp.pl [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk (Poland); Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk (Poland)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of definitive continuous 7-days-a-week pelvic irradiation without breaks between external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between November 1998 and December 1999, 30 patients with International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Stage IIB or IIIB cervical cancer were included in a prospective Phase I/II study of continuous 7-days-a-week pelvic irradiation, to the total Manchester point B dose of 40.0-57.6 Gy. The first 13 patients (Group A) were given a daily tumor dose of 1.6 Gy, and the remaining 17 patients (Group B) were given 1.8 Gy. One or two immediate brachytherapy applications (point A dose 10-20 Gy, each) were performed in 28 cases. Results: Two patients did not complete the irradiation because of apparent early progression of disease during the irradiation. Eleven of the 28 evaluable patients (39%; 45% and 35% in Groups A and B, respectively) completed their treatment within the prescribed overall treatment time. Acute toxicity (including severe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 and 4 effects in 40%) was experienced by 83% of patients and resulted in unplanned treatment interruptions in 40% of all patients (31% and 47% of patients in Groups A and B, respectively). Severe intestinal side effects occurred in 31% and 41% of Patients in Groups A and B, respectively (p = 0.71). The 5-year overall survival probability was 33%. Cancer recurrence occurred in 63% of patients: 20% inside and 57% outside the pelvis. Cumulative incidence of late severe bowel and urinary bladder toxicity at 24 months was 15%. Conclusion: Continuous irradiation in locally advanced cervical cancer is associated with a high incidence of severe acute toxicity, resulting in unplanned treatment interruptions. Late severe effects and survival after continuous radiotherapy do not substantially differ from

  12. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Five-year results of a prospective phase II clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozsa, Emoeke [National Institute of Oncology, Centre of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Landesklinikum Wiener Neustadt, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Meszaros, Norbert; Major, Tibor; Froehlich, Georgina; Stelczer, Gabor; Fodor, Janos; Polgar, Csaba [National Institute of Oncology, Centre of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Sulyok, Zoltan [National Institute of Oncology, Centre of Surgery, Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this study was to report the 5-year results of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2011, 44 patients with low-risk, stage I-II breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery. Postoperative APBI was given by means of 3D-CRT using three to five non-coplanar fields. The total dose of APBI was 36.9 Gy (nine fractions of 4.1 Gy b.i.d.). The mean follow-up time was 58.2 months for surviving patients. Survival results, side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. One (2.3 %) local recurrence was observed, for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.7 %. Neither regional nor distant failure was observed. Two patients died of internal disease. The 5-year disease-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival rates were 96.3, 100, and 95.1 %, respectively. Acute side effects included grade 1 (G1) erythema in 75 %, G1 parenchymal induration in 46 %, and G1 pain in 46 % of patients. No G2 or higher acute side effect occurred. Late side effects included G1, G2, and G3 fibrosis in 44, 7, and 2 % of patients, respectively, G1 skin pigmentation in 12 %, and G1 pain in 2 %. Asymptomatic fat necrosis occurred in 14 %. Cosmetic results were rated excellent or good in 86 % of cases by the patients themselves and 84 % by the physicians. The 5-year local tumor control, toxicity profile, and cosmetic results of APBI delivered with external beam 3D-CRT are encouraging and comparable to other APBI series. (orig.) [German] Evaluation der 5-Jahres-Ergebnisse bezueglich Ueberleben, Tumorkontrolle, Nebenwirkungen und Kosmetik nach Teilbrustbestrahlung (APBI) mittels 3-D-konformaler, akzelerierter Radiotherapie (3D-CRT). Zwischen 2006 und 2011 wurden 44 Patienten mit Brustkrebs im Stadium I-II und niedrigem Risikoprofil brusterhaltend operiert. Die adjuvante, 3-D-konformale APBI wurde mittels 3-5 nonkoplanarer Feldern durchgefuehrt. Die Gesamtdosis betrug 36,9 Gy bei 9 -mal 4,1 Gy b.i.d.. Nach

  13. Determination of the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) of Photocatalytic Oxidation (PCO) Purifiers for Indoor Air Pollutants Using a Closed-Loop Reactor. Part II: Experimental Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héquet, Valérie; Batault, Frédéric; Raillard, Cécile; Thévenet, Frédéric; Le Coq, Laurence; Dumont, Éric

    2017-03-06

    The performances of a laboratory PhotoCatalytic Oxidation (PCO) device were determined using a recirculation closed-loop pilot reactor. The closed-loop system was modeled by associating equations related to two ideal reactors: a perfectly mixed reservoir with a volume of VR = 0.42 m³ and a plug flow system corresponding to the PCO device with a volume of VP = 5.6 × 10(-3) m³. The PCO device was composed of a pleated photocatalytic filter (1100 cm²) and two 18-W UVA fluorescent tubes. The Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) of the apparatus was measured under different operating conditions. The influence of three operating parameters was investigated: (i) light irradiance I from 0.10 to 2.0 mW·cm(-2); (ii) air velocity v from 0.2 to 1.9 m·s(-1); and (iii) initial toluene concentration C₀ (200, 600, 1000 and 4700 ppbv). The results showed that the conditions needed to apply a first-order decay model to the experimental data (described in Part I) were fulfilled. The CADR values, ranging from 0.35 to 3.95 m³·h(-1), were mainly dependent on the light irradiance intensity. A square root influence of the light irradiance was observed. Although the CADR of the PCO device inserted in the closed-loop reactor did not theoretically depend on the flow rate (see Part I), the experimental results did not enable the confirmation of this prediction. The initial concentration was also a parameter influencing the CADR, as well as the toluene degradation rate. The maximum degradation rate rmax ranged from 342 to 4894 ppbv/h. Finally, this study evidenced that a recirculation closed-loop pilot could be used to develop a reliable standard test method to assess the effectiveness of PCO devices.

  14. Phase II trial of pre-irradiation and concurrent temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and mixed anaplastic oligoastrocytomas: long term results of RTOG BR0131.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelbaum, Michael A; Hu, Chen; Peereboom, David M; Macdonald, David R; Giannini, Caterina; Suh, John H; Jenkins, Robert B; Laack, Nadia N; Brachman, David G; Shrieve, Dennis C; Souhami, Luis; Mehta, Minesh P

    2015-09-01

    We report on the long-term results of a phase II study of pre-irradiation temozolomide followed by concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) and mixed anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Pre-RT temozolomide was given for up to 6 cycles. RT with concurrent temozolomide was administered to patients with less than a complete radiographic response. Forty eligible patients were entered and 32 completed protocol treatment. With a median follow-up time of 8.7 years (range 1.1-10.1), median progression-free survival (PFS) is 5.8 years (95 % CI 2.0, NR) and median overall survival (OS) has not been reached (5.9, NR). 1p/19q data are available in 37 cases; 23 tumors had codeletion while 14 tumors had no loss or loss of only 1p or 19q (non-codeleted). In codeleted patients, 9 patients have progressed and 4 have died; neither median PFS nor OS have been reached and two patients who received only pre-RT temozolomide and no RT have remained progression-free for over 7 years. 3-year PFS and 6-year OS are 78 % (95 % CI 61-95 %) and 83 % (95 % CI 67-98 %), respectively. Codeleted patients show a trend towards improved 6-year survival when compared to the codeleted procarbazine/CCNU/vincristrine (PCV) and RT cohort in RTOG 9402 (67 %, 95 % CI 55-79 %). For non-codeleted patients, median PFS and OS are 1.3 and 5.8 years, respectively. These updated results suggest that the regimen of dose intense, pre-RT temozolomide followed by concurrent RT/temozolomide has significant activity, particularly in patients with 1p/19q codeleted AOs and MAOs.

  15. Phase II Trial of Radiotherapy After Hyperbaric Oxygenation With Multiagent Chemotherapy (Procarbazine, Nimustine, and Vincristine) for High-Grade Gliomas: Long-Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ishiuchi, Shogo [Department of Neurosurgery, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Yoshii, Yoshihiko [Department of Neurosurgery, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Tsukuba Memorial Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan); Saito, Atsushi [Department of Neurosurgery, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan); Watanabe, Takashi [Department of Neurosurgery, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Iraha, Shiro [Department of Radiology, Okinawa South Medical Center, Okinawa (Japan); Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Ariga, Takuro; Kasuya, Goro; Murayama, Sadayuki [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term results of a Phase II trial of radiotherapy given immediately after hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) with multiagent chemotherapy in adults with high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed high-grade gliomas were administered radiotherapy in daily 2 Gy fractions for 5 consecutive days per week up to a total dose of 60 Gy. Each fraction was administered immediately after HBO, with the time interval from completion of decompression to start of irradiation being less than 15 minutes. Chemotherapy consisting of procarbazine, nimustine, and vincristine and was administered during and after radiotherapy. Results: A total of 57 patients (39 patients with glioblastoma and 18 patients with Grade 3 gliomas) were enrolled from 2000 to 2006, and the median follow-up of 12 surviving patients was 62.0 months (range, 43.2-119.1 months). All 57 patients were able to complete a total radiotherapy dose of 60 Gy immediately after HBO with one course of concurrent chemotherapy. The median overall survival times in all 57 patients, 39 patients with glioblastoma and 18 patients with Grade 3 gliomas, were 20.2 months, 17.2 months, and 113.4 months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, histologic grade alone was a significant prognostic factor for overall survival (p < 0.001). During treatments, no patients had neutropenic fever or intracranial hemorrhage, and no serious nonhematologic or late toxicities were seen in any of the 57 patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy delivered immediately after HBO with multiagent chemotherapy was safe, with virtually no late toxicities, and seemed to be effective in patients with high-grade gliomas.

  16. Interim Results from a Study of the Impacts of Tin (II) Based Mercury Treatment in a Small Stream Ecosystem: Tims Branch, Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); BryanJr., Larry [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    A research team is assessing the impacts of an innovative mercury treatment system in Tims Branch, a small southeastern stream. The treatment system, installed in 2007, reduces and removes inorganic mercury from water using tin(II) (stannous) chloride addition followed by air stripping. The system results in discharge of inorganic tin to the ecosystem. This screening study is based on historical information combined with measurements of contaminant concentrations in water, fish, sediment, biofilms and invertebrates. Initial mercury data indicate that first few years of mercury treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mercury concentration in an upper trophic level fish, redfin pickerel, at all sampling locations in the impacted reach. For example, the whole body mercury concentration in redfin pickerel collected from the most impacted pond decreased approximately 72% between 2006 (pre-treatment) and 2010 (post-treatment). Over this same period, mercury concentrations in the fillet of redfin pickerel in this pond were estimated to have decreased from approximately 1.45 {micro}g/g (wet weight basis) to 0.45 {micro}g/g - a decrease from 4.8x to 1.5x the current EPA guideline concentration for mercury in fillet (0.3 {micro}g/g). Thermodynamic modeling, scanning electron microscopy, and other sampling data for tin suggest that particulate tin (IV) oxides are a significant geochemical species entering the ecosystem with elevated levels of tin measured in surficial sediments and biofilms. Detectable increases in tin in sediments and biofilms extended approximately 3km from the discharge location. Tin oxides are recalcitrant solids that are relatively non-toxic and resistant to dissolution. Work continues to develop and validate methods to analyze total tin in the collected biota samples. In general, the interim results of this screening study suggest that the treatment process has performed as predicted and that the concentration of mercury in upper trophic level

  17. QUIJOTE Scientific Results. II. Polarisation Measurements of the Microwave Emission in the Galactic molecular complexes W43 and W47 and supernova remnant W44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génova-Santos, R.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Peláez-Santos, A.; Poidevin, F.; Rebolo, R.; Vignaga, R.; Artal, E.; Harper, S.; Hoyland, R.; Lasenby, A.; Martínez-González, E.; Piccirillo, L.; Tramonte, D.; Watson, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    We present Q-U-I JOint TEnerife (QUIJOTE) intensity and polarisation maps at 10 - 20 GHz covering a region along the Galactic plane 24° ≲ l ≲ 45°, |b| ≲ 8°. These maps result from 210 h of data, have a sensitivity in polarisation of ≈40 μK beam-1 and an angular resolution of ≈1°. Our intensity data are crucial to confirm the presence of anomalous microwave emission (AME) towards the two molecular complexes W43 (22σ) and W47 (8σ). We also detect at high significance (6σ) AME associated with W44, the first clear detection of this emission towards a SNR. The new QUIJOTE polarisation data, in combination with WMAP, are essential to: i) Determine the spectral index of the synchrotron emission in W44, βsync = -0.62 ± 0.03, in good agreement with the value inferred from the intensity spectrum once a free-free component is included in the fit. ii) Trace the change in the polarisation angle associated with Faraday rotation in the direction of W44 with rotation measure -404 ± 49 rad m-2. And iii) set upper limits on the polarisation of W43 of ΠAME < 0.39 per cent (95 per cent C.L.) from QUIJOTE 17 GHz, and <0.22 per cent from WMAP 41 GHz data, which are the most stringent constraints ever obtained on the polarisation fraction of the AME. For typical physical conditions (grain temperature and magnetic field strengths), and in the case of perfect alignment between the grains and the magnetic field, the models of electric or magnetic dipole emissions predict higher polarisation fractions.

  18. QUIJOTE scientific results - II. Polarisation measurements of the microwave emission in the Galactic molecular complexes W43 and W47 and supernova remnant W44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génova-Santos, R.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Peláez-Santos, A.; Poidevin, F.; Rebolo, R.; Vignaga, R.; Artal, E.; Harper, S.; Hoyland, R.; Lasenby, A.; Martínez-González, E.; Piccirillo, L.; Tramonte, D.; Watson, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    We present Q-U-I JOint TEnerife (QUIJOTE) intensity and polarisation maps at 10-20 GHz covering a region along the Galactic plane 24° ≲ l ≲ 45°, |b| ≲ 8°. These maps result from 210 h of data, have a sensitivity in polarisation of ≈40 μK beam-1 and an angular resolution of ≈1°. Our intensity data are crucial to confirm the presence of anomalous microwave emission (AME) towards the two molecular complexes W43 (22σ) and W47 (8σ). We also detect at high significance (6σ) AME associated with W44, the first clear detection of this emission towards a supernova remnant. The new QUIJOTE polarisation data, in combination with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), are essential to (i) determine the spectral index of the synchrotron emission in W44, βsync = -0.62 ± 0.03, in good agreement with the value inferred from the intensity spectrum once a free-free component is included in the fit; (ii) trace the change in the polarisation angle associated with Faraday rotation in the direction of W44 with rotation measure -404 ± 49 rad m-2 and (iii) set upper limits on the polarisation of W43 of ΠAME < 0.39 per cent (95 per cent C.L.) from QUIJOTE 17 GHz, and <0.22 per cent from WMAP 41 GHz data, which are the most stringent constraints ever obtained on the polarisation fraction of the AME. For typical physical conditions (grain temperature and magnetic field strengths), and in the case of perfect alignment between the grains and the magnetic field, the models of electric or magnetic dipole emissions predict higher polarisation fractions.

  19. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolamide for glioblastoma in good performance status elderly patients – early results of a phase II trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eFloyd

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is an aggressive primary brain neoplasm with dismal prognosis. Based on successful phase III trials, 60 Gy involved-field radiotherapy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks (Standard RT with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide is currently the standard of care. In this disease, age and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS are the most important prognostic factors. For elderly patients, clinical trials comparing standard RT with radiotherapy abbreviated to 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks demonstrated similar outcomes, indicating shortened radiotherapy may be an appropriate option for elderly patients. However, these trials did not include temozolomide chemotherapy, and included patients with poor KPS, possibly obscuring benefits of more aggressive treatment for some elderly patients. We conducted a prospective Phase II trial to examine the efficacy of a hypofractionated radiation course followed by a stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in elderly patients with good performance status. In this study, patients 65 years and older with a KPS >70 and histologically confirmed GBM received 40 Gy in 15 fractions with 3D conformal technique followed by a 1-3 fraction stereotactic boost to the enhancing tumor. All patients also received concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. Patients were evaluated 1 month post-treatment and every 2 months thereafter. Between 2007 and 2010, 20 patients (9 males and 11 females were enrolled in this study. The median age was 75.4 years (range 65-87 years. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range 7-32 months, 12 patients progressed and 5 are alive. The median progression free survival was 11 months and the median overall survival was 13 months. There was no additional toxicity. These results indicate that elderly patients with good KPS can achieve outcomes comparable to the current standard of care using an abbreviated radiotherapy course, radiosurgery boost and

  20. Recent Results in Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Christopher Michael [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-08-01

    In this dissertation, we study the original excess of low energy events observed by the Co- GeNT collaboration and the annual modulation reported by the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration, and discuss whether these signals could both be the result of the same elastically scattering dark matter particle. We find that, without channeling but when taking into account uncertainties in the relevant quenching factors, a dark matter candidate with a mass of approximately ~7.0 GeV and a cross section with nucleons of σDM-N ~2 x 10-40 cm2 could account for both of these observations. We also compare the region of parameter space favored by DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT to the constraints from XENON 10, XENON 100, and CDMS (Si).

  1. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with gemcitabine/cisplatin and surgery versus immediate surgery in resectable pancreatic cancer. Results of the first prospective randomized phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golcher, Henriette; Merkel, Susanne; Hohenberger, Werner [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Brunner, Thomas B. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Witzigmann, Helmut [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Surgery, Leipzig (Germany); Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, General Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Marti, Lukas [Hospital of Kanton St. Gallen, General Surgery, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Bechstein, Wolf-Otto [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Surgery, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Bruns, Christiane [University Hospital Munich, Department of Surgery - Hospital Campus Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); University Hospital Magdeburg, Department of Surgery, Magdeburg (Germany); Jungnickel, Henry [Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, General Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Schreiber, Stefan [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Surgery, Leipzig (Germany); Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Coburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany); Meyer, Thomas [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Ansbach, General Surgery, Ansbach (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-25

    In nonrandomized trials, neoadjuvant treatment was reported to prolong survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. As neoadjuvant chemoradiation is established for the treatment of rectal cancer we examined the value of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic cancer in a randomized phase II trial. Radiological staging defining resectability was basic information prior to randomization in contrast to adjuvant therapy trials resting on pathological staging. Patients with resectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head were randomized to primary surgery (Arm A) or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery (Arm B), which was followed by adjuvant chemotherapy in both arms. A total of 254 patients were required to detect a 4.33-month improvement in median overall survival (mOS). The trial was stopped after 73 patients; 66 patients were eligible for analysis. Twenty nine of 33 allocated patients received chemoradiotherapy. Radiotherapy was completed in all patients. Chemotherapy was changed in 3 patients due to toxicity. Tumor resection was performed in 23 vs. 19 patients (A vs. B). The R0 resection rate was 48 % (A) and 52 % (B, P = 0.81) and (y)pN0 was 30 % (A) vs. 39 % (B, P = 0.44), respectively. Postoperative complications were comparable in both groups. mOS was 14.4 vs. 17.4 months (A vs. B; intention-to-treat analysis; P = 0.96). After tumor resection, mOS was 18.9 vs. 25.0 months (A vs. B; P = 0.79). This worldwide first randomized trial for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic cancer showed that neoadjuvant chemoradiation is safe with respect to toxicity, perioperative morbidity, and mortality. Nevertheless, the trial was terminated early due to slow recruiting and the results were not significant. ISRCTN78805636; NCT00335543. (orig.) [German] Mehrere nichtrandomisierte Studien zeigten, dass eine neoadjuvante Therapie das Ueberleben bei Patienten mit Pankreaskarzinom verlaengert. Beim lokal fortgeschrittenen Rektumkarzinom gehoert die

  2. Enterovirus 71 VP1 activates calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and results in the rearrangement of vimentin in human astrocyte cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Haolong

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is one of the main causative agents of foot, hand and mouth disease. Its infection usually causes severe central nervous system diseases and complications in infected infants and young children. In the present study, we demonstrated that EV71 infection caused the rearrangement of vimentin in human astrocytoma cells. The rearranged vimentin, together with various EV71 components, formed aggresomes-like structures in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy and viral RNA labeling indicated that the aggresomes were virus replication sites since most of the EV71 particles and the newly synthesized viral RNA were concentrated here. Further analysis revealed that the vimentin in the virus factories was serine-82 phosphorylated. More importantly, EV71 VP1 protein is responsible for the activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK-II which phosphorylated the N-terminal domain of vimentin on serine 82. Phosphorylation of vimentin and the formation of aggresomes were required for the replication of EV71 since the latter was decreased markedly after phosphorylation was blocked by KN93, a CaMK-II inhibitor. Thus, as one of the consequences of CaMK-II activation, vimentin phosphorylation and rearrangement may support virus replication by playing a structural role for the formation of the replication factories. Collectively, this study identified the replication centers of EV71 in human astrocyte cells. This may help us understand the replication mechanism and pathogenesis of EV71 in human.

  3. Talactoferrin in Severe Sepsis: Results From the Phase II/III Oral tAlactoferrin in Severe sepsIS Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vincent, J.L.; Marshall, J.C.; Dellinger, R.P.; Simonson, S.G.; Guntupalli, K.; Levy, M.M.; Singer, M.; Malik, R.; Pickkers, P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Talactoferrin alfa is a recombinant form of the human glycoprotein, lactoferrin, which has been shown to have a wide range of effects on the immune system. This phase II/III clinical trial compared talactoferrin with placebo, in addition to standard of care, in patients with severe sepsis

  4. Increased mortality associated with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in the intensive care unit: results from the EPIC II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanberger, H.; Walther, S.; Leone, M.; Barie, P.S.; Rello, J.; Lipman, J.; Marshall, J.C.; Anzueto, A.; Sakr, Y.; Pickkers, P.; Felleiter, P.; Engoren, M.; Vincent, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Controversy continues regarding whether the presence of meticillin resistance increases mortality risk in Staphylococcus aureus infections. In this study, we assessed the role of meticillin resistance in survival of patients with S. aureus infection included in the EPIC II point-prevalence study of

  5. Class II-associated invariant chain peptide down-modulation enhances the immunogenicity of myeloid leukemic blasts resulting in increased CD4(+) T-cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Luijn, M.M.; Chamuleau, M.E.D.; Thompson, J.A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, S.; Westers, T.M.; Souwer, Y.; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Ham, S.M.; van de Loosdrecht, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Disease recurrence in patients with acute myeloid leukemia may be partially explained by the escape of leukemic blasts from CD4(+) T-cell recognition. The current study investigates the role of aberrant HLA class II antigen presentation on leukemic blasts by determining both the clinical

  6. Seeking the seaward limits of the Irish Sea Ice Stream: glaciation of the Celtic Sea and first results from the GATEWAYS II campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praeg, Daniel; McCarron, Stephen; Dove, Dayton; Glamar; Shipboard Parties, Gateways

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) are thought to have been strongly influenced by the activity of marine-based ice streams, the largest of which flowed down the Irish Sea and, at maximum, onto the broad continental shelf of the Celtic Sea. However, the maximum extent of the Irish Sea Ice Stream (ISIS) remains unclear: subglacial tills and glaciomarine muds recovered in BGS vibrocores from the Irish-UK sectors have been used to propose a mid-shelf grounding line, but subglacial or ice-proximal sediments have also been cored at two sites near the shelf edge over 100 km to farther seaward. The glacigenic sediments were cored between, but in places from the flanks of, a vast system of shelf-crossing seabed ridges (up to 55 m high, 7 km wide and 300 km long) that fan seaward from the northern Celtic. The ridges have traditionally been interpreted as moribund tidal sand banks formed during the post-glacial marine transgression, albeit overridden in the NW by the last ice sheet. An alternative explanation is that they are glaciofluvial landforms, recording meltwater drainage beneath beneath an ISIS that extended to the shelf edge. The glacigenic succession on and between the ridges has been investigated through the acquisition of multibeam imagery and subbottom profiles during the Italian-led GLAMAR and Irish-led GATEWAYS I campaigns (2009, 2012), which targeted the key BGS vibrocores used to propose a mid-shelf grounding line. Results indicate subglacial tills and glaciomarine muds to extend across the ridges, forming distinctive transform bedforms (ribs) that extend at least 60 km seaward of the proposed grounding line. The rectilinear network of ridges and transverse ribs are tentatively interpreted as giant eskers flanked by glaciofluvial De Geer moraines, a hypothesis with implications for both the extent and the dynamics of the ISIS. This hypothesis is to be further tested during the GATEWAYS II campaign of the Celtic Explorer in February

  7. Implementation of image-guided intensity-modulated accelerated partial breast irradiation. Three-year results of a phase II clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meszaros, Norbert; Major, Tibor; Stelczer, Gabor; Zaka, Zoltan; Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Fodor, Janos; Polgar, Csaba [National Institute of Oncology, Center of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Mozsa, Emoke [National Institute of Oncology, Center of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Landesklinikum, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Pukancsik, David [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Breast and Sarcoma Surgery, Budapest (Hungary)

    2017-01-15

    To report 3-year results of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) following breast conserving surgery (BCS) for low-risk early invasive breast cancer. Between July 2011 and March 2014, 60 patients with low-risk early invasive breast cancer underwent BCS and were enrolled in this phase II prospective study. The total dose was 36.9 Gy (9 fractions of 4.1 Gy, two fractions/day). Patient setup errors were detected in LAT, LONG and VERT directions. Local tumour control, survival results, early and late side effects and cosmetic outcome were assessed. At a median follow-up of 39 months, all patients were alive and neither locoregional nor distant failure occurred. One contralateral breast cancer and two new primary malignancies outside the breast were observed. No grade (G) 3-4 acute toxicity was detected. G1 and G2 erythema occurred in 21 (35%) and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively; while G1 oedema was observed in 23 (38.8%) cases. G1 and G2 pain was reported by 6 (10%) and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. Among the late radiation side effects, G1 pigmentation or telangiectasia, G1 fibrosis and G1 asymptomatic fat necrosis occurred in 10 (16.7%), 7 (11.7%) and 3 (5%) patients, respectively. No ≥ G2 late toxicity was detected. Cosmetic outcome was excellent in 43 (71.7%) and good in 17 (28.3%) patients. IG-IMRT is a reproducible and feasible technique for delivery of external beam APBI following BCS for treatment of low-risk, early-stage invasive breast carcinoma. In order to avoid toxicity, image guidance performed before each radiation fraction is necessary to minimize the PTV. Three-year results are promising, early and late radiation side-effects are minimal, and cosmetic results are excellent to good. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung der 3-Jahres-Ergebnisse der Teilbrustbestrahlung (APBI) mittels bildgefuehrter intensitaetsmodulierter Strahlentherapie (IG-IMRT) nach brusterhaltender Operation (BCS

  8. Combination therapy of renal cell carcinoma or breast cancer patients with dendritic cell vaccine and IL-2: results from a phase I/II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YongMan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ten cancer patients (Six renal cell carcinoma and four breast cancer patients were treated in a phase I/II study with a vaccine composed of autologous dendritic cells (DCs and IL-2 to evaluate the DC vaccine-related toxicity and antigen-specific immune alteration. Methods Cancer patients were treated twice with autologous CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell-derived, GM-CSF/IFN-γ-differentiated DCs pulsed with autologous tumor lysate and KLH, by 4-week interval. Following each subcutaneous injection of therapeutic DCs, low-dose (200 MIU IL-2 was introduced for 14 consecutive days as an immune adjuvant. To determine the DC vaccine-induced immunological alterations, the KLH-specific lymphocyte proliferation, number of IFN-γ secreting T cells (ELISPOT assay, NK activity and the cytokine modulation were measured. Results Cultured-DCs expressing HLA-DR, CD11c, CD83, and B7.1/B7.2 produced IL-12p70. After vaccination, the patients tolerated it. Clinical response was observed in one RCC patient as stable disease. However DC-vaccine related antigen-specific immune responses including peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation and the number of IFN-r secreting cells were induced in six patients without clear correlation with clinical responses. Also NK activity was induced significantly in six patients after vaccination. DC vaccine-related decrease of TGF-β level or increase of IL-12p70 level and decline of CD4+CD25+ T cells were observed in three patients. However only in the RCC patient whose disease stabilized, combination of stimulatory as well as inhibitory immune alterations including induction of IFN-γ secreting T cell with reduction of CD4+ CD25+ T cell were correlated with clinical responses. Conclusion Data indicated that DC vaccine combined with IL-2 is well tolerated without major side effects. DC vaccine induced the specific immunity against introduced antigen. Combinatorial alterations of immunological parameters indicating

  9. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of APF530 (extended-release granisetron in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy: results of two Phase II trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrail N

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nashat Gabrail,1 Ronald Yanagihara,2 Marek Spaczyński,3 William Cooper,4 Erin O'Boyle,5 Carrie Smith,1 Ralph Boccia6 1Gabrail Cancer Center, Canton, OH, USA; 2St Louise Regional Hospital, Gilroy, CA, USA; 3Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecologic Oncology, University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 4TFS International, Flemington, NJ, USA; 5FibroGen, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA; 6Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Bethesda, MD, USA Background: Despite advances with new therapies, a significant proportion of patients (>30% suffer delayed-onset chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV despite use of antiemetics. APF530 is a sustained-release subcutaneous (SC formulation of granisetron for preventing CINV. APF530 pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy were studied in two open-label, single-dose Phase II trials (C2005-01 and C2007-01, respectively in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Methods: In C2005-01, 45 patients received APF530 250, 500, or 750 mg SC (granisetron 5, 10, or 15 mg, respectively. In C2007-01, 35 patients were randomized to APF530 250 or 500 mg SC. Injections were given 30 to 60 minutes before single-day moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Plasma granisetron was measured from predose to 168 hours after study drug administration. Safety and efficacy were also evaluated. Results: APF530 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional, with slow absorption and elimination of granisetron after a single SC dose. Median time to maximum plasma concentration and half-life were similar for APF530 250 and 500 mg in both trials, with no differences between the groups receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Exposure to granisetron was maintained at a therapeutic level over the delayed-onset phase, at least 168 hours. Adverse events in both trials were as expected for granisetron; injection site reactions (eg, erythema

  10. Long-term results and recurrence patterns from SCOPE-1: a phase II/III randomised trial of definitive chemoradiotherapy +/− cetuximab in oesophageal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, T; Hurt, C N; Falk, S; Gollins, S; Staffurth, J; Ray, R; Bridgewater, J A; Geh, J I; Cunningham, D; Blazeby, J; Roy, R; Maughan, T; Griffiths, G; Mukherjee, S

    2017-01-01

    Background: The SCOPE-1 study tested the role of adding cetuximab to conventional definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT), and demonstrated greater toxicity and worse survival outcomes. We present the long-term outcomes and patterns of recurrence. Methods: SCOPE-1 was a phase II/III trial in which patients were randomised to cisplatin 60 mg m−2 (day 1) and capecitabine 625 mg m−2 bd (days 1–21) for four cycles +/− cetuximab 400 mg m−2 day 1 then by 250 mg m−2 weekly. Radiotherapy consisted of 50 Gy/25# given concurrently with cycles 3 and 4. Recruitment was between February 2008 and February 2012, when the IDMC recommended closure on the basis of futility. Results: About 258 patients (dCRT=129; dCRT+cetuximab (dCRT+C)=129) were recruited from 36 centres. About 72.9% (n=188) had squamous cell histology. The median follow-up (IQR) was 46.2 (35.9–48.3) months for surviving patients. The median overall survival (OS; months; 95% CI) was 34.5 (24.7–42.3) in dCRT and 24.7 (18.6–31.3) in dCRT+C (hazard ratio (HR)=1.25, 95% CIs: 0.93–1.69, P=0.137). Median progression-free survival (PFS; months; 95% CI) was 24.1 (15.3–29.9) and 15.9 (10.7–20.8) months, respectively (HR=1.28, 95% CIs: 0.94–1.75; P=0.114). On multivariable analysis only earlier stage, full-dose RT, and higher cisplatin dose intensity were associated with improved OS. Conclusions: The mature analysis demonstrates that the dCRT regimen used in the study provided useful survival outcomes despite its use in patients who were largely unfit for surgery or who had inoperable disease. Given the competing risk of systemic and local failure, future studies should continue to focus on enhancing local control as well as optimising systemic therapy. PMID:28196063

  11. A Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiotherapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma: Preliminary Results of RTOG 0417

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefter, Tracey E., E-mail: tracey.schefter@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kwon, Janice S. [University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Stuhr, Kelly [Anschutz Cancer Pavilion, Aurora, CO (United States); Balaraj, Khalid [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yaremko, Brian P. [University of Western Ontario, London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (Canada); Small, William [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Gaffney, David K. [University of Utah Health Science Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. RTOG 0417 was a Phase II study exploring the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to standard CRT. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky tumors (Stage IB-IIIB) were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for three cycles. Treatment-related serious adverse event (SAE) and other adverse event (AE) rates within the first 90 days from treatment start were determined. Treatment-related SAEs were defined as any Grade {>=}4 vaginal bleeding or thrombotic event or Grade {>=}3 arterial event, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, or bowel/bladder perforation, or any Grade 5 treatment-related death. Treatment-related AEs included all SAEs and Grade 3 or 4 GI toxicity persisting for >2 weeks despite medical intervention, Grade 4 neutropenia or leukopenia persisting for >7 days, febrile neutropenia, Grade 3 or 4 other hematologic toxicity, and Grade 3 or 4 GI, renal, cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, or neurologic AEs. All AEs were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE) v 3.0 (MedDRA version 6.0). Results: A total of 60 patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009, and of these, 49 patients were evaluable. The median follow-up was 12.4 months (range, 4.6-31.4 months).The median age was 45 years (range, 22-80 years). Most patients had FIGO Stage IIB (63%) and were of Zubrod performance status of 0 (67%). 80% of cases were squamous. There were no treatment-related SAEs. There were 15 (31%) protocol-specified treatment-related AEs within 90 days of treatment start; the most common were hematologic (12/15; 80%). 18 (37%) occurred during treatment or follow-up at any time. 37 of the 49 patients (76%) had cisplatin and bevacizumab

  12. Update of the BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Co-60 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 60Co to include the 2011 result of the CNEA (Argentina), the 2012 results of the BARC (India) and the NRC (Canada), and the 2014 result of the NIM (China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michotte, C.; Ratel, G.; Courte, S.; Arenillas, P.; Balpardo, C.; Joseph, L.; Anuradha, R.; Kulkarni, D. B.; Galea, R.; Moore, K.; Stroak, A.; Zhang, Ming; Liang, Juncheng; Liu, Haoran

    2017-01-01

    Since 2010, four national metrology institutes (NMI) have each submitted a sample of known activity of 60Co to the International Reference System (SIR) for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), with comparison identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Co-60. The values of the activity submitted were between about 175 kBq and 1600 kBq. The primary standardization results for the CNEA, Argentina and the BARC, India replace their earlier result of 2003 and 2001, respectively. There are now seventeen results in the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Co-60 comparison. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been updated using the power-moderated weighted mean. The degrees of equivalence between each equivalent activity measured in the SIR and the KCRV have been calculated and the results are given in the form of a table. A graphical presentation is also given. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  13. SEALDH-II: An airborne, autonomous, calibration-free TDLAS Hygrometer. First in-flight results with metrological links to the German Primary Humidity Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, B.; Ebert, V.

    2014-12-01

    The accuracy and comparability of airborne hygrometers remains under debate often only reaching ±10% under static lab conditions or even >±30% in flight. This often limits atmospheric models as well as other species sensors which need to be corrected for water vapor dilution or cross sensitivity. Further challenges come from the huge dynamic range (2-40000 ppmv), the strong spatial gradients (up to several 1000 ppmv/s). and the difficult and error-prone calibration processes, very often without any direct links to the accurate global metrological water vapor scales, which are defined via national primary humidity generators. To fill this gap and provide "traceable", i.e. metrologically validated, airborne hygrometers we developed the Selective Extractive Airborne Laser Diode Hygrometer, SEALDH, which uses dTDLAS with a special, calibration-free data evaluation to circumvent the need for frequent field calibrations and to ensure high accuracy and comparability by a holistic data quality assurance concept in combination with extensive metrological validations at national primary standards. Thus SEALDH-II can be used in a calibration-free field sensor mode (with an absolute, metrologically defined uncertainty of 4.3% +- 3ppmv). The response time is mainly limited by the gas flow and significantly below 1 sec, yielding precision down to 0.08 ppmv (1σ, 1sec) measured at 600 ppmv and 1000 hPa. Its excellent long-term stability, field transfer standard. SEALDH-II has been recently operated without any failures for over 50 hours on several airborne science missions (DENCHAR, AIRTOSS-I, and AIRTOSS-II). In addition SEALDH participated in the representative, international comparison AquaVIT-II. The performance during these missions and the value of a traceability will be demonstrated and discussed.

  14. Head, Face, and Neck Injuries During Operation Iraqi Freedom II: Results From the US Navy and Marine Corps Combat Trauma Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-12

    injuries at Navy–Marine Corps military medical treatment facilities (MTFs). Examples of Navy–Marine Corps MTFs include battalion aids stations (ie...incident details, injuries , treatment , and outcomes is collected by the patient’s medical provider(s) in the form of a clinical record. Clinical...and mouth; and neck injuries included trauma to cervical area and cervical spine. Head, Face, and Neck Injuries During OIF-II 7 Descriptive

  15. Modeling of radionuclide transport through rock formations and the resulting radiation exposure of reference persons. Calculations using Asse II parameters; Modellierung des Transports von Radionukliden durch Gesteinsschichten und der resultierenden Strahlenexposition von Referenzpersonen. Berechnungen mit Parametern der Asse II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueppers, Christian; Ustohalova, Veronika; Steinhoff, Mathias

    2012-05-21

    The long-term release of radioactivity into the ground water path cannot be excluded for the radioactive waste repository Asse II. The possible radiological consequences were analyzed using a radio-ecological scenario developed by GRS. A second scenario was developed considering the solubility of radionuclides in salt saturated solutions and retarding/retention effects during the radionuclide transport through the cap rock layers. The modeling of possible radiation exposure was based on the lifestyle habits of reference persons. In Germany the calculation procedure for the prediction of radionuclide release from final repositories is not defined by national standards, the used procedures are based on analogue methods from other radiation protection calculations.

  16. Chemoradiation in cervical cancer with cisplatin and high-dose rate brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. Results of a phase-II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, H.G.; Laban, C.; Puschmann, D.; Koelbl, H. [Dept. of Gynecology, Martin-Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Dunst, J.; Haensgen, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin-Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Background: In 1999, five randomized studies demonstrated that chemoradiation with cisplatin and low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy has a benefit in locally advanced cervical cancer and for surgically treated patients in high-risk situations. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of concomitant chemoradiation with cisplatin and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Patients and Method: 27 patients were included in our phase-II trial: 13 locally advanced cases (group A) and 14 adjuvant-therapy patients in high-risk situations (group B). A definitive radiotherapy was performed with 25 fractions of external beam therapy (1.8 Gy per fraction/middle shielded after eleven fractions). Brachytherapy was delivered at HDR schedules with 7 Gy in point A per fraction (total dose 35 Gy) in FIGO Stages IIB-IIIB. The total dose of external and brachytherapy was 70 Gy in point A and 52-54 Gy in point B. All patients in stage IVA were treated without brachytherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed with external beam radiotherapy of the pelvis with 1.8 Gy single-dose up to 50.4 Gy. Brachytherapy was delivered at HDR schedules with two fractions of 5 Gy only in patients with tumor-positive margins or tumor involvement of the upper vagina. The chemotherapeutic treatment schedule provided six courses of cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly recommended in the randomized studies GOG-120 and -123. Results: A total of 18/27 patients (66.7%) completed all six courses of chemotherapy. Discontinuation of radiotherapy due to therapy-related morbidity was not necessary in the whole study group. G3 leukopenia (29.6%) was the only relevant acute toxicity. There were no differences in toxicity between group A and B. Serious late morbidity occurred in 2/27 patients (7.4%). 12/13 patients (92.3%) with IIB-IVA cervical cancer showed a complete response (CR). 13/14 adjuvant cases (92.8%) are free of recurrence (median follow up: 19.1 months). Conclusion: Concomitant

  17. Update of the BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Cs-134 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 134Cs to include the 2008 results of the BEV (Austria), the 2009 result of the IRA (Switzerland) and the 2010 results of the NMISA (South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michotte, C.; Ratel, G.; Courte, S.; Maringer, F. J.; Caffari, Y.; van Wyngaardt, W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008, three national metrology institutes have submitted ampoules for the measurement of 134Cs in the International Reference System (SIR). The values of the activity submitted were between about 0.17 MBq and 2.3 MBq. The primary standardization result for the IRA, Switzerland, replaces their earlier result of 1978 but no change is proposed for the key comparison reference value at the present time. There are now 14 results in the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Cs-134 comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Strategies for the long-term climate policy. The results of the Cool project. Final report of the second phase of the Dutch National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change (NRP II) 1995-2001. Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk M; Hisschemoller M; Mol T; Hordijk L; Kok M; Metz B; NOP

    2002-01-01

    This report, Climate Change, a Permanent Concern, presents the results of research that was conducted in over 90 projects during the second phase of the National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change (NRP-II, 1995-2001). The report is intended for policymakers, members of bu

  19. Update of the BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Cu-64 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 64Cu to include the 2009 results of the CMI-IIR (Czech Rep.) and the NPL (UK), the 2010 result of the LNE-LNHB (France) and the 2011 result of the ENEA-INMRI (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michotte, C.; Ratel, G.; Courte, S.; Sochorovà, J.; Auerbach, P.; Keightley, J.; Johansson, L.; Bakhshandeiar, E.; Cassette, P.; Moune, M.; Capogni, M.; De Felice, P.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2009, four national metrology institutes (NMI) have submitted four samples of known activity of 64Cu to the International Reference System (SIR) for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), with comparison identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Cu-64. The values of the activity submitted were between about 3 MBq and 260 MBq. There are now five results in the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Cu-64 comparison. A key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been calculated for the first time for this nuclide. The degrees of equivalence between each equivalent activity measured in the SIR and the KCRV have been calculated and the results are given in the form of a table. A graphical presentation is also given. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. 30-year trends in serum lipids among United States adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys II, III, and 1999-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jerome D; Cziraky, Mark J; Cai, Qian; Wallace, Anna; Wasser, Thomas; Crouse, John R; Jacobson, Terry A

    2010-10-01

    Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) II (1976 to 1980), NHANES III (1988 to 1994), and NHANES 1999 to 2006 were examined to assess trends in total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs), lipid-lowering medication use, and obesity. Age-adjusted decreases in TC (210 to 200 mg/dl) and LDL cholesterol (134 to 119 mg/dl) were observed. Those with high TC showed a decrease of 9% from NHANES II to NHANES 1999 to 2006, whereas those with LDL cholesterol ≥160 mg/dl showed a decrease of 8%. A significant increase in mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was observed (50 to 53 mg/dl, p lipid medication use by those with high cholesterol increased from 16% to 38%. Mean body mass index increased from 26 to 29 kg/m(2), and prevalence of obesity doubled and was significantly associated with increased TG. In conclusion, recent favorable trends in TC and LDL cholesterol are likely due to increased awareness of high cholesterol and the greater use of lipid-lowering drugs. However, countertrends in obesity and TG levels, if continued, will likely have a negative impact on cardiovascular disease in the future.

  1. CHEERS Results from NGC 3393, II: Investigating the Extended Narrow Line Region using Deep Chandra Observations and Hubble Narrow Line Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Maksym, W Peter; Elvis, Martin; Karovska, Margarita; Paggi, Alessandro; Raymond, John; Wang, Junfeng; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    2016-01-01

    The CHandra Extended Emission Line Region Survey (CHEERS) is an X-ray study of nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) designed to take full advantage of Chandra's unique angular resolution by spatially resolving feedback signatures and effects. In the second paper of a series on CHEERS target NGC 3393, we examine deep high-resolution Chandra images and compare them with Hubble narrow line images of [O III], [S II] and H$\\alpha$, as well as previously-unpublished mid-ultraviolet (MUV) images. We find evidence for a complex multi-phase structure in the circumnuclear ISM, with no single simple correlation between X-rays and high-ionization ([O III]/H$\\alpha$-dominated) and low-ionization ([S II]-dominated) features. We also find X-ray structures ~50-pc in extent, H$\\alpha$ evidence for gas compression, and extended MUV emission associated with the S-shaped arms that envelope the radio jets. In conjunction with existing STIS kinematics, these findings support a role for shock contributions to the feedback, driven by...

  2. Cannabidiol for the Prevention of Graft-versus-Host-Disease after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Results of a Phase II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshurun, Moshe; Shpilberg, Ofer; Herscovici, Corina; Shargian, Liat; Dreyer, Juliet; Peck, Anat; Israeli, Moshe; Levy-Assaraf, Maly; Gruenewald, Tsipora; Mechoulam, Raphael; Raanani, Pia; Ram, Ron

    2015-10-01

    Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is a major obstacle to successful allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic ingredient of Cannabis sativa, possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. We hypothesized that CBD may decrease GVHD incidence and severity after alloHCT. We conducted a phase II study. GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine and a short course of methotrexate. Patients transplanted from an unrelated donor were given low-dose anti-T cell globulin. CBD 300 mg/day was given orally starting 7 days before transplantation until day 30. Forty-eight consecutive adult patients undergoing alloHCT were enrolled. Thirty-eight patients (79%) had acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome and 35 patients (73%) were given myeloablative conditioning. The donor was either an HLA-identical sibling (n = 28), a 10/10 matched unrelated donor (n = 16), or a 1-antigen-mismatched unrelated donor (n = 4). The median follow-up was 16 months (range, 7 to 23). No grades 3 to 4 toxicities were attributed to CBD. None of the patients developed acute GVHD while consuming CBD. In an intention-to-treat analysis, we found that the cumulative incidence rates of grades II to IV and grades III to IV acute GVHD by day 100 were 12.1% and 5%, respectively. Compared with 101 historical control subjects given standard GVHD prophylaxis, the hazard ratio of developing grades II to IV acute GVHD among subjects treated with CBD plus standard GVHD prophylaxis was .3 (P = .0002). Rates of nonrelapse mortality at 100 days and at 1 year after transplantation were 8.6% and 13.4%, respectively. Among patients surviving more than 100 days, the cumulative incidences of moderate-to-severe chronic GVHD at 12 and 18 months were 20% and 33%, respectively. The combination of CBD with standard GVHD prophylaxis is a safe and promising strategy to reduce the incidence of acute GVHD. A randomized double-blind controlled study is warranted

  3. Warm intermediate inflation in the Randall-Sundrum II model in the light of Planck 2015 and BICEP2 results: a general dissipative coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Ramon [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Videla, Nelson [FCFM, Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, Santiago (Chile); Olivares, Marco [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-05-15

    A warm inflationary Universe in the Randall- Sundrum II model during intermediate inflation is studied. For this purpose, we consider the general form for the dissipative coefficient Γ(T, φ) = C{sub φ}(T{sup m})/(φ{sup m-T}), and also we analyze this inflationary model in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We study the evolution of the Universe under the slow-roll approximation and find solutions to the full effective Friedmann equation in the brane-world framework. In order to constrain the parameters in our model, we consider the recent data from the BICEP2 to Planck 2015 data together with the necessary condition for warm inflation T > H, and also the condition from the weak (or strong) dissipative regime. (orig.)

  4. Retinal degeneration slow (rds) in mouse results from simple insertion of a t haplotype-specific element into protein-coding exon II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Norton, J.C.; Allen, A.C.; Burns, J.L.; Travis, G.H. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-20

    Retinal degeneration slow (rds) is a semidominant mutation of mice that causes dysplasia and degeneration of rod and cone photoreceptors. Mutations in RDS, the human ortholog of the rds gene, are responsible for several inherited retinal dystrophies including a subset of retinitis pigmentosa. The normal rds locus encodes rds/peripherin, an integral membrane glycoprotein present in outer segment discs. Genomic libraries form wildtype and rds/rds mice were screened with an rds cDNA, and phage {lambda} clones that span the normal and mutant loci were mapped. We show that in mice, rds is caused by the insertion into exon II of a 9.2-kb repetitive genomic element that is very similar to the t haplotype-specific element in the H-2 complex. The entire element is included in the RNA products of the mutant locus. We present evidence that rds in mice represents a null allele. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Radioimmunotherapy in medullary thyroid cancer using bispecific antibody and iodine 131-labeled bivalent hapten: preliminary results of a phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeber-Bodéré, F; Bardet, S; Hoefnagel, C A; Vieira, M R; Vuillez, J P; Murat, A; Ferreira, T C; Bardiès, M; Ferrer, L; Resche, I; Gautherot, E; Rouvier, E; Barbet, J; Chatal, J F

    1999-10-01

    The toxicity and therapeutic efficacy of escalating doses of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen x anti-N alpha-(diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N''-tetraacetic acid)-In bispecific monoclonal antibody (F6-734) and iodine 131-labeled bivalent hapten were determined in a Phase I/II trial. A total of 26 patients with recurrences of medullary thyroid cancer documented by imaging and a rise in serum thyrocalcitonin were enrolled. Twenty to 50 mg of F6-734 and 40-100 mCi of 131I-hapten were injected 4 days apart. Quantitative scintigraphy was performed after the second injection for dosimetry estimations in eight cases. Clinical, biological, and morphological follow-up was carried out for 1 year after treatment. The mean percentage of injected activity per gram of tumor at the time of maximum uptake was 0.08% (range, 0.003-0.26%). The tumor biological half-life ranged from 3 to 95 days, and tumor doses ranged from 2.91 to 184 cGy/mCi. The estimated tumor-to-nontumor dose ratios were 43.8 x 53.4, 29.6 x 35.3, 10.9 x 13.6, and 8.4 x 10.0 for total body, red marrow, liver, and kidney, respectively. Grade III/IV hematological toxicity was observed in seven patients, most of them with bone metastases. Among the 17 evaluable patients, 4 pain reliefs, 5 minor tumor responses, and 4 biological responses with decrease of thyrocalcitonin were observed. Nine patients developed human anti-mouse antibody. Dose-limiting toxicity was hematological, and maximum tolerated activity was 48 mCi/m2 in this group of patients, most of whom had suspected bone marrow involvement. The therapeutic responses observed in patients mainly with a small tumor burden are encouraging for the performance of a Phase II trial with minimal residual disease.

  6. Update of the BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 18F to include the 2010 result of the LNE-LNHB (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michotte, C.; Ratel, G.; Courte, S.; Cassette, P.; Moune, M.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2001, six national metrology institutes (NMI) have submitted seven samples of known activity of 18F to the International Reference System (SIR) for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), with comparison identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18. The values of the activity submitted were between about 1 MBq and 18 MBq. The primary standardization result for the LNE-LNHB, France, replaces their earlier result of 2002 and the key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been recalculated. In the frame of the BIPM.RI(II)-K4.F18 comparison, the NPL updated their result in the KCDB. Consequently there are now five results in the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18 comparison. The degrees of equivalence between each equivalent activity measured in the SIR and the updated KCRV have been calculated and the results are given in the form of a table. A graphical presentation is also given. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    been further delays to the F-35 System Development and Demonstration ( SDD ) program. As a result, the SDB II integration will be accomplished as a...follow-on integration to the F-35 SDD . SDB II OT&E on the F-35 will not be completed by the FRP threshold of October 2019, thus delaying the FRP decision

  8. Valproic Acid, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, in Combination with Paclitaxel for Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Phase II/III Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Graziella Catalano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC has a median survival less than 5 months and, to date, no effective therapy exists. Taxanes have recently been stated as the main drug treatment for ATC, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid efficiently potentiates the effects of paclitaxel in vitro. Based on these data, this trial assessed the efficacy and safety of the combination of paclitaxel and valproic acid for the treatment of ATC. This was a randomized, controlled phase II/III trial, performed on 25 ATC patients across 5 centers in northwest Italy. The experimental arm received the combination of paclitaxel (80 mg/m2/weekly and valproic acid (1,000 mg/day; the control arm received paclitaxel alone. Overall survival and disease progression, evaluated in terms of progression-free survival, were the primary outcomes. The secondary outcome was the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. The coadministration of valproic acid did not influence the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. Neither median survival nor median time to progression was statistically different in the two arms. Median survival of operated-on patients was significantly better than that of patients who were not operated on. The present trial demonstrates that the addition of valproic acid to paclitaxel has no effect on overall survival and disease progression of ATC patients. This trial is registered with EudraCT 2008-005221-11.

  9. Complexity of illness and adjunctive benzodiazepine use in outpatients with bipolar I or II disorder: results from the Bipolar CHOICE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, William V; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; Ketter, Terence A; Brody, Benjamin D; Kinrys, Gustavo; Kemp, David E; Shelton, Richard C; McElroy, Susan L; Sylvia, Louisa G; Kocsis, James H; McInnis, Melvin G; Friedman, Edward S; Singh, Vivek; Tohen, Mauricio; Bowden, Charles L; Deckersbach, Thilo; Calabrese, Joseph R; Thase, Michael E; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Rabideau, Dustin J; Schoenfeld, David A; Faraone, Stephen V; Kamali, Masoud

    2015-02-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely prescribed for patients with bipolar disorders in clinical practice, but very little is known about the subtypes of patients with bipolar disorder or aspects of bipolar illness that contribute most to benzodiazepine use. We examined the prevalence of and factors associated with benzodiazepine use among 482 patients with bipolar I or II disorder enrolled in the Bipolar CHOICE study. Eighty-one subjects were prescribed benzodiazepines at study entry and were considered benzodiazepine users. Stepwise logistic regression was used to model baseline benzodiazepine use versus nonuse, using entry and exit criteria of P benzodiazepine users were prescribed a significantly higher number of other psychotropic medications and were more likely to be prescribed lamotrigine or antidepressants as compared with benzodiazepine nonusers. Benzodiazepine users were more likely to have a diagnosis of bipolar I disorder and comorbid anxiety disorder, but not comorbid alcohol or substance use disorders. Benzodiazepine users also had experienced more anxiety and depressive symptoms and suicidality, but not irritability or manic symptoms, than did benzodiazepine nonusers. In the multivariate model, anxiety symptom level (regardless of diagnosis), lamotrigine use, number of concomitant psychotropic medications, college education, and high household income predicted benzodiazepine use. Benzodiazepine use in patients with bipolar disorders is associated with greater illness complexity as indicated by a higher number of concomitant psychotropic medications and higher anxiety symptom burden, regardless of a comorbid anxiety disorder diagnosis. Demographic factors were also important determinants of benzodiazepine use, which may be related to access to care and insurance coverage for benzodiazepines.

  10. Emtonjeni-A Structural Intervention to Integrate Sexual and Reproductive Health into Public Sector HIV Care in Cape Town, South Africa: Results of a Phase II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantell, J E; Cooper, D; Exner, T M; Moodley, J; Hoffman, S; Myer, L; Leu, C-S; Bai, D; Kelvin, E A; Jennings, K; Stein, Z A; Constant, D; Zweigenthal, V; Cishe, N; Nywagi, N

    2017-03-01

    Integration of sexual and reproductive health within HIV care services is a promising strategy for increasing access to family planning and STI services and reducing unwanted pregnancies, perinatal HIV transmission and maternal and infant mortality among people living with HIV and their partners. We conducted a Phase II randomized futility trial of a multi-level intervention to increase adherence to safer sex guidelines among those wishing to avoid pregnancy and adherence to safer conception guidelines among those seeking conception in newly-diagnosed HIV-positive persons in four public-sector HIV clinics in Cape Town. Clinics were pair-matched and the two clinics within each pair were randomized to either a three-session provider-delivered enhanced intervention (EI) (onsite contraceptive services and brief milieu intervention for staff) or standard-of-care (SOC) provider-delivered intervention. The futility analysis showed that we cannot rule out the possibility that the EI intervention has a 10 % point or greater success rate in improving adherence to safer sex/safer conception guidelines than does SOC (p = 0.573), indicating that the intervention holds merit, and a larger-scale confirmatory study showing whether the EI is superior to SOC has merit.

  11. Phase 1 study results of the type II glycoengineered humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in B-cell lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Gilles; Morschhauser, Franck; Lamy, Thierry; Milpied, Noel; Thieblemont, Catherine; Tilly, Hervé; Bieska, Gabi; Asikanius, Elina; Carlile, David; Birkett, Joe; Pisa, Pavel; Cartron, Guillaume

    2012-05-31

    Whereas the chimeric type I anti-CD20 Ab rituximab has improved outcomes for patients with B-cell malignancies significantly, many patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) remain incurable. Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a glycoengineered, humanized anti-CD20 type II Ab that has demonstrated superior activity against type I Abs in vitro and in preclinical studies. In the present study, we evaluated the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of GA101 in a phase 1 study of 21 patients with heavily pretreated, relapsed, or refractory CD20(+) indolent NHL. Patients received GA101 in a dose-escalating fashion (3 per cohort, range 50/100-1200/2000 mg) for 8 × 21-day cycles. The majority of adverse events (AEs) were grades 1 and 2 (114 of 132 total AEs). Seven patients reported a total of 18 grade 3 or 4 AEs. Infusion-related reactions were the most common AE, with most occurring during the first infusion and resolving with appropriate management. Three patients experienced grade 3 or 4 drug-related infusion-related reactions. The best overall response was 43%, with 5 complete responses and 4 partial responses. Data from this study suggest that GA101 was well tolerated and demonstrated encouraging activity in patients with previously treated NHL up to doses of 2000 mg. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00517530.

  12. Radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy by cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C in locally advanced oropharynx carcinomas: results on a test in phase II. Radiotherapie et chimiotherapie concomitante par cisplatine (CDDP), 5-fluorouracile (5FU) et mitomycine C (MMC) dans les cancers localement evolues de l'oropharynx: resultats d'un essai de phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.; Chapet, S.; Reynaud-Bougnoux, A.; Calais, G.; Le Floch, O. (Hopital Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France))

    1994-01-01

    After exclusive irradiation the prognosis of advanced oropharynx carcinomas is bad. To improve the response to the tumoral treatment, a test in phase II was made, associating irradiation and concomitant chemotherapy. The results show that this association allow a high rate of complete remissions at the end of the treatment, but with a severe digestive and hematological toxicity.

  13. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II and folate deficiencies result in reciprocal protection against cognitive and social deficits in mice: implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaevitz, Laura R; Picker, Jonathan D; Rana, Jasmine; Kolodny, Nancy H; Shane, Barry; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne E; Coyle, Joseph T

    2012-06-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors underlie a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia (SZ) and autism (AD). Due to the complexity and multitude of the genetic and environmental factors attributed to these disorders, recent research strategies focus on elucidating the common molecular pathways through which these multiple risk factors may function. In this study, we examine the combined effects of a haplo-insufficiency of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) and dietary folic acid deficiency. In addition to serving as a neuropeptidase, GCPII catalyzes the absorption of folate. GCPII and folate depletion interact within the one-carbon metabolic pathway and/or of modulate the glutamatergic system. Four groups of mice were tested: wild-type, GCPII hypomorphs, and wild-types and GCPII hypomorphs both fed a folate deficient diet. Due to sex differences in the prevalence of SZ and AD, both male and female mice were assessed on a number of behavioral tasks including locomotor activity, rotorod, social interaction, prepulse inhibition, and spatial memory. Wild-type mice of both sexes fed a folic acid deficient diet showed motor coordination impairments and cognitive deficits, while social interactions were decreased only in males. GCPII mutant mice of both sexes also exhibited reduced social propensities. In contrast, all folate-depleted GCPII hypomorphs performed similarly to untreated wild-type mice, suggesting that reduced GCPII expression and folate deficiency are mutually protective. Analyses of folate and neurometabolite levels associated with glutamatergic function suggest several potential mechanisms through which GCPII and folate may be interacting to create this protective effect.

  14. New film-coated tablet formulation of deferasirox is well tolerated in patients with thalassemia or lower-risk MDS: Results of the randomized, phase II ECLIPSE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Ali T; Origa, Raffaella; Perrotta, Silverio; Kourakli, Alexandra; Ruffo, Giovan Battista; Kattamis, Antonis; Goh, Ai-Sim; Cortoos, Annelore; Huang, Vicky; Weill, Marine; Merino Herranz, Raquel; Porter, John B

    2017-01-31

    Once-daily deferasirox dispersible tablets (DT) have a well-defined safety and efficacy profile and, compared with parenteral deferoxamine, provide greater patient adherence, satisfaction, and quality of life. However, barriers still exist to optimal adherence, including gastrointestinal tolerability and palatability, leading to development of a new film-coated tablet (FCT) formulation that can be swallowed with a light meal, without the need to disperse into a suspension prior to consumption. The randomized, open-label, phase II ECLIPSE study evaluated the safety of deferasirox DT and FCT formulations over 24 weeks in chelation-naïve or pre-treated patients aged ≥10 years, with transfusion-dependent thalassemia or IPSS-R very-low-, low-, or intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndromes. One hundred seventy-three patients were randomized 1:1 to DT (n = 86) or FCT (n = 87). Adverse events (overall), consistent with the known deferasirox safety profile, were reported in similar proportions of patients for each formulation (DT 89.5%; FCT 89.7%), with a lower frequency of severe events observed in patients receiving FCT (19.5% vs. 25.6% DT). Laboratory parameters (serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and urine protein/creatinine ratio) generally remained stable throughout the study. Patient-reported outcomes showed greater adherence and satisfaction, better palatability and fewer concerns with FCT than DT. Treatment compliance by pill count was higher with FCT (92.9%) than with DT (85.3%). This analysis suggests deferasirox FCT offers an improved formulation with enhanced patient satisfaction, which may improve adherence, thereby reducing frequency and severity of iron overload-related complications.

  15. Diversity and abundance of deep-sea Isopoda along the Southern Polar Front: Results from the SYSTCO I and II expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Löbbecke, A.; Brandt, A.; Brix, S.

    2014-10-01

    For the investigation of the diversity and composition of deep-sea Isopoda in the Polar Front of the Southern Ocean two expeditions were performed, ANtartic benthic DEEP-sea biodiversity: colonization history and recent community patterns-SYSTem COupling (ANDEEP-SYSTCO I, 2007/2008) and SYSTCO II (2012). Samples were taken in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Polar Front (52°S) within a depth range between 2752 and 4327 m using an epibenthic sledge. From nine stations, located in four different geographic areas, a total of 107 species from 476 specimens were identified, 99% belonged to the suborder Asellota. Haploniscidae was the most dominant family in terms of abundance, followed by Munnopsidae and Desmosomatidae. However, Munnopsidae were the most diverse followed by Desmosomatidae and Haploniscidae. The majority of species (53%) did not occur frequently indicating a patchy distribution; only one species, Haploniscus spinifer Hansen, 1916, was found at almost all stations comprising more than 10% of all sampled specimens. Isopod abundance was generally low in the Polar Front compared to other regions of the Southern Ocean, like the Weddell Sea. Diversity strongly varied between stations even within the same sampling area, it was highest around a depth of 3000 m with 48 species found at station 13-16 at 0°E. Surface chl a concentration, received from satellite images as a measure for food supply, was compared with isopod abundance and diversity, however, no clear pattern could be observed. Analysis of the species composition of Isopoda revealed in general terms that deep-sea stations within the same depth range build one cluster. Also the sampling year, the geographic area or salinity turned out to be possible factors affecting species composition. The deep-sea area along the Southern Polar Front is characterized by low numbers of specimens but shelters a relatively high level of isopod diversity with species also known from other regions of the Atlantic.

  16. Comparative in vitro activity of carbapenems against major Gram-negative pathogens: results of Asia-Pacific surveillance from the COMPACT II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Chongthaleong, Anan; Tan, Thean Yen; Lagamayo, Evelina; Roberts, Sally; Garcia, Jemelyn; Davies, Todd

    2012-04-01

    Resistance rates amongst Gram-negative pathogens are increasing in the Asia-Pacific region. The Comparative Activity of Carbapenem Testing (COMPACT) II study surveyed the carbapenem susceptibility and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of doripenem, imipenem and meropenem against 1260 major Gram-negative pathogens isolated from hospitalised patients at 20 centres in five Asia-Pacific countries (New Zealand, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam) during 2010. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=625), Enterobacteriaceae (n=500), and other Gram-negative pathogens including Acinetobacter baumannii (n=135) were collected from patients with bloodstream infection (32.2%), nosocomial pneumonia including ventilator-associated pneumonia (58.1%), and complicated intra-abdominal infection (9.7%), with 36.7% being isolated from patients in an Intensive Care Unit. As high as 29.8% of P. aeruginosa and 73.0% of A. baumannii isolates were not susceptible to at least a carbapenem, whereas the majority of Enterobacteriaceae (97.2%) were susceptible to all carbapenems. Respective MIC(50)/MIC(90) values (MICs for 50% and 90% of the organisms, respectively) of doripenem, imipenem and meropenem were: 0.38/8, 1.5/32 and 0.38/16 mg/L for P. aeruginosa; 0.023/0.094, 0.25/0.5 and 0.032/0.094 mg/L for Enterobacteriaceae; and 32/64, 32/128 and 32/64 mg/L for A. baumannii. Doripenem and meropenem had comparable activity against P. aeruginosa, both being more active than imipenem. All carbapenems were highly potent against Enterobacteriaceae, although imipenem demonstrated higher MIC values than doripenem and meropenem. The three carbapenems showed less activity against A. baumannii. The high prevalence of carbapenem resistance amongst important nosocomial pathogens (P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii) warrants rigorous infection control measures and appropriate antimicrobial use in the Asia-Pacific region.

  17. Results of a Multicenter Phase II Trial of Brentuximab Vedotin as Second-Line Therapy before Autologous Transplantation in Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Robert; Palmer, Joycelynne M; Martin, Peter; Tsai, Nicole; Kim, Young; Chen, Bihong T; Popplewell, Leslie; Siddiqi, Tanya; Thomas, Sandra H; Mott, Michelle; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Armenian, Saro; Leonard, John; Nademanee, Auayporn; Forman, Stephen J

    2015-12-01

    This multicenter prospective phase II study examines the activity and tolerability of brentuximab vedotin as second-line therapy in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma that was relapsed or refractory after induction therapy. Brentuximab vedotin (1.8 mg/kg) was administered i.v. on day 1 of a 21-day cycle for a total of 4 cycles. Patients then proceeded to autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT), if eligible, with or without additional salvage therapy, based on remission status after brentuximab vedotin. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR). Secondary endpoints were safety, stem cell mobilization/collection, AHCT outcomes, and association of CD68(+) with outcomes. Of 37 patients, the ORR was 68% (13 complete remission, 12 partial remission). The regimen was well tolerated with few grade 3/4 adverse events, including lymphopenia (1), neutropenia (3), rash (2), and hyperuricemia (1). Thirty-two patients (86%) were able to proceed to AHCT, with 24 patients (65%) in complete remission at time of AHCT. Thirteen patients in complete remission, 4 in partial remission, and 1 with stable disease (49%) received AHCT without salvage combination chemotherapy. CD68 expression did not correlate with response to brentuximab vedotin. The median number of stem cells mobilized was 6.0 × 10(6) (range, 2.6 to 34), and median number of days to obtain minimum collection (2 × 10(6)) was 2 (range, 1 to 6). Brentuximab vedotin as second-line therapy is active, well tolerated, and allows adequate stem cell collection and engraftment. For Hodgkin lymphoma patients with relapsed/refractory disease after induction therapy, second-line brentuximab vedotin, followed by combination chemotherapy for residual disease, can effectively bridge patients to AHCT.

  18. Administration of alemtuzumab and G-CSF to adults with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of a phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Isnard, Françoise; Garderet, Laurent; Ikhlef, Souhila; Corm, Selim; Quesnel, Bruno; Legrand, Ollivier; Cachanado, Marine; Rousseau, Alexandra; Laporte, Jean-Philippe

    2013-10-01

    The outlook for adults with refractory and relapsed acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is poor. CD52 is expressed in most patients with ALL. Alemtuzumab is an anti-CD52 humanized monoclonal antibody. This phase II study assessed the efficacy of alemtuzumab combined with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to boost antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity mediated by neutrophils. Twelve patients with relapsed (n = 11) or refractory (n = 1) ALL, including four relapses postallogeneic stem cell transplantation, were treated and monitored between October 2006 and January 2011. Patients received 1 wk of alemtuzumab every other day at increasing doses of 3, 10, and 30 mg to test tolerance and 30 mg three times a week for 12-18 infusions. If in complete remission (CR), patients received maintenance therapy for 1 wk, every 2 months. G-CSF was administered at 5 μg/kg per day during alemtuzumab administration. The primary endpoint was disappearance of blast cells on a marrow aspirate. CD52 was expressed in all patients. Four patients reached CR. In one additional patient, clearance of blast cells was observed in peripheral blood but not in the marrow. The most frequent adverse events during course 1 of treatment were fever and chills (n = 3), skin rash (n = 3), and bronchospasm (n = 2). Tumor lysis syndrome was observed at treatment initiation in one patient who reached CR. All patients progressed within a few months and all but one died. The surviving patient is still alive after relapse and a second allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This study shows that in relapse/refractory ALL, alemtuzumab with G-CSF can produce good responses of short duration.

  19. Uracil/ftorafur/leucovorin combined with irinotecan (TEGAFIRI) or oxaliplatin (TEGAFOX) as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer patients: results of randomised phase II study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajetta, E; Di Bartolomeo, M; Buzzoni, R; Mariani, L; Zilembo, N; Ferrario, E; Lo Vullo, S; Aitini, E; Isa, L; Barone, C; Jacobelli, S; Recaldin, E; Pinotti, G; Iop, A

    2007-01-01

    This randomised phase II study evaluates the safety and efficacy profile of uracil/tegafur/leucovorin combined with irinotecan (TEGAFIRI) or with oxaliplatin (TEGAFOX). One hundred and forty-three patients with measurable, non-resectable metastatic colorectal cancer were randomised in a multicentre study to receive TEGAFIRI (UFT 250 mg m−2 day days 1–14, LV 90 mg day days 1–14, irinotecan 240 mg m−2 day 1; q21) or TEGAFOX (UFT 250 mg m−2 day days 1–14, LV 90 mg day days 1–14, oxaliplatin 120 mg m−2 day 1; q21). Among 143 randomised patients, 141 were analysed (68 received TEGAFIRI and 73 TEGAFOX). The main characteristics of the two arms were well balanced. The most common grade 3–4 treatment-related adverse events were neutropenia (13% of cases with TEGAFIRI; 1% in the TEGAFOX group). Diarrhoea was prevalent in the TEGAFIRI arm (16%) vs TEGAFOX (4%). Six complete remission (CR) and 19 partial remission (PR) were recorded in the TEGAFIRI arm (odds ratio (OR): 41.7; 95% confidence limit (CL), 29.1–55.1%), and six CR and 22 PR were recorded in the TEGAFOX group, (OR: 38.9; 95% CL, 27.6–51.1). At a median time follow-up of 17 months (intequartile (IQ) range 12–23), a median survival probability of 20 and 19 months was obtained in the TEGAFIRI and TEGAFOX groups, respectively. Median time to progression was 8 months for both groups. TEGAFIRI and TEGAFOX are both effective and tolerable first-line therapies in MCRC patients. The employment of UFT/LV given in doublet combination is interesting and the presented data appear comparable to equivalent infusion regimens described in the literature. The safety profile of the two combinations also allows an evaluation with other biological agents such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:17245343

  20. First Direct Limits on Lightly Ionizing Particles with Electric Charge Less than e/6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nelson, H.; Nelson, R. H.; Ogburn, R. W.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-03-18

    While the Standard Model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically- produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than e/6. A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers found no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between e/6 and e/200.

  1. First direct limits on Lightly Ionizing Particles with electric charge less than $e/6$

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nelson, H; Nelson, R H; Ogburn, R W; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    While the Standard Model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically-produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than $e$/6. A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers found no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between $e$/6 and $e$/200.

  2. Heterogeneity prevails: the state of clinical trial data management in Europe - results of a survey of ECRIN centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Ohmann, Christian; Yang, Qin;

    2010-01-01

    The use of Clinical Data Management Systems (CDMS) has become essential in clinical trials to handle the increasing amount of data that must be collected and analyzed. With a CDMS trial data are captured at investigator sites with "electronic Case Report Forms". Although more and more of these el...... of these electronic data management systems are used in academic research centres an overview of CDMS products and of available data management and quality management resources for academic clinical trials in Europe is missing.......The use of Clinical Data Management Systems (CDMS) has become essential in clinical trials to handle the increasing amount of data that must be collected and analyzed. With a CDMS trial data are captured at investigator sites with "electronic Case Report Forms". Although more and more...

  3. Concurrent hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with 5-FU and once weekly cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The 10-year results of a prospective phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, V.; Boehmer, D.; Badakhshi, H.; Jahn, U.; Stromberger, C. [Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiooncology, Clinic for Radiooncology, Berlin (Germany); Becker, E.T. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Berlin (Germany); Wernecke, K.D. [Sostana Statistics GmbH, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    In this study, the acute toxicity and long-term outcome of a hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation regimen with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck were evaluated. From 2000-2002, 38 patients with stage III (5.3 %) and stage IV (94.7 %) head and neck cancer were enrolled in a phase II study. Patients received hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy with 72 Gy in 15 fractions of 2 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily with concurrent, continuous infusion 5-FU of 600 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 6 cycles of weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2}). Acute toxicities (CTCAEv2.0), locoregional control (LRC), metastases-free (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed and exploratively compared with the ARO 95-06 trial. Median follow-up was 11.4 years (95 % CI 8.6-14.2) and mean dose 71.6 Gy. Of the patients, 82 % had 6 (n = 15) or 5 (n = 16) cycles of cisplatin, 5 and 2 patients received 4 and 3 cycles, respectively. Grade 3 anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 15.8, 15.8, and 2.6 %, respectively. Grade 3 mucositis in 50 %, grade 3 and 4 dysphagia in 55 and 13 %. The 2-, 5-, and 10-year LRC was 65, 53.6, and 48.2 %, the MFS was 77.5, 66.7, and 57.2 % and the OS 59.6, 29.2, and 15 %, respectively. Chemoradiation with 5-FU and cisplatin seems feasible and superior in terms of LRC and OS to the ARO 95-06C-HART arm at 2 years. However, this did not persist at the 5- and 10-year follow-ups. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der Akuttoxizitaet und des Langzeitueberlebens einer hyperfraktioniert-akzelerierten simultanen Radiochemotherapie mit Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) bei Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Von 2000 bis 2002 wurden 38 Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region im Stadium III (5,3 %) und IV (94,7 %) eingeschlossen. Es erfolgte eine simultane hyperfraktionierte akzelerierte Radiochemotherapie mit 72 Gy in 15 Fraktionen a 2 Gy

  4. Partial breast irradiation for early breast cancer: 3-year results of the German-Austrian phase II-trial; Teilbrustbestrahlung beim Mammakarzinom mit guenstigen prognostischen Faktoren: 3-Jahres-Ergebnisse der deutschoesterreichischen Phase II-Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Lotter, M.; Sauer, R.; Strnad, V. [Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany); Poetter, R. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Strahlenbiologie, AKH Wien (Austria); Hildebrandt, G. [Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany); Hammer, J. [Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie, KH Barmherzige Schwestern Linz (Austria); Beckmann, M.W. [Frauenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: to evaluate perioperative morbidity, toxicity and cosmetic outcome in patients treated with interstitial brachytherapy to the tumor bed as the sole radiation modality after breast conserving surgery. Materials and methods: from 11/2000 to 11/2004, 240 women with early stage breast cancer participated in a protocol of tumor bed irradiation alone using pulsed dose rate (PDR) or high dose rate (HDR) interstitial multi-catheter implants (partial breast irradiation). Perioperative morbidity, acute and late toxicity as well as cosmetic outcome were assessed. Of the first 51 patients treated in this multicenter trial, we present interim findings after a median follow-up of 36 months. Results: perioperative Morbidity: Bacterial infection of the implant: 2% (1/51). Acute toxicity: radiodermatitis grade 1: 4% (2/51). Late toxicity: breast pain grade 1: 8% (4/51), grade 2: 2% (1/51); dyspigmentation grade 1: 8% (4/51); fibrosis grade 1: 4% (2/51), grade 2: 8% (4/51); telangiectasia grade 1: 10% (5/51), grade 2: 4% (2/51). Cosmetic results: Excellent and good in 94% (48/51) of the patients. Conclusion: this analysis indicates that accelerated partial breast irradiation with 192-iridium interstitial multicatheter PDR-/HDR-implants (partial breast irradiation) is feasible with low perioperative morbidity, low acute and mild late toxicity at a median follow-up of 36 months. The cosmetic result is not significantly affected. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of a laboratory system intended for use in physicians' offices. II. Reliability of results produced by health care workers without formal or professional laboratory training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsey, R; Vandenbark, M; Goitein, R K; Baer, D M

    1987-07-17

    The Kodak DT-60 tabletop chemistry analyzer was evaluated with standardized protocols to determine the system's precision and accuracy when operated by four volunteers (a secretary, a licensed practical nurse, and two family medicine residents) in a simulated office laboratory. The variability of the results was found to be significantly greater than the variability of results produced by medical technologists who analyzed the same samples during the same study period with another DT-60 placed in the hospital laboratory. The source(s) of increased variance needs to be identified so the system can be modified or new control procedures can be developed to ensure the reliability of results used in patient care. Prospective purchasers, manufacturers, and patients need this kind of objective information about the reliability of results produced by systems intended for use in physicians' office laboratories.

  6. Risk Factor to Chronic Disease no Transmitted In Cienfuegos, Cuba 2010. Preliminaries results of CARMEN II Factores de Riesgo para Enfermedades Crónicas en Cienfuegos, Cuba 2010. Resultados preliminares de CARMEN II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ovidio Orduñez García

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Cuba, the monitoring of them is an important element to alert health care system on its evolution. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of four of the most important risk factors for these diseases during the preliminary data of the second survey of Cienfuegos CARMEN project, with emphasis on the differences with the first survey results. Method: Preliminary results of the second CARMEN survey are presented, corresponding to the first (847 cases measured integrally from a probabilitic and representative sample of the adult population of Cienfuegos City. Studied variables included: hypertension; obesity, measured by the body mass index, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Results: 33.7% of interviewed persons were smokers, slightly lower than the first measurement, obesity BMI> = 30 kg/m2 was 18.8%, almost 8% higher than the baseline survey, the arterial hypertension to 35.5% and diabetes mellitus to 6.8%, both well above the measurement of 2001-2002. Conclusions: the risk factors discussed show that the problem after improving over the past 10 years, and generally worsens the values are much higher than those observed during the first measurement CARMEN.Las enfermedades crónicas constituyen la primera causa de morbilidad y también de mortalidad en Cuba, la vigilancia de ellas constituye un elemento importante para alertar al sistema de salud sobre su evolución. El objetivo de esta comunicación breve es describir la prevalencia de cuatro de los más importante factores de riesgo de estas enfermedades durante el primer corte que se hace de la segunda medición del proyecto CARMEN Cienfuegos, mostrándose también las diferencias con los resultados de la primera medición. Método: Se presenta un corte de la segunda medición de la iniciativa CARMEN en Cienfuegos

  7. The treatment of disc herniation-induced sciatica with infliximab - One-year follow-up results of FIRST II, a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korhonen, Timo; Karppinen, Jaro; Paimela, Leena; Malmivaara, Antti; Lindgren, Karl-August; Bowman, Chris; Hammond, Anthony; Kirkham, Bruce; Jarvinen, Simo; Niinimaki, Jaakko; Veeger, Nic; Haapea, Marianne; Torkki, Markus; Tervonen, Osmo; Seitsalo, Seppo; Hurri, Heikki

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. A randomized controlled trial. Objectives. To evaluate the long-term efficacy of infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), in patients with acute/subacute sciatica secondary to herniated disc. Summary of Background Data. The results of experimen

  8. Partial dispensability of Djp1's J domain in peroxisomal protein import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results from genetic redundancy with another class II J protein, Caj1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobriyal, Neha; Tripathi, Prerna; Sarkar, Susrita; Tak, Yogesh; Verma, Amit K; Sahi, Chandan

    2017-03-06

    J proteins are obligate co-chaperones of Hsp70s. Via their signature J domain, all J proteins interact with their partner Hsp70s and stimulate their weak ATPase activity, which is vital for Hsp70 functions. The dependency of J proteins on their J domain is such that mutations in critical amino acids in the J domain often results into a null phenotype for a particular J protein. Here, we show that the J domain of Djp1, a cytosolic J protein important for peroxisomal protein import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is partially dispensable. A complete deletion of Djp1 J domain resulted into only partial loss in peroxisomal protein import function. Instead, the C-terminal domain of Djp1 was found to be essential for proper localization of the peroxisomal targeted GFP-PTS1. Furthermore, we show that Caj1, another cytosolic J protein, also has some role in peroxisomal protein import. Caj1 was found to be partially redundant with Djp1 as cells lacking both Djp1 and Caj1 resulted into a much more severe defect in GFP-PTS1 localization. Based on these results, we propose that dispensability of J domains could be attributed to genetic redundancy between different J proteins sharing common structural topology and cellular localization.

  9. A MULTIPLE TESTING OF THE ABC METHOD AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SECOND-GENERATION MODEL. PART II, TEST RESULTS AND AN ANALYSIS OF RECALL RATIO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALTMANN, BERTHOLD

    AFTER A BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE TEST PROGRAM (DESCRIBED MORE FULLY IN LI 000 318), THE STATISTICAL RESULTS TABULATED AS OVERALL "ABC (APPROACH BY CONCEPT)-RELEVANCE RATIOS" AND "ABC-RECALL FIGURES" ARE PRESENTED AND REVIEWED. AN ABSTRACT MODEL DEVELOPED IN ACCORDANCE WITH MAX WEBER'S "IDEALTYPUS" ("DIE OBJEKTIVITAET SOZIALWISSENSCHAFTLICHER UND…

  10. HTGT-Turbotech II. Project: 1.222: transonic diffusers and resulting unsteady effects. Final report; HTGT-Turbotech II. Teilprojekt 1.222: Transsonische Diffusoren und resultierende instationaere Effekte. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stetter, H.; Margot-Peters, X.; Kraus, P.

    1999-12-01

    The tip gap between rotor blades and the casing of a turbomachine is essential for a safe operation. Behind the last stage the resulting leakage jet may however cause a supersonic flow region at the outer diffuser casing which can induce - due to shock/boundary layer interactions - unsteady shock oscillations. Until now this process can't be described numerically. Therefore the scope of this project was to provide an extensive validated numerical code which can be used simultaneously to optimize the diffuser's flow properties and to minimize the blade loading due to shock oscillations. Fundamental questions such as shock oscillation amplitudes and influence area of the leakage jet had been answered by using the hydraulic analogy. To realize the flow properties steady and unsteady flow measurements had been carried out at an air test rig to deliver boundary conditions and validation data for the numerical code. Concerning the numerical work an existent steady Navier-Stokes-Code had been upgraded to unsteady calculations. Some turbulence models had been tested to proof its qualification for separated unsteady flows. However with the intended solution approach - no full threedimensional discretisation - it has been found impossible to converge the unsteady shock/boundary layer interaction calculations. Reasons are re-entry flow at the diffuser outlet and the measured, significant circumferential variation of flow properties. However important insights to the continuous work could be extracted from the preliminary negative results of the numerical studies: The circumferential variation of the flow properties can locally cause re-entry flow at the diffuser outlet. In addition the unsteady shock/boundary-interactions vary round the periphere, but they could be influenced by locally applied methods. Therefore a proofed numerical treatment supposes detailed solutions for the modelling of boundary conditions for re-entry flow and unsteady circumferentially varying

  11. First Results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search in the Soudan Underground Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Armel-Funkhouser, M S; Attisha, M J; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Beaty, J; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Callahan, D; Castle, J P; Chang, C L; Choate, R; Crisler, M B; Cushman, P; Dixon, R; Dragowsky, M R; Driscoll, D D; Duong, L; Emes, J; Ferril, R; Filippini, J; Gaitskell, R J; Haldeman, M; Hale, D; Holmgren, D; Huber, M E; Johnson, B; Johnson, W; Kamat, S; Kozlovsky, M; Kula, L; Kyre, S; Lambin, B; Lu, A; Mahapatra, R; Manalaysay, A G; Mandic, V; May, J; McDonald, R; Merkel, B; Meunier, P; Mirabolfathi, N; Morrison, S; Nelson, H; Nelson, R; Novak, L; Ogburn, R W; Orr, S; Perera, T A; Perillo-Isaac, M C; Ramberg, E; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Ross, R R; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Savage, C; Schmitt, R L; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Smith, A; Smith, G; Spadafora, A L; Sundqvist, K; Thompson, J P F; Tomada, A; Wang, G; Williams, J; Yellin, S; Young, B A

    2004-01-01

    We report the first results from a search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Four Ge and two Si detectors were operated for 52.6 live days, providing 19.4 kg-d of Ge net exposure after cuts for recoil energies between 10-100 keV. A blind analysis was performed using only calibration data to define the energy threshold and selection criteria for nuclear-recoil candidates. These data set the world's lowest exclusion limits on the coherent WIMP-nucleon scalar cross-section for all WIMP masses above 15 GeV, ruling out a significant range of neutralino supersymmetric models. The minimum of the limit curve at the 90% C.L. is 4 x 10^{-43} cm^2 at a WIMP mass of 60 GeV.

  12. Statistical Analysis of Deflation in Covariance and Resultant Pc Values for AQUA, AURA and TERRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Syed O.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will display statistical analysis performed for raw conjunction CDMs received for the EOS Aqua, Aura and Terra satellites within the period of February 2015 through July 2016. The analysis performed indicates a discernable deflation in covariance calculated at the JSpOC after the utilization of the dynamic drag consider parameter was implemented operationally in May 2015. As a result, the overall diminution in the conjunction plane intersection of the primary and secondary objects appears to be leading to reduced probability of collision (Pc) values for these conjunction events. This presentation also displays evidence for this theory with analysis of Pc trending plots using data calculated by the SpaceNav CRMS system.

  13. Investigations of the effects of cosmic rays on Artemia cysts and tobacco seeds: results of Exobloc II experiment, flown aboard Biocosmos 1887

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaubin, Y.; Pianezzi, B.; Gasset, G.; Planel, H. (Laboratoire de Biologie Medicale, Faculte de Medecine, Toulouse (France)); Delpoux, M. (Laboratoire de Biogeographie, Faculte des Sciences, Toulouse (France)); Heilmann, C. (Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Centre de Recherches Nucleaires)

    1990-01-01

    Artemia (Brine shrimp) cysts and tobacco seeds, dormant biological material devoid of metabolic activity, were flown aboard the Soviet Biocosmos 1887 in order to investigate the effects of cosmic rays. Artemia cysts and tobacco seeds were used in bulk or in monolayers sandwiched with track detectors. Biological and physical units were located outside and inside the spacecraft. Stacks included lead shielding in order to expose the objects to different doses of radiation. Total dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent detectors. In spite of low levels of doses, the space flight resulted in a decrease in developmental capacity of Artemia cysts, and in a higher mutation rate in tobacco seeds. The more obvious responses occurred, in both cases, in biological objects exposed to the highest doses. These results are compared to those of previous space experiments. (author).

  14. On the Local Artin Conductor $\\mathfrak{f}$ Artin () of a Character of Gal(/) - II: Main Results for the Metabelian Case

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kâzim İlhan İkeda

    2003-05-01

    This paper which is a continuation of [2], is essentially expository in nature, although some new results are presented. Let be a local field with finite residue class field $k_K$. We first define (cf. Definition 2.4) the conductor $\\mathfrak{f}(E/K)$ of an arbitrary finite Galois extension / in the sense of non-abelian local class field theory as $$\\mathfrak{f}(E/K)=\\mathfrak{p}_K^{[[n_G

  15. Results from the Upper Limb International Spasticity Study-II (ULIS-II): a large, international, prospective cohort study investigating practice and goal attainment following treatment with botulinum toxin A in real-life clinical management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Fheodoroff, Klemens; Jacinto, Jorge; Maisonobe, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe real-life practice and person-centred outcomes in the treatment of poststroke upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A). Design Observational, prospective study. Setting 84 secondary care centres in 22 countries. Participants 456 adults (≥18 years) with poststroke upper limb spasticity treated with one cycle of BoNT-A. Methods/outcomes Muscle selection, BoNT-A preparation, injection technique and timing of follow-up were conducted according to routine practice for each centre. Primary outcome: achievement of the patient's primary goal for treatment using goal-attainment scaling (GAS). Measurements of spasticity, standardised outcome measures and global benefits were also recorded. Results The median number of injected muscles was 5 (range 1–15) and the most frequently injected muscles were the long finger flexors, followed by biceps and brachioradialis. The median (range) follow-up time was 14 (2.6 to 32.3) weeks. The common primary treatment goals were passive function (132 (28.9%)), active function (104 (22.8%)), pain (61 (13.4%)), impairment (105 (23%)), involuntary movement (41 (9%)) and mobility (10 (2.2%)). Overall, 363 (79.6%) (95% CI 75.6% to 83.2%) patients achieved (or overachieved) their primary goal and 355 (75.4%) (95% CI 71.2% to 79.2%) achieved their secondary goal. Mean (SD) change from baseline in GAS T-scores was 17.6 (11.0) (95% CI 16.4 to 18.8; p<0.001). GAS T-scores were strongly correlated with global benefit and other standard measures (correlations of 0.38 and 0.63, respectively; p<0.001). Conclusions BoNT-A demonstrated a clinically significant effect on goal attainment for the real-life management of upper-limb spasticity following stroke. The study confirms the feasibility of a common international data set to collect systematic prospective data, and of using GAS to capture person-centred outcomes relating to passive and active functions and to pain. Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT

  16. DYNAMIC BIMORPH THERMO-PIEZOELECTRIC BENDERS WITH ARBITRARY SUPPORT LOCATION. PART II: APPLICATION TO ENERGY HARVESTING-NUMERICAL RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagdasaryan, Gevorg Y.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive theoretical analysis of a dynamic thermo-ferro-electric pre-stressed bimorph energy harvester is performed. The analysis also takes into account pyroelectric and thermal expansion effects. The most general analytical expression for the energy conversation coefficients are presented for bi-layer. These coefficients we derive for more general situation when mechanical, electrical, thermal fields are present. We derive coefficients (transformation coefficients for sensing, actuating, and energy harvesting. As a particular case, we derive an analytical expression for the energy harvesting coefficient due to pyroelectric and thermal expansion effects in a rater general situation. This is a function of material properties, location of boundary conditions, vibration frequency, and in plane compressive/tensile follower force. Numerical simulations of the analytical results are presented. Effects of volume fraction, material properties, applied mechanical loads, and boundary conditions on the harvesting coefficients are introduced in the figures. The results for a cantilever and a simply-supported plate-layer are obtained as particular cases. The result for a low frequency (static system is obtained as a particular case by approaching the vibration frequency to zero. It is shown that volume fraction, material properties, plain compressive/tensile follower force, the location of the boundary conditions, and the vibrational frequency of the bimorph strongly influence the strain distribution, and this in effect influences the charge coefficient and the generation of energy. The proposed model can be extended to thermal energy harvesters of piezoelectric-shape memory alloy (SMA composites.

  17. Cilengitide in patients with recurrent glioblastoma: the results of NABTC 03-02, a phase II trial with measures of treatment delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Mark R; Kuhn, John; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Lieberman, Frank; Wen, Patrick Y; Mehta, Minesh; Cloughesy, Timothy; Lassman, Andrew B; Deangelis, Lisa M; Chang, Susan; Prados, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Cilengitide is a cyclic pentapeptide that is a specific inhibitor of the αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins. Preclinical studies demonstrate antiangiogenic activity and anti-invasive activity in a number of glioma models. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and tumor delivery of cilengitide in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Patients with recurrent glioblastoma who require a surgical resection for optimal clinical care received 3 intravenous doses of cilengitide at either 500 or 2000 mg (day -8, -4, -1) prior to undergoing tumor resection with corresponding blood samples for plasma to tumor comparisons. After recovery from surgery, patients were treated with cilengitide (2000 mg i.v. twice weekly, maximum of 2 years of treatment). The study accrued 30 patients with recurrent glioblastoma, 26 were evaluable for efficacy. The 6-month progression free survival rate was 12%. Cilengitide was detected in all tumor specimens with higher levels in the group receiving 2000 mg dosing while corresponding plasma concentrations were low, often below the lower limit of detection. These results confirm drug delivery and possibly retention in tumor. This study provides evidence that with established dosing, cilengitide is adequately delivered to the tumor, although as a single agent, efficacy in recurrent glioblastoma is modest. However, these results demonstrating drug delivery to tumor do support continued investigation of this agent as preliminary results from recent studies combining cilengitide with cytotoxic therapies are promising.

  18. Combination verteporfin photodynamic therapy ranibizumab-dexamethasone in choroidal neovascularization due to age-related macular degeneration: results of a phase II randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallemore, Ron P; Wallsh, Josh; Hudson, Henry L; Ho, Allen C; Chace, Richard; Pearlman, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether combination therapy (CT) reduces retreatments when compared to ranibizumab monotherapy (RM), while safely maintaining similar vision outcomes. Methods In this 24-month trial, patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) were randomized to 1) quarter-fluence or 2) half-fluence triple therapy (verteporfin photodynamic therapy [vPDT] + ranibizumab + dexamethasone), 3) half-fluence double therapy (vPDT + ranibizumab), or 4) RM. The primary outcomes were number of retreatment visits and change from baseline in visual acuity (VA) at 12 months. Results One hundred sixty-two subjects enrolled. There were 4.0 (P=0.02), 3.2 (P<0.001), 4.1 (P=0.03), and 5.7 retreatment visits through month 12, and 5.9 (P=0.03), 4.3 (P<0.001), 5.9 (P=0.02) and 8.7 through month 24, in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively (P-value comparing with RM). Month 12 VA score change from baseline (95% confidence interval) was +3.6 (−0.9 to +8.1), +6.8 (+2.4 to +11.1), +5.0 (+0.6 to +9.3), and +6.5 (+1.7 to +11.4), respectively. Conclusion CT resulted in significantly fewer retreatment visits than a RM regimen at months 12 and 24. VA results appeared similar although wide confidence intervals preclude conclusions regarding vision outcomes. PMID:28182161

  19. Film cooling research on the endwall of a turbine nozzle guide vane in a short duration annular cascade. II - Analysis and correlation of results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasgama, S. P.; Burton, C. D.

    1991-06-01

    Measurements of the heat transfer characteristics of the film cooled endwall (platform) of a turbine nozzle guide vane in an annular cascade at engine representative conditions are analyzed. The experimental results are well represented by the superposition theory of film cooling. It is shown that high cooling effectiveness can be achieved when the data are corrected for axial pressure gradients. The data are correlated against both the slot-wall jet parameter and the discrete hole injection function for flat-plate, zero pressure gradient cases. The pressure gradient correction brings the data to within +/- 11 percent of the discrete hole correlation.

  20. Application of high resolution land use and land cover data for atmospheric modeling in the Houston-Galveston Metropolitan area: Part II. Air quality simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang-Yi; Kim, Soontae; Byun, Daewon W.

    In the companion paper, we showed that MM5 simulation using a satellite-derived high resolution Texas Forest Service (TFS) land use and land cover (LULC) data set (M2), compared to the MM5 results with the default USGS-LULC (M1), improved representation of the complicated features of the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) in the Houston ship channel (HSC) area, where large industrial emission sources are concentrated. In the present paper, the study is extended to investigate these effects on air quality simulations. Two emission inputs, namely E1 and E2, are prepared with the M1 and M2 meteorology data, respectively, to reflect the differences in the point source plume rise estimates while keeping the biogenic and mobile emissions the same. Air quality simulations were performed with CMAQ using the M1E1 and M2E2 inputs. The simulation results demonstrate the importance of utilizing high resolution LULC data. In the default LULC data, the HSC area was classified as grass land cover, and MM5 predicted confined mixing, resulting in over-prediction of ozone (O 3) precursors, such as NO x (NO plus NO 2), and highly reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOC) species, including ethylene and propylene, over the HSC area. In the TFS data, the area was classified as the impervious "urban" land use and MM5 predicted enhanced mixing of the precursor species, leading to better agreements with measurements. The high resolution LULC also resolves the location of water body near the HSC more accurately, predicting shallower PBL heights than the default LULC during daytime. With favorable wind conditions, the O 3 precursors were transported from the HSC emission source towards the area, trapping the pollutants in a confined shallow mixing layer that occasionally led to a rapid photochemical production of O 3. The above comparison includes the changes in both meteorological and plume-rise emissions inputs. We performed two additional CMAQ simulations using the same

  1. Analysis of the quench propagation along Nb3Sn Rutherford cables with the THELMA code. Part II: Model predictions and comparison with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfreda, G.; Bellina, F.; Bajas, H.; Perez, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    To improve the technology of the new generation of accelerator magnets, prototypes are being manufactured and tested in several laboratories. In parallel, many numerical analyses are being carried out to predict the magnets behaviour and interpret the experimental results. This paper focuses on the quench propagation velocity, which is a crucial parameter as regards the energy dissipation along the magnet conductor. The THELMA code, originally developed for cable-in-conduit conductors for fusion magnets, has been used to study such quench propagation. To this purpose, new code modules have been added to describe the Rutherford cable geometry, the material non-linear thermal properties and to describe the thermal conduction problem in transient regime. THELMA can describe the Rutherford cable at the strand level, modelling both the electrical and thermal contact resistances between strands and enabling the analysis of the effects of local hot spots and quench heaters. This paper describes the model application to a sample of Short Model Coil tested at CERN: a comparison is made between the experimental results and the model prediction, showing a good agreement. A comparison is also made with the prediction of the most common analytical models, which give large inaccuracies when dealing with low n-index cables like Nb3Sn cables.

  2. [Results of multiphasic oncology screening of the population in the community of Beĕj 1986-1987. II. Questionnaire screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burány, B; Beretka, F; Dzigurski-Sekulić, N

    1990-01-01

    In the framework of the multiphase oncologic population screening in the community of Becej in the period from 1986-1987, the inquiry screening comprised 16,895 persons, whereby the following results were obtained: two malignant breast neoplasms, one uterine corpus neoplasm, one carcinoma of the larynx, and out of the non-target locations, not included in the specific questionnaire, there was one carcinoma of the lower lip and one malignant neoplasm of the salivary gland. Besides, 10 benign breast neoplasms and 12 benign uterine neoplasms were also detected. These specific results lagged behind the expected ones on the basis of the known average incidence and mortality in locations of Vojvodina included by this questionnaire. The elucidation of all possible causes leading to this disaccordance, was the task of specific studies intended for the improvement of this questionnaire as a method for the early detection of malignant and premalignant lesions. Other numerous mass pathological states were detected during the screening of either the characteristic signs of specific malignant neoplasm locations, or of risk factors of particular importance for the appearances of these malignant neoplasms. These health problems with clarified epidemiological dimensions in the population studied, necessitated planned solution according to the accepted doctrinary principals (protocols). Data on these diseases gave new dimensions to the inquiry (and the overall multiphase) oncologic population screening. The target-health educational effect of this inquiry which reached every man over 40 years of age in the population studied should not be neglected, either.

  3. Charged pion form factor between Q^2=0.60 and 2.45 GeV^2. II. Determination of, and results for, the pion form factor

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, G M; Horn, T; Beise, E J; Gaskell, D; Mack, D J; Tadevosyan, V; Volmer, J; Abbott, D; Aniol, K; Anklin, H; Armstrong, C; Arrington, J; Assamagan, K; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Barrett, B; Bochna, C; Boeglin, W; Brash, E J; Breuer, H; Chang, C C; Chant, N; Christy, M E; Dunne, J; Eden, T; Ent, R; Gibson, E; Gilman, R; Gustafsson, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Jackson, H; Jin, S; Jones, M K; Keppel, C E; Kim, P H; Kim, W; King, P M; Klein, A; Koltenuk, D; Kovaltchouk, V; Kiang, M; Liu, J; Lolos, G J; Lung, A; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Matsumura, A; McKee, D; Meekins, D; Mitchell, J; Miyoshi, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Müller, B; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Okayasu, Y; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C; Pitz, D; Potterveld, D; Punjabi, V; Qin, L M; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Roos, P G; Sarty, A; Shin, I K; Smith, G R; Stepanyan, S; Tang, L G; Tvaskis, V; Van der Meer, R L J; Vansyoc, K; Van Westrum, D; Vidakovic, S; Vulcan, W; Warren, G; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yan, C; Zhao, W -X; Zheng, X; Zihlmann, B

    2008-01-01

    The charged pion form factor, Fpi(Q^2), is an important quantity which can be used to advance our knowledge of hadronic structure. However, the extraction of Fpi from data requires a model of the 1H(e,e'pi+)n reaction, and thus is inherently model dependent. Therefore, a detailed description of the extraction of the charged pion form factor from electroproduction data obtained recently at Jefferson Lab is presented, with particular focus given to the dominant uncertainties in this procedure. Results for Fpi are presented for Q^2=0.60-2.45 GeV^2. Above Q^2=1.5 GeV^2, the Fpi values are systematically below the monopole parameterization that describes the low Q^2 data used to determine the pion charge radius. The pion form factor can be calculated in a wide variety of theoretical approaches, and the experimental results are compared to a number of calculations. This comparison is helpful in understanding the role of soft versus hard contributions to hadronic structure in the intermediate Q^2 regime.

  4. Charged pion form factor between $Q^2$=0.60 and 2.45 GeV$^2$. II. Determination of, and results for, the pion form factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Garth; Blok, Henk; Horn, Tanja; Beise, Elizabeth; Gaskell, David; Mack, David; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Volmer, Jochen; Abbott, David; Aniol, Konrad; Anklin, Heinz; Armstrong, Christopher; Arrington, John; Assamagan, Ketevi; Avery, Steven; Baker, O.; Barrett, Robert; Bochna, Christopher; Boeglin, Werner; Brash, Edward; Breuer, Herbert; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chant, Nicholas; Christy, Michael; Dunne, James; Eden, Thomas; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Benjamin; Gibson, Edward; Gilman, Ronald; Gustafsson, Kenneth; Hinton, Wendy; Holt, Roy; Jackson, Harold; uk Jin, Seong; Jones, Mark; Keppel, Cynthia; Kim, pyunghun; Kim, Wooyoung; King, Paul; Klein, Andreas; Koltenuk, Douglas; Kovaltchouk, Vitali; Liang, Meihua; Liu, Jinghua; Lolos, George; Lung, Allison; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Matsumura, Akihiko; McKee, David; Meekins, David; Mitchell, Joseph; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Mueller, Robert; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Okayasu, Yuichi; Pentchev, Lubomir; Perdrisat, Charles; Pitz, David; Potterveld, David; Punjabi, Vina; Qin, Liming; Reimer, Paul; Reinhold, Joerg; Roche, Julie; Roos, Philip; Sarty, Adam; Shin, Ilkyoung; Smith, Gregory; Stepanyan, Stepan; Tang, Liguang; Tvaskis, Vladas; van der Meer, Rob; Vansyoc, Kelley; Van Westrum, Derek; Vidakovic, Sandra; Vulcan, William; Warren, Glen; Wood, Stephen; Xu, Chen; Yan, Chen; Zhao, Wenxia; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zihlmann, Benedikt

    2008-10-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.045203
    The charged pion form factor, Fpi(Q2), is an important quantity that can be used to advance our knowledge of hadronic structure. However, the extraction of Fpi from data requires a model of the 1H(e,e'pi+)n reaction and thus is inherently model dependent. Therefore, a detailed description of the extraction of the charged pion form factor from electroproduction data obtained recently at Jefferson Lab is presented, with particular focus given to the dominant uncertainties in this procedure. Results for Fpi are presented for Q2=0.60-2.45 GeV2. Above Q2=1.5 GeV2, the Fpi values are systematically below the monopole parametrization that describes the low Q2 data used to determine the pion charge radius. The pion form factor can be calculated in a wide variety of theoretical approaches, and the experimental results are compared to a number of calculations. This comparison is helpful in understanding the role of soft versus hard c

  5. Effect of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) on Pb(II) biosorption by algae Gelidium-derived materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-06-15

    Biosorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) from binary metal solutions onto the algae Gelidium sesquipedale, an algal industrial waste and a waste-based composite material was investigated at pH 5.3, in a batch system. Binary Pb(II)/Cu(II), Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) solutions have been tested. For the same equilibrium concentrations of both metal ions (1 mmol l(-1)), approximately 66, 85 and 86% of the total uptake capacity of the biosorbents is taken by lead ions in the systems Pb(II)/Cu(II), Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II), respectively. Two-metal results were fitted to a discrete and a continuous model, showing the inhibition of the primary metal biosorption by the co-cation. The model parameters suggest that Cd(II) and Zn(II) have the same decreasing effect on the Pb(II) uptake capacity. The uptake of Pb(II) was highly sensitive to the presence of Cu(II). From the discrete model it was possible to obtain the Langmuir affinity constant for Pb(II) biosorption. The presence of the co-cations decreases the apparent affinity of Pb(II). The experimental results were successfully fitted by the continuous model, at different pH values, for each biosorbent. The following sequence for the equilibrium affinity constants was found: Pb>Cu>Cd approximately Zn.

  6. Fibrinogen geneva II: a new congenitally abnormal fibrinogen alpha chain (Gly17Asp) with a review of similar mutations resulting in abnormal knob A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, Alessandro; De Maistre, Emmanuel; Casini-Stuppi, Virginie; Fontana, Pierre; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; de Moerloose, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Congenital dysfibrinogenemias are characterized by biosynthesis of a structurally abnormal fibrinogen molecule that exhibits reduced functional levels compared with the level of fibrinogen antigen. To date a large number of mutations have been identified in patients with dysfibrinogenemia. Mutations occurring at the thrombin cleavage site (Arg16-Gly17 in the mature alpha-chain) at the amino-terminal end of the fibrinogen alpha chain are a common cause of the disease. These mutations causing abnormal fibrin polymerization are associated with different phenotypes. Here, we report the identification of a novel heterozygous missense mutation of Glycine 17 (Gly17Asp) in a female patient with mild bleeding manifestations, and compare it with other previously reported mutations also resulting in abnormal knob A.

  7. Full non-linear treatment of the global thermospheric wind system. I - Mathematical method and analysis of forces. II - Results and comparison with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, P. W.; Harris, I.

    1975-01-01

    The equations of horizontal motion of the neutral atmosphere between 120 and 500 km are integrated with the inclusion of all nonlinear terms of the convective derivative and the viscous forces due to vertical and horizontal velocity gradients. Empirical models of the distribution of neutral and charged particles are assumed to be known. The model of velocities developed is a steady state model. In Part I the mathematical method used in the integration of the Navier-Stokes equations is described and the various forces are analyzed. Results of the method given in Part I are presented with comparison with previous calculations and observations of upper atmospheric winds. Conclusions are that nonlinear effects are only significant in the equatorial region, especially at solstice conditions and that nonlinear effects do not produce any superrotation.

  8. Three-dimensional mixed-wet random pore-scale network modeling of two- and three-phase flow in porous media. II. Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piri, Mohammad; Blunt, Martin J

    2005-02-01

    We use the model described in Piri and Blunt [Phys. Rev. E 71, 026301 (2005)] to predict two- and three-phase relative permeabilities of Berea sandstone using a random network to represent the pore space. We predict measured relative permeabilities for two-phase flow in a water-wet system. We then successfully predict the steady-state oil, water, and gas three-phase relative permeabilities measured by Oak (Proceedings of the SPE/DOE Seventh Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery, Tulsa, OK, 1990). We also study secondary and tertiary gas injection into media of different wettability and initial oil saturation and interpret the results in terms of pore-scale displacement processes.

  9. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in advanced renal cell carcinoma. Results of a phase II-trial of somatostatine analogue therapy in patients with advanced RCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Goerges, R.; Stergar, H.; Bockisch, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Gauler, T.; Bauer, S. [Dept. of Internal Medicine (Cancer Research), Univ. of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Antoch, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Univ. of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Schuette, J. [Dept. of Medical Oncology/Hematology, Marien-Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Aims: objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with respect to potential therapy with somatostatin analogue (SST-A) and to assess the response rate under therapy with SST-A. Patients, methods: 16 patients with documented progression of histologically confirmed advanced RCC were included. Planar whole-body SRS was performed 4, 24 and 48h post i.v. injection of 175-200 MBq {sup 111}In-pentetreoide. 5 and 25 h p.i. SPECT of thorax and abdomen were performed. Documentation of somatostatin receptor expression via SRS in > 50% of known tumour lesions was the criteria for treatment start with SST-A (Sandostatin LAR {sup registered} -Depot 30mg i.m. every four weeks). Results: in 9/16 of the patients SRS showed at least one metastasis with moderate (n = 5) or intense (n = 4) tracer uptake. Lesion-based SRS evaluation showed only 12.1% (20/165) of all metastases. Most false-negative lesions were located in the lungs. In too patients, the majority of the known metastases was SRS positive and these patients received SST-A therapy. The first radiographic evaluation after a two-month interval showed progressive disease in both patients. Conclusions: we conclude that SRS is of limited value in staging of advanced RCC. In our patients SST-A did not result in a growth control of RCC. Consequently, the use of SST-A in advanced RCC seems to be no relevant therapeutic option. (orig.)

  10. Fuel and fission product behaviour in early phases of a severe accident. Part II: Interpretation of the experimental results of the PHEBUS FPT2 test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, R.; Barrachin, M.; Ducher, R.; Gavillet, D.; De Bremaecker, A.

    2014-10-01

    One objective of the FPT2 test of the PHEBUS FP Program was to study the degradation of an irradiated UO2 fuel bundle and the fission product behaviour under conditions of low steam flow. The results of the post-irradiation examinations (PIE) at the upper levels (823 mm and 900 mm) of the test section previously reported are interpreted in the present paper. Solid state interactions between fuel and cladding have been compared with the characteristics of interaction identified in the previous separate-effect tests. Corium resulting from the interaction between fuel and cladding was formed. The uranium concentration in the corium is compared to analytical tests and a scenario for the corium formation is proposed. The analysis showed that, despite the rather low fuel burn up, the conditions of temperature and oxygen potential reached during the starvation phase are able to give an early very significant release fraction of caesium. A significant part (but not all) of the molybdenum was segregated at grain boundaries and trapped in metallic inclusions from which they were totally removed in the final part of the experiment. During the steam starvation phase, the conditions of oxygen potential were favourable for the formation of simple Ba and BaO chemical forms but the temperature was too low to provoke their volatility. This is one important difference with out-of-pile experiments such as VERCORS for which only a combination of high temperature and low oxygen potential induced a significant barium release. Finally another significant difference with analytical out-of-pile experiments comes from the formation of foamy zones due to the fission gas presence in FPT2-type experiments which give an additional possibility for the formation of stable fission product compounds.

  11. Fuel and fission product behaviour in early phases of a severe accident. Part II: Interpretation of the experimental results of the PHEBUS FPT2 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubourg, R. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, B.P. 3, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Barrachin, M., E-mail: marc.barrachin@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, B.P. 3, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Ducher, R. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, B.P. 3, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gavillet, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); De Bremaecker, A. [Institute for Nuclear Materials Sciences, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2014-10-15

    One objective of the FPT2 test of the PHEBUS FP Program was to study the degradation of an irradiated UO{sub 2} fuel bundle and the fission product behaviour under conditions of low steam flow. The results of the post-irradiation examinations (PIE) at the upper levels (823 mm and 900 mm) of the test section previously reported are interpreted in the present paper. Solid state interactions between fuel and cladding have been compared with the characteristics of interaction identified in the previous separate-effect tests. Corium resulting from the interaction between fuel and cladding was formed. The uranium concentration in the corium is compared to analytical tests and a scenario for the corium formation is proposed. The analysis showed that, despite the rather low fuel burn up, the conditions of temperature and oxygen potential reached during the starvation phase are able to give an early very significant release fraction of caesium. A significant part (but not all) of the molybdenum was segregated at grain boundaries and trapped in metallic inclusions from which they were totally removed in the final part of the experiment. During the steam starvation phase, the conditions of oxygen potential were favourable for the formation of simple Ba and BaO chemical forms but the temperature was too low to provoke their volatility. This is one important difference with out-of-pile experiments such as VERCORS for which only a combination of high temperature and low oxygen potential induced a significant barium release. Finally another significant difference with analytical out-of-pile experiments comes from the formation of foamy zones due to the fission gas presence in FPT2-type experiments which give an additional possibility for the formation of stable fission product compounds.

  12. A model-constrained Monte Carlo method for blind arterial input function estimation in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: II. In vivo results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabel, Matthias C.; DiBella, Edward V. R.; Jensen, Randy L.; Salzman, Karen L.

    2010-08-01

    Accurate quantification of pharmacokinetic model parameters in tracer kinetic imaging experiments requires correspondingly accurate determination of the arterial input function (AIF). Despite significant effort expended on methods of directly measuring patient-specific AIFs in modalities as diverse as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), dynamic positron emission tomography (PET), and perfusion computed tomography (CT), fundamental and technical difficulties have made consistent and reliable achievement of that goal elusive. Here, we validate a new algorithm for AIF determination, the Monte Carlo blind estimation (MCBE) method (which is described in detail and characterized by extensive simulations in a companion paper), by comparing AIFs measured in DCE-MRI studies of eight brain tumor patients with results of blind estimation. Blind AIFs calculated with the MCBE method using a pool of concentration-time curves from a region of normal brain tissue were found to be quite similar to the measured AIFs, with statistically significant decreases in fit residuals observed in six of eight patients. Biases between the blind and measured pharmacokinetic parameters were the dominant source of error. Averaged over all eight patients, the mean biases were +7% in K trans, 0% in kep, -11% in vp and +10% in ve. Corresponding uncertainties (median absolute deviation from the best fit line) were 0.0043 min-1 in K trans, 0.0491 min-1 in kep, 0.29% in vp and 0.45% in ve. The use of a published population-averaged AIF resulted in larger mean biases in three of the four parameters (-23% in K trans, -22% in kep, -63% in vp), with the bias in ve unchanged, and led to larger uncertainties in all four parameters (0.0083 min-1 in K trans, 0.1038 min-1 in kep, 0.31% in vp and 0.95% in ve). When blind AIFs were calculated from a region of tumor tissue, statistically significant decreases in fit residuals were observed in all eight patients despite larger

  13. Photospheric Magnetic Field Properties of Flaring vs. Flare-Quiet Active Regions II: A Magnetic Charge Topology Model and Statistical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Longcope, D. W.

    2003-05-01

    The complexity of the coronal magnetic field extrapolated from a Magnetic Charge Topology (MCT) model, is examined for pre-event signatures unique to solar energetic phenomena. Although extensive use has been made of quantities measured at the photosphere, it is important to consider the magnetic field in the corona, where (for example) the hard X-ray signatures of energy release in solar flares are observed. By quantifying the inferred coronal magnetic topology we are no longer limited to considering solely the magnetic state of the photosphere. MCT is applied to temporally sampled photospheric magnetic data from the U. Hawai`i Imaging Vector Magnetograph, for 24 flare-event and flare-quiet epochs from seven active regions. We outline the methodology employed for automating the application of MCT to large data sets of complex active regions: partitioning the observed Bz at the photosphere, assigning a charge to each partition, and using this charge distribution to extrapolate the field in the corona. From the resulting field we compute the connectivity matrix ψ ij, the location of null points and the intersection of separatrix surfaces, i.e. separator field lines. Parameters are constructed to describe, for example, the magnetic connectivities, the magnetic flux in those connections, and the number of separators. Examining particular events results in no obvious trends in the magnitude and temporal evolution of the parameters just prior to flare events. Thus, we employ the same quantitative statistical approach outlined in Leka and Barnes [this session], i.e. applying discriminant analysis and Hotelling's T2-test, and ranking all four-variable discriminant functions as a proxy for a single all-variable discriminant function. We present those parameters which consistently appear in the best combinations, indicating that they may play an important role in defining a pre-event coronal state. This work was performed under Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  14. Diffusion of Tritiated Water (HTO) and {sup 22}Na{sup +}-Ions through Non-Degraded Hardened Cement Pastes - II. Modelling Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakob, A

    2002-12-01

    In this report, the procedure and the results of an inverse modelling study on the through-diffusion of tritiated water (HTO) and {sup 2}2Na{sup +}-ions are presented using high-porous hardened cement pastes with a water/cement ratio of 1.3 in the first stage of the cement degradation. For the analysis two alternative models were applied: 1) a diffusion model where a possible sorption of the tracer was entirely neglected, and 2) a diffusion model with linear sorption. The analysis of the through-diffusion phase allowed extracting values for the effective diffusion coefficient (D{sub e}) and the rock-capacity factor ({alpha}). Both models could fit the breakthrough curves equally well, and also mass-balance considerations did not allow to clearly preferring one of the two competing models to the other. But blind-predictions for tracer out-diffusion using the best-fit parameter values deduced from analysing the former through-diffusion phase gave a clear indication that linear sorption had to be included in the diffusion model. The extracted K{sub d} values for HTO are in excellent agreement with values from batch sorption experiments and are of the order of 0.8. 10{sup -3} m{sup 3}/kg. Those for {sup 2}2Na{sup +} are of the order of 1.0. 10{sup -3} m{sup 3}/kg and are by a factor of two larger than values from batch sorption experiments. The values for the effective diffusion coefficients for HTO are of the order of (2-3).10{sup -1}0 m{sup 2}/s, and those for sodium are roughly by a factor of two smaller than values for HTO. On the one hand, the observed tracer uptake could only partially be addressed to isotope exchange; the most obvious process which could account for the remaining part of the uptaken tracer mass is diffusion into a second type of porosity, the dead-end pores. On the other hand, the results and conclusions drawn are encouraging for future investigations; therefore no major deficiency concerning the applied equipment and the modelling methodology

  15. Heat transport and solidification in the electromagnetic casting of aluminum alloys: Part II. Development of a mathematical model and comparison with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasso, D. C.; Evans, J. W.; Wilson, I. J.

    1995-02-01

    In this second article of a two-part series, a mathematical model for heat transport and solidification of aluminum in electromagnetic casting is developed. The model is a three-dimensional one but involves a simplified treatment of convective heat transport in the liquid metal pool. Heat conduction in the solid was thought to play a dominant role in heat transport, and the thermal properties of the two alloys used in measurements reported in Part I (AA 5182 and 3104) were measured independently for input to the model. Heat transfer into the water sprays impacting the sides of the ingot was approximated using a heat-transfer coefficient from direct chill casting; because this heat-transfer step appears not to be rate determining for solidification and cooling of most of the ingot, there is little inaccuracy involved in this approximation. Joule heating was incorporated into some of the computations, which were carried out using the finite element software FIDAP. There was good agreement between the computed results and extensive thermocouple measurements (reported in Part I) made on a pilot-scale caster at Reynolds Metals Company (Richmond, VA).

  16. Impact of adjuvants on CD4(+) T cell and B cell responses to a protein antigen vaccine: Results from a phase II, randomized, multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux-Roels, Geert; Marchant, Arnaud; Levy, Jack; Van Damme, Pierre; Schwarz, Tino F; Horsmans, Yves; Jilg, Wolfgang; Kremsner, Peter G; Haelterman, Edwige; Clément, Frédéric; Gabor, Julian J; Esen, Meral; Hens, Annick; Carletti, Isabelle; Fissette, Laurence; Tavares Da Silva, Fernanda; Burny, Wivine; Janssens, Michel; Moris, Philippe; Didierlaurent, Arnaud M; Van Der Most, Robbert; Garçon, Nathalie; Van Belle, Pascale; Van Mechelen, Marcelle

    2016-08-01

    Immunogenicity and safety of different adjuvants combined with a model antigen (HBsAg) were compared. Healthy HBV-naïve adults were randomized to receive HBs adjuvanted with alum or Adjuvant Systems AS01B, AS01E, AS03A or AS04 at Days 0 and 30. Different frequencies of HBs-specific CD4+ T cells 14days post dose 2 but similar polyfunctionality profiles were induced by the different adjuvants with frequencies significantly higher in the AS01B and AS01E groups than in the other groups. Antibody concentrations 30days post-dose 2 were significantly higher in AS01B, AS01E and AS03A than in other groups. Limited correlations were observed between HBs-specific CD4+ T cell and antibody responses. Injection site pain was the most common solicited local symptom and was more frequent in AS groups than in alum group. Different adjuvants formulated with the same antigen induced different adaptive immune responses and reactogenicity patterns in healthy naïve adults. The results summary for this study (GSK study number 112115 - NCT# NCT00805389) is available on the GSK Clinical Study Register and can be accessed at www.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com.

  17. The Nainital-Cape Survey -- II:Report for pulsation in five chemically peculiar A-type stars and presentation of 140 null results

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, S; Martínez, P; Kurtz, D W; Girish, V; Seetha, S; Sagar, R; Ashoka, B N; Joshi, Santosh; Martinez, Peter; Sagar, Ram

    2006-01-01

    To search photometric variability in chemically peculiar A type stars in the northern hemisphere. High-speed photometric observations of Ap and Am star candidates have been carried out from ARIES (Manora Peak, Nainital) using a three-channel fast photometer attached to the ARIES 104-cm Sampurnanand telescope. This paper presents three new variables: HD 113878, HD 118660 and HD 207561. During the time span of the survey (1999 December to 2004 January) pulsations of the $\\delta$ Sct type were also found for the two evolved Am stars HD 102480 and HD 98851, as reported in Joshi et al. (2002, 2003). Additionally, we present 140 null results of the survey for this time span. The star HD 113878 pulsates with a period of 2.31 hr, which is typical of $\\delta$ Sct stars. HD 118660 exhibits multi-periodic variability with a prominent period of nearly 1 hr. These periods need to be investigated and make HD 118660 a particularly interesting target for further observations. For HD 207561, a star classified as Am, a probabl...

  18. Phytoremediation of soils polluted by heavy metals and metalloids using crops: (ii early results from the in situ experiment of torviscosa (udine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Zerbi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Two annual high biomass yield crops – Sorghum bicolor and Helianthus annuus – were grown in a soil polluted by pyrite cinders. Specific aims of this work were: to observe the concentration of metals in plants during the crop cycle and to establish the amount of metal removal by the crops. The field trial was arranged in a randomized block design. The concentrations of heavy metals in the soil were: As 309, Cd 4.90, Co 50.9, Cu 1527, Pb 233 and Zn 980 mg kg-1. The crops received respectively mineral fertilization and organic amendment while plants in control soil did not receive any input. The phytoextraction potential of crops was estimated during the whole growth cycle; the concentration of the metals in the plant roots and in the harvestable biomass and two bioconcentration factors are reported. The amelioration of the nutritive status of soil resulted highly effective for the biomass yield but not in the concentration of metals in plant fractions. The evaluation of the potential of phytoremediation of our plants compared to other crops in terms of metal removal, was positive. Sorghum performed better than sunflower removing from the soil 220 g ha-1 of As, 5.6 g ha-1 of Cd, 30.2 g ha-1 of Co, 820 g ha-1 of Cu, 107 g ha-1 of Pb and 1944 g ha-1 of Zn.

  19. Phytoremediation of soils polluted by heavy metals and metalloids using crops: (ii early results from the in situ experiment of torviscosa (udine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Marchiol

    Full Text Available Two annual high biomass yield crops – Sorghum bicolor and Helianthus annuus – were grown in a soil polluted by pyrite cinders. Specific aims of this work were: to observe the concentration of metals in plants during the crop cycle and to establish the amount of metal removal by the crops. The field trial was arranged in a randomized block design. The concentrations of heavy metals in the soil were: As 309, Cd 4.90, Co 50.9, Cu 1527, Pb 233 and Zn 980 mg kg-1. The crops received respectively mineral fertilization and organic amendment while plants in control soil did not receive any input. The phytoextraction potential of crops was estimated during the whole growth cycle; the concentration of the metals in the plant roots and in the harvestable biomass and two bioconcentration factors are reported. The amelioration of the nutritive status of soil resulted highly effective for the biomass yield but not in the concentration of metals in plant fractions. The evaluation of the potential of phytoremediation of our plants compared to other crops in terms of metal removal, was positive. Sorghum performed better than sunflower removing from the soil 220 g ha-1 of As, 5.6 g ha-1 of Cd, 30.2 g ha-1 of Co, 820 g ha-1 of Cu, 107 g ha-1 of Pb and 1944 g ha-1 of Zn.

  20. Planck Intermediate Results II: Comparison of Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements from Planck and from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager for 11 galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Planck,; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bikmaev, I; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bourdin, H; Brown, M L; Bucher, M; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cabella, P; Carvalho, P; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Démoclès, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Feroz, F; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Fosalba, P; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fromenteau, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Grainge, K J B; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Hurley-Walker, N; Jagemann, T; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Khamitov, I; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Liddle, A; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Luzzi, G; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Munshi, D; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Noviello, F; Olamaie, M; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perrott, Y C; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Pierpaoli, E; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, C; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Saunders, R D E; Savini, G; Schammel, M P; Scott, D; Shimwell, T W; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2012-01-01

    A comparison is presented of Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements for 11 galaxy clusters as obtained by Planck and by the ground-based interferometer, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager. Assuming a universal spherically-symmetric Generalised Navarro, Frenk & White (GNFW) model for the cluster gas pressure profile, we jointly constrain the integrated Compton-Y parameter (Y_500) and the scale radius (theta_500) of each cluster. Our resulting constraints in the Y_500-theta_500 2D parameter space derived from the two instruments overlap significantly for eight of the clusters, although, overall, there is a tendency for AMI to find the Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal to be smaller in angular size and fainter than Planck. Significant discrepancies exist for the three remaining clusters in the sample, namely A1413, A1914, and the newly-discovered Planck cluster PLCKESZ G139.59+24.18. The robustness of the analysis of both the Planck and AMI data is demonstrated through the use of detailed simulations, which also discount confu...

  1. Measurement of ocean water optical properties and seafloor reflectance with scanning hydrographic operational airborne lidar survey (SHOALS): II. Practical results and comparison with independent data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuell, Grady H.; Feygels, Viktor; Kopilevich, Yuri; Weidemann, Alan D.; Cunningham, A. Grant; Mani, Reza; Podoba, Vladimir; Ramnath, Vinod; Park, J. Y.; Aitken, Jen

    2005-08-01

    Estimation of water column optical properties and seafloor reflectance (532 nm) is demonstrated using recent SHOALS data collected at Fort Lauderdale, Florida (November, 2003). To facilitate this work, the first radiometric calibrations of SHOALS were performed. These calibrations permit a direct normalization of recorded data by converting digitized counts at the output of the SHOALS receivers to input optical power. For estimation of environmental parameters, this normalization is required to compensate for the logarithmic compression of the signals and the finite frequency of the bandpass of the detector/amplifier. After normalization, the SHOALS data are used to estimate the backscattering coefficient, the beam attenuation coefficient, the single-scattering albedo, the VSF asymmetry, and seafloor reflectance by fitting simulated waveforms to actual waveforms measured by the SHOALS APD and PMT receivers. The resulting estimates of these water column optical properties are compared to in-situ measurements acquired at the time of the airborne data collections. Images of green laser bottom reflectance are also presented and compared to reflectance estimated from simultaneously acquired passive spectral data.

  2. Assimilation of Geosat Altimetric Data in a Nonlinear Shallow-Water Model of the Indian Ocean by Adjoint Approach. Part II: Some Validation and Interpretation of the Assimilated Results. Part 2; Some Validation and Interpretation of the Assimilated Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Eric; Perigaud, Claire

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the results of assimilating Geosat sea level variations relative to the November 1986-November 1988 mean reference, in a nonlinear reduced-gravity model of the Indian Ocean, Data have been assimilated during one year starting in November 1986 with the objective of optimizing the initial conditions and the yearly averaged reference surface. The thermocline slope simulated by the model with or without assimilation is validated by comparison with the signal, which can be derived from expandable bathythermograph measurements performed in the Indian Ocean at that time. The topography simulated with assimilation on November 1986 is in very good agreement with the hydrographic data. The slopes corresponding to the South Equatorial Current and to the South Equatorial Countercurrent are better reproduced with assimilation than without during the first nine months. The whole circulation of the cyclonic gyre south of the equator is then strongly intensified by assimilation. Another assimilation experiment is run over the following year starting in November 1987. The difference between the two yearly mean surfaces simulated with assimilation is in excellent agreement with Geosat. In the southeastern Indian Ocean, the correction to the yearly mean dynamic topography due to assimilation over the second year is negatively correlated to the one the year before. This correction is also in agreement with hydrographic data. It is likely that the signal corrected by assimilation is not only due to wind error, because simulations driven by various wind forcings present the same features over the two years. Model simulations run with a prescribed throughflow transport anomaly indicate that assimilation is rather correcting in the interior of the model domain for inadequate boundary conditions with the Pacific.

  3. Update of the BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Bi-207 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 207Bi to include the 2010 result of the LNE-LNHB (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michotte, C.; Ratel, G.; Courte, S.; Bobin, C.; Moune, M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, the Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais-Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB) submitted one sample of known activity of 207Bi to the International Reference System for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, with comparison identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Bi-207. The value of the activity submitted was about 180 kBq. There is now one result in the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Bi-207 comparison. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been evaluated for the first time using the LNE-LNHB result and a PTB result dating 1982. The degree of equivalence between the LNE-LNHB equivalent activity measured in the SIR and the KCRV has been calculated and is reported. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  4. Update of the BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Sr-85 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 85Sr to include the 2009 result of the POLATOM (Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michotte, C.; Ratel, G.; Courte, S.; Dziel, T.; Listkowska, A.

    2015-01-01

    Since 1975, ten laboratories have submitted 27 samples of known activity of 85Sr to the International Reference System (SIR) for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), with comparison identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Sr-85. The values of the activity submitted were between about 0.2 MBq and 19 MBq. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been recalculated to include the primary standardization result for the POLATOM, Poland. There are now four results in the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Sr-85 comparison. The degrees of equivalence between each equivalent activity measured in the SIR and the updated KCRV have been calculated and the results are given in the form of a table. A graphical presentation is also given. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  5. Overview of results from the WaterTox intercalibration and environmental testing phase II program: part 2, ecotoxicological evaluation of drinking water supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Baez, M C; Sánchez, W A; Dutka, B J; Ronco, A; Castillo, G; Pica-Granados, Y; Castillo, L E; Ridal, J; Arkhipchuk, V; Srivastava, R C

    2002-01-01

    Because of rapid population growth, industrial development, and intensified agricultural production increasing amounts of chemicals are being released into the environment, polluting receiving water bodies around the world. Given the potential health risk associated with the presence of toxicants in water sources used for drinking yet the scarcity of available data, there is a need to evaluate these waters and develop strategies to reduce and prevent their contamination. The present study examined the applicability of a battery of simple, inexpensive bioassays in environmental management and the relevance of the test results in establishing the toxicological quality of water sources and drinking water within the framework of the eight-country WaterTox Network, sponsored by the International Development Research Centre, Ottawa, Canada. Seventy-six samples were collected from surface and groundwater sources and seven samples from drinking water treatment plants. Each sample was tested with a core battery of bioassays (Daphnia magna, Hydra attenuata, and Lactuca sativa root inhibition tests) and a limited set of physical and chemical parameters. In addition, three labs included the Selenastrum capricornutum test. When no toxic effects were found with the battery, samples were concentrated 10x using a solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Nonconcentrated natural water samples produced a toxic response in 24% of cases with all three core bioassays. When all bioassays are considered, the percentage of raw samples showing toxicity with at least one bioassay increased to 60%. Of seven treated drinkingwater samples, four showed toxicity with at least one bioassay, raising the possibility that treatment processes in these instances were unable to remove toxic contaminants. The Daphnia magna and Hydra attenuata tests indicated a high level of sensitivity overall. Although only three of the eight countries used S. capricornutum, it proved to be an efficient and reliable

  6. Weekly oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid (OXALF as first-line chemotherapy for elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer: results of a phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzi B

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elderly patients have been often excluded from or underrepresented in the study populations of combination chemotherapy trials. The primary end point of this study was to determine the response rate and the toxicity of the weekly oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid (OXALF regimen in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer. The secondary objective was to measure the time to disease progression and the survival time. Methods Chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced gastric cancer aged 70 or older were considered eligible for study entry. Patients received weekly oxaliplatin 40 mg/m2, fluorouracil 500 mg/m2 and folinic acid 250 mg/m2. All drugs were given intravenously on a day-1 schedule. Results A total of 42 elderly patients were enrolled. Median age was 73 years and all patients had metastatic disease. The response rate according to RECIST criteria was 45.2% (95% CIs: 30%–56% with two complete responses, 17 partial responses, 13 stable diseases and 10 progressions, for an overall tumor rate control of 76.2% (32 patients. Toxicity was generally mild and only three patients discontinued treatment because of treatment related adverse events. The most common treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events were fatigue (7.1%, diarrhoea (4.8%, mucositis (2.4%, neurotoxicity (2.4% and neutropenia (4.8%. The median response duration was 5.3 months (95% CIs: 2.13 – 7.34, the median time to disease progression was 5.0 months (95% CIs: 3.75 – 6.25 and the median survival time was 9.0 months (95% CIs: 6.18 – 11.82. Conclusion OXALF represents an active and well-tolerated treatment modality for elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer.

  7. SCENARIOS FOR MEETING CALIFORNIA'S 2050 CLIMATE GOALS California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume I: Non-Electricity Sectors and Overall Scenario Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey; Donovan, Sally; Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    This study provides an updated analysis of long-term energy system scenarios for California consistent with the State meeting its 2050 climate goal, including detailed analysis and assessment of electricity system build-out, operation, and costs across the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) region. Four key elements are found to be critical for the State to achieve its 2050 goal of 80 percent greenhouse (GHG) reductions from the 1990 level: aggressive energy efficiency; clean electricity; widespread electrification of passenger vehicles, building heating, and industry heating; and large-scale production of low-carbon footprint biofuels to largely replace petroleum-based liquid fuels. The approach taken here is that technically achievable energy efficiency measures are assumed to be achieved by 2050 and aggregated with the other key elements mentioned above to estimate resultant emissions in 2050. The energy and non-energy sectors are each assumed to have the objective of meeting an 80 percent reduction from their respective 1990 GHG levels for the purposes of analysis. A different partitioning of energy and non-energy sector GHG greenhouse reductions is allowed if emission reductions in one sector are more economic or technically achievable than in the other. Similarly, within the energy or non-energy sectors, greater or less than 80 percent reduction from 1990 is allowed for sub-sectors within the energy or non-energy sectors as long as the overall target is achieved. Overall emissions for the key economy-wide scenarios are considered in this report. All scenarios are compliant or nearly compliant with the 2050 goal. This finding suggests that multiple technical pathways exist to achieve the target with aggressive policy support and continued technology development of largely existing technologies.

  8. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma treated with prolonged temozolomide and radiotherapy--results of a United Kingdom phase II trial (CNS 2007 04).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S; Howman, A; Wheatley, K; Wherton, D; Boota, N; Pizer, B; Fisher, D; Kearns, P; Picton, S; Saran, F; Gibson, M; Glaser, A; Connolly, D J A; Hargrave, D

    2013-12-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) has a dismal prognosis with no chemotherapy regimen so far resulting in any significant improvement over standard radiotherapy. In this trial, a prolonged regimen (21/28d) of temozolomide was studied with the aim of overcoming O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) mediated resistance. Forty-three patients with a defined clinico-radiological diagnosis of DIPG received radiotherapy and concomitant temozolomide (75 mg/m(2)) after which up to 12 courses of 21d of adjuvant temozolomide (75-100mg/m(2)) were given 4 weekly. The trial used a 2-stage design and passed interim analysis. At diagnosis median age was 8 years (2-20 years), 81% had cranial nerve abnormalities, 76% ataxia and 57% long tract signs. Median Karnofsky/Lansky score was 80 (10-100). Patients received a median of three courses of adjuvant temozolomide, five received all 12 courses and seven did not start adjuvant treatment. Three patients were withdrawn from study treatment due to haematological toxicity and 10 had a dose reduction. No other significant toxicity related to temozolomide was noted. Overall survival (OS) (95% confidence interval (CI)) was 56% (40%, 69%) at 9 months, 35% (21%, 49%) at 1 year and 17% (7%, 30%) at 2 years. Median survival was 9.5 months (range 7.5-11.4 months). There were five 2-year survivors with a median age of 13.6 years at diagnosis. This trial demonstrated no survival benefit of the addition of dose dense temozolomide, to standard radiotherapy in children with classical DIPG. However, a subgroup of adolescent DIPG patients did have a prolonged survival, which needs further exploration.

  9. Mobilisation of hematopoietic CD34+ precursor cells in patients with acute stroke is safe--results of an open-labeled non randomized phase I/II trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Boy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regenerative strategies in the treatment of acute stroke may have great potential. Hematopoietic growth factors mobilize hematopoietic stem cells and may convey neuroprotective effects. We examined the safety, potential functional and structural changes, and CD34(+ cell-mobilization characteristics of G-CSF treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. METHODS AND RESULTS: Three cohorts of patients (8, 6, and 6 patients per cohort were treated subcutaneously with 2.5, 5, or 10 µg/kg body weight rhG-CSF for 5 consecutive days within 12 hrs of onset of acute stroke. Standard treatment included i.v. thrombolysis. Safety monitoring consisted of obtaining standardized clinical assessment scores, monitoring of CD34(+ stem cells, blood chemistry, serial neuroradiology, and neuropsychology. Voxel-guided morphometry (VGM enabled an assessment of changes in the patients' structural parenchyma. 20 patients (mean age 55 yrs were enrolled in this study, 5 of whom received routine thrombolytic therapy with r-tPA. G-CSF treatment was discontinued in 4 patients because of unrelated adverse events. Mobilization of CD34(+ cells was observed with no concomitant changes in blood chemistry, except for an increase in the leukocyte count up to 75,500/µl. Neuroradiological and neuropsychological follow-up studies did not disclose any specific G-CSF toxicity. VGM findings indicated substantial atrophy of related hemispheres, a substantial increase in the CSF space, and a localized increase in parenchyma within the ischemic area in 2 patients. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate a good safety profile for daily administration of G-CSF when begun within 12 hours after onset of ischemic stroke and, in part in combination with routine i.v. thrombolysis. Additional analyses using VGM and a battery of neuropsychological tests indicated a positive functional and potentially structural effect of G-CSF treatment in some of our patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German

  10. Assessment of SFR reactor safety issues: Part II: Analysis results of ULOF transients imposed on a variety of different innovative core designs with SAS-SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruessmann, R., E-mail: regina.kruessmann@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Ponomarev, A.; Pfrang, W.; Struwe, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Champigny, J.; Carluec, B. [AREVA, 10, rue J. Récamier, 69456 Lyon Cedex 06 (France); Schmitt, D.; Verwaerde, D. [EDF R& D, 1 avenue du général de Gaulle, 92140 Clamart (France)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of different core designs for a sodium-cooled fast reactor. • Safety assessment with the code system SAS-SFR. • Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) scenario. • Sodium boiling and core melting cannot be avoided. • A net negative Na void effect provides more grace time prior to local SA destruction. - Abstract: In the framework of cooperation agreements between KIT-INR and AREVA SAS NP as well as between KIT-INR and EDF R&D in the years 2008–2013, the evaluation of severe transient behavior in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) was investigated. In Part I of this contribution, the efficiency of newly conceived prevention and mitigation measures was investigated for unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF), unprotected loss-of-heat-sink (ULOHS) and the unprotected transient-overpower (UTOP) transients. In this second part, consequence analyses were performed for the initiation phase of different unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) scenarios imposed on a variety of different core design options of SFRs. The code system SAS-SFR was used for this purpose. Results of analyses for cases postulating unavailability of prevention measures as shut-down systems, passive and/or active additional devices show that entering into an energetic power excursion as a consequence of the initiation phase of a ULOF cannot be avoided for those core designs with a cumulative void reactivity feedback larger than zero. However, even for core designs aiming at values of the void reactivity less than zero it is difficult to find system design characteristics which prevent the transient entering into partial core destruction. Further studies of the transient core and system behavior would require codes dedicated to specific aspects of transition phase analyses and of in-vessel material relocation analyses.

  11. JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay for detection of genotoxic carcinogens: II. Summary of definitive validation study results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yoshifumi; Kojima, Hajime; Omori, Takashi; Corvi, Raffaella; Honma, Masamistu; Schechtman, Leonard M; Tice, Raymond R; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Burlinson, Brian; Hobbs, Cheryl A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Kraynak, Andrew R; McNamee, James; Nakagawa, Yuzuki; Pant, Kamala; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Priestley, Catherine; Takasawa, Hironao; Wada, Kunio; Wirnitzer, Uta; Asano, Norihide; Escobar, Patricia A; Lovell, David; Morita, Takeshi; Nakajima, Madoka; Ohno, Yasuo; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    The in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay (comet assay) is used internationally to investigate the in vivo genotoxic potential of test chemicals. This assay, however, has not previously been formally validated. The Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM), with the cooperation of the U.S. NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM)/the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM), the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), and the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society/Mammalian Mutagenesis Study Group (JEMS/MMS), organized an international validation study to evaluate the reliability and relevance of the assay for identifying genotoxic carcinogens, using liver and stomach as target organs. The ultimate goal of this exercise was to establish an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. The study protocol was optimized in the pre-validation studies, and then the definitive (4th phase) validation study was conducted in two steps. In the 1st step, assay reproducibility was confirmed among laboratories using four coded reference chemicals and the positive control ethyl methanesulfonate. In the 2nd step, the predictive capability was investigated using 40 coded chemicals with known genotoxic and carcinogenic activity (i.e., genotoxic carcinogens, genotoxic non-carcinogens, non-genotoxic carcinogens, and non-genotoxic non-carcinogens). Based on the results obtained, the in vivo comet assay is concluded to be highly capable of identifying genotoxic chemicals and therefore can serve as a reliable predictor of rodent carcinogenicity.

  12. Aggressive simultaneous radiochemotherapy with cisplatin and paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck tumors. Results of a phase I-II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Pelz, T.; Haensgen, G.; Dunst, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Becker, A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Municipial Hospital, Dessau (Germany); Bloching, M.; Passmann, M. [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Lotterer, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2003-10-01

    We have tested a very aggressive combination protocol with cisplatin and escalated paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy to assess the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), overall toxicity, and response rate. Patients and Methods: The trial recruited 24 patients (21 males, three females, mean age 57 years) treated at our department from 1998 through 2001. Irradiation was administered in daily doses of 2 Gy up to 30 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily up to 70.6 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodes and 51 Gy to the clinically negative regional nodes. The chemotherapy schedule included cisplatin in a fixed dose of 20 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 29-33 and paclitaxel at increasing dose levels of 20, 25, 30 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly over the whole treatment time. Patients were recruited in cohorts of three to six, and the MTD was reached if two out of six patients in one cohort developed DLT. DLT was defined as any grade 4 toxicity or any grade 3 toxicity requiring treatment interruption or unplanned hospitalization or any grade 3 neurotoxicity. We recruited mainly patients with large tumors for this protocol; all patients were stage IV, and the mean tumor volume (primary + metastases) amounted to 72 {+-} 61 cm{sup 3}. The mean follow-up was 30 months (range 4-39 months). Results: One early death (peritonitis and sepsis a t day 10) occurred, and 23 patients were evaluable for acute toxicity and response. The MTD of paclitaxel was reached at the third dose level (30 mg/m{sup 2} paclitaxel twice weekly). The DLT was severe mucositis grade 3 (n = 1) and skin erythema grade 4 (n = 2). After determining the MTD, another 14 patients were treated at the recommended dose level of paclitaxel with 25 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly. In summary, 13/23 patients (57%) developed grade 3 and 10/23 (43%) grade 2 mucositis. Two patients (9%) had grade 4, five (22%) grade 3, and 16 (69%) grade 2 dermatitis. One patient died at day 30

  13. KEY COMPARISON Update of the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Tc-99m comparison of activity measurements for the radionuclide 99mTc to include new results for the LNE-LNHB and the NPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michotte, C.; Courte, S.; Ratel, G.; Moune, M.; Johansson, L.; Keightley, J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 and 2008 respectively, the Laboratoire national de métrologie et d'essais-Laboratoire national Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB), France and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), UK, submitted ampoules with between 10 MBq and 130 MBq activity of 99mTc to the International Reference System (SIR), to update their results in the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Tc-99m comparison. Together with the four other national metrology institutes (NMI) that are participants, thirteen samples have been submitted since 1983. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been recalculated to include the latest primary results of the PTB and the LNE-LNHB as this makes the evaluation more robust. The degrees of equivalence between each equivalent activity measured in the SIR are given in the form of a matrix for all six NMIs. A graphical presentation is also given. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section II, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  14. Mature Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing 5-Flourouracil with Leucovorin to 5-Flourouracil with Levamisole as Adjuvant Therapy of Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer- The Israel Cooperative Oncology Group (ICOG Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Figer, Aviram Nissan, Adi Shani, Riva Borovick, Mariana Stiener, Mario Baras, Herbert R. Freund, Aaron Sulkes, Alexander Stojadinovic, Tamar Peretz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Survival benefit with adjuvant therapy was shown in patients with Stage III colorectal cancer (CRC. This study evaluates long-term (10-year outcome in patients with CRC randomly assigned to adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin (5FU+LV or 5-FU/Levamisole (5FU+LEV.Methods: Between 1990 and 1995, 398 patients with curatively resected Stage II-III CRC were randomly assigned to adjuvant 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV for 12 months.Results: No difference was evident in 10-year relapse-free or overall survival between study groups. Grade III toxicity was similar between groups; however, neurotoxicity was significantly greater with 5FU+LEV (p=0.02 and gastrointestinal toxicity with 5FU+LV (p=0.03. Female patients treated with 5FU+LEV had improved overall survival.Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment of CRC is still based on leucovorin modulated fluorouracil. The long-term follow-up results of this trial indicate that the adjuvant treatment of Stage II-III CRC with 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV is equally effective. The finding of improved survival in female subjects treated with 5FU+LEV warrants further study to determine if Levamisole is a better modulator of 5-FU than Leucovorin in this patient subset.

  15. Mature Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing 5-Flourouracil with Leucovorin to 5-Flourouracil with Levamisole as Adjuvant Therapy of Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer- The Israel Cooperative Oncology Group (ICOG) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figer, Arie; Nissan, Aviram; Shani, Adi; Borovick, Riva; Stiener, Mariana; Baras, Mario; Freund, Herbert R.; Sulkes, Aaron; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Peretz, Tamar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Survival benefit with adjuvant therapy was shown in patients with Stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). This study evaluates long-term (10-year) outcome in patients with CRC randomly assigned to adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin (5FU+LV) or 5-FU/Levamisole (5FU+LEV). Methods: Between 1990 and 1995, 398 patients with curatively resected Stage II-III CRC were randomly assigned to adjuvant 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV for 12 months. Results: No difference was evident in 10-year relapse-free or overall survival between study groups. Grade III toxicity was similar between groups; however, neurotoxicity was significantly greater with 5FU+LEV (p=0.02) and gastrointestinal toxicity with 5FU+LV (p=0.03). Female patients treated with 5FU+LEV had improved overall survival. Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment of CRC is still based on leucovorin modulated fluorouracil. The long-term follow-up results of this trial indicate that the adjuvant treatment of Stage II-III CRC with 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV is equally effective. The finding of improved survival in female subjects treated with 5FU+LEV warrants further study to determine if Levamisole is a better modulator of 5-FU than Leucovorin in this patient subset. PMID:21475636

  16. Higgs results from the Tevatron Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuchming, B.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2005-01-01

    The data taken at the Tevatron experiments have been analyzed to search for Higgs bosons. For the Standard Model Higgs searches, no excess is observed, the data are in good agreement with the expectations, so that limits are set on the production rates. For various theoretical models beyond the Standard Model, there is no excess either, which allows to derive constraints in their respective parameter spaces.

  17. Phase II modification of the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER) for Kentucky: The sinkhole-drainage process, point-and-click basin delineation, and results of karst test-basin simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Charles J.; Williamson, Tanja N.; Newson, Jeremy K.; Ulery, Randy L.; Nelson, Hugh L.; Cinotto, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes Phase II modifications made to the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER), which applies the process-based TOPMODEL approach to simulate or predict stream discharge in surface basins in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The previous (Phase I) version of WATER did not provide a means of identifying sinkhole catchments or accounting for the effects of karst (internal) drainage in a TOPMODEL-simulated basin. In the Phase II version of WATER, sinkhole catchments are automatically identified and delineated as internally drained subbasins, and a modified TOPMODEL approach (called the sinkhole drainage process, or SDP-TOPMODEL) is applied that calculates mean daily discharges for the basin based on summed area-weighted contributions from sinkhole drain-age (SD) areas and non-karstic topographically drained (TD) areas. Results obtained using the SDP-TOPMODEL approach were evaluated for 12 karst test basins located in each of the major karst terrains in Kentucky. Visual comparison of simulated hydrographs and flow-duration curves, along with statistical measures applied to the simulated discharge data (bias, correlation, root mean square error, and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficients), indicate that the SDPOPMODEL approach provides acceptably accurate estimates of discharge for most flow conditions and typically provides more accurate simulation of stream discharge in karstic basins compared to the standard TOPMODEL approach. Additional programming modifications made to the Phase II version of WATER included implementation of a point-and-click graphical user interface (GUI), which fully automates the delineation of simulation-basin boundaries and improves the speed of input-data processing. The Phase II version of WATER enables the user to select a pour point anywhere on a stream reach of interest, and the program will automatically delineate all upstream areas that contribute drainage to that point. This capability enables

  18. Resultados del Programa de Rehabilitación Cardíaca Fase II, desarrollado por el Centro Nacional de Rehabilitación, Costa Rica Results of the Phase II Cardiac Rehabilitation Programat the National Center of Rehabilitation, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Wong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Debido a la importancia de la enfermedad cardiovascular en Costa Rica y a la escasa información de los programas de rehabilitación cardiaca a nivel nacional, el presente estudio buscó describir los resultados del Programa de Rehabilitación Cardiaca, Fase II, en el Centro Nacional de Rehabilitación. Métodos: Se trata de un estudio retrospectivo de revisión de expedientes clínicos de pacientes portadores de enfermedad arterial coronaria, remitidos a un programa de rehabilitación cardiaca desde marzo de 2009 a mayo de 2010. De un total de 158 pacientes, 131 finalizaron la fase II. Se comparó la capacidad funcional máxima -estimada mediante una prueba de esfuerzo en banda sin fin- y el perfil de lípidos. Estas pruebas se realizaron al inicio y al final de esta fase II, la cual consta de 10 a 12 semanas de duración. Resultados: Se obtuvo un aumento significativo de la capacidad funcional estimada en Equivalentes Metabólicos (METs, con un promedio equivalente a un 29.7% al finalizar las 10 a 12 semanas (pAim: Due to the importance of the cardiovascular disease in Costa Rica, and the lack of information about Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs in our country, the objective of this study is to determine the results of a phase II Cardiac Rehabilitation program at the National Center of Rehabilitation. Methods: retrospective study based on a review of the clinical records of patients with coronary artery disease referred for the phase II Cardiac Rehabilitation Program from March 2009 to May 2010. Of a total of 158 patients, 131 finished the phase II. We compared the results of maximal functional capacity estimated by a treadmill stress testing, and lipid profile at the beginning and the end of the 10 - 12 week program. Results: we found a significant statistical increase in the functional capacity of Metabolic Equivalents (METs in average of 29,7% at the end of the 10-12 week program (p<0,05 estimated by a treadmill stress testing

  19. Direct detection experiments explained with mirror dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, R.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the CDMS/Si experiment has observed a low energy excess of events in their dark matter search. In light of this new result we update the mirror dark matter explanation of the direction detection experiments. We find that the DAMA, CoGeNT, CRESST-II and CDMS/Si data can be simultaneously explained by halo ∼Fe‧ interactions provided that vrot≈200 km/s. Other parameter space is also possible. Forthcoming experiments, including CDMSlite, CDEX, COUPP, LUX, C-4, … should be able to further scrutinize mirror dark matter and closely related hidden sector models in the near future.

  20. Direct detection experiments explained with mirror dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the CDMS/Si experiment has observed a low energy excess of events in their dark matter search. In light of this new result we update the mirror dark matter explanation of the direction detection experiments. We find that the DAMA, CoGeNT, CRESST-II and CDMS/Si data can be simultaneously explained by halo $\\sim Fe'$ interactions provided that $v_{rot} \\approx 200$ km/s. Other parameter space is also possible. Forthcoming experiments, including CDMSlite, CDEX, COUPP, LUX, C-4,... should be able to further scrutinize mirror dark matter and closely related hidden sector models in the near future.

  1. Sequential (gemcitabine/vinorelbine and concurrent (gemcitabine radiochemotherapy with FDG-PET-based target volume definition in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: first results of a phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanzel Sven

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD of gemcitabine every two weeks concurrent to radiotherapy, administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radiochemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and to evaluate the efficacy of this regime in a phase II study. Methods 33 patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a combined radiochemotherapy protocol. 29 patients were assessable for evaluation of toxicity and tumor response. Treatment included two cycles of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1200 mg/m2 and vinorelbine (30 mg/m2 at day 1, 8 and 22, 29 followed by concurrent radiotherapy (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy and chemotherapy with gemcitabine every two weeks at day 43, 57 and 71. Radiotherapy planning included [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET based target volume definition. 10 patients were included in the phase I study with an initial gemcitabine dose of 300 mg/m2. The dose of gemcitabine was increased in steps of 100 mg/m2 until the MTD was realized. Results MTD was defined for the patient group receiving gemcitabine 500 mg/m2 due to grade 2 (next to grade 3 esophagitis in all patients resulting in a mean body weight loss of 5 kg (SD = 1.4 kg, representing 8% of the initial weight. These patients showed persisting dysphagia 3 to 4 weeks after completing radiotherapy. In accordance with expected complications as esophagitis, dysphagia and odynophagia, we defined the MTD at this dose level, although no dose limiting toxicity (DLT grade 3 was reached. In the phase I/II median follow-up was 15.7 months (4.1 to 42.6 months. The overall response rate after completion of therapy was 64%. The median overall survival was 19.9 (95% CI: [10.1; 29.7] months for all eligible patients. The median disease-free survival for all patients was 8.7 (95% CI: [2.7; 14.6] months. Conclusion

  2. Update of the BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Sn-113 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 113Sn to include the 2010 results of the PTB (Germany) and the LNE-LNHB (France), and the 2011 result of the CIEMAT (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michotte, C.; Ratel, G.; Courte, S.; Kossert, K.; Nähle, O.; Bobin, C.; Lépy, M.-C.; Moune, M.; Garcia-Toraño, E.; Peyres, V.; Roteta, M.

    2016-01-01

    Since 1975, seven national metrology institutes (NMI) have submitted eleven samples of known activity of 113Sn to the International Reference System (SIR) for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), with comparison identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Sn-113. The values of the activity submitted were between about 0.7 MBq and 22 MBq. The present primary standardization results for the PTB, Germany and the LNE-LNHB, France, replace their earlier results of 1989 and 1992, respectively. A key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been evaluated for the first time for 113Sn. There are only three results remaining in the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Sn-113 comparison, all the previously published ones being outdated. The degrees of equivalence between each of these three equivalent activities measured in the SIR and the KCRV have been calculated and the results are given in the form of a table. A graphical presentation is also given. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Inhibitory role of peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) on cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying-Hao; Kim, Hyun-Sun; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Sang-Keun; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2005-08-29

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated in all oxygen-utilizing organisms. Peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) as one of antioxidant enzymes may play a protective role against the oxidative damage caused by ROS. In order to define the role of Prx II in organismal aging, we evaluated cellular senescence in Prx II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF). As compared to wild type MEF, cellular senescence was accelerated in Prx II(-/-) MEF. Senescence-associated (SA)-beta-galactosidase (Gal)-positive cell formation was about 30% higher in Prx II(-/-) MEF. N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment attenuated SA-beta-Gal-positive cell formation. Prx II(-/-) MEF exhibited the higher G2/M (41%) and lower S (1.6%) phase cells as compared to 24% and 7.3% [corrected] in wild type MEF, respectively. A high increase in the p16 and a slight increase in the p21 and p53 levels were detected in PrxII(-/-) MEF cells. The cellular senescence of Prx II(-/-) MEF was correlated with the organismal aging of Prx II(-/-) mouse skin. While extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 activation was detected in Prx II(-/-) MEF, ERK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was detected in Prx II(-/-) skin. These results suggest that Prx II may function as an enzymatic antioxidant to prevent cellular senescence and skin aging.

  4. Container II

    OpenAIRE

    Baraklianou, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Container II, self-published artists book.\\ud The book was made on the occasion of the artists residency at the Banff Arts Centre, in Alberta Canada. \\ud \\ud Container II is a performative piece, it worked in conjunction with the photographic installation "Stage Set: Cool Tone" . (photographic floor installation, Reclaimed wood, frames, 130x145cm, 2016) \\ud The photographic installation was also part of the artists residency titled "New Materiality" at the Banff Arts Centre. \\ud \\ud Limited E...

  5. Dark Matter in Light of the LUX Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Patrick J. [Fermilab; Jung, Gabriel [Fermilab; Sorensen, Peter [LLNL, Livermore; Weiner, Neal [New York U.

    2014-05-22

    The landscape of dark matter direct detection has been profoundly altered by the slew of recent experiments. While some have claimed signals consistent with dark matter, others have seen few, if any, events consistent with dark matter. The results of the putative detections are often incompatible with each other in the context of naive spin-independent scattering, as well as with the null results. In particular, in light of the conflicts between the DM interpretation of the three events recently reported by the CDMS-Si experiment and the first results of the LUX experiment, there is a strong need to revisit the assumptions that go into the DM interpretations of both signals and limits. We attempt to reexamine a number of particle physics, astrophysics and experimental uncertainties. Specifically, we examine exothermic scattering, isospin-dependent couplings, modified halo models through astrophysics independent techniques, and variations in the assumptions about the scintillation light in liquid Xenon. We find that only a highly tuned isospin-dependent scenario remains as a viable explanation of the claimed detections, unless the scintillation properties of LXe are dramatically different from the assumptions used by the LUX experiment.

  6. Anterior single odontoid screw placement for type II odontoid fractures: our modified surgical technique and initial results in a cohort study of 15 patients [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Munakomi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anterior odontoid screw fixation for type II odontoid fracture is the ideal management option. However in the context of unavailability of an O-arm or neuro-navigation and poor images from the available C-arm may be an obstacle to ideal trajectory and placement of the odontoid screw. We herein detail  our surgical technique so as to ensure a correct trajectory and subsequent good fusion in Type II odontoid fractures. This may be advantageous  in clinical set ups lacking state of the art facilities.  Methods and Results: In this cohort study we included 15 consecutive patients who underwent anterior odontoid screw placement. We routinely dissect the longus colli to completely visualize the entire width of C3 body. We then perform a median C2-C3 disectomy followed by creating a gutter in the superior end of C3 body. We then guide the Kirchsner (K wire purchasing adequate anterior cortex of C2. Rest of the procedure follows the similar steps as described for odontoid screw placement. We achieved 100% correct trajectory and screw placement in our study. There were no instances of screw break out, pull out or nonunion. There was one patient mortality following myocardial infarction in our study. Conclusion: Preoperative imaging details, proper patient positioning, meticulous dissection, thorough anatomical knowledge and few added surgical nuances are the cornerstones in ideal odontoid screw placement. This may be pivotal in managing  patients in developing nations having rudimentary neurosurgical set up.

  7. A randomised phase II trial of weekly high-dose 5-fluorouracil with and without folinic acid and cisplatin in patients with advanced biliary tract carcinoma: results of the 40955 EORTC trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ducreux, M.; Cutsem, E. van; Laethem, J. van; Gress, T.M.; Jeziorski, K.; Rougier, P.; Wagener, T.; Anak, O.; Baron, B.; Nordlinger, B.

    2005-01-01

    Previous small phase II trials have demonstrated that the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and cisplatin(CDDP) could have clinical activity in metastatic biliary tract cancer. This randomised phase II trial was designed to assess the activity and safety of a high-dose infusional weekly 5FU alone

  8. A randomised phase II trial of weekly high-dose 5-fluorouracil with and without folinic acid and cisplatin in patients with advanced biliary tract carcinoma : results of the 40955 EORTC trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ducreux, M; van Cutsem, E; van Laethern, JL; Gress, TM; Jeziorski, K; Rougier, P; Wagener, T; Anak, O; Baron, B; Nordlinger, B

    2005-01-01

    Previous small phase II trials have demonstrated that the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and cisplatin(CDDP) could have clinical activity in metastatic biliary tract cancer. This randomised phase II trial was designed to assess the activity and safety of a high-dose infusional weekly 5FU alone

  9. Association between gene expression profiles and clinical outcome of pemetrexed-based treatment in patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer: exploratory results from a phase II study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean A Fennell

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We report exploratory gene-expression profiling data from a single-arm Phase-II-study in patients with non-squamous (nsNSCLC treated with pemetrexed and cisplatin. Previously disclosed results indicated a significant association of low thymidylate-synthase (TS-expression with longer progression-free and overall survival (PFS/OS. METHODS: Treatment-naïve nsNSCLC patients (IIIB/IV received 4 cycles of pemetrexed/cisplatin; non-progressing patients continued on pemetrexed-maintenance. Diagnostic tissue-samples were used to assess TS-expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC and mRNA-expression array-profiling (1,030 lung cancer-specific genes. Cox proportional-hazard models were applied to explore the association between each gene and PFS/OS. Genes significantly correlated with PFS/OS were further correlated with TS-protein expression (Spearman-rank. Unsupervised clustering was applied to all evaluable samples (n = 51 for all 1,030 genes and an overlapping 870-gene subset associated with adenocarcinoma (ADC, n = 47. RESULTS: 51/70 tissue-samples (72.9% were evaluable; 9 of 1,030 genes were significantly associated with PFS/OS (unadjusted p < 0.01, genes: Chromosome 16 open reading frame 89, napsin A, surfactant protein B, aquaporin 4, TRAF2- and Nck-interacting kinase, Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1, Interleukin 1 receptor type II, NK2 homeobox 1, ABO glycosyl-transferase; expression for all except IL1R2 correlated negatively with nuclear TS-expression (statistically significant for 5/8 genes, unadjusted p<0.01. Cluster-analysis based on 1,030 genes revealed no clear trend regarding PFS/OS; the ADC-based cluster analysis identified 3 groups (n = 21/11/15 with median (95%CI PFS of 8.1(6.9,NE/2.4(1.2,NE/4.4(1.2,NE months and OS of 20.3(17.5,NE/4.3(1.4,NE/8.3(3.9,NE months, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These exploratory gene-expression profiling results describe genes potentially linked to low TS-expression. Nine genes were

  10. TBscore II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Lemvik, Grethe; Abate, Ebba;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The TBscore, based on simple signs and symptoms, was introduced to predict unsuccessful outcome in tuberculosis patients on treatment. A recent inter-observer variation study showed profound variation in some variables. Further, some variables depend on a physician assessing...... them, making the score less applicable. The aim of the present study was to simplify the TBscore. Methods: Inter-observer variation assessment and exploratory factor analysis were combined to develop a simplified score, the TBscore II. To validate TBscore II we assessed the association between start...

  11. Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere: Validation Experiments (MOHAVE I and MOHAVE II). Results Overview and Implication for the Long-Term Lidar Monitoring of Water Vapor in the UT/LS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. S.; Vomel, H.; Whiteman, D.; Twigg, Larry; McGee, T. G.

    2008-01-01

    1. MOHAVE+MOHAVE II = very successful. 2. MOHAVE -> Fluorescence was found to be inherent to all three participating lidars. 3. MOHAVE II -> Fluorescence was removed and agreement with CFH was extremely good up to 16-18 km altitude. 4. MOHAVE II -> Calibration tests revealed unsuspected shortfalls of widely used techniques, with important implications for their applicability to longterm measurements. 5. A factor of 5 in future lidar signal-to-noise ratio is reasonably achievable. When this level is achieved water vapor Raman lidar will become a key instrument for the long-term monitoring of water vapor in the UT/LS

  12. Mid-term results after midcarpal arthrodesis using an iliac crest cortical chip for grade II/III SLAC/SNAC-wrists [Mittelfristige Ergebnisse nach mediokarpaler Teilarthrodese mit kortikospongiösem Beckenkammspan bei SLAC/SNAC-wrist Grad II/III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeplin, Philip H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available [english] Purpose: The four-corner-fusion is an option for grade II/III SNAC-/SLAC-wrists. The case-control study evaluates the results of a four-corner-f with a screw-fixed iliac crest cortical chip. Methods: Ten patients with SNAC/SLAC-wrist ≥ grade II were treated. The evaluation occurred after 24 months using a standard study protocol. Results: The mean postoperative active range of motion were 46% (extension/flexion and 52% (radial/ulnar deviation of the contralateral wrist respectively. The postoperative mean grip strength was 43% of the contralateral side, and 84% compared to the preoperative values. The mean Cooney-Bussey Score was 63 and the mean DASH score was 25 (p≤0.05. Four of the patients (40% had to undergo a partial removal of the osteosynthetic material because of radiodorsal impingement. Conclusions: The four-corner fusion using an iliac crest cortical chip represents an alternative operating procedure for treatment, even though the period of immobilisation cannot be reduced. [german] Hintergrund: Die mediokarpale Teilarthrodese stellt eine anerkannte Behandlungsmethode bei karpalen Kollaps nach Skaphoidpseudarthrose (SNAC-wrist oder nach Ruptur des skapholunären Bandes (SLAC-wrist dar. Anhand der vorliegenden Fall-Kontrollstudie wurden die Ergebnisse nach mediokarpaler Teilarthrodese unter Verwendung eines kortikospongiösen Beckenkammspanes evaluiert. Material und Methoden: Zehn Patienten wurden 24 Monate nach mediokarpaler Teilarthrodese bei mit SLAC/SNAC-wrist Grad II/III mit einem kortikospongiösen Beckenkammspan nachuntersucht. Ergebnisse: Das mittlere postoperative Bewegungsausmaß des Handgelenkes betrug für Extension/Flexion 46% und für Radial-/Ulnaradduktion 52% im Vergleich zur unbehandelten Gegenseite. Die postoperative Griffstärke betrug im Mittel 43% der Gegenseite und 84% der präoperativen Werte. Der mittlere Cooney-Bussey-Score lag bei 63, der mittlere DASH-Score bei 25 (p≤0.05. Bei vier Patienten

  13. Biomarker analysis of cetuximab plus oxaliplatin/leucovorin/5-fluorouracil in first-line metastatic gastric and oesophago-gastric junction cancer: results from a phase II trial of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Internistische Onkologie (AIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luber Birgit

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-directed monoclonal antibody cetuximab combined with oxaliplatin/leucovorin/5-fluorouracil (FUFOX was assessed in first-line metastatic gastric and oesophago-gastric junction (OGJ cancer in a prospective phase II study showing a promising objective tumour response rate of 65% and a low mutation frequency of KRAS (3%. The aim of the correlative tumour tissue studies was to investigate the relationship between EGFR gene copy numbers, activation of the EGFR pathway, expression and mutation of E-cadherin, V600E BRAF mutation and clinical outcome of patients with gastric and OGJ cancer treated with cetuximab combined with FUFOX. Methods Patients included in this correlative study (n = 39 were a subset of patients from the clinical phase II study. The association between EGFR gene copy number, activation of the EGFR pathway, abundance and mutation of E-cadherin which plays an important role in these disorders, BRAF mutation and clinical outcome of patients was studied. EGFR gene copy number was assessed by FISH. Expression of the phosphorylated forms of EGFR and its downstream effectors Akt and MAPK, in addition to E-cadherin was analysed by immunohistochemistry. The frequency of mutant V600E BRAF was evaluated by allele-specific PCR and the mutation profile of the E-cadherin gene CDH1 was examined by DHPLC followed by direct sequence analysis. Correlations with overall survival (OS, time to progression (TTP and overall response rate (ORR were assessed. Results Our study showed a significant association between increased EGFR gene copy number (≥ 4.0 and OS in gastric and OGJ cancer, indicating the possibility that patients may be selected for treatment on a genetic basis. Furthermore, a significant correlation was shown between activated EGFR and shorter TTP and ORR, but not between activated EGFR and OS. No V600E BRAF mutations were identified. On the other hand, an

  14. Different Supramolecular Coordination Polymers of [N,N'-di(pyrazin-2-yl-pyridine-2,6-diamine]Ni(II with Anions and Solvent Molecules as a Result of Hydrogen Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ta Wang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Ni(II complexes of N,N'–di(pyrazin–2–ylpyridine–2,6–diamine (H2dpzpda with different anions were synthesized and their structures were determined by X-ray diffraction. Hydrogen bonds between the amino groups and anions assembled the mononuclear molecules into different architectures. The perchlorate complex had a 1-D chain structure, whereas switching the anion from perchlorate to nitrate resulted in a corresponding change of the supramolecular structure from 1-D to 3-D. When the nitrate complex packed with the co-crystallized water, a double chain structure was formed through hydrogen bonding. The magnetic studies revealed values of g = 2.14 and D = 3.11 cm-1 for [Ni(H2dpzpda2](ClO42 (1 and g = 2.18 and D = 2.19 cm-1 for [Ni(H2dpzpda2](NO32 (2, respectively.

  15. Differential Item Functioning Assessment in Cognitive Diagnostic Modeling: Application of the Wald Test to Investigate DIF in the DINA Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Likun; de la Torre, Jimmy; Nandakumar, Ratna

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing examinees' responses using cognitive diagnostic models (CDMs) has the advantage of providing diagnostic information. To ensure the validity of the results from these models, differential item functioning (DIF) in CDMs needs to be investigated. In this article, the Wald test is proposed to examine DIF in the context of CDMs. This study…

  16. Long-term Survival Outcomes Following Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Results of a Large Retrospective Study With 12-Year Follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jee Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doo Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang-Ok, E-mail: cosuh317@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae, E-mail: sjhuh@smc.samsung.co.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 396 patients with stage II-III breast cancer were treated with postmastectomy radiation therapy with (n=197) or without (n=199) IMNI. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. IMNI was administered at the clinical discretion of the treating physician. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0-59.4 Gy) in 28 fractions, with inclusion of the supraclavicular fossa in 96% of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 99.7% of the patients and endocrine therapy to 53%. Results: The median follow-up was 149 months (range, 124-202). IMNI patients had more advanced nodal stage and non-high grade tumors than those without IMNI (P<.001). Otherwise, disease and treatment characteristics were well balanced. The 10-year DFS with and without IMNI was 65% and 57%, respectively (P=.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IMNI was an independent, positive predictor of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P=.02). Benefits of IMNI in DFS were seen most apparently in N2 patients (HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.74) and inner/central tumors (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.90). The 10-year OS with and without IMNI was 72% and 66%, respectively (P=.62). The 10-year DFS and OS were 61%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Internal mammary node irradiation significantly improved DFS in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Pending long-term results from randomized trials, treatment of internal mammary nodes should be considered in postmastectomy radiation therapy.

  17. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy alone in stage III-IV unresectable head and neck cancer. Results of a randomized phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Fodor, Janos [National Institute of Oncology, Center of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Hitre, Erika [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Chemotherapy and Clinical Pharmacology, Budapest (Hungary); Remenar, Eva; Kasler, Miklos [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Surgery, Budapest (Hungary); Oberna, Ferenc [Bacs-Kiskun County Hospital, Department of Oral, Maxillofacial and Head and Neck Surgery, Kecskemet (Hungary); Goedeny, Maria [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-08-15

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In this phase II randomized study, the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concurrent CRT was compared with those after standard CRT alone in patients with locally advanced, unresectable head and neck cancer. Between January 2007 and June 2009, 66 patients with advanced (stage III or IV) unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx) were randomly assigned to two groups: one receiving two cycles of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil ICT followed by CRT with three cycles of cisplatin and one treated by CRT alone. Response rate, local tumor control (LTC), locoregional tumor control (LRTC), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and toxicity results were assessed. Three patients from the ICT + CRT group did not appear at the first treatment, so a total of 63 patients were evaluated in the study (30 ICT + CRT group and 33 CRT group). Three patients died of febrile neutropenia after ICT. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 63 months (range 53-82 months). The rate of radiologic complete response was 63 % following ICT + CRT, whereas 70 % after CRT alone. There were no significant differences in the 3-year rates of LTC (56 vs. 57 %), LRTC (42 vs. 50 %), OS (43 vs. 55 %), and PFS (41 vs. 50 %) in the ICT + CRT group and in the CRT group, respectively. The rate of grade 3-4 neutropenia was significantly higher in the ICT + CRT group than in the CRT group (37 and 12 %; p = 0.024). Late toxicity (grade 2 or 3 xerostomia) developed in 59 and 42 % in the ICT + CRT and CRT groups, respectively. The addition of ICT to CRT did not show any advantage in our phase II trial, while the incidence of adverse events increased. The three deaths as a consequence of ICT call attention to the importance of

  18. Final results of a phase I/II pilot study of capecitabine with or without vinorelbine after sequential dose-dense epirubicin and paclitaxel in high-risk early breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Volkmar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of the non-cross-resistant chemotherapeutic agents capecitabine and vinorelbine into an intensified dose-dense sequential anthracycline- and taxane-containing regimen in high-risk early breast cancer (EBC could improve efficacy, but this combination was not examined in this context so far. Methods Patients with stage II/IIIA EBC (four or more positive lymph nodes received post-operative intensified dose-dense sequential epirubicin (150 mg/m² every 2 weeks and paclitaxel (225 mg/m² every 2 weeks with filgrastim and darbepoetin alfa, followed by capecitabine alone (dose levels 1 and 3 or with vinorelbine (dose levels 2 and 4. Capecitabine was given on days 1-14 every 21 days at 1000 or 1250 mg/m2 twice daily (dose levels 1/2 and 3/4, respectively. Vinorelbine 25 mg/m2 was given on days 1 and 8 of each 21-day course (dose levels 2 and 4. Results Fifty-one patients were treated. There was one dose-limiting toxicity (DLT at dose level 1. At dose level 2 (capecitabine and vinorelbine, five of 10 patients experienced DLTs. Therefore evaluation of vinorelbine was abandoned and dose level 3 (capecitabine monotherapy was expanded. Hand-foot syndrome and diarrhoea were dose limiting with capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 twice daily. At 35.2 months' median follow-up, the estimated 3-year relapse-free and overall survival rates were 82% and 91%, respectively. Conclusions Administration of capecitabine monotherapy after sequential dose-dense epirubicin and paclitaxel is feasible in node-positive EBC, while the combination of capecitabine and vinorelbine as used here caused more DLTs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN38983527.

  19. Feasibility and toxicity of concomitant radio/immunotherapy with MabThera (Rituximab {sup registered}) for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Results of a prospective phase I/II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haidenberger, Alfred; Popper, Bela-Andre; Skvortsova, Ira; Lukas, Peter [Medical Univ. Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy/Radiooncology; Fromm-Haidenberger, Sabine [Hospital Gmunden (Austria). Inst. of Radiology; Vries, Alexander de [Hospital Feldkirch (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy/Radiooncology; Steurer, Michael; Kantner, Johanna; Gunsilius, Eberhard [Medical Univ. Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Hematology

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) have a high radio- and chemosensitivity. Although initially responsive, approximately 50% of low grade B-cell lymphomas relapse after 10-15 years. Besides chemo- and radiotherapy, rituximab, a mouse/human chimeric antibody targeting CD20 antigen on the surface of B-cell lymphoma cells, is another treatment approach. In vitro data showed potentiation of radiation-induced apoptosis by addition of rituximab. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of radiotherapy with concomitant application of rituximab in NHL patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 21 patients with B-cell lymphoma (stage I: n = 11; II: n = 5; III: n = 1; IV: n = 4) were included in this study, treated with radiotherapy of 30-40 Gy and weekly application of rituximab (375 mg/m{sup 2}). Nine patients had R-CHOP chemotherapy previously, 1 patient leuceran chemotherapy, and 2 patients an initial treatment with 6 cycles of rituximab. Mean time of follow-up was 41.7 months. Results: No grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death was observed. In 1 patient, rituximab application had to be stopped after 3 cycles due to radiation-induced side effects. No late toxicities were reported. All patients were in complete remission after treatment. Progression or relapse was observed in 6 patients (28%); the mean time to progression was 27 months. The mean overall survival (OS) was 53 months. Conclusion: Combined radio/immunotherapy is feasible and safe. Treatment was well tolerated, no late toxicities were observed, and treatment outcome is promising. Randomized trials are necessary to clarify the benefit of this treatment approach and its applicability. (orig.)

  20. Felipe II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Restrepo Canal

    1962-04-01

    Full Text Available Como parte de la monumental Historia de España que bajo la prestante y acertadísima dirección de don Ramón Menéndez Pidal se comenzó a dar a la prensa desde 1954 por la Editorial Espasa Calpe S. A., aparecieron en 1958 dos tomos dedicados al reinado de Felipe II; aquella época en que el imperio español alcanzó su unidad peninsular juntamente con el dilatado poderío que le constituyó en la primera potencia de Europa.

  1. Optimal implantation depth and adherence to guidelines on permanent pacing to improve the results of transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the medtronic corevalve system: The CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Petronio (Anna S.); J.-M. Sinning (Jan-Malte); N.M. van Mieghem (Nicolas); G. Zucchelli (Giulio); G. Nickenig (Georg); R. Bekeredjian (Raffi); B. Bosmans; F. Bedogni (Francesco); M. Branny (Marian); K. Stangl (Karl); J. Kovac (Jan); M. Schiltgen (Molly); S. Kraus (Stacia); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives The aim of the CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study was to define the rates of conduction disturbances and permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the Medtronic CoreValve System (Minneapolis, Minnes

  2. Multicenter Phase II Study of Whole-Body and Intracranial Activity With Ceritinib in Patients With ALK-Rearranged Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Chemotherapy and Crizotinib : Results From ASCEND-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crino, Lucio; Ahn, Myung-Ju; De Marinis, Filippo; Groen, Harry J. M.; Wakelee, Heather; Hida, Toyoaki; Mok, Tony; Spigel, David; Felip, Enriqueta; Nishio, Makoto; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Branle, Fabrice; Emeremni, Chetachi; Quadrigli, Massimiliano; Zhang, Jie; Shaw, Alice T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Phase I data (ASCEND-1) showed ceritinib efficacy in patients with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), regardless of brain metastases status and with or without prior therapy with an inhibitor of the ALK protein. Data are presented from a phase II trial (ASCEND-2) in which cer

  3. A [Mn18Dy] SMM resulting from the targeted replacement of the central MnII in the S = 83/2 [Mn19]-aggregate with DyIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ako, Ayuk M; Mereacre, Valeriu; Clérac, Rodolphe; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Hewitt, Ian J; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K

    2009-02-07

    Anisotropy can be introduced into the [Mn(19)]-aggregate, which currently has the highest known spin ground state of S = 83/2, by the targeted replacement of the central Mn(II) cation with Dy(III) leading to a [Mn(18)Dy] complex with the same core topology showing slow relaxation of the magnetisation.

  4. Long-term results of a phase II trial of high-dose radiotherapy (60 Gy) and UFT/l-leucovorin in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestermark, Lene W; Jakobsen, Anders; Qvortrup, Camilla;

    2008-01-01

    , 52 patients (median age 60 years (32-83); median PS 0 (0-2)) with LARC (36 primary, 16 recurrent) were included in this phase II study. All but three patients received the planned 60 Gy, median duration of RT was 42 days (25-49). Toxicity was very modest; only four patients had a dose reduction...

  5. Radioimmunotherapy of small cell lung carcinoma with the two-step method using a bispecific anti-carcinoembryonic antigen/anti-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) antibody and iodine-131 Di-DTPA hapten: results of a phase I/II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillez, J P; Kraeber-Bodéré, F; Moro, D; Bardiès, M; Douillard, J Y; Gautherot, E; Rouvier, E; Barbet, J; Garban, F; Moreau, P; Chatal, J F

    1999-10-01

    As small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is frequently a widespread disease at diagnosis, highly radiosensitive and often only partially responsive to chemotherapy, radioimmunotherapy (RIT) would appear to be a promising technique for treatment. We report the preliminary results of a Phase I/II trial of RIT in SCLC using a two-step method and a myeloablative protocol with circulating stem cells transplantation. Fourteen patients with proved SCLC relapse after chemotherapy were treated with RIT. They were first injected i.v. with a bispecific (anti-carcinoembryonic antigen/anti-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) monoclonal antibody (20-80 mg in 100 ml of saline solution) and then 4 days later with di-(In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid)-tyrosyl-lysine hapten labeled with 1.48-6.66 GBq (40-180 mCi) of I-131 and diluted in 100 ml of saline solution. In patients receiving 150 mCi or more, circulating stem cells were harvested before treatment and reinfused 10-15 days later. Treatment response was evaluated by CT and biochemical data during the month before and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. All patients received the scheduled dose without immediate adverse reactions to bispecific antibody or 1-131 hapten. Toxicity was mainly hematological, with two cases of grade 2 leukopenia and three cases of grade 3 or 4 thrombopenia. Body scanning 8 days after injection of the radiolabeled hapten generally showed good uptake at the tumor sites. Estimated tumor dose was 2.6-32.2 cGy/mCi. Among the 12 patients evaluated to date, we have observed 9 progressions, 2 partial responses (one almost complete for 3 months), and 1 stabilization of more than 24 months. Efficiency and toxicity were dose-related. The maximal tolerable dose without hematological rescue was 150 mCi. These preliminary results are encouraging, and dose escalation is currently continuing to reach 300 mCi. RIT should prove to be an interesting therapeutic method for SCLC, although repeated injections and

  6. Phase I-II study of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost using volumetric modulated arc therapy for adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer patients: a report of feasibility and early toxicity results in the first 50 treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scorsetti Marta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report results in terms of feasibility and early toxicity of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB approach with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT as adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery. Methods Between September 2010 and May 2011, 50 consecutive patients presenting early-stage breast cancer were submitted to adjuvant radiotherapy with SIB-VMAT approach using RapidArc in our Institution (Istituto Clinico Humanitas ICH. Three out of 50 patients were irradiated bilaterally (53 tumours in 50 patients. All patients were enrolled in a phase I-II trial approved by the ICH ethical committee. All 50 patients enrolled in the study underwent VMAT-SIB technique to irradiate the whole breast with concomitant boost irradiation of the tumor bed. Doses to whole breast and surgical bed were 40.5 Gy and 48 Gy respectively, delivered in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Skin toxicities were recorded during and after treatment according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria with a median follow-up of 12 months (range 8–16. Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results The median age of the population was 68 years (range 36–88. According to AJCC staging system, 38 breast lesions were classified as pT1, and 15 as pT2; 49 cases were assessed as N0 and 4 as N1. The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 20/50 patients, Grade 1 in 32/50, Grade 2 in 0 and Grade 3 in 1/50 (one of the 3 cases of bilateral breast irradiation. No Grade 4 toxicities were observed. All Grade 1 toxicities had resolved within 3 weeks. No significant differences in cosmetic scores on baseline assessment vs. 3 months and 6 months after the treatment were observed: all patients were scored as excellent/good (50/50 compared with baseline; no fair/poor judgment was recorded. No other toxicities or local failures were recorded during follow-up. Conclusions The 3

  7. Results of the phase II EORTC 22971 trial evaluating combined accelerated external radiation and chemotherapy with 5FU and cisplatin in patients with muscle invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poortmans, Philip M. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Inst., Tilburg (NL)); Van Der Hulst, Marleen; Richaud, Pierre (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inst. Bergonieacute, Bordeaux (France)); Collette, Laurence; Pierart, Marianne (Statistics Dept., EORTC Data Center, Brussels (Belgium)); Ho Goey, S. (Dept. of Medical Oncology, TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (NL)); Bolla, Michel (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, CHU, Grenoble (France))

    2008-06-15

    Introduction. We prospectively evaluated concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for advanced bladder cancer in a phase II EORTC trial to test whether it could be further studied as a potential treatment of bladder cancer. Patients and methods. Patients up to 75 years of age with invasive transitional-cell carcinoma of the bladder up to 5 cm, stage pT2 to pT3b, N0M0, without residual macroscopical tumour after transurethral excision were eligible. Radiotherapy consisted of 2 fractions of 1.2 Gy daily up to 60 Gy delivered in a period of 5 weeks. During the first and the last week, cisplatin 20 mg/m2/day and 5 FU 375 mg/m2/day were given concomitantly. Results. The study was interrupted early due to poor recruitment. Nine patients of the originally 43 planned were treated. Mean age was 63 years. Five patients had tumour stage pT2, 1 stage pT3a and 3 stage pT3b. All patients completed radiotherapy and chemotherapy as scheduled. Only one grade 3 and no grade 4 toxicity was seen. All patients were evaluated 3 months after treatment: eight patients had no detectable tumour and one had para-aortic lymph nodes. During further follow-up, a second patient got lymph node metastases and two patients developed distant metastases (lung in the patient with enlarged lymph nodes at the first evaluation and abdominal in one other). Those three patients died at respectively 19, 14, and 18 months after registration. Late toxicity was limited and often temporary. After 26 to 57 months of follow-up, no local recurrences were seen. Six patients remained alive without disease. Discussion. Despite the small cohort, this combination of concomitant chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer seemed to be well tolerated and to result in satisfactory local control with limited early and late toxicity. It could therefore be considered for study in further clinical trials

  8. Long-term results of a phase II trial of high-dose radiotherapy (60 Gy) and UFT/l-leucovorin in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestermark, Lene W.; Qvortrup, Camilla; Baatrup, Gunnar; Pfeiffer, Per (Odense Univ. Hospital, Odense (Denmark)); Bisgaard, Claus; Jacobsen, Anders (Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark)); Hansen, Flemming; Rasmussen, Peter (Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2008-03-15

    Background. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is a cornerstone in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To improve outcome (number of R0 resections and survival) high-dose radiotherapy (RT) was combined with oral UFT/l-leucovorin to allow tumour regression before radical intended surgery. Methods. Pelvic RT was delivered with megavoltage photons using a 5 field technique. RT was CT-based, given 5 days a week through one posterior field and two lateral fields (48.6 Gy/27 fractions) to encompass the primary tumour and the regional lymph nodes. In addition, the tumour bed received a concurrent boost (5.4 Gy/27 fractions) and a final boost (6 Gy/3 fractions); thus GTV received 60 Gy/30 fractions. Concurrent with RT patients received a daily dose of oral UFT 300 mg/m2 plus l-leucovorin 22.5 mg 5/7days (divided in three doses). Results. From September 2000 to November 2004, 52 patients (median age 60 years (32-83); median PS 0 (0-2)) with LARC (36 primary, 16 recurrent) were included in this phase II study. All but three patients received the planned 60 Gy, median duration of RT was 42 days (25-49). Toxicity was very modest; only four patients had a dose reduction of UFT. No hematological toxicity of clinical significance was seen. Non-hematological toxicity grade 1 (GI-toxicity, fatigue and/or dysuria) was frequently observed but only four patients experienced grade 3 toxicity (diarrhoea and/or nausea/vomiting). Forty patients (77%) were operated (30 R0, 5 R1, 5 R2) median 55 days (27-112) after completion of RT. Seven (13%) patients had a pathological complete response (pCR). Thirty-one patients (60%) died after median 25.4 months (1.6-45.2 months). Twenty-one patients (40%) are still alive June 2007. Conclusions. Preoperative high-dose RT and concomitant UFT produces major regression in most patients with non-resectable LARC and thus a good chance of cure

  9. Sequential (gemcitabine/vinorelbine) and concurrent (gemcitabine) radiochemotherapy with FDG-PET-based target volume definition in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: first results of a phase I/II study

    OpenAIRE

    Stanzel Sven; Kaiser Hans J; Krohn Thomas; Reinartz Patrick; Pinkawa Michael; Piroth Marc; Gagel Bernd; Breuer Christian; Asadpour Branka; Schmachtenberg Axel; Eble Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine every two weeks concurrent to radiotherapy, administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radiochemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate the efficacy of this regime in a phase II study. Methods 33 patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a combined radiochemotherapy protocol. 29 patien...

  10. Phase I/II {sup 90}Y-Zevalin (yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8) radioimmunotherapy dosimetry results in relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiseman, G.A.; Dunn, W.L. [Dept. Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States); White, C.A.; Berlfein, J.R.; Ding, E.; Grillo-Lopez, A.J. [IDEC Pharmaceuticals Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Stabin, M.; Erwin, W.; Spies, S. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University and Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Il (United States); Dahlbom, M.; Silverman, D.H.S. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Raubitschek, A. [City of Hope, Duarte, CA (United States); Karvelis, K. [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Schultheiss, T. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Witzig, T.E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States); Belanger, R. [Ryan Belanger Associates, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Dosimetry studies in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were performed to estimate the radiation absorbed dose to normal organs and bone marrow from {sup 90}Y-Zevalin (yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8) treatment in this phase I/II, multicenter trial. The trial was designed to determine the dose of Rituximab (chimeric anti-CD20, Rituxan, IDEC-C2B8, MabThera), the unlabeled antibody given prior to the radioconjugate to clear peripheral blood B cells and optimize distribution, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose of {sup 90}Y-Zevalin [7.4, 11, or 15 MBq/kg (0.2, 0.3, or 0.4 mCi/kg)]. Patients received {sup 111}In-Zevalin (indium-111 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-In2B8) on day 0 followed by a therapeutic dose of {sup 90}Y-Zevalin on day 7. Both doses were preceded by an infusion of the chimeric, unlabeled antibody Rituximab. Following administration of {sup 111}In-Zevalin, serial anterior/posterior whole-body scans were acquired. Major-organ radioactivity versus time estimates were calculated using regions of interest. Residence times were computed and entered into the MIRDOSE3 computer software program to calculate estimated radiation absorbed dose to each organ. Initial analyses of estimated radiation absorbed dose were completed at the clinical site. An additional, centralized dosimetry analysis was performed subsequently to provide a consistent analysis of data collected from the seven clinical sites. In all patients with dosimetry data (n=56), normal organ and red marrow radiation absorbed doses were estimated to be well under the protocol-defined upper limit of 20 Gy and 3 Gy, respectively. Median estimated radiation absorbed dose was 3.4 Gy to liver (range 1.2-7.8 Gy), 2.6 Gy to lungs (range 0.72-4.4 Gy), and 0.38 Gy to kidneys (range 0.07-0.61 Gy). Median estimated tumor radiation absorbed dose was 17 Gy (range 5.8-67 Gy). No correlation was noted between hematologic toxicity and the following variables: red marrow radiation absorbed dose

  11. 90y-Ibritumumab Tiuxetan (Zevalin®-BEAM/C with Autologous Stem Cell Support as Therapy for Advanced Mantle Cell Lymphoma. - Preliminary Results From the Third Nordic II Study (MCL3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolstad, Arne; Laurell, Anna; Andersen, Niels S

    The Nordic Lymphoma Group has since 1996 conducted three consecutive phase II trials for front-line treatment of MCL patients ≤ 65 years of age. The first protocol (MCL1) 1996-2000 introduced high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support (unpurged or ex vivo purged) as consolidation...... with alternating cycles of maxi-CHOP-rituximab (3 cycles) and Ara-C-rituximab (3 cycles). Response evaluation was done after cycle 5. PET/CT was recommended, but could not influence the response evaluation, which was done according to the International Workshop criteria. Responders underwent in vivo purged harvest...

  12. Monocytes and neutrophils as 'bad guys' for the outcome of interleukin-2 with and without histamine in metastatic renal cell carcinoma--results from a randomised phase II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donskov, F; Hokland, M; Marcussen, N;

    2006-01-01

    Histamine (HDC) inhibits formation and release of phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species, and thereby protects natural killer (NK) and T cells against oxidative damage. Thus, the addition of histamine may potentially improve the efficacy of interleukin-2 (IL-2). We have explored this potential...... mechanism clinically in two randomised phase II trials in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). In parallel with the clinical trial in Denmark (n=63), we obtained serial blood samples and tumour biopsies searching for a potential histamine effect in situ. At baseline and on-treatment weeks 3 and 8, we...

  13. Investigations of Spree river water quality trends. Project 5.1: Reactions and material transport processes resulting from mining and storage in the LOHSA II storage system and the neighbouring groundwater systems and their effects on the receiving watercourses Kleine Spree and Spree. Final report; Untersuchungen zur Gewaesserbeschaffenheitsentwicklung der Spree. Teilprojekt 5.1: Bergbau- und speicherwirtschaftsbedingte Stoffumsatz- und Stofftransportprozesse im Speichersystem LOHSA II und in den diese umlagernden Grundwassersystemen und deren Auswirkung auf die Beschaffenheit der Vorfluter Kleine Spree und Spree. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, U.; Ehret, B.; Mazur, K.

    2003-03-01

    The effects of mining lakes used as water stores (Dreiweibern, Lohsa II, Burghammer) on the water quality of the Spree river catchment area was investigated. The focus was on the potential water quality problems caused by the water storage, not on the processes involved in water quality development in general. Both expert opinions and monitoring results, especially of the project 'Gewaesserguete in Tagebauseen der Lausitz (BTUC/LMBV), suggest that especially in low-water situations with reduced storage levels, both the lake water quality and the quality of the receiving watercourses 'Kleine Spree' and 'Spree' will deteriorate dramatically. In consequence, water management should not be based on water volumes alone, but the aspect of water quality must be considered as a key criterion as well. In project 5.1, water management of the LOHSA II system was investigated, including the establishment of forecasts of recirculation conditions from the LOHSA II storages system into the Kleine Spree and Spree as receiving watercourses. (orig.) [German] Um die wasserhaushaltliche Sanierung der durch die bergbauliche Taetigkeit gestoerten Oberflaechenwasser- und Grundwassersysteme zu gewaehrleisten und langfristig eine gezielte Steuerung des Wasserdargebots im Einzugsgebiet der Spree zu ermoeglichen, werden die Tagebaurestloecher Dreiweibern, Lohsa II und Burghammer zu wasserwirtschaftlichen Speichern ausgebaut, die das zukuenftige Speichersystem bilden. In dem hier vorgestellten Projekt galt es, den Einfluss der Nutzung von Tagebauseen als Speicher auf die Gewaesserguete zu untersuchen. Im Mittelpunkt des Interesses standen dabei weniger die Prozesse, die generell die Entwicklung der Wasserqualitaet in der Flutungsphase und im stationaeren Endzustand aller Tagebauseen steuern, als vielmehr die durch die Speicherbewirtschaftung selbst hervorgerufenen Gueteprobleme. Gutachten und Monitoringergebnisse, vor allem im wissenschaftlich - technischen Projekt

  14. Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Bomb Increment II (SDB II) DoD Component Air Force Joint Participants Department of the Navy Responsible Office References SAR Baseline ( Production ...Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-439 Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Funding 19 Low Rate Initial Production 31 Foreign Military Sales 32 Nuclear Costs 32 Unit Cost 33 Cost Variance 36 Contracts

  15. Elizabeth II uus kunstigalerii

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Tähistamaks oma troonile asumise 50. aastapäeva, avab Elizabeth II 6. II 2002 Buckinghami palees uue kunstigalerii, mis ehitatakse palee tiibhoonena. Arhitekt John Simpson. Elizabeth II kunstikogust

  16. Selective chelation of Cd(II) and Pb(II) versus Ca(II) and Zn(II) by using octadentate ligands containing pyridinecarboxylate and pyridyl pendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirós-Martínez, Raquel; Esteban-Gómez, David; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa

    2009-12-07

    Herein we report the coordination properties toward Cd(II), Pb(II), Ca(II), and Zn(II) of a new octadentate ligand (py-H(2)bcpe) based on a ethane-1,2-diamine unit containing two picolinate and two pyridyl pendants, which is structurally derived from the previous reported ligand bcpe. Potentiometric studies have been carried out to determine the protonation constants of the ligand and the stability constants of the complexes with these cations. The introduction of the pyridyl pendants in bcpe provokes a very important increase of the logK(ML) values obtained for the Pb(II) and Cd(II) complexes, while this effect is less important in the case of the Zn(II) analogue. As a result, py-bcpe shows a certain selectivity for Cd(II) and Pb(II) over Zn(II) while keeping good Pb(II)/Ca(II) and Cd(II)/Ca(II) selectivities, and the new receptor py-bcpe can be considered as a new structural framework for the design of novel Cd(II) and Pb(II) extracting agents. Likewise, the stabilities of the Cd(II) and Pb(II) complexes are higher than those of the corresponding EDTA analogues. The X-ray crystal structure of [Zn(py-bcpe)] shows hexadentate binding of the ligand to the metal ion, the coordination polyhedron being best described as a severely distorted octahedron. However, the X-ray crystal structure of the Pb(II) analogue shows octadentate binding of the ligand to the metal ion. A detailed investigation of the structure in aqueous solution of the complexes by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP) shows that while in the Zn(II) complex the metal ion is six-coordinated, in the Pb(II) and Ca(II) analogues the metal ions are eight-coordinated. For the Cd(II) complex, our results suggest that in solution the complex exists as a mixture of seven- and eight-coordinated species. DFT calculations performed both in the gas phase and in aqueous solution have been also used to investigate the role of the Pb(II) lone pair in

  17. Can Co(II) or Cd(II) substitute for Zn(II) in zinc fingers?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Rabindra Reddy; M Radhika

    2001-02-01

    Zinc finger domains consist of sequences of amino acids containing cysteine and histidine residues tetrahedrally coordinated to a zinc ion. The role of zinc in a DNA binding finger was considered purely structural due to the absence of redox chemistry in zinc. However, whether other metals e.g. Co(II) or Cd(II) can substitute Zn(II) is not settled. For an answer the detailed interaction of Co(II) and Cd(II) with cysteine methylester and histidine methylester has been investigated as a model for the zinc core in zinc fingers. The study was extended to different temperatures to evaluate the thermodynamic parameters associated with these interactions. The results suggest that zinc has a unique role.

  18. [Ecology of indigenious arbovirus in Alsace. Tick Central European Encephalitis. I.--Complex Ixodes ricinus--bank voles. II.--Study of bank voles population immunity. III.--Virologic results in bank voles population (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, J; Hannoun, C; Rodhain, F; Chatelain, J; Hannoun, C; Salmon, A M; Ardoin, P; Chatelain, J; Hannoun, C; Sureau, P

    1979-01-01

    I.--After showing that bank voles are parasited only by Ixodes ricinus larvae, the authors attempt to found different factors (demographic, biometric, and sexual) who favor individual parasitism. The authors conclude to absent of anti tick immunity for this rodent specie. II.--The search for anti-central european encephalitis antibodies (I.H.A.) are shown that 2 p. cent animals were immuns. Yearly and monthly chronologies of antibodies apparition are shown, factors favoring the growth of specific Central european encephalitis antibodies are discussed. III.--The Central european encephalitis tick viral infection of bank vole is studied according to the number of viral strains isolated from different viscera. The monthly chronology of this infection is shown.

  19. Selective separation of Cu (II), Zn (II), and Cd (II) by solvent extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Keng; WEN Jiankang; HUA Yixin; RUAN Renman

    2008-01-01

    An experimental investigation was presented on the separation of Cu (II), Zn (II), and Cd (II) from a rich sulfate leachate of zinc slag by solvent extraction. The results of orthogonal experiments indicate that LIX 984N is highly selective and very efficient in the extraction of Cu (II), and the analysis of variance indicates that the sequence of parameters according to their influence on the separation efficiency is phase ratio>LIX 984N concentration>pH value>extraction time. The optimal condition for copper extraction is obtained as 25% of LIX 984N concentration, 7 min of extraction time, 3:2 of phase ratio O/A, and pH=1.7. The separation of Zn (II) and Cd (II) was performed after the copper extraction from the raffinate. Comparative analysis of the separation with di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (D2EHPA), D2EHPA-tributyl-phosophate (TBP) synergistic extracting system, and 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono 2-ethylhexyl ester (HEHEHP) was made at pH=2.0. It is demonstrated that the extraction efficiency with D2EHPA is improved after being saponified by sodium hydroxide, and D2EHPA-TBP synergistic extracting, as well as HEHEHP, has a superior selectivity to Zn (II) over Cd (II).

  20. Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions alter the dynamics and distribution of Mn(II) in cultured chick glial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedler, F.C.; Ley, B.W. (Dept. of Molecular Cell Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Previous studies revealed that Mn(II) is accumulated in cultured glial cells to concentrations far above those present in whole brain or in culture medium. The data indicated that Mn(II) moves across the plasma membrane into the cytoplasm by facilitated diffusion or counter-ion transport with Ca(II), then into mitochondria by active transport. The fact that 1-10 microM Mn(II) ions activate brain glutamine synthetase makes important the regulation of Mn(II) transport in the CNS. Since Cu(II) and Zn(II) caused significant changes in the accumulation of Mn(II) by glia, the mechanisms by which these ions alter the uptake and efflux of Mn(II) ions has been investigated systematically under chemically defined conditions. The kinetics of (54MN)-Mn(II) uptake and efflux were determined and compared under four different sets of conditions: no adducts, Cu(II) or Zn(II) added externally, and with cells preloaded with Cu(II) or Zn(II) in the presence and absence of external added metal ions. Zn(II) ions inhibit the initial velocity of Mn(II) uptake, increase total Mn(II) accumulated, but do not alter the rate or extent Mn(II) efflux. Cu(II) ions increase both the initial velocity and the net Mn(II) accumulated by glia, with little effect on rate or extent of Mn(II) efflux. These results predict that increases in Cu(II) or Zn(II) levels may also increase the steady-state levels of Mn(II) in the cytoplasmic fraction of glial cells, which may in turn alter the activity of Mn(II)-sensitive enzymes in this cell compartment.

  1. Fermionic dark matter through a light pseudoscalar portal: Hints from the DAMA results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kwei-Chou

    2016-08-01

    We study the fermionic dark matter (DM) particle interacting with Standard Model quarks via a light pseudoscalar mediator. We consider separately the scenarios for which the DM-pseudoscalar coupling is C P conserving or C P violating. We show that taking a contact interaction is not suitable, even when the mediator has a mass of the same order of magnitude as the typical momentum transfer at the direct-detection experiments, such that the allowed DAMA region is excluded or considerably modified by the correct relic density requirement. The DAMA result seems to indicate that the C P -violating interaction is dominant at direct searches. We find that, if the proton-to-neutron effective coupling ratio is -60 ˜-40 , the exclusion limits set by SuperCDMS, XENON100, and LUX are highly suppressed, and the DAMA signal can thus be easily reconciled with these null measurements. For this model, the allowed region determined by the DAMA signal and correct relic density can successfully satisfy the conditions required by the thermal equilibrium, big bang nucleosynthesis, and DM self-interactions. The results of future measurements on flavor physics will provide important constraints on the related models. Precise measurements performed by COUPP, PICASSO, SIMPLE, and KIMS should be able to test this model in the near future.

  2. Physicochemical properties of 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoates of Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Zn(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. FERENC

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The complexes of Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II with 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid anion of the formula: M(C10H11O52·nH2O, where n = 6 for Ni(II, n = 1 for Mn(II, Co(II, Cu(II, and n = 0 for Zn, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, X–ray diffraction measurements, thermogravimetry and magnetic studies. They are crystalline compounds characterized by various symmetry. They decompose in various ways when heated in air to 1273 K. At first, they dehydrate in one step and form anhydrous salts. The final products of decomposition are oxides of the respective metals (Mn2O3, Co3O4, NiO, CuO, ZnO. The solubilities of the analysed complexes in water at 293 K are in the orders of 10-2 – 10-4 mol dm-3. The magnetic susceptibilities of the Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II complexes were measured over the range of 76–303 K and the magnetic moments were calculated. The results show that the 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoates of Mn(II, Co(II and Ni(II are high-spin complexes but that of Cu(II forms a dimer [Cu2(C10H11O54(H2O2]. The carboxylate groups bind as monodentate or bidentate chelating or bridging ligands.

  3. Top Quark Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS collaboration; LHCb collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of top quarks from Run-I and Run-II of the LHC are presented. Results on differential and inclusive top quark production cross sections, measured by the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments, and measurements of top quark properties and mass are reported.

  4. Efficiency of Chitosan for the Removal of Pb (II, Fe (II and Cu (II Ions from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Sobhanardakani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heavy metals have been recognized as harmful environmental pollutant known to produce highly toxic effects on different organs and systems of both humans and animals. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the adsorption potential of chitosan for the removal of Pb(II, Fe(II and Cu(II ions from aqueous solutions. Methods: This study was conducted in laboratory scale. In this paper chitosan has been used as an adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II, Fe(II and Cu(II from aqueous solution. In batch tests, the effects of parameters like pH solution (1.0-8.0, initial metal concentrations (100-1000 mgL-1, contact time (5.0-150 min and adsorbent dose (1.0-7.0 g on the adsorption process were studied. Results: The results showed that the adsorption of Pb(II, Fe(II and Cu(II ions on chitosan strongly depends on pH. The experimental isothermal data were analyzed using the Langmuir and Freundlich equations and it was found that the removal process followed the Langmuir isotherm and maximum adsorption capacity for the adsorption of Pb(II, Fe(II and Cu(II ions by the chitosan were 55.5mg g−1, 71.4 mg g−1 and 59 mg g−1, respectively, under equilibrium conditions at 25±1 ºC. The adsorption process was found to be well described by the pseudo-second-order rate model. Conclusion: The obtained results showed that chitosan is a readily, available, economic adsorbent and was found suitable for removing Pb(II, Fe(II and Cu(II ions from aqueous solution.

  5. Addition of cladribine to the standard induction treatment improves outcomes in a subset of elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients. Results of a randomized Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG) phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, Agnieszka; Robak, Tadeusz; Wrzesien-Kus, Agata; Katarzyna Budziszewska, Bozena; Sulek, Kazimierz; Wawrzyniak, Ewa; Czemerska, Magdalena; Zwolinska, Malgorzata; Golos, Aleksandra; Holowiecka-Goral, Aleksandra; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Piszcz, Jaroslaw; Kloczko, Janusz; Mordak-Domagala, Monika; Lange, Andrzej; Razny, Małgorzata; Madry, Krzysztof; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw; Grosicki, Sebastian; Butrym, Aleksandra; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Holowiecki, Jerzy; Giebel, Sebastian; Szydlo, Richard; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka

    2017-04-01

    Intensive induction chemotherapy using anthracycline and cytarabine backbone is considered the most effective upfront therapy in physically fit older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, outcomes of the standard induction in elderly AML are inferior to those observed in younger patients, and they are still unsatisfactory. As addition of cladribine to the standard induction therapy is known to improve outcome in younger AML patients. The present randomized phase II study compares efficacy and toxicity of the DAC (daunorubicin plus cytarabine plus cladribine) regimen with the standard DA (daunorubicin plus cytarabine) regimen in the newly diagnosed AML patients over 60 years of age. A total of 171 patients were enrolled in the study (DA, 86; DAC, 85). A trend toward higher complete remission (CR) was observed in the DAC arm compared to the DA arm (44% vs. 34%; P = .19), which did not lead to improved median overall survival, which in the case of the DAC group was 8.6 months compared to in 9.1 months in the DA group (P = .64). However, DAC appeared to be superior in the group of patients aged 60-65 (CR rate: DAC 51% vs. DA 29%; P = .02). What is more, a subgroup of patients, with good and intermediate karyotypes, benefited from addition of cladribine also in terms of overall survival (P = .02). No differences in hematological and nonhematological toxicity between the DA and DAC regimens were observed.

  6. Results of a phase II trial with second-line cystemustine at 60 mg/m{sup 2} in advanced soft tissue sarcoma: A trial of the EORTC early clinical studies group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chollet, P. [Centre Jean Perrin and Inserm U71, 58 rue Montalembert, B.P. 392, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1 (France); Fumoleau, P. [Centre Rene Gauducheau, Site Hospitalier Nord, Boulevard Jacques Monod, 44805 Saint-Herblain Cedex (France); Lentz, M.A. [EORTC Data Center, Avenue E. Mounier, 83-B. 11, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Chevallier, B. [Centre Henri Becquerel, Rue d' Amiens, 76038 Rouen Cedex (France); Roche, H. [Centre Claudius Regaud, 20-24 rue du Pont-Saint-Pierre, 31052 Toulouse Cedex (France); Kerbrat, P. [Centre Eugene Marquis, Rue de la bataille Flandre-Dunkerque, B.P. 6279, 35062 Rennes Cedex (France); Tubiana, N. [C.H.U. Dupuytren, 2 avenue Martin Luther King, 87042 Limoges Cedex (France); Adenis, A. [Centre Oscar Lambret, Rue Frederic Combemale, B.P. 307, 59020 Lille Cedex (France); Krakowski, I. [Centre Alexis Vautrin, Avenue de Bourgogne, 54511 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Cure, H. [Centre Jean Perrin and Inserm U71, 58 rue Montalembert, B.P. 392, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1 (France)

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this phase II trial was to examine the efficacy of a new nitrosourea, cystemustine, in soft tissue sarcoma. Between January 1990 and March 1991, 32 pretreated patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma were enrolled. Cystemustine was given every 2 weeks at 60 mg/m{sup 2} via a 15-min i.v. infusion. All eligible patients were considered evaluable for response and toxicity (WHO criteria). Of the 32 enrolled patients, 4 were ineligible, leaving 28 evaluable patients. All but 1 had been pretreated: 6 with adjuvant chemotherapy, 18 patients with first-line palliative chemotherapy without nitrosourea, 3 with both treatments, and 18 had received radiotherapy. Median age was 54 years (range 20-73) and median performance status was 1 (0-2). One partial response (PR, duration 12 weeks), 2 stable disease and 25 progressions were observed, giving an overall response rate of 3.57% (confidence interval: 0.1-18.4%). Toxicity was mild, and was mainly neutropenia (no grade 3 or 4), thrombocytopenia (3.57% grade 3 and grade 4) and nausea-vomiting (no grade 3 or 4). It should be noted that the treatment for the patient who obtained a PR was third line with no previous response. Cystemustine with this schedule appears to have a low clinical activity and toxicity in advanced soft tissue sarcoma. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. The type II collagen fragments Helix-II and CTX-II reveal different enzymatic pathways of human cartilage collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charni-Ben Tabassi, N; Desmarais, S; Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay

    2008-01-01

    sections were then incubated for up to 84h in the presence or absence of E-64 and GM6001, inhibitors of cysteine proteases and MMPs, respectively. RESULTS: In vitro, Cats K, L and S generated large amount of Helix-II, but not CTX-II. Cat B generated CTX-II fragment, but destroyed Helix-II immunoreactivity...

  8. Spectral and thermodynamic properties of Ag(I), Au(III), Cd(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Hg(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), U(IV), and Zn(II) binding by methanobactin from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong W; Do, Young S; Zea, Corbin J; McEllistrem, Marcus T; Lee, Sung-W; Semrau, Jeremy D; Pohl, Nicola L; Kisting, Clint J; Scardino, Lori L; Hartsel, Scott C; Boyd, Eric S; Geesey, Gill G; Riedel, Theran P; Shafe, Peter H; Kranski, Kim A; Tritsch, John R; Antholine, William E; DiSpirito, Alan A

    2006-12-01

    Methanobactin (mb) is a novel chromopeptide that appears to function as the extracellular component of a copper acquisition system in methanotrophic bacteria. To examine this potential physiological role, and to distinguish it from iron binding siderophores, the spectral (UV-visible absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron) and thermodynamic properties of metal binding by mb were examined. In the absence of Cu(II) or Cu(I), mb will bind Ag(I), Au(III), Co(II), Cd(II), Fe(III), Hg(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), U(VI), or Zn(II), but not Ba(II), Ca(II), La(II), Mg(II), and Sr(II). The results suggest metals such as Ag(I), Au(III), Hg(II), Pb(II) and possibly U(VI) are bound by a mechanism similar to Cu, whereas the coordination of Co(II), Cd(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) by mb differs from Cu(II). Consistent with its role as a copper-binding compound or chalkophore, the binding constants of all the metals examined were less than those observed with Cu(II) and copper displaced other metals except Ag(I) and Au(III) bound to mb. However, the binding of different metals by mb suggests that methanotrophic activity also may play a role in either the solubilization or immobilization of many metals in situ.

  9. Macrocyclic receptor showing extremely high Sr(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Ca(II) selectivities with potential application in chelation treatment of metal intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirós-Martínez, Raquel; Esteban-Gómez, David; Tóth, Éva; de Blas, Andrés; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa

    2011-04-18

    Herein we report a detailed investigation of the complexation properties of the macrocyclic decadentate receptor N,N'-Bis[(6-carboxy-2-pyridil)methyl]-4,13-diaza-18-crown-6 (H(2)bp18c6) toward different divalent metal ions [Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Sr(II), and Ca(II)] in aqueous solution. We have found that this ligand is especially suited for the complexation of large metal ions such as Sr(II) and Pb(II), which results in very high Pb(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) selectivities (in fact, higher than those found for ligands widely used for the treatment of lead poisoning such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (edta)), as well as in the highest Sr(II)/Ca(II) selectivity reported so far. These results have been rationalized on the basis of the structure of the complexes. X-ray crystal diffraction, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as theoretical calculations at the density functional theory (B3LYP) level have been performed. Our results indicate that for large metal ions such as Pb(II) and Sr(II) the most stable conformation is Δ(δλδ)(δλδ), while for Ca(II) our calculations predict the Δ(λδλ)(λδλ) form being the most stable one. The selectivity that bp18c6(2-) shows for Sr(II) over Ca(II) can be attributed to a better fit between the large Sr(II) ions and the relatively large crown fragment of the ligand. The X-ray crystal structure of the Pb(II) complex shows that the Δ(δλδ)(δλδ) conformation observed in solution is also maintained in the solid state. The Pb(II) ion is endocyclically coordinated, being directly bound to the 10 donor atoms of the ligand. The bond distances to the donor atoms of the pendant arms (2.55-2.60 Å) are substantially shorter than those between the metal ion and the donor atoms of the crown moiety (2.92-3.04 Å). This is a typical situation observed for the so-called hemidirected compounds, in which the Pb(II) lone pair is stereochemically active. The X-ray structures of the Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes show that

  10. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search: First 5-Tower Data and Improved Understanding of Ionization Collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Catherine N. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is searching for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with cryogenic particle detectors. These detectors have the ability to discriminate between nuclear recoil candidate and electron recoil background events by collecting both phonon and ionization energy from recoils in the detector crystals. The CDMS-II experiment has completed analysis of the first data runs with 30 semiconductor detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, resulting in a world leading WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section limit for WIMP masses above 44 GeV/c2. As CDMS aims to achieve greater WIMP sensitivity, it is necessary to increase the detector mass and discrimination between signal and background events. Incomplete ionization collection results in the largest background in the CDMS detectors as this causes electron recoil background interactions to appear as false candidate events. Two primary causes of incomplete ionization collection are surface and bulk trapping. Recent work has been focused on reducing surface trapping through the modification of fabrication methods for future detectors. Analyzing data taken with test devices has shown that hydrogen passivation of the amorphous silicon blocking layer worsens surface trapping. Additional data has shown that the iron-ion implantation used to lower the critical temperature of the tungsten transition-edge sensors causes a degradation of the ionization collection. Using selective implantation on future detectors may improve ionization collection for events near the phonon side detector surface. Bulk trapping is minimized by neutralizing ionized lattice impurities. Detector investigations at testing facilities and in situ at the experimental site have provided methods to optimize the neutralization process and monitor running conditions to maintain full ionization collection. This work details my contribution to the 5-tower data taking, monitoring, and analysis effort as

  11. Rhodiola rosea, folic acid, zinc and biotin (EndEP(®)) is able to improve ejaculatory control in patients affected by lifelong premature ejaculation: Results from a phase I-II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tommaso; Verze, Paolo; Massenio, Paolo; Tiscione, Daniele; Malossini, Gianni; Cormio, Luigi; Carrieri, Giuseppe; Mirone, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    The therapeutic armamentarium currently available for the treatment of premature ejaculation (PE) is not highly satisfactory. However, phytotherapeutics appear to be an interesting option for PE management. The present study aimed to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of a phytotherapeutic combination of Rhodiola rosea, folic acid, biotin and zinc (EndEP(®)) in the treatment of patients affected by lifelong PE. All patients affected by lifelong PE who were attending three Urological Institutions from July to December 2014 were enrolled in this prospective, multicentre, phase I-II study. All patients were assigned to receive oral tablets of EndEP(®) (one tablet per day) for 90 days. Clinical and instrumental analyses were carried out at enrolment and at the end of the study. International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-15, Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) and Short Form (SF)-36 questionnaires were used. The intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) for each event was also evaluated using the stop-watch technique. The main outcome measure was the difference from baseline in PEDT questionnaire and mean IELT at the end of the follow-up period. In total, 91 patients (mean age, 32.3±5.6 years) were analysed. The baseline questionnaires mean scores were 1.1±1.6, 26.1±2.9, 15.3±3.4 and 98.2±0.5, for IPSS, IIEF-15, PEDT and SF-36, respectively. The mean IELT at baseline was 73.6±46.9s. At the follow-up examination (90 days after the start of treatment), no statistically significant differences were identified in terms of IPSS (1.4±1.5) or IIEF-15 (26.3±3.1) compared with the pre-treatment values (P=0.19 and P=0.64, respectively). A statistically significant difference was detected between the mean IELT at enrolment and after treatment (73.6±46.9 vs. 102.3±60.0; Pejaculation (60.4%). Very few adverse events were reported (4.4%). In conclusion, it was found that EndEP(®) significantly improved

  12. Rhodiola rosea, folic acid, zinc and biotin (EndEP®) is able to improve ejaculatory control in patients affected by lifelong premature ejaculation: Results from a phase I-II study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tommaso; Verze, Paolo; Massenio, Paolo; Tiscione, Daniele; Malossini, Gianni; Cormio, Luigi; Carrieri, Giuseppe; Mirone, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic armamentarium currently available for the treatment of premature ejaculation (PE) is not highly satisfactory. However, phytotherapeutics appear to be an interesting option for PE management. The present study aimed to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of a phytotherapeutic combination of Rhodiola rosea, folic acid, biotin and zinc (EndEP®) in the treatment of patients affected by lifelong PE. All patients affected by lifelong PE who were attending three Urological Institutions from July to December 2014 were enrolled in this prospective, multicentre, phase I–II study. All patients were assigned to receive oral tablets of EndEP® (one tablet per day) for 90 days. Clinical and instrumental analyses were carried out at enrolment and at the end of the study. International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-15, Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) and Short Form (SF)-36 questionnaires were used. The intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) for each event was also evaluated using the stop-watch technique. The main outcome measure was the difference from baseline in PEDT questionnaire and mean IELT at the end of the follow-up period. In total, 91 patients (mean age, 32.3±5.6 years) were analysed. The baseline questionnaires mean scores were 1.1±1.6, 26.1±2.9, 15.3±3.4 and 98.2±0.5, for IPSS, IIEF-15, PEDT and SF-36, respectively. The mean IELT at baseline was 73.6±46.9s. At the follow-up examination (90 days after the start of treatment), no statistically significant differences were identified in terms of IPSS (1.4±1.5) or IIEF-15 (26.3±3.1) compared with the pre-treatment values (P=0.19 and P=0.64, respectively). A statistically significant difference was detected between the mean IELT at enrolment and after treatment (73.6±46.9 vs. 102.3±60.0; Pejaculation (60.4%). Very few adverse events were reported (4.4%). In conclusion, it was found that EndEP® significantly improved

  13. Two novel Krebs-type polyoxoanions [Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-XW 9O 33) 2] 12- (X = Sb III, Bi III) resulting in 2D layer structures linked by copper(I) ions and copper(II) complex groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Shuxia; Feng, Dan; Zhang, Chundan; Sun, Ping; Ma, Fengji

    2009-11-01

    Two sandwich-type organic-inorganic hybrid polyoxotungstates [enH 2] 5[Cu II(en) 2][Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-SbW 9O 33) 2]·16H 2O ( 1) and [enH 2] 5[Cu II(en) 2][Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-BiW 9O 33) 2]·22H 2O ( 2) (en = ethylenediamine) have been synthesized hydrothermally and structurally characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermal stability analyses, X-ray powder diffraction, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The polyoxoanions in 1 and 2 are composed of two trivacant (B-β-XW 9O 33) 9- (X = Sb III ( 1), Bi III ( 2)) subunits joined together by two Cu(I) ions and two W(VI) ions resulting in two novel Krebs-type sandwich structures. These polyoxoanions are further connected by Cu(I) ions and [Cu II(en) 2] 2+ coordination cations, and afford the first copper(I)-linked 2D layer structure constructed from Krebs-type polyoxotungstates. Additionally, the electrochemical behavior and electrocatalysis of 1 and 2 modified carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) have been studied. The results indicate that they have good electrocatalytic activities toward the reduction of nitrite.

  14. Factor II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  15. Results of a collaborative study of the EDNAP group regarding the reproducibility and robustness of the Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS389 I and II, DYS390 and DYS393 in a PCR pentaplex format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carracedo, A; Beckmann, A; Bengs, A

    2001-01-01

    390 and DYS393 and to determine whether uniformity of results could be achieved among different European laboratories.Laboratories were asked to analyze the five Y-STRs using singleplex and multiplex conditions in three bloodstains and one mixed stain (95% female and 5% male).All the laboratories...... reported the same results even for the mixed stain included in the exercise. This demonstrates the reproducibility and robustness of Y-chromosome STR typing even with multiplex formats and proves the usefulness of Y-STR systems for analyzing mixed stains with a male component.A total of 930 male samples...

  16. Mass spectrometry and potentiometry studies of Pb(II)-, Cd(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furia, Emilia; Aiello, Donatella; Di Donna, Leonardo; Mazzotti, Fabio; Tagarelli, Antonio; Thangavel, Hariprasad; Napoli, Anna; Sindona, Giovanni

    2014-01-21

    Cd(II)-, Pb(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes were investigated by potentiometric and different mass spectrometric (MS) methodologies. Laser desorption mass spectrometry has provided both the composition and structure of metal-cystine complexes according to the speciation models proposed on the basis of the potentiometric data. Detection of neutral complexes was achieved by protonation or electrochemical reduction during mass spectrometric experiments. The redox activity of metal-cystine complexes was confirmed by laser desorption and charge transfer matrix assisted laser assisted MS experiments, which allowed us to observe the formation of complexes with a reduction of cystine. The stoichiometry of Cd(II)-, Pb(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes was defined by observing the isotopic pattern of the investigated compound. The results suggest that interaction occurs through the carboxylate group of the ligand.

  17. Development of Low Cost Adsorbent from Cow Horn for the Biosorption of Mn (II, Ni (II and Cd (II Ion from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimoh. O. Tijani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of low cost adsorbent from cow horn for the biosorption of Mn (II, Ni (II and Cd (II ion aqueous solution was carried out by batch adsorption experiment at 32°C. Parameters such as pH, contact time, metal ion concentrations as well as temperature were monitored. The residual concentration of Mn (II, Ni (II and Cd (II were determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The results revealed that maximum Ni (II and Cd (II ion removal occurred at pH of 6 while Mn (II ion occurred at pH of 7 respectively. Langmuir and Temkin adsorption isotherm were used to describe the equilibrium data. The equilibrium data fitted well to Langmuir isotherm than Temkin isotherm. Thermodynamic investigation showed that standard Gibbs free energy (∆G˚ was positive indicating the feasibility and non-spontaneous of the process. The positive value of standard Enthalpy (∆H˚ implies that the reaction was endothermic and the negative standard Entropy (∆S˚ signifies decrease in the randomness at the solid/solution interface of the adsorbent during the adsorption process. The kinetic study revealed that adsorption of Mn (II, Ni (II and Cd (II could be best described by pseudo-second model. This study demonstrated that adsorbent developed from cow horn could be used as an alternative to commercial activated carbon in the removal of Mn (II, Ni (II and Cd (II ions from aqueous solution.

  18. Efficacy of goserelin plus anastrozole in premenopausal women with advanced or recurrent breast cancer refractory to an LH-RH analogue with tamoxifen: results of the JMTO BC08-01 phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Anan, Keisei; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Higaki, Kenji; Tanaka, Maki; Shibuta, Kenji; Sagara, Yasuaki; Ohno, Shinji; Tsuyuki, Shigeru; Mase, Takahiro; Teramukai, Satoshi

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) analogue plus an aromatase inhibitor following failure to respond to standard LH-RH analogue plus tamoxifen (TAM) in premenopausal patients. Premenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and/or progesterone-receptor positive, advanced or recurrent breast cancer refractory to an LH-RH analogue plus TAM received goserelin (GOS) in conjunction with anastrozole (ANA). The primary endpoint was the objective response rate (ORR). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), clinical benefit rate (CBR) and safety. Between September 2008 and November 2010, 37 patients were enrolled. Thirty-five patients (94.6%) had ER-positive tumors, and 36 (97.3%) had human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2-negative tumors. Thirty-six (97.3%) had measurable lesions and 1 (2.7%) had only bone metastasis. The ORR was 18.9% [95% confidence interval (CI), 8.0-35.2%], the CBR was 62.2% (95% CI, 44.8-77.5%) and the median PFS was 7.3 months. Eight patients had adverse drug reactions but none resulted in discontinuation of treatment. GOS plus ANA is a safe effective treatment for premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, recurrent or advanced breast cancer. The treatment may become viable treatment in the future, particularly when TAM is ineffective or contraindicated. Further studies and discussion are warranted.

  19. Combination of ruthenium(II)-arene complex [Ru(η6-p-cymene)Cl2(pta)] (RAPTA-C) and the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib results in efficient angiostatic and antitumor activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndsen, Robert H.; Weiss, Andrea; Abdul, U. Kulsoom; Wong, Tse J.; Meraldi, Patrick; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Dyson, Paul J.; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja

    2017-01-01

    Ruthenium-based compounds show strong potential as anti-cancer drugs and are being investigated as alternatives to other well-established metal-based chemotherapeutics. The organometallic compound [Ru(η6-p-cymene)Cl2(pta)], where pta = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (RAPTA-C) exhibits broad acting anti-tumor efficacy with intrinsic angiostatic activity. In the search for an optimal anti-angiogenesis drug combination, we identified synergistic potential between RAPTA-C and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, erlotinib. This drug combination results in strong synergistic inhibition of cell viability in human endothelial (ECRF24 and HUVEC) and human ovarian carcinoma (A2780 and A2780cisR) cells. Additionally, erlotinib significantly enhances the cellular uptake of RAPTA-C relative to treatment with RAPTA-C alone in human ovarian carcinoma cells, but not endothelial cells. Drug combinations induce the formation of chromosome bridges that persist after mitotic exit and delay abscission in A2780 and A2780cisR, therefore suggesting initiation of cellular senescence. The therapeutic potential of these compounds and their combination is further validated in vivo on A2780 tumors grown on the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model, and in a preclinical model in nude mice. Immunohistochemical analysis confirms effective anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative activity in vivo, based on a significant reduction of microvascular density and a decrease in proliferating cells. PMID:28223694

  20. THE EGG – FUNCTIONAL FOOD.COMPARATIVE STUDY ON VARIOUS NUTRITIONAL SOLUTIONS TO ENRICH THE EGG POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS. II YOLK FATTY ACIDS PROFILE RESULTING FROM THE DIETARY USE OF SAFFLOWER OIL AND FLAX SEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTE RODICA. D.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results obtained in a study on the comparative evaluation of the effect of a diet with safflower oil and flax seeds compared to a control soybean oil diet given to layers on the bioproductive effects, egg characteristics and yolk fatty acids profile. The trial involved 32 Lowman Brown layers during the age period 23- 28 weeks (1 week of accommodation and 4 experimental weeks. The layers, assigned to 2 groups (16 layers/group, 4 layers/cage received diets based on corn, wheat and soybean meal. The diets differed by the source of fatty acids: soybean oil for the control group (SO; safflower oil and flax seeds for SSO+FS. The diets were supplemented with 250 ppm vitamin E. Twelve eggs per group were collected randomly 10 and 30 days, respectively, after the beginning of the experiment. The paper presents comparative data on the: average egg weight, egg component (egg shell, yolk, egg white weight, intensity of yolk colour (Hoffman – La Roche colour range, yolk protein, fat yolk pH (measured one week after collection, the eggs being kept at 50C and yolk fatty acids. All data show that the profile of yolk unsaturated fatty acids can be handled quite easily by the nature of the dietary fats, their level of inclusion and their dietary ratio.

  1. Tertiary to secondary reduction of aminomethylphosphane derived from 1-ethylpiperazine as a result of its coordination to ruthenium(II) centre - The first insight into the nature of process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płotek, Michał; Starosta, Radosław; Komarnicka, Urszula K.; Skórska-Stania, Agnieszka; Kołoczek, Przemysław; Dudek, Karol; Kyzioł, Agnieszka

    2016-10-01

    Introduction of tertiary aminomethylphosphane P{CH2N(CH2CH2)2NCH2CH3}3 (B; tris{1-[4-ethyl(tetrahydro-1,4-diazino)]methyl}phosphane) to methanolic solution of [Ru(η5-C5H5)Cl(PPh3)2] (1) and NaBF4, instead of straightforward substitution of the chloride leads to concomitant cleavage of aminomethylphosphane's Psbnd CH2 bond. The obtained complex [Ru(η5-C5H5)PH{CH2N(CH2CH2)2NCH2CH3}2(PPh3)2]BF4 (2B‧) was fully characterized by spectroscopic methods ((NMR, IR, ESI-MS) and its solid state structure was determined with single crystal X-ray diffraction method. It was proven that the structure of 2B‧ is similar to the previously synthesized morpholine counterpart [Ru(η5-C5H5)PH{CH2N(CH2CH2)2O}2(PPh3)2]BF4 (2A‧). DFT calculations (B3LYP with the D95V(d,p) basis set for C, N, H and O and LanL2DZ with Los Alamos ECPs for Ru, P and Cl) revealed that the binding of aminomethylphosphanes to the ruthenium centre leads to the Psbnd C bonds elongation, which may finally result in breaking one of them and phosphane's reduction from tertiary to secondary ones.

  2. Alleviation of insulin resistance and liver damage by oral administration of Imm124-E is mediated by increased Tregs and associated with increased serum GLP-1 and adiponectin: results of a phase I/II clinical trial in NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizrahi M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Meir Mizrahi,1 Yehudit Shabat,1 Ami Ben Ya'acov,1 Gadi Lalazar,1 Tomer Adar,1 Victor Wong,2 Brian Muller,2 Grant Rawlin,2 Yaron Ilan11Liver Unit, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; 2Immuron Limited, North Melbourne, AustraliaBackground: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is considered to be part of the nonalcoholic fatty liver disorders and its incidence is increasing. Imm124-E (Immuron Ltd, Melbourne, Australia, containing hyperimmune bovine colostrum, has been shown to exert an immunomodulatory effect and to alleviate target organ damage in animal models of NASH. The aim of our study was to determine the safety and efficacy of oral administration of Imm124-E to patients with insulin resistance and NASH.Methods: In an open-label trial, ten patients with biopsy-proven NASH and insulin resistance were orally treated with Imm124-E for 30 days.Results: Oral administration of Imm124-E was safe, and no side effects were noted. Alleviation of insulin resistance was reflected by significantly improved hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c values in all ten treated patients. For between five and eight responders, the following effects were noted: a decrease in fasting glucose levels; improved oral glucose tolerance test (OGGT and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA scores; and alleviation in lipid profile. These effects were accompanied by increased serum levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, adiponectin and T regulatory cells.Conclusion: Hyperimmune colostrum alleviates NASH.Keywords: NASH, anti-LPS, diabetes, adipokines, regulatory T cells

  3. Vinflunine–gemcitabine versus vinflunine–carboplatin as first-line chemotherapy in cisplatin-unfit patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma: results of an international randomized phase II trial (JASINT1)†

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, M.; Wiechno, P. J.; Bellmunt, J.; Lucas, C.; Su, W.-C.; Albiges, L.; Lin, C.-C.; Senkus-Konefka, E.; Flechon, A.; Mourey, L.; Necchi, A.; Loidl, W. C.; Retz, M. M.; Vaissière, N.; Culine, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no standard first-line chemotherapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma (aUC) in cisplatin-ineligible (cisplatin-unfit) patients. The study assessed the efficacy and tolerability profile of two vinflunine-based cytotoxic regimens in this setting. Patients and methods Patients with aUC a creatinine clearance (CrCl) of <60 but ≥30 ml/min, performance status 0 or 1 and no prior chemotherapy for advanced disease were randomized (1 : 1). They received vinflunine 250 or 280 mg/m2 (based on baseline CrCl) on day 1, plus either gemcitabine [750 mg/m2 escalated to 1000 mg/m2 in cycle 2 if no toxicity grade (G) ≥2 on days 1 and 8 (VG) or plus carboplatin area under the curve 4.5 day 1 (VC) every 21 days]. To detect a 22% improvement in each arm compared with H0 (41%) in the primary end point, disease control rate (DCR = complete response + partial response + stable disease), 31 assessable patients per arm were required (α = 5%, β = 20%). Results Sixty-nine patients were enrolled (34 VG, 35 VC). Less G3/4 haematological adverse events (AEs) were reported with VG: neutropaenia was seen in 38% (versus 68% with VC) and febrile neutropaenia in 3% (versus 14% with VC) of patients. No major differences were observed for non-haematological AEs. DCR was 77% in both groups; overall response rate (ORR) was 44.1% versus 28.6%, with a median progression-free survival of 5.9 versus 6.1 months and median OS of 14.0 versus 12.8 months with VG and VC, respectively. Conclusion Both vinflunine-based doublets offer a similar DCR, ORR and OS. The better haematological tolerance favours the VG combination, which warrants further study. ClinicalTrials.gov protocol identifier NCT 01599013. PMID:26673352

  4. GRID Computing at Belle II

    CERN Document Server

    Bansal, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Tsukuba, Japan, will start physics data taking in 2018 and will accumulate 50 ab$^{-1}$ of e$^{+}$e$^{-}$ collision data, about 50 times larger than the data set of the earlier Belle experiment. The computing requirements of Belle II are comparable to those of a run I high-p$_T$ LHC experiment. Computing will make full use of such grids in North America, Asia, Europe, and Australia, and high speed networking. Results of an initial MC simulation campaign with 3 ab$^{-1}$ equivalent luminosity will be described

  5. Pol II CTD Code Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corden, Jeffry L

    2016-01-21

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Schüller et al. (2016) and Suh et al. (2016) describe genetic and mass spectrometry methodologies for mapping phosphorylation sites on the tandem repeats of the RNA polymerase II CTD. The results suggest that the CTD Code may be simpler than expected.

  6. [Biosorption of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) in aqueous solutions by fruiting bodies of macrofungi (Auricularia polytricha and Tremella fuciformis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yu; Pan, Rong; Huang, Hai-wei; Cao, Li-xiang; Zhang, Ren-duo

    2010-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to study the ability of fruiting bodies of Auricularia polytricha and Tremella fuciformis to adsorb Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions, including biosorption ability of the biomass to remove heavy metals from solutions with different concentrations, kinetics of adsorption, influence of co-cations, and biosorption affinity in multi-metalsystem. Results showed that in the solutions with individual metal, the maximum biosorption amounts of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) by A. polytricha were 18.91, 18.69, 20.33, 12.42 mg x g(-1), respectively, and the highest removal rates for all cases were more than 85%. The maximum biosorption amounts of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) by T. fuciformis were 19.98, 20.15, 19.16, 16.41 mg x g(-1), respectively, and highest removal rates for all cases were more than 75%. In the solutions with initial concentrations of 10, 50 and 100 mg x L(-1), the biosorption amounts increased but the removal rates decreased as the initial concentrations increasing. The pseudo-second-order reaction model described adsorption kinetics of heavy metal ions by fruiting bodies of A. polytricha and T. fuciformis better than the pseudo-first-order reaction model. In the solutions with multi metals, the biosorption amounts of heavy metals by two biosorbent were in the order of Ph(II) > Cd(II) > Cu(II) > Zn(II). The ions with more negative charges were preferential to be sorbed. The biosorption ability of A. polytricha was inhibited in multi-metal solutions. In multi-metal solutions, T. fuciformis sorbed a higher amount of Pb(II) but lower amounts of other three ions than that in the individual metal solutions. The results indicated that both fruiting bodies of A. polytricha and T. fuciformis were potential biosorbents.

  7. Enceladus Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Here are some results from the Spectra Decomposition Algorithm on infrared spectral images of Saturn's moon Enceladus. Figure 1 is the spatial contribution of the...

  8. Removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and trichloroethylene from water by Nanofer ZVI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglal, Mahmoud M; Ramamurthy, Amruthur S

    2015-01-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticle (Nanofer ZVI) is a new reagent due to its unique structure and properties. Images of scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that Nanofer ZVI is stable, reactive and has a unique structure. The particles exhibited a spherical shape, a chain-like structure with a particle size of 20 to 100 nm and a surface area between 25-30 m2g(-1). The time interval for particles to agglomerate and settle was between 4-6 h. SEM/EDS Images showed that particle size increased to 2 µm due to agglomeration. Investigation of adsorption and oxidation behavior of Nanofer ZVI used for the removal of Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) ions and trichloroethylene (TCE) from aqueous solutions showed that the optimal pH for Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and TCE removal were 4.5 and 4.8, 5.0 and 6.5, respectively. Test data were used to form Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum contaminant loading was estimated as 270, 170, 110, 130 mg per gram of Nanofer ZVI for Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and TCE respectively. Removal of metal ions is interpreted in terms of their hydrated ionic radii and their electronegativity. TCE oxidation followed the dechlorination pathway resulting in nonhazardous by-products.

  9. Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  10. Quininium tetrachloridozinc(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhuang Chen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound {systematic name: 2-[hydroxy(6-methoxyquinolin-1-ium-4-ylmethyl]-8-vinylquinuclidin-1-ium tetrachloridozinc(II}, (C20H26N2O2[ZnCl4], consists of a double protonated quininium cation and a tetrachloridozinc(II anion. The ZnII ion is in a slightly distorted tetrahedral coordination environment. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular N—H...Cl and O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds.

  11. Hydrosol II Project; El Proyecto Hydrosol II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Martinez, A.

    2008-07-01

    At present energy production is based on the combustion of fossil fuels and is the main cause of greenhouse gas emissions, which is to say it is the main cause of the climate change that is affecting the planet. On a worldwide scale, the use of solar concentration systems with systems capable of dissociating water is considered, from both an energy and an economic standpoint, as the most important long-term goal in the production of solar fuels to reduce the costs of hydrogen and to ensure practically zero carbon dioxide emissions. The Hydrosol II project has the largest pilot plant of its kind, and the Hydrosol II reactors will be capable of breaking up the water molecule on the basis of thermochemical cycles at moderate temperatures. The Hydrosol II project pilot plant is now a reality, located in the SSPS heliostats field of the Almeria Solar Platform. (Author)

  12. Planck early results. II. The thermal performance of Planck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bréelle, E.; Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the Planck instruments in space is enabled by their low operating temperatures, 20 K for LFI and 0.1 K for HFI, achieved through a combination of passive radiative cooling and three active mechanical coolers. The scientific requirement for very broad frequency coverage led to two...

  13. Planck 2013 results. II. The Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.;

    2013-01-01

    than the dipole are removed by an iterative procedure based on simultaneous fitting of calibration parameters and sky maps. Noise properties are estimated from time-ordered data after the sky signal has been removed, using a generalized least squares map-making algorithm. A destriping code (Madam...

  14. Planck 2013 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falvella, M. C.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the data processing pipeline of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing centre (DPC) to create and characterize full-sky maps based on the first 15.5 months of operations at 30, 44, and 70 GHz. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data, from telemetry packets through to the production of cleaned, calibrated timelines and calibrated frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation induced on the mean temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation by the proper motion of the spacecraft. Sky signals other than the dipole are removed by an iterative procedure based on simultaneous fitting of calibration parameters and sky maps. Noise properties are estimated from time-ordered data after the sky signal has been removed, using a generalized least squares map-making algorithm. A destriping code (Madam) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated noise. Noise covariance matrices, required to compute statistical uncertainties on LFI and Planck products, are also produced. Main beams are estimated down to the ≈- 20 dB level using Jupiter transits, which are also used for the geometrical calibration of the focal plane.

  15. Planck 2013 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cappellini, B; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Cruz, M; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falvella, M C; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Gaier, T C; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Kangaslahti, P; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Lindholm, V; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Peel, M; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Salerno, E; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; White, S D M; Wilkinson, A; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    We describe the data processing pipeline of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing centre (DPC) to create and characterize full-sky maps based on the first 15.5 months of operations at 30, 44 and 70 GHz. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data, starting from telemetry packets through to the production of cleaned, calibrated timelines and calibrated frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation induced on the mean temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation by the proper motion of the spacecraft. Sky signals other than the dipole are removed by an iterative procedure based on simultaneous fitting of calibration parameters and sky maps. Noise properties are estimated from time-ordered data after the sky signal has been removed, using a generalized least square map-making algorithm. A destriping code (Madam) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated...

  16. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  17. Use of APACHE II and SAPS II to predict mortality for hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byeong Hoo; Park, Sang Kyu; Jang, Dong Kyu; Jang, Kyoung Sool; Kim, Jong Tae; Han, Yong Min

    2015-01-01

    We studied the applicability of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with acute stroke and compared the results with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We also conducted a comparative study of accuracy for predicting hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke mortality. Between January 2011 and December 2012, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients admitted to the ICU were included in the study. APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were compared using a calibration curve, the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and the results were compared with the GCS and NIHSS. Overall 498 patients were included in this study. The observed mortality was 26.3%, whereas APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were 35.12% and 35.34%, respectively. The mean GCS and NIHSS scores were 9.43 and 21.63, respectively. The calibration curve was close to the line of perfect prediction. The ROC curve showed a slightly better prediction of mortality for APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients. The GCS and NIHSS were inferior in predicting mortality in both patient groups. Although both the APACHE II and SAPS II systems can be used to measure performance in the neurosurgical ICU setting, the accuracy of APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients was superior.

  18. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with folfox-cetuximab in stage III oesophagus and cardia carcinomas: final results of the phase-II Erafox study of the Gercor group; Chimioradiotherapie concomitante par folfox-cetuximab dans les carcinomes du cardia et de l'oesophage de stade III: resultats definitifs de l'etude de phase II Erafox du groupe Gercor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lledo, G.; Mammar, V.; Michel, P. [Hopital Jean-Mermoz, Lyon (France); Dahan, L. [CHU Rouen, Rouen (France); Mineur, L.; Dupuis, O. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84000 Avignon (France); Galais, M.P. [CHU Timone, Marseille (France); Chibaudel, B. [InstitutJean-Godinot, Reims (France); Jovenin, N. [Gercor, Paris (France); Gramont, A. de [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report and discuss the results of a French national multicentre study which aimed at assessing the efficiency and tolerance of a folfox- and cetuximab-based chemotherapy concomitant with a radiotherapy for the treatment of stage-III cardia and oesophagus cancers. Patients (60 men and 19 women) have been selected according to the carcinoma type, performance index, age, weight loss over the last six months. Results are discussed in terms of response, steadiness, advancement, grade 3 and 4 toxicity, and side effects. The therapeutic efficiency corresponds to an objective response rate of 77 per cent, and tolerance profile seems to be acceptable for patients suffering from locally advanced cardia and oesophagus cancer. Short communication

  19. Resultative Predicates in Japanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Takamine

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Washio (1997; 1999 observes that resultative predicates are divided into two different groups, strong and weak resultatives, depending on ‘patienthood’ of the object. This typology of resultatives seems to capture a point of crosslinguistic variation in resultatives; Japanese has weak but not strong resultatives, while English has both. Washio also observes that there is another group of examples that bears a superficial resemblance to resultatives but constitutes a different phenomenon, hence spurious resultatives. The difference between weak and strong resultatives is made in terms of the ‘affectedness’ of the verb. Thus the typology of resultatives proposed by Washio is semantically grounded. In this paper, I propose: (i a fine-grained distinction for Washio’s weak resultatives: (ii a syntactic analysis of the different resultative types. On the basis of syntactic evidence, I argue that there are two types of weak resultatives, an adjunct of VP and a complement of VP within the vP projection. I also argue that spurious resultatives are structurally higher than weak resultatives in Japanese.

  20. Results of railgun experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Peterson, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    During the 1979 Megagauss II conference the hypervelocity potential of railguns and the pulsed power technology needed to power them were discussed. Since then, many laboratories have initiated railgun R and D projects for a variety of potential applications. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories initiated a collaborative experimental railgun project which resulted in several successes in accelerating projectiles to high velocities, emphasized the limits on railgun operation, and indicated that the numerical modeling of railgun operation was in good agreement with the experiments.