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Sample records for cdms ii experiment

  1. Search for Solar Axions with the CDMS-II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bruch, T

    2008-01-01

    The CDMS-II experiment operates 19 germanium detectors with a mass of 250g each in a very low background environment. Originally designed for the search for Dark Matter the experiment can also detect solar axions by Primakoff conversion to photons. The Bragg condition for X-ray momentum transfer in a crystal allows for coherent amplification of the Primakoff process. Since the orientation of the crystal lattice with respect to the Sun changes with daytime an unique pattern in time and energy of solar axion conversions is expected. The low background ~1.5 counts/kg/day/keV and knowledge of the exact orientation of all three crystal axes with respect to the Sun make the CDMS-II experiment very sensitive to solar axions. In contrast to helioscopes, the high mass region < 1 keV can also be probed effectively. The alternating orientations of the individual crystals in the experimental setup provide different patterns of solar axion conversion, making a false positive result extremely unlikely. The result of an ...

  2. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) Experiment: First Results from the Soudan Mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Clarence Leeder

    2004-09-01

    There is an abundance of evidence that the majority of the mass of the universe is in the form of non-baryonic non-luminous matter that was non-relativistic at the time when matter began to dominate the energy density. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, are attractive cold dark matter candidates because they would have a relic abundance today of {approx}0.1 which is consistent with precision cosmological measurements. WIMPs are also well motivated theoretically. Many minimal supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model have WIMPs in the form of the lightest supersymmetric partner, typically taken to be the neutralino. The CDMS II experiment searches for WIMPs via their elastic scattering off of nuclei. The experiment uses Ge and Si ZIP detectors, operated at <50 mK, which simultaneously measure the ionization and athermal phonons produced by the scattering of an external particle. The dominant background for the experiment comes from electromagnetic interactions taking place very close to the detector surface. Analysis of the phonon signal from these interactions makes it possible to discriminate them from interactions caused by WIMPs. This thesis presents the details of an important aspect of the phonon pulse shape analysis known as the ''Lookup Table Correction''. The Lookup Table Correction is a position dependent calibration of the ZIP phonon response which improves the rejection of events scattering near the detector surface. The CDMS collaboration has recently commissioned its experimental installation at the Soudan Mine. This thesis presents an analysis of the data from the first WIMP search at the Soudan Mine. The results of this analysis set the world's lowest exclusion limit making the CDMS II experiment at Soudan the most sensitive WIMP search to this date.

  3. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (cdms-ii) Experiment: First Results From The Soudan Mine

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C L

    2005-01-01

    There is an abundance of evidence that the majority of the mass of the universe is in the form of non-baryonic non-luminous matter that was non-relativistic at the time when matter began to dominate the energy density. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, are attractive cold dark matter candidates because they would have a relic abundance today of ∼0.1 which is consistent with precision cosmological measurements. WIMPs are also well motivated theoretically. Many minimal supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model have WIMPs in the form of the lightest supersymmetric partner, typically taken to be the neutralino. The CDMS II experiment searches for WIMPs via their elastic scattering off of nuclei. The experiment uses Ge and Si ZIP detectors, operated at <50 mK, which simultaneously measure the ionization and athermal phonons produced by the scattering of an external particle. The dominant background for the experiment comes from electromagnetic interactions taking place very close...

  4. Task I: Dark Matter Search Experiments with Cryogenic Detectors: CDMS-I and CDMS-II Task II: Experimental Study of Neutrino Properties: EXO and KamLAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, Blas [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Gratta, Giorgio [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2013-08-30

    Dark Matter Search - During the period of performance, our group continued the search for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles or WIMPs. As a key member of the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) collaboration, we completed the CDMS II experiment which led the field in sensitivity for more than five years. We fabricated all detectors, and participated in detector testing and verification. In addition, we participated in the construction and operation of the facility at the Soudan Underground Laboratory and played key roles in the data acquisition and analysis. Towards the end of the performance period, we began operating the SuperCDMS Soudan experiment, which consists of 15 advanced Ge (9 kg) detectors. The advanced detector design called iZIP grew out of our earlier DOE Particle Detector R&D program which demonstrated the rejection of surface electrons to levels where they are no longer the dominant source of background. Our group invented this advanced design and these larger detectors were fabricated on the Stanford campus in collaboration with the SLAC CDMS group and the Santa Clara University group. The sensitivity reach is expected to be up to 5 times better than CDMS II after two years of operation. We will check the new limits on WIMPs set by XENON100, and we expect improved sensitivity for light mass WIMPs beyond that of any other existing experiment. Our group includes the Spokesperson for SuperCDMS and continues to make important contributions to improvements in the detector technology which are enabling the very low trigger thresholds used to explore the low mass WIMP region. We are making detailed measurements of the charge transport and trapping within Ge crystals, measuring the diffusive trapping distance of the quasiparticle excitations within the Al phonon collector fins on the detector surface, and we are contributing to the development of much improved detector Monte Carlos which are essential to guide the detector

  5. Advancing the Search for Dark Matter: from CDMS II to SuperCDMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Scott A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    An overwhelming proportion of the universe (83% by mass) is composed of particles we know next to nothing about. Detecting these dark matter particles directly, through hypothesized weak-force-mediated recoils with nuclear targets here on earth, could shed light on what these particles are, how they relate to the standard model, and how the standard model ts within a more fundamental understanding. This thesis describes two such experimental eorts: CDMS II (2007-2009) and SuperCDMS Soudan (ongoing). The general abilities and sensitivities of both experiments are laid out, placing a special emphasis on the detector technology, and how this technology has evolved from the rst to the second experiment. Some topics on which I spent signicant eorts are described here only in overview (in particular the details of the CDMS II analysis, which has been laid out many times before), and some topics which are not described elsewhere are given a somewhat deeper treatment. In particular, this thesis is hopefully a good reference for those interested in the annual modulation limits placed on the low-energy portion of the CDMS II exposure, the design of the detectors for SuperCDMS Soudan, and an overview of the extremely informative data these detectors produce. It is an exciting time. The technology I've had the honor to work on the past few years provides a wealth of information about each event, more so than any other direct detection experiment, and we are still learning how to optimally use all this information. Initial tests from the surface and now underground suggest this technology has the background rejection abilities necessary for a planned 200kg experiment or even ton-scale experiment, putting us on the threshold of probing parameter space orders of magnitude from where the eld currently stands.

  6. The CDMS II Data Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, D. A.; Burke, S.; Cooley, J.; Crisler, M.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Duong, L.; Ferril, R.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Holmgren, D.; Mahapatra, R.; Nelson, H.; Reisetter, A.; Sander, J.; Savage, C.

    2011-05-01

    The Data Acquisition System for the CDMS II dark matter experiment was designed and built when the experiment moved to its new underground installation at the Soudan Lab. The combination of remote operation and increased data load necessitated a completely new design. Elements of the original LabView system remained as stand-alone diagnostic programs, but the main data processing moved to a VME-based system with custom electronics for signal conditioning, trigger formation and buffering. The data rate was increased 100-fold and the automated cryogenic system was linked to the data acquisition. A modular server framework with associated user interfaces was implemented in Java to allow control and monitoring of the entire experiment remotely.

  7. The CDMS II data acquisition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, D.A.; /Fermilab; Burke, S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Cooley, J.; /Southern Methodist U.; Crisler, M.; /Fermilab; Cushman, P.; /Minnesota U.; DeJongh, F.; /Fermilab; Duong, L.; /Minnesota U.; Ferril, R.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Golwala, S.R.; /Caltech; Hall, J.; /Fermilab; Holmgren, D.; /Fermilab /Texas A-M

    2011-01-01

    The Data Acquisition System for the CDMS II dark matter experiment was designed and built when the experiment moved to its new underground installation at the Soudan Lab. The combination of remote operation and increased data load necessitated a completely new design. Elements of the original LabView system remained as stand-alone diagnostic programs, but the main data processing moved to a VME-based system with custom electronics for signal conditioning, trigger formation and buffering. The data rate was increased 100-fold and the automated cryogenic system was linked to the data acquisition. A modular server framework with associated user interfaces was implemented in Java to allow control and monitoring of the entire experiment remotely.

  8. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment: Results and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are a strong candidate for the Cold Dark Matter of the Universe. CDMS-II is a direct-search WIMP search experiment, operating at 50 mK and housed at the Soudan mine, Minnesota. The 250 gram Ge detectors utilize athermal phonon sensors where tungsten transition edge sensors are operated in negative electrothermal feedback. The search at Soudan is ongoing with an expected final reach of CDMS-II by the end of 2008 of a WIMP-nucleon cross-section sensitivity of 2.1 x10-44 cm2, at a WIMP mass of 60 GeV/c2. To proceed further, we have proposed the SuperCDMS program.

  9. Global interpretation of direct Dark Matter searches after CDMS-II results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2009-12-01

    We perform a global fit to data from Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiments, including the recent CDMS-II results. We discuss possible interpretations of the DAMA annual modulation signal in terms of spin-independent and spin-dependent DM-nucleus interactions, both for elastic and inelastic scattering. We find that for the spin-dependent inelastic scattering off protons a good fit to all data is obtained. We present a simple toy model realizing such a scenario. In all the remaining cases the DAMA allowed regions are disfavored by other experiments or suffer from severe fine tuning of DM parameters with respect to the galactic escape velocity. Finally, we also entertain the possibility that the two events observed in CDMS-II are an actual signal of elastic DM scattering, and we compare the resulting CDMS-II allowed regions to the exclusion limits from other experiments.

  10. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fritts, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Graham, M; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nelson, R H; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS~II) experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from $^{210}$Pb decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. We confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

  11. A Search for WIMP Dark Matter Using an Optimized Chi-square Technique on the Final Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment (CDMS II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manungu Kiveni, Joseph [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This dissertation describes the results of a WIMP search using CDMS II data sets accumulated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Results from the original analysis of these data were published in 2009; two events were observed in the signal region with an expected leakage of 0.9 events. Further investigation revealed an issue with the ionization-pulse reconstruction algorithm leading to a software upgrade and a subsequent reanalysis of the data. As part of the reanalysis, I performed an advanced discrimination technique to better distinguish (potential) signal events from backgrounds using a 5-dimensional chi-square method. This dataanalysis technique combines the event information recorded for each WIMP-search event to derive a backgrounddiscrimination parameter capable of reducing the expected background to less than one event, while maintaining high efficiency for signal events. Furthermore, optimizing the cut positions of this 5-dimensional chi-square parameter for the 14 viable germanium detectors yields an improved expected sensitivity to WIMP interactions relative to previous CDMS results. This dissertation describes my improved (and optimized) discrimination technique and the results obtained from a blind application to the reanalyzed CDMS II WIMP-search data.

  12. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Thomas James [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed e ective ducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection su cient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125 - 128 were analyzed for the rst time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel \\mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have signi cant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them di cult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent ducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for mid- to low

  13. The SuperCDMS Soudan high threshold WIMP search and the planned SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, R.; SuperCDMS collaboration

    2016-05-01

    There is ample evidence that visible matter cannot account for a large component of the mass in the universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are one popular hypothesis to account for the missing mass. The Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect WIMPs through interactions with a nucleus in a target crystal. The SuperCDMS detectors are instrumented with phonon and charge sensors, enabling excellent rejection of electron-recoil backgrounds. Approximately 3000 kg-days of exposure have been collected with the SuperCDMS Soudan experiment. We will describe the search for WIMPs with masses between 10-100 GeV and work towards the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment.

  14. Background Characterization and Discrimination in the Final Analysis of the CDMS II Phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritts, Matthew C. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is designed to detectWeakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in the Milky Way halo. The phase known as CDMS II was performed in the Soudan Underground Laboratory. The final set of CDMS II data, collected in 2007-8 and referred to as Runs 125-8, represents the largest exposure to date for the experiment. We seek collisions between WIMPs and atomic nuclei in disk-shaped germanium and silicon detectors. A key design feature is to keep the rate of collisions from known particles producing WIMP-like signals very small. The largest category of such background is interactions with electrons in the detectors that occur very close to one of the faces of the detector. The next largest category is collisions between energetic neutrons that bypass the experimental shielding and nuclei in the detectors. Analytical efforts to discriminate these backgrounds and to estimate the rate at which such discrimination fails have been refined and improved throughout each phase of CDMS. Next-generation detectors for future phases of CDMS require testing at cryogenic test facilities. One such facility was developed at the University of Minnesota in 2007 and has been used continuously since then to test detectors for the next phase of the experiment, known as SuperCDMS.

  15. Multi-Higgs portal dark matter under the CDMS-II results

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Mayumi; Seto, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    In a scenario of Higgs portal dark matter, Higgs exchange processes are essential for both dark matter annihilation in the early Universe and direct search experiments. The CDMS-II collaboration has recently released their final results on direct dark matter searches. We study a scalar dark matter model with multi-Higgs doublets under the constraint from the CDMS-II results and also from the WMAP data. We find that the possible maximal value for the branching ratio of the invisible decay of the Higgs boson can be significantly greater than that in the Higgs portal model with one Higgs doublet. Therefore, the search for the invisible decay of the Higgs boson at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and future collider experiments would provide useful information not only for the nature of dark matter but also for the structure of the Higgs sector even without detecting any extra scalar boson directly.

  16. Silicon Detector Results from the First Five-Tower Run of CDMS II

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Arrenberg, S; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Borgland, A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Dejongh, F; Di Stefano, P C F; Silva, E Do Couto E; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fox, J; Fritts, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, R H; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kim, P; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Lopez-Asamar, E; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nadeau, P; Nelson, R H; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Sundqvist, K M; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhan, J

    2013-01-01

    We report results of a search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with the Si detectors of the CDMS II experiment. This report describes a blind analysis of the first data taken with CDMS II's full complement of detectors in 2006-2007. Results from this exposure using the Ge detectors have already been presented. We observed no candidate WIMP-scattering events in an exposure of 55.9 kg-days before analysis cuts. These data set an upper limit of 1.7x10-41 cm2 on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of a 10 GeV/c2 WIMP; this limit improves to 8.3x10-42 cm2 in combination with previous Si data from this installation. These data exclude parameter space for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering that is relevant to recent searches for low-mass WIMPs.

  17. Inelastic Dark Matter at DAMA, CDMS and Future Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, David R.; Weiner, Neal

    2002-01-01

    The DAMA annual modulation signature, interpreted as evidence for a spin-independent WIMP coupling, seems in conflict with null results from CDMS. However, in models of ``inelastic dark matter'', the experiments are compatible. Inelastic dark matter can arise in supersymmetric theories as the real component of a sneutrino mixed with a singlet scalar. In contrast with ordinary sneutrino dark matter, such particles can satisfy all experimental constraints while giving the appropriate relic abun...

  18. Geneva University: Dark matter Search with the CDMS experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Wednesday 21 September 2011 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium “ Dark matter Search with the CDMS experiment ” Par Dr. Sebastian Arrenberg, Université de Zürich The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment (CDMS) employs a total of 30 germanium and silicon detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their scattering from the target nuclei. Previous CDMS results, released in December 2009, set the world leading limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section above WIMP masses of ~50 GeV/c2 assuming elastic scattering.  In a subsequent analysis we investigated the inelastic dark matter scenario which was proposed to reconcile the disagreement between the results of DAMA/LIBRA and other existing dark matter searc...

  19. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallows, Scott Mathew [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for \\background- free" operation of CDMS II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space.

  20. Collider Constraints on the Dark Matter Interpretation of the CDMS II Results

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Tseng, Po-Yan; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    The recent observation of three events by the CDMS II experiment can be interpreted as a 8.6 GeV dark matter scatters elastically with the nucleons inside the silicon detectors with a spin-independent cross section of 1.9 x 10^-41 cm^2. We employ the effective dark matter interaction approach to fit to the interpreted cross section, and make predictions for monojet and monophoton production at the LHC with the fitted parameters. We show that some of the operators are already ruled out by current data while the others can be further probed in the upcoming 14 TeV run of the LHC.

  1. Search for lightly ionizing particles using CDMS-II data and fabrication of CDMS detectors with improved homogeneity in properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e/3. While this is a well established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge quantization phenomenon is lacking. On the other hand, there exist numerous theoretical models that naturally allow for existence of particles with fractional electromagnetic charge. These particles, if existing, hint towards existence of physics beyond the standard model. Multiple high energy, optical, cosmological and astrophysical considerations restrict the allowable mass-charge parameter space for these fractional charges. Still, a huge unexplored region remains. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II), located at Soudan mines in northern Minnesota, employs germanium and silicon crystals to perform direct searches for a leading candidate to dark matter called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Alternately, the low detection threshold allows search for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent with corresponding \\signatures" resulting from the passage of a fractionally charged particle. In this dissertation, the CDMS-II data is analyzed to search for LIPs, with an expected background of 0.078 0.078 events. No candidate events are observed, allowing exclusion of new parameter space for charges between e/6 and e/200.

  2. Results from the search for WIMPs with the CDMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment (CDMS) employs a total of 30 Germanium and Silicon Detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their elastic scattering from the target nuclei. In February 2008 the collaboration released their last results, yielding a world-leading limit for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections for WIMP masses above 42 GeV/c2, restricting significant parts of the parameter space favored by supersymmetric models. Currently, data from fur consecutive runs between July 2007 and October 2008 is under analysis with the prospect of increasing the sensitivity by a factor of ∼ 4. We will present the results emerging from this analysis. (author)

  3. A dark-matter search using the final CDMS II dataset and a novel detector of surface radiocontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Zeeshan [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence from galaxies, galaxy clusters, and cosmological scales suggests that ~85% of the matter of our universe is invisible. The missing matter, or "dark matter" is likely composed of non-relativistic, non-baryonic particles, which have very rare interactions with baryonic matter and with one another. Among dark matter candidates, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are particularly well motivated. In the early universe, thermally produced particles with weak-scale mass and interactions would `freeze out’ at the correct density to be dark matter today. Extensions to the Standard Model of particle physics, such as Supersymmetry, which solve gauge hierarchy and coupling unification problems, naturally provide such particles. Interactions of WIMPs with baryons are expected to be rare, but might be detectable in low-noise detectors. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment uses ionization- and phonon- sensitive germanium particle detectors to search for such interactions. CDMS detectors are operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, within a shielded environment to lower cosmogenic and radioactive background. The combination of phonon and ionization signatures from the detectors provides excellent residual-background rejection. This dissertation presents improved techniques for phonon calibration of CDMS II detectors and the analysis of the final CDMS II dataset with 612 kg-days of exposure. We set a limit of 3.8x10$^{-}$44 cm$^{2}$ on WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross section for a WIMP mass of 70 GeV/c$^{2}$. At the time this analysis was published, these data presented the most stringent limits on WIMP scattering for WIMP masses over 42 GeV/c$^{2}$, ruling out previously unexplored parameter space. Next-generation rare-event searches such as SuperCDMS, COUPP, and CLEAN will be limited in sensitivity, unless they achieve stringent control of the surface radioactive contamination on their detectors. Low

  4. Hidden Sector Dirac Dark Matter, Stueckelberg Z' Model and the CDMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    We show that in some classes of hidden-sector models, in which the connection bridge to the Standard Model (SM) is via Z-Z' mixing, an effective coupling can be generated between the fermionic dark matter particle and the SM Higgs boson through a triangular loop of Z and/or Z' bosons. It therefore can contribute to the spin-independent scattering cross section of dark matter that may be measurable with direct detection experiments. We show that the result is consistent with the most recent CDMS II limits. We use the Stueckelberg Z' model for illustration, though the result we obtain is rather general and applicable to other Z-Z' portal-type hidden-sector models as well.

  5. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Asai, M; Balakishiyeva, D; Barker, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Calkins, R; Cerdeño, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jardin, D; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Lukens, P; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Toback, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wilson, J S; Wright, D H; Yang, X; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    CDMS II data from the 5-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector WIMP-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to $\\sim$5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/$c^2$. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and 6 events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of $1.8 \\times 10^{-44}$ and $1.18 \\times 10 ^{-41}$ cm$^2$ at 90\\% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/$c^2$ WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/$c^2$ WIMPs.

  6. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-10-31

    CDMS II data from the five-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to ~5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/c2. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and six events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of 1.8×10-44 and 1.18×10-41 at 90% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/c2 WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/c2 WIMPs.

  7. Status of CDMS search for dark matter WIMPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the latest results from the CDMS (cryogenic dark matter search) experiment. The experiment uses superconducting particle detectors, operated below 100 mK, to search for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive elementary particles or WIMPs. These detectors are either Si or Ge crystals, where the electron-hole production and the phonon production are measured for each event, allowing the discrimination of electron recoils (most backgrounds due to gammas and betas) from nuclear recoils (due to WIMPs and neutrons). We have recently reported new limits from the Stanford shallow site experiment (CDMS-I) which explore supersymmetric models where the lightest supersymmetric particle is often an excellent WIMP candidate. We will also report on the Soudan deep site facility for the CDMS-II experiment which is under construction, and on the status of the CDMS-II detector fabrication

  8. Low-Mass Dark-Matter Hint from CDMS II, Higgs Boson at LHC, and Darkon Models

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2013-01-01

    The underground CDMS II experiment searching directly for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter (DM) has observed three WIMP-candidate events corresponding to a WIMP mass of order 9 GeV. Since the confidence level of the finding is only about three sigmas, it does not yet offer conclusive evidence for WIMPs. Nevertheless, interestingly, although the parameter region implied by the signal hypothesis seems to be already excluded mainly by the current strictest limits from the XENON experiments, most of this tension can go away if the WIMP interaction with nuclei violates isospin symmetry. This motivates us to explore some of the implications for models in which a real gauge-singlet scalar particle, dubbed the darkon, serves as the WIMP, taking into account the recent discovery of a Higgs boson at the LHC and Planck determination of the DM relic density. In the simplest scenario, which involves only the standard model plus a darkon, the Higgs boson is largely invisible due to its decay into a pa...

  9. Dark matter and Higgs phenomenology predicted by left-right twin Higgs model in light of CDMS II results

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lei

    2010-01-01

    The left-right twin Higgs model predicts a light stable scalar \\hat{S}, which is a candidate for WIMP dark matter. We study its scattering on nucleon and find that the cross section is below the CDMS II upper bound but can reach the SuperCDMS sensitivity. Then we study the Higgs phenomenology by paying special attention to the decay h->\\hat{S}\\hat{S} which is strongly correlated with the dark matter scattering on nucleon. We find that such an invisible decay can be sizable, which can severely suppress the conventional decay modes like h->VV (V=W,Z) and h->b\\bar{b}. On the other hand, compared to the SM prediction, the rates of Higgs boson productions at the LHC via gluon-gluon fusion, weak boson fusion or in association with top quark pairs are all reduced significantly, e.g., the gluon-gluon fusion channel can be suppressed by about 30%.

  10. Conceptual Design for SuperCDMS SNOLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyond the present dark matter direct detection experiment at the Soudan underground laboratory, the SuperCDMS Collaboration is engaged in R and D activities for a 100-kg scale germanium dark matter experiment nominally sited at SNOLAB (2070 m overburden of rock). The expected sensitivity after 3 years of running is 3 x 10-46 cm2 for the spin-independent cross section, an order of magnitude improvement over present exclusion limits for WIMP masses ∼80 GeV/c2. At this depth, and appropriate design of shielding and cryostat, neutron backgrounds will be negligible. The baseline design is an expanded version of CDMS II with Ge substrates (100 x 33 mm discs) instrumented with the iZIP phonon sensor layout to achieve the electron surface-event rejection power required.

  11. Controlling cosmogenic radioactivity in SuperCDMS SNOLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alan; CDMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment is being designed with sensitivity far in excess of existing experiments to low-mass WIMP dark matter. To attain this sensitivity, events due to ionizing radiation that mimic dark matter must be controlled. Depending on the source of ionizing radiation, different strategies are required for its mitigation. Cosmic rays and neutron radiation at earth's surface continuously generate an multitude of radioactive atoms in the materials that will be used to build SuperCDMS SNOLAB. Of these isotopes, we are concerned with isotopes with long half-lives and high production rates. The production and effects of cobalt-60, silicon-32, and tritium will be discussed. A new analysis of the silicon-32 concentration in the CDMS-II silicon detectors will be discussed and compared to the measured concentration of silicon-32 in the silicon used by the DAMIC dark matter search.

  12. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Aramaki, T; Asai, M; Baker, W; Balakishiyeva, D; Barker, D; Basu Thakur, R; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Calkins, R; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Ghaith, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jardin, D; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Leder, A; Loer, B; Lopez Asamar, E; Lukens, P; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Mast, N; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Morales Mendoza, J D; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Roberts, A; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Toback, D; Underwood, R; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wilson, J S; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2016-02-19

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg day, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. A fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded for WIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5  GeV/c^{2}. PMID:26943526

  13. Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS): The Hunt for Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deciphering the nature of dark matter has great scientific importance. A leading hypothesis is that dark matter is made of Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs), which may result from supersymmetry or additional spatial dimensions. The underground search for elastic scattering of WIMPs on suitable targets (the so-called 'direct detection') is currently led by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II (CDMS II) experiment. Its sensitivity is ten times better than any other experiment and we hope to obtain another factor ten in the coming two years. After a brief recall of our recent results, I will describe the complementarity between direct detection experiments, the LHC and the ILC and I will outline the role that SLAC could play in this SuperCDMS program.

  14. CDMSlite: A Search for Low-Mass WIMPs using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Asai, M; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nadeau, P; Nelson, R H; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this paper, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage- assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for 10 live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of 170 eVee (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV/c2.

  15. CDMS, Supersymmetry and Extra Dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CDMS experiment aims to directly detect massive, cold dark matter particles originating from the Milky Way halo. Charge and lattice excitations are detected after a particle scatters in a Ge or Si crystal kept at ∼30 mK, allowing to separate nuclear recoils from the dominating electromagnetic background. The operation of 12 detectors in the Soudan mine for 75 live days in 2004 delivered no evidence for a signal, yielding stringent limits on dark matter candidates from supersymmetry and universal extra dimensions. Thirty Ge and Si detectors are presently installed in the Soudan cryostat, and operating at base temperature. The run scheduled to start in 2006 is expected to yield a one order of magnitude increase in dark matter sensitivity

  16. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Schneck, K.; Cornell, B.; Golwala, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model ...

  17. Simulations of Noise in Phase-Separated Transition-Edge Sensors for SuperCDMS

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, A J; Pyle, M; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; McCarthy, K; Doughty, T; Cherry, M; Young, B

    2011-01-01

    We briefly review a simple model of superconducting-normal phase-separation in transition-edge sensors in the SuperCDMS experiment. After discussing some design considerations relevant to the TES in the detectors, we study noise sources in both the phase-separated and phase-uniform cases. Such simulations are valuable for optimizing the critical temperature and TES length of future SuperCDMS detectors.

  18. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-04-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have

  19. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogburn, IV, Reuben Walter [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have

  20. The Up-Shot of Down-Scattering at CDMS-Si

    CERN Document Server

    Frandsen, Mads T

    2014-01-01

    We study dark matter that inelastically scatters and de-excites in direct detection experiments, as an interpretation of the CDMS-Si events in light of the recent LUX data. The constraints from LUX and XENON10 require the mass-splitting between the DM excited and de-excited states to be $|\\delta| \\gtrsim 50$ keV. At the same time, the CDMS-Si data itself do not allow for a consistent DM interpretation for mass splittings larger than $|\\delta| \\sim $200 keV. We find that a low threshold analysis will be needed to rule out this interpretation of the CDMS-Si events. In a simple model with a kinetically mixed dark photon, we show that the CDMS-Si rate and the thermal relic abundance can both be accommodated.

  1. SuperCDMS Cold Hardware Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the current design of the cold hardware and cold electronics to be used in the upcoming SuperCDMS Soudan deployment. Engineering challenges associated with such concerns as thermal isolation, microphonics, radiopurity, and power dissipation are discussed, along with identifying the design changes necessary for SuperCDMS SNOLAB. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) employs ultrapure 1-inch thick, 3-inch diameter germanium crystals operating below 50 mK in a dilution cryostat. These detectors give an ionization and phonon signal, which gives us rejection capabilities regarding background events versus dark matter signals.

  2. Prototyping an Active Neutron Veto for SuperCDMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calkins, Robert [Southern Methodist U.; Loer, Ben [Fermilab

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  3. Prototyping an active neutron veto for SuperCDMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calkins, Robert [Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275 (United States); Loer, Ben [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  4. Testing and Characterization of SuperCDMS Dark Matter Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shank, Benjamin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) relies on collection of phonons and charge carriers in semiconductors held at tens of milliKelvin as handles for detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). This thesis begins with a brief overview of the direct dark matter search (Chapter 1) and SuperCDMS detectors (Chapter 2). In Chapter 3, a 3He evaporative refrigerator facility is described. Results from experiments performed in-house at Stanford to measure carrier transport in high-purity germanium (HPGe) crystals operated at sub-Kelvin temperatures are presented in Chapter 4. Finally, in Chapter 5 a new numerical model and a time-domain optimal filtering technique are presented, both developed for use with superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TESs), that provide excellent event reconstruction for single particle interactions in detectors read out with superconducting W-TESs coupled to energy-collecting films of Al. This thesis is not intended to be read straight through. For those new to CDMS or dark matter searches, the first two chapters are meant to be a gentle introduction for experimentalists. They are by no means exhaustive. The remaining chapters each stand alone, with different audiences.

  5. Exothermic isospin-violating dark matter after SuperCDMS and CDEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We show that exothermic isospin-violating dark matter (IVDM can make the results of the latest CDMS-Si experiment consistent with recent null experiments, such as XENON10, XENON100, LUX, CDEX, and SuperCDMS, whereas for the CoGeNT experiment, a strong tension still persists. For CDMS-Si, separate exothermic dark matter or isospin-violating dark matter cannot fully ameliorate the tensions among these experiments; the tension disappears only if exothermic scattering is combined with an isospin-violating effect of fn/fp=−0.7. For such exothermic IVDM to exist, at least a new vector gauge boson (dark photon or dark Z' that connects SM quarks to Majorana-type DM particles is required.

  6. Experiment Tgv II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čermák, P.; Štekl, I.; Beneš, P.; Brudanin, V. B.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Egorov, V. G.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalík, A.; Salamatin, A. V.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Briancon, Ch.; Šimkovic, F.

    2004-07-01

    The project aims at the measurement of very rare processes of double-beta decay of 106Cd and 48Ca. The experimental facility TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) makes use of 32 HPGe planar detectors mounted in one common cryostat. The detectors are interleaved with thin foils containing ββ sources. Besides passive shielding against background radiation made of pure copper, lead and boron dopped polyethylene additional techniques for background suppression based on digital pulse shape analysis are used. The experimental setup is located in Modane underground laboratory (France). A review of the TGV II facility, its performance parameters and capabilities are presented.

  7. The SuperCDMS SNOLAB Detector Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, Tsuguo

    2016-08-01

    The SuperCDMS collaboration is moving forward with the design and construction of SuperCDMS SNOLAB, where the initial deployment will include ˜ 30 kg of Ge and ˜ 5 kg of Si detectors. Here, we will discuss the associated cryogenic cold hardware required for the detector readout. The phonon signals will be read out with superconducting quantum interference device arrays and the ionization signals will use high electron mobility transistor amplifiers operating at 4 K. A number of design challenges exist regarding the required wiring complex impedance, noise pickup, vibration, and thermal isolation. Our progress to date will be presented.

  8. Validation of Phonon Physics in the CDMS Detector Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, K A; Anderson, A J; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Cabrera, B; Cherry, M; Silva, E Do Couto E; Cushman, P; Doughty, T; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Kim, P; Mirabolfathi, N; Novak, L; Partridge, R; Pyle, M; Reisetter, A; Resch, R; Sadoulet, B; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tomada, A

    2011-01-01

    The SuperCDMS collaboration is a dark matter search effort aimed at detecting the scattering of WIMP dark matter from nuclei in cryogenic germanium targets. The CDMS Detector Monte Carlo (CDMS-DMC) is a simulation tool aimed at achieving a deeper understanding of the performance of the SuperCDMS detectors and aiding the dark matter search analysis. We present results from validation of the phonon physics described in the CDMS-DMC and outline work towards utilizing it in future WIMP search analyses.

  9. Search for Low-Mass WIMPs with SuperCDMS

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Asai, M; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Beaty, J; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cherry, M; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; DeVaney, D; Di Stefano, P C F; Silva, E Do Couto E; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Hansen, S; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hines, B A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kenany, S; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Nelson, R H; Novak, L; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Platt, M; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Resch, R W; Ricci, Y; Ruschman, M; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schmitt, R L; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Tomada, A; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    We report a first search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) using the background rejection capabilities of SuperCDMS. An exposure of 577 kg-days was analyzed for WIMPs with mass < 30 GeV/c2, with the signal region blinded. Eleven events were observed after unblinding. We set an upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section of 1.2e-42 cm2 at 8 GeV/c2. This result is in tension with WIMP interpretations of recent experiments and probes new parameter space for WIMP-nucleon scattering for WIMP masses < 6 GeV/c2.

  10. Up-shot of inelastic down-scattering at CDMS-Si

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; M. Shoemaker, Ian

    2014-01-01

    We study dark matter that inelastically scatters and de-excites in direct detection experiments, as an interpretation of the CDMS-Si events in light of the recent LUX data. The constraints from LUX and XENON10 require the mass-splitting between the DM excited and de-excited states to be $|\\delta|...

  11. TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental results of startup tests after reconstruction and modification of the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana are presented. The experiments were performed with a completely fresh, compact, and uniform core. The operating conditions were well defined and controlled, so that the results can be used as a benchmark test case for TRIGA reactor calculations. Both steady-state and pulse mode operation were tested. In this paper, the following steady-state experiments are treated: critical core and excess reactivity, control rod worths, fuel element reactivity worth distribution, fuel temperature distribution, and fuel temperature reactivity coefficient

  12. ERB-II operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As originally designed and operated, EBR-II successfully demonstrated the concept of a sodium-cooled fast breeder power plant with a closed fuel reprocessing cycle (mini-nuclear park). Subsequent operation has been as an irradiation facility, a role which will continue into the foreseeable future. Since the beginning of operation in 1961, operating experience of EBR-II has been very satisfactory. Most of the components and systems have performed well. In particular, the mechanical performance of heat-removal systems has been excellent. A review of the operating experience reveals that all the original design objectives have been successfully demonstrated. To date, no failures or incidents resulting in serious in-core or out-of-core consequences have occurred. No water-to-sodium leaks have been detected over the life of the plant. At the present time, the facility is operating very well and continuously except for short shutdowns required by maintenance, refueling, modification, and minor repair. A plant factor of 76.9% was achieved for the calendar year 1976

  13. A Supersymmetric Model for Dark Matter and Baryogenesis Motivated by the Recent CDMS Result

    CERN Document Server

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Mohapatra, Rabindra N; Sinha, Kuver

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a supersymmetric model for cogenesis of dark and baryonic matter where the dark matter (DM) has mass in the 8-10 GeV range as indicated by several direct detection searches including most recently the CDMS experiment with the desired cross section. The DM candidate is a real scalar filed. Two key distinguishing features of the model are the following: (i) in contrast with the conventional WIMP dark matter scenarios where thermal freeze-out is responsible for the observed relic density, our model uses non-thermal production of dark matter after reheating of the universe caused by moduli decay at temperatures below the QCD phase transition, a feature which alleviates the relic over-abundance problem caused by small annihilation cross section of light DM particles; (ii) baryogenesis occurs also at similar low temperatures from the decay of TeV scale mediator particles arising from moduli decay. A possible test of this model is the existence of colored particles with TeV masses accessible at the LHC.

  14. SuperCDMS Detector Readout Cryogenic Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, D. N.; Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D. S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C. N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D. A.; Beaty, J.; Brink, P. L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Clark, K.; Cooley, J.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Duong, L.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Filippini, J.; Fritts, M.; Golwala, S. R.; Grant, D. R.; Hall, J.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hertel, S.; Homgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Kamaev, O.; Kiveni, M.; Kos, M.; Leman, S. W.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Moore, D.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Nelson, H.; Novak, L.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, X.; Ramberg, E.; Rau, W.; Reisetter, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Serfass, B.; Sundqvist, K. M.; Tomada, A.; Wang, G.; Wikus, P.; Yellin, S.; Yoo, J.; Young, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    SuperCDMS employs 1-inch thick germanium crystals operated below 50mK in a dilution cryostat. Each detector produces ionization and phonon signals. Ionization signals are amplified by JFETs operating at 150K within an assembly mounted on the 4K cryostat stage. These high impedance signals are carried to the FETs by superconducting "vacuum coaxes" which minimize thermal conductivity, stray capacitance, and microphonics. Transition edge sensors produce low-impedance phonon signals, amplified by SQUID arrays mounted on a 600mK stage. Detectors are mounted in a six-sided wiring configuration called a "tower", which carries signals from 40mK to 4K. A flex circuit 3 meters in length carries amplified signals for each detector from 4K to a vacuum bulkhead. We describe the methods used to support the detectors, wiring and amplifier elements at various thermal stages, minimizing electrical noise and thermal loads.

  15. Present status of the experiment TGV II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present status of the experiment TGV II is given. The experiment TGV II is devoted to the measurement of double-beta decay of 106Cd and 48Ca. The new HPGe multi-detector TGV spectrometer has been constructed and installed in the Modane underground laboratory (in France). Preliminary results of the first background measurement are presented. (author)

  16. Present Status of the Experiment TGV II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štekl, I.; Čermák, P.; Beneš, P.; Brudanin, V. B.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Egorov, V. G.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalík, A.; Salamatin, A. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Šimkovic, F.

    2002-04-01

    Present status of the experiment TGV II is given. The experiment TGV II is devoted to the measurement of double-beta decay of 106Cd and 48Ca. The new HPGe multi-detector TGV spectrometer has been constructed and installed in the Modane underground laboratory (in France). Preliminary results of the first background measurement are presented.

  17. A modified detector concept for SuperCDMS: The HiZIP and its charge performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Kedar Mohan [Queen' s U.

    2013-01-01

    SuperCDMS (Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) is a leading direct dark mat-ter search experiment which uses solid state detectors (Ge crystals) at milliKelvintemperatures to look for nuclear recoils caused by dark matter interactions in the de-tector. `Weakly Interacting Massive Particles' (WIMPs) are the most favoured darkmatter candidate particles. SuperCDMS, like many other direct dark matter searchexperiments, primarily looks for WIMPs. The measurement of both the ionizationand the lattice vibration (phonon) signals from an interaction in the detector allow itto discriminate against electron recoils which are the main source of background forWIMP detection.SuperCDMS currently operates about 9 kg of Ge detectors at the Soudan under-ground lab in northern Minnesota. In its next phase, SuperCDMS SNOLAB plansto use 100-200 kg of target mass (Ge) which would allow it to probe more of theinteresting and and as of yet unexplored parameter space for WIMPs predicted bytheoretical models. The SuperCDMS Queen's Test Facility is a detector test facilitywhich is intended to serve as detector testing and detector research and developmentpurposes for the SuperCDMS experiment.A modifed detector called the HiZIP (Half-iZIP), which is reduced in complex-ity in comparison to the currently used iZIP (interleaved Z-sensitive Ionization and Phonon mediated) detectors, is studied in this thesis. The HiZIP detector designalso serves to discriminate against background from multiple scatter events occurringclose to the surfaces in a single detector. Studies carried out to compare the surfaceevent leakage in the HiZIP detector using limited information from iZIP data takenat SuperCDMS test facility at UC Berkley produce a highly conservative upper limitof 5 out of 10,000 events at 90% condence level. This upper limit is the best amongmany different HiZIP congurations that were investigated and is comparable to theupper limit calculated for an HiZIP detector in the same way

  18. CDMS: CAD data set system design description. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is intended to formalize the program design of the CAD Data Set Management System (CDMS) and to be the vehicle to communicate the design to the Engineering, Design Services, and Configuration Management organizations and the WHC IRM Analysts/Programmers. The SDD shows how the software system will be structured to satisfy the requirements identified in the WHC-SD-GN-CSRS-30005 CDMS Software Requirement Specification (SRS). It is a description of the software structure, software components, interfaces, and data that make up the CDMS System. The design descriptions contained within this document will describe in detail the software product that will be developed to assist the aforementioned organizations for the express purpose of managing CAD data sets associated with released drawings, replacing the existing locally developed system and laying the foundation for automating the configuration management

  19. Time Evolution of Electric Fields in CDMS Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Leman, S W; Brink, P L; Cabrera, B; Chagani, H; Cherry, M; Cushman, P; Silva, E Do Couto E; Doughty, T; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Pyle, M; Reisetter, A; Resch, R; Sadoulet, B; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tomada, A; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2011-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) utilizes large mass, 3" diameter x 1" thick target masses as particle detectors. The target is instrumented with both phonon and ionization sensors, the later providing a $\\sim$1 V cm$^{-1}$ electric field in the detector bulk. Cumulative radiation exposure which creates $\\sim 200\\times 10^6$ electron-hole pairs is sufficient to produce a comparable reverse field in the detector thereby degrading the ionization channel performance. To study this, the existing CDMS detector Monte Carlo has been modified to allow for an event by event evolution of the bulk electric field, in three spatial dimensions. Our most resent results and interpretation are discussed.

  20. Thermal conductance measurements of bolted copper joints for SuperCDMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R. L. [Fermilab; Tatkowski, G [Fermilab; Ruschman, M. [Fermilab; Golwala, S. [Caltech; Kellaris, N. [UC, Berkeley; Daal, M. [UC, Berkeley; Hall, J. [PNL, Richland; Hoppe, E. W. [PNL, Richland

    2015-05-22

    Joint thermal conductance testing has been undertaken for bolted copper to copper connections from 60 mK to 26 K. This testing was performed to validate an initial design basis for the SuperCDMS experiment, where a dilution refrigerator will be coupled to a cryostat via multiple bolted connections. Copper used during testing was either gold plated or passivated with citric acid to prevent surface oxidation. Results obtained are well fit by a power law regression of joint thermal conductance to temperature and match well with data collected during a literature review.

  1. Belle-II Experiment Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David; Bell, Greg; Carlson, Tim; Cowley, David; Dart, Eli; Erwin, Brock; Godang, Romulus; Hara, Takanori; Johnson, Jerry; Johnson, Ron; Johnston, Bill; Dam, Kerstin Kleese-van; Kaneko, Toshiaki; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Kuhr, Thomas; McCoy, John; Miyake, Hideki; Monga, Inder; Nakamura, Motonori; Piilonen, Leo; Pordes, Ruth; Ray, Douglas; Russell, Richard; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Jim; Sevior, Martin; Singh, Surya; Suzuki, Soh; Sasaki, Takashi; Williams, Jim

    2013-05-28

    The Belle experiment, part of a broad-based search for new physics, is a collaboration of ~400 physicists from 55 institutions across four continents. The Belle detector is located at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The Belle detector was operated at the asymmetric electron-positron collider KEKB from 1999-2010. The detector accumulated more than 1 ab-1 of integrated luminosity, corresponding to more than 2 PB of data near 10 GeV center-of-mass energy. Recently, KEK has initiated a $400 million accelerator upgrade to be called SuperKEKB, designed to produce instantaneous and integrated luminosity two orders of magnitude greater than KEKB. The new international collaboration at SuperKEKB is called Belle II. The first data from Belle II/SuperKEKB is expected in 2015. In October 2012, senior members of the Belle-II collaboration gathered at PNNL to discuss the computing and neworking requirements of the Belle-II experiment with ESnet staff and other computing and networking experts. The day-and-a-half-long workshop characterized the instruments and facilities used in the experiment, the process of science for Belle-II, and the computing and networking equipment and configuration requirements to realize the full scientific potential of the collaboration's work.

  2. Global track finder for Belle II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an implementation of a method based on the Legendre transformation for reconstruction charged particle tracks in the central drift chamber of the Belle II experiment. The method is designed for fast track finding and restoring circular patterns of track hits in transverse plane. It is done by searching for common tangents to drift circles of hits in the conformal space. With known transverse trajectories longitudinal momentum estimation performed by assigning stereo hits followed by determination of the track parameters. The method includes algorithms responsible for track quality estimation and reduction of rate of fakes. The work is targeting at increasing the efficiency and reducing the execution time because the computing power available to the experiment is limited. The algorithm is developed within the Belle II software environment with using Monte-Carlo simulation for probing its efficiency.

  3. Measurement of SQUID noise levels for SuperCDMS SNOLAB detectors - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Maxwell [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-27

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB is a second generation direct dark matter search. In the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, detectors are able to pick up from signals from dark matter nuclear recoil interactions which occur inside the bulk of the detectors. These interactions produce both phonon and charge signals. HEMTs read out charge signals whereas TES are used to detect phonon signals which are then read out by SQUID amplifiers. SQUID amplifiers must add negligible noise to the TES intrinsic noise which has been previously measured and is approximately 50pA/√Hz down to 100Hz for ease of signal distinguishability in dark matter nuclear interactions. The intrinsic noise level of the SQUID was tested in the SLAC 300mK fridge and determined to provide adequately low levels of noise with a floor of approximately 3pA/√Hz. Furthermore, a 10x amplifier was tested for addition of extraneous noise. This noise was investigated with and without this amplifier, and it was found that it did not add a significant amount of noise to the intrinsic SQUID noise.

  4. Command and data management system (CDMS) of the Philae lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, A.; Baksa, A.; Bitterlich, H.; Hernyes, I.; Küchemann, O.; Pálos, Z.; Rustenbach, J.; Schmidt, W.; Spányi, P.; Sulyán, J.; Szalai, S.; Várhalmi, L.

    2016-08-01

    The paper covers the principal requirements, design concepts and implementation of the hardware and software for the central on-board computer (CDMS) of the Philae lander in the context of the ESA Rosetta space mission, including some technical details. The focus is on the implementation of fault tolerance, autonomous operation and operational flexibility by means of specific linked data structures and code execution mechanisms that can be interpreted as a kind of object oriented model for mission sequencing.

  5. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schneck, K; Cerdeno, D G; Mandic, V; Rogers, H E; Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Asai, M; Balakishiyeva, D; Barker, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Caldwell, D O; Calkins, R; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jardin, D M; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Lukens, P; Mahapatra, R; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Mendoza, J D Morales; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Roberts, A; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Toback, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wilson, J S; Wright, D H; Yang, X; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  6. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; et al.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  7. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  8. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  9. Liner target interaction experiments on Pegasus II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos High Energy Density Physics program uses capacitively driven low voltage, inductive-storage pulse power to implode cylindrical targets for hydrodynamics experiments. Once a precision driver liner was characterized an experimental series characterizing the aluminum target dynamics was performed. The target was developed for shock-induced quasi-particle ejecta experiments including holography. The concept for the Liner shock experiment is that the driver liner is used to impact the target liner which then accelerates toward a collimator with a slit in it. A shock wave is set up in the target liner and as the shock emerges from the back side of the target liner, ejecta are generated. By taking a laser hologram the particle distribution of the ejecta are hoped to be determined. The goal for the second experimental series was to characterize the target dynamics and not to measure and generate the ejecta. Only the results from the third shot, Pegasus II-26 fired April 26th, 1994, from the series is discussed in detail. The second experimental series successfully characterized the target dynamics necessary to move forward towards the planned quasi-ejecta experiments

  10. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, in the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Christian P; Schilke, Peter; Stutzki, Jürgen; Müller, Holger S P

    2016-01-01

    The CDMS was founded 1998 to provide in its catalog section line lists of molecular species which may be observed in various astronomical sources using radio astronomy. The line lists contain transition frequencies with qualified accuracies, intensities, quantum numbers, as well as further auxilary information. They have been generated from critically evaluated experimental line lists, mostly from laboratory experiments, employing established Hamiltonian models. Seperate entries exist for different isotopic species and usually also for different vibrational states. As of December 2015, the number of entries is 792. They are available online as ascii tables with additional files documenting information on the entries. The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre was founded more than 5 years ago as a common platform for atomic and molecular data. This platform facilitates exchange not only between spectroscopic databases related to astrophysics or astrochemistry, but also with collisional and kinetic databases...

  11. Experiments with radioactive nuclear beams II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies of nuclear reactions with heavy ions have been carried out for years for the group of heavy ions of the laboratory of the Accelerator of the ININ. Especially in the last years the group has intruded in the studies of nuclear reactions with radioactive beams, frontier theme at world level. Presently Technical Report is presented in detailed form the experimental methods and the analysis procedures of the research activities carried out by the group. The chpater II is dedicated to the procedures used in the analysis of the last two experiments with radioactive beams carried out by the group. In the chapter III is presented the procedure followed to carrying out an extended analysis with the CCDEF code, to consider the transfer channel of nucleons in the description of the fusion excitation functions of a good number of previously measured systems by the group. Finally, in the chapter IV the more important steps to continue in the study of the reaction 12C + 12C experiment drifted to be carried out using the available resources of the Tandem Accelerator Laboratory of the ININ are described. At the end of each chapter some of the more representative results obtained in the analysis are presented and emphasis on the scientific production generated by the group for each case is made. (Author)

  12. VINETA II: a linear magnetic reconnection experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlin, H; Von Stechow, A; Rahbarnia, K; Grulke, O; Klinger, T

    2014-02-01

    A linear experiment dedicated to the study of driven magnetic reconnection is presented. The new device (VINETA II) is suitable for investigating both collisional and near collisionless reconnection. Reconnection is achieved by externally driving magnetic field lines towards an X-point, inducing a current in the background plasma which consequently modifies the magnetic field topology. Owing to the open field line configuration of the experiment, the current is limited by the axial sheath boundary conditions. A plasma gun is used as an additional electron source in order to counterbalance the charge separation effects and supply the required current. Two drive methods are used in the device. First, an oscillating current through two parallel conductors drive the reconnection. Second, a stationary X-point topology is formed by the parallel conductors, and the drive is achieved by an oscillating current through a third conductor. In the first setup, the magnetic field of the axial plasma current dominates the field topology near the X-point throughout most of the drive. The second setup allows for the amplitude of the plasma current as well as the motion of the flux to be set independently of the X-point topology of the parallel conductors. PMID:24593355

  13. Experiment TGV II - results of Phases I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the TGV collaboration is investigating the two-neutrino double electron capture (2vEC/EC) of 106Cd at the Modane underground laboratory. The study is performed with low-background multi-HPGe detector TGV II, which has been constructed for measurements of the rare processes. The half-life limits of T1/2>2.6x1020 years(for Phase I, 8687 hours) and T1/2>3.6x1020 years(for Phase II, 9003 hours) were obtained for the ground state to ground state 2vEC/EC of 106Cd. The results already allow to rule out some of the previous nuclear structure calculations.

  14. EBR-II: summary of operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, W.H.; Leman, J.D.; Lentz, G.L.; Longua, K.J.; Olson, W.H.; Shields, J.A.; Wolz, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. The primary cooling system is a submerged-pool type. The early operation of the reactor successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor operating as an integrated reactor, power plant, and fuel-processing facility. In 1967, the role of EBR-II was reoriented from a demonstration plant to an irradiation facility. Many changes have been made and are continuing to be made to increase the usefulness of EBR-II for irradiation and safety tests. A review of EBR-II's operating history reveals a plant that has demonstrated high availability, stable and safe operating characteristics, and excellent performance of sodium components. Levels of radiation exposure to the operating and maintenance workers have been low; and fission-gas releases to the atmosphere have been minimal. Driver-fuel performance has been excellent. The repairability of radioactive sodium components has been successfully demonstrated a number of times. Recent highlights include installation and successful operation of (1) the hydrogen-meter leak detectors for the steam generators, (2) the cover-gas-cleanup system and (3) the cesium trap in the primary sodium. Irradiations now being conducted in EBR-II include the run-beyond-cladding breach fuel tests for mixed-oxide and carbide elements. Studies are in progress to determine EBR-II's capability for conducting important ''operational safety'' tests. These tests would extend the need and usefulness of EBR-II into the 1980's.

  15. EBR-II: summary of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. The primary cooling system is a submerged-pool type. The early operation of the reactor successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor operating as an integrated reactor, power plant, and fuel-processing facility. In 1967, the role of EBR-II was reoriented from a demonstration plant to an irradiation facility. Many changes have been made and are continuing to be made to increase the usefulness of EBR-II for irradiation and safety tests. A review of EBR-II's operating history reveals a plant that has demonstrated high availability, stable and safe operating characteristics, and excellent performance of sodium components. Levels of radiation exposure to the operating and maintenance workers have been low; and fission-gas releases to the atmosphere have been minimal. Driver-fuel performance has been excellent. The repairability of radioactive sodium components has been successfully demonstrated a number of times. Recent highlights include installation and successful operation of (1) the hydrogen-meter leak detectors for the steam generators, (2) the cover-gas-cleanup system and (3) the cesium trap in the primary sodium. Irradiations now being conducted in EBR-II include the run-beyond-cladding breach fuel tests for mixed-oxide and carbide elements. Studies are in progress to determine EBR-II's capability for conducting important ''operational safety'' tests. These tests would extend the need and usefulness of EBR-II into the 1980's

  16. FEBEX II Project THG Laboratory Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missana, T.

    2004-07-01

    The main roles of the bentonite in a radioactive waste repository is to act as a geochemical barrier against the radionuclides migration. The effectiveness of this geochemical barrier depends on the surface properties of the solid phases and on the physico-chemical environment generated by the interaction of the solid phases with the groundwater. Within the FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barriers Experiment) project, a program of laboratory tests was designed to study and to understand the processes taking place in the clay barrier. Since the first stages of the project, these laboratory tests enabled to isolate different processes, making easier their interpretation, and provided fundamental parameters to be used in the Thermo Hydro Mechanical (THM) and Thermo Hydro Geochemical (THG) models. Additionally, experimental data enabled to check the predictive capability of these models. In the second phase of the project, laboratory tests focused on all those relevant aspects not sufficiently covered during FEBEX I. Particularly, the following main objectives were proposed for the THG investigations during FEBEX II : Attainment of a reliable description of the pore water chemistry at different geochemical conditions. Identification of the different types of water present in the bentonite and to determine the amount of available water for the solute transport.Evaluation of the potential effects of the extraction pressure in the chemical composition of the water obtained by squeezing methods.Study of the effects of the exchange complex in the rheological properties of the clay.Identification and modelling of the surface processes occurring in smectite, determination of the solubility constants of smectite and the formation constants of the surface complexes.Understanding of the mechanisms involved in the sorption of different radionuclides in the bentonite. Investigation of the diffusion mechanisms of conservative neutral and anionic species to have a deeper insight on the

  17. Program of Experiments in the KNK II Breeder Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sodium cooled fast reactor KNK II in the Research Center of Karlsruhe with a thermal power of 58 MW and an electric power of 20 MW has the mission, like other experimental plants such as EBRII in the US, RAPSODIE in France or JOYO in Japan, to collect experience for the construction and the operation of prototype plants. For KNK II, this program comprised the following areas: irradiation experiments and the corresponding post-irradiation examination, fuel cycle, instrumentation and detection techniques, operation related experiments and reactor chemistry. These areas are described in this report, after an illustration of the properties of KNK II as an irradiation reactor

  18. Assembly and operation experience of EVA II steam reforming bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main test component of the experimental facility EVA-II/ADAM-II is a helium heated steam reformer bundle with 30 tubes. The tubes are filled with a catalyst of raschig ring type. The main test of the component were related to the power dependence. A series of experiment dealt with the influence of steam/methane ratio on the carbon deposit formation

  19. Plasma opening switch experiments on the Particle Beam Accelerator II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma opening switch (POS) experiments have been done since 1986 on the PBFA-II ion beam accelerator to develop a rugged POS that will open rapidly (80%) into a high impedance (> 10 ohm) load. In a recent series of experiments on PBFA II, the authors have developed and tested three different switch designs that use magnetic fields to control and confine the injected plasma. All three configurations couple current efficiently to a 5-ohm electron beam diode. In this experimental series, the PBFA-II Delta Series, more extensive diagnostics were used than in previous switch experiments on PBFA II or on the Blackjack 5 accelerator at Maxwell Laboratories. Data from the experiments with these three switch designs is presented

  20. EBR-II: twenty years of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. For the last 20 years EBR-II has operated safely, has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, has shown excellent performance of its sodium components, and has had an excellent plant factor. These years of operating experience provide a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future liquid metal fast reactors. This report provides a brief description of the EBR-II plant and its early operating experience, describes some recent problems of interest to the nuclear community, and also mentions some of the significant operating achievements of EBR-II. Finally, a few words and speculations on EBR-II's future are offered. 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. The TGV II Experiment (Phase I Results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of 106Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of Cd-106 enriched to 75% (total mass about 10 g). In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture (g.s.→g.s.) in 106Cd as 2.0x1020 years. This limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published

  2. The TGV II Experiment (Phase I Results)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneš, P.; Briançon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Čermák, P.; Egorov, V. G.; Gusev, K. N.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalik, A.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Šimkovic, F.; Štekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.

    2007-10-01

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of 106Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of Cd-106 enriched to 75% (total mass about 10 g). In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture (g.s.→g.s.) in 106Cd as 2.0×1020 years. This limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  3. SIMMER-II analysis of transition-phase experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses of Los Alamos transition-phase experiments with the SIMMER-II computer code are reported. These transient boilup experiments simulated the recriticality-induced transient motion of a boiling pool of molten fuel, molten steel and steel vapor, within a subassembly duct in a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor during the transition phase of a core-disruptive accident. The two purposes of these experiments were to explore and reach a better understanding of fast reactor safety issues, and to provide data for SIMMER-II verification. Experimental data, consisting of four pressure traces and a high-speed movie, were recorded for four sets of initial conditions. For three of the four cases, SIMMER-II-calculated pressures compared reasonably well with the experimental pressures. After a modification to SIMMER-II's liquid-vapor drag correlation, the comparison for the fourth case was reasonable also. 12 refs., 4 figs

  4. First results of the Auroral Turbulance II rocket experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielides, M.A.; Ranta, A.; Ivchenco, N.;

    1999-01-01

    The Auroral Turbulance II sounding rocket was launched on February 11, 1997 into moderately active nightside aurora from the Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, US. The experiment consisted of three independent, completely instrumented payloads launched by a single vehicle. The aim of the experiment...

  5. RADLAC II high current electron beam propagation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resistive hose instability of an electron beam was observed to be convective in recent RADLAC II experiments for higher current shots. The effects of air scattering for these shots were minimal. These experiments and theory suggest low-frequency hose motion which does not appear convective may be due to rapid expansion and subsequent drifting of the beam nose

  6. KUCA critical experiments using MEU fuel (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to mutual concerns in the USA and Japan about the proliferation potential of highly-enriched uranium (HEU), a joint study program I was initiated between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL and Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) in 1978. In accordance with the reduced enrichment for research and test reactor (RERTR) program, the alternatives were studied for reducing the enrichment of the fuel to be used in the Kyoto University High Flux Reactor (KUHFR). The KUHFR has a distinct feature in its core configuration it is a coupled-core. Each annular shaped core is light-water-moderated and placed within a heavy water reflector with a certain distance between them. The phase A reports of the joint ANL-KURRI program independently prepared by two laboratories in February 1979, 3,4 concluded that the use of medium-enrichment uranium (MEU, 45%) in the KUHFR is feasible, pending results of the critical experiments in the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) 5 and of the burnup test in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor 6 (ORR). An application of safety review (Reactor Installation License) for MEU fuel to be used in the KUCA was submitted to the Japanese Government in March 1980, and a license was issued in August 1980. Subsequently, the application for 'Authorization before Construction' was submitted and was authorized in September 1980. Fabrication of MEU fuel-elements for the KUCA experiments by CERCA in France was started in September 1980, and was completed in March 1981. The critical experiments in the KUCA with MEU fuel were started on a single-core in May 1981 as a first step. The first critical state of the core using MEU fuel was achieved at 312 p.m. in May 12, 1981. After that, the reactivity effects of the outer side-plates containing boron burnable poison were measured. At Munich Meeting in Sept., 1981, we presented a paper on critical mass and reactivity of burnable poison in the MEU core. Since then we carried out the following experiments

  7. Parallelizing Climate Data Management System, version 3 (CDMS3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, D.; Williams, D. N.; Painter, J.; Doutriaux, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Climate Data Management System is an object-oriented data management system, specialized for organizing multidimensional, gridded data used in climate analyses for data observation and simulation. The basic unit of computation in CDMS3 is the variable, which consist of a multidimensional array that represents climate information in four dimensions corresponding to: time, pressure levels, latitudes, and longitudes. As model become more precise in their computation, the volume of data generated becomes bigger and difficult to handle due to the limit of computational resources. Model today can produce data a time frequency of one hourly, three hourly, or six hourly for spatial footprint close to satellite data used run models. The amount of time for scientists to analyze the data and retrieve useful information is more and more unmanageable. Parallelizing libraries such as CMDS3 would ease the burden of working with such big datasets. Multiple approaches of parallelizing are possible. The most obvious one is embarrassingly parallel or pleasingly parallel programming where each computer node processes one file at a time. A more challenging approach is to send a piece of the data to each node for computation and each node will save the results at its right place in a file as a slab of data. This is possible with Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). A final approach would be the use of Open Multi-Processing API (OpenMP) where a master thread is split in multiple threads for different sections of the main code. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. This poster bring to light each benefit of these methods and seek to find an optimal solution to compute climate data analyses in a efficient fashion using one or a mixtures of these parallelized methods.

  8. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  9. The Belle II experiment: fundamental physics at the flavor frontier

    CERN Document Server

    de la Cruz, Ivan Heredia

    2016-01-01

    After the major success of B-factories to establish the CKM mechanism and its proven potential to search for new physics, the Belle II experiment will continue exploring the physics at the flavor frontier over the next years. Belle II will collect 50 times more data than its predecessor, Belle, and allow for various precision measurements and searches of rare decays and particles. This paper introduces the B-factory concept and the flavor frontier approach to search for new physics. It then describes the SuperKEKB accelerator and the Belle II detector, as well as some of the physics that will be analyzed in Belle II, concluding with the experiment status and schedule.

  10. Construction and operating experiences at KNK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the construction and operation of KNK-2 a number of problems were detected and solved. Joint efforts of all parties concerned ensured that the project was successful, success meaning that for the first time in the Federal Republic of Germany the burnup of a mixed-oxide fuel element reached the value of 100.000 MWd/t and the breeder reactor fuel cycle was closed. The experience gained in the event has all the time been transferred to the SNR-300 because of a joint fast breeder development programme, and it will certainly help reducing installation and commissioning hazards. Furthermore, the KNK-2 reactor has become for the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre a major research instrument where many tasks concerning the fast breeder reactor project have been solved by trial. Besides irradiation of fuel elements a great number of tests on reactor instrumentation and plant design have been carried out. We may therefore state that the great amount of work done and money paid in the Federal Republic of Germany to construct a sodium-cooled breeder trial plant did pay after all. (orig.)

  11. BEATRIX-II: A multi-national solid breeder experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEATRIX-II is an IEA program focused on tritium recovery experiments on lithium ceramic materials in a fast neutron reactor which partially simulates the environment of a fusion blanket. In addition to data on the performance of Li2O and Li2ZrO3, the BEATRIX-II program offers information on innovative technologies associated with tritium recovery. The successful execution of the BEATRIX-II program also offers a precedent for the structure, schedule and interfaces that other international programs should consider. Japan, Canada, and USA re participants in the BEATRIX-II program with primary responsibilities being assigned to Japan Atomic Research Institute, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Westinghouse Hanford Company. The purpose of the BEATRIX-II experiment is to conduct in situ tritium recovery experiments on ceramic solid breeder materials under irradiation conditions which expanded the burnup, irradiation damage, tritium production, and temperature regimes previously investigated. A liquid metal, fast neutron reactor was selected because spatial variations in tritium and heat production are minimized and temporal variations in the lithium burnup rate (burnout) are also minimal. The Fast Flux Test Facility was selected because it possessed a high neutron flux, excellent control and monitoring capabilities and ready access for a tritium recovery experiment

  12. Searches for New Physics at the Belle II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Boqun

    2015-01-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider is an upgrade of the Belle / KEKB experiment. It will start physics data taking from 2018 and with $40$ times luminosity, its goal is to accumulate 50 $ab^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ collision data. The physics programs have a wide range of areas for new physics, such as more constraints on CKM Unitarity Triangle, searching for charged Higgs, direct CPV, Lepton Flavour Violation and dark matter.In this monograph, we will review the current status of Belle II and SuperKEKB construction and introduce the main physics opportunities at this facility.

  13. Results of experiments in the THIBO II test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was possible to prove in 1988 in the course of the THIBO I experiments; that under certain operating conditions thermohydraulically induced rod damaging oscillations may occur in sodium cooled Mark II fuel elements. Since May 1989 another THIBO II test series has been performed in a new test section of the sodium loop of the IMF III. The area of the coolant channel was reduced to approximately half its previous surface so that the thermohydraulic conditions come very close to those prevailing in the KNK II reactor. The experiments have shown that even with minor sodium enthalpy raises and low rating, respectively, motions of the fuel pins can be induced. This applies also in cases where the clearance of the pin in the spacer has been set to realistically low values

  14. The Software Framework of the Belle II Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    The future of CP-Violation experiments is to begin in 2014 with the launch of the SuperKEKB collider in Tsukuba, Japan. As a part of this process the BELLE experiment will undergo an upgrade, giving rise to the BELLE II experiment. The BELLE II detector will include improvements and redesigns of various subdetectors, as well as the addition of an entire new subdetector for precise vertexing. In order to reflect these changes in the existing BELLE software framework, major modifications of nearly all parts of the software would have been necessary. As a result the decision was made to completely rewrite the software framework. In this article the main concepts of the new framework and the applied technologies are presented.

  15. EBR-II experience with sodium cleaning and radioactivity decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EBR-II is now in Its 13th year of operation. During that period more than 2400 subassemblies have been cleaned of sodium without a serious incident of any kind by a two-step process developed at Argonne. Sodium cleaning and decontamination of other reactor components has been performed only on the relatively few occasions in which a repair or replacement has been required. A summary of the EBR-II experience will be presented. A new facility will be described for the improved cleaning and maintenance of sodium-wetted primary components

  16. Experience with lifetime limits for EBR-II core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is operated for the US Department of Energy by Argonne National Laboratory and is located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory where most types of American reactor were originally tested. EBR-II is a complete electricity-producing power plant now in its twenty-fourth year of successful operation. During this long history the reactor has had several concurrent missions, such as demonstration of a closed Liquid-Metal Reactor (LMR) fuel cycle (1964-69); as a steady-state irradiation facility for fuels and materials (1970 onwards); for investigating effects of operational transients on fuel elements (from 1981); for research into the inherent safety aspects of metal-fueled LMR's (from 1983); and, most recently, for demonstration of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept using U-Pu-Zr fuels. This paper describes experience gained at EBR-II in defining lifetime limits for LMR core components, particularly fuel elements

  17. The silicon strip vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuki, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    The Belle II upgrade of the Belle experiment will extend the search for physics beyond the standard model. The upgrade is currently under construction, and foreseen to complete in time for the physics run scheduled for 2016. The vertex detector of the Belle II comprises two types of silicon detectors: the pixel detector (PXD) and the strip detector (SVD) using double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD). One of the most characteristic features of the SVD is a unique chip-on-sensor scheme which enabling good signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio while reducing the material budget. This paper describes the implementation of the scheme, status and future prospects of the Belle II SVD.

  18. Progress of opacity experiment on the Shengguang II Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, a series of opacity diagnostics have been developed at the Research Center of Laser Fusion in China. Two types of cavities (a conical cavity called a type I target, and a cylindrical cavity with foam baffles called a type II target) were designed to convert the eight-beam laser into x-ray radiation to efficiently heat the sample and to prevent the sample from irradiation of the reflected laser and plasmas on the Shengguang II laser facility. Typical opacity experiments have been carried out using the two target designs, respectively. The results show that a sample temperature of about 95 eV has been reached using the type II target which is the highest obtained on the high power laser facility.

  19. The Belle II Experiment and SuperKEKB Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The Belle II / SuperKEKB experiment is an $e^+e^-$ collider running at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance energy to produce B meson pairs. As an upgrade of the Belle / KEKB experiment, it will start physics data taking from 2018 and with $\\sim 40$ times luminosity, its goal is to accumulate 50 $ab^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ collision data. Now the upgrade of the sub-detector systems is on going in KEK. The physics programs have a wide range of areas, including searches for direct CPV, Lepton Flavour Violation and dark matter. In this proceedings, we will review the current upgrade status of Belle II and SuperKEKB and introduce some physics opportunities at this facility.

  20. Beam waveguide for ECRH at TJ-II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayza, M.S.; Del Rio Bocio, C. [Universidad Publica de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Garcia, R.M.; Cepero Diaz, J.R.; Likin, K.M. [Asociacion Euratom-Ciemat para Fusion, Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In this paper the authors present the main parameters of the transmission line system for Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) for TJ-II experiment in Madrid. This system is based upon two quasioptical transmission lines to carry 400 kW and 0.5 sec of pulse length each line operating at the frequency of 53.2 GHz. The principal parameters of the designed mirrors and that of the guided beams are given in next paragraphs.

  1. Lithium beam characterization of cylindrical PBFA II hohlraum experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandia National Laboratories is actively engaged in exploring indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (PBFA II) with pulsed-power accelerated lithium ions as the driver. Experiments utilizing cylindrical hohlraum targets were conducted in 1994. Using the incoming ion beam-induced line radiation from titanium wires surrounding these hohlraums, beam profiles during these experiments have been measured and characterized. These data, their comparison/cross-correlation with particle-based beam diagnostics, and an analysis of the beam parameters that most significantly influence target temperature are presented

  2. Particle Physics Implications and Constraints on Dark Matter Interpretations of the CDMS Signal

    CERN Document Server

    Cotta, Randel C; Tait, Tim M P; Wijangco, Alexander M

    2013-01-01

    Recently the CDMS collaboration has reported an excess of events in the signal region of a search for dark matter scattering with Silicon nuclei. Three events on an expected background of 0.4 have a significance of about 2 sigma, and it is premature to conclude that this is a signal of dark matter. Nonetheless, it is important to examine the space of particle theories capable of explaining this excess, to see what theories are capable of explaining it, and how one might exclude it or find corroborating evidence in other channels. We examine a simplified model containing a scalar mediator particle, and find regions consistent with the CDMS observations. Bounds from colliders put important restrictions on the theory, but viable points, including points leading to the observed thermal relic density, survive.

  3. Database usage and performance for the Fermilab Run II experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonham, D.; Box, D.; Gallas, E.; Guo, Y.; Jetton, R.; Kovich, S.; Kowalkowski, J.; Kumar, A.; Litvintsev, D.; Lueking, L.; Stanfield, N.; Trumbo, J.; Vittone-Wiersma, M.; White, S.P.; Wicklund, E.; Yasuda, T.; /Fermilab; Maksimovic, P.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2004-12-01

    The Run II experiments at Fermilab, CDF and D0, have extensive database needs covering many areas of their online and offline operations. Delivering data to users and processing farms worldwide has represented major challenges to both experiments. The range of applications employing databases includes, calibration (conditions), trigger information, run configuration, run quality, luminosity, data management, and others. Oracle is the primary database product being used for these applications at Fermilab and some of its advanced features have been employed, such as table partitioning and replication. There is also experience with open source database products such as MySQL for secondary databases used, for example, in monitoring. Tools employed for monitoring the operation and diagnosing problems are also described.

  4. Results on QCD Physics from the CDF-II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliarone, C.; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-12-01

    In this paper the authors review a selection of recent results obtained, in the area of QCD physics, from the CDF-II experiment that studies p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. All results shown correspond to analysis performed using the Tevatron Run II data samples. In particular they will illustrate the progress achieved and the status of the studies on the following QCD processes: jet inclusive production, using different jet clustering algorithm, W({yields} e{nu}{sub e}) + jets and Z({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, {gamma} + b-jet production, dijet production in double pomeron exchange and finally exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} production. No deviations from the Standard Model have been observed so far.

  5. New Results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Armel, M S; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Bolozdynya, A I; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Castle, J P; Chang, C L; Clarke, R M; Crisler, M B; Cushman, P B; Davies, A K; Dixon, R; Driscoll, D D; Duong, L; Emes, J; Ferril, R; Gaitskell, R J; Golwala, S R; Haldeman, M; Hellmig, J; Hennessey, M; Holmgren, D; Huber, M E; Kamat, S; Kurylowicz, M; Lu, A; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinis, J M; Meunier, P; Mirabolfathi, N; Nam, S W; Nelson, H; Nelson, R; Ogburn, R W; Perales, J; Perera, T A; Perillo-Isaac, M C; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Ross, R R; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Savage, C; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Shutt, T A; Smith, G; Spadafora, A L; Thompson, J P F; Tomada, A; Wang, G; Yellin, S; Young, B A

    2003-01-01

    Using improved Ge and Si detectors, better neutron shielding, and increased counting time, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment has obtained stricter limits on the cross section of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) elastically scattering from nuclei. Increased discrimination against electromagnetic backgrounds and reduction of neutron flux confirm WIMP-candidate events previously detected by CDMS were consistent with neutrons and give limits on spin-independent WIMP interactions which are >2X lower than previous CDMS results for high WIMP mass, and which exclude new parameter space for WIMPs with mass between 8-20 GeV/c^2.

  6. Simulations, Diagnostics and Recent Results of the VISA II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Andonian, G; Pellegrini, C; Reiche, S; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G

    2005-01-01

    The VISA II experiment entails use of a chirped beam to drive a high gain SASE FEL. The output radiation is diagnosed with a modified frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) technique. Sextupoles are implemented to correct the lonigtudinal aberrations affecting the high energy spread chirped beam during transport to the undulator. The double differential energy spectrum is measured with a pair of slits and a set of gratings. In this paper, we report on start-to-end simulations, radiation diagnostics, as well as intial experimental results; experimental methods are described.

  7. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment - Getting Ready for Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Carsten B., E-mail: ckrauss@owl.phy.queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Kingston, ON, K7L 2N6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    PICASSO is a dark matter search experiment that uses the superheated droplet technique to find spin-dependently interacting WIMPs. A set of 1 l detectors with a total active mass of 19.4 g was used to prove the validity of the technique. The data from this run disfavors WIMP-proton cross sections larger than 1.3 pb for a WIMP mass of 29 GeV. Currently phase II of PICASSO is getting started. It will consist of 32 4.5 l detectors with a projected active mass of 2.5 kg and improved detectors.

  8. Operational experience data base of TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two kinds of operational data available from operator logs: component failure-event data and abnormal event scenario information can be effectively used in PSA. Most operating data collection systems are aimed at improving the safety and availability of research reactors or commercial plants. This paper describes our failure-event data collection scheme, suitable for reliability and safety evaluations. Following the proposed data collection scheme the last five years operational experience was analysed and computerized data base for Triga Mark II reactor was developed. (orig.)

  9. TOP counter for particle identification at the Belle II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Ring imaging Cherenkov counter, named TOP counter, utilizing precise photon detection timing has been developed as a particle identification detector for the Belle II experiment. The real size prototype has been produced and tested with 2 GeV positrons at Spring-8 LEPS beam line. The quartz radiator production and assembling with microchannel plate photomultipliers was successfully carried out. The beam test data shows good agreement with full Monte-Carlo simulation results in the ring image and the distribution of number of detected photons and timing information.

  10. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10's of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy

  11. Computer thermal modeling for the Salt Rock II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, O.L. Jr.

    1980-10-01

    The Salt Block II experiment consisted of a cylindrical block of bedded salt which was heated from within by a cylindrical electric heater. It was an extensively instrumented laboratory experiment that served, among other things, as a touchstone against which to measure the validity of a computer thermal model. The thermal model consisted of 282 nodes joined by 572 conductors, and was constructed for use with the CINDA heat transfer code. Both transient and steady-state temperature distributions within the salt were computed for heater power levels of 200, 400, 600, 1000 and 1500 watts. Temperature versus time plots are presented for 23 locations throughout the Block over a 58-day period. Comparisons of the model results and experimental results are shown for both transient and steady-state conditions. The computed steady-state results were used to develop equations describing both the temperature and the temperature derivative as functions of radial location.

  12. DARHT-II Long-Pulse Beam-Dynamics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ekdahl, Carl; Bartsch, Richard; Bender, Howard; Briggs, Richard J; Broste, William; Carlson, Carl; Caudill, Larry; Chan, Kwok-Chi D; Chen Yu Jiuan; Dalmas, Dale; Durtschi, Grant; Eversole, Steven; Eylon, Shmuel; Fawley, William M; Frayer, Daniel; Gallegos, Robert J; Harrison, James; Henestroza, Enrique; Holzscheiter, M H; Houck, Timothy L; Hughes, Thomas P; Jacquez, Edward; Johnson, Douglas; Johnson, Jeffrey; Jones, Kenneth; McCuistian, Brian T; Meidinger, Alfred; Montoya, Nicholas; Mostrom, Chris; Moy, Kenneth; Nath, Subrata; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Rodriguez, Leroy; Rodriguez, Patrick; Rowton, Larry J; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin; Schulze, Martin E; Simmons, David; Studebaker, Jan; Sturgess, Ronald; Sullivan, Gary; Swinney, Charles; Tang, Yan; Temple, Rodney; Tipton, Angela; Tom, C Y; Vernon Smith, H; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    When completed, the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) will produce a 2-kA, 18-MeV electron beam with more than 1500-ns current/energy "flat-top." In initial tests DARHT-II has already accelerated beams with current pulse lengths from 500-ns to 1200-ns full-width at half maximum (FWHM) with more than1.2-kA, 12.5-MeV peak current and energy. Experiments are now underway with a ~2000-ns pulse length, but reduced current and energy. These pulse lengths are all significantly longer than any other multi-MeV LIA, and they define a novel regime for high-current beam dynamics, especially with regard to beam stability. Although the initial tests demonstrated absence of BBU, the pulse lengths were too short to test the predicted protection against ion-hose instability. The present experiments are designed to resolve these and other beam-dynamics issues with a ~2000-ns pulse length beam.

  13. TRIGA Mark II Criticality Benchmark Experiment with Burned Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental results of criticality benchmark experiments performed at the Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II reactor are presented. The experiments were performed with partly burned fuel in two compact and uniform core configurations in the same arrangements as were used in the fresh fuel criticality benchmark experiment performed in 1991. In the experiments, both core configurations contained only 12 wt% U-ZrH fuel with 20% enriched uranium. The first experimental core contained 43 fuel elements with average burnup of 1.22 MWd or 2.8% 235U burned. The last experimental core configuration was composed of 48 fuel elements with average burnup of 1.15 MWd or 2.6% 235U burned. The experimental determination of keff for both core configurations, one subcritical and one critical, are presented. Burnup for all fuel elements was calculated in two-dimensional four-group diffusion approximation using the TRIGLAV code. The burnup of several fuel elements was measured also by the reactivity method

  14. Experiments with the HORUS-II test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the scope of the German reactor safety research the thermohydraulic computer code ATHLET which was developed for accident analyses of western nuclear power plants is more and more used for the accident analysis of VVER-plants particularly for VVER-440,V-213. The experiments with the HORUS-facilities and the analyses with the ATHLET-code have been realized at the Technical University Zittau/Goerlitz since 1991. The aim of the investigations was to improve and verify the condensation model particularly the correlations for the calculation of the heat transfer coefficients in the ATHLET-code for pure steam and steam-noncondensing gas mixtures in horizontal tubes. About 130 condensation experiments have been performed at the HORUS-II facility. The experiments have been carried out with pure steam as well as with noncondensing gas injections into the steam mass flow. The experimental simulations are characterized as accident simulation tests for SBLOCA for VVER-conditions. The simulation conditions had been adjusted correspondingly to the parameters of a postulated SBLOCA's fourth phase at the original plant

  15. Experiments with the HORUS-II test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, S.; Lischke, W. [Univ. for Applied Sciences Zittau/Goerlitz, Zittau (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Within the scope of the German reactor safety research the thermohydraulic computer code ATHLET which was developed for accident analyses of western nuclear power plants is more and more used for the accident analysis of VVER-plants particularly for VVER-440,V-213. The experiments with the HORUS-facilities and the analyses with the ATHLET-code have been realized at the Technical University Zittau/Goerlitz since 1991. The aim of the investigations was to improve and verify the condensation model particularly the correlations for the calculation of the heat transfer coefficients in the ATHLET-code for pure steam and steam-noncondensing gas mixtures in horizontal tubes. About 130 condensation experiments have been performed at the HORUS-II facility. The experiments have been carried out with pure steam as well as with noncondensing gas injections into the steam mass flow. The experimental simulations are characterized as accident simulation tests for SBLOCA for VVER-conditions. The simulation conditions had been adjusted correspondingly to the parameters of a postulated SBLOCA`s fourth phase at the original plant. 4 refs.

  16. IPROP simulations of the GAMBLE II proton transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author has simulated the proton transport of the 6-kA, 1-MV GAMBLE II experiment using a modified version of the IPROP particle-in-cell code. IPROP now uses a hybrid model in which plasma electrons are divided into high-energy macro particle and thermal-fluid components. This model includes open-quotes knock-onclose quotes bound-electron collision and runaway sources for high-energy electrons. Using IPROP, the authors has calculated net currents in reasonable agreement with the experiment ranging from 5-11% of the total current in pressures from 0.25-4 torr helium. In the simulations, the pinch current sample by the 1.5-cm beam was 2-3 times larger than the net current at 4 cm radius. The attenuation of net current at larger radii was the result of a highly-conductive energetic component of plasma electrons surrounding the beam. Having benchmarked IPROP against experiment, the author has examined higher-current ion beams with respect to possible transport for inertial confinement fusion

  17. Experiments on Electron Cloud Mitigation at PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron cloud effect has been observed at many accelerator facilities. It has been the subject of many workshops and reviews. An electron cloud is formed when low energy photoelectrons released from the vacuum chamber surfaces and ionized residual gas molecules, driven by the beam fields of passing positively charged bunches, impinge on the chamber walls and create secondary emission. It is an important issue for many currently operating facilities and the damping rings of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) because beam-cloud interaction can severely impact the machines performance. Systematic studies on the electron cloud effect, and its possible remedies, have been carried out in many laboratories. At SLAC, the effort has been concentrated on theoretical understanding with the aid of computer simulations, and experimental measurements with high intensity positron beams at PEP-II. Computer simulation results have been presented at ECLOUD07 and in an earlier article in this journal. In this article, we present recent results from electron cloud experiments at the positron storage ring of PEP-II. In particular, we discuss the performance of various mitigation techniques.

  18. Microwave experiments in He II. New peculiarities of persistent superflows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability and oscillatory properties of superfluid ring flow arising around the cylindrical surface of a disk-shaped dielectric resonator immersed in liquid helium are studied experimentally. The velocity of superfluid flow is controlled with special heat guns, placed in He II and generating counterflows of the normal and superfluid components, directed along the tangent to the cylindrical surface of the resonator. In the experiment the amplitude of the microwave signal passing through the resonator is measured and the effect of the phase and dynamic states of the liquid on the signal amplitude is studied. It is found that periodic oscillations of the signal are observed in the He II state, and each period starts with a sharp spike of the amplitude. It is proposed that this behavior signifies instability of superfluid ring flow due to a change in the number of circulation quanta of the superfluid velocity over a very short time. Another effect is due to the appearance of new periodically repeating resonance peaks, together with the ordinary whispering gallery modes, in the system. The effect is absent above α-point and is attributed to characteristic oscillatory modes of the undamped superfluid flow. Possible reasons for the observed features are analyzed

  19. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-07-01

    The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment, structured in a lantern shape, consists of four layers of ladders, fabricated from two to five silicon sensors. The APV25 readout ASIC chips are mounted on one side of the ladder to minimize the signal path for reducing the capacitive noise; signals from the sensor backside are transmitted to the chip by bent flexible fan-out circuits. The ladder is assembled using several dedicated jigs. Sensor motion on the jig is minimized by vacuum chucking. The gluing procedure provides such a rigid foundation that later leads to the desired wire bonding performance. The full ladder with electrically functional sensors is consistently completed with a fully developed assembly procedure, and its sensor offsets from the design values are found to be less than 200 μm. The potential functionality of the ladder is also demonstrated by the radioactive source test.

  20. Neutrino-lepton scattering in the CHARM II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final results from the CHARM II experiment on neutrino-electron scattering and inverse muon decay (IMD) are reported. From the study of the first process the vector and axial-vector coupling constants of the muon neutrino to the electron, gVνe, are obtained; the comparison of these results with the LEP measurements allows to test the Standard Model at a scale of Q2 ∼0.01 GeV2,to estimate the coupling of the muon neutrino to the Z, and to test the universality of neutrino couplings in neutral current interactions. The study of the inverse muon decay reaction complements the results on muon decay in determining the structure of the charged current coupling of the electron to the muon; a limit on the scalar coupling of these particles is derived. (author). 5 figs., 9 refs

  1. Fuel element failure detection experiments, evaluation of the experiments at KNK II/1 (Intermediate Report)

    CERN Document Server

    Bruetsch, D

    1983-01-01

    In the frame of the fuel element failure detection experiments at KNK II with its first core the measurement devices of INTERATOM were taken into operation in August 1981 and were in operation almost continuously. Since the start-up until the end of the first KNK II core operation plugs with different fuel test areas were inserted in order to test the efficiency of the different measuring devices. The experimental results determined during this test phase and the gained experiences are described in this report and valuated. All three measuring techniques (Xenon adsorption line XAS, gas-chromatograph GC and precipitator PIT) could fulfil the expectations concerning their susceptibility. For XAS and GC the nuclide specific sensitivities as determined during the preliminary tests could be confirmed. For PIT the influences of different parameters on the signal yield could be determined. The sensitivity of the device could not be measured due to a missing reference measuring point.

  2. A Survey of Optometry Graduates to Determine Practice Patterns: Part II: Licensure and Practice Establishment Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleimann, Robert L.; Smith, Lee W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of Part II of a two-volume study of optometry graduates conducted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry is presented. Part II includes the analysis of the graduates' licensure and practice establishment experiences. (MLW)

  3. Convoy active safety technologies war fighter experiment II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenherr, Edward W.

    2009-01-01

    The operational ability to project and sustain forces in distant, anti-access and area denial environments poses new challenges for combatant commanders. One of the new challenges is the ability to conduct sustainment operations at operationally feasible times and places on the battlefield. Combatant commanders require a sustainment system that is agile, versatile, and survivable throughout the range of military operations and across the spectrum of conflict. A key component of conducting responsive, operationally feasible sustainment operations is the ability to conduct sustainment convoys. Sustainment convoys are critical to providing combatant commanders the right support, at the right time and place, and in the right quantities, across the full range of military operations. The ability to conduct sustainment convoys in a variety of hostile environments require force protection measures that address the enemy threat and protect the Soldier. One cost effective, technically feasible method of increasing the force protection for sustainment convoys is the use of robotic follower technology and autonomous navigation. The Convoy Active Safety Technologies (CAST) system is a driver assist, convoy autopilot technology aimed to address these issues. The CAST Warfigher Experiment II, being held at The Nevada Automotive Test Center in the fall of 2008, will continue analysis of the utility of this vehicle following technology not only in measures of system integrity and performance vs. manual driving, but also the physiological effects on the operators themselves. This paper will detail this experiment's methodology and analysis. Results will be presented at the SPIE Electronic Imaging 2009 symposium.

  4. Discharge initiation experiments in the Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments in the Tokapole II tokamak demonstrate the benefits of high density (n/sub e//n0 greater than or equal to 0.01) preionization by reducing four quantities at startup: necessary toroidal loop voltage (V1) (50%), volt-second consumption (40 to 50%), impurity radiation (25 to 50%), and runaway electron production (approx. 80 to 100%). A zero-dimensional code models the loop voltage reduction dependence on preionization density and predicts a similar result for reactor scale devices. The code shows low initial resistivity and a high resistivity time derivative contribute to loop voltage reduction. The power balance of the ECR plasma in a toroidal-field-only case was studied. Langmuir probes and impurity doping were used. The vertical electric field (E/sub v/) and current (I/sub v/), which result from curvature drift, were measured (E/sub v/ approx. 10 V/cm and I/sub v/ approx. 50 Amps) and exceeded expected values for the bulk electron temperature (approx. 10 eV). A series of experiments with external windings to simulate field errors perpendicular to the toroidal field was done. The results imply that an error field of 0.1% of the toroidal field is deleterious to ECR plasma density

  5. Seventeen years of LMFBR experience: Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operating experience at EBR-II over the past 17 years has shown that a sodium-cooled pool-type reactor can be safely and efficiently operated and maintained. The reactor has performed predictably and benignly during normal operation and during both unplanned and planned plant upsets. The duplex-tube evaporators and superheaters have never experienced a sodium/water leak, and the rest of the steam-generating system has operated without incident. There has been no noticeable degradation of the heat transfer efficiency of the evaporators and superheaters, except for the one superheater replaced in 1981. There has been no need to perform any chemical cleaning of steam-system components

  6. DEPFET Active Pixel Sensors for the Belle II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, P

    2010-01-01

    DEPleted Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) active pixel detectors combine a first amplification stage with a fully depleted sensor in one single device, resulting in a very good signal-to-noise ratio even for thin sensors. DEPFET pixels are produced in MOS technology with two metal and two poly-silicon layers and have been developed for the use in Xray imaging and tracking in particle physics experiments. The sensor concept will be presented and all aspects of operation will be detailed with the focus on its application at the upgraded detector Belle II under preparation for the high-luminosity upgrade of the e+e- KEKB collider in Japan. The stringent requirements on excellent spatial resolution can be met by cell sizes as small as 25x25 um2 and minimal material budget. The readout ASICs attached to the sensors will be described as well as the module design and the thinning technology employed to reduced the active sensor thickness to as little as 50 um. DEPFET prototype performance at lab and beam tests will ...

  7. The new neutron EDM experiment at the FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the 1950's people have been searching for electric dipole moments (EDMs) of fundamental particles. This is a very promising approach to find yet unknown manifestations of broken underlying symmetries in the early Universe. Although these experiments are among the most precise in physics, no EDM has been observed so far. In this talk a next generation approach with a sensitivity of -28 ecm (3σ) for the neutron EDM based at the FRM-II neutron source is presented. Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields is applied to trapped ultra-cold neutrons (UCNs) in vacuum. For the investigation of systematic effects a sophisticated strategy of various means to control ambient parameters on an unprecedented level of accuracy is currently being set up. The construction is planned to be finished by end of 2013, followed by the first measurements with UCNs in 2014. An overview of the overall strategy, main systems for magnetic field control and magnetometry, as well as the current status of the ongoing implementation on site is shown.

  8. A high resolution Timing Counter for the MEG II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gerone, M.; Bevilacqua, A.; Biasotti, M.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Gatti, F.; Nishimura, M.; Ootani, W.; Pizzigoni, G.; Rossella, M.; Shibata, N.; Siccardi, F.; Simonetta, M.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K.

    2016-07-01

    The development of a Timing Counter detector designed for the MEGII upgrade of the MEG experiment, which strives to improve the sensitivity on the μ+ →e+ γ decay of an order of magnitude, is presented. It is based on two sets of counters (sectors) arranged on a semi-cylindrical structure; each sector consists of 256 counters. Each counter consists of tile of fast scintillator with a dual-side read-out based on SiPM arrays in series connection. The high granularity has two advantages: optimized size for achieving high resolution (75 ps) for the single counter, and a signal e+ crosses several counters, so that resolution improves by averaging multiple time measurements. A prototype has been built and tested both in BTF and PSI facilities in order to prove the multi-hit scheme in MEG-like beam conditions. A 35 ps resolution with eight hits has been obtained with a e+ beam at 100 kHz. The first sector will be tested in the MEG II pre-engineering run planned at the end of 2015.

  9. Experiments with radioactive nuclear beams II; Experimentos con haces nucleares radiactivos II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera R, E.F.; Martinez Q, E.; Gomez C, A.; Lizcano C, D.; Garcia M, H.; Rosales M, P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-12-15

    The studies of nuclear reactions with heavy ions have been carried out for years for the group of heavy ions of the laboratory of the Accelerator of the ININ. Especially in the last years the group has intruded in the studies of nuclear reactions with radioactive beams, frontier theme at world level. Presently Technical Report is presented in detailed form the experimental methods and the analysis procedures of the research activities carried out by the group. The chpater II is dedicated to the procedures used in the analysis of the last two experiments with radioactive beams carried out by the group. In the chapter III is presented the procedure followed to carrying out an extended analysis with the CCDEF code, to consider the transfer channel of nucleons in the description of the fusion excitation functions of a good number of previously measured systems by the group. Finally, in the chapter IV the more important steps to continue in the study of the reaction {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C experiment drifted to be carried out using the available resources of the Tandem Accelerator Laboratory of the ININ are described. At the end of each chapter some of the more representative results obtained in the analysis are presented and emphasis on the scientific production generated by the group for each case is made. (Author)

  10. Plasma-filled diode experiments on PBFA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PBFA-II accelerator is designed to use a Plasma Opening Switch (POS) for pulse shaping and voltage multiplication using inductive storage. The vacuum section of the machine consists of a set of short magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs) that both act as a voltage adder for series stacking of the pulses out of the 72 parallel plate water lines, and as a 100 nH (total) storage inductor upstream of a biconically shaped POS region. There are two POS plasma injection areas, located above and below an equatorial load, which has consisted of either a short circuit, a blade (electron beam) diode, or an Applied B magnetically insulated ion diode. The POS is designed to conduct up to 6 MA, and open into a 5 ohm diode load in 10 ns or less. Under these conditions, the voltage at the load is predicted to exceed 24 MV. Initial POS experiments using these loads have produced 1) opening times of typically 20 ns or longer, 2) poor current transfer efficiency (less than 50%) when load impedances averaged 2 ohms or more, and 3) differential switch opening in azimuthal segments of the power feed, thought to be caused by poor plasma uniformity across the flashboard plasma source. One possible explanation for 2) is that efficient transfer out of the POS requires that the current carried to the load be magnetically insulated, or else considerable energy will be deposited in the feed region between the POS and load. This had indeed been observed. The problem is further exacerbated by the longer current turn-on times that occur when an ion diode is used as the load

  11. Phase II of the multinational project for fracture analysis of large-scale international reference experiments (FALSIRE II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the organization and plan for Phase II fo the Project for Fracture Analysis of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE). The experiments employ a variety of test specimens, test materials, and loading conditions. The primary focus of the experiments was on the behaviour of relatively shallow cracks under conditions that relate to pressurized-thermal-shock loading in a reactor perssure vessel (RPV); the effects of biaxial loading and of cladding on cleavage fracture were separate topics of study in two experiments. A summary of each experiment is included in this report. Final versions of the problem statements will form the basis for FALSIRE II in which evaluations of the experiments will be performed by an international group of analysts using a variety of structural and fracture mechanis techniques. 7 refs, 7 figs, 5 tabs

  12. PLANS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER EXPERIMENTS AND IFE TARGET EXPERIMENTS ON NDCX-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) is currently developing design concepts for NDCX-II, the second phase of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, which will use ion beams to explore Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) target hydrodynamics. The ion induction accelerator will consist of a new short pulse injector and induction cells from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). To fit within an existing building and to meet the energy and temporal requirements of various target experiments, an aggressive beam compression and acceleration schedule is planned. WDM physics and ion-driven direct drive hydrodynamics will initially be explored with 30 nC of lithium ions in experiments involving ion deposition, ablation, acceleration and stability of planar targets. Other ion sources which may deliver higher charge per bunch will be explored. A test stand has been built at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to test refurbished ATA induction cells and pulsed power hardware for voltage holding and ability to produce various compression and acceleration waveforms. Another test stand is being used to develop and characterize lithium-doped aluminosilicate ion sources. The first experiments will include heating metallic targets to 10,000 K and hydrodynamics studies with cryogenic hydrogen targets

  13. Operating and test experience of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EBR-II has operated for 27 years, the longest for any Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) power plant. During that time, much has been learned about successful LMR operation and design. The basic lesson is that conservatism in design can pay significant dividends in operating reliability. Furthermore, such conservatism need not mean high cost. The EBR-II system emphasizes simplicity, minimizing the number of valves in the heat transport system, for example, and simplifying the primary heat-transport-system layout. Another lesson is that emphasizing reliability of the steam generating system at the sodium-water interface (by using duplex tubes in the case of EBR-II) has been well worth the higher initial costs; no problems with leakage have been encountered in EBR-II's operating history. Locating spent fuel storage in the primary tank and providing for decay heat removal by natural connective flow have also been contributors to EBR-II's success. The ability to accommodate loss of forced cooling or loss of heat sink passively has resulted in benefits for simplification, primarily through less reliance on emergency power and in not requiring the secondary sodium or steam systems to be safety grade. Also, the 'piped-pool' arrangement minimizes thermal stress to the primary tank and enhances natural convective flow. These benefits have been realized through a history of operation that has seen EBR-II evolve through four major phases in its test programs, culminating in its present mission as the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) prototype. (author)

  14. Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a complete nuclear power plant, incorporating a pool-type liquid-metal reactor (LMR) with a fuel-power thermal output of 62.5 MW and an electrical output of 20 MW. Initial criticality was in 1961, utilizing a metallic driver fuel design called the Mark-I. The fuel design has evolved over the last 30 yr, and significant progress has been made on improving performance. The first major innovations were incorporated into the Mark-II design, and burnup then increased dramatically. This design performed successfully, and fuel element lifetime was limited by subassembly hardware performance rather than the fuel element itself. Transient performance of the fuel was also acceptable and demonstrated the ability of EBR-II to survive severe upsets such as a loss of flow without scram. In the mid 1980s, with renewed interest in metallic fuels and Argonne's integral fast reactor (IFR) concept, the Mark-II design was used as the basis for new designs, the Mark-III and Mark-IV. In 1987, the Mark-III design began qualification testing to become a driver fuel for EBR-II. This was followed in 1989 by the Mark-IIIA and Mark-IV designs. The next fuel design, the Mark-V, is being planned to demonstrate the utilization of recycled fuel. The fuel cycle facility attached to EBR-II is being refurbished to produce pyroprocessed recycled fuel as part of the demonstration of the IFR

  15. Experience with EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor] driver fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exceptional performance of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) metallic driver fuel has been demonstrated by the irradiation of a large number of elements under steady-state, transient overpower, and loss-of-flow conditions. High burnup with high reliability has been achieved by a close coupling of element design and materials selection. Quantification of reliability has allowed full utilization of element lifetime. Improved design and duct materials currently under test are expected to increase the burnup from 8 to 14 at.%

  16. FALSIRE Phase II. CSNI project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (Phase II). Comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for Fracture Analysis of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE) is presented. A FALSIRE II Workshop focused on analyses of reference fracture experiments. More than 30 participants representing 22 organizations from 12 countries took part in the workshop. Final results for 45 analyses of the reference experiments were received from the participating analysts. For each experiment, analysis results provided estimates of variables that include temperature, crack-mouth-opening displacement, stress, strain, and applied K and J values. The data were sent electronically to the Organizing Committee, who assembled the results into a comparative data base using a special-purpose computer program. A comparative assessment and discussion of the analysis results are presented in the report. Generally, structural responses of the test specimens were predicted with tolerable scatter bands. (orig./DG)

  17. Experiment TGV II—results of Phases I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briançon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Čermák, P.; Egorov, V. G.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalík, A.; Mamedov, F.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Sandukovski, V. G.; Shitov, Yu. A.; Šimkovic, F.; Stekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Zinatulina, D. R.

    2009-11-01

    Currently, the TGV collaboration is investigating the two-neutrino double electron capture (2vEC/EC) of 106Cd at the Modane underground laboratory. The study is performed with low-background multi-HPGe detector TGV II, which has been constructed for measurements of the rare processes. The half-life limits of T1/2>2.6×1020 years (for Phase I, 8687 hours) and T1/2>3.6×1020 years (for Phase II, 9003 hours) were obtained for the ground state to ground state 2vEC/EC of 106Cd. The results already allow to rule out some of the previous nuclear structure calculations.

  18. Component and operation experience of reactor TRIGA MARK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor TRIGA MARK II is Jozef Stefan Institute's research reactor. It has been operating since 1966. A probabilistic approach of reactor safety estimation was used first in 1989 when a Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of the reactor was performed. A lack of reactor component data was found as the major problem in probabilistic assessment. It was decided to continue the work with specific data base development. The project has been divided in two phases. In the first phase specific data from year 1985 to 1990 were collected. In the second phase the collected data were treated. The comparison of generic and specific data showed significant difference between the generic and specific data and leads to a conclusion that a generic data based PSA has a limited credibility indicating that there is a need to build a specific data base for research reactors. The TRIGA MARK II research reactor has three major purposes: operator training, research involving neutrons and isotope production. The paper represents specific data base formation for TRIGA MARK II research reactor in Podgorica. Specific data on reactor scrams, components operation and human errors were collected. The data of fifteen components were estimated by classical and Bayesian method. The results of both methods are very different. Because of good specific data the results of classical methods were preferred. The comparison of specific and generic data showed that there is a great need to build a specific data base for research reactors. It is expected to use the specific data for existing PSA of TRIGA MARK II reactor reevaluation and optimisation of its operation. (authors)

  19. Current drive experiments in the Helicity Injected Torus - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamp, W. T.; Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Mueller, D.

    2006-10-01

    The HIT-II spherical torus (ST) device has demonstrated four toroidal plasma current drive configurations to form and sustain a tokamak: 1) inductive (ohmic) current drive, 2) coaxial helicity injection (CHI) current drive, 3) CHI initiated plasmas with ohmic sustainment (CHI+OH), and 4) ohmically initiated plasmas with CHI edge current drive (OH+ECD). CHI discharges with a sufficiently high ratio of injector current to toroidal field current form a closed flux core, and amplify the injector poloidal flux through magnetic reconnection. CHI+OH plasmas are more robust than unassisted ohmic discharges, with a wider operating space and more efficient use of the transformer Volt-seconds. Finally, edge CHI can enhance the plasma current of an ohmic discharge without significantly degrading the quality of the discharge. Results will be presented for each HIT-II operating regime, including empirical performance scalings, applicable parametric operating spaces, and requirements to produce these discharges. Thomson scattering measurements and EFIT simulations are used to evaluate confinement in several representative plasmas. Finally, we outline extensions to the HIT-II CHI studies that could be performed with NSTX, SUNIST, or other ST devices.

  20. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  1. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) - II Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, J.W.

    2009-10-01

    LBNL has received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding to construct a new accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to significantly increase the energy on target, which will allow both the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) and Warm Dense Matter (WDM) research communities to explore scientific conditions that have not been available in any other device. For NDCX-II, a new induction linear accelerator (linac) will be constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). NDCX-II will produce nano-second long ion beam bunches to hit thin foil targets. The final kinetic energy of the ions arriving at the target varies according to the ion mass. For atomic mass unit of 6 or 7 (Lithium ions), useful kinetic energies range from 1.5 to 5 or more MeV. The expected beam charge in the 1 ns (or shorter) pulse is about 20 nanoCoulombs. The pulse repetition rate will be about once or twice per minute (of course, target considerations will often reduce this rate). Our approach to building the NDCX-II ion accelerator is to make use of the available induction modules and 200 kV pulsers from the retired ATA electron linac at LLNL. Reusing this hardware will maximize the ion energy on target at a minimum cost. Some modification of the cells (e.g., reduce the bore diameter and replace with higher field pulsed solenoids) are needed in order to meet the requirements of this project. The NDCX-II project will include the following tasks: (1) Physics design to determine the required ion current density at the ion source, the injector beam optics, the layout of accelerator cells along the beam line, the voltage waveforms for beam acceleration and compression, the solenoid focusing, the neutralized drift compression and the final focus on target; (2) Engineering design and fabrication of the accelerator components, pulsed power system, diagnostic system, and control and data acquisition system; (3) Conventional facilities; and (4) Installation and integration

  2. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) - II Quarterly Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LBNL has received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding to construct a new accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to significantly increase the energy on target, which will allow both the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) and Warm Dense Matter (WDM) research communities to explore scientific conditions that have not been available in any other device. For NDCX-II, a new induction linear accelerator (linac) will be constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). NDCX-II will produce nano-second long ion beam bunches to hit thin foil targets. The final kinetic energy of the ions arriving at the target varies according to the ion mass. For atomic mass unit of 6 or 7 (Lithium ions), useful kinetic energies range from 1.5 to 5 or more MeV. The expected beam charge in the 1 ns (or shorter) pulse is about 20 nanoCoulombs. The pulse repetition rate will be about once or twice per minute (of course, target considerations will often reduce this rate). Our approach to building the NDCX-II ion accelerator is to make use of the available induction modules and 200 kV pulsers from the retired ATA electron linac at LLNL. Reusing this hardware will maximize the ion energy on target at a minimum cost. Some modification of the cells (e.g., reduce the bore diameter and replace with higher field pulsed solenoids) are needed in order to meet the requirements of this project. The NDCX-II project will include the following tasks: (1) Physics design to determine the required ion current density at the ion source, the injector beam optics, the layout of accelerator cells along the beam line, the voltage waveforms for beam acceleration and compression, the solenoid focusing, the neutralized drift compression and the final focus on target; (2) Engineering design and fabrication of the accelerator components, pulsed power system, diagnostic system, and control and data acquisition system; (3) Conventional facilities; and (4) Installation and integration

  3. Operational features and microwave characteristics of the Vircator II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vircator II oscillating virtual-cathode microwave source operates with diode voltages between 600 and 800 kV and diode current between 50 and 120 kA. Maximal microwave output power between 200 and 500 MW is achieved when the diode aspect ratio, cathode surface, charge voltage, and extraction coupling are arranged to simultaneously 1) maximize diode voltage, 2) satisfy magnetic insulation criteria, 3) avoid nonuniform or unstable electron emission, and 4) optimize microwave transmission from the virtual cathode to the launching antenna. Broad-band radiation between 0.4 and 5.5 GHz is generated. The central frequency follows the beam plasma frequency. It is tuned by varying the current density with anode-cathode (A-K) gap adjustments

  4. MCNP simulation of the TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete 3D MCNP model of the TRIGA Mark II reactor is presented. It enables precise calculations of some quantities of interest in a steady-state mode of operation. Calculational results are compared to the experimental results gathered during reactor reconstruction in 1992. Since the operating conditions were well defined at that time, the experimental results can be used as a benchmark. It may be noted that this benchmark is one of very few high enrichment benchmarks available. In our simulations experimental conditions were thoroughly simulated: fuel elements and control rods were precisely modeled as well as entire core configuration and the vicinity of the core. ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-V libraries were used. Partial results of benchmark calculations are presented. Excellent agreement of core criticality, excess reactivity and control rod worths can be observed. (author)

  5. Operational features and microwave characteristics of the Vircator II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, D.; Fittinghoff, O.; Benford, J.; Sze, H.; Woo, W.

    1988-04-01

    The Vircator II oscillating virtual-cathode microwave source operates with diode voltages between 600 and 800 kV and diode current between 50 and 120 kA. Maximal microwave output power between 200 and 500 MW is achieved when the diode aspect ratio, cathode surface, charge voltage, and extraction coupling are arranged to simultaneously 1) maximize diode voltage, 2) satisfy magnetic insulation criteria, 3) avoid nonuniform or unstable electron emission, and 4) optimize microwave transmission from the virtual cathode to the launching antenna. Broad-band radiation between 0.4 and 5.5 GHz is generated. The central frequency follows the beam plasma frequency. It is tuned by varying the current density with anode-cathode (A-K) gap adjustments.

  6. PINEX II - French contribution to an international benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the PINEX-2 experiment was to demonstrate that it was possible to delay the failure threshold of an irradiated fuel pin during an overpower transient assuming a particular design of the pin. The preirradiation calculations were conducted with the mixed oxyde fuel reference code COREF 1. The transient thermal and mechanical calculations were performed with a special version of the PHYSURA IA code, using the COREF 1 results as input data. Although PHYSURA is made of simple models, it is able to interpret correctly a complex experiment like PINEX 2. Indeed, it has been established: a good agreement with thermal experimental results, a good agreement between calculated and experimental fuel redistribution out of the fissile zone and an agreement with experiment on clad rupture analysis

  7. The Framed Standard Model (II) - A first Test against Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, HM

    2015-01-01

    Apart from the qualitative features described in \\cite{chm}, the renormalization group equation derived for the rotation of the fermion mass matrices are amenable to quantitative study. The equation depends on a coupling and a fudge factor and, on integration, on 3 integration constants. Its application to data analysis, however, requires the input from experiment of the heaviest generation masses $m_t, m_b, m_\\tau, m_{\

  8. Experiências de cavalos para citrus II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Brieger

    1945-01-01

    Full Text Available The English resumé is given in a different form from the Portuguese "conclusões". In the former we gave mainly the results which may be of general interest, explaining the tables (quadros and the procedure of statistical analysis, while in the other the properties of the different rootstocks are discussed in detail since they are of immediate local interest. 1. In a previous publication, Moreira (19 explained the layout and the first results of an experiment, under way since 1936 in the Limeira Exp. Sta., on the influence of twelve different types of Citrus rootstocks on three scion varieties : the oranges "Baianinha" and "Pera" and the grape-fruit "Marsh Seedless". We report here three main results obtained during the first six years of the experiment: a all plants budded on sour and bitter-sweet oranges (C. aurantium, showed definite signs of the new disease "tristeza" ; b other rootstocks such as citron (C. medica, ponderosa lemon (C. lemon had such disadvantageous effect that they could be eliminated as suitable stocks ; c the data of the first four crops permit to determine certain particularities of some rootstocks varieties used in the experiment. The present paper deals with the complete

  9. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedl, Markus, E-mail: friedl@hephy.a [Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Bergauer, Thomas; Gfall, Immanuel; Irmler, Christian; Valentan, Manfred [Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-02-01

    After 10 years of successful operation, the Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) will be completed in 2010. Thereafter, a major upgrade of the KEK-B machine is foreseen until 2014, aiming at a final luminosity of 8x10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is about 40 times higher than the present peak value. Consequently, also the Belle experiment needs to be changed and the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) in particular will be completely replaced as it already operates close to its limits in the present system. The future SVD (a.k.a. SuperSVD) will consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors like the present one, but at larger radii, because it will be complemented by a two-layer pixel detector as the innermost sensing device. The SuperSVD will be entirely composed of silicon sensors made from 6 in. wafers read out by APV25 front-end chips that were originally developed for the CMS experiment at the LHC. Several years of R and D effort led to innovations such as the Origami chip-on-sensor concept and readout electronics with hit time finding which were successfully demonstrated on prototypes. These features will be included in the final system which is presently being designed. This paper will give an overview of the SuperSVD and present results from prototype tests ranging from detector modules to back-end electronics.

  10. The active phasing experiment: Part II. Design and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonte, F.; Yaitskova, N.; Derie, F.; Araujo, C.; Brast, R.; Delabre, B.; Dierickx, P.; Dupuy, C.; Frank, C.; Guisard, S.; Karban, R.; Noethe, L.; Sedghi, B.; Surdej, I.; Wilhelm, R.; Reyes, M.; Esposito, S.; Langlois, M.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of the Active Phasing Experiment, designed under the lead of ESO, is to validate wavefront control concepts for ELT class telescopes. This instrument includes an Active Segmented Mirror, located in a pupil image. It will be mounted at a Nasmyth focus of one of the Unit Telescopes of the ESO VLT. APE contains four different types of phasing sensors, which are developed by Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Arcetri, Instituto Astrofisica Canarias, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille and ESO. These phasing sensors can be compared simultaneously under identical optical and environmental conditions. All sensors receive telecentric F/15 beams with identical optical quality and intensity. Each phasing sensor can measure segmentation errors of the active segmented mirror and correct them in closed loop. The phasing process is supervised by an Internal Metrology system developed by FOGALE Nanotech and capable of measuring piston steps with an accuracy of a few nanometers. The Active Phasing Experiment is equipped with a turbulence generator to simulate atmospheric seeing between 0.45 and 0.85 arcsec in the laboratory. In addition, the Active Phasing Experiment is designed to control simultaneously with the phasing corrections the guiding and the active optics of one of the VLT Unit Telescopes. This activity is supported by the European Community (Framework Programme 6, ELT Design Study, contract No 011863).

  11. Pleiades Experiments on the NIF: Phase II-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benstead, James [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Morton, John [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Guymer, Thomas [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Garbett, Warren [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Stevenson, Mark [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Moore, Alastair [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kline, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schmidt, Derek [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Ted [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lanier, Nick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Workman, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Pleiades was a radiation transport campaign fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) between 2011 and 2014. The primary goals of the campaign were to develop and characterise a reproducible ~350eV x-ray drive and to constrain a number of material data properties required to successfully model the propagation of radiation through two low-density foam materials. A further goal involved the development and qualification of diagnostics for future radiation transport experiments at NIF. Pleiades was a collaborative campaign involving teams from both AWE and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  12. Design and operating experience of EBR-II intermediate heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buschman, H.W.; Koenig, J.F.; Stone, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has operated for over 15 years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls. EBR-II has served the nation in providing information on fuels, materials, and components under conditions approaching those expected for commercial power plants. In addition, EBR-II is a power plant generating electricity with an availability of about 70%. A key component, the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX), of any Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) must perform with a high degree of reliability for successful commercialization. The design and operating experience gained from EBR-II demonstrates that the IHX can be built and operated with confidence that its performance and reliability will be satisfactory.

  13. FNR demonstration experiments Part II: Subcadmium neutron flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FNR HEU-LEU Demonstration Experiments include a comprehensive set of experiments to identify and quantify significant operational differences between two nuclear fuel enrichments. One aspect of these measurements, the subcadmium flux profiling, is the subject of this paper. The flux profiling effort has been accomplished through foil and wire activations, and by rhodium self-powered neutron detector (SPND) mappings. Within the experimental limitations discussed, the program to measure subcadmium flux profiles, lead to the following conclusions: (1) Replacement of a single fresh HEU element by a fresh LEU element at the center of an equilibrium HEU core produces a local flux depression. The ratio of HEU to LEU local flux is 1.19 ± .036, which is, well within experimental uncertainty, equal to the inverse of the U-235 masses for the two elements. (2) Whole core replacement of a large 38 element equilibrium HEU core by a fresh or nearly unburned LEU core reduces the core flux and raises the flux in both D2O and H2O reflectors. The reduction in the central core region is 40% to 10.0% for the small fresh 29 element LEU core, and 16% to 18% for a 31 element LEU core 482) with low average burnup 2O reflector fluxes relative to core fluxes as measured by SPND with a fixed value of sensitivity, are in gross disagreement with the same flux ratios measured by Fe and Rh wire activations. Space dependent refinements of S are calculated to give some improvement in the discrepancy but the major part of the correction remains to be resolved

  14. Neutronic Analysis of the 3 MW TRIGA MARK II Research Reactor, Part II: Benchmark Analysis of TRIGA Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP4C was used to develop a versatile and accurate full-core model of the TRIGA MARK II research reactor at AERE, Savar. Thr consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics was established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Analysis of neutron flux and reactivity experiments comprising control rod worths, critical rod height, excess reactivity and shutdown margin were used in the validation process. Calculations of fast neutron flux, and fuel and graphite element worths distribution are also presented. Good agreement between the experiments and MCNP calculations indicate that the simulation of TRIGA reactor is treated adequately. (author)

  15. The "Chugakuryoko" and Hogan's Heroes: The Experience Gap between U.S. and Japanese Students' Knowledge of World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwell, Russ

    2011-01-01

    Based on his own teaching experiences and findings, the author discusses the experience gap between U.S. and Japanese students' knowledge of World War II. He compares and contrasts how the subject of World War II is taught in the United States versus Japan. While it takes teacher effort to enrich the history experiences of U.S. students, the…

  16. Response of EBR-II's delayed neutron monitoring systems during sinusoidal reactivity-oscillation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multifrequency reactivity-oscillation experiments were recently performed during operation with an exposed fission source in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate the response characteristics of EBR-II's delayed neutron (DN) monitoring systems under a broad range of transient power and transient temperature conditions. A secondary objective was to verify that EBR-II's fission product source (FPS) capsules, which are being supplied to foreign reactors for calibration of their fission product monitoring systems, are pure recoil sources - i.e., that the fission product release rate is directly proportional to the product of the fission rate and surface area under both steady-state and transient temperature conditions. A detailed analysis of the results from these experiments has demonstrated that (a) EBR-II's DN monitoring systems are very sensitive and have excellent counting statistics; (b) they are highly linear with respect to power variations and are unaffected by concomitant variations in DND temperature; and (c) they can accurately follow transient release rate variations over a broad frequency range

  17. Safety and operating experience at EBR-II: lessons for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackett, J.I.; Golden, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    EBR-II is a small LMFBR power plant that has performed safely and reliably for 16 years. Much has been learned from operating it to facilitate the design, licensing, and operation of large commercial LMFBR power plants in the US. EBR-II has been found relatively easy to keep in conformity with evolving safety requirements, largely because of inherent safety features of the plant. Such features reduce dependence on active safety systems to protect against accidents. EBR-II has experienced a number of plant-transient incidents, some planned, others inadvertent; none has resulted in any significant plant damage. The operating experience with EBR-II has led to the formulation of an Operational Reliability Test Program (ORTP), aimed at showing inherently safe performance of fuel and plant systems.

  18. Search for low-mass WIMPs in a 0.6 kg day exposure of the DAMIC experiment at SNOLAB

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Bertou, X; Butner, M; Cancelo, G; Vázquez, A Castañeda; Vergara, B A Cervantes; Chavarria, A E; Chavez, C R; Neto, J R T de Mello; D'Olivo, J C; Estrada, J; Moroni, G Fernandez; Gaïor, R; Guandincerri, Y; Torres, K P Hernández; Izraelevitch, F; Kavner, A; Kilminster, B; Lawson, I; Letessier-Selvon, A; Liao, J; Molina, J; Pena, J; Privitera, P; Ramanathan, K; Sarkis, Y; Schwarz, T; Sengul, C; Settimo, M; Haro, M Sofo; Thomas, R; Tiffenberg, J; Tiouchichine, E; Machado, D Torres; Trillaud, F; You, X; Zhou, J

    2016-01-01

    We present results of a dark matter search performed with a 0.6 kg day exposure of the DAMIC experiment at the SNOLAB underground laboratory. We measured the energy spectrum of ionization events in the bulk silicon of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) down to a signal of 60 eV electron-equivalent. The data is consistent with radiogenic backgrounds, and constraints on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic-scattering cross-section are accordingly placed. Cross-sections relevant to the potential signal from the CDMS-II Si experiment are excluded using the same target for the first time. This result, obtained with a limited exposure, demonstrates the potential to explore the low-mass WIMP region (<10 GeV/$c^{2}$) of the upcoming DAMIC100, a 100 g detector currently being installed in SNOLAB.

  19. Vanadium alloy irradiation experiment X530 in EBR-II{sup *}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Hins, A.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objective of the X530 experiment in EBR-II was to obtain early irradiation performance data, particularly the fracture properties, on the new 500-kg production heat of V-4Cr-4Ti material before the scheduled reactor shutdown at the end of September 1994.

  20. Experience in the operation and maintenance of the Austrian TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Austrian TRIGA Mark II reactor ia in operation since March 1962. The reactor instrumentation, core design and irradiation facilities and operation are described. Besides steady state power and pulse operation, square wave operation has been installed 1968, allowing power squares up to 750 kW. A Survey of reactor operation and experiments is given

  1. Reactor dynamics experiment of nuclear ship Mutsu using pseudo random signal (II). The second experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate dynamics of the reactor plant of the nuclear ship Mutsu, the second reactor noise experiment using pseudo random binary sequences (PRBS) was performed on August 30, 1991 in the third experimental navigation. The experiments using both reactivity and load disturbances were performed at 50% of reactor power and under a quiet sea condition. Each PRBS was applied by manual operation of the control rod or the main steam valve. Various signals of the plant responses and of the acceleration of ship motion were measured. Furthermore, natural reactor noise signals were measured after each PRBS experiment in order to evaluate the effects of the PRBS disturbances. This paper summarizes the planning of the experiment, the instruction for the experiment and logs, the data recording conditions, recorded signal wave forms and the results of power spectral analysis. (author)

  2. Milli-Interacting Dark Matter Interpretation of the Direct-Search Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reinterpret the results of the direct searches for dark matter in terms of milli-interacting dark particles. The model reproduces the positive results from DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT and is consistent with the absence of signal in the XENON100, CDMS-II/Ge, and LUX detectors. Dark atoms, interacting with standard atoms through a kinetic mixing between photons and dark photons and a mass mixing of σ mesons with dark scalars, diffuse elastically in terrestrial matter where they deposit all their energy. Reaching underground detectors through gravity at thermal energies, they form bound states with nuclei of the active medium by radiative capture, which causes the emission of photons that produce the observed signals. The parameter space of the model is explored and regions reproducing the results at the 2σ level are obtained for each experiment

  3. Phase II Upgrade of the GERDA Experiment for the Search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorovits, B.

    Observation of neutrinoless double beta decay could answer the question regarding the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos. The GERDA experiment utilizes HPGe detectors enriched with the isotope 76Ge to search for this process. Recently the GERDA collaboration has unblinded data of Phase I of the experiment. In order to further improve the sensitivity of the experiment, additionally to the coaxial detectors used, 30 BEGe detectors made from germanium enriched in 76Ge will be deployed in GERDA Phase II. BEGe detectors have superior PSD capability, thus the background can be further reduced. The liquid argon surrounding the detector array will be instrumented in order to reject background by detecting scintillation light induced in the liquid argon by radiation. After a short introduction the hardware preparations for GERDA Phase II as well as the processing and characterization of the 30 BEGe detectors are discussed.

  4. Caries experience in a child population in a deprived area of Brazil, using ICDAS II

    OpenAIRE

    de Amorim, Rodrigo Guedes; Figueiredo, Maria José; Leal, Soraya Coelho; Mulder, Jan; FRENCKEN, Jo. E.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the caries experience of children aged 6 to 7 years old in a socially deprived suburban area of Brazil’s Federal District, using the ICDAS II system and to investigate determinants of dental caries. The survey was carried out in six public schools by three calibrated examiners, on a sample of 835 children. ICDAS II codes had to be converted into dmf/DMF components at surface and tooth levels, resulting in unfamiliar caries variables, to enable some m...

  5. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  6. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II), a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-11-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  7. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.

    2009-12-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  8. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at ∼1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of ∼50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  9. Conversion of Phase II Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Data to Common Format; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vast amount of aerodynamic, structural, and turbine performance data were collected during three phases of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE). To compare data from the three phases, a similar format of engineering unit data is required. The process of converting Phase II data from a previous engineering unit format to raw integer counts is discussed. The integer count files can then be input to the new post-processing software, MUNCH. The resulting Phase II engineering unit files are in a common format with current and future UAE engineering unit files. An additional objective for changing the file format was to convert the Phase II data from English units to SI units of measurement

  10. First Results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment at the Deep Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandic, Vuk

    2004-06-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to search for dark matter in the form of the Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). For this purpose, CDMS uses detectors based on crystals of Ge and Si, operated at the temperature of 20 mK, and providing a two-fold signature of an interaction: the ionization and the athermal phonon signals. The two signals, along with the passive and active shielding of the experimental setup, and with the underground experimental sites, allow very effective suppression and rejection of different types of backgrounds. This dissertation presents the commissioning and the results of the first WIMP-search run performed by the CDMS collaboration at the deep underground site at the Soudan mine in Minnesota. We develop different methods of suppressing the dominant background due to the electron-recoil events taking place at the detector surface and we apply these algorithms to the data set. These results place the world's most sensitive limits on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent elastic-scattering cross-section. Finally, they examine the compatibility of the supersymmetric WIMP-models with the direct-detection experiments (such as CDMS) and discuss the implications of the new CDMS result on these models.

  11. Writing Seveso II safety reports: new EU guidance reflecting 5 years' experience with the Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Maureen Heraty; Fabbri, Luciano; Struckl, Michael

    2008-09-15

    Since the coming into force of the Seveso II Directive, considerable experience has been acquired in regard to preparation of safety reports for establishments that fall under the requirements of this Directive. In light of this experience, the Amendment of the Seveso II Directive adopted by the European Parliament and the Council on 16 December 2003, gave the European Commission the mandate "to review by 31 December 2006 in close cooperation with the Member States, the existing Guidance on the Preparation of a safety report (EUR 17690)". As a result, a technical working group of Member States representing the Seveso competent authorities and the European Commission's Major Accident Hazards Bureau was established to review and re-examine the guidance. The new guidance maintains the high-level and overarching character of the older version, but improves the document through better definition of conceptual elements of the safety report and greater alignment with Annex II of the Directive, which describes the essential elements of the safety report. This paper describes the new guidance in terms of its contribution to developing a harmonized conceptual framework for preparing and reviewing safety reports within the context of Seveso II implementation. Overall, the aim of the guidance is to provide concrete advice to operators and competent authorities on the logic and expectations underlying the safety report, so as to make both preparation and review of the report a more efficient and useful exercise for all parties involved. PMID:18276071

  12. Analysis of complex vessel experiments using the Hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian containment code ALICE-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the ALICE-II analysis of and comparison with complex vessel experiments. Tests SM-2 through SM-5 were performed by SRI International in 1978 in studying the structural response of 1/20 scale models of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor to a simulated hypothetical core-disruptive accident. These experiments provided quality data for validating treatments of the nonlinear fluid-structure interactions and many complex excursion phenomena, such as flow through perforated structures, large material distortions, multi-dimensional sliding interfaces, flow around sharp corners, and highly contorted fluid boundaries. Correlations of the predicted pressures with the test results of all gauges are made. Wave characteristics and arrival times are also compared. Results show that the ALICE-II code predicts the pressure profile well. Despite the complexity, the code gave good results for the SM-5 test

  13. Mass analysis of low-energy ions in the Baseball II plasma containment experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a magnetic mirror plasma experiment, the plasma containment time is often limited by the charge exchange of energetic plasma ions with thermal gas. The low-energy ions that result from the charge exchange are not trapped by the magnetic field, but emerge through the mirrors and follow the field lines with an energy of the order of the plasma potential. Mass identification of these ions helps in locating and eliminating the source of the charge-exchange gas. To perform this identification, a modified quadrupole mass spectrometer is operated in the fringe magnetic field of the Baseball II plasma experiment. From the resulting spectra an estimate is made of the density of each component of the thermal gas. For various experimental conditions of Baseball II, component density estimates and time-resolved mass analyses are given. The mass spectrometer and its operation are also described. (author)

  14. Particle identification performance of the prototype Aerogel RICH counter for the Belle II experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Iwata, S; Adachi, I.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kakuno, H.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.(Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata, 950-2181, Japan); Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; T. Kumita; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S; Pestotnik, R.; Šantelj, L.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new type of particle identification device, called an Aerogel Ring Imaging Cherenkov (ARICH) counter, for the Belle II experiment. It uses silica aerogel tiles as Cherenkov radiators. For detection of Cherenkov photons, Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detectors (HAPDs) are used. The designed HAPD has a high sensitivity to single photons under a strong magnetic field. We have confirmed that the HAPD provides high efficiency for single-photon detection even after exposure to neutron ...

  15. Experiment on performance of upper head injection system with ROSA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the total 10 ROSA-II/UHI performance tests, 6 were reported previously. The rest are presented and discussion is made on the effects of heat generation in the core and UHI injection and repeatability of experiments. In addition, the following are described: (1) Pressure spikes observed in the upper head after sudden stoppage of UHI injection, and (2) discharge flow oscillation possibly due to UHI water injection into the upper plenum. (auth.)

  16. CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA's Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method

  17. CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schulz, H.; Sievers, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Gemany)

    1996-11-01

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

  18. Data uncertainty reduction in high converter reactor designs using PROTEUS phase II integral experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was performed for several parameters of interest in the design of the high conversion reactor (HCR) concept. The main goals of this work were to determine the response standard deviation due to basic nuclear data uncertainties, and to incorporate integral experiment information from the PROTEUS facility to reduce the computed uncertainties wherever possible. This paper highlights the results for K and five important reaction rate ratios that were part of the measurement program in the PROTEUS phase II experiments. The computed correlation coefficients between the PROTEUS and HCR models were uniformly high, which indicates that a considerable reduction in uncertainty can be achieved (within measurement uncertainties)

  19. REWET-II and REWET-III facilities for PWR LOCA experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the REWET research project is to improve the understanding of the basic phenomena of accident situations in nuclear power plants and to provide experimental data for the development and verification of the LOCA and SBLOCA codes. For calculations of the experiments exact data of the facility and the initial state of the experiment must be known. The REWET-II and REWET-III facilities are described here in order to give necessary information aboaut the facilities and to prepare input for the computer codes

  20. Exponential and Critical Experiments Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Exponential and Critical Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In September 1963 the International Atomic Energy Agency organized the Symposium on Exponential and Critical Experiments in Amsterdam, Netherlands, at the invitation of the Government of the Netherlands. The Symposium enabled scientists from Member States to discuss the results of such experiments which provide the physics data necessary for the design of power reactors. Great advances made in recent years in this field have provided scientists with highly sophisticated and reliable experimental and theoretical methods. This trend is reflected in the presentation, at the Symposium, of many new experimental techniques resulting in more detailed and accurate information and a reduction of costs. Both the number of experimental parameters and their range of variation have been extended, and a closer degree of simulation of the actual power reactor has been achieved, for example, by means of high temperature critical assemblies. Basic types of lattices have continued to be the objective of many investigations, and extensive theoretical analyses have been carried out to provide a more thorough understanding of the neutron physics involved. Twenty nine countries and 3 international organizations were represented by 198 participants. Seventy one papers were presented. These numbers alone show the wide interest which the topic commands in the field of reactor design. We hope that this publication, which includes the papers presented at the Symposium and a record of the discussions, will prove useful as a work of reference to scientists working in this field

  1. Detector Simulation and WIMP Search Analysis for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kevin [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Astrophysical and cosmological measurements on the scales of galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the universe indicate that 85% of the matter in the universe is composed of dark matter, made up of non-baryonic particles that interact with cross-sections on the weak scale or lower. Hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, represent a potential solution to the dark matter problem, and naturally arise in certain Standard Model extensions. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) collaboration aims to detect the scattering of WIMP particles from nuclei in terrestrial detectors. Germanium and silicon particle detectors are deployed in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These detectors are instrumented with phonon and ionization sensors, which allows for discrimination against electromagnetic backgrounds, which strike the detector at rates orders of magnitude higher than the expected WIMP signal. This dissertation presents the development of numerical models of the physics of the CDMS detectors, implemented in a computational package collectively known as the CDMS Detector Monte Carlo (DMC). After substantial validation of the models against data, the DMC is used to investigate potential backgrounds to the next iteration of the CDMS experiment, known as SuperCDMS. Finally, an investigation of using the DMC in a reverse Monte Carlo analysis of WIMP search data is presented.

  2. Simulation of TRIGA Mark II Benchmark Experiment using WIMSD4 and CITATION codes; Simulacao com WIMSD4 e CITATION do Triga Mark II benchmark experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalle, Hugo Moura [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Pereira, Claubia [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents a simulation of the TRIGA Mark II Benchmark Experiment, Part I: Steady-State Operation and is part of the calculation methodology validation developed to the neutronic calculation of the CDTN's TRIGA IPR - R1 reactor. A version of the WIMSD4, obtained in the Centro de Tecnologia Nuclear, in Cuba, was used in the cells calculation. In the core calculations was adopted the diffusion code CITATION. Was adopted a 3D representation of the core and the calculations were carried out at two energy groups. Many of the experiments were simulated, including, K{sub eff}, control rods reactivity worth, fuel elements reactivity worth distribution and the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient. The comparison of the obtained results, with the experimental results, shows differences in the range of the accuracy of the measurements, to the control rods worth and fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, or on an acceptable range, following the literature, to the K{sub eff} and fuel elements reactivity worth distribution and the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient. The comparison of the obtained results, with the experimental. results, shows differences in the range of the accuracy of the measurements, to the control rods worth and fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, or in an acceptable range, following the literature, to the K{sub eff} and fuel elements reactivity worth distribution. (author)

  3. Commissioning and performance studies of a proton recoil detector at the COMPASS-II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joerg, Philipp; Buechele, Maximilian; Fischer, Horst; Gorzellik, Matthias; Grussenmeyer, Tobias; Herrmann, Florian; Koenigsmann, Kay; Kremser, Paul; Schopferer, Sebastian [Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The COMPASS-II experiment is a fixed target experiment situated at CERN. A tertiary myon beam from the SPS scattered of protons from a liquid hydrogen target is used to measure Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Hard Exclusive Meson Production (HEMP). These processes offer a unique way to determine Generalized Parton Distributions, which are related to the total angular momentum of quarks, antiquarks and gluons in the nucleon by Ji's Sum Rule. One of the major parts of the COMPASS-II upgrade is the CAMERA detector. CAMERA is a proton recoil detector surrounding the COMPASS-II liquid hydrogen target. Its purpose is to measure the recoiled target proton in DVCS and HEMP reactions and viz to act as a veto to ensure the exclusivity of the measurement. The talk gives an outline of the detector and its readout electronics. It is focused on the commissioning and performance of the CAMERA detector and gives a brief insight into the ongoing DVCS analysis.

  4. Particle identification performance of the prototype aerogel RICH counter for the Belle II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, S.; Adachi, I.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kakuno, H.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kumita, T.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Šantelj, L.; Seljak, A.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Tahirovic, E.; Yusa, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a new type of particle identification device, called an aerogel ring imaging Cherenkov (ARICH) counter, for the Belle II experiment. It uses silica aerogel tiles as Cherenkov radiators. For detection of Cherenkov photons, hybrid avalanche photo-detectors (HAPDs) are used. The designed HAPD has a high sensitivity to single photons under a strong magnetic field. We have confirmed that the HAPD provides high efficiency for single-photon detection even after exposure to neutron and γ -ray radiation that exceeds the levels expected in the 10-year Belle II operation. In order to confirm the basic performance of the ARICH counter system, we carried out a beam test at the using a prototype of the ARICH counter with six HAPD modules. The results are in agreement with our expectations and confirm the suitability of the ARICH counter for the Belle II experiment. Based on the in-beam performance of the device, we expect that the identification efficiency at 3.5 GeV/c is 97.4% and 4.9% for pions and kaons, respectively. This paper summarizes the development of the HAPD for the ARICH and the evaluation of the performance of the prototype ARICH counter built with the final design components.

  5. Particle identification performance of the prototype Aerogel RICH counter for the Belle II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, S; Hara, K; Iijima, T; Ikeda, H; Kakuno, H; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Kumita, T; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Pestotnik, R; Šantelj, L; Seljak, A; Tabata, M; Tahirović, E; Yusa, Y

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new type of particle identification device, called an Aerogel Ring Imaging Cherenkov (ARICH) counter, for the Belle II experiment. It uses silica aerogel tiles as Cherenkov radiators. For detection of Cherenkov photons, Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detectors (HAPDs) are used. The designed HAPD has a high sensitivity to single photons under a strong magnetic field. We have confirmed that the HAPD provides high efficiency for single-photon detection even after exposure to neutron and gamma-ray radiation that exceeds the levels expected in the 10-year Belle II operation. In order to confirm the basic performance of the ARICH counter system, we carried out a beam test at the DESY using a prototype of the ARICH counter with six HAPD modules. The results are in agreement with our expectations and confirm the suitability of the ARICH counter for the Belle II experiment. Based on the in-beam performance of the device, we expect that the identification efficiency at 3.5 GeV/c is 97.4% and 4.9% for pions ...

  6. Commissioning and performance studies of a proton recoil detector at the COMPASS-II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The COMPASS-II experiment is a fixed target experiment situated at CERN. A tertiary myon beam from the SPS scattered of protons from a liquid hydrogen target is used to measure Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Hard Exclusive Meson Production (HEMP). These processes offer a unique way to determine Generalized Parton Distributions, which are related to the total angular momentum of quarks, antiquarks and gluons in the nucleon by Ji's Sum Rule. One of the major parts of the COMPASS-II upgrade is the CAMERA detector. CAMERA is a proton recoil detector surrounding the COMPASS-II liquid hydrogen target. Its purpose is to measure the recoiled target proton in DVCS and HEMP reactions and viz to act as a veto to ensure the exclusivity of the measurement. The talk gives an outline of the detector and its readout electronics. It is focused on the commissioning and performance of the CAMERA detector and gives a brief insight into the ongoing DVCS analysis.

  7. Radon backgrounds in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Daw, E; Gauvreau, J -L; Gold, M; Harmon, L J; Landers, J M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Miller, E H; Murphy, A StJ; Paling, S M; Pipe, M; Robinson, M; Sadler, S; Scarff, A; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Walker, D

    2013-01-01

    Low pressure gas Time Projection Chambers being developed for directional Dark Matter searches offer a technology with high particle identification power, combined with poten- tial to produce a definitive detection of galactic Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) Dark Matter. A source of background events in such experiments, able to mimic genuine WIMP in- duced nuclear recoil tracks, arises from potential radon contamination and the recoils that result from associated daughter nuclei, termed Radon Progeny Recoils (RPRs). We present here experi- mental data from a long-term study of this background using the DRIFT-II directional dark matter experiment at the Boulby Underground Laboratory. By detailed examination of event classes in both spatial and time coordinates using 5.5 years of data we show ability to determine the origin of 4 specific background populations and describe development of new technology and mitigation strategies to suppress them.

  8. Charge exchange contamination of CRIT-II barium CIV experiment. [critical ionization velocity in ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Meyerott, R. E.; Rairden, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments have been recently performed which attempted to confirm critical ionization velocity (CIV) ionization by deploying chemicals at high velocity in the ionosphere. Specifically, the CRIT-II rocket performed a barium release in the ionosphere, where observations of Ba(+) resonant emissions following the release are believed to have resulted from the CIV process. Calculations are presented which suggest a significant fraction (if not all) of the Ba(+) observed likely resulted from charge exchange with the thermosphere ions and not through CIV processes. The results presented here are pertinent to other CIV experiments performed in the ionosphere. It is recommended that laboratory measurements should be made of the charge exchange cross section between O(+) and Ba as well as other metal vapors used in CIV experiments.

  9. Development of Ring Imaging Cherenkov counter for Belle II experiment at super KEKB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, S.; Adachi, I.; Dolenec, R.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Imamura, M.; Kawai, H.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Kubo, M.; Kumita, T.; Mori, W.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Seljak, A.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Takagaki, H.; Tagai, S.; Verheyden, R.

    For the Belle II experiment at the superKEKB, we have been developing a proximity focusing ring imaging Cherenkov detector using a silica aerogel as a radiator. A 144-channel Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector which is developed with Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. was adopted as the photon detector for the Aerogel RICH counter. We have conducted beam tests in order to evaluate the particle identification performance for the A-RICH system. One of our current concern for the system is a radiation hardness of the HAPD. In order to realize the neutron hardness for 10-year Belle II operation, we have tried to make APDs with a thinner P-layer which is expected to help in reducing the leakage current. As a result, we actually confirmed effects of the improved APD. In this paper, we would alike to report the status of the A-RICH development, especially about the improvement of the HAPD.

  10. FIX-II. Loca-blowdown heat transfer and pump trip experiments. Summary report of phase 1: Design of experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FIX-II is a loss of coolant blowdown heat transfer experiment, performed under contract for The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI. The purpose of the experiments is to provide measurements from simulations of a pipe rupture on an external recirculation line in a Swedish BWR. Pump trips in BWRs with internal recirculation pumps will also be simulated. The existing FIX-loop at the Thermal Engineering Laboratory of Studsvik Energiteknik AB will be modified and used for the experiments. Components are included to simulate the steam dome, downcomer, two recirculation lines with one pump each, lower plenum, core (36-rod full length bundle), control rod guide tubes, core bypass, upper plenum and steam separators. The results of the first phase of the project are reported here. The following tasks are included in Phase 1: reactor reference analysis, scaling calculations of the FIX loop, development of fuel rod simulators, design of test section and test loop layout and proposal for test program. Further details of the work and results obtained for the different sub-projects are published in a number ofdetailed reports. (author)

  11. Directory search performance optimization of AMGA for the Belle II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geunchul; Kwak, Jae-Hyuck; Huh, Taesang; Hwang, Soonwook

    2015-12-01

    AMGA (ARDA Metadata Grid Application) is a grid metadata catalogue system that has been developed as a component of the EU FP7 EMI consortium based on the requirements of the HEP (High-Energy Physics) and the biomedical user communities. Currently, AMGA is exploited to manage the metadata in the gBasf2 framework at the Belle II experiment, one of the largest particle physics experiments in the world. In this paper, we present our efforts to optimize the metadata query performance of AMGA to better support the massive MC Campaign of the Belle II experiment. Although AMGA exhibits very outstanding performance for a relatively small amount of data, as the number of directories and the metadata size increase (e.g. hundreds of thousands of directories) during the MC Campaign, AMGA suffers from severe query processing performance degradation. To address this problem, we modified the query search mechanism and the database scheme of AMGA to provide dramatic improvements of metadata search performance and query response time. Throughout our comparative performance analysis of metadata search operations, we show that AMGA can be an optimal solution for a metadata catalogue in a large-scale scientific experimental framework

  12. EMC studies for the vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The upgrade of the Belle II experiment plans to use a vertex detector based on two different technologies, DEPFET pixel (PXD) technology and double side silicon microstrip (SVD) technology. The vertex electronics are characterized by the topology of SVD bias that forces to design a sophisticated grounding because of the floating power scheme. The complex topology of the PXD power cable bundle may introduce some noise inside the vertex area. This paper presents a general overview of the EMC issues present in the vertex system, based on EMC tests on an SVD prototype and a study of noise propagation in the PXD cable bundle based on Multi-conductor transmission line theory

  13. Streaming-plasma measurements in the Baseball II-T mirror experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The warm plasma from a deuterium-loaded titanium washer gun, streaming along magnetic-field lines through the steady-state magnetic well of Baseball II, has been examined for its suitability in this experimental situation as a target plasma for hot-ion buildup experiments and for microinstability control. The gun was positioned near the magnetic axis outside the mirror region. Measurements were made with gridded, end-loss detectors placed outside the opposite mirror, a microwave interferometer, a beam-attenuation detector, and other diagnostics

  14. Operating experience and maintenance at the TRIGA Mark II LENA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last two years at the Trigs Mark II LENA plant were characterized by the running of the n-n-bar oscillation NADIR experiment. Consequently reactor operation was positively affected and the running hours rose again above 1000 hours per year. The LENA team was also deeply involved in the procedures for the renewal of the reactor operation license. The new requirements set by the Nuclear Energy Licensing Authority (ENEA for Italy) most of which concerning radiation protection and environmental impact, have been already fulfilled. In some cases the installation of new apparatus is underway

  15. Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere and Validation Experiments (Mohave, Mohave II): Results Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Iain S.; McGee, Thomas G.; Twigg, Laurence W.; Sumnicht, Grant K.; Whiteman, David N.; Rush, Kurt D.; Cadirola, Martin P.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Connell, R.; Demoz, Belay B.; Vomel, Holger; Miloshevich, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere and Validation Experiments (MOHAVE, MOHAVE-II) inter-comparison campaigns took place at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Table Mountain Facility (TMF, 34.5(sup o)N) in October 2006 and 2007 respectively. Both campaigns aimed at evaluating the capability of three Raman lidars for the measurement of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). During each campaign, more than 200 hours of lidar measurements were compared to balloon borne measurements obtained from 10 Cryogenic Frost-point Hygrometer (CFH) flights and over 50 Vaisala RS92 radiosonde flights. During MOHAVE, fluorescence in all three lidar receivers was identified, causing a significant wet bias above 10-12 km in the lidar profiles as compared to the CFH. All three lidars were reconfigured after MOHAVE, and no such bias was observed during the MOHAVE-II campaign. The lidar profiles agreed very well with the CFH up to 13-17 km altitude, where the lidar measurements become noise limited. The results from MOHAVE-II have shown that the water vapor Raman lidar will be an appropriate technique for the long-term monitoring of water vapor in the UT/LS given a slight increase in its power-aperture, as well as careful calibration.

  16. Early Experience with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug II for Occlusive Purposes in Arteriovenous Hemodialysis Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Amplatzer Vascular Plug Type II (AVP II) has proven effective in the therapeutic embolization of various vascular lesions. It benefits from very rapid occlusion of the target lesion and can be deployed, retrieved, and redeployed if required. There is no literature available on use of the AVP II in the maintenance, closure, and management of complicated arteriovenous access in hemodialysis patients. In this series, we present our clinical experience with the use of the AVP II for embolization of problematic hemodialysis access. The AVP II is a self-expandable Nitinol wire-mesh device. Mounted on a delivery wire it has the capability to be deployed, recaptured, and redeployed. In total seven patients (four males: one diabetic, all nonsmokers), with ages ranging from 44 to 81 years (mean, 63 years), were treated between July 2008 and January 2009. One patient had not started dialysis. The remaining six patients had varied histories, with the time on hemodialysis ranging from 1 to 21 years. Retrospective review of clinical notes revealed patient demographics, type of access, device size, deployment site, and outcomes. Indications for embolization included steal syndrome (one patient), high-flow tributaries (two patients), and limb swelling (four patients). All patients had clinical and sonographical follow-up to 3 months. Surgical ligation had either failed, was considered a contraindication due to concerns regarding wound healing, or was considered difficult due to complex venous anatomy. Only one device was used in each patient, ranging from 6 to 16 mm in diameter. Immediate technical success was seen in 100%. All these patients were followed up clinically in the vascular access radiology clinic at 4 weeks and 3 months. Occlusion of the treated vessel and resolution of symptoms were reconfirmed in 100% of cases at 3 months. It was also noted whether patients were having successful dialysis, if required. There were no complications. Average procedural time was 19

  17. Search for electroweak single top-quark production with the CDF II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Svenja; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2007-11-01

    Understanding the world -- This aim drives humankind since the beginning of conscious thinking. Especially the nature of matter has been of major interest. Nowadays, we have a complex image of the constitution of matter. Atoms consist of electrons and nucleons. But even nucleons are not elementary. Their basic constituents are called quarks. Physicists developed a model describing the elementary components of matter as well as the forces between them: the standard model of elementary particle physics. The substructure of matter is only visible in scattering experiments. In high energy physics, these experiments are done at particle accelerators. The world's highest energetic collider, the Tevatron, is hosted by the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), also called Fermilab, in the vicinity of Chicago. The proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are recorded by two multipurpose detectors, namely D0 and CDF II.

  18. Analysis of PROTEUS phase II experiments in support of light water high conversion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen test zones were studied in the Phase II program of light water high conversion reactor physics experiments at the PROTEUS zero-power facility in Wuerenlingen. The test lattice configurations investigated, the types of integral measurements carried out, experimental techniques applied, and accuracies achieved are reviewed. Parallel to the experimental program, a continuous improvement of the calculational methods and nuclear data used for the prediction of lattice parameters took place. A short description is given of the specially developed computer codes and nuclear data bases. Finally, various experimental results are compared with calculated values. For several types of parameters, the agreement between experiment and calculation is now within the experimental error limits. In certain cases, however, such agreement is found to be the result of compensating discrepancies. (orig.)

  19. Ammonia-pellet generation system for the Baseball II-T target plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation of a small pellet by a pulsed laser is one method of producing a startup target plasma for plasma experiments employing neutral-beam injection. A system for generating charged, uniformly sized, solid-ammonia, 150-μm-diam, spherical pellets having a charge-to-mass ratio of 10-4 C/kg is described. These pellets are electrostatically guided at a speed of 32 m/sec (over a distance of several meters) to a laser focal zone. This complete system (pellet generation and pellet guidance) has been successfully operated on a 3-m test stand where 250-μm-diam pellets were regularly irradiated by a pulsed, 30-J CO2 laser. The system is now installed on the Baseball II-T experiment; in preliminary tests, several 150-μm-diam pellets were irradiated with the pulsed 300-J CO2 laser

  20. Analysis of full core steam flooding experiments for the Phase II GCFR critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial program of bench mark critical experiments conducted on behalf of the design and safety evaluations for the 300 MW(e) gas cooled fast breeder reactor demonstration plant included extensive measurements of the reactivity effects of accidental steam ingress. Insertions of polyethylene (CH2) foam into all of the void channels in the 1250-liter (l) core, the radial blankets, and the axial blankets of the Phase II GCFR critical assembly gave simulated floodings of up to 2.25% steam in the coolant. The report presents results of General Atomic Company (GA) analyses of the Phase II steam entry experiments, giving comparisons of calculated and measured flooding worths under various conditions, including changes in core geometry and introduction of control rod poisoning. Also studied were the effects of steam flooding on control material worth and other physics parameters. Calculated worths of hydrogenous materials were found to be significantly sensitive to variations in analytical models and methods. Good agreement with experiments was obtained by a 28-group analysis when a rigorous regeneration of cross sections, cell-heterogeneity factors, and directional diffusion coefficients was provided at each specific flooding density to account for the moderated spectra. Steam worths in a rodded core can be similarly well predicted provided that rod shielding effects are re-evaluated in the steam environment. Extrapolations based on these experiments clearly suggest that should a steam leak occur, it would not be a major safety concern, even in a small GCFR demonstration plant. Details of the analytical procedures and models utilized are presented

  1. Benchmark analysis of TRIGA mark II reactivity experiment using a continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The benchmark analysis of reactivity experiments in the TRIGA-II core at the Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (Musashi reactor; 100 kW) was performed by a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP4A. The reactivity worth and integral reactivity curves of the control rods as well as the reactivity worth distributions of fuel and graphite elements were used in the validation process of the physical model and neutron cross section data from the ENDF/B-V evaluation. The calculated values of integral reactivity curves of the control rods were in agreement with the experimental data obtained by the period method. The integral worth measured by the rod drop method was also consistent with the calculation. The calculated values of the fuel and the graphite element worth distributions were consistent with the measured ones within the statistical error estimates. These results showed that the exact core configuration including the control rod positions to reproduce the fission source distribution in the experiment must be introduced into the calculation core for obtaining the precise solution. It can be concluded that our simulation model of the TRIGA-II core is precise enough to reproduce the control rod worth, fuel and graphite elements reactivity worth distributions. (author)

  2. Preliminary Results from the PrimEx-II experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparian, Ashot [NCA& T, Greensboro, NC; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Properties of the neutral pion, as the lightest hadron in Nature, are most sensitive to the basic symmetries and their partial breaking effects in the theory of the strong interaction (QCD). In particular, the po →gg decay width is primarily defined by the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking effect (chiral anomaly) in QCD. The next order corrections to the anomaly have been shown to be small and are known to a 1% precision level. The PrimEx Collaboration at JLab has developed and performed two Primakoff type experiments to measure the po →gg decay width with a similar precision. The published result from the PrimEx-I experiment, G(p0 →gg ) = 7.82±0.14 (stat.)±0.17 (syst.) eV, was a factor of two more precise than the average value quoted in PDG-2010 [1]. The second experiment was performed in 2010 with a goal of 1.4% total uncertainty to address the next-to-leading-order theory calculations. The preliminary results from the PrimEx-II experiment are presented and discussed in this note.

  3. Monte Carlo Simulation of the TRIGA Mark II Benchmark Experiment with Burned Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo calculations of a criticality experiment with burned fuel on the TRIGA Mark II research reactor are presented. The main objective was to incorporate burned fuel composition calculated with the WIMSD4 deterministic code into the MCNP4B Monte Carlo code and compare the calculated keff with the measurements. The criticality experiment was performed in 1998 at the ''Jozef Stefan'' Institute TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenia, with the same fuel elements and loading pattern as in the TRIGA criticality benchmark experiment with fresh fuel performed in 1991. The only difference was that in 1998, the fuel elements had on average burnup of ∼3%, corresponding to 1.3-MWd energy produced in the core in the period between 1991 and 1998. The fuel element burnup accumulated during 1991-1998 was calculated with the TRIGLAV in-house-developed fuel management two-dimensional multigroup diffusion code. The burned fuel isotopic composition was calculated with the WIMSD4 code and compared to the ORIGEN2 calculations. Extensive comparison of burned fuel material composition was performed for both codes for burnups up to 20% burned 235U, and the differences were evaluated in terms of reactivity. The WIMSD4 and ORIGEN2 results agreed well for all isotopes important in reactivity calculations, giving increased confidence in the WIMSD4 calculation of the burned fuel material composition. The keff calculated with the combined WIMSD4 and MCNP4B calculations showed good agreement with the experimental values. This shows that linking of WIMSD4 with MCNP4B for criticality calculations with burned fuel is feasible and gives reliable results

  4. RF heating and current drive experiments on the Alcator C and Versator II tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lower hybrid heating and current drive experiments on the Alcator C tokamak (R = 0.64 m, a = 0.165 m, molybdenum limiters) were performed at a frequency of 4.6 GHz with net injected rf powers up to P/sub rf/ ≤ 1.5 MW. Recent experiments have focused on energy confinement studies in lower hybrid current-driven (LHCD) and LHRF heated Ohmic discharges, and sawtooth stabilization in combined LHCD-OH driven discharges at densities n-bar/sub e/ ≤ 1.4 x 1020 m-3. Ion Bernstein wave heating experiments were also carried out in Alcator C at a frequency of f = 183 MHz at power levels P/sub rf/ ≤ 200 kW. Significant heating (ΔT/sub i/ ≤ 400 eV) was observed at ω/ω/sub CH/ ≅ 1.5, 2.5 and ω/ω/sub CD/ ≅ 2.5 at densities n-bar/sub e/ ≅ 1 x 1020 m-3. In the Versator II tokamak, particle confinement improvement (by factors of ≅2) was observed in the presence of 2.45 GHz lower hybrid current drive

  5. Lower-hybrid-heating experiments on the Alcator C and the Versator II Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkolab, M.; Schuss, J. J.; Takase, Y.; Texter, S.; Fiore, C. L.; Gandy, R.; Greenwald, M. J.; Gwinn, D. A.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E. S.

    Initial results from lower hybrid wave heating experiments carried out on the MIT Alcator-C and Versator II Tokamak are reported. In the Alcator-C experiments a 4 waveguide array, with internally brazed ceramic windows was used to inject 160 kW of microwave power at 4.6 GHz into the plasma with nO less than or equal to 1 x 10(15) cm(+3), and BO less than or equal to 12 T. The RF coupling studies show optimal coupling when the local density at the waveguide mouth is 25 to 50 times overdense. Heating experiments show an ion tail formation in hydrogen discharge peaking at a density of anti-n approx. = 2.7 x 10(14) cm(+3) at B = 8.9 T, and bulk ion heating at a density of anti n approx. = 1.5 x 10(14) c(+3) at B approx. = 11 T. Evidence of RF current enhancement has been observed at a density of n approx. = 3 x 10(13) cm (+3). Doppler broadening of the OVII and NVI lines shows a (RADICAL)T/sub i/= 50 eV rise in the bulk ion temperature. A significant RF produced ion tail is also observed by charge exchange analysis. A toroidal ray tracing code and a 1-D transport code to study the heating density bands and heating efficiencies were successfully combined.

  6. RF heating and current drive experiments on the Alcator C and Versator II tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.; Chen, K.I.; Fiore, C.; Granetz, R.; Griffin, D.; Gwinn, D.; Knowlton, S.; Lipschultz, B.; Luckhardt, S.C.

    1986-11-01

    Lower hybrid heating and current drive experiments on the Alcator C tokamak (R = 0.64 m, a = 0.165 m, molybdenum limiters) were performed at a frequency of 4.6 GHz with net injected rf powers up to P/sub rf/ less than or equal to 1.5 MW. Recent experiments have focused on energy confinement studies in lower hybrid current-driven (LHCD) and LHRF heated Ohmic discharges, and sawtooth stabilization in combined LHCD-OH driven discharges at densities n-bar/sub e/ less than or equal to 1.4 x 10/sup 20/ m/sup -3/. Ion Bernstein wave heating experiments were also carried out in Alcator C at a frequency of f = 183 MHz at power levels P/sub rf/ less than or equal to 200 kW. Significant heating (..delta..T/sub i/ less than or equal to 400 eV) was observed at ..omega../..omega../sub CH/ approx. = 1.5, 2.5 and ..omega../..omega../sub CD/ approx. = 2.5 at densities n-bar/sub e/ approx. = 1 x 10/sup 20/ m/sup -3/. In the Versator II tokamak, particle confinement improvement (by factors of approx. =2) was observed in the presence of 2.45 GHz lower hybrid current drive.

  7. Simulation and modeling of the Gamble II self-pinched ion beam transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in numerical simulations and modeling of the self-pinched ion beam transport experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is reviewed. In the experiment, a 1.2-MeV, 100-kA proton beam enters a 1-m long, transport region filled with a low pressure gas (30--250 mTorr helium, or 1 Torr air). The time-dependent velocity distribution function of the injected ion beam is determined from an orbit code that uses a pinch-reflex ion diode model and the measured voltage and current from this diode on the Gamble II generator at NRL. This distribution function is used as the beam input condition for numerical simulations carried out using the hybrid particle-in-cell code IPROP. Results of the simulations will be described, and detailed comparisons will be made with various measurements, including line-integrated electron-density, proton-fluence, and beam radial-profile measurements. As observed in the experiment, the simulations show evidence of self-pinching for helium pressures between 35 and 80 mTorr. Simulations and measurements in 1 Torr air show ballistic transport. The relevance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion will be discussed

  8. Microwave experiments in He II. New features of undamped superfluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybalko, A. S.; Rubets, S. P.; Rudavskiĭ, É. Ya.; Tikhiĭ, V. A.; Tarapov, S. I.; Golovashchenko, R. V.; Derkach, V. N.

    2008-07-01

    The stability and oscillatory properties of superfluid ring flow arising around the cylindrical surface of a disk-shaped dielectric resonator immersed in liquid helium are studied experimentally. The velocity of superfluid flow is controlled with special heat guns, placed in He II and generating counterflows of the normal and superfluid components, directed along the tangent to the cylindrical surface of the resonator. In the experiment the amplitude of the microwave signal passing through the resonator is measured and the effect of the phase and dynamic states of the liquid on the signal amplitude is studied. It is found that periodic oscillations of the signal are observed in the He II state, and each period starts with a sharp spike of the amplitude. It is proposed that this behavior signifies instability of superfluid ring flow due to a change in the number of circulation quanta of the superfluid velocity over a very short time. Another effect is due to the appearance of new periodically repeating resonance peaks, together with the ordinary whispering gallery modes, in the system. The effect is absent above λ point and is attributed to characteristic oscillatory modes of the undamped superfluid flow. Possible reasons for the observed features are analyzed.

  9. Combustion of Solids in Microgravity: Results from the BASS-II Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkul, Paul V.; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Miller, Fletcher; Olson, Sandra L.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; T’ien, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The Burning and Suppression of Solids-II (BASS-II) experiment was performed on the International Space Station. Microgravity combustion tests burned thin and thick flat samples, acrylic slabs, spheres, and cylinders. The samples were mounted inside a small wind tunnel which could impose air flow speeds up to 53 cms. The wind tunnel was installed in the Microgravity Science Glovebox which supplied power, imaging, and a level of containment. The effects of air flow speed, fuel thickness, fuel preheating, and oxygen concentration on flame appearance, growth, spread rate, and extinction were examined in both the opposed and concurrent flow configuration. The flames are quite sensitive to air flow speed in the range 0 to 5 cms. They can be sustained at very low flow speeds of less than 1 cms, when they become dim blue and stable. In this state they are not particularly dangerous from a fire safety perspective, but they can flare up quickly with a sudden increase in air flow speed. Including earlier BASS-I results, well over one hundred tests have been conducted of the various samples in the different geometries, flow speeds, and oxygen concentrations. There are several important implications related to fundamental combustion research as well as spacecraft fire safety. This work was supported by the NASA Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division (SLPSRA).

  10. Preliminary experiment of neutral beam injection heating in JIPP T-II stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam injection experiments are carried out in JIPP T-II, which is a hybrid device of stellarator and tokamak. Two neutral beam injectors are equipped tangentially in the direction of co- and counter-injections. Hydrogen neutral beams of 22 keV, 60 kW (co-injection) and 30 kW (counter-injection) are applied to the ohmically heated stellarator plasma and also to the tokamak plasma. The bulk ion heating efficiency for co-injection is around 1.6 eV/kW in the case of stellarator and 1.9 eV/kW in the case of tokamak, while the heating efficiencies for counter-injection are about 1.6 eV/kW in both cases. The difference between the tokamak and stellarator is considered to be caused by the enhanced orbit loss due to the helical ripples in the stellarator. (author)

  11. MPS II: a tracking detector system for large high rate experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MPS II tracking detector system, developed for a variety of low cross section experiments that are only practical in a high beam rate environment, is described. It was built as a general purpose device for use in a fixed target (AGS) situation where the beam passes through all elements of the detector. The electronics is dead-timeless so that high efficiency is achieved at event rates as high as 106/sec/ch. This capability would allow these detectors to be used as close as 20 cm from a hadron-hadron collider at 1 Tev of luminosity up to 1033/cm2/sec. The detector is a multilayer-modular drift chamber using stereo projections to provide for 3-dimensional event reconstruction

  12. Initial operation of ECRH heating experiments on the Versator II tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckhardt, S.C.; Chen, K.I.; Kirkwood, R.; Porkolab, M.; Singleton, D.; Squire, J.; Villasenor, J.; Lu, Z.

    1987-09-01

    Operation of a 35GHz electron cyclotron heating experiment has begun on Versator II with gyrotron power of 100kW. The EC antenna is located on the high magnetic field side of the plasma and launches linearly polarized radiation in the HE11 hybrid mode with externally controllable polarization and parallel index of refraction. The transmission system provides mode conversion from the TE01 output mode of the gyrotron to the HE11 mode and polarization control. The mode transformation characteristics of the transmission system were measured by means of a computer controlled two dimensional scanning system, and contour plots of the far field radiation pattern of each transmission system element were made and compared with theory. Overall the transmission system is found to be approximately 95% efficient with mode patterns in generally excellent agreement with theory.

  13. Experience in operation and maintenance of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience in the operation and maintenance of the 250 kW steady state/250 MW pulsed TRIGA Mark II Reactor of the University of Pavia in the past two years is reported. Data for the reactor utilization and of Health Physics activity are also presented. Since the Second European Conference of TRIGA Reactor Users in 1972, reactor operation continued normally. No major troubles occurred during this time except for rotary specimen rack rotation. Maintenance of reactor facilities, including the substitution of the rotary specimen rack with a new one manufactured on-site is described. In June 1974 measurements of fluxes in the thermal column, with most of the graphite elements removed, were carried out in order to install a neutron converter in thermal column. Some results of fluxes and cadmium ratio values are reported. A description of the converter facility set up is given. (U.S.)

  14. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, Emily [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Snelson, Catherine M [NSTec; Chipman, Veraun D [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Emer, Dudley [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); White, Bob [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Emmit, Ryan [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Wright, Al [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Drellack, Sigmund [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Huckins-Gang, Heather [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Mercadante, Jennifer [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Floyd, Michael [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); McGowin, Chris [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Cothrun, Chris [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Bonal, Nedra [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-05

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined.

  15. Experiment on performance of upper head injection system with ROSA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermo-hydraulic behavior in the primary cooling system of a pressurized water reactor with an upper head injection system (UHI) in a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has been studied with ROSA-II test facility. Simulated UHI and internal structures of the pressure vessel were installed to the facility for the experiment. Nine maximum-sized double-ended break tests and one medium-sized split break test were performed for the cold-leg break condition. The results are as follows: (1) Fluid mixing in the upper head is not perfect. (2) Cold water injection into the steam or two-phase fluid causes violent depressurization due to the condensation. Flow pattern in the primary cooling system is largely influenced by the above two. (auth.)

  16. A US perspective on fast reactor fuel fabrication technology and experience. Part II: Ceramic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is Part II of a review focusing on the United States experience with oxide, carbide, and nitride fast reactor fuel fabrication. Over 60 years of research in fuel fabrication by government, national laboratories, industry, and academia has culminated in a foundation of research and resulted in significant improvements to the technologies employed to fabricate these fuel types. This part of the review documents the current state of fuel fabrication technologies in the United States for each of these fuel types, some of the challenges faced by previous researchers, and how these were overcome. Knowledge gained from reviewing previous investigations will aid both researchers and policy makers in forming future decisions relating to nuclear fuel fabrication technologies.

  17. New LUX and PandaX-II Results Illuminating the Simplest Higgs-Portal Dark Matter Models

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Direct searches for dark matter (DM) by the LUX and PandaX-II Collaborations employing xenon-based detectors have recently come up with the most stringent limits to date on the elastic scattering of DM off nucleons. For Higgs-portal scalar DM models, the new results have precluded any possibility of accommodating low-mass DM as suggested by the DAMA and CDMS II Si experiments utilizing other target materials, even after invoking isospin-violating DM interactions with nucleons. In the simplest model, SM+D, which is the standard model plus a real scalar singlet named darkon acting as the DM candidate, the LUX and PandaX-II limits rule out DM masses from 5 GeV to about 330 GeV, except a small range around the resonant point at half of the Higgs mass where the interaction cross-section is near the neutrino-background floor. In the THDMII+D, which extends the SM+D by the addition of another Higgs doublet, the region excluded in the SM+D by the direct searches can be recovered due to suppression of the DM effective...

  18. The Proteus phase II experiments as data base for LWHCR physics validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve different test zones, Cores 7 to 18, have been studied to date in the Phase II program of LWHCR physics experiments at the PROTEUS zero-power facility. This paper reviews the test lattice configurations investigated, the types of integral measurements carried out, experimental techniques and accuracies, the transferability of results to LWHCR design, as also typical comparisons with calculations based on standard LWR methods. It has been shown that the experimental data base provided is broad - in terms of both high converter design characteristics represented and the types of integral data measured. Thus, the experimental program covers changes in moderation ratio (lattice geometry) and effective fissile-Pu enrichment - with investigations of neutron balance components, moderator voidage effects, influence of lattice poisoning, relative control rod worths and core heterogeneity effects. The importance of having such a broad data base is illustrated by the trends currently reported for the C/E (calculation/experiment) variation for reaction rate ratios with degree of moderation. (author) 6 tabs., 3 figs., 18 refs

  19. The PROTEUS Phase II experiments as data base for LWHCR physics validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve different test zones, Cores 7 to 18, have been studied to date in the Phase II program of LWCHR physics experiments at the PROTEUS zero-power facility. This paper reviews the test lattice configurations investigated, the types of integral measurements carried out, experimental techniques and accuracies, the transferability of results to LWHCR design, as also typical comparisons with calculations based on standard LWR methods. It has been shown that the experimental data base provided is broad - in terms of both high converter design characteristics represented and the types of integral data measured. Thus, the experimental program covers changes in moderation ratio (lattice geometry) and effective fissile-Pu enrichment - with investigations of neutron balance components, moderator voidage effects, influence of lattice poisoning, relative control rod worths and core heterogeneity effects. The importance of having such a broad data base is illustrated by the trends currently reported for the C/E (calculation/experiment) variation for reaction rate ratios with degree of moderation. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs, 6 tabs

  20. Simulation of TRIGA Mark II Benchmark Experiment using WIMSD4 and CITATION codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a simulation of the TRIGA Mark II Benchmark Experiment, Part I: Steady-State Operation and is part of the calculation methodology validation developed to the neutronic calculation of the CDTN's TRIGA IPR - R1 reactor. A version of the WIMSD4, obtained in the Centro de Tecnologia Nuclear, in Cuba, was used in the cells calculation. In the core calculations was adopted the diffusion code CITATION. Was adopted a 3D representation of the core and the calculations were carried out at two energy groups. Many of the experiments were simulated, including, Keff, control rods reactivity worth, fuel elements reactivity worth distribution and the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient. The comparison of the obtained results, with the experimental results, shows differences in the range of the accuracy of the measurements, to the control rods worth and fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, or on an acceptable range, following the literature, to the Keff and fuel elements reactivity worth distribution and the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient. The comparison of the obtained results, with the experimental. results, shows differences in the range of the accuracy of the measurements, to the control rods worth and fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, or in an acceptable range, following the literature, to the Keff and fuel elements reactivity worth distribution. (author)

  1. RF Cell Modeling and Experiments for Wakefield Minimization in DARHT-II

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, S D; Nelson, Scott D.; Vella, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Electron beams of linear induction accelerators experience deflective forces caused by RF fields building up as a result of accelerating cavities of finite size. These forces can significantly effect the beam when a long linac composed of identical cells is assembled. Recent techniques in computational modeling, simulation, and experiments for 20 MeV DARHT-II (Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test) accelerator cells were found to reduce the wakefield impedance of the cells from 800 ohms/meter to 350 ohms/meter and experimental results confirm the results of the modeling efforts. Increased performance of the cell was obtained through a parametric study of the accelerator structure, materials, material tuning, and geometry. As a result of this effort, it was found that thickness-tuned ferrite produced a 50% deduction in the wakefield impedance in the low frequency band and was easily tunable based on the material thickness. It was also found that shaped metal sections allow for high-Q resonances to be de-tun...

  2. Search for solar axions with the X-ray telescope of the CAST experiment (phase II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CAST (CERN Solar Axion Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside a transverse magnetic field. So far, no solar axionsignal has been detected, but a new upper limit could be given (CAST Phase I). Since 2005, CAST entered in its second phase where it operates with a buffer gas (4He) in the conversion region to extend the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axionmasses. For the first time it is possible to enter the theoretically favored axion massrange and to give an upper limit for this solar axion mass-range (>0.02 eV). This thesis is about the analysis of the X-ray telescope data Phase II with 4He inside the magnet. The result for the coupling constant of axions to photons is: gαγγ-10 GeV-1 (95%C.L.) for ma=0.02-0.4 eV. (2) This result is better than any result that has been given before in this mass range for solar axions. (orig.)

  3. Imaging radar observations of Farley Buneman waves during the JOULE II experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Vector electric fields and associated E×B drifts measured by a sounding rocket in the auroral zone during the NASA JOULE II experiment in January 2007, are compared with coherent scatter spectra measured by a 30 MHz radar imager in a common volume. Radar imaging permits precise collocation of the spectra with the background electric field. The Doppler shifts and spectral widths appear to be governed by the cosine and sine of the convection flow angle, respectively, and also proportional to the presumptive ion acoustic speed. The neutral wind also contributes to the Doppler shifts. These findings are consistent with those from the JOULE I experiment and also with recent numerical simulations of Farley Buneman waves and instabilities carried out by Oppenheim et al. (2008. Simple linear analysis of the waves offers some insights into the spectral moments. A formula relating the spectral width to the flow angle, ion acoustic speed, and other ionospheric parameters is derived.

  4. Outstanding in the Field II: Citizen Science Experiences for Middle Schools in Northeast Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case Hanks, A. T.; Bhattacharjee, J.; Clark, L.; Pugh, A.

    2012-12-01

    In order to prepare middle school teachers for the next generation sciences standards and the new common core, the University of Louisiana at Monroe (ULM) Colleges of Arts and Sciences and Education and Human Development launched the Outstanding in the Field II program. Through the creation of a mesonet with the weather stations at middle school sites, this project aims to foster and enrich the experience of teacher/student-collected data while logging the data into a larger scientific database, producing citizen scientists. By empowering students and teachers to actively participate in 'real science', they generate data to be analyzed from both the physical and life science perspective and thus, highlight the next generation science standards and core disciplinary ideas. This project also promotes collaboration between the life and physical sciences while highlighting scientific practices and cross-cutting concepts within science and literacy. To ensure the successful implementation of the program, faculty and will provide several follow-up workshops during the academic year. These workshops will focus on the common core connections of math and literacy as well as ways in which the project can be supported at each site through face-to-face observations and online collaborations. This year-long program began with a field intensive workshop in July 2012 and enrolled 30 6th, 7th, and 8th science teachers from the Northeast region of Louisiana to provide a genuine scientific experience that would be taken back and applied within the classroom. By becoming students, teachers began by collecting data in the field and establishing and refining the intricate connection between real- world experiments and science taught in classrooms. . They returned to the ULM campus to build and deploy weather stations. Teachers were then tasked with the development of a plan to install the weather station and collect data at their school site with emphasis on implementation within their

  5. Silicon strip tracking detector development and prototyping for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, S.

    2016-07-01

    In about ten years from now, the Phase-II upgrade of the LHC will be carried out. Due to increased luminosity, a severe radiation dose and high particle rates will occur for the experiments. In consequence, several detector components will have to be upgraded. In the ATLAS experiment, the current inner detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracking detector with the goal of at least delivering the present detector performance also in the harsh Phase-II LHC conditions. This report presents the current planning and results from first prototype measurements of the upgrade silicon strip tracking detector.

  6. Comprehensive diagnostic set for intense lithium ion hohlraum experiments on PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the comprehensive diagnostic package developed at Sandia National Laboratories for intense lithium ion hohlraum target experiments on PBFA II will be presented. This package contains an extensive suite of x-ray spectral and imaging diagnostics that enable measurements of target radiation smoothing, hydro-motion, and temperature. The x-ray diagnostics include time-integrated and time-resolved pinhole cameras, energy-resolved 1-D streaked imaging diagnostics that enable measurements of target radiation smoothing, hydro-motion, and temperature. The x-ray diagnostics include time-integrated and time-resolved pinhole cameras, energy-resolved 1-D streaked imaging diagnostics, time-integrated and time-resolved grazing incidence spectrographs, a transmission grating spectrography, an elliptical crystal spectrograph, a bolometer array, an eleven element x-ray diode (XRD) array, and an eleven element PIN diode detector array. A hohlraum temperature measurement technique under development is a shock breakout diagnostic that measures the radiation pressure at the hohlraum wall. The incident Li beam symmetry and an estimate of incident Li beam power density are measured from ion beam-induced characteristic x-ray line and neutron emissions. An attempt to measure the Li beam intensity directly on target used Rutherford scattered ions into an ion movie camera and a magnetic spectrograph. The philosophy used in designing all the diagnostics in the set has emphasized redundant and independent measurements of fundamental physical quantities relevant to the performance of the target. Details of each diagnostic, its integration, data reduction procedures, and recent PBFA-II data will be discussed

  7. Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueck, Jan; /KARLSRUHE U., EKP

    2009-07-01

    The standard model of elementary particle physics (SM) predicts, besides the top-quark pair production via the strong interaction, also the electroweak production of single top-quarks [19]. Up to now, the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton-collider is the only place to produce and study top quarks emerging from hadron-hadron-collisions. Top quarks were directly observed in 1995 during the Tevatron Run I at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.8 TeV simultaneously by the CDF and D0 Collaborations via the strong production of top-quark pairs. Run II of the Tevatron data taking period started 2001 at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV after a five year upgrade of the Tevatron accelerator complex and of both experiments. One main component of its physics program is the determination of the properties of the top quark including its electroweak production. Even though Run II is still ongoing, the study of the top quark is already a successful endeavor, confirmed by dozens of publications from both Tevatron experiments. A comprehensive review of top-quark physics can be found in reference. The reasons for searching for single top-quark production are compelling. As the electroweak top-quark production proceeds via a Wtb vertex, it provides the unique opportunity of the direct measurement of the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}|, which is expected to be |V{sub tb}| {approx} 1 in the SM. Significant deviations from unity could be an indication of a fourth quark generation, a production mode via flavor-changing neutral currents, and other new phenomena, respectively. There are two dominating electroweak top-quark production modes at the Fermilab Tevatron: the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson striking a b quark and the s-channel production of a timelike W boson via the fusion of two quarks. In proton-antiproton-collisions the third electroweak production mode, the associated Wt production of an on-shell W boson in conjunction with a top quark has a comparatively negligible small

  8. AMIDAS-II: Upgrade of the AMIDAS Package and Website for Direct Dark Matter Detection Experiments and Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, Chung-Lin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we give a detailed user's guide to the AMIDAS (A Model-Independent Data Analysis System) (package and) website, which is developed for online simulations and data analyses for direct Dark Matter detection experiments and phenomenology. Recently, the whole (AMIDAS package and website) system has been upgraded to the second phase: AMIDAS-II, for including the new developed Bayesian analysis technique. AMIDAS(-II) has the ability to do full Monte Carlo simulations as well as to analyze (real/pseudo-) data sets either generated by another event generating programs or recorded in direct DM detection experiments. Moreover, the AMIDAS(-II) package can include several "user-defined" functions into the main code: the (fitting) one-dimensional WIMP velocity distribution function, the nuclear form factors for spin-independent and spin-dependent cross sections, artificial/experimental background spectrum for both of simulation and data analysis procedures, as well as different distribution functions needed...

  9. Toward Reanalysis of the Tight-Pitch HCLWR-PROTEUS Phase II Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Grégory; Vlassopoulos, Efstathios; Hursin, Mathieu; Pautz, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The HCLWR-Proteus Phase II experiments were conducted from 1985 to 1990 in the zero-power reactor Proteus at PSI in Switzerland. The experimental program was dedicated to the physics of high conversion light water reactors and in particular to the measurement of reactor parameters such as reaction rate traverses, spectral indices, absorber reactivity worths and void coefficients. The HCLWR experiments are especially interesting because they generated knowledge in the epithermal range of the neutron flux spectrum, for which little integral experimental data is available. In an effort to assess the interest of this experimental data to validate modern nuclear data and improve their uncertainties, a preliminary re-analysis of selected configurations was conducted with Monte-Carlo codes (MCNP6/SERPENT2) and modern nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and JENDL-4.0). The spectral ndices, flux spectra and sensitivity coefficients on k∞ were calculated using cell models representative of the tight-pitch measurement configurations containing 11% PuO2-UO2 fuel rods in different moderation conditions (air, water and dowtherm). Spectral index predictions using the three nuclear data libraries agreed within two standard deviations with the measured values. The only exception is the Pu-242-capture-to-Pu-239-fission ratio, which was overestimated with all libraries by more than four standard deviations, i.e. 13%, in the non-moderated configuration. In this configuration, Pu-242 captures are few since the flux spectrum in the Pu-242 capture resonance region (between 1eV and 1keV) is small making this spectral index hard to measure. Sensitivity coefficient predictions with both MCNP6 and SERPENT2 were in good agreement.

  10. Optical link card design for the phase II upgrade of TileCal experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio, F; Ferrer, A; Gonzalez, V; Higon, E; Marin, C; Moreno, P; Sanchis, E; Solans, C; Valero, A; Valls, J

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an optical link card developed in the frame of the R&D activities for the phase 2 upgrade of the TileCal experiment. This board, that is part of the evaluation of different technologies for the final choice in the next years, is designed as a mezzanine that can work independently or be plugged in the optical multiplexer board of the TileCal backend electronics. It includes two SNAP 12 optical connectors able to transmit and receive up to 75 Gb/s and one SFP optical connector for lower speeds and compatibility with existing hardware as the read out driver. All processing is done in a Stratix II GX field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Details are given on the hardware design, including signal and power integrity ana lysis, needed when working with these high data rates and on firmware development to obtain the best performance of the FPGA signal transceivers and for the use of the GBT protocol.

  11. Operational Experience with the TRIGA Mark II Reactor of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (LENA) is an Interdepartmental Research Centre of the University of Pavia which operates a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II Research Nuclear Reactor, a Cyclotron for the production of radioisotopes and other irradiation facilities. The reactor is in operation since 1965 and many home-made upgrading were realized in the past years in order to assure a continuous operation of the reactor for the future. The annual reactor operational time at nominal power is in the range of 300 - 400 hours depending upon the time schedule of some experiments and research activities. The reactor is mainly used for NAA activities, BNCT research, samples irradiation and training. In specific, few tens of hours of reactor operation per year are dedicated to training courses for University students and for professionals. Besides, the LENA Centre hosts every year more than one thousand high school students in visit. Lately, LENA was certified ISO 9001:2008 for the ''operation and maintenance of the reactor'' and for the ''design and delivery of the irradiation service''. Nowadays the reactor shows a good technical state and, at the moment, there are no political or economical reason to consider the reactor shut-down. (author)

  12. Utilization and operating experience of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimic, V. (J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia))

    1999-12-15

    The operating experience of the 250 kW TRIGA Mark-II reactor of the J. Stefan Institute in Ljubljana, Slovenia in the years 1996 and 1997 is reported. The reactor has been in operation without long undesired shut-down. In 1996 the production of energy was 401 MWh (around 1600 hours in operation) and there was 7 unplanned shut-downs because of electricity broke down. In 1997 the production of energy was 272 MWh (around 1090 hours in operation). In 1991 and 1997 the reactor was almost completely reconstructed and upgraded. The reconstruction consisted mainly of replacing the grid plates, the control rod mechanisms and the control unit. Recently, the new PC based system was adopted and developed to collect the operational radiation data of the reactor. The new wiring of the electric power system, part of the primary and secondary coolant system piping and the spent fuel storage pool have been modified and the new air-exchange system in the control room were installed. Because of this large reconstruction of the reactor, for the last years in the operation of the reactor no significant problems have been detected. The facility is expected to operate without major investment at least until 2006. The reactor has been utilized in the projects: Neutron activation analysis, Boron neutron capture therapy, Real time neutron radiography, Neutron tomography, and Dosimetry research. The activities of neutron activation analysis, neutron radiography and tomography as well as boron neutron capture therapy are shortly presented

  13. Operational Experience with the TRIGA Mark II Reactor of the University of Pavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tigliole, A. Borio Di; Alloni, D.; Cagnazzo, M.; Coniglio, M.; Lana, F.; Losi, A.; Magrotti, G.; Manera, S.; Marchetti, F.; Pappalardo, P.; Prata, M.; Provasi, M.C.; Salvini, A.; Scian, G.; Vinciguerra, G. [University of Pavia, Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (L.E.N.A), Via Aselli 41, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (LENA) is an Interdepartmental Research Centre of the University of Pavia which operates a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II Research Nuclear Reactor, a Cyclotron for the production of radioisotopes and other irradiation facilities. The reactor is in operation since 1965 and many home-made upgrading were realized in the past years in order to assure a continuous operation of the reactor for the future. The annual reactor operational time at nominal power is in the range of 300 - 400 hours depending upon the time schedule of some experiments and research activities. The reactor is mainly used for NAA activities, BNCT research, samples irradiation and training. In specific, few tens of hours of reactor operation per year are dedicated to training courses for University students and for professionals. Besides, the LENA Centre hosts every year more than one thousand high school students in visit. Lately, LENA was certified ISO 9001:2008 for the ''operation and maintenance of the reactor'' and for the ''design and delivery of the irradiation service''. Nowadays the reactor shows a good technical state and, at the moment, there are no political or economical reason to consider the reactor shut-down. (author)

  14. Utilization and operating experience of the 250 kw TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its 35th year, the TRIGA Mark II 250 kW pulsing research reactor in Ljubljana is continuing its busy operation. With the maximum neutron flux in the central thimble of 10 13 n/cm 2 sec and many sample radiation positions the reactor has been used to perform many experiments in the following fields: solid state physics (elastic and inelastic neutron scattering), neutron dosimetry, neutron radiography, reactor physics including burn up measurements and calculations, boron neutron capture therapy and neutron activation analysis which represents one of the major usage of our reactor. Besides these, applied research around the reactor has been conducted, such as doping of silicon monocrystals, a routine production of various radioactive isotopes for industry ( 60Co, 64Zn, 24Na, 82Br) and medical use ( 18F, 99m Tc, etc.) and other activities. During the past decade the reactor was almost completely reconstructed (new grid plates, the control mechanisms and the control unit, modification of the spent fuel storage pool, etc). The main novelty in the reactor physics and operation features of the reactor was the installation of a pulse rod, therefore the reactor can be operated in a pulse mode. After reconstruction, the core was loaded with fresh 20% enriched fuel elements. In 1999 all spent fuel elements were shipped to the USA. (author)

  15. Utilization and operating experience of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operating experience of the 250 kW TRIGA Mark-II reactor of the J. Stefan Institute in Ljubljana, Slovenia in the years 1996 and 1997 is reported. The reactor has been in operation without long undesired shut-down. In 1996 the production of energy was 401 MWh (around 1600 hours in operation) and there was 7 unplanned shut-downs because of electricity broke down. In 1997 the production of energy was 272 MWh (around 1090 hours in operation). In 1991 and 1997 the reactor was almost completely reconstructed and upgraded. The reconstruction consisted mainly of replacing the grid plates, the control rod mechanisms and the control unit. Recently, the new PC based system was adopted and developed to collect the operational radiation data of the reactor. The new wiring of the electric power system, part of the primary and secondary coolant system piping and the spent fuel storage pool have been modified and the new air-exchange system in the control room were installed. Because of this large reconstruction of the reactor, for the last years in the operation of the reactor no significant problems have been detected. The facility is expected to operate without major investment at least until 2006. The reactor has been utilized in the projects: Neutron activation analysis, Boron neutron capture therapy, Real time neutron radiography, Neutron tomography, and Dosimetry research. The activities of neutron activation analysis, neutron radiography and tomography as well as boron neutron capture therapy are shortly presented

  16. EDELWEISS-II, direct Dark Matter search experiment: first data analysis and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    relies in the measurement of nuclear recoils that produce measurable effects in the crystal such ionization and heat. My PhD thesis is organized as follows. The first chapter aims to provide an introduction to the theoretical framework and the scientific motivation for the following work. The nature of DM has been one of the most challenging topics in contemporary physics since the first evidences of its existence had been found in the 1930's. Cosmologists and astrophysicists on one side, together with particle theorists on the other have put a lot of effort into this field: I will briefly account for their achievements and for the experimental strategies which can be set in this scenario. Since this thesis work was carried out within the EDELWEISS-II direct dark matter experiment, I will focus the next chapter on this topic, describing the main features. The second chapter is related to the set-up of the EDELWEISS-II, the current stage of the EDELWEISS experiment necessary after a first phase that achieved the best upper limit on the WIMP elastic scattering on nucleon as a function of WIMP mass in 2004. The set-up was conceived to reduce radioactive background observed in the first experiment phase. Thus, describing the starting point for this second stage, I will present detectors involved in, with a peculiar regard to the Ge-NTD type, the same implied in EDELWEISS-I, on which I have focused my thesis work. In the third chapter the performed Ge-NTD analysis chain is presented. Starting with the signal processing of the recorded data, I will enter in the essential analysis steps from calibration signals passing through measurements of thresholds and resolutions in order to predict nuclear and electronic recoil band and definition of fiducial zone to conclude determining a selection for likely WIMP candidate. These suggestions are applied in the fourth chapter, which presents the analysis and the results of the 8. cool down that takes places from November 2007 to March

  17. Operation experience with the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) has been operating since September 14, 1986. The reactor is used for radioisotope production (131I, 99mTc, 46Sc), various R and D activities and manpower training. The reactor has been operated successfully since it's commissioning with the exception of a few reportable incidents. Of these, the decay tank leakage incident of 1997 is considered to be the most significant one. As a result of this incident, reactor operation at full power under forced-convection mode remained suspended for about 4 years. During that time, the reactor was operated at a power level of 250 kW so as to carry out experiments that require lower neutron flux. This was made possible by establishing a temporary by pass connection across the decay tank using local technology. The other incident was the contamination of the Dry Central Thimble (DCT) that took place in March 2002 when a pyrex vial containing 50 g of TeO2 powder got melted inside the DCT. The vial was melted due to high heat generation on its surface while the reactor was operated for 8 hours at 3 MW for trial production of Iodine-131 (131I). A Wet Central Thimble (WCT) was used to replace the damaged DCT in June 2002 such that the reactor operation could be resumed. The WCT was again replaced by a new DCT in June 2003 such that radioisotope production could be continued. A total of 873 irradiation requests (IRs) have been catered for different reactor uses. Out of these, 114 IRs were for radioisotope (RI) production and 759 IRs for different experiments. The total amount of RI produced stands at about 2100 GBq. The total amount of burn-up-fuel is about 6158 MWh. Efforts are on to undertake an ADP project so as to convert the analog console and I and C system of the reactor into digital one. The paper summarizes the reactor operation experiences focusing on troubleshooting, rectification, modification, RI production, various R and D activities

  18. One Model Explains DAMA/LIBRA, CoGENT, CDMS, and XENON

    CERN Document Server

    Ralston, John P

    2010-01-01

    Many experiments seek dark matter by detecting relatively low energy nuclear recoils. Yet since events from ordinary physics with energies in the 1-100 KeV range are commonplace, all claims of signals or their absence hinge on exhaustive calibrations and background rejection. We document many curious and consistent discrepancies between the backgrounds which neutrons can produce versus the picture of neutrons and claims of neutron calibration found in dark matter literature. Much of the actual physics of neutrons is either under-recognized or under-reported, opening up new interpretations of current data. All signals seen so far, including those presented tentatively such as CoGENT, or the bold claims and time dependence of DAMA/LIBRA, appear to be consistent with neutron-induced backgrounds. At the same time it is the burden of proof of experimental groups to support their claims no possible background could matter, not ours. The existing hypotheses about backgrounds stated by experiments, accepted at face v...

  19. Electroweak production of the top quark in the Run II of the D0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Benoit

    2006-04-01

    The work exposed in this thesis deals with the search for electroweak production of top quark (single top) in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This production mode has not been observed yet. Analyzed data have been collected during the Run II of the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 370 pb{sup -1}. In the Standard Model, the decay of a top quark always produce a high momentum bottom quark. Therefore bottom quark jets identification plays a major role in this analysis. The large lifetime of b hadrons and the subsequent large impact parameters relative to the interaction vertex of charged particle tracks are used to tag bottom quark jets. Impact parameters of tracks attached to a jet are converted into the probability for the jet to originate from the primary vertex. This algorithm has a 45% tagging efficiency for a 0.5% mistag rate. Two processes (s and t channels) dominate single top production with slightly different final states. The searched signature consists in 2 to 4 jets with at least one bottom quark jet, one charged lepton (electron or muon) and missing energy accounting for a neutrino. This final state is background dominated and multivariate techniques are needed to separate the signal from the two main backgrounds: associated production of a W boson and jets and top quarks pair production. The achieved sensitivity is not enough to reach observation and we computed upper limits at the 95% confidence level at 5 pb (s-channel) and 4.3 pb (t-channel) on single top production cross-sections.

  20. Operation experience and maintenance at the TRIGA Mark II L.E.N.A. reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II reactor of the University of Pavia was operated in the last two years on a routine basis, mostly for neutron activation analysis purposes. Moreover the reactor was completely shutdown in the first six months of this year to allow the dismantling of the NADIR experimental setup. The paper presents: - Reactor operation from July 1990 to June 1992; - Reactor users in the time period January 1990 - December 1991; - Specific activities of some radionuclides in the filling materials; - Specific activity of some radionuclides in thermal column materials. Operations related to dismantling of NADIR experimental facility are described. Finally the new thermal column configuration is presented. Starting from the end inside the reactor tank, a graphite layer (35 cm thick) was positioned, followed by a bismuth layer (10 cm thick) to reduce gamma-ray intensity. The old graphite rods were then positioned leaving in the central part, on the equatorial plane of the thermal column, a cavity whose vertical section has 40 cm width and 20 cm height. The bottom of the cavity, towards to the reactor tank, has been lined with additional layers of graphite (10 cm), bismuth (10 cm) and again graphite (1 cm). The new configuration allowed new experiments to be performed. The cavity in the central part has been created to allow the irradiation of large biological samples such as experimental animal and human livers. This is a peculiar step in a neutron capture boron therapy project to be carried out at the University of Pavia. In order to avoid an implemented 41Ar production in the void space between shutters and the thermal column outer end, the external surface of the thermal column has been coated with boral sheets. The neutron flux profile, both thermal and epithermal, and cadmium ratio for gold are shown. The flux distribution appears to be adequate to proceed with the neutron capture boron therapy experiment. The LENA Health Physics Service has checked all phases of

  1. Contamination of Dark Matter Experiments from Atmospheric Magnetic Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, A; Sánchez-Lucas, P; Setzer, N

    2013-01-01

    Dark matter collisions with heavy nuclei (Xe, Ge, Si, Na) may produce recoils observable at direct-search experiments. Given that some of these experiments are yielding conflicting information, however, it is worth asking if physics other than dark matter may produce similar nuclear recoils. We examine under what conditions an atmospherically-produced neutral particle with a relatively large magnetic dipole moment could fake a dark matter signal. We argue that a very definite flux could explain the signals seen at DAMA/LIBRA, CDMS/Si and CoGeNT consistently with the bounds from XENON100 and CDMS/Ge. To explore the plausibility of this scenario, we discuss a concrete model with 10-50 MeV sterile neutrinos that was recently proposed to explain the LSND and MiniBooNE anomalies.

  2. Investigation of Co(II) sorption on GMZ bentonite from aqueous solutions by batch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a local bentonite from Gaomiaozi county (Inner Mongolia, China) was converted to Na-bentonite and was characterized by FTIR and XRD to determine its chemical constituents and micro-structure. The removal of cobalt from aqueous solutions by Na-bentonite was investigated as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions and temperature by batch technique under ambient conditions. The results indicated that the sorption of Co(II) was strongly dependent on pH. At low pH, the sorption of Co(II) was dominated by outer-sphere surface complexation or ion exchange whereas inner-sphere surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism at high pH. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and D-R models were used to simulate the sorption isotherms of Co(II) at the temperatures of 293.15, 313.15 and 333.15 K, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG0, ΔS0, ΔH0) of Co(II) sorption on GMZ bentonite calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms indicated that the sorption of Co(II) on GMZ bentonite was an exothermic and spontaneous process. The Na-bentonite is a suitable material for the preconcentration and solidification of Co(II) from aqueous solutions. (author)

  3. Preparation of a N-Heterocyclic Carbene Nickel(II) Complex: Synthetic Experiments in Current Organic and Organometallic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritleng, Vincent; Brenner, Eric; Chetcuti, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    A four-part experiment that leads to the synthesis of a cyclopentadienyl chloro-nickel(II) complex bearing a N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand is presented. In the first part, the preparation of 1,3-bis-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazolium chloride (IMes[middle dot]HCl) in a one-pot procedure by reaction of 2,4,6-trimethylaniline with…

  4. A LabVIEW-Based Remotely Controllable and Accesible Laboratory Platform for Communication Systems II Lecture Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Akar, Aynur; Yayla, Ayse; ERDER, Berkay

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a remotely accessible and controllable communication systems laboratory model is designed for the undergraduate Electronics and Communication Engineering Education. This laboratory model is designed by using LabVIEW program as real time and virtual for Communication Systems II lecture laboratory applications  that contain Convolutional Codes, Viterbi Decoding Algorithm Method, phase shift keying modulated / demodulated schemes and system performance experiments. ...

  5. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000 kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4 -8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear , plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes

  6. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  7. Dissociative experiences in bipolar disorder II: Are they related to childhood trauma and obsessive-compulsive symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Eryilmaz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of dissociative symptoms and whether they are related to childhood trauma and obsessive-compulsive symptoms in bipolar disorder type II (BD-II. Methods Thirty-three euthymic patients (HDRS<8, YMRS<5 and 50 healthy subjects were evaluated by SCID-I and SCID-NP. We excluded all first and second-axis comorbidities. All patients and healthy subjects were examined with the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-53, and Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder scale (Y-BOCS. Results In pairwise comparisons between the BD-II and control groups, the total CTQ, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, DES, and total Y-BOCS scores in the BD-II group were significantly higher than those in the control group (p < 0.05. There were five cases with DES scores over 30 (15.2% and one case (2% in the control group. DES was weakly correlated with total CTQ and Y-BOCS in patients diagnosed with BD-II (r = 0.278, p < 0.05 and r = 0.217, p < 0.05, respectively. While there was no correlation between total CTQ and Y-BOCS, the CTQ sexual abuse subscale was found to be related to Y-BOCS (r = 0.330, p < 0.05. Discussion These results suggest that there is a relation between childhood traumas and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, or that dissociative symptoms are more associated with anxiety than obsessive symptoms, which prevents the increase of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in BD-II.

  8. Considerations for advanced reactor design based on EBR-II experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term success of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) provides several insights into fundamental characteristics and design features of a nuclear generating station that enhance safety, operability, and maintainability. Some of these same characteristics, together with other features, offer the potential for operational lifetimes well beyond the current licensing time frame, and improved reliability that could potentially reduce amortized capital costs as well as overall operation and maintenance costs if incorporated into advanced plant designs. These features and characteristics are described and the associated benefits are discussed

  9. Grid-generated He II turbulence in a finite channel - experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present experimental data on decaying turbulence, generated by towing a grid through a stationary sample of He II. We describe in detail the experimental apparatus and physical principles that allow observation of up to six orders of magnitude of decaying vortex line density over three orders of magnitude in time using the second sound attenuation technique. (orig.)

  10. Operation experience of the UE44 fixed gap APPLE II at SLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All soft x-ray beamlines at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) are served with variable polarization from APPLE II [1] type and electromagnetic undulators. Three APPLE II type undulators are used: a twin and a single standard APPLE II (UE56 and UE54) and a fixed gap APPLE II (UE44) which follows the adjustable-phase undulator approach by R. Carr [2], [3]. The demand to rotate the linear polarization vector from 0 – 180° required all four magnet arrays to be shiftable. This opened the possibility to also vary the energy by a suitable shift of the magnet arrays with a simplified support structure lacking in any gap drive system [4], [5]. The current photon beam quality in linear and circular mode and the pros and cons of the operation of the UE44 will be discussed, namely the underestimated influence of gradients in the complex field distribution. As a consequence the spectra are degraded, but can be recovered by use of distributed coils or by a simple change in the operation mode.

  11. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in top-antitop quark production with the CDF II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, Julia; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-12-01

    The Fermi National Laboratory (Fermilab) operates the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, the is therefore the only collider which is today able to produce the heaviest known particle, the top quark. The top quark was discovered at the Tevatron by the CDF and D0 collaborations in 1995. At the Tevatron, most top quarks are produced via the strong interaction, whereby quark-antiquark annihilation dominates with 85%, and gluon fusion contributes with 15%. Considering next-to-leading order (NLO) contributions in the cross section of top-antitop quark production, leads to a slight positive asymmetry in the differential distribution of the production angle {alpha} of the top quarks. This asymmetry is due to the interference of certain NLO contributions. The charge asymmetry A in the cosine of {alpha} is predicted [14] to amount to 4-6%. Information about the partonic rest frame, necessary for a measurement of A in the observable cos {alpha}, is not accessible in the experiment. Thus, they use the rapidity difference of the top and the antitop quark as sensitive variable. This quantity offers the advantage of Lorentz invariance and is uniquely correlated with the cosine of {alpha}, justifying the choice of the rapidity difference to describe the behavior of cos {alpha}. In preparation for a measurement of the charge asymmetry, they conduct several Monte Carlo based studies concerning the effect of different event selection criteria on the asymmetry in the selected event samples. They observe a strong dependence of the measured asymmetry on the number of required jets in the particular event sample. This motivates further studies to understand the influence of additional gluon radiation, which leads to more than four observed jets in an event, on the rapidity distribution of the produced top quarks. They find, that events containing hard gluon radiation are correlated with a strong negative shift of the rapidity

  12. Current drive experiments in the helicity injected torus (HIT-II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Helicity Injected Torus [HIT-II: T. Jarboe et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1807 (1998)] is a low-aspect-ratio tokamak capable of both inductive (ohmic) and Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) current drive. HIT-II is modest in size (major radius R=0.3 m, minor radius a=0.2 m, and on-axis toroidal field of up to 0.5 T), but has demonstrated 200 kA of toroidal plasma current, using either CHI or induction separately. The loop voltage, boundary flux, and plasma equilibrium are controlled by a real-time flux feedback system. HIT-II ohmic plasmas exhibit reconnection events during both the current ramp-up and decay, events that relax the current profile while conserving the magnetic helicity. A new operating regime for CHI plasmas, using a double-null divertor (DND) boundary flux, has been explored. DND CHI plasmas exhibit good shot-to-shot reproducibility, low impurity content, minimal shorting current in the absorber region, and EFIT-reconstructed equilibria consistent with significant closed-flux core regions [EFIT: L. Lao et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1611 (1985)]. HIT-II DND CHI discharges also exhibit a continuous n=1 mode at the outer midplane, a mode that has been correlated experimentally with current-profile relaxation. A detailed explanation of helicity injection current drive has been developed, which is consistent with experimental observations of HIT and HIT-II discharges. According to this mechanism, asymmetric distortion of the n=1 mode structure generates current drive in the core plasma by dynamo action, relaxing the CHI-driven current profile

  13. Study of the Nucleon Spin Structure by the Drell–Yan Process in the COMPASS-II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Quaresma, M

    2012-01-01

    The Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) and the spin structure of the nucleon are important topics studied by the COMPASS experiment. The Drell–Yan (DY) process will be used in the future COMPASS-II measurements to access the Transverse Momentum Dependent PDFs (TMD PDFs). Studying the angular distributions of dimuons from the DY reactions with a negative pion beam with 190 GeV/c momentum and a transversely polarised proton target, we will be able to extract the azimuthal spin asymmetries and to access the various TMD PDFs, such as Sivers and Boer–Mulders functions. The start of the COMPASS DY experiment is scheduled for 2014. Three beam tests have been already performed, one of them in 2009 using a prototype hadron absorber downstream of the target, to understand the background reduction factors and the spectrometer response, and also to verify our results from Monte Carlo simulations. COMPASS aims at performing the first DY experiment with a transversely polarised target.

  14. Operational-safety advantages of LMFBR's: the EBR-II experience and testing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackett, J.I.; Lindsay, R.W.; Golden, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    LMFBR's contain many inherent characteristics that simplify control and improve operating safety and reliability. The EBR-II design is such that good advantage was taken of these characteristics, resulting in a vary favorable operating history and allowing for a program of off-normal testing to further demonstrate the safe response of LMFBR's to upsets. The experience already gained, and that expected from the future testing program, will contribute to further development of design and safety criteria for LMFBR's. Inherently safe characteristics are emphasized and include natural convective flow for decay heat removal, minimal need for emergency power and a large negative reactivity feedback coefficient. These characteristics at EBR-II allow for ready application of computer diagnosis and control to demonstrate their effectiveness in response to simulated plant accidents. This latter testing objective is an important part in improvements in the man-machine interface. (MMI)

  15. CP Violation in τ Decays at SuperB and Belle II Experiments – like Finding Signs of Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BaBar has found ACP(τ−→νKSπ−[≥π0])=(−0.36±0.23±0.11)% with 2.8 σ difference with SM prediction ACP(τ−→νKSπ−)=(0.36±0.01)% based on K0−K¯0 oscillation. Four central points: (i) to establish both the ‘existence’ of New Dynamics (ND) and its ‘features’ in local CP asymmetries; (ii) to increase the number of final states to be probed; (iii) to emphasize correlations of CP violations between different final states; (iv) likewise for the correlations with D± final states. These measurements should be possible at SuperB and Belle II experiments

  16. Safety implications from 20 years of operating experience at EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackett, J.I.; Buschman, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    EBR-II recently passed a major milestone in its operating history, 20 years of operation on August 13, 1984. The plant has gone through three major program phases during this time and is now entering a fourth. Those are: (1) demonstration of the feasibility of a complete LMFBR power plant, including on-site reprocessing of metal fuel, (2) irradiation testing of fuels and materials to support core and fuel design for CRBR and FFTF, (3) operational-safety testing to establish and demonstrate the inherent safety of LMFBRs and now, (4) the integration of this technology into demonstration of the integral fast reactor (IFR) concept. As EBR-II has progressed through these phases, much has been learned that is relevant to fast-reactor safety.

  17. Online monitoring for the CDF Run II experiment and the remote operation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Fabiani, D.; /INFN, Pisa; Hirschbuehl, D.; /Karlsruhe U.; Ikado, K.; /Waseda U.; Kubo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Kusakabe, Y.; /Waseda U.; Maeshima, K.; /UCLA; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; /Waseda U.; Plager, C.; /UCLA; Schmidt, E.; /Fermilab /INFN, Pisa /Karlsruhe U.

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of the CDF Run II online event monitoring framework, placed well before the physics runs start, allowed to develop coherent monitoring software across all the different subsystems which consequently made maintenance and operation simple and efficient. Only one shift person is needed to monitor the entire CDF detector, including the trigger system. High data quality check is assured in real time and well defined monitoring results are propagated coherently to offline datasets used for physics analyzes. We describe the CDF Run II online event monitoring system and operation, with emphasis on the remote monitoring shift operation started since November 2006 with Pisa-INFN as pilot Institution and exploiting the WEB based access to the data.

  18. Experience with Phase II insertion devices in the x-ray ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, G.; Galayda, J.; Krinsky, S.; Solomon, L.

    1989-01-01

    The installation of Phase II insertion devices in the NSLS x-ray ring was completed in February 1989, when the hybrid wiggler magnet (HBW) for beam line X21 and the superconducting wiggler (SCW) for beam line X17 were installed. Prior to this time, the soft x-ray undulator (SXU) and X1, another hybrid wiggler at X25, and the ten period mini-undulator at X13 had been installed. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Operating experience of the EBR-II intermediate heat exchanger and the steam generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) is an experimental liquid metal fast breeder reactor located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It consists of an unmoderated, heterogeneous, sodium-cooled reactor with a nominal thermal power output of 62.5 MW; an intermediate closed loop of secondary sodium coolant; and a steam plant that produces 20 MW of electrical power through a conventional turbine generator. The EBR-II heat transport system continues to operate satisfactorily after 18 years. This represents about 89,000 hours of steaming, which results in a total integrated thermal power production of about 215,000 MWd. In this time, the steam generator has experienced over 580 plant startups and 349 reactor scrams. The plant capacity factor for the past five years has been in excess of 70%, and in fact has averaged almost 60% over the last thirteen years. This excellent record is partly attributable to the trouble-free operation of the steam generator which, aside from an initial construction tube-to-tubesheet weld defect, has had a plant availability of 100%

  20. Over Twenty Years Of Experience In ITU TRIGA MARK-II Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I.T.U. TRIGA MARK-II Training and Research Reactor, rated at 250 kW steady-state and 1200 MW pulsing power is the only research and training reactor owned and operated by a university in Turkey. Reactor has been operating since March 11, 1979; therefore the reactor has been operating successfully for more than twenty years. Over the twenty years of operation: - The tangential beam tube was equipped with a neutron radiography facility, which consists of a divergent collimator and exposure room; - A computerized data acquisition system was designed and installed such that all parameters of the reactor, which are observed from the console, could be monitored both in normal and pulse operations; - An electrical power calibration system was built for the thermal power calibration of the reactor; - Publications related with I.T.U. TRIGA MARK-II Training and Research Reactor are listed in Appendix; - Two majors undesired shutdown occurred; - The I.T.U. TRIGA MARK-II Training and Research Reactor is still in operation at the moment. (authors)

  1. A One-Pot Self-Assembly Reaction to Prepare a Supramolecular Palladium(II) Cyclometalated Complex: An Undergraduate Organometallic Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Alberto; Lopez-Torres, Margarita; Fernandez, Jesus J.; Vazquez-Garcia, Digna; Vila, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for students in advanced inorganic chemistry is described. Students prepare palladium(II) cyclometalated complexes. A terdentate [C,N,O] Schiff base ligand is doubly deprotonated upon reaction with palladium(II) acetate in a self-assembly process to give a palladacycle with a characteristic tetranuclear structure. This…

  2. Reliability of the TJ-II Power Supply System: collection and analysis of the operational experience data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effort to develop a fusion specific component reliability database is being carried out by international organizations such as EURATOM and the International Energy Agency (IAE). Moreover, several fusion related devices are involved in the collection of operational experience. In this frame, TJ-II is performing a reliability assessment of its main systems initiating the evaluation process with the Power Supply System (PSS). The PSS has been chosen because it is one of the most critical systems in TJ-II. During a TJ-II pulse, the provision of magnetic fields requires a total amount of power of almost 50 MW. Such amount of power is supplied by the national grid and a 140 MVA flywheel generator (100 MJ, 15 kV 100 Hz). Since the TJ-II loads require direct current, a set of thyristor converters, transformers and circuit breakers for each coil system are being used. Power requirements range from 5 kA (100 V) to 32 kA (1000 V). Also the heating systems (ECRH and NBI) load the PSS with additional 15 MVA. Failure data of these main components and components from auxiliary systems (rectifiers cooling, uninterrupted power supply system, control system ...) have been collected from PSS operation notes and personnel interviewing. Data related to general operation, campaign schedules, and maintenance have been collected from TJ-II engineering annotations, TJ-II web based electronic-board and TJ-II campaign archives. A database with date, time, pulse number, failure description, failure mode and other related information has been implemented. Failures and malfunctions in the PSS have been identified and processed, including information on failure modes and, where possible, causes of the failures. About 1700 failures and malfunctions have been identified in the period May 1998 - Dec 2004 (1309 of them in operational days and 381 during tests or maintenance task). Most malfunctions come from spurious signals over the circuit breaker and from the generation system. Main

  3. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments with the monochromatic imaging mode of the RITA-II spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Lefmann, Kim; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech;

    2006-01-01

    Recently a monochromatic multiple data taking mode has been demonstrated for diffraction experiments using a RITA type cold neutron spectrometer with a multi-bladed analyser and a position-sensitive detector. Here, we show how this mode can be used in combination with a flexible radial collimator...... to perform real inelastic neutron scattering experiments. We present the results from inelastic powder, single crystal dispersion and single crystal constant energy mapping experiments. The advantages and complications of performing these experiments are discussed along with a comparison between the...... imaging mode and the traditional monochromatic focussing mode....

  4. Cognitive Experiences Reported by Borderline Patients and Axis II Comparison Subjects: A 16-year Prospective Follow-up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Wedig, Michelle M.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study assesses three main types of cognition: nonpsychotic thought (odd thinking, unusual perceptual experiences, and non-delusional paranoia), quasi-psychotic thought, and true-psychotic thought in borderline patients followed prospectively for 16 years. It also compares the rates of these disturbed cognitions to those reported by axis II comparison subjects. Method The cognitive experiences of 362 inpatients—290 borderline patients and 72 axis II comparison subjects—were assessed at study entry using the cognitive section of the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines. Their cognitive experiences were reassessed every two years using the same interview. Results Each of the five main types of thought studied was reported by a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients than axis II comparison subjects over time. Each of these types of thought, except true-psychotic thought, declined significantly over time for those in both groups. Eleven of the 17 more specific forms of thought studied were also reported by a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients over the years of follow-up: magical thinking, overvalued ideas, recurrent illusions, depersonalization, derealization, undue suspiciousness, ideas of reference, other paranoid ideation, quasi-psychotic delusions, quasi-psychotic hallucinations, and true-psychotic hallucinations. Fourteen specific forms of thought were found to decline significantly over time for those in both groups: all forms of thought mentioned above except true-psychotic hallucinations plus marked superstitiousness, sixth sense, telepathy, and clairvoyance. Conclusions Disturbed cognitions are common among borderline patients and distinguishing for the disorder. They also decline substantially over time but remain a problem, particularly those of a nonpsychotic nature. PMID:23558452

  5. Title: Development of Single photon Quantum Optical Experiments using Type-I and Type-II Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugharn, Andrew; Maleki, Seyfollah

    We constructed a quantum optical apparatus to control and detect single photons. We generated these photons via Type-I and Type-II spontaneous parametric down conversion by pumping a GaN laser (405nm) incident on a BBO crystal. We detected the two down converted photons (810nm), denoted signal and idler, in coincidence so as to measure and control single photons. We implemented a coincidence counting unite onto an Altera DE2 board and used LabView for data acquisition. We used these photon pairs to demonstrate quantum entanglement and indistinguishability using multiple optical experiments.

  6. An FPGA-based trigger for the phase II of the MEG experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, A.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Morsani, F.; Nicolò, D.; Ritt, S.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    For the phase II of MEG, we are going to develop a combined trigger and DAQ system. Here we focus on the former side, which operates an on-line reconstruction of detector signals and event selection within 450 μs from event occurrence. Trigger concentrator boards (TCB) are under development to gather data from different crates, each connected to a set of detector channels, to accomplish higher-level algorithms to issue a trigger in the case of a candidate signal event. We describe the major features of the new system, in comparison with phase I, as well as its performances in terms of selection efficiency and background rejection.

  7. Experiment TGV II: results on double electron capture in {sup 106}Cd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cermak, P; Benes, P; Stekl, I [IEAP CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Briancon, C [CSNSM Orsay (France); Brudanin, V B; Egorov, V G; Gusev, K N; Klimenko, A A; Kovalenko, V E; Kovalik, A; Rukhadze, N I; Salamatin, A V; Timkin, V V; Vylov, T [JINR Dubna (Russian Federation); Simkovic, F [CU Bratislave (Slovakia)], E-mail: Pavel.Cermak@utef.cvut.cz

    2008-06-15

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of {sup 106}Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of {sup 106}Cd enriched to 75%. In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture in {sup 106}Cd as 2.0x10{sup 20}y. The new limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  8. Experiment TGV II: results on double electron capture in 106Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of 106Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of 106Cd enriched to 75%. In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture in 106Cd as 2.0x1020y. The new limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published

  9. Experiment TGV II: results on double electron capture in 106Cd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, P.; Benes, P.; Briançon, C.; Brudanin, V. B.; Egorov, V. G.; Gusev, K. N.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalik, A.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Simkovic, F.; Stekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, T.

    2008-06-01

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of 106Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of 106Cd enriched to 75%. In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture in 106Cd as 2.0x1020y. The new limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  10. Operation experiences of the Kartini reactor using Bandung Triga Mark II spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operating history and improvements of the Kartini research reactor are presented. The Kartini reactor is operated during office hours: 5 days a week and 6-7 hours a day, except in particular cases. For 15 years since 1979 the Kartini reactor has been operated using spent fuels and used core from the Bandung Triga Mark II. Since 1994, however the Kartini reactor has been operated using the 104 SS type of fuel elements. Several difficulties and anomalies were encountered during its operation. A brief explanation of the maintenance, quality control and quality assurance programme during its operation are also discussed. (orig.)

  11. Operating experience of TRIGA MK-II Research Reactor in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3 MW TRIGA MK II Research Reactor was installed in Bangladesh in 1986. The reactor is being utilized for research, training and for production of radioisotopes. Recently two faults were detected, one in the Emergency Core Cooling System and the other in the Primary Coolant Loop, which hindered the operation of the reactor partially. The faults were investigated by a team of local experts. Results of analyses of possible initiating events of the faults and the remedial steps are briefly discussed in the paper. (author)

  12. Lasers in the Undergraduate Curriculum II: Coursework Experiments and Research Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steehler, Jack K.

    1990-01-01

    Described are 14 experiments that use lasers. Topic areas include physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and biochemistry. Instrumentation and the use of the laser in undergraduate research are discussed. (CW)

  13. Utilizing subcooled, superfluid He-II in the design of a 12-Tesla tandem mirror experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A design study of 12-T yin-yang coils for a conceptual Tandem Mirror Next Step facility has been recently performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Convair Division of General Dynamics. The large magnets have major and mirror radii of 3.7 and 1.5 m, 0.70 x 3.75 m2 cross section, 46.3 MA turns, and an overall current density of 1765 A/cm2, obtained by the use of Nb3Sn and Nb-Ti superconductors. Each coil is composed of several subcoils separated by internal strengthening substructure to react the enormous electromagnetic forces. The size of the yin-yang coils, and hence the current density, was reduced by utilizing subcooled, superfluid He-II at 1.8 K for the coolant. This paper reviews the design study, with emphasis on He-II heat transport and conductor stability. Methods are also presented which allow the extension of Gorter-Mellink-channel calculations to encompass multiple, interconnecting coolant channels

  14. Uncommon Mixed Type I and II Choledochal Cyst: An Indonesian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fransisca J. Siahaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile duct cyst is an uncommon disease worldwide; however, its incidence is remarkably high in Asian population, primarily in children. Nevertheless, the mixed type choledochal cysts are extremely rare especially in adults. A case report of a 20-year-old female with a history of upper abdominal pain that was diagnosed with cholecystitis with stone and who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy is discussed. Choledochal malformation was found intraoperatively. Magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP and USG after first surgery revealed extrahepatic fusiform dilatation of the CBD; therefore, provisional diagnosis of type I choledochal cyst was made. Complete resection of the cyst was performed, and a mixed type I and II choledochal cyst was found intraoperatively. Bile duct reconstruction was carried out with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. The mixed type I and II choledochal cysts are rare in adults, and this is the third adult case that has been reported. The mixed type can be missed on radiology imaging, and diagnosing the anomaly is only possible after a combination of imaging and intraoperative findings. Mixed type choledochal cyst classification should not be added to the existing classification since it does not affect the current operative techniques.

  15. Analysis of pipe flow with free surface. Part II. Theoretical analysis and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Amane; Takaki, Ryuji

    1994-05-01

    Flow field near the front of an incompressible viscous fluid pushed into a circular pipe is analyzed theoretically and observed experimentally. In the theory, an approximated stream function for a steady state near the axis of the pipe is obtained by use of the Stokes equation. In the experiment, the shape of the surface was observed by a video camera. The theoretical velocity profile and the surface shape near the axis coincide with those from computation (Part I) and experiment.

  16. Decaying light particles in the SHiP experiment (II): Signal rate estimates for light neutralinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbunov, D

    2015-01-01

    Considering the supersymmetric models with light neutralino and R-parity violation, we perform estimates of the signal rate expected at the recently proposed fixed target SHiP experiment exploiting CERN SPS beam of 400 GeV protons. We extend the existing studies by introducing new production channels (in particular through the beauty mesons) and decay modes. We also constrain model parameter space from analysis of negative results of the CHARM experiment.

  17. Active optics experiments. II - Measurement of mirror deformation by holographic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Noboru; Mikami, Izumi; Miyawaki, Keizou; Sasaki, Aki; Tabata, Masao

    An active optics experiment was performed to study the feasibility of using an active correction system for the Japanese National Large Telescope (Wilson, 1986). A thin mirror was deformed with an active support mechanism and the mirror surface was measured by a holographic method. The experiment is performed for several cases of excess force distributions assigned at the supporting points. The results show good agreement with predictions from FEM analysis.

  18. Analysis of PROTEUS phase II experiments performed using the AARE modular system and JEF-based libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of the advanced analysis of reactor engineering (AARE) modular code system and JEF-1-based nuclear data libraries to analyze light water high converter reactor (LWHCR) lattices is investigated by calculating the wet and dry cells of the PROTEUS-LWHCR phase II experiment. The results are compared to those obtained using several cell codes. Main features of the AARE code system, such as the self-shielding of resonance cross sections in the whole energy range, the generation of adequate fission source spectra, and the efficiency of the elastic removal correction,are investigated. In particular, it is shown that AARE results for the k ∞ void coefficient agree very well with the experiment, whereas other codes give larger deviations

  19. Simulations of the muon-induced neutron background of the EDELWEISS-II experiment for Dark Matter search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In modern astroparticle physics and cosmology, the nature of Dark Matter is one of the central problems. Particle Dark Matter in form of WIMPs is favoured among many proposed candidates. The EDELWEISS direct Dark Matter search uses Germanium bolometers to detect these particles by nuclear recoils. Here, the use of two signal channels on an event-by-event basis, namely the heat and ionisation signal, enables the detectors to discriminate between electron and nuclear recoils. This technique leaves neutrons in the underground laboratory as the main background for the experiment. Besides (α,n) reactions of natural radioactivity, neutrons are produced in electromagnetic and hadronic showers induced by cosmic ray muons in the surrounding rock and shielding material of the Germanium crystals. To reach high sensitivities, the EDELWEISS-II experiment, as well as other direct Dark Matter searches, has to efficiently suppress this neutron background. The present work is devoted to study the muon-induced neutron flux in the underground laboratory LSM and the interaction rate within the Germanium crystals by using the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4. To ensure reliable results, the implemented physics in the toolkit regarding neutron production is tested in a benchmark geometry and results are compared to experimental data and other simulation codes. Also, the specific energy and angular distribution of the muon flux in the underground laboratory as a consequence of the asymmetric mountain overburden is implemented. A good agreement of the simulated muon flux is shown in a comparison to preliminary experimental data obtained with the EDELWEISS-II muon veto system. Furthermore, within a detailed geometry of the experimental setup, the muon-induced background rate of nuclear recoils in the bolometers is simulated. Coincidences of recoil events in the Germanium with an energy deposit of the muoninduced shower in the plastic scintillators of the veto system are studied to

  20. Simulations of the muon-induced neutron background of the EDELWEISS-II experiment for Dark Matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, O.M.

    2007-12-21

    In modern astroparticle physics and cosmology, the nature of Dark Matter is one of the central problems. Particle Dark Matter in form of WIMPs is favoured among many proposed candidates. The EDELWEISS direct Dark Matter search uses Germanium bolometers to detect these particles by nuclear recoils. Here, the use of two signal channels on an event-by-event basis, namely the heat and ionisation signal, enables the detectors to discriminate between electron and nuclear recoils. This technique leaves neutrons in the underground laboratory as the main background for the experiment. Besides ({alpha},n) reactions of natural radioactivity, neutrons are produced in electromagnetic and hadronic showers induced by cosmic ray muons in the surrounding rock and shielding material of the Germanium crystals. To reach high sensitivities, the EDELWEISS-II experiment, as well as other direct Dark Matter searches, has to efficiently suppress this neutron background. The present work is devoted to study the muon-induced neutron flux in the underground laboratory LSM and the interaction rate within the Germanium crystals by using the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4. To ensure reliable results, the implemented physics in the toolkit regarding neutron production is tested in a benchmark geometry and results are compared to experimental data and other simulation codes. Also, the specific energy and angular distribution of the muon flux in the underground laboratory as a consequence of the asymmetric mountain overburden is implemented. A good agreement of the simulated muon flux is shown in a comparison to preliminary experimental data obtained with the EDELWEISS-II muon veto system. Furthermore, within a detailed geometry of the experimental setup, the muon-induced background rate of nuclear recoils in the bolometers is simulated. Coincidences of recoil events in the Germanium with an energy deposit of the muoninduced shower in the plastic scintillators of the veto system are studied

  1. Benchmark analysis of criticality experiments in the TRIGA mark II using a continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criticality analysis of the TRIGA-II benchmark experiment at the Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MuITR, 100kW) was performed by the three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code (MCNP4A). To minimize errors due to an inexact geometry model, all fresh fuels and control rods as well as vicinity of the core were precisely modeled. Effective multiplication factors (keff) in the initial core critical experiment and in the excess reactivity adjustment for the several fuel-loading patterns as well as the fuel element reactivity worth distributions were used in the validation process of the physical model and neutron cross section data from the ENDF/B-V evaluation. The calculated keff overestimated the experimental data by about 1.0%Δk/k for both the initial core and the several fuel-loading arrangements (fuels or graphite elements were added only to the outer-ring), but the discrepancy increased to 1.8%Δk/k for the some fuel-loading patterns (graphite elements were inserted into the inner-ring). The comparison result of the fuel element worth distribution showed above tendency. All in all, the agreement between the MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values is good, which indicates that the Monte Carlo model is enough to simulate criticality of the TRIGA-II reactor. (author)

  2. Molecular structures, charge distributions, and vibrational analyses of the tetracoordinate Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) bromide complexes of p-toluidine investigated by density functional theory in comparison with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakçı, Tayyibe; Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    The Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) bromide complexes of p-toluidine have been studied with B3LYP calculations by using def2-TZVP basis set at the metal atoms and using def2-TZVP and 6-311G+(d,p) basis sets at the remaining atoms. Both basis set combinations give analogous results, which validate the use of quickly converging 6-311G+(d,p) basis set in future studies. The molecular structures, atomic charge and spin distributions, and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the complexes have been calculated. The Zn, Cd and Hg complexes have been found to have distorted tetrahedral environments around the metal atoms whereas Cu complex has a square planar geometry. The NBO charge analysis have been found more accurate and less misleading compared with the Mulliken scheme. The present vibrational spectra calculations allow accurate assignment of the vibrational bands, which otherwise assigned tentatively in previous experimental-only studies.

  3. Dark Matter Results from First 98.7-day Data of PandaX-II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Andi; Cui, Xiangyi; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yunhua; Fang, Deqing; Fu, Changbo; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Gong, Haowei; Hu, Shouyang; Huang, Xingtao; Ji, Xiangdong; Ju, Yonglin; Lei, Siao; Li, Shaoli; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xinglong; Liang, Hao; Lin, Qing; Liu, Huaxuan; Liu, Jianglai; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Ma, Yugang; Mao, Yajun; Ni, Kaixuan; Ren, Xiangxiang; Schubnell, Michael; Shen, Manbin; Shi, Fang; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jiming; Wang, Meng; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Xuming; Wang, Zhou; Wu, Shiyong; Xiao, Xiang; Xie, Pengwei; Yan, Binbin; Yang, Yong; Yue, Jianfeng; Zeng, Xionghui; Zhang, Hongguang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Huanqiao; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Xiaopeng

    2016-01-01

    We report the WIMP dark matter search results using the first physics-run data of the PandaX-II 500 kg liquid xenon dual-phase time-projection chamber, operating at the China JinPing Underground Laboratory. No dark matter candidate is identified above background. In combination with the data set during the commissioning run, with a total exposure of 3.3$\\times10^4$ kg-day,the most stringent limit to the spin-independent interaction between the ordinary and WIMP dark matter is set for a range of dark matter mass between 3.5 and 1000 GeV/c$^2$. The best upper limit on the scattering cross section is found $2.5\\times 10^{-46}$ cm$^2$ for the WIMP mass 40 GeV/c$^2$ at 90% confidence level.

  4. Ion Bernstein wave heating experiment on JIPPT-II-U device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion Bernstein wave heating is investigated in the JIPPT-II-U tokamak plasma, n-bar sub(o) asymptoticaly equals 1.5 x 1013 cm-3, Tsub(eo) asymptoticaly equals 700 eV, and Tsub(io) = 300 eV for Psub(rf) 1-- 100 kW. In a two-ion-species helium-hydrogen plasma, the third harmonics of helium minority cyclotron resonance (deuterium-like) is heated. The background hydrogen ion temperature monitored by charge-exchange shows a significant rise, ΔTsub(i) 1-- 600 eV, when the helium harmonic resonance layer is placed near the center of the plasma. Typical observed hydrogen ion heating quality factor, ΔTsub(i)/Psub(rf)/n-barsub(o), is 1-- 10 eV/kW/1013cm-3. The dependence of ion heating efficiency on rf power, magnetic field and ion concentration is presented. (author)

  5. Operating experience and maintenance at the TRIGA Mark II LENA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor operation at the Triga Mark II LENA plant, at the University of Pavia, in the past two years has been greatly affected by fulfilment of the new Italian fire prevention act's requirements, by the final red-tape work to get the renewal of the operation licence and by answering to the observations of Inspectors of the Italian Ministry of Labour and Social Security. All personnel was involved in the revision of manuals and prescriptions according to government rules and new ideas on modern nuclear safety. Consequently reactor operation was largely reduced due to works going on in the plant and to the lack of practicability of the Radiochemistry Laboratory. Finally, at the end of May 1990, the Reactor Operation Licence was renewed for the time period 1990-1995 by the Italian Ministry of Industry. (orig.)

  6. Experience with service and maintenance of a TRIGA Mark II reactor after 24 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maintenance work and the inspection program carried out at the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna after more than two decades of reactor operation is described. With the help of a special underwater telescope all surfaces inside the reactor tank were inspected visually and two beam tubes were inspected with an endoscope. A new water purification loop was installed in 1985, which was followed by a new primary coolant circuit in 1986. The reactor bridge was dismantled, all control rod drives were serviced and some components replaced. As a result of this program it was observed that a TRIGA reactor can be serviced, improved and backfitted even after 24 years of operation with minor efforts. (author)

  7. Electronics and mechanics for the Silicon Vertex Detector of the Belle II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irmler, C; Bergauer, T; Friedl, M; Gfall, I; Valentan, M, E-mail: irmler@hephy.oeaw.ac.a [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-12-15

    A major upgrade of the KEK-B factory (Tsukuba, Japan), aiming at a peak luminosity of 8 x 10{sup 35}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, which is 40 times the present value, is foreseen until 2014. Consequently an upgrade of the Belle detector and in particular its Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) is required. We will introduce the concept and prototypes of the full readout chain of the Belle II SVD. Its APV25 based front-end utilizes the Origami chip-on-sensor concept, while the back-end VME system provides online data processing as well as hit time finding using FPGAs. Furthermore, the design of the double-sided silicon detectors and the mechanics will be discussed.

  8. The Quartz-Crystal Microbalance in an Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment II: Measuring Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsionsky, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Various water-alcohol and alcohol-alcohol based experiments are used to demonstrate how the quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) technique is used for measuring the viscosity of a system. The technique is very advantageous, as it is inexpensive and provides digital output.

  9. Solventless and One-Pot Synthesis of Cu(II) Phthalocyanine Complex: A Green Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R. K.; Sharma, Chetna; Sidhwani, Indu Tucker

    2011-01-01

    With the growing awareness of green chemistry, it is increasingly important for students to understand this concept in the context of laboratory experiments. Although microwave-assisted organic synthesis has become a common and invaluable technique in recent years, there have been few procedures published for microwave-assisted inorganic synthesis…

  10. Proton and neutron polarized targets for nucleon-nucleon experiments at SATURNE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A SATURNE polarized target has been used for nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering and transmission experiments for 15 years. The polarized proton target is a 70 cm3 cartridge loaded with Pentanol-2. For polarized neutron target, two cartridges loaded with 6LiD and 6LiH are set in the refrigerator and can be quickly inserted in the beam. First experiments using 6Li products in quasielastic pp or pn analyzing power measurements are compared with the same observables measured in a free nucleon-nucleon scattering using polarized proton targets. Angular distribution as a function of a kinematically conjugate angle and coplanarity in nucleon-nucleon scattering is shown for different targets. (author)

  11. The Outer Tracker Detector of the HERA-B Experiment. Part II: Front-End Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, H

    2005-01-01

    The HERA-B Outer Tracker is a large detector with 112674 drift chamber channels. It is exposed to a particle flux of up to 2x10^5/cm^2/s thus coping with conditions similar to those expected for the LHC experiments. The front-end readout system, based on the ASD-8 chip and a customized TDC chip, is designed to fulfil the requirements on low noise, high sensitivity, rate tolerance, and high integration density. The TDC system is based on an ASIC which digitizes the time in bins of about 0.5 ns within a total of 256 bins. The chip also comprises a pipeline to store data from 128 events which is required for a deadtime-free trigger and data acquisition system. We report on the development, installation, and commissioning of the front-end electronics, including the grounding and noise suppression schemes, and discuss its performance in the HERA-B experiment.

  12. Practical experience with the planning and organization of inspections at Beznau I and II nuclear power stations of North Eastern Switzerland Power Stations Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznau I and II are identical pressurized water reactor power stations each of 350 MW capacity. After every inspection the accummulated experience has been evaluated, so that before each further inspection the objectives could be freshly formulated. The paper reports on experience in carrying out the planned work with foreign firms. (orig.)

  13. Operational Experience, Improvements, and Performance of the CDF Run II Silicon Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Calancha, C; Carron, S.; Cihangir, S.; Corbo, M.; Clark, D.; Di Ruzza, B.; Eusebi, R.; Fernandez, J.P.; Freeman, J.C.; Garcia, J.E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Grinstein, S.; Hartz, M.; Herndon, M.; Hill, C.; Hocker, A.; Husemann, U.; Incandela, J.; Issever, C.; Jindariani, S.; Junk, T.R.; Knoepfel, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M.; Merkel, P; Mondragon, M.N.; Moore, R.; Mumford, J.R.; Nahn, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nelson, T.K.; Pavlicek, V.; Pursley, J.; Redondo, I.; Roser, R.; Schultz, K.; Spalding, J.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; Stuart, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Tesarek, R.; Treptow, K.; Wallny, R.; Worm, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) pursues a broad physics program at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Between Run II commissioning in early 2001 and the end of operations in September 2011, the Tevatron delivered 12 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. Many physics analyses undertaken by CDF require heavy flavor tagging with large charged particle tracking acceptance. To realize these goals, in 2001 CDF installed eight layers of silicon microstrip detectors around its interaction region. These detectors were designed for 2--5 years of operation, radiation doses up to 2 Mrad (0.02 Gy), and were expected to be replaced in 2004. The sensors were not replaced, and the Tevatron run was extended for several years beyond its design, exposing the sensors and electronics to much higher radiation doses than anticipated. In this paper we describe the operational challenges encountered over the past 10 years of running the CDF silicon detectors, the preventive measures undertaken, an...

  14. Creating a universe from thermodynamic thought experiments II -- exploring a basis for structure and force

    CERN Document Server

    Ojo, A

    2006-01-01

    Assuming that the universe is a system obedient to known thermodynamic laws and equations, here we explore whether it is a possibility for the universe to exist and evolve without any cosmic structure or force necessarily emerging within it. From symmetry considerations and the invariance of Boltzmann's constant during the experiment, we infer that it is an inevitable occurrence that structure and force will appear during transformation of the created universe.

  15. Particle transport simulation of lower-hybrid current drive experiments on the Versator II tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.h.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Porkolab, M.

    1987-09-01

    The one-dimensional particle transport equation has been solved numerically to simulate temporal and spatial evolutions of density behavior observed during 800MHz and 2.45GHz LHCD experiments. In order to fit the 800MHz profiles, the inward pinch velocity has to be increased several fold. However, for the 2.45GHz case, the reduction of the diffusive loss near the periphery seems to be needed.

  16. Validation of the Serpent 2 code on TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćalić, Dušan; Žerovnik, Gašper; Trkov, Andrej; Snoj, Luka

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is the development and validation of a 3D computational model of TRIGA research reactor using Serpent 2 code. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental results and to calculations performed with the MCNP code. The results show that the calculated normalized reaction rates and flux distribution within the core are in good agreement with MCNP and experiment, while in the reflector the flux distribution differ up to 3% from the measurements. PMID:26516989

  17. Investigation of the muon-induced background of the EDELWEISS-II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EDELWEISS experiment aims at detecting WIMPs (weakly interactive massive particles) which could possibly amount for all or part of the dark matter in the universe. It measures the energy released by nuclear recoils produced by the elastic collision of a WIMP in an ordinary matter target. Due to the very small interaction cross-section of WIMP with nucleons, which leads to an extremely low expected event rate (R < 250 keV. (author)

  18. Early Pottery Making in Northern Coastal Peru. Part II: Field Firing Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present data from three seasons of experimental field work designed to recreate ancient Andean coastal ceramic firing techniques. Based on the recent discovery of two different archaeological ceramic production sites in the La Leche river valley of northern coastal Peru, the opportunity arose to apply Moessbauer spectroscopy and other analytical methods to reconstruct ancient firing procedures. Two sets of firings took place in 1993 and 1997 in Batan Grande using a partially restored Formative kiln from about 800 BC, local hardwood and cow dung as fuel. A third experiment followed in 2000 after the discovery of a Middle Sican ceramics workshop in use between ca. AD 950 and 1050 at Huaca Sialupe, where an exact replica of an ancient kiln was built from local clay, and fired with local wood and cow dung. Additionally, inverted urns found at Huaca Sialupe were tested for their potential use as furnaces for metal working. Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to compare the physical and chemical state of specimens produced in the field experiments with ancient ceramics and with specimens produced in controlled laboratory experiments.

  19. Early Pottery Making in Northern Coastal Peru. Part II: Field Firing Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, I.; Goldstein, D. [Southern Illinois University (United States); Sosa, J. [Potter in the City of Chulcanas (Peru); Wagner, U. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department E15 (Germany)

    2003-09-15

    We present data from three seasons of experimental field work designed to recreate ancient Andean coastal ceramic firing techniques. Based on the recent discovery of two different archaeological ceramic production sites in the La Leche river valley of northern coastal Peru, the opportunity arose to apply Moessbauer spectroscopy and other analytical methods to reconstruct ancient firing procedures. Two sets of firings took place in 1993 and 1997 in Batan Grande using a partially restored Formative kiln from about 800 BC, local hardwood and cow dung as fuel. A third experiment followed in 2000 after the discovery of a Middle Sican ceramics workshop in use between ca. AD 950 and 1050 at Huaca Sialupe, where an exact replica of an ancient kiln was built from local clay, and fired with local wood and cow dung. Additionally, inverted urns found at Huaca Sialupe were tested for their potential use as furnaces for metal working. Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to compare the physical and chemical state of specimens produced in the field experiments with ancient ceramics and with specimens produced in controlled laboratory experiments.

  20. Lower hybrid current drive experiments on the MIT Alcator C and Versator II tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, S.; McDermott, S.; Porkolab, M.; Takase, Y.; Texter, S.; Bonoli, P.; Fiore, C.; McCool, S.; Mayberry, M.; Chen, K.I.

    1985-08-01

    Energy confinement studies in lower hybrid RF driven discharges at 4.6 GHz have been carried out on the Alcator C tokamak. The electron temperature profile is measured by a five point Thomson scattering system and the ion temperature by charge-exchange analysis. The energy content of the bulk plasma is found to be similar for RF-driven and ohmic discharges of identical current and density. In the parameter range anti n/sub e/ = 3 - 7 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, B = 7 - 11 T, I/sub p/ = 100 - 200 kA, q (a) > 8, the RF power needed to sustain the discharge is significantly greater than the ohmic power required to maintain a similar plasma. The gross energy confinement time is lower in the RF-driven discharges than in the ohmic ones by a factor of 1.5 to 4, depending on plasma conditions. The frequency scaling of the density limit for current drive is reported from the Versator II tokamak. The steady-state current drive density limit of anti n/sub e/ = 6 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/ at 800 MHz. has been raised to a density of at least anti n/sub e/ = 1.0 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ at the same toroidal field by operations at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. Superthermal electron effects during RF injection are observed up to a density of anti n/sub e/ = 2.5 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/.

  1. Photophysics of octabutoxy phthalocyaninato-Ni(II) in toluene: ultrafast experiments and DFT/TDDFT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaratne, Tissa C; Gusev, Alexey V; Peng, Xinzhan; Rosa, Angela; Ricciardi, Giampaolo; Baerends, Evert Jan; Rizzoli, Corrado; Kenney, Malcolm E; Rodgers, Michael A J

    2005-03-17

    Reported herein is a combination of experimental and DFT/TDDFT theoretical investigations of the ground and excited states of 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-Octabutoxyphthalocyaninato-nickel(II), NiPc(BuO)(8), and the dynamics of its deactivation after excitation into the S(1)(pi,pi) state in toluene solution. According to X-ray crystallographic analysis NiPc(BuO)(8) has a highly saddled structure in the solid state. However, DFT studies suggest that in solution the complex is likely to flap from one D(2)(d)-saddled conformation to the opposite one through a D(4)(h)-planar structure. The spectral and kinetic changes for the complex in toluene are understood in terms of the 730 nm excitation light generating a primarily excited S(1) (pi,pi) state that transforms initially into a vibrationally hot (3)(d(z)2,d(x)2(-)(y)2) state. Cooling to the zeroth state is complete after ca. 8 ps. The cold (d,d) state converted to its daughter state, the (3)LMCT (pi,d(x)2(-)(y)2), which itself decays to the ground state with a lifetime of 640 ps. The proposed deactivation mechanism applies to the D(2)(d)-saddled and the D(4)(h)-planar structure as well. The results presented here for NiPc(BuO)(8) suggest that in nickel phthalocyanines the (1,3)LMCT (pi,d(x)2(-)(y)2) states may provide effective routes for radiationless deactivation of the (1,3)(pi,pi) states. PMID:16838978

  2. First experiences in treatment of low-grade glioma grade I and II with proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To retrospectively assess feasibility and toxicity of proton therapy in patients with low-grade glioma (WHO °I/II). Proton beam therapy only administered in 19 patients (median age 29 years; 9 female, 10 male) for low-grade glioma between 2010 and 2011 was reviewed. In 6 cases proton therapy was performed due to tumor progression after biopsy, in 8 cases each due to tumor progression after (partial-) resection, and in 5 cases due to tumor progression after chemotherapy. Median total dose applied was 54 GyE (range, 48,6-54 GyE) in single fractions of median 1.8 GyE. Median clinical target volume was 99 cc (range, 6–463 cc) and treated using median 2 beams (range, 1–2). Proton therapy was finished as planned in all cases. At end of proton therapy, 13 patients showed focal alopecia, 6 patients reported mild fatigue, one patient with temporal tumor localization concentration deficits and speech errors and one more patient deficits in short-term memory. Four patients did not report any side effects. During follow-up, one patient presented with pseudo-progression showing worsening of general condition and brain edema 1–2 months after last irradiation and restitution after 6 months. In the present MR imaging (median follow-up 5 months; range 0–22 months) 12 patients had stable disease, 2 (1) patients partial (complete) remission, one more patient pseudo-progression (differential diagnosis: tumor progression) 4 weeks after irradiation without having had further follow-up imaging so far, and one patient tumor progression approximately 9 months after irradiation. Regarding early side effects, mild alopecia was the predominant finding. The rate of alopecia seems to be due to large treatment volumes as well as the anatomical locations of the target volumes and might be avoided by using multiple beams and the gantry in the future. Further evaluations including neuropsychological testing are in preparation

  3. Plant growth during the greenhouse II experiment on the Mir orbital station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 m2 growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (3, then 4 of 6 lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 °C), and sometimes excessive substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 d, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the U.S. Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experimental procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 d in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible.

  4. A New Chicane Experiment In PEP-II to Test Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Effect for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings, and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of future colliders [1-3]. The effect is expected to be particularly severe in magnetic field regions. To test possible mitigation methods in magnetic fields, we have installed a new 4-dipole chicane experiment in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) at SLAC with both bare and TiN-coated aluminum chambers. In particular, we have observed a large variation of the electron flux at the chamber wall as a function of the chicane dipole field. We infer this is a new high order resonance effect where the energy gained by the electrons in the positron beam depends on the phase of the electron cyclotron motion with respect to the bunch crossing, leading to a modulation of the secondary electron production. Presumably the cloud density is modulated as well and this resonance effect could be used to reduce its magnitude in future colliders. We present the experimental results obtained during January 2008 until the April final shut-down of the PEP-II machine

  5. First results for the measurement of double-electron capture of 106Cd in the experiment TGV II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štekl, I.; Čermák, P.; Beneš, P.; Brudanin, V. B.; Gusev, K. N.; Egorov, V. G.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalík, A.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Briançon, Ch.; Šimkovic, F.

    2006-05-01

    Present status of the experiment TGV II which is devoted to the measurement of double-beta decay of 106Cd is given. The low background spectrometer TGV II is installed in the Modane Underground Laboratory and has been running from February 2005 with approx 10 grams of 106Cd enriched at 75%. After an analysis of 3736 hours of experimental data the new improved half-life limit for 2νEC/EC decay of 106Cd (0 g.s. + → 0 g.s. + ) is given as T 1 2/2ν > 4.8 × 1019 years (90% CL). The search for 2νEC/EC decay of 106Cd to the excited states of 106Pd allows to determine the limits of the half-lives T 1 2/2ν (0 g.s. + → 2 1 + ) > 3.9 × 1019 years (90% CL) and T 1 2/2ν (0 g.s. + → 0 1 + ) > 5.8 × 1019 years (90% CL).

  6. Complete Photoionization Experiments via Ultrafast Coherent Control with Polarization Multiplexing II: Numerics & Analysis Methodologies

    CERN Document Server

    Hockett, P; Lux, C; Baumert, T

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of complete photoionization experiments, in which the full set of photoionization matrix elements are determined, using multiphoton ionization schemes with polarization-shaped pulses has recently been demonstrated [Hockett et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 223001 (2014)]. Here we extend on our previous work to discuss further details of the numerics and analysis methodology utilised, and compare the results directly to new tomographic photoelectron measurements, which provide a more sensitive test of the validity of the results. In so doing we discuss in detail the physics of the photoionziation process, and suggest various avenues and prospects for this coherent multiplexing methodology.

  7. The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment II: Autonomous Platforms and Mixed Layer Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. M.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Perry, M.; Fennel, K.; Gray, A.; Rehm, E.; Briggs, N.; Sackmann, B. S.; Gudmundsson, K.

    2008-12-01

    The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment (NAB08) employed a system of drifting floats, mobile gliders and ship-based measurements to resolve patch-scale physical and biological variability over the 3- month course of an entire bloom. Although both autonomous and ship-based elements were essential to achieving NAB08 goals, the autonomous system provided a novel perspective by employing long-range gliders to repeatedly survey the volume surrounding a drifting Lagrangian float, thus characterizing patch- scale bloom evolution. Integration of physical and biogeochemical sensors (temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence, light transmission, optical backscatter, spectral light, and nitrate) and development of in situ calibration techniques were required to support this new autonomous approach. Energetic, small-scale eddy activity at the experiment site (southeast of Iceland, near the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study and Marine Light Mixed Layer sites) produced a swift, heterogeneous velocity field that challenged the gliders" operational abilities and drove refinements to the piloting techniques used to maintain float-following surveys. Although intentionally deployed outside of energetic eddies, floats and gliders were rapidly entrained into these features. Floats circulated within eddies near the start and end of the experiment, drifting generally northwest, across the basin, in-between. An eddy sampled late in the deployment provided particularly interesting signatures, with elevated biological signals manifest consistently in one quadrant. As measurements were collected in a parcel-following Lagrangian frame, this suggests energetic small-scale exchange process (such as vertical or lateral mixing) paired with fast-acting biological processes capable of modifying the newly entrained water as it navigates its path around the eddy. Despite this energetic kilometer-scale heterogeneity, broadly distributed platforms appeared to

  8. Malaria and World War II: German malaria experiments 1939-45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, W U; Vondra, H

    2000-06-01

    The epidemiological and pharmacological fight against malaria and German malaria research during the Nazi dictatorship were completely under the spell of war. The Oberkommando des Heeres (German supreme command of the army) suffered the bitter experience of unexpected high losses caused by malaria especially at the Greek front (Metaxes line) but also in southern Russia and in the Ukraine. Hastily raised anti-malaria units tried to teach soldiers how to use the synthetic malaria drugs (Plasmochine, Atebrine) properly. Overdoses of these drugs were numerous during the first half of the war whereas in the second half it soon became clear that it would not be possible to support the army due to insufficient quantities of plasmochine and atebrine. During both running fights and troop withdrawals at all southern and southeastern fronts there was hardly any malaria prophylaxis or treatment. After war and captivity many soldiers returned home to endure heavy malaria attacks. In German industrial (Bayer, IG-Farben) and military malaria laboratories of the Heeres-Sanitäts-Akademie (Army Medical Academy) the situation was characterised by a hasty search for proper dosages of anti-malaria drugs, adequate mechanical and chemical prophylaxis (Petroleum, DDT, and other insecticides) as well as an anti-malaria vaccine. Most importantly, large scale research for proper atebrine and plasmochine dosages was conducted in German concentration camps and mental homes. In Dachau Professor Claus Schilling tested synthetic malaria drugs and injected helpless prisoners with high and sometimes lethal doses. Since the 1920s he had been furiously looking for an anti-malaria vaccine in Italian mental homes and from 1939 he continued his experiments in Dachau. Similar experiments were also performed in Buchenwald and in a psychiatric clinic in Thuringia, where Professor Gerhard Rose tested malaria drugs with mentally ill Russian prisoners of war. Schilling was put to death for his criminal

  9. Spatial clustering of polydisperse inertial particles in turbulence: II. Comparing simulation with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particles that are heavy compared to the fluid in which they are embedded (inertial particles) tend to cluster in turbulent flow, with the degree of clustering depending on the particle Stokes number. The phenomenon is relevant to a variety of multiphase flows, including atmospheric clouds; in most realistic systems, particles have a continuous distribution of sizes and therefore the clustering of ‘polydisperse’ particle populations is of special relevance. In this part of the study, measurements of spatial correlations of particles in high-Reynolds-number turbulence are compared with the results of a direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulence. The experimentally derived radial distribution functions (RDFs) exhibit a pronounced scale break at approximately 10–30 times the Kolmogorov scale, with large-scale clustering arising from ‘scalar mixing’ of the droplet field, and smaller-scale clustering depending on the particle Stokes numbers. A procedure is outlined for isolating the RDF due to inertial clustering from that resulting from large-scale mixing. Reasonable agreement between the experiment and the direct numerical simulations (DNS) is obtained for St ≲ 0.3 when particle Stokes number distributions in the DNS match those existing in the experiments. The experimental RDFs are consistent with the flattening or saturation scale appearing for bidisperse particles, but as in the companion paper, also support the ‘saturation’ effect in the asymmetric response of the power-law slope. The evidence for a universal scale break, as observed in both the DNS and the experiments, suggests that the pre-factor in the theoretical expression for the RDF is inherently tied to the power-law exponent, and an empirical form for this is given. Finally, no strong influence of the turbulence Reynolds number was observed for the clustering phenomenon. The consistency between the carefully analyzed DNS and experiments, in terms of St dependence, dissipation

  10. Utilization of the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana. Thirty years of experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its 30th year, the TRIGA Mark II 250 kW pulsing reactor is continuing its busy operation. With the maximum neutron flux in the central thimble of 1.1013 n/cm2 sec and many sample radiation positions the reactor has been used for a number of sophisticated experiments in the following fields: solid state physics (elastic and inelastic scattering of neutrons), neutron dosimetry, neutron radiography, reactor physics including nuclear burn up measurements and calculations and neutron activation analysis which represents one of the major usage of our reactor. Besides these, applied research around the reactor has been conducted, such as dopping of silicon monocrystals, a routine production of various radioactive isotopes for industry and medical use (18F,99mTc). At the Nuclear Training Centre the TRIGA reactor is the main teaching equipment. This training centre can fulfil the training requirements of the first Slovenian Nuclear Power Plant Krsko. (orig.)

  11. On the momentum re-distribution via turbulence in fusion plasmas: Experiments in JET and TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms underlying the generation of plasma flows play a crucial role to understand transport in magnetically confined plasmas. The amplitude of measured parallel flow is significantly larger than those resulting from simulations. Recent experiments have pointed out the possible influence of turbulence to explain flows in the plasma boundary region. This paper reports the first experimental evidence of significant radial gradients in the cross-correlation between parallel and radial fluctuating velocities near the LCFS in JET tokamak and TJ-II stellarator. These gradients are mainly due to the radial variations in the level of poloidal electric field fluctuations and in the cross-phase coherence. These findings might provide the underlying physics of spontaneous toroidal rotation and large parallel flows in plasma boundary reported in fusion plasmas. (author)

  12. Force unfolding kinetics of RNA using optical tweezers. II. Modeling experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Manosas, M; Li, P T X; Smith, S B; Bustamante, C; Tinoco, I; Ritort, F

    2007-01-01

    By exerting mechanical force it is possible to unfold/refold RNA molecules one at a time. In a small range of forces, an RNA molecule can hop between the folded and the unfolded state with force-dependent kinetic rates. Here, we introduce a mesoscopic model to analyze the hopping kinetics of RNA hairpins in an optical tweezers setup. The model includes different elements of the experimental setup (beads, handles and RNA sequence) and limitations of the instrument (time lag of the force-feedback mechanism and finite bandwidth of data acquisition). We investigated the influence of the instrument on the measured hopping rates. Results from the model are in good agreement with the experiments reported in the companion article (1). The comparison between theory and experiments allowed us to infer the values of the intrinsic molecular rates of the RNA hairpin alone and to search for the optimal experimental conditions to do the measurements. We conclude that long handles and soft laser traps represent the best cond...

  13. First experiences in treatment of low-grade glioma grade I and II with proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauswald Henrik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To retrospectively assess feasibility and toxicity of proton therapy in patients with low-grade glioma (WHO °I/II. Patients and methods Proton beam therapy only administered in 19 patients (median age 29 years; 9 female, 10 male for low-grade glioma between 2010 and 2011 was reviewed. In 6 cases proton therapy was performed due to tumor progression after biopsy, in 8 cases each due to tumor progression after (partial- resection, and in 5 cases due to tumor progression after chemotherapy. Median total dose applied was 54 GyE (range, 48,6-54 GyE in single fractions of median 1.8 GyE. Median clinical target volume was 99 cc (range, 6–463 cc and treated using median 2 beams (range, 1–2. Results Proton therapy was finished as planned in all cases. At end of proton therapy, 13 patients showed focal alopecia, 6 patients reported mild fatigue, one patient with temporal tumor localization concentration deficits and speech errors and one more patient deficits in short-term memory. Four patients did not report any side effects. During follow-up, one patient presented with pseudo-progression showing worsening of general condition and brain edema 1–2 months after last irradiation and restitution after 6 months. In the present MR imaging (median follow-up 5 months; range 0–22 months 12 patients had stable disease, 2 (1 patients partial (complete remission, one more patient pseudo-progression (differential diagnosis: tumor progression 4 weeks after irradiation without having had further follow-up imaging so far, and one patient tumor progression approximately 9 months after irradiation. Conclusion Regarding early side effects, mild alopecia was the predominant finding. The rate of alopecia seems to be due to large treatment volumes as well as the anatomical locations of the target volumes and might be avoided by using multiple beams and the gantry in the future. Further evaluations including neuropsychological testing are in

  14. Search for solar axions with the X-ray telescope of the CAST experiment (phase II); Suche nach solaren Axionen mit dem Roentgenteleskop des CAST-Experiments (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordt, Annika

    2009-10-14

    The CAST (CERN Solar Axion Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside a transverse magnetic field. So far, no solar axionsignal has been detected, but a new upper limit could be given (CAST Phase I). Since 2005, CAST entered in its second phase where it operates with a buffer gas ({sup 4}He) in the conversion region to extend the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axionmasses. For the first time it is possible to enter the theoretically favored axion massrange and to give an upper limit for this solar axion mass-range (>0.02 eV). This thesis is about the analysis of the X-ray telescope data Phase II with {sup 4}He inside the magnet. The result for the coupling constant of axions to photons is: g{sub {alpha}}{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}<1.6-6.0 x 10{sup -10} GeV{sup -1} (95%C.L.) for m{sub a}=0.02-0.4 eV. (2) This result is better than any result that has been given before in this mass range for solar axions. (orig.)

  15. The Course of Adult Experiences of Abuse in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and Axis II Comparison Subjects: A 10-Year Follow-Up Study

    OpenAIRE

    McGowan, Amelia; King, Hannah; Frankenburg, Frances F.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    The first objective of this study was to assess the rates of adult experiences of verbal, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse reported by borderline patients and axis II comparison subjects over ten years of prospective follow-up. The second objective was to determine time-to-cessation, recurrence, and new onset of each type of abuse. The Abuse History Interview was administered to 290 borderline patients and 72 axis II comparison subjects at baseline. The AHI Follow-up Version was administ...

  16. Experience with modernization and refurbishment of the Vienna TRIGA Mark II reactor I and C system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The refurbishment of the instrumentation and control (I and C) system of a research reactor is a major task which needs careful planning and taking many aspects into account. At any early planning stage, the future of the facility has to be demonstrated to the national authorities by providing a detailed business plan and the cost of I and C replacement will be compared by financial authorities against the cost of decommissioning the facility. The TRIGA reactor Vienna was modernized in 1992 with a new digital instrumentation and control (I and C) system. The replacement procedure and the reactor-specific modifications to the standard reactor instrumentation offered by the supplier, the operation experience during the past 15 years and a compilation of benefits and other issues to be considered in these procedures (changing from analog to digital I and C system) are summarized in this report. (nevyjel)

  17. Experiences from the design and construction of plug II in the Prototype Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlstroem, Lars-Olof (NCC Teknik (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    The intention with this document is to summarise the comprehensive documentation and experience that was gained during the design and construction of the temporary plugs in the Prototype Repository experiment at Aespoe HRL. The Prototype Repository experiment was designed to in full scale test the engineered barriers and their function, including the plug that separate the deposition tunnel from the temporary access- and transportation tunnels that are at atmospheric pressure. This plug is designed and constructed as a concrete plug with a spherical front side and a flat pressurised side. This report presents the processes and operations that were considered when developing the 'plug', design, construction and verification. In the Prototype Repository the demand of leakage control is very high and the maximum length of the plugs is constrained due to available clearance space, experimental set-up and configuration. Therefore a typical 'friction plug' normally used to block waterways in connection with hydropower plants, is not suitable. Instead a plug constructed as an 'arch plug' with abutments was considered. In order to minimize the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) the abutments, in which the plug is inserted, was excavated by seam drilling with coring technique. The steel formwork was pre-assembled at the ground surface before taken down to the tunnel. The steel was bolted and welded together and crossbars and plywood were mounted on top. Before taken down to the tunnel, the formwork was separated into smaller pieces that were easier to transport down the tunnel but easy to assembly at the Prototype Repository experiment. Before assembling the formwork, a retaining wall was installed to resist the earth and compaction pressure developed from the backfill material. The retaining wall consists of pre-fabricated concrete beams that were installed parallel with the installation of the backfill. Reinforcement was cut and bent at the

  18. Phosphate system as medium for radioactive waste fixation - simplex experiment. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties are described of the solidification product of the system: fission product oxides-Na2O-Fe2O3-P2O5. Sample preparation and analytical methods used are described. The results are shown of calcinate behaviour during melting, of viscosity measurement, of the system crystal forming capacity, of differential thermal analysis, of density measurement, transformation temperature and other dilatometric constants measurement, and microhardness data determination. Specimens containing 30 wt.% of fission product oxides, 60 wt.% of P2O5 and 10 wt.% of Fe2O3 were found to be most suitable for technological experiments. Depending on the composition of actual high-level radioactive wastes, especially on the presence of corrosion products, the amount of Fe2O3 used as an additive could further be reduced. Thus, the vitrification process would be simplified and would only require proportioning a single additive, ie., phosphoric acid. (B.S.)

  19. Experiences from the design and construction of plug II in the Prototype Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intention with this document is to summarise the comprehensive documentation and experience that was gained during the design and construction of the temporary plugs in the Prototype Repository experiment at Aespoe HRL. The Prototype Repository experiment was designed to in full scale test the engineered barriers and their function, including the plug that separate the deposition tunnel from the temporary access- and transportation tunnels that are at atmospheric pressure. This plug is designed and constructed as a concrete plug with a spherical front side and a flat pressurised side. This report presents the processes and operations that were considered when developing the 'plug', design, construction and verification. In the Prototype Repository the demand of leakage control is very high and the maximum length of the plugs is constrained due to available clearance space, experimental set-up and configuration. Therefore a typical 'friction plug' normally used to block waterways in connection with hydropower plants, is not suitable. Instead a plug constructed as an 'arch plug' with abutments was considered. In order to minimize the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) the abutments, in which the plug is inserted, was excavated by seam drilling with coring technique. The steel formwork was pre-assembled at the ground surface before taken down to the tunnel. The steel was bolted and welded together and crossbars and plywood were mounted on top. Before taken down to the tunnel, the formwork was separated into smaller pieces that were easier to transport down the tunnel but easy to assembly at the Prototype Repository experiment. Before assembling the formwork, a retaining wall was installed to resist the earth and compaction pressure developed from the backfill material. The retaining wall consists of pre-fabricated concrete beams that were installed parallel with the installation of the backfill. Reinforcement was cut and bent at the factory and was ready for

  20. Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen-II. Analysis of the discrepancy of theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Various theoretical explanation for the recently observed experimental-theoretical discrepancy in the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift are explored. → These include a dip in the proton form factor slope, nonperturbative vacuum polarization and millicharged virtual particles, as well as process-dependent screening corrections. → Screening corrections may need to be explored further. → The need for an alternative determination of the Rydberg constant is highlighted. - Abstract: Currently, both the g factor measurement of the muon as well as the Lamb shift 2S-2P measurement in muonic hydrogen are in disagreement with theory. Here, we investigate possible theoretical explanations, including proton structure effects and small modifications of the vacuum polarization potential. In particular, we investigate a conceivable small modification of the spectral function of vacuum polarization in between the electron and muon energy scales due to a virtual millicharged particle and due to an unstable vector boson originating from a hidden sector of an extended standard model. We find that a virtual millicharged particle which could explain the muonic Lamb shift discrepancy alters theoretical predictions for the muon anomalous magnetic moment by many standard deviations and therefore is in conflict with experiment. Also, we find no parameterizations of an unstable virtual vector boson which could simultaneously explain both 'muonic' discrepancies without significantly altering theoretical predictions for electronic hydrogen, where theory and experiment currently are in excellent agreement. A process-dependent correction involving electron screening is evaluated to have the right sign and order-of-magnitude to explain the observed effect in muonic hydrogen. Additional experimental evidence from light muonic atoms and ions is needed in order to reach further clarification.

  1. Hoe Creek II field experiment on underground coal gasification, preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiman, W.R.; Thorsness, C.B.; Hill, R.W.; Rozsa, R.B.; Cena, R.; Gregg, D.W.; Stephens, D.R.

    1978-02-27

    A second in-situ coal gasification experiment was performed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory at Hoe Creek in Wyoming. The Linked Vertical Wells scheme for in-situ coal gasification was used. The experiment took 100 days for air flow testing, reverse combustion linking, forward combustion gasification, and post-burn steam flow. Air was used for gasification except for a 2-day test with oxygen and steam. Reverse combustion linking took 14 days at 1.6 m/day. Air requirements for linking were 0.398 Mgmol per meter of link assuming a single direct link. The coal pyrolysed during linking was 17 m/sup 3/, which corresponds to a single link 1.0 m in diameter. There was, however, strong evidence of at least two linkage paths. The detected links stayed below the 3 m level in the 7.6 coal seam; however, the product flow from the forward-burn gasification probably followed the coal-overburden interface not the reverse burn channels at the 3 m level. A total of 232 Mgmols (194 Mscf) of gas was produced with heating value above 125 kJ/mol (140 Btu/scf) for significant time periods and an average of 96 kJ/mol (108 Btu/scf). During the oxygen-steam test the heating value was above 270 kJ/gmol (300 Btu/scf) twice and averaged 235 kJ/gmol (265 Btu/scf). The coal recovery was 1310 m/sup 3/ (1950 ton). Gasification was terminated because of decreasing product quality not because of burn through. The product quality decreased because of increasing underground heat loss.

  2. E-st@r-I experience: Valuable knowledge for improving the e-st@r-II design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpino, S.; Obiols-Rabasa, G.; Mozzillo, R.; Nichele, F.

    2016-04-01

    Many universities all over the world have now established hands-on education programs based on CubeSats. These small and cheap platforms are becoming more and more attractive also for other-than-educational missions, such as technology demonstration, science applications, and Earth observation. This new paradigm requires the development of adequate technology to increase CubeSat performance and mission reliability, because educationally-driven missions have often failed. In 2013 the ESA Education Office launched the Fly Your Satellite! Programme which aims at increasing CubeSat mission reliability through several actions: to improve design implementation, to define best practices for conducting the verification process, and to make the CubeSat community aware of the importance of verification. Within this framework, the CubeSat team at Politecnico di Torino developed the e-st@r-II CubeSat as follow-on of the e-st@r-I satellite, launched in 2012 on the VEGA Maiden Flight. E-st@r-I and e-st@r-II are both 1U satellites with educational and technology demonstration objectives: to give hands-on experience to university students and to test an active attitude determination and control system based on inertial and magnetic measurements with magnetic actuation. This paper describes the know-how gained thanks to the e-st@r-I mission, and how this heritage has been translated into the improvement of the new CubeSat in several areas and lifecycle phases. The CubeSat design has been reviewed to reduce the complexity of the assembly procedure and to deal with possible failures of the on-board computer, for example re-coding the software in the communications subsystem. New procedures have been designed and assessed for the verification campaign accordingly to ECSS rules and with the support of ESA specialists. Different operative modes have been implemented to handle some anomalies observed during the operations of the first satellite. A new version of the on-board software is

  3. A distributed network PCs/Linux system and its application in study of charm physics in BES/BES-II experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the configuration of a small PC-PARM and/or a distributed network clustered Linux PCs system and its application in study of the BES/BES-II charm physics. With the system the authors did a full Monte Carlo study of ψ(3770) D physics which will be carried out in the BES-II experiment. Using the J/ψ data collected with the BES-II at BEPC, the authors studied the stability and reliability of the system, as well as the possibility and capability of the system in the data off-line processing

  4. Recent neutron physical experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments using polarized neutrons and the recently constructed neutron interferometer are described. Polarized neutrons are used for the investigation of magnetic domains. These measurements are based on the depolarizing action of a ferromagnetic material. A substance extensively investigated is DY. Here some interesting features were measured. One is the heavy broadening of the AFM-FM phase transition in polycrystalline material. This is an indication of internal stresses which influence the magnetic energy and thus the phase transition via the magnetostrictive effect. Further, two different phase transition points with raising and lowering temperature and a marked time dependence of the neutron depolarization were observed. A Laue type neutron interferometer was successfully tested. In this interferometer two widely separated coherent neutron beams are obtained by diffraction on an ideal Si-crystal. Putting a phase shifting medium within the two beams causes a characteristic intensity variation behind the interferometer. These intensity oscillations could easily be detected using Al and Bi as phase shifted material. An inhomogeneous magnetic field caused a marked reduction of these oscillations. No intensity oscillations could be observed using an unmagnetized Ni-sample as phase shifter. This is a result of inhomogeneous phase shifts because of the random magnetic domain structure of the sample. (U.S.)

  5. Optical observations on the CRIT-II Critical Ionization Velocity Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rocket borne Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment was carried out from Wallops Island at dusk on May 4, 1989. Two barium shaped charges were released below the solar terminator (to prevent photoionization) at altitudes near 400 km. The ambient ionospheric electron density was 5x105 cm-3. The neutral barium jet was directed upwards and at an angle of nominally 45 degrees to B which gives approximately 3x1023 neutrals with super critical velocity. Ions created by a CIV process in the region of the neutral jet would travel up along B into sunlight where they can be detected optically. Well defined ion clouds (max. brightness 750 R) were observed in both releases. An ionization rate of 0.8%s-1 (125s ionization time constant) can account for the observed ion cloud near the release field line, but the ionization rate falls off with increasing distance from the release. It is concluded that a CIV process was present in the neutral jet out to about 50 km from the release, which is significantly further than allowed by current theories

  6. Optical observations on the CRIT-II Critical Ionization Velocity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Haerendel, G.; Valenzuela, A.

    1990-01-01

    A rocket borne Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV0 experiment was carried out from Wallops Island at dusk on May 4, 1989. Two barium shaped charges were released below the solar terminator (to prevent photoionization) at altitudes near 400 km. The ambient ionospheric electron density was 50,000/cu cm. The neutral barium jet was directed upward and at an angle of nominally 45 degrees to B which gives approximately 3 x 10 to the 23rd neutrals with super critical velocity. Ions created by a CIV process in the region of the neutral jet would travel up along B into sunlight where they can be detected optically. Well defined ion clouds (max. brightness 750 R) were observed in both releases. An ionization rate of 0.8 percent/sec (125 sec ionization time constant) can account for the observed ion cloud near the release field line, but the ionization rate falls off with increasing distance from the release. It is concluded that a CIV process was present in the neutral jet out to about 50 km from the release, which is significantly further than allowed by current theories.

  7. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žagar, Tomaž; Božič, Matjaž; Ravnik, Matjaž

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived (γ emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be 133Ba, 60Co and 152Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. 133Ba, 41Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  8. Early electromagnetic waves from earthquake rupturing: II. validation and numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yongxin; Chen, Xiaofei; Hu, Hengshan; Zhang, Jie

    2013-03-01

    We validate the branch-cut integration (BCI) technique presented in the companion paper. The numerical result shows that the early electromagnetic (EM) signal calculated by the BCI method is in good agreement with that in the full waveform calculated by the real-axis integration method. We further find that to calculate the early EM signal only the integrals along the vertical branch cuts that are around the k0 and kem branch points are needed, whereas neither the integrals along the vertical branch cuts around the Pf(P), S and Ps branch points nor the residues of the poles are necessary. We conduct numerical experiments to analyse the early EM signal generated by an earthquake in a porous half-space, including its component analysis, sensitivities to the conductivity, viscosity and recording depth, and radiation pattern. The component analysis shows that the total early EM (emTotal) signal is not a single wave but a combination of three kinds of EM waves, namely, the direct emd wave radiated from the source, the reflected emr waves converted from the emd wave, the direct P and S waves at the free surface and the critically refracted EM0 waves which are also converted from the emd wave, the direct P and S waves at the free surface. Three pulses, namely, the emd-, P- and S-converted pulses are identified in the emTotal signal according to their different arrival times. The emd-converted pulse arrives immediately after the occurrence of the earthquake and it is a combination of the emd wave, the emr and EM0 waves converted from the emd wave at the free surface. The P-converted (S-converted, respectively) pulse owns an arrival time approximately equal to that spent by the P wave (S wave, respectively) travelling from the hypocentre to the epicentre, and it is a combination of the emr and EM0 waves converted from the P wave (S wave, respectively) at the free surface. The P-converted pulse is usually weaker than the S- and emd-converted pulses in the electrogram and is

  9. Mechanics of Crystal Layering in Magmatic Mush Columns: Fluid Dynamic Experiments-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, J.; Flanagan-Brown, R.; Marsh, B. D.

    2004-05-01

    In a companion report (Part I) we describe results of a series of scaled experiments involving the transmission of slurries of unsorted particles upward through a system of thin horizontal tanks (sills) interconnected by cylindrical conduits. Here we report on more detailed observations on the processes of particle sorting including particle size distribution (PSD) measurements. The apparatus is meant to mimic a Magmatic Mush Column as might be expected beneath major volcanic centers or as is exposed in the Ferrar Dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The underlying premise of these experiments is that well formed, well-sorted modal layering can be produced purely by the mechanical effects of a particle-laden flow moving through a system of a geometry similar to what might be expected in an actual magmatic system. The experimental apparatus consists of a 2-m-vertical stack of sill-like tanks connected by resistive conduits with water as the working fluid and particles with Re nos. that approximate those of real systems. The system is initially filled with water then slowly intruded by a slurry of particle-laden water from an over-pressured tank at the base. The entrained particles may become deposited in the tanks, entrained after deposition, or transported out (erupted) of the system at the top. Flow rate is controlled by monitoring a flow-meter; flow path is controlled with on/off valves placed at each of the conduits; and flow is additionally restricted with check valves of low and high resistance. Flow rates in the system range from 0.25 to 3.5 gal/min. Flow path within any tank can be in-line, with the outflow directly above the inflow, or offset. With an in-line flow path, the initial flow of particles into a sill-tank typically forms a billowing toroid proximal to the flow. Deposits under these conditions form near the inflow in broad, crater-like, moderately sorted, inclined layers. With the inflow and outflow offset, incoming particle slurries

  10. High-affinity dextromethorphan binding sites in guinea pig brain. II. Competition experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craviso, G L; Musacchio, J M

    1983-05-01

    Binding of dextromethorphan (DM) to guinea pig brain is stereoselective, since levomethorphan is 20 times weaker than DM in competing for DM sites. In general, opiate agonists and antagonists as well as their corresponding dextrorotatory isomers are weak competitors for tritiated dextromethorphan ([3H]DM) binding sites and display IC50 values in the micromolar range. In contrast, several non-narcotic, centrally acting antitussives are inhibitory in the nanomolar range (IC50 values for caramiphen, carbetapentane, dimethoxanate, and pipazethate are 25 nM, 9 nM, 41 nM, and 190 nM, respectively). Other antitussives, such as levopropoxyphene, chlophedianol, and fominoben, have poor affinity for DM sites whereas the antitussive noscapine enhances DM binding by increasing the affinity of DM for its central binding sites. Additional competition studies indicate that there is no correlation of DM binding with any of the known or putative neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. DM binding is also not related to tricyclic antidepressant binding sites or biogenic amine uptake sites. However, certain phenothiazine neuroleptics and typical and atypical antidepressants inhibit binding with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Moreover, the anticonvulsant drug diphenylhydantoin enhances DM binding in a manner similar to that of noscapine. Preliminary experiments utilizing acid extracts of brain have not demonstrated the presence of an endogenous ligand for DM sites. The binding characteristics of DM sites studied in rat and mouse brain indicate that the relative potencies of several antitussives to inhibit specific DM binding vary according to species. High-affinity, saturable, and stereoselective [3H]DM binding sites are present in liver homogenates, but several differences have been found for these peripheral binding sites and those described for brain. Although the nature of central DM binding sites is not known, the potent interaction of several classes of centrally

  11. Interactions of carbon nanotubes in a nematic liquid crystal. II. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Hakam; Galerne, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT) colloids with different anchoring conditions are dispersed in pentyl-cyanobiphenyl (5CB), a thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) that exhibits a room-temperature nematic phase. The experiments make use of CNTs treated for strong planar, homeotropic, or Janus anchorings. Observations with a polarizing microscope show that the CNTs placed in a uniform nematic field stabilize parallel or perpendicular to n depending on their anchoring conditions. In the presence of a splay-bend disclination line, they are first attracted toward it and ultimately, they get trapped on it. Their orientation relative to the line is then found to be parallel or perpendicular to it, again depending on the anchoring conditions. When a sufficient number of particles are deposited on a disclination line, they form a micro- or nanonecklace in the shape of a thin thread or of a bottle brush, with the CNTs being oriented parallel or perpendicular to the disclination line according to the anchoring treatment. The system exhibits a rich versatility, even if until now the weak anchorings appear to be difficult to control. In a next step, the necklaces may be glued by means of pyrrole electropolymerization. In this manner, we realize a true materialization of the disclination lines, and we obtain nanowires capable of conducting the electricity in the place of the initial disclinations that just worked as templates. The advantage of the method is that it finally provides nanowires that are automatically connected to predesignated three-dimensional (3D) electrodes. Such a 3D nanowiring could have important applications, as it could allow one to develop electronic circuits in the third dimension. They could thus help with increasing the transistor density per surface unit, although downsizing of integrated circuits will soon be limited to atomic sizes or so. In other words, the predicted limitation to Moore's law could be avoided. For the moment, the nanowires that we obtain

  12. B Flavour Tagging with Artificial Neural Networks for the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Andreas; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2010-01-01

    One of the central questions arising from human curiosity has always been what matter is ultimately made of, with the idea of some kind of elementary building-block dating back to the ancient greek philosophers. Scientific activities of multiple generations have contributed to the current best knowledge about this question, the Standard Model of particle physics. According to it, the world around us is composed of a small number of stable elementary particles: Electrons and two different kinds of quarks, called up and down quarks. Quarks are never observed as free particles, but only as bound states of a quark-antiquark pair (mesons) or of three quarks (baryons), summarized as hadrons. Protons and Neutrons, the constituents forming the nuclei of all chemical elements, are baryons made of up and down quarks. The electron and the electron neutrino - a nearly massless particle without electric charge - belong to a group called leptons. These two quarks and two leptons represent the first generation of elementary particles. There are two other generations of particles, which seem to have similar properties as the first generation except for higher masses, so there are six quarks and six leptons altogether. They were around in large amounts shortly after the beginning of the universe, but today they are only produced in high energetic particle collisions. Properties of particles are described by quantum numbers, for example charge or spin. For every type of particle, a corresponding antiparticle exists with the sign of all charges swapped, but similar properties otherwise. The Standard Model is a very successful theory, describing the properties of all known particles and the interactions between them. Many of its aspects have been tested in various experiments at very high precision. Although none of these experimental tests has shown a significant deviation from the corresponding Standard Model prediction, the theory can not be complete yet: Cosmological aspects like

  13. B Flavour Tagging with Artificial Neural Networks for the CDF II Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the central questions arising from human curiosity has always been what matter is ultimately made of, with the idea of some kind of elementary building-block dating back to the ancient greek philosophers. Scientific activities of multiple generations have contributed to the current best knowledge about this question, the Standard Model of particle physics. According to it, the world around us is composed of a small number of stable elementary particles: Electrons and two different kinds of quarks, called up and down quarks. Quarks are never observed as free particles, but only as bound states of a quark-antiquark pair (mesons) or of three quarks (baryons), summarized as hadrons. Protons and Neutrons, the constituents forming the nuclei of all chemical elements, are baryons made of up and down quarks. The electron and the electron neutrino - a nearly massless particle without electric charge - belong to a group called leptons. These two quarks and two leptons represent the first generation of elementary particles. There are two other generations of particles, which seem to have similar properties as the first generation except for higher masses, so there are six quarks and six leptons altogether. They were around in large amounts shortly after the beginning of the universe, but today they are only produced in high energetic particle collisions. Properties of particles are described by quantum numbers, for example charge or spin. For every type of particle, a corresponding antiparticle exists with the sign of all charges swapped, but similar properties otherwise. The Standard Model is a very successful theory, describing the properties of all known particles and the interactions between them. Many of its aspects have been tested in various experiments at very high precision. Although none of these experimental tests has shown a significant deviation from the corresponding Standard Model prediction, the theory can not be complete yet: Cosmological aspects like

  14. Experience gathered from the transport of a fuel element prototype of the CNA-II (Atucha-II nuclear power plant) type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the needs to materialize the transport of a fuel element prototype of the CNA-II (Atucha-II nuclear power plant) type, under special conditions, from the Fabrication Pilot Plant sited at the Constituyentes Atomic Center and the Ezeiza Atomic Center, for its subsequent analysis at the High Pressure Experimental Loop. The special conditions under which the transport has been made responded to the fact that the prototype presents a fragile adjustment between rods and separators, necessary to be preserved. (Author)

  15. Experiments TGV I (double-beta decay of 48Ca) and TGV II (double-beta decay of 106Cd and 48Ca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štekl, I.; Čermák, P.; Beneš, P.; Brudanin, V. B.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Egorov, V. G.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalík, A.; Salamatin, A. V.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Briancon, Ch.; Šimkovic, F.

    2000-04-01

    Present status of experiments TGV I and TGV II is given. The TGV I collaboration has studied the double-beta decay of 48Ca with a low-background and high sensitivity Ge multi-detector spectrometer TGV (Telescope Germanium Vertical). The preliminary results of years and years (90% CL) for double-beta decay of 48 Ca has been found after the processing of experimental data obtained after 8700 hours of measuring time using approximately 1 gramme of 48Ca. The aim of the experiment TGV II is the development of the experimental methods, construction of spectrometers and measurement of the decay (++, β+/EC, EC/EC) of 106Cd particularly the 2νEC/EC mode. The theoretical description and performance of the TGV II spectrometer are also given.

  16. The Childhood Experience of Being a War Orphan: A Study of the Effects of Father Loss on Women Whose Fathers Were Killed in World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sharon Estill

    2010-01-01

    Asking the research question, "What is the lived experience of women whose fathers died in World War II?" led to awareness of the unexplored impact of war loss on children. It was hypothesized that this research would show that women who experienced father-loss due to war would share commonality in certain areas. Areas of exploration including…

  17. Development and characterization of a time-, position- and energy-resolved x-ray diagnostic for PBFA II target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time-, position- and energy-resolved soft x-ray (100--500 eV) diagnostic is being developed for PBFA II target experiments. The diagnostic provides measurements of hydrodynamic motion and thermal gradients in light-ion fusion targets. A slit-image of the source is imprinted onto thin sheets (20μm) of organic scintillator to create a one-dimensional image. The scintillator light is then proximity-coupled to a linear array of fiber-optics that transports the light to a streak camera that is operated without an intensifier. The streak camera output is recorded on a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera. We are characterizing the spatial and temporal resolutions of the systems. This is done by collecting data from as many as 90 individual fibers and correcting for variations in throughput and the effects of spatial resolution to roughly 5% standard deviation in their relative throughput. Spatial resolution of these systems at the source is approximately 0.4 mm. Timing resolution is nominally 2 ns and it is limited primarily by the scintillator response and dispersion in the 50-m-long fiber array. We describe the measurement techniques and the results of the characterization

  18. First results for the measurement of double-electron capture of 106Cd in the experiment TGV II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present status of the experiment TGV 11 which is devoted to the measurement of double-beta decay of 106Cd is given. The low background spectrometer TGV II is installed in the Modane Underground Laboratory and has been running from February 2005 with approx. 10 grams of 106Cd enriched at 75%. After an analysis of 3736 hours of experimental data the new improved half-life limit for 2νEC/EC decay of 106Cd (0g.s.+ → 0g.s.+) is given as T1/22ν > 4.8 x 1019 years (90% CL). The search for 2νEC/EC decay of 106Cd to the excited states of 106Pb allows to determine the limits of the half-lives T1/22ν (0g.s.+ → 21+) > 3.9 x 1019 years (90% CL) and T1/22ν (0g.s.+ → 01+) > 5.8 x 1019 years (90% CL). (author)

  19. Measuring Solar Doppler Velocities in the He ii 30.38 nm Emission Using the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, P. C.

    2016-08-01

    The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory has provided unprecedented measurements of the solar EUV irradiance at high temporal cadence with good spectral resolution and range since May 2010. The main purpose of EVE was to connect the Sun to the Earth by providing measurements of the EUV irradiance as a driver for space weather and Living With a Star studies, but after launch the instrument has demonstrated the significance of its measurements in contributing to studies looking at the sources of solar variability for pure solar physics purposes. This paper expands upon previous findings that EVE can in fact measure wavelength shifts during solar eruptive events and therefore provide Doppler velocities for plasma at all temperatures throughout the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to hot flaring temperatures. This process is not straightforward as EVE was not designed or optimized for these types of measurements. In this paper we describe the many detailed instrumental characterizations needed to eliminate the optical effects in order to provide an absolute baseline for the Doppler shift studies. An example is given of a solar eruption on 7 September 2011 (SOL2011-09-07), associated with an X1.2 flare, where EVE Doppler analysis shows plasma ejected from the Sun in the He ii 30.38 nm emission at a velocity of almost 120 km s^{-1} along the line-of-sight.

  20. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search low ionization-threshold experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu Thakur, Ritoban [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Over 80 years ago we discovered the presence of Dark Matter in our universe. Endeavors in astronomy and cosmology are in consensus with ever improving precision that Dark Matter constitutes an essential 27% of our universe. The Standard Model of Particle Physics does not provide any answers to the Dark Matter problem. It is imperative that we understand Dark Matter and discover its fundamental nature. This is because, alongside other important factors, Dark Matter is responsible for formation of structure in our universe. The very construct in which we sit is defined by its abundance. The Milky Way galaxy, hence life, wouldn't have formed if small over densities of Dark Matter had not caused sufficient accretion of stellar material. Marvelous experiments have been designed based on basic notions to directly and in-directly study Dark Matter, and the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment has been a pioneer and forerunner in the direct detection field. Generations of the CDMS experiment were designed with advanced scientific upgrades to detect Dark Matter particles of mass O(100) GeV/c2. This mass-scale was set primarily by predictions from Super Symmetry. Around 2013 the canonical SUSY predictions were losing some ground and several observations (rather hints of signals) from various experiments indicated to the possibility of lighter Dark Matter of mass O(10) GeV/c2. While the SuperCDMS experiment was probing the regular parameter space, the CDMSlite experiment was conceived to dedicatedly search for light Dark Matter using a novel technology. "CDMSlite" stands for CDMS - low ionization threshold experiment. Here we utilize a unique electron phonon coupling mechanism to measure ionization generated by scattering of light particles. Typically signals from such low energy recoils would be washed under instrumental noise. In CDMSlite via generation of Luke-Neganov phonons we can detect the small ionization energies, amplified in

  1. SIMMER II analysis of the CAMEL II C6 and C7 experiments (simulated fuel penetration into a primary control assembly)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CAMEL C6 and C7 tests, performed at Argonne National Laboratory, simulated asymmetric midplane fuel injection into a nonvoided fully withdrawn primary control assembly during the meltdown phase of a hypothetical core-disruptive accident in a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor. These tests were modeled with no a priori knowledge of the experimental results using the SIMMER-II code. Subsequent comparison of calculations with experimental results showed good agreement. 21 figures, 3 tables

  2. Dissociative experiences in bipolar disorder II: Are they related to childhood trauma and obsessive-compulsive symptoms?

    OpenAIRE

    Gul Eryilmaz; Sermin Kesebir; Işil Göğcegöz Gül; Eylem Özten; Kayihan Oğuz Karamustafalioğlu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of dissociative symptoms and whether they are related to childhood trauma and obsessive-compulsive symptoms in bipolar disorder type II (BD-II). Methods Thirty-three euthymic patients (HDRS

  3. Search for the Production of Gluinos and Squarks with the CDF II Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lorenzo, Gianluca; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2010-05-01

    b}{sub 1} {yields} b{sub {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}}. The expected signal for direct sbottom pair production is characterized by the presence of two jets of hadrons from the hadronization of the bottom quarks and E=T from the two LSPs in the final state. The events are selected with large E{sub T} and two energetic jets in the final state, and at least one jet is required to be associated with a b quark. The measurements are in good agreement with SM predictions for backgrounds. The results are translated into 95% CL exclusion limits on production cross sections and sbottom and neutralino masses in the given MSSM scenario. Cross sections down to 0.1 pb are excluded for the sbottom mass range considered. Sbottom masses up to 230 GeV/c{sup 2} are excluded at 95% CL for neutralino masses below 70 GeV/c{sup 2}. This analysis increases the previous CDF limit by more than 40 GeV/c{sup 2}. The sensitivity of both the inclusive and the exclusive search is dominated by systematic effects and the results of the two analyses can be considered as conclusive for CDF Run II. With the new energy frontier of the newly commissioned Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, the experience from Tevatron will be of crucial importance in the developing of effective strategies to search for SUSY in the next era of particle physics experiments.

  4. Chemical operational experience with the water/steam-circuit at KNK II; Presentation at the meeting on Experience exchange on operational experience of fast breeder reactors, Karlsruhe/Bensberg/Kalkar, June 18. - 22. 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of sodium cooled reactors depends essentially from the safety and reliability of the sodium heated steam generator. The transition from experimental plants with 12-20 MW electrical power to larger plants with 600 MW (BN-600) or 1200 MW (Superphenix) required the change from modular components to larger and compact steam generators with up to 800 MW. Defects of these large components cause extreme losses in availability of the plant and have to be avoided. In view of this request, a comprehensive test program has been performed at KNK II in addition to the normal control of the water/steam-circuit to compile all operational data on the water and steam side of the sodium heated steam generator. This paper describes the plant and the water/steam-circuit with its mode of operation. The experience with the surveillance and different methods of the conditioning are discussed in detail in this presentation

  5. Resonant production of sleptons in the run I of the DO experiment and identification of electrons in the run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the resonant production of supersymmetric particles smuons and muon sneutrinos. The theoretical framework of this study rests on the model mSUGRA in which 5 parameters are considered: m0, m1/2, tan(β), A0, sign(μ) and one parameter for the violation of the R-parity. 2 analysis methods have been used: the traditional sequential analysis and the neuron network analysis that begins to be largely used in particle physics. This work is based on the experimental data collected during the run I of the experiment DO at the Tevatron (Fermilab, Usa). The value of luminosity is 94 pb-1. The general result is that no more events were detected than predicted by the standard model, so these results can be interpreted as a mean to draw limits for the values of the parameters. For instance values up to 230 GeV and 260 GeV are excluded for m0 and m1/2 respectively if the coupling constant λ211 is worth 0.09, tan(β) = 2, sign(μ) =-1 and A0 = 0. The interpretation can be made in terms of mass and the study shows that relative masses for ν-tildeμ and χ01 of 280 GeV and 112 GeV respectively are excluded with a 95% probability. Another part of this work deals with the identification of electron in the run II, different tools can be used, here the author chose the covariance matrix ( H matrix). (A.C.)

  6. What kinds of ferryl species exist for compound II of chloroperoxidase? A dialog of theory with experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wenzhen; Chen, Hui; Shaik, Sason

    2009-06-01

    QM/MM calculations of Mossbauer parameters lead to assignments of the three isomeric species of CPO-II, "major", "minor", and unassigned "6% species", which were recently observed in experiment and posed two puzzles (Stone, K. L.; Hoffart, L. M.; Behan, R. K.; Krebs, C.; Green, M. T. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 6147). Both the minor and major species were found to be iron(IV)-hydroxides, thus accounting for the observed ratio of their relative yield that is pH-independent. The difference between the minor and major species is a single water molecule that acts as a H-bond acceptor from the ferryl in the minor species (2b) and it is essential to get a good match of the calculated Mossbauer parameters to the experimentally observed ones for the minor species. The major species (2c-2e, 2e-NW) may or may not have a water molecule. The calculations reveal also two candidates for the unassigned 6% species, which are a Por+*FeIIIOH species 2e-Fe(III), without or with a water molecule, or the corresponding aqua complex Por+*FeIIIOH2 3c formed by adding an additional proton to the system. These species have DeltaEQ parameters of the same magnitude but with opposite signs: negative (-2.30 mm/s) for the two 2e-Fe(III) species and positive (2.39 mm/s) for 3c. The above assignments were further consolidated by an extended correlation (Figure 2) between the iron spin density and the DeltaEQ parameters of the species calculated in the present study and by relating DeltaEQ to the d-electronic configuration on iron. A bonding model of the FeO(H) moiety (Figure 3) was used to account for the variation of the spin density and provided further support for the correlation in Figure 2 and the assignment. Experimental determination of the sign of the quadruple parameter will finally confirm the identity of this species. In addition, since 3c possesses an additional proton, its identity can be revealed by pH-dependent yield. All in all, the present paper shows that QM/MM calculations can

  7. Investigation of 90Sr(II) sorption onto graphene oxides studied by macroscopic experiments and theoretical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The graphene oxides were applied as adsorbents to remove 90Sr(II) ions from aqueous solutions under different experimental conditions. The results showed that 90Sr(II) sorption was mainly dominated by ion exchange and outer-sphere surface complexation. The maximum sorption capacity (Csmas) was calculated to be 3.84 x 10-4 mol/g at pH 5.8 and 20 deg C, which was much higher than that of 90Sr(II) on other today's materials. The thermodynamic parameters suggested that the sorption was an endothermic and spontaneous process. The theoretical calculation results indicated that COH and COC groups contributed to the coordination of Sr(II) ions. (author)

  8. Belatacept-Based Immunosuppression in De Novo Liver Transplant Recipients: 1-Year Experience From a Phase II Randomized Study

    OpenAIRE

    Klintmalm, G. B.; Feng, S.; Lake, J R; Vargas, H E; Wekerle, T; Agnes, S; Brown, K. A.; B. Nashan; Rostaing, L; Meadows-Shropshire, S; Agarwal, M; Harler, M B; García-Valdecasas, J-C

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory phase II study evaluated the safety and efficacy of belatacept in de novo adult liver transplant recipients. Patients were randomized (N = 260) to one of the following immunosuppressive regimens: (i) basiliximab + belatacept high dose [HD] + mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), (ii) belatacept HD + MMF, (iii) belatacept low dose [LD] + MMF, (iv) tacrolimus + MMF, or (v) tacrolimus alone. All received corticosteroids. Demographic characteristics were similar among groups. The proporti...

  9. True Transformations of Spacetime Lengths and Apparent Transformations of Spatial and Temporal Distances. II. the Comparison with Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Ivezic, Tomislav

    2000-01-01

    Some of the well-known experiments: the ''muon'' experiment, the Michelson-Morley type experiments, the Kennedy-Thorndike type experiments and the Ives-Stilwell type experiments are analyzed using the nonrelativistic theory, the ''apparent transformations (AT) relativity'' and the ''true transformations (TT) relativity.'' It is shown that all the experiments (when they are complete from the ''TT relativity'' viewpoint) are in agreement with the ''TT relativity'' in which the special relativit...

  10. RTNS-II: experience at 14-MeV source strengths between 1 x 1013 and 4 x 1013 n/s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design concepts, operational experience, and modifications of the two RTNS-II (Rotating Target Neutron Source-II) 14 MeV neutron sources are reviewed. The original design called for operation at a peak neutron source strength of 4 x 1013 n/cm2s. The facility was to operate at high plant factor and at an acceptable cost in both dose delivered to operating staff and releases to the environment. The possibilities of higher source strengths are discussed in light of the operating experience to date and of new technologies that may be applied to the problems of high flux generators of this type. Changes in ancillary equipment that would provide more efficient or safe operation are also indicated

  11. Effects of CO2 on particle size distribution and phytoplankton abundance during a mesocosm bloom experiment (PeECE II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schartau

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of seawater carbon dioxide (CO2 concentration on the size distribution of suspended particles (2–60 μm and on phytoplankton abundance was investigated during a mesocosm experiment at the large scale facility (LFS in Bergen, Norway, in the frame of the Pelagic Ecosystem CO2 Enrichment study (PeECE II. In nine outdoor enclosures the partial pressure of CO2 in seawater was modified by an aeration system to simulate past (~190 μatm CO2, present (~370 μatm CO2 and future (~700 μatm CO2 CO2 conditions in triplicates. Due to the initial addition of inorganic nutrients, phytoplankton blooms developed in all mesocosms and were monitored over a period of 19 days. Seawater samples were collected daily for analysing the abundance of suspended particles and phytoplankton with the Coulter Counter and with Flow Cytometry, respectively. During the bloom period, the abundance of small particles (2 levels. At that time, a direct relationship between the total-surface-to-total-volume ratio of suspended particles and DIC concentration was determined for all mesocosms. Significant changes with respect to the CO2 treatment were also observed in the phytoplankton community structure. While some populations such as diatoms seemed to be insensitive to the CO2 treatment, others like Micromonas spp. increased with CO2, or showed maximum abundance at present day CO2 (i.e. Emiliania huxleyi. The strongest response to CO2 was observed in the abundance of small autotrophic nano-plankton that strongly increased during the bloom in the past CO2 mesocosms. Together, changes in particle size distribution and phytoplankton community indicate a complex interplay between the ability of the cells to physiologically respond to changes in CO2 and size selection. Size of cells is of general importance for a variety of processes in marine systems such as diffusion-limited uptake of substrates, resource allocation, predator-prey interaction, and gravitational settling

  12. Accumulation of methylmercury in rice and flooded soil in experiments with an enriched isotopic Hg(II) tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickman, R. J.; Mitchell, C. P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin produced in anoxic aquatic sediments. Numerous factors, including the presence of aquatic plants, alter the biogeochemistry of sediments, affecting the rate at which microorganisms transform bioavailable inorganic Hg (IHg) to MeHg. Methylmercury produced in flooded paddy soils and its transfer into rice has become an important dietary consideration. An improved understanding of how MeHg reaches the grain and the extent to which rice alters MeHg production in rhizosphere sediments could help to inform rice cultivation practices. We conducted a controlled greenhouse experiment with thirty rice plants grown in individual, flooded pots amended with enriched 200Hg. Unvegetated controls were maintained under identical conditions. At three plant growth stages (vegetative growth, flowering, and grain maturity), ten plants were sacrificed and samples collected from soil, roots, straw, panicle, and grain of vegetated and unvegetated pots, and assessed for MeHg and THg concentrations. We observed consistent ratios between ambient and tracer MeHg between soils (0.36 ±0.04 — 0.44 ± 0.09) and plant compartments (0.23 ± 0.07 -0.34 ± 0.05) indicating that plant MeHg contamination originates in the soil rather than in planta methylation. The majority of this MeHg was absorbed between the tillering (4.48 ± 2.38 ng/plant) and flowering (8.43 ± 5.12 ng/pl) phases, with a subsequent decline at maturity (2.87 ± 1.23 ng/pl) only partly explained by translocation to the developing grain, indicating that MeHg was demethylated in planta. In contrast, IHg was absorbed from both soil and air, as evidenced by the higher ambient IHg concentrations compared to tracer (3.76 ± 1.19 vs. 0.27 ± 0.40 ng/g). Surprisingly, MeHg accumulation was significantly (p= 0.042-- 0.003) lower in vegetated vs. unvegetated sediments at flowering (1.41 ± 0.26 vs. 1.57 ± 0.23) and maturity (1.27 ± 0.22 vs. 1.71 ± 0.25), suggesting that plant exudates bound Hg(II

  13. Atlantic Coastal experiment III, FRV Delaware II cruise, 17-27 May 1977 and R/V ONRUST cruise, 28-30, June 1977. Data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malloy, S.; Stoddard, A.; von Bock, K. (eds.)

    1980-09-01

    The DELAWARE II and ONRUST cruises, continuations of Atlantic Coastal Experiment III, were made during May and late June, 1977, to compare seasonal changes in chlorophyll a, nitrogen nutrient, dissolved oxygen and phytoplankton composition within the mid-Atlantic and New York Bights. Data from 106 stations and 3300 km of surface mapping are reported as classical hydrographic listings, areal and/or vertical contours of chlorophyll a, inorganic nitrogen and salinity, and listings of phytoplankton species abun- dance. Temperature profiles from 100 stations are included, as well as res- piration experiments [ETS assay] for the dinoflagellate, Ceratium tripos.

  14. Experiments of highly transient thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena in He II induced by gas dynamic shock wave impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compression and thermal shock waves are generated in the superfluid shock tube facility by the impingement of a gas-dynamic shock wave propagating through helium vapor onto a He II free surface. He II can be shock-compressed to convert to He I across the λ-line in the case of He II initially at temperatures rather close to the λ-temperature. The phenomena realized in the shock tube are extremely rapid ones with a characteristic time of the order of a few microseconds. Accordingly, some advanced experimental technology is required for the measurement, and thus piezo-type pressure transducers and a superconductive temperature sensor are used for the measurement of the transient behavior. Visualization of both shock waves is successfully carried out by using an ultra-high-speed video camera with Schlieren optics. It is found from the mass velocity of bulk He II derived from a series of video images that an high Reynolds number flow, about 1.2x107, can be realized behind a compression shock wave in a very short duration. It is also an objective of the present research to make a successful transfer of experimental techniques developed in conventional thermo-fluid dynamics to cryogenic researches

  15. Experiments TGV I (double-beta decay of 48Ca) and TGV II (double-beta decay of 106Cd and 48Ca)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present status of experiments TGV I and TGV II is given. The TGV I collaboration has studied the double-beta decay of 48Ca with a low-background and high sensitivity Ge multi-detector spectrometer TGV (Telescope Germanium Vertical). The preliminary results of T1/22νββ = (4.2 (+3.3) (-1.3)) x 1019 years and T1/20νββ > 1.5 x 1021 years (90% CL) for double-beta decay of 48Ca has been found after the processing of experimental data obtained after 8700 hours of measuring time using approximately 1 gram of 48Ca. The aim of the experiment TGV II is the development of the experimental methods, construction of spectrometers and measurement of the ββ decay (β+β+, β+ /EC, EC/EC) of 106Cd particularly the 2νEC/EC mode. The theoretical description and performance of the TGV II spectrometer are also given. (author)

  16. EXPERIENCE WITH NON - INVASIVE VENTILATION IN TYPE II RESPIRATORY FAILURE AT DEPARTMENT OF PULMONARY MEDICINE, KURNOOL MEDICAL COLLEGE, KURNOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailaja

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Non - invasive ventilation (NIV is the delivery of positive pressure ventilation through an interface to upper airways without using the invasive airway. Use of NIV is becoming common with the increasing recognition of its benefits. OBJECTIVES: This study was done to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of NIV (BiPAP in Type II Respiratory Failu re in Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Kurnool Medical College. Materials and Methods: An observational study conducted over a period of 18 months in Department of pulmonary medicine, Kurnool Medical C ollege in 40 patients who were treated by NIV (BiPaP. Patients were stratified on basis of set of exclusion and inclusion criteria. NIV was given in accordance with the arterial blood gas (ABG parameters defining Type II respiratory failure. RESULTS: In the present study NIPPV was successful in 34(85% and failed in 6(15% patients . The most common indication of NIV in our hospital was acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE - COPD 90% and 88% of AE - COPD patients were improved by NIV. Application of NIV resulted in significant improvem ent of pH and blood gases in COPD patients. Kyphoscoliosis, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA patients with Type II Respirato r y failure also showed significant improvement in partial pressure of oxygen and carbon dioxide. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates and encourages the use of NIV as the first - line ventilator treatment in AE - COPD patients with Type II respiratory failure. It also supports NIV usage in other causes of type II Respiratory failure as a promising step toward prevention of mechanical ventila tion.

  17. West African monsoon decadal variability and surface-related forcings: second West African Monsoon Modeling and Evaluation Project Experiment (WAMME II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yongkang; De Sales, Fernando; Lau, William K.-M.; Boone, Aaron; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Mechoso, Carlos R.; Wang, Guiling; Kucharski, Fred; Schiro, Kathleen; Hosaka, Masahiro; Li, Suosuo; Druyan, Leonard M.; Sanda, Ibrah Seidou; Thiaw, Wassila; Zeng, Ning; Comer, Ruth E.; Lim, Young-Kwon; Mahanama, Sarith; Song, Guoqiong; Gu, Yu; Hagos, Samson M.; Chin, Mian; Schubert, Siegfried; Dirmeyer, Paul; Ruby Leung, L.; Kalnay, Eugenia; Kitoh, Akio; Lu, Cheng-Hsuan; Mahowald, Natalie M.; Zhang, Zhengqiu

    2016-06-01

    The second West African Monsoon Modeling and Evaluation Project Experiment (WAMME II) is designed to improve understanding of the possible roles and feedbacks of sea surface temperature (SST), land use land cover change (LULCC), and aerosols forcings in the Sahel climate system at seasonal to decadal scales. The project's strategy is to apply prescribed observationally based anomaly forcing, i.e., "idealized but realistic" forcing, in simulations by climate models. The goal is to assess these forcings' effects in producing/amplifying seasonal and decadal climate variability in the Sahel between the 1950s and the 1980s, which is selected to characterize the great drought period of the last century. This is the first multi-model experiment specifically designed to simultaneously evaluate such relative contributions. The WAMME II models have consistently demonstrated that SST forcing is a major contributor to the twentieth century Sahel drought. Under the influence of the maximum possible SST forcing, the ensemble mean of WAMME II models can produce up to 60 % of the precipitation difference during the period. The present paper also addresses the role of SSTs in triggering and maintaining the Sahel drought. In this regard, the consensus of WAMME II models is that both Indian and Pacific Ocean SSTs greatly contributed to the drought, with the former producing an anomalous displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone before the WAM onset, and the latter mainly contributes to the summer WAM drought. The WAMME II models also show that the impact of LULCC forcing on the Sahel climate system is weaker than that of SST forcing, but still of first order magnitude. According to the results, under LULCC forcing the ensemble mean of WAMME II models can produces about 40 % of the precipitation difference between the 1980s and the 1950s. The role of land surface processes in responding to and amplifying the drought is also identified. The results suggest that catastrophic

  18. EXPERIENCE WITH NON - INVASIVE VENTILATION IN TYPE II RESPIRATORY FAILURE AT DEPARTMENT OF PULMONARY MEDICINE, KURNOOL MEDICAL COLLEGE, KURNOOL

    OpenAIRE

    Sailaja; Bharat; Naga Sreedhar Rao; Swetha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Non - invasive ventilation (NIV) is the delivery of positive pressure ventilation through an interface to upper airways without using the invasive airway. Use of NIV is becoming common with the increasing recognition of its benefits. OBJECTIVES: This study was done to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of NIV (BiPAP) in Type II Respiratory Failu re in Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Kurnool Medical College. Materials and Methods: A...

  19. Phase II study of irinotecan (CPT-11) in children with high-risk malignant brain tumors: the Duke experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Christopher D.; Gururangan, Sridharan; Eastwood, James; Bottom, Krystal; Watral, Melody; Beason, Rodney; McLendon, Roger E; Allan H Friedman; Tourt-Uhlig, Sandra; Miller, Langdon L.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2002-01-01

    A phase II study of irinotecan (CPT-11) was conducted at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, to evaluate the activity of this agent in children with high-risk malignant brain tumors. A total of 22 children were enrolled in this study, including 13 with histologically verified recurrent malignant brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM] 4, anaplastic astrocytoma 1, ependymoma 5, and medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor 3), 5 with recurrent diffuse pontine glioma, and 4 wi...

  20. The DIRC Detector at the SLAC B-Factory PEP-II: Operational Experience and Performance for Physics Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dirc, a novel type of Cherenkov ring imaging device, is the primary hadronic particle identification system for the BABAR detector at the asymmetric B-factory, Pep-II at SLAC. It is based on total internal reflection and uses long, rectangular bars made from synthetic fused silica as Cherenkov radiators and light guides. BABAR began taking data with colliding beams in late spring 1999. This paper describes the performance of the Dirc during the first 2.5 years of operation

  1. Comparison and analysis of 2-D simulation results with two implosion radiation experiments on the Los Alamos Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two experiments, PegI-41, conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus I capacitor bank, and PegII-25, on the Pegasus II bank, consisted of the implosions of 13 mg (nominal), 5 cm radius, 2 cm high thin cylindrical aluminum foils resulting in soft x-ray radiation pulses from the plasma thermalization on axis. The implosions were conducted in direct-drive (no intermediate switching) mode with peak currents of about 4 MA and 5 MA respectively, and implosion times of about 2.5 micros and 2.0 micros. A radiation yield of about 250 kJ was measured for PegII-25. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the physics of the implosion and relate this physics to the production of the radiation pulse and to provide detailed experimental data which could be compared with 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations. Included in the experimental diagnostic suites were faraday rotation and dB/dt current measurements, a visible framing camera, an x-ray stripline camera, time-dependent spectroscopy, bolometers and XRD'S. A comparison of the results from these experiments shows agreement with 2-D simulation results in the instability development, current, and radiation pulse data, including the pulsewidth, shape, peak power and total radiation yield as measured by bolometry. Instabilities dominate the behavior of the implosion and largely determine the properties of the resulting radiation pulse. The 2-D simulations can be seen to be an important tool in understanding the implosion physics

  2. Validation of DSMC results for chemically nonequilibrium air flows against measurements of the electron number density in RAM-C II flight experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ionized flow around the RAM C-II vehicle in the range of altitudes from 73 to 81 km is studied by the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method with three models of chemical reactions. It is demonstrated that vibration favoring in reactions of dissociation of neutral molecules affects significantly the predicted values of plasma density in the shock layer, and good agreement between the results of experiments and DSMC computations can be achieved in terms of the plasma density as a function of the flight altitude

  3. Operating and test experience with Experimental Breeder Reactor number 2 (EBR-II), the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor number 2 (EBR-II) has operated for 30 years, the longest for any liquid metal cooled reactor (LMR) power plant in the world. Given the scope of what has been developed and demonstrated over those years, it is arguably the most successful test reactor operation ever. Tests have been carried out on virtually every fast reactor fuel type. The reactor itself has been extensively studied. The most dramatic safety tests, conducted on 3 April, 1986, showed that an LMR with metallic fuel could safely accommodate loss of flow or loss of heat-sink without scram. EBR-II operated as the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) prototype, demonstrating important innovations in safety, plant design, fuel design and actinide recycle. The ability to accommodate anticipated transients without scram passively resulted in significant simplification of the reactor plant, primarily through less reliance on emergency power and not having to require the secondary sodium or steam systems to be safety grade. These features have been quantified in a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) conducted for EBR-II, demonstrating considerable safety advantages over other reactor concepts. Fundamental to the superior safety and operating characteristics of this reactor is the metallic U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel. Performance of the fuel has been fully proven: achieved burnup levels exceed 20 at.% in the lead test assemblies. A complete set of fuel performance and safety limits has been developed and was carried forward in formal safety documents supporting conversion of the core to IFR fuel. The last major demonstration planned was to assess the performance of recycled actinides in the fuel and to confirm that passive safety characteristics are maintained with recycled actinide fuel in the core. (author)

  4. Recent progress in the development of large area silica aerogel for use as RICH radiator in the Belle II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Nishida, Shohei; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    We report recent progress in the development of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter to be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector, which is currently being upgraded at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan. The production of approximately 450 aerogel tiles with refractive indices of either 1.045 or 1.055 was completed in May, 2014, and the tiles are now undergoing optical characterization. Installation of the aerogels was tested by installing them into a partial mock-up of the support structure.

  5. Belatacept-Based Immunosuppression in De Novo Liver Transplant Recipients: 1-Year Experience From a Phase II Randomized Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintmalm, G B; Feng, S; Lake, J R; Vargas, H E; Wekerle, T; Agnes, S; Brown, K A; Nashan, B; Rostaing, L; Meadows-Shropshire, S; Agarwal, M; Harler, M B; García-Valdecasas, J-C

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory phase II study evaluated the safety and efficacy of belatacept in de novo adult liver transplant recipients. Patients were randomized (N = 260) to one of the following immunosuppressive regimens: (i) basiliximab + belatacept high dose [HD] + mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), (ii) belatacept HD + MMF, (iii) belatacept low dose [LD] + MMF, (iv) tacrolimus + MMF, or (v) tacrolimus alone. All received corticosteroids. Demographic characteristics were similar among groups. The proportion of patients who met the primary end point (composite of acute rejection, graft loss, death by month 6) was higher in the belatacept groups (42–48%) versus tacrolimus groups (15–38%), with the highest number of deaths and grafts losses in the belatacept LD group. By month 12, the proportion surviving with a functioning graft was higher with tacrolimus + MMF (93%) and lower with belatacept LD (67%) versus other groups (90%: basiliximab + belatacept HD; 83%: belatacept HD; 88%: tacrolimus). Mean calculated GFR was 15–34 mL/min higher in belatacept-treated patients at 1 year. Two cases of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease and one case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy occurred in belatacept-treated patients. Follow-up beyond month 12 revealed an increase in death and graft loss in another belatacept group (belatacept HD), after which the study was terminated. PMID:25041339

  6. Self-similarity of hard cumulative processes in fixed target experiment for BES-II at STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Search for signatures of phase transition in Au + Au collisions is in the heart of the heavy ion program at RHIC. Systematic study of particle production over a wide range of collision energy revealed new phenomena such as the nuclear suppression effect expressed by nuclear modification factor, the constituent quark number scaling for elliptic flow, the 'ridge effect' in - fluctuations, etc. To determine the phase boundaries and location of the critical point of nuclear matter, the Beam Energy Scan (BES-I) program at RHIC has been suggested and performed by STAR and PHENIX Collaborations. The obtained results have shown that the program (BES-II) should be continued. In this paper a proposal to use hard cumulative processes in BES Phase-II program is outlined. Selection of the cumulative events is assumed to enrich data sample by a new type of collisions characterized by higher energy density and more compressed matter. This would allow finding clearer signatures of phase transition, location of a critical point and studying extreme conditions in heavy ion collisions.

  7. Self-similarity of hard cumulative processes in fixed target experiment for BES-II at STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Search for signatures of phase transition in Au + Au collisions is in the heart of the heavy ion program at RHIC. Systematic study of particle production over a wide range of collision energy revealed new phenomena such as the nuclear suppression effect expressed by nuclear modification factor, the constituent quark number scaling for elliptic flow, the 'ridge effect' in Δφ-Δη fluctuations, etc. To determine the phase boundaries and location of the critical point of nuclear matter, the Beam Energy Scan (BES-I) program at RHIC has been suggested and performed by STAR and PHENIX Collaborations. The obtained results have shown that the program (BES-II) should be continued. In this paper a proposal to use hard cumulative processes in BES Phase-II program is outlined. Selection of the cumulative events is assumed to enrich data sample by a new type of collisions characterized by higher energy density and more compressed matter. This would allow finding clearer signatures of phase transition, location of a critical point and studying extreme conditions in heavy ion collisions.

  8. Drosophila GENE experiment in the Spanish Soyuz mission to the ISS: II. effects of the containment constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Herranz, R.; Lavan, D.A.; Medina, F J; Loon, van, J.J.A.; Marco, R.

    2009-01-01

    In the GENE experiment performed during an 11-day Soyuz Mission to the International Space Station (ISS), we intended to determine if microgravity aff ects Drosophila metamorphosis processes. Control experiments were performed including a 1g ground control parallel to the ISS flight samples and a Random Position Machine microgravity simulated control. A preliminary analysis of the results indicates that five hundred to one thousand genes change their expres- sion profiles depending on the cut...

  9. Present and future beam tube experiments at the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor Wien

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four beam tubes and the thermal column at the TRIGA reactor Wien were well used in the reporting period. Since the thermal column is used as a gamma source for different irradiation experiments and as a neutron source for radiography, the other facilities are mainly used for neutron spectroscopy experiments: polarized neutrons, neutron interferometry, small angle scattering and neutron choppers, In the piercing beam tube a fast rabbit system is installed which is mainly used for high precision activation analysis. (author)

  10. A multi-wavelength streak-optical-pyrometer for warm-dense matter experiments at NDCX-I and NDCX-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a multi-wavelength streak-optical-pyrometer (SOP) developed the for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments at the existing NDCX-I facility and the NDCX-II facility currently being commissioned at LBNL. The SOP served as the primary temperature diagnostic in the recent NDCX-I experiments, in which an intense K+ beam was used to heat different metal samples into WDM states. The SOP consists of a spectral grating (visible and near-infrared spectral range) and a fast, high-dynamic-range optical streak camera. The instrument is calibrated absolutely with a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp and can itself be considered as an absolutely calibrated, time-resolving spectrometer. The sample temperature is determined from fitting the recorded thermal spectrum into the Planck formula multiplied by a model of emissivity

  11. Experiments and analysis of gold disk targets irradiated by smoothing beams of Xingguang II facilities with 350 nm wavelength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Gold disk targets were irradiated using focusing and beam smoothing methods on Xingguang (XG-II) laser facilities with 350 nm wavelength, 0.6 ns pulse width and 20-80 Joules energies. Laser absorption, light scattering and X-ray conversion were experimentally investigated. The experimental results showed that laser absorption and scattered light were about 90% and 10%, respectively, under focusing irradiation, but the laser absorption increased 5%-10% and the scattered light about 1% under the condition of beam smoothing. Compared with the case of focusing irradiation, the laser absorption was effectively improved and the scattered light remarkably dropped under uniform irradiation; then due to the decrease in laser intensity, X-ray conversion increased. This is highly advantageous to the inertial confinement fusion. However, X-ray conversion mechanism basically did not change and X-ray conversion efficiency under beam smoothing and focusing irradiation was basically the same.

  12. Reliability of the TJ-II power supply system: Collection and analysis of the operational experience data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a TJ-II pulse, the provision of magnetic fields requires a total amount of power exceeding 80 MVA. Such amount of power is supplied by a 132 MVA flywheel generator (15 kV output voltage, 80-100 Hz output frequency) and the related motor, transformers, breakers, rectifiers, regulators, protections, busbars, connections, etc. Failure data of these main components have been collected identified and processed including information on failure modes and, where possible, causes of the failures. Main statistical values about failure rates for the period from May of 1998 to December of 2004 have been calculated and are ready to be compared with those of the International Fusion Component Failure Rate Database (FCFR-DB)

  13. Silica aerogel radiator for use in the A-RICH system utilized in the Belle II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, Makoto, E-mail: makoto@hepburn.s.chiba-u.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara (Japan); Department of Physics, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Adachi, Ichiro [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Hamada, Nao [Department of Physics, Toho University, Funabashi (Japan); Hara, Koji [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Iijima, Toru [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Iwata, Shuichi; Kakuno, Hidekazu [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji (Japan); Kawai, Hideyuki [Department of Physics, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Korpar, Samo [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Maribor (Slovenia); Experimental High Energy Physics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Križan, Peter [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Experimental High Energy Physics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kumita, Tetsuro [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji (Japan); Nishida, Shohei [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Ogawa, Satoru [Department of Physics, Toho University, Funabashi (Japan); Pestotnik, Rok; Šantelj, Luka; Seljak, Andrej [Experimental High Energy Physics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sumiyoshi, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji (Japan); and others

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents recent progress in the development and mass production of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter, which will be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector. The proximity-focusing A-RICH system is especially designed to identify charged kaons and pions. The refractive index of the installed aerogel Cherenkov radiators is approximately 1.05, and we aim for a separation capability exceeding 4σ at momenta up to 4 GeV/c. Large-area aerogel tiles (over 18×18×2 cm{sup 3}) were first fabricated in test productions by pin drying in addition to conventional methods. We proposed to fill the large end-cap region (area 3.5 m{sup 2}) with 124 water-jet-trimmed fan-shaped dual-layer-focusing aerogel combinations of different refractive indices (1.045 and 1.055). Guided by the test production results, we decided to manufacture aerogels by the conventional method and are currently proceeding with mass production. In an electron beam test undertaken at the DESY, we confirmed that the K/π separation capability of a prototype A-RICH counter exceeded 4σ at 4 GeV/c. - Highlights: • Aerogel tiling as a RICH radiator in the end cap of Belle II detector is proposed. • Conventional method for producing real-size aerogels is established. • No crack-free, real-size aerogels attained in the test production by pin drying. • Beam test confirms the utility of real-size aerogels made by conventional method. • Mass aerogel production for an actual RICH system started by conventional method.

  14. Silica aerogel radiator for use in the A-RICH system utilized in the Belle II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents recent progress in the development and mass production of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter, which will be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector. The proximity-focusing A-RICH system is especially designed to identify charged kaons and pions. The refractive index of the installed aerogel Cherenkov radiators is approximately 1.05, and we aim for a separation capability exceeding 4σ at momenta up to 4 GeV/c. Large-area aerogel tiles (over 18×18×2 cm3) were first fabricated in test productions by pin drying in addition to conventional methods. We proposed to fill the large end-cap region (area 3.5 m2) with 124 water-jet-trimmed fan-shaped dual-layer-focusing aerogel combinations of different refractive indices (1.045 and 1.055). Guided by the test production results, we decided to manufacture aerogels by the conventional method and are currently proceeding with mass production. In an electron beam test undertaken at the DESY, we confirmed that the K/π separation capability of a prototype A-RICH counter exceeded 4σ at 4 GeV/c. - Highlights: • Aerogel tiling as a RICH radiator in the end cap of Belle II detector is proposed. • Conventional method for producing real-size aerogels is established. • No crack-free, real-size aerogels attained in the test production by pin drying. • Beam test confirms the utility of real-size aerogels made by conventional method. • Mass aerogel production for an actual RICH system started by conventional method

  15. [60]Fullerene Displacement from (Dihapto-Buckminster-Fullerene) Pentacarbonyl Tungsten(0): An Experiment for the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.; Moore-Russo, Deborah A.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics experiments on the ligand-C[subscript 60] exchange reactions on (dihapto-[60]fullerene) pentacarbonyl tungsten(0), ([eta][superscript 2]-C[subscript 60])W(CO)[subscript 5], form an educational activity for the inorganic chemistry laboratory that promotes graphical thinking as well as the understanding of kinetics, mechanisms, and the…

  16. The Quantitative Resolution of a Mixture of Group II Metal Ions by Thermometric Titration with EDTA. An Analytical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert L.; Popham, Ronald E.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an experiment in thermometric titration used in an analytic chemistry-chemical instrumentation course, consisting of two titrations, one a mixture of calcium and magnesium, the other of calcium, magnesium, and barium ions. Provides equipment and solutions list/specifications, graphs, and discussion of results. (JM)

  17. Comparison of three labeled silica nanoparticles used as tracers in transport experiments in porous media. Part II: Transport experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of labeled silica nanoparticles were used in transport experiments in saturated sand. The goal of this study was to evaluate both the efficiency of labeling techniques (fluorescence (FITC), metal (Ag(0) core) and radioactivity (110mAg(0) core)) in realistic transport conditions and the reactive transport of silica nanocolloids of variable size and concentration in porous media. Experimental results obtained under contrasted experimental conditions revealed that deposition in sand is controlled by nanoparticles size and ionic strength of the solution. A mathematical model is proposed to quantitatively describe colloid transport. Fluorescent labeling is widely used to study fate of colloids in soils but was the less sensitive one. Ag(0) labeling with ICP-MS detection was found to be very sensitive to measure deposition profiles. Radiolabeled (110mAg(0)) nanoparticles permitted in situ detection. Results obtained with radiolabeled nanoparticles are wholly original and might be used for improving the modeling of deposition and release dynamics. -- Highlights: • Three kinds of labeled nanotracers were used in transport experiments in sand columns. • They were used as surrogates of silica nanoparticles or mineral colloid. • Deposition depending on colloid size and ionic strength was observed and modeled. • Fluorescence labeling had the worse detection limit but was the more convenient. • Radiolabeled nanotracers were detected in situ in a non destructive way. -- Follow the kinetics of transport, deposition and release of silica nanoparticles with suitably labeled nanoparticles

  18. Adubação da mamoneira II: experiências de espaçamento x adubação Fertilizer experiments with castor beans II: plant density x fertility level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Canecchio Filho

    1959-01-01

    Full Text Available Para estudar a influência do espaçamento sôbre o efeito dos três nutrientes essenciais na cultura da mamoneira anã, variedade IA-38, em-1951-52 foram instaladas quatro experiências nas Estações Experimentais de Ribeirão Prêto (terra-roxa legítima, Mococa (solo massapê-salmourão, Jahú (teira-roxa-misturada e Campinas (terra-roxa-misturada. Enquanto as três últimas só foram conduzidas durante um ano agrícola, a de Ribeirão Prêto foi continuada em 1052-53 com as mesmas plantas e sem nova adubação. Em tôdas elas se usaram, num esquema fatorial com fusão parcial das interações espaçamentos x fósforo x potássio, três espaçamentos (1,50x1,20, 1,00x0,90 e 1,00x0,45m, três níveis de fósforo (0, 60 e 120 kg/ha de P2O5e três de potássio (0, 30 e 60 kg/ha de K2O; nas de Ribeirão Preto e Mococa a metade de cada canteiro recebeu 46,5 kg/ha de N. O azôto, o fósforo e o potássio foram empregados respectivamente nas formas de salitre do Chile, superfosfato e cloreto de potássio. O primeiro adubo foi aplicado em cobertura: os dois últimos o foram nos sulcos de plantio, ao ser êste efetuado. Nas experiências de Ribeirão Prêto, Jahú e Mococa, que se desenvolveram em condições relativamente favoráveis, em média de tôdas as adubações as produções foram bem menores com o espaçamento largo do que com o médio ou o estreito, pouco diferindo as obtidas com os dois últimos. Os três nutrientes estudados, principalmente o azôto e o potássio, tiveram grande influência na determinação do melhor espaçamento: na ausência dêles a vantagem do aumento da densidade de plantas foi pequena ou nula, ao passo que na sua presença ela se tornou considerável. Correspondentemente, as respostas a êsses nutirentes, sobretudo ao azôto e ao potássio, que foram pequenas, nulas ou mesmo negativas com o espaçamento largo, elevaram-se consideravelmente quando se usaram os espaçamentos mais cerrados. Na experiência de

  19. What is the probability that direct detection experiments have observed dark matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozorgnia, Nassim [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schwetz, Thomas, E-mail: n.bozorgnia@uva.nl, E-mail: schwetz@fysik.su.se [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-12-01

    In Dark Matter direct detection we are facing the situation of some experiments reporting positive signals which are in conflict with limits from other experiments. Such conclusions are subject to large uncertainties introduced by the poorly known local Dark Matter distribution. We present a method to calculate an upper bound on the joint probability of obtaining the outcome of two potentially conflicting experiments under the assumption that the Dark Matter hypothesis is correct, but completely independent of assumptions about the Dark Matter distribution. In this way we can quantify the compatibility of two experiments in an astrophysics independent way. We illustrate our method by testing the compatibility of the hints reported by DAMA and CDMS-Si with the limits from the LUX and SuperCDMS experiments. The method does not require Monte Carlo simulations but is mostly based on using Poisson statistics. In order to deal with signals of few events we introduce the so-called ''signal length'' to take into account energy information. The signal length method provides a simple way to calculate the probability to obtain a given experimental outcome under a specified Dark Matter and background hypothesis.

  20. What is the probability that direct detection experiments have observed dark matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Dark Matter direct detection we are facing the situation of some experiments reporting positive signals which are in conflict with limits from other experiments. Such conclusions are subject to large uncertainties introduced by the poorly known local Dark Matter distribution. We present a method to calculate an upper bound on the joint probability of obtaining the outcome of two potentially conflicting experiments under the assumption that the Dark Matter hypothesis is correct, but completely independent of assumptions about the Dark Matter distribution. In this way we can quantify the compatibility of two experiments in an astrophysics independent way. We illustrate our method by testing the compatibility of the hints reported by DAMA and CDMS-Si with the limits from the LUX and SuperCDMS experiments. The method does not require Monte Carlo simulations but is mostly based on using Poisson statistics. In order to deal with signals of few events we introduce the so-called ''signal length'' to take into account energy information. The signal length method provides a simple way to calculate the probability to obtain a given experimental outcome under a specified Dark Matter and background hypothesis

  1. Results of level-ii oncoplasty in breast cancer patients: an early experience from a tertiary care hospital in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for breast cancer patients who underwent breast conservation therapy using Level II oncoplasty techniques. Methods: The prospective, non-randomised and descriptive study was conducted at the Department of Surgery, Unit IV of Civil Hospital, Karachi, from December 2009 to November 2011 in which 21 consecutive women with breast carcinoma who underwent wide local excision with remodeling mammoplasty were enrolled. All patients were reviewed by the surgeon and medical oncologist every 3 months for the first year. A grading system of 5-1 (excellent to poor) was employed and those with 3 or more were considered to have acceptable results. Results: The mean patient age was 45.38+-10.09 years (range: 26-70); 11 (52.3%) were premenopausal and 10 (47.7%) were postmenopausal; and 5 (27.8%) had family history of breast cancer. The mean size of the tumour determined by histology was 59.9+-3.18 mm (range: 25-150). Eight (30%) patients received preoperative chemotherapy to downsize the tumour. Three (14.2%) patients received preoperative radiotherapy. Mean operative time was 1.59+-0.52 hours (range: 1-2.5 hours). Mean volume of breast tissue excised from the breast containing the tumour was 545.27+-412.06 cm3 (range: 43.70-1456). Assessment of excision margins showed no tumour at the margins of 19 (90.4%) patients. Two (9.5%) patients had close but negative margins. The mean hospital stay was 7.10+-3.30 days (range: 4-15). There were early complications in 4 (19%) patients. One (4.76%) patient had late complications. Two (9.5%) patients developed tumour recurrence; both had an ipsilateral tumour recurrence. None of the patients developed metastases and one died of cardiac problem. Twenty (95.2%) patients had an acceptable post-surgical cosmetic result. Conclusion: Level II oncoplasty was a safe option in breast conservation allowing large sized and difficult-location tumour excision with good cosmetic outcome in the study

  2. High-performance nonequilibrium-plasma magnetohydrodynamic electrical power generator using slightly divergent channel configuration: II. Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Okuno, Yoshihiro [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-G3-38, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: murakami@es.titech.ac.jp

    2008-06-21

    We describe experiments carried out to evaluate a newly developed high-performance nonequilibrium-plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generator equipped with a slightly divergent supersonic channel. The slightly divergent generator and a similar-scale highly divergent generator are evaluated in shock-tube experiments. The effects of electrical conductivity control and magnetic flux density control on the generator operation are investigated, and Hall voltage-Hall current characteristics, plasma-fluid behaviour and plasma structures are described. The slightly divergent channel configuration and the application of high- and uniform-density magnetic flux overcome the disadvantages of the generator due to its compactness, and markedly improves its performance. The ratio of isentropic efficiency to enthalpy extraction ratio and the power output density are outstanding compared with previous MHD power generators. The experimental results are supported by the numerically simulated results. This paper is the second part of a duology.

  3. High-performance nonequilibrium-plasma magnetohydrodynamic electrical power generator using slightly divergent channel configuration: II. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Okuno, Yoshihiro

    2008-06-01

    We describe experiments carried out to evaluate a newly developed high-performance nonequilibrium-plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generator equipped with a slightly divergent supersonic channel. The slightly divergent generator and a similar-scale highly divergent generator are evaluated in shock-tube experiments. The effects of electrical conductivity control and magnetic flux density control on the generator operation are investigated, and Hall voltage-Hall current characteristics, plasma-fluid behaviour and plasma structures are described. The slightly divergent channel configuration and the application of high- and uniform-density magnetic flux overcome the disadvantages of the generator due to its compactness, and markedly improves its performance. The ratio of isentropic efficiency to enthalpy extraction ratio and the power output density are outstanding compared with previous MHD power generators. The experimental results are supported by the numerically simulated results. This paper is the second part of a duology.

  4. Silica aerogel radiator for use in the A-RICH system utilized in the Belle II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tabata, Makoto; Hamada, Nao; Hara, Koji; Iijima, Toru; Iwata, Shuichi; Kakuno, Hidekazu; Kawai, Hideyuki; Korpar, Samo; Križan, Peter; Kumita, Tetsuro; Nishida, Shohei; Ogawa, Satoru; Pestotnik, Rok; Šantelj, Luka; Seljak, Andrej; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki; Tahirović, Elvedin; Yoshida, Keisuke; Yusa, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents recent progress in the development and mass production of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter, which will be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector. The proximity-focusing A-RICH system is especially designed to identify charged kaons and pions. The refractive index of the installed aerogel Cherenkov radiators is approximately 1.05, and we aim for a separation capability exceeding 4$\\sigma $ at momenta up to 4 GeV/$c$. Large-area aerogel tiles (over 18 $\\times $ 18 $\\times $ 2 cm$^3$) were first fabricated in test productions by pin drying in addition to conventional methods. We proposed to fill the large end-cap region (area 3.5 m$^2$) with 124 water-jet-trimmed fan-shaped dual-layer-focusing aerogel combinations of different refractive indices (1.045 and 1.055). Guided by the test production results, we decided to manufacture aerogels by the conventional method and are currently procee...

  5. UO2-PuO2 critical experiments based on a coupled NJOY/AMPX-II/HAMMER-TECHNION system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of the HAMMER-TECHNION system in the criticality analysis of mixed oxide (UO sub(2)-PuO sub(2)) fuel pins clad with Zircaloy-2 and having light water as moderator was analyzed in this work. The basic nuclear data libraries for the HAMMER-TECHNION have been generated by processing the ENDF/B-IV and JENDL-2 nuclear data files with the NJOY system. The question of the effect of Plutonium resonances close to the thermal region on the average thermal parameters was addressed by creating a special version of the HAMMER-TECHNION system with the thermal energy cut-off at 1.855 eV. The final system effective multiplication factor was calculated with the CITATION code by using the homogeneized four-group cross sections generated by the HAMMER-TECHNION system. Results are shown for the original HAMMER-TECHNION thermal cut-off and for the one at 1.855 eV. Besides that, for some selected critical systems, the effect of the resonance interference among the resonances of the Uranium and Plutonium isotopes was addressed by using the ROLAIDS module of the AMPX-II system. The effect of the thermal energy cut-off on the integral parameters of the critical systems was not found to be of extreme importance. (author)

  6. Various Litter Species and High Water-Table Levels Hamper Type II Methanotrophs in a Bare Peatland Regeneration Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Siegenthaler, Andy; Gattinger, Andreas; Francez, Andre-Jean; Gilbert, Daniel; Buttler, Alexandre; Tonolla, Mauro; Mitchell, Edward A.D.

    2009-01-01

    Significant areas of temperate bogs have been damaged by peat harvesting. After abandonment and spontaneous regeneration, these secondary mires can become important methane sources towards the atmosphere (Basiliko et al., 2007). Recent studies have shown the importance of methane oxidising bacteria (MOB) for the recycling of carbon from methane effluxes (e.g., Dedysh et al., 2001; Raghoebarsing et al., 2005). We set up a factorial experiment that allowed us to tests the effects of three level...

  7. Diagnosing GCM errors over West Africa using relaxation experiments. Part II: intraseasonal variability and African easterly waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, Benjamin [CNRM-GAME, Meteo-France, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Centre de Recherches de Climatologie, CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, Dijon (France); Douville, Herve [CNRM-GAME, Meteo-France, CNRS, Toulouse (France)

    2011-10-15

    A near-global grid-point nudging of the Arpege-Climat atmospheric General Circulation Model towards ECMWF reanalyses is used to diagnose the regional versus remote origin of the summer model biases and variability over West Africa. First part of this study revealed a limited impact on the monsoon climatology compared to a control experiment without nudging, but a significant improvement of interannual variability, although the amplitude of the seasonal anomalies remained underestimated. Focus is given here on intraseasonal variability of monsoon rainfall and dynamics. The reproducible part of these signals is investigated through 30-member ensemble experiments computed for the 1994 rainy season, a year abnormally wet over the Sahel but representative of the model systematic biases. In the control experiment, Arpege-Climat simulates too few rainy days that are associated with too low rainfall amounts over the central and western Sahel, in line with the seasonal dry biases. Nudging the model outside Africa tends to slightly increase the number of rainy days over the Sahel, but has little effect on associated rainfall amounts. However, results do indicate that a significant part of the monsoon intraseasonal variability simulated by Arpege-Climat is controlled by lateral boundary conditions. Parts of the wet/dry spells over the Sahel occur in phase in the 30 members of the nudging experiment, and are therefore embedded in larger-scale variability patterns. Inter-member spread is however not constant across the selected summer season. It is partly controlled by African Easterly Waves, which show dissimilar amplitude from one member to another, but a coherent phasing in all members. A lowpass filtering of the nudging fields suggests that low frequency variations in the lateral boundary conditions can lead to eastward extensions of the African Easterly Jet, creating a favorable environment for easterly waves, while high frequency perturbations seem to control their

  8. A phase II experience with neoadjuvant irinotecan (CPT-11, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and leucovorin (LV for colorectal liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bigam David

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotherapy may improve survival in patients undergoing resection of colorectal liver metastases (CLM. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may help identify patients with occult extrahepatic disease (averting unnecessary metastasectomy, and it provides in vivo chemosensitivity data. Methods A phase II trial was initiated in which patients with resectable CLM received CPT-11, 5-FU and LV for 12 weeks. Metastasectomy was performed unless extrahepatic disease appeared. Postoperatively, patients with stable or responsive disease received the same regimen for 12 weeks. Patients with progressive disease received either second-line chemotherapy or best supportive care. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival (DFS; secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS and safety. Results 35 patients were accrued. During preoperative chemotherapy, 16 patients (46% had grade 3/4 toxicities. Resection was not possible in 5 patients. One patient died of arrhythmia following surgery, and 1 patient had transient liver failure. During the postoperative treatment phase, 12 patients (55% had grade 3/4 toxicities. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT occurred in 11 patients (34% at various times during treatment. Of those who underwent resection, median DFS was 23.0 mo. and median OS has not been reached. The overall survival from time of diagnosis of liver metastases was 51.6 mo for the entire cohort. Conclusion A short course of chemotherapy prior to hepatic metastasectomy may serve to select candidates best suited for resection and it may also direct postoperative systemic treatment. Given the significant incidence of DVT, alternative systemic neoadjuvant regimens should be investigated, particularly those that avoid the use of a central venous line. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00168155.

  9. A phase II experience with neoadjuvant irinotecan (CPT-11), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (LV) for colorectal liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemotherapy may improve survival in patients undergoing resection of colorectal liver metastases (CLM). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may help identify patients with occult extrahepatic disease (averting unnecessary metastasectomy), and it provides in vivo chemosensitivity data. A phase II trial was initiated in which patients with resectable CLM received CPT-11, 5-FU and LV for 12 weeks. Metastasectomy was performed unless extrahepatic disease appeared. Postoperatively, patients with stable or responsive disease received the same regimen for 12 weeks. Patients with progressive disease received either second-line chemotherapy or best supportive care. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival (DFS); secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS) and safety. 35 patients were accrued. During preoperative chemotherapy, 16 patients (46%) had grade 3/4 toxicities. Resection was not possible in 5 patients. One patient died of arrhythmia following surgery, and 1 patient had transient liver failure. During the postoperative treatment phase, 12 patients (55%) had grade 3/4 toxicities. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) occurred in 11 patients (34%) at various times during treatment. Of those who underwent resection, median DFS was 23.0 mo. and median OS has not been reached. The overall survival from time of diagnosis of liver metastases was 51.6 mo for the entire cohort. A short course of chemotherapy prior to hepatic metastasectomy may serve to select candidates best suited for resection and it may also direct postoperative systemic treatment. Given the significant incidence of DVT, alternative systemic neoadjuvant regimens should be investigated, particularly those that avoid the use of a central venous line. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00168155

  10. CROPS AND CHEMISM OF PLANTS OF A MULTIVARIANT MODEL EXPERIMENT ON COAL COMBUSTION WASTE DEPOSITS. PART II (2012 – 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Siuta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Reclamation efficiency of composts produced from the mixture of municipal waste (Radiowo and ZUSOK, urban green waste composts (Complex, housing estate lawn mowing waste (plants and sewage sludge, as well as mineral fertilizer (NPK – without the use of any organic fertilizer, was assessed in a model experiment on an ash soil. The experiment was launched in 2005 and continued until the end of 2013. Crops were collected and subjected to the analysis in 2005, 2006 and between 2011 and 2012. In the period between 2007 and 2010 no agrotechnical treatments were carried out, with the experiment being limited to mere observation of the natural (spontaneous succession of plants. Reclamation doses of composts and sewage sludge were measured quantitatively, therefore they differed in the content of dry matter as well as in the contents of organic substances and minerals in the dry matter. The largest aggregated dry matter yield of plants (2005–2013 was reported in the Complex variant, and similarly, in the Radiowo and plant variants, whereas the ZUSOK variant reported the lowest aggregated dry matter field of plants. The yield-forming efficiency of NPK fertilizer was lower than in the case of compost and sludge variants. However, the field-forming efficiency of sewage sludge was lower than its fertilization potential as it was unstable and difficult to mix with the experimental soil. The results showed the yield-forming potential of plants on the experimental coal combustion waste deposits fertilized with composts and sewage sludge as well as the examples of the sites where sewage sludge could be used for the biological reclamation of landfills and spoil tips.

  11. Experience in maintenance of pumps in test facilities at R.E.D., B.A.R.C. [Paper No.: II-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centrifugal pumps are used for circulating water in various test facilities which are meant for testing reactor components. Operating pressures are about 85 bars at 250 degC. Reciprocating pumps are used for make up service at pressures upto 160 bars. A primary heat transport pump for 200 MWe Candu type reactor, is being tested for checking its performance and for collection of base data. The following are discussed: (i) failure of hydrostatic seal and hydrostatic bearing and its causes, (ii) subsequent repairs and reconditioning, (iii) steps taken to avoid repetition of such failures, and (iv) problems in assembly. For a pump used in the fuelling machine test facility, following maintenance problems are discussed: (1) failure of various components like bearings, mechanical, seals, wear rings, etc., (2) causes of failure and steps taken to remedy the deficiencies noted, (3) experience with the indigenous antifriction bearings, and (4) experience with indigenous spiral wound gaskets. For the reciprocating pumps, leakage through gland packing is a problem. Experience with various types of packing and other parameters, affecting leakage are discussed. (author)

  12. Reporting Military Sexual Trauma: A Mixed-Methods Study of Women Veterans' Experiences Who Served From World War II to the War in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kristina B; Mills, Peter D

    2016-08-01

    Since 2004, there has been increased effort to reduce military sexual trauma (MST) in the U.S. military. Although MST covers a range of inappropriate behaviors, the majority of research, treatment, and outreach are focused on sexual assault and the experiences of individuals serving in Afghanistan and Iraq. During a study on veterans' involvement in a national peace organization, participants were asked about their military experiences. Veterans served from World War II to current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Emerging out of the responses were descriptions of women's experiences with MST, barriers to reporting incidents of sexual misconduct and sexual assault, and the challenges they faced when seeking care. Data were gathered using anonymous questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Out of 52 female veterans, the majority (90%) was subjected to at least one form of MST, and 15% (8) attempted to report the incident(s). Over half of the assailants were of a higher rank than the survivors. The majority of veterans remained silent due to lack of options to report, the status of perpetrators, and fear of retaliation. These data provide a glimpse into the challenges many women veterans faced when seeking assistance reporting incidents or obtaining health care for their MST. PMID:27483522

  13. Overview of the data-acquisition system (including shielding, isolation and grounding) on the Beta II field-reversed plasma-gun experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer-supported acquisition, analysis, and storage of mirror fusion experimental data requires the solution of several problems. The data must be gathered with a minimum amount of noise, and transients must be excluded from the computer so that it can function properly. On Beta II (which was an experiment to produce field-reversed plasma rings from a coaxial plasma gun) the diagnostic system was planned to provide the shielding and isolation necessary to solve these two problems. The Beta II system has been in operation for about two years and provides 300-channel capacity, CAMAC interfaced, to a Hewlett Packard 21MX computer. The system routinely handles signals ranging from 1 mV to 50 kV, with bandwidths from .05 Hz to 10 MHz. The data are captured by transient recorders during a shot, then transferred to the computer. The computer stores the data on disc for immediate processing and on tape for long-term storage. Processed data from any number of channels (usually 20 to 30) is plotted between shots for immediate review. The rest of the data is processed and plotted during off hours

  14. Pre-WIPP in-situ experiments in salt. Part I. Executive summary. Part II. Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents plans for in-situ experiments in a specific location in southeastern New Mexico. Schedule and facility design were based on features of a representative local potash mine and on contract negotiations with mine owners. Subsequent WIPP program uncertainties have required a delay in the implementation of the activities discussed here; however, the relative schedule for various activities are appropriate for future planning. The document represents a matrix of in-situ activities to address relevant technical issues prior to the availability of a bedded salt repository

  15. II Spatial metaphors and somatic communication: the embodiment of multigenerational experiences of helplessness and futility in an obese patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This paper explores the analysis of an obese woman who came to experience her flesh as a bodying forth of personal and multigenerational family and cultural experiences of helplessness. The paper discusses the ideas and images that formed the basis of how I engaged with these themes as they presented countertransferentially. My thesis is that clinical approaches which draw on spatial metaphors for the psyche offer valuable tools for working with people whose inner world expresses itself somatically because such metaphors can be used to engage simultaneously with the personal, cultural, and ancestral dimensions of these unconscious communications. The paper builds on Jung's view of the psyche as comprised of pockets of inner otherness (complexes), on Redfearn's image of psyche as landscape-like and on Samuels' thinking on embodied countertransference and on the political psyche. It also draws on Butler's work on the body as a social phenomenon and on the theme of being a helpless non-person or nobody as explored in Tom Stoppard's play Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead which retells Shakespeare's Hamlet from the perspective of two of the play's 'bit' characters. PMID:23750939

  16. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run-II at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mullier, Geoffrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of the LHC. Taking advantage of the detector development period 2013 – 2014, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface to equip it with new service panels and to repair modules furthermore this helped with the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), fourth layer of pixel, installed in between the existing Pixel Detector and a new beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and increased pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been used. A new readout chip has been designed with CMOS 130nm technology with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. Dedicated design features in combination with a new composite material were considered and used in order to reduce the material budget of the support structure while keeping the optimal thermo-mechanical perfor...

  17. LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a plan for a 45-GeV 40-μA proton synchrotron with a 200-μA 9-GeV booster. These machines can provide simultaneously 45-GeV slow-extracted beam for production of kaons, antiprotons, and other secondary particles, and 9-GeV fast-extracted beam for neutrino and pulsed muon physics. The LAMPF II machines are compared with existing and proposed kaon factories. Relative to the Brookhaven AGS as it exists today, LAMPF II will provide 90 times as many neutrino events per year and 300 times as many kaons per year. A number of experiments requiring vastly increased beam current are examined. Two programs, the search for quark-gluon plasma using high-energy antiproton annihilation in nuclei, and the measurement of nuclear quark structure functions using the Drell-Yan process, address the highest priority problems of the NSAC long-range plan. Some of the design features of the LAMPF II accelerators are shown to be important for reducing beam losses and increasing beam availability. Because of the large rf power and voltage required, innovation on ferrite-tuned cavities is required. A commercially available Mg-Mn ferrite with perpendicular bias has been shown to raise the available ferrite Q by more than a factor of 10 compared with the materials now in use at other accelerators. A preliminary cost estimate is discussed. The cost of the LAMPF II machine is compared with estimates of several other proposed machines made with the same set of costing algorithms. The 45-GeV LAMPF II proposal produces far more neutrinos, kaons, and antiprotons per unit cost than an upgraded conventional machine. The LAMPF II booster alone, which can provide 100 μA at 12 GeV, is shown to be a very interesting option at moderate cost

  18. Medium-Range Predictability of Contrail-Cirrus Demonstrated during Experiments Ml-Cirrus and Access-Ii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Contrail Cirrus Prediction model CoCiP (doi:10.5194/gmd-5-543-2012) has been applied quasi operationally to predict contrails for flight planning of ML-CIRRUS (C. Voigt, DLR, et al.) in Europe and for ACCESS II in California (B. Anderson, NASA, et al.) in March-May 2014. The model uses NWP data from ECMWF and past airtraffic data (actual traffic data are used for analysis). The forecasts provided a sequence of hourly forecast maps of contrail cirrus optical depth for 3.5 days, every 12 h. CoCiP has been compared to observations before, e.g. within a global climate-aerosol-contrail model (Schumann, Penner et al., ACPD, 2015, doi:10.5194/acpd-15-19553-2015). Good predictions would allow for climate optimal routing (see, e.g., US patent by Mannstein and Schumann, US 2012/0173147 A1). The predictions are tested by: 1) Local eyewitness reports and photos, 2) satellite observed cloudiness, 3) autocorrelation analysis of predictions for various forecast periods, 4) comparisons of computed with observed optical depth from COCS (doi:10.5194/amt-7-3233-2014, 2014) by IR METEOSAT-SEVIRI observations over Europe. The results demonstrate medium-range predictability of contrail cirrus to a useful degree for given traffic, soot emissions, and high-quality NWP data. A growing set of satellite, Lidar, and in-situ data from ML-CIRRUS and ACCENT are becoming available and will be used to further test the forecast quality. The autocorrelation of optical depth predictions is near 70% for 3-d forecasts for Europe (outside times with high Sahara dust loads), and only slightly smaller for continental USA. Contrail cirrus is abundant over Europe and USA. More than 1/3 of all cirrus measured with the research aircraft HALO during ML-CIRRUS was impacted by contrails. The radiative forcing (RF) is strongly daytime and ambience dependent. The net annual mean RF, based on our global studies, may reach up to 0.08 W/m2 globally, and may well exceed 1 W/m2 regionally, with maximum over Europe

  19. Experiences on implementation of on-the-job training programmes for maintenance personnel in Asco and Vandellos II NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a process and methodology for definition and implementation of On-Job-Training Programmes (OJTP) for new maintenance personnel in Asco and Vandellos II. The content of these OJTP has been defined for each maintenance job position. A simplified task analysis was carried out to specify common and specific training. Generally, the specific maintenance training programs includes training modules in classroom and workshop environment on (1) maintenance of components and (2) maintenance fundamentals of mechanical, electrical and instrumentation. This specific training has been finally completed with a OJT programme based on the execution, observation or/and discussion about the main maintenance activities under entitled worker supervision. Each lesson, task or activity is defined in a format where the training objective, milestones and deliverables are specified. The list of activities makes up the OJTP. It is based on applicable plant procedures and maintenance instruction to each job position. Several participants or actors have been defined to implement the OJTP: co-ordinator of the process, tutors for each OJT task, line maintenance manager and trainee. Co-ordinator is the link among all actors. He knows the OJTP scope and plans the training activities according to the line maintenance manager. Co-ordinator carries out a tracking process, informs to training and maintenance managers about the progress in the programme, elaborates the progress and final reports and keeps training records. Tutors, usually entitled workers in the job position, transfer the knowledge to the trainee and discuss, review and assess the trainee's performance. Trainee carries out the scheduled tasks, keeps records of work done, prepares deliverables and informs about his activities to the Co-ordinator. The OJT programme for each new maintenance worker starts with a launching meeting with all involved actors. The goals of this meeting are to explain the OJTP scope and

  20. DIBU, a two-dimensioanl vectorized diffusion code for the evaluation of the PROTEUS-PHASE-II highconverter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities related to the Light Water High Conversion Reactor have been conducted at the Swiss PROTEUS critical facility. In the context of these neutron physics experiments the DITUBS code system, including a vectorized two-dimensional computer code DIBU, has been developed. In the code several different methods for time-efficient solutions of the neutron flux calculation have been tested on vector computers. Two-dimensional results of whole-core calculations for the PROTEUS test facility provided the qualification and applicability of less expensive one-dimensional calculations for the determination of numerical corrections on experimental values. This correction factors take into account the influence of the outer fuel zones of the driven PROTEUS facility on the neutron flux spectrum in the test zone. (orig./DG)

  1. Development of a 30 cm-cube Electron-Tracking Compton Camera for the SMILE-II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mizumura, Y; Kubo, H; Takada, A; Parker, J D; Mizumoto, T; Sonoda, S; Tomono, D; Sawano, T; Nakamura, K; Matsuoka, Y; Komura, S; Nakamura, S; Oda, M; Miuchi, K; Kabuki, S; Kishimoto, Y; Kurosawa, S; Iwaki, S

    2013-01-01

    To explore the sub-MeV/MeV gamma-ray window for astronomy, we have developed the Electron-Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC), and carried out the first performance test at room condition using several gamma-ray sources in the sub-MeV energy band. Using a simple track analysis for a quick first test of the performance, the gamma-ray imaging capability was demonstrated by clear images and 5.3 degrees of angular resolution measure (ARM) measured at 662 keV. As the greatest impact of this work, a gamma-ray detection efficiency on the order of $10^{-4}$ was achieved at the sub-MeV gamma-ray band, which is one order of magnitude higher than our previous experiment. This angular resolution and detection efficiency enables us to detect the Crab Nebula at the 5 sigma level with several hours observation at balloon altitude in middle latitude. Furthermore, good consistency of efficiencies between this performance test and simulation including only physical processes has a large importance; it means we achieve nearly 100% d...

  2. Measurement of the neutral current reaction at high Q2 in the H1 experiment at HERA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents inclusive e±p double and single differential cross section measurements for neutral current deep inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized leptons on protons as a function of the negative four-momentum transfer squared Q2 and the Bjorken variable x. The data were collected in the years 2003-2007 in the H1 experiment at HERA with positively and negatively longitudinally polarized lepton beams of 27 GeV and a proton beam of 920 GeV corresponding to the centre-of-mass energy of √(s)=319 GeV. The integrated luminosity is about 330 pb-1. An overview of the phenomenology of the deep inelastic scattering is given and the experimental apparatus is described. The NC cross section measurement procedure is presented and discussed in details. The measured cross sections are used to investigate electroweak effects at high Q2. The proton structure function xF3, sensitive to the valence quarks in the proton, is measured. The polarization effects sensitive to the chiral structure of neutral currents are investigated. The Standard Model predictions are found to be in a good agreement with the measurement.

  3. An experience on the purification of bacterially infested I.T.U. TRIGA Mark-II reactor water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the failure of conductivity meter at the makeup water purification system, highconductivity water was added into the tank water. For this reason, the conductivity of the tank water rose to 12.5 μS/cm and the tank water became turbid. Bacteriological analysis showed that the tank water became infested with bacteria. A suitable method for the sterilization of the tank water by means of the irradiation and the chemical materials was searched. Hydrogen-Peroxide (H2P2) was chosen as the most suitable material for the chemical sterilization. However, it was not used since it was not experienced in any reactor previously and the tank water was cleaned from the bacteria by means of the irradiation and the purification system. The makeup water purification system was modified permanently for this purpose. As a result, conductivity of the tank water was decreased to 0.2 μS/cm by using this modified system. Some new experiences about the purification and protection of tank water from the bacteria were gained during these operations. (orig.)

  4. Measurement of the neutral current reaction at high Q{sup 2} in the H1 experiment at HERA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shushkevich, Stanislav

    2012-12-15

    This thesis presents inclusive e{sup {+-}}p double and single differential cross section measurements for neutral current deep inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized leptons on protons as a function of the negative four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} and the Bjorken variable x. The data were collected in the years 2003-2007 in the H1 experiment at HERA with positively and negatively longitudinally polarized lepton beams of 27 GeV and a proton beam of 920 GeV corresponding to the centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=319 GeV. The integrated luminosity is about 330 pb{sup -1}. An overview of the phenomenology of the deep inelastic scattering is given and the experimental apparatus is described. The NC cross section measurement procedure is presented and discussed in details. The measured cross sections are used to investigate electroweak effects at high Q{sup 2}. The proton structure function xF{sub 3}, sensitive to the valence quarks in the proton, is measured. The polarization effects sensitive to the chiral structure of neutral currents are investigated. The Standard Model predictions are found to be in a good agreement with the measurement.

  5. Theory versus experiment for vacuum Rabi oscillations in lossy cavities. II. Direct test of uniqueness of vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper continues the analysis of vacuum Rabi oscillations we started in part I [Phys. Rev. A 79, 033836 (2009)]. Here we concentrate on experimental consequences for cavity QED of two different classes of representations of harmonic-oscillator Lie algebras. The zero-temperature master equation, derived in part I for irreducible representations of the algebra, is reformulated in a reducible representation that models electromagnetic fields by a gas of harmonic-oscillator wave packets. The representation is known to introduce automatic regularizations that in irreducible representations would have to be justified by ad hoc arguments. Predictions based on this representation are characterized in thermodynamic limit by a single parameter σ, responsible for collapses and revivals of Rabi oscillations in exact vacuum. Collapses and revivals disappear in the limit σ→∞. Observation of a finite σ would mean that cavity quantum fields are described by a non-Wightmanian theory, where vacuum states are zero-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates of a N-particle bosonic oscillator gas and, thus, are nonunique. The data collected in the experiment of Brune et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1800 (1996)] are consistent with any σ>400.

  6. Hardware Demonstrator of a Level-1 Track Finding Algorithm with FPGAs for the Phase II CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cieri, Davide

    2016-01-01

    At the HL-LHC, proton bunches collide every 25\\,ns, producing an average of 140 pp interactions per bunch crossing. To operate in such an environment, the CMS experiment will need a Level-1 (L1) hardware trigger, able to identify interesting events within a latency of 12.5\\,$\\mu$s. This novel L1 trigger will make use of data coming from the silicon tracker to constrain the trigger rate. Goal of this new \\textit{track trigger} will be to build L1 tracks from the tracker information. The architecture that will be implemented in future to process tracker data is still under discussion. One possibility is to adopt a system entirely based on FPGA electronic. The proposed track finding algorithm is based on the Hough transform method. The algorithm has been tested using simulated pp collision data and it is currently being demonstrated in hardware, using the ``MP7'', which is a $\\mu$TCA board with a powerful FPGA capable of handling data rates approaching 1 Tb/s. Two different implementations of the Hough tran...

  7. Measurement of the W boson helicity in top-antitop quark events with the CDF II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwalek, Thorsten; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-10-01

    bosons depends on the Yukawa coupling of the top quarks, the measurement of F{sub 0} is sensitive to the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. Alternative models can lead to an altered F{sub 0} fraction. In this analysis the W helicity fractions are measured in a selected sample rich in t{bar B} events where one lepton, at least four jets, and missing transverse energy are required. All kinematic quantities describing the t{bar t} decay are determined. As a sensitive observable, we use the cosine of the decay angle {theta}*, which is defined as the angle between the momentum of the charged lepton in the W boson rest frame and the W boson momentum in the top quark rest frame. The data used in this analysis were taken with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II) in the years 2002-2006 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 955 pb{sup -1}. Previous CDF measurements of the W boson helicity fractions in top quark decays used either the square of the invariant mass of the charged lepton and the b quark jet, M{sub {ell}b}{sup 2}, or the lepton p{sub T} distribution as a discriminant. The D0 collaboration used a matrix-element method to extract a value of F{sub 0}; in a second analysis the reconstructed distribution of cos {theta}* was utilized to measure F{sub +}. CDF gives the latest value of F{sub 0} = 0.74{sub -0.34}{sup +0.22}, while D measured F{sub 0} = 0.56 {+-} 0.31. The CDF collaboration also gives the current upper limit of F{sub +} < 0.09.

  8. Quality Assurance on F18 production: Experience with GE II target/ion source system for the minitracer cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Ever since the demonstration of FDG/PET in the diagnosis of cancer and in target delinearation for radiation treatment, major medical centers as well as ontological centers across the world are including FDG/PET as one of their premium imaging modalities in cancer care. Due to the relatively short half-life of positron emitting isotopes, a good number of centers have been adding small compact medical cyclotrons into their practice to generate FDG as well as other tracers for research purpose. To meet the demands of more than 6000 FDG studies a year plus additional research projects on oncological imaging using new F18 tracers and PET/CT, the North Florida Cyclotron Center USA, a division of the Integrated Community of Oncology Network (ICON) in Jacksonville, Florida, recently upgraded their ion source and target system to boost its F18 production with inhouse GE MiniTracer cyclotron. This upgrade is based on the GE Gen II target system as well as a new ion source that is capable of generating higher initial ion current and a target assembly that not only increases the target (H2O18) volume 50% from 1.3 mL to 2.0 mL but also increases the cooling capacity that allows higher target current from 35 μA to 50 μA. This combination allows more than 200% F18 production as well as FDG yield. In this paper, we describe a quality assurance (QA) program specifically designed for consistent F18 production. Methodology: The process of FDG production has been compartmentized into three different parts. Part I involves the production of proton beams (target current) for the O18(p,n)F18 reaction. Part 2 involves the production of F18, which includes the Oxygen-18 water target system, and Part 3 involves the production of FDG, which includes all the processes inside the FDG synthesis box. The performances with respect to each part can thus be assessed separately. The performance of each cyclotron ran is analyzed based on the recorded log file. The mean and standard

  9. Numerical analysis of resonances induced by s wave neutrons in transmission time-of-flight experiments with a computer IBM 7094 II; Methodes d'analyse des resonances induites par les neutrons s dans les experiences de transmission par temps de vol et automatisation de ces methodes sur ordinateur IBM 7094 II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corge, Ch. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-01-01

    Numerical analysis of transmission resonances induced by s wave neutrons in time-of-flight experiments can be achieved in a fairly automatic way on an IBM 7094/II computer. The involved computations are carried out following a four step scheme: 1 - experimental raw data are processed to obtain the resonant transmissions, 2 - values of experimental quantities for each resonance are derived from the above transmissions, 3 - resonance parameters are determined using a least square method to solve the over determined system obtained by equalling theoretical functions to the correspondent experimental values. Four analysis methods are gathered in the same code, 4 - graphical control of the results is performed. (author) [French] L'automatisation, sur ordinateur IBM 7094/II, de l'analyse des resonances induites par les neutrons s dans les experiences de transmission par temps de vol a ete accomplie en la decomposant selon un schema articule en quatre phases: 1 - le traitement des donnees experimentales brutes pour obtenir les transmissions interfero-resonnantes, 2 - la determination des grandeurs d'analyse a partir des transmissions precedentes, 3 - l'analyse proprement dite des resonances dont les parametres sont obtenus par la resolution d'un systeme surabondant. Quatre methodes d'analyse sont groupees en un meme programme, 4 - la procedure de verification graphique. (auteur)

  10. The role of natural organic matter in the migration behaviour of americium in the Boom clay - Part II: analysis of migration experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: In demonstrating the suitability of Boom Clay as a potential site for the disposal of radioactive waste in Belgium, the role of the relatively high amount of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) present in the Boom Clay on the mobility of critical radionuclides needs investigation. Trivalent actinides and lanthanides form strong complexes with humic substances. Complexation of these trivalent radionuclides with NOM present in the Boom Clay may have opposing effects. If complexed by the aqueous phase (mobile) NOM, radionuclide transport will be governed by the mobility of these dissolved radionuclide-NOM species. If complexed by the solid phase (immobile) NOM, migration will be retarded. One of the aims of the EC projects TRANCOM-Clay and TRANCOM-II was to investigate the role of mobile NOM as radionuclide carrier with the objective of deriving conceptual models that can be implemented in repository performance assessment (PA) models. A separate paper describes the results of column migration experiments involving the transport of 241Am-14C-NOM complexes through Boom Clay cores. This paper describes the transport model, POPCORN, that was developed to describe and evaluate the influence of NOM on radionuclide transport in clay, taking into account attachment/detachment rates of NOM to clay surfaces and the kinetics of RN complexation to, and destabilization from, NOM. The POPCORN model was used to evaluate diffusion experiments involving injection of 14C-labelled NOM in Boom Clay cores. Model fits were obtained by varying the rates of filtration of NOM by attachment to the surface of the clay matrix. POPCORN was then used to analyse the 241Am-14C-NOM migration experiments. The stability properties of the 241Am-NOM were characterised by kinetic constants, and good matches to the migration data were achieved for the experiments. The findings suggest that a small sub-population of the original 241Am-OM is the most stable, and that this sub

  11. Inhalative steroids as an individual treatment in symptomatic lung cancer patients with radiation pneumonitis grade II after radiotherapy – a single-centre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess efficacy of our single-centre experience with inhalative steroids (IS) in lung cancer patients with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) grade II. Between 05/09 and 07/10, 24 patients (female, n = 8; male, n = 16) with lung cancer (non-small cell lung carcinoma [NSCLC]: n = 19; small cell lung cancer [SCLC]: n = 3; unknown histology: n = 2) and good performance status (ECOG ≤1) received definitive radiotherapy to the primary tumour site and involved lymph nodes with concurrent chemotherapy (n = 18), sequential chemotherapy (n = 2) or radiation only (n = 4) and developed symptomatic RP grade II during follow-up. No patient presented with oxygen requiring RP grade III. The mean age at diagnosis was 66 years (range: 50–82 years). Nine patients suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) before treatment, and 18 patients had a smoking history (median pack years: 48). The mean lung dose was 15.5 Gy (range: 3.0–23.1 Gy). All patients were treated with IS. If a patient’s clinical symptoms did not significantly improve within two weeks of IS therapy initiation, their treatment was switched to oral prednisolone. All 24 patients were initially treated with a high dose IS (budesonide 800 μg 1-0-1) for 14 days. Of the patients, 18 showed a significant improvement of clinical symptoms and 6 patients did not show significant improvement of clinical symptoms and were classified as non-responders to IS. Their treatment was switched to oral steroids after two weeks (starting with oral prednisolone, 0.5 mg/kg bodyweight; at least 50 mg per day). All of these patients responded to the prednisolone. None of non-responders presented with increased symptoms of RP and required oxygen and / or hospitalization (RP grade III). The median follow-up after IS treatment initiation was 18 months (range: 4–66 months). The median duration of IS treatment and prednisolone treatment was 8.2 months (range: 3.0–48.3 months) and 11.4 months (range: 5.0–44

  12. IORT and external beam irradiation (EBI) in clinical stage I-II NSCLC patients with severely compromised pulmonary function: an 52-patient single-institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In limited stage NSCLC surgery offers the best chance for cure. However, patients who would not tolerate a radical surgical procedure such as lobectomy on the basis of severely compromised pulmonary function or cardio respiratory impairment are also poor candidates for radical external beam irradiation. These patients may benefit from alternative procedures that allow maximum sparing of adjacent lung tissue such as brachytherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy or IORT. There is clear evidence that loco-regional control in lung cancer is dose related, but neighboring normal tissues such as ipsilateral or collateral lung, heart, spinal cord are limiting factors for delivering doses necessary to eradicate the primary or loco-regional metastases. The rational of IORT, builds on the observation that only patients in whom local control has been achieved had a prolonged survival. IORT permits to selectively deliver high single doses to the tumor or the tumor bed with maximum sparing of adjacent normal tissue and has been applied with curative and palliative intent in a variety of tumors. Experience with IORT in lung cancer is still very limited. The current study evaluates the outcome of combined IORT and EBI in a highly selected cohort of patients with clinical stage I-II NSCLC who were fit to undergo thoracotomy and lymph node sampling but unable to undergo lobectomy or conventional high dose EBI due to severely compromised pulmonary function. (orig.)

  13. IORT and external beam irradiation (EBI) in clinical stage I-II NSCLC patients with severely compromised pulmonary function: an 52-patient single-institutional experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakse, G.; Kapp, K.S.; Geyer, E.; Oechs, A. [Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Dept. of Surgery, Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria); Maier, A.; Gabor, S.; Juettner, F.M. [Div. of Thoracic and Hyperbaric Surgery, Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria)

    2007-12-15

    In limited stage NSCLC surgery offers the best chance for cure. However, patients who would not tolerate a radical surgical procedure such as lobectomy on the basis of severely compromised pulmonary function or cardio respiratory impairment are also poor candidates for radical external beam irradiation. These patients may benefit from alternative procedures that allow maximum sparing of adjacent lung tissue such as brachytherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy or IORT. There is clear evidence that loco-regional control in lung cancer is dose related, but neighboring normal tissues such as ipsilateral or collateral lung, heart, spinal cord are limiting factors for delivering doses necessary to eradicate the primary or loco-regional metastases. The rational of IORT, builds on the observation that only patients in whom local control has been achieved had a prolonged survival. IORT permits to selectively deliver high single doses to the tumor or the tumor bed with maximum sparing of adjacent normal tissue and has been applied with curative and palliative intent in a variety of tumors. Experience with IORT in lung cancer is still very limited. The current study evaluates the outcome of combined IORT and EBI in a highly selected cohort of patients with clinical stage I-II NSCLC who were fit to undergo thoracotomy and lymph node sampling but unable to undergo lobectomy or conventional high dose EBI due to severely compromised pulmonary function. (orig.)

  14. Analysis of the SEFOR I and II Doppler experiments and their use in assessing the accuracy of calculated fast reactor Doppler effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doppler effects in the SEFOR (South-West Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor) cores have been calculated and compared with experimental measurements, from which conclusions have been drawn regarding the accuracy of FGL5 calculations of the Doppler effects in the UK Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) and the Commercial Fast Reactor (CFR). SEFOR experiments have been examined in order to place an uncertainty on the results and in order to renormalise them to a reactivity scale calculated using the current UK recommended delayed neutron data. Calculations for SEFOR-I have been carried out in spherical and cylindrical geometry using various calculational techniques and the data sets FD4, FD5, and FGL5. This work highlights differences between FD5 and FGL5/MURALB calculations. Both SEFOR I and II have been analysed in R/Z geometry using the FGL5/MURALB method; including treatments for fuel rod, subassembly and B4C absorber rod heterogeneities, some allowance has also been made for the temperature dependence of the iron cross sections. The results of these analyses have been used in order to assess the performance of FGL5/MURALB data and methods applied to the UK Prototype and Commercial Fast Reactors. (U.K.)

  15. TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results of pulse parameters and control rod worth measurements at TRIGA Mark 2 reactor in Ljubljana are presented. The measurements were performed with a completely fresh, uniform, and compact core. Only standard fuel elements with 12 wt% uranium were used. Special efforts were made to get reliable and accurate results at well-defined experimental conditions, and it is proposed to use the results as a benchmark test case for TRIGA reactors

  16. Phase ii Wage Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Daniel J. B.

    1974-01-01

    This study summarizes Phase ii Pay Board standards, assessing their effectiveness, and concluding that they had a significant impact on wage increases in new union agreements, less effect on deferred increases and nonunion wages, and little effect on aggregate income shares. The Phase ii experience can provide guidance for future control programs.…

  17. Part I. How experiments end: three case studies on the interaction of experiment and theory in twentieth-century physics. Part II. Large weak isospin and the W mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis for part I addresses the question: how does evidence from a physical experiment become persuasive to those performing the experiment. Two methods are used to examine case studies in 20th century physics. First, experiments are chosen that at some point involved an error; some of the physicists involved believed a result to be true that we now consider false. This throws into relief their criteria for accepting the original (incorrect) result. Second, in each study two competing groups are analysed. This also helps make clear the standards and nature of what each group considered to be compelling evidence. The three case studies are chosen to represent three very different epochs in 20th century physics experimentation. Part II proposes a variation of the usual SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1)/sub Y/ weak interaction theory in which strongly coupled scalars phi transform as N N's of SU(2)/sub L/ and as an (N, anti N) of a global SU(N)/sub L/ x SU(N)/sub R/. The gauge group is embedded in the global group so that when U(N)/sub L/ x U(N)/sub R/ breaks down to U(N)/sub v/ it breaks SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1)/sub Y/ to U(1)/sub EM/. This scheme preserves the free level relation M/sub Z//M/sub W/ = 1/cos theta/sub W/. Radiative corrections (ΔM/sub W/) to M/sub W/ are then discussed and it is found that (a) the screening theorem holds, i.e. ΔM/sub W/ approx. αM/sub W/2 In xi not αM/sub H/2 In xi where xi is identical with (M2/sub H//M2/sub W/) and M/sub H/ = scalar mass approx. 1 TeV. A simple symmetry argument accounts for this. (b) Radiative corrections increase with the size N of the weak multiplet as N4

  18. Belle II production system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hideki; Grzymkowski, Rafal; Ludacka, Radek; Schram, Malachi

    2015-12-01

    The Belle II experiment will record a similar quantity of data to LHC experiments and will acquire it at similar rates. This requires considerable computing, storage and network resources to handle not only data created by the experiment but also considerable amounts of simulated data. Consequently Belle II employs a distributed computing system to provide the resources coordinated by the the DIRAC interware. DIRAC is a general software framework that provides a unified interface among heterogeneous computing resources. In addition to the well proven DIRAC software stack, Belle II is developing its own extension called BelleDIRAC. BelleDIRAC provides a transparent user experience for the Belle II analysis framework (basf2) on various environments and gives access to file information managed by LFC and AMGA metadata catalog. By unifying DIRAC and BelleDIRAC functionalities, Belle II plans to operate an automated mass data processing framework named a “production system”. The Belle II production system enables large-scale raw data transfer from experimental site to raw data centers, followed by massive data processing, and smart data delivery to each remote site. The production system is also utilized for simulated data production and data analysis. Although development of the production system is still on-going, recently Belle II has prepared prototype version and evaluated it with a large scale simulated data production. In this presentation we will report the evaluation of the prototype system and future development plans.

  19. First direct limits on Lightly Ionizing Particles with electric charge less than $e/6$

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nelson, H; Nelson, R H; Ogburn, R W; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    While the Standard Model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically-produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than $e$/6. A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers found no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between $e$/6 and $e$/200.

  20. First Direct Limits on Lightly Ionizing Particles with Electric Charge Less than e/6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nelson, H.; Nelson, R. H.; Ogburn, R. W.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-03-18

    While the Standard Model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically- produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than e/6. A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers found no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between e/6 and e/200.

  1. Solution Conditions Affect the Ability of the K30D Mutation To Prevent Amyloid Fibril Formation by Apolipoprotein C-II: Insights from Experiments and Theoretical Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yu; Todorova, Nevena; Zlatic, Courtney O; Gooley, Paul R; Griffin, Michael D W; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Yarovsky, Irene

    2016-07-12

    Apolipoproteins form amphipathic helical structures that bind lipid surfaces. Paradoxically, lipid-free apolipoproteins display a strong propensity to form cross-β structure and self-associate into disease-related amyloid fibrils. Studies of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) amyloid fibrils suggest that a K30-D69 ion pair accounts for the dual abilities to form helix and cross-β structure. Consistent with this is the observation that a K30D mutation prevents fibril formation under standard fibril forming conditions. However, we found that fibril formation by K30D apoC-II proceeded readily at low pH and a higher salt or protein concentration. Structural analysis demonstrated that K30D apoC-II fibrils at pH 7 have a structure similar to that of the wild-type fibrils but are less stable. Molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type apoC-II fibril model at pH 7 and 3 showed that the loss of charge on D69 at pH 3 leads to greater separation between residues K30 and D69 within the fibril with a corresponding reduction in β-strand content around residue 30. In contrast, in simulations of the K30D mutant model at pH 7 and 3, residues D30 and D69 moved closer at pH 3, accompanied by an increase in β-strand content around residue 30. The simulations also demonstrated a strong dominance of inter- over intramolecular contacts between ionic residues of apoC-II and suggested a cooperative mechanism for forming favorable interactions between the individual strands under different conditions. These observations demonstrate the important role of the buried K30-D69 ion pair in the stability and solution properties of apoC-II amyloid fibrils. PMID:27311794

  2. Experience with the functional assessment of cancer therapy-lung (FACT-L) in ECOG 4593, a phase II hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (HART) trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PURPOSE: To gain experience in measuring quality of life (QOL) using the FACT-L in patients (pt) with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with an altered fractionation regimen, HART, in a Phase II, multiinstitutional ECOG trial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Version 2 of FACT-L, with 43 questions in 6 subscale categories (8 physical well-being, 8 social/family well-being, 3 relationship with doctor, 6 emotional well-being, 8 functional well-being, 10 lung cancer symptoms), available in English, Spanish and French, was administered by data managers and filled out by pts, independent of physician presence or input. The HART trial enrolled 30 pts, and FACT-L was administered at baseline (tp 1), treatment completion (tp 2) and 4 weeks following therapy (tp 3). (35(43)) FACT-L items were designed to yield a total QOL score with higher values reflective of better QOL; in addition, a FACT-L trial outcome index (TOI) was computed (TOI = physical score + functional score + lung cancer related score), and is considered the most relevant clinical QOL measure. RESULTS: The FACT-L completion rates were: tp 1 - (30(30)) (100%), tp 2 - (29(30)) (97%) and tp 3 - (24(30)) (80%); the mean scores at various time points are summarized in the table below and indicate that FACT-L is responsive to changes over time. The differences in subscales and total scores can be used as a measure of change in QOL resulting from treatment; statistically significant change was noted from baseline to tp 2 for physical, emotional and functional well-being; and from baseline to tp 3 for emotional well-being. The change in TOI score was also evaluated as a function of response and toxicity grade, and no clear association emerged. When assessed as a function of survival (at the time of this analysis, (5(30)) pt were alive, with median survival of 56 weeks), the degradation in QOL was most severe for pt who died early; the mean change in TOI from baseline to tp 3 for pt dying in the first 25 weeks, 25

  3. Long-term ELBARA-II Assistance to SMOS Land Product and Algorithm Validation at the Valencia Anchor Station (MELBEX Experiment 2010-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Schwank, Mike; Miernecki, Maciej; Kerr, Yann; Casal, Tania; Delwart, Steven; Fernandez-Moran, Roberto; Mecklenburg, Susanne; Coll Pajaron, M. Amparo; Salgado Hernanz, Paula

    The main activity of the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS) is currently now to support the validation of SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) Level 2 and 3 land products (soil moisture, SM, and vegetation optical depth, TAU). With this aim, the European Space Agency (ESA) has provided the Climatology from Satellites Group of the University of Valencia with an ELBARA-II microwave radiometer under a loan agreement since September 2009. During this time, brightness temperatures (TB) have continuously been acquired, except during normal maintenance or minor repair interruptions. ELBARA-II is an L-band dual-polarization radiometer with two channels (1400-1418 MHz, 1409-1427 MHz). It is continuously measuring over a vineyard field (El Renegado, Caudete de las Fuentes, Valencia) from a 15 m platform with a constant protocol for calibration and angular scanning measurements with the aim to assisting the validation of SMOS land products and the calibration of the L-MEB (L-Band Emission of the Biosphere) -basis for the SMOS Level 2 Land Processor- over the VAS validation site. One of the advantages of using the VAS site is the possibility of studying two different environmental conditions along the year. While the vine cycle extends mainly between April and October, during the rest of the year the area remains under bare soil conditions, adequate for the calibration of the soil model. The measurement protocol currently running has shown to be robust during the whole operation time and will be extended in time as much as possible to continue providing a long-term data set of ELBARA-II TB measurements and retrieved SM and TAU. This data set is also showing to be useful in support of SMOS scientific activities: the VAS area and, specifically the ELBARA-II site, offer good conditions to control the long-term evolution of SMOS Level 2 and Level 3 land products and interpret eventual anomalies that may obscure sensor hidden biases. In addition, SM and TAU that are currently

  4. Experience and challenges on safeguards practices and approaches for BAEC 3 MW TRIGA Mk-II research reactor and other establishment of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangladesh is deeply committed to nuclear non-proliferation signing and accesses to different unilateral protocols, agreements and treaties like Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), Safeguards Agreements, Nuclear Cooperation Agreements with the USA and other countries etc. are the manifestations of such commitment. The first of such agreements, the NPT was signed in August 1979. NPT is a national commitment that the signatory country will not engage in activities related on nuclear detonations. Subsequently a bilateral agreement entitled 'Safeguards Agreements' was signed with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in June 1982. This provides for international verification of facilities and balancing of nuclear materials. 3MW TRIGA Mark-II Research Reactor Facility of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) is inspected physically by the IAEA Safeguards Inspectors on an annual basis. For this purpose, a subsidiary arrangement was made with the IAEA, which had defined the scope of such verification. Bangladesh has also signed a Nuclear Cooperation Agreement with the USA on September 17, 1981, which facilitated export of nuclear technology from USA to Bangladesh. Bangladesh also signed another bilateral agreement entitled 'Protocol Additional to the Safeguards Agreements' with the IAEA in March 30, 2001. The main purpose of this agreement is to provide the IAEA with information on 'so called dual-purpose materials and facilities' including the front end and back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Its enforcement required filing of an initial declaration, draft of which has been sent to the Ministry of Science, Information and Communication Technology (MOSICT) for approval and transmittal to IAEA through the office of the permanent mission in Geneva. This protocol till to-date is the highest level of verification under the nonproliferation regime. The commitment of Bangladesh to non-proliferation is adequately reflected

  5. A Low-threshold Analysis of Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Raymond A., III

    Although dark matter appears to constitute over 80% of the matter in the Universe, its composition is a mystery. Astrophysical observations suggest that the luminous portions of the Galaxy are embedded in a halo of darkmatter particles. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are the most studied class of dark-matter candidates and arise naturally within the context of many weak-scale supersymmetric theories. Direct-detection experiments like the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) strive to discern the kinetic energy of recoiling nuclei resulting from WIMP interactions with terrestrial matter. This is a considerable challenge in which the low (expected) rate of WIMP interactions must be distinguished from an overwhelming rate due to known types of radiation. An incontrovertible positive detection has remained elusive. However, a few experiments have recorded data that appear consistent with a low-mass WIMP. This thesis describes an attempt to probe the favored parameter space. To increase sensitivity to low-mass WIMPs, a low-threshold technique with improved sensitivity to small energy depositions is applied to CDMS shallow-site data. Four germanium and two silicon detectors were operated between December 2001 and June 2002, yielding 118 days of exposure. By sacrificing some of the CDMS detectors' ability to discriminate signal from background, energy thresholds of ˜1 and ˜2 keV were achieved for three of the germanium and both silicon detectors, respectively. A large number of WIMP candidate events are observed, most of which can be accounted for by misidentification of background sources. No conclusive evidence for a low-mass WIMP signal is found. The observed event rates are used to set upper limits on the WIMPnucleon scattering cross section as a function of WIMP mass. Interesting parameter space is excluded for WIMPs with masses below ˜9GeV/c 2. Under standard assumptions, the parameter space favored by interpretations of other experiments' data as

  6. Measurement of the charge asymmetry and the W boson helicity in top-antitop quark events with the CDF II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschbuehl, Dominic; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2005-12-01

    In 1995 the heaviest elementary particle, top quark, was discovered at the Tevatron collider in top-antitop quark pair production. Since the top quark mass is of the same order as the electroweak symmetry breaking scale, measurements of the properties of the top quark like mass, charge, spin or the production mechanism, offer a good opportunity to test the Standard Model at such high energies. Top quarks at the Tevatron are predominantly pair-produced through light quark-antiquark annihilation. Higher order perturbative QCD calculations predict a sizeable asymmetry between the number of top quarks and antitop quarks produced in forward direction. This asymmetry is induced through radiative corrections. A measurement of the asymmetry can check the perturbative QCD predictions. Due to the high mass of the top quark, nearly the mass of a gold nucleus, the life time of the top quark is much shorter than the hadronization time-scale. This means that the top quark decays before it has a chance to form a bound state. The Standard Model predicts that the top quark decays in nearly 100% of the cases into a W boson and a b quark via a charge-current weak interaction. The measurement of the W boson helicity probes the V-A structure of the weak interaction and differences to the expectation would give evidence for new physics. Until the start of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron is the only experiment where top quarks can be directly produced and their properties be measured. The Tevatron reaches a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton antiproton collisions. The data used in this analysis were taken in Run II of the Tevatron with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in the years 2001-2004 and represent an integrated luminosity of 319 pb{sup -1}. The thesis is organized in the following way: In the first chapter a short overview of the Standard Model is given. The theoretical aspects of the top quark decay are described with particular emphasis on the

  7. Measurement of the charge asymmetry and the W boson helicity in top-antitop quark events with the CDF II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschbuehl, Dominic; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2005-12-01

    In 1995 the heaviest elementary particle, top quark, was discovered at the Tevatron collider in top-antitop quark pair production. Since the top quark mass is of the same order as the electroweak symmetry breaking scale, measurements of the properties of the top quark like mass, charge, spin or the production mechanism, offer a good opportunity to test the Standard Model at such high energies. Top quarks at the Tevatron are predominantly pair-produced through light quark-antiquark annihilation. Higher order perturbative QCD calculations predict a sizeable asymmetry between the number of top quarks and antitop quarks produced in forward direction. This asymmetry is induced through radiative corrections. A measurement of the asymmetry can check the perturbative QCD predictions. Due to the high mass of the top quark, nearly the mass of a gold nucleus, the life time of the top quark is much shorter than the hadronization time-scale. This means that the top quark decays before it has a chance to form a bound state. The Standard Model predicts that the top quark decays in nearly 100% of the cases into a W boson and a b quark via a charge-current weak interaction. The measurement of the W boson helicity probes the V-A structure of the weak interaction and differences to the expectation would give evidence for new physics. Until the start of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron is the only experiment where top quarks can be directly produced and their properties be measured. The Tevatron reaches a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton antiproton collisions. The data used in this analysis were taken in Run II of the Tevatron with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in the years 2001-2004 and represent an integrated luminosity of 319 pb{sup -1}. The thesis is organized in the following way: In the first chapter a short overview of the Standard Model is given. The theoretical aspects of the top quark decay are described with particular emphasis on the

  8. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars. XIV. Classical and Type II Cepheids in the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Soszynski, I; Pietrukowicz, P; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Poleski, R; Kozlowski, S

    2011-01-01

    The fourteenth part of the OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars (OIII-CVS) contains Cepheid variables detected in the OGLE-II and OGLE-III fields toward the Galactic bulge. The catalog is divided into two main categories: 32 classical Cepheids (21 single-mode fundamental-mode F, four first-overtone 1O, two double-mode F/1O, three double-mode 1O/2O and two triple-mode 1O/2O/3O pulsators) and 335 type II Cepheids (156 BL Her, 128 W Vir and 51 RV Tau stars). Six of the type II Cepheids likely belong to the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy. The catalog data include the time-series photometry collected in the course of the OGLE survey, observational parameters of the stars, finding charts, and cross-identifications with the General Catalogue of Variable Stars. We discuss some statistical properties of the sample and compare it with the OGLE catalogs of Cepheids in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Multi-mode classical Cepheids in the Galactic bulge show systematically smaller period ratios than their counter...

  9. A Low-Threshold Analysis of Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunker, Raymond [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Although dark matter appears to constitute over 80% of the matter in the Universe, its composition is a mystery. Astrophysical observations suggest that the luminous portions of the Galaxy are embedded in a halo of darkmatter particles. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are the most studied class of dark-matter candidates and arise naturally within the context of many weak-scale supersymmetric theories. Direct-detection experiments like the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) strive to discern the kinetic energy of recoiling nuclei resulting from WIMP interactions with terrestrial matter. This is a considerable challenge in which the low (expected) rate of WIMP interactions must be distinguished from an overwhelming rate due to known types of radiation. An incontrovertible positive detection has remained elusive. However, a few experiments have recorded data that appear consistent with a low-mass WIMP. This thesis describes an attempt to probe the favored parameter space. To increase sensitivity to low-mass WIMPs, a low-threshold technique with improved sensitivity to small energy depositions is applied to CDMS shallowsite data. Four germanium and two silicon detectors were operated between December 2001 and June 2002, yielding 118 days of exposure. By sacrificing some of the CDMS detectors’ ability to discriminate signal from background, energy thresholds of ~1 and ~2 keV were achieved for three of the germanium and both silicon detectors, respectively. A large number of WIMP candidate events are observed, most of which can be accounted for by misidentification of background sources. No conclusive evidence for a low-mass WIMP signal is found. The observed event rates are used to set upper limits on the WIMPnucleon scattering cross section as a function of WIMP mass. Interesting parameter space is excluded for WIMPs with masses below ~9GeV/c2. Under standard assumptions, the parameter space favored by interpretations of other experiments

  10. Experience in the operation and maintenance of the L.E.N.A. 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia, 1966-1970

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience in the operation and maintenance of the L.E.N.A. 250 Kw TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia - Italy is described. First the Laboratorio Energia Nucleare Applicata (L.E.N.A.) is presented including some historical notes, administration and personnel. Reactor operation since 1966 is reported together with the cost of a recent one year period. Some minor operational difficulties such as a crack in the biological shield and fuel element elongations are described in detail. The activity of the health physics group is also presented. (author)

  11. Juno II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-01-01

    The Juno II launch vehicle, shown here, was a modified Jupiter Intermediate-Range Ballistic missionile, developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Between December 1958 and April 1961, the Juno II launched space probes Pioneer III and IV, as well as Explorer satellites VII, VIII and XI.

  12. The “Gene” Experiment in the Spanish Soyuz Mission to the International Space Station. II. Effects of oxygen concentration constrain

    OpenAIRE

    Herranz, Raúl; Laván, David A.; Medina, F. Javier; van Loon, Jack JWA; de Marco, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    In the GENE experiment performed during an 11-day Soyuz Mission to the International Space Station (ISS), we intended to determine if microgravity affects Drosophila metamorphosis processes. Control experiments were performed including a 1g ground control parallel to the ISS flight samples and a Random Position Machine microgravity simulated control. A preliminary analysis of the results indicates that five hundred to one thousand genes change their expression profiles depending on the cut-of...

  13. Analysis of PROTEUS LWHCR [light water high conversion reactor] Phase II experiments performed using the AARE [advanced analysis for reactor engineering] modular system and JEF [joint evaluated file] based libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of the AARE [advanced analysis for reactor engineering] modular code system and JEF-1 [joint evaluated file] based nuclear data libraries to analyze LWHCR [light water high conversion reactor] lattices is investigated by calculating the wet and dry cells of the PROTEUS-LWHCR Phase II experiment. The results are compared to those obtained using several cell codes. Main features of AARE, such as the self-shielding of resonance cross sections in the whole energy range, the generation of adequate fission source spectra, the accurate calculation of migration areas, and the efficiency of the elastic removal correction are investigated. In particular, it is shown that AARE can predict the k∞ void coefficient well with a 1% deviation from experiment, whereas the other codes give larger deviations

  14. Software Development at Belle II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhr, Thomas; Hauth, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Belle II is a next generation B-factory experiment that will collect 50 times more data than its predecessor Belle. This requires not only a major upgrade of the detector hardware, but also of the simulation, reconstruction, and analysis software. The challenges of the software development at Belle II and the tools and procedures to address them are reviewed in this article.

  15. Halo independent comparison of direct dark matter detection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We extend the halo-independent method of Fox, Liu, and Weiner to include energy resolution and efficiency with arbitrary energy dependence, making it more suitable for experiments to use in presenting their results. Then we compare measurements and upper limits on the direct detection of low mass ( ∼ 10 GeV) weakly interacting massive particles with spin-independent interactions, including the upper limit on the annual modulation amplitude from the CDMS collaboration. We find that isospin-symmetric couplings are severely constrained both by XENON100 and CDMS bounds, and that isospin-violating couplings are still possible at the lowest energies, while the tension of the higher energy CoGeNT bins with the CDMS modulation constraint remains. We find the CRESST-II signal is not compatible with the modulation signals of DAMA and CoGeNT

  16. The influence of Injection Pockets on the Performance of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings: Part II - Comparison Between Theory and Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrichson, Niels; Fuerst, Axel; Santos, Ilmar

    2006-01-01

    This is Part II of a two-part series of papers describing the effects of high pressure injection pockets on the operating conditions of tilting-pad thrust bearings. Measurements of the distribution of pressure and oil film thickness are presented for tilting-pad thrust bearing pads of approximately...... 100 cm2 surface area. Two pads are measured in a laboratory test-rig at loads of approximately 0.5, 1.5 and 4.0 MPa and velocities of up to 33 m/s. One pad has a plain surface. The other pad has a conical injection pocket at the pivot point and a leading edge taper. The measurements are compared to...... theoretical values obtained using a three dimensional thermo-elasto-hydrodynamic (TEHD) numerical model. At low and intermediate loads the theoretical pressure distribution corresponds well to the measured values for both pads although the influence of the pocket is slightly underestimated. At high loads...

  17. Operating experience and maintenance of the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II Reactor Vienna in the period July 1982 to July 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation and maintenance of the TRIGA Mark II Reactor Vienna during the period July 1982 to July 1984 is reported. The reactor operated without any major undesired shutdown period. The total power production was 261 MWh in 1982 and 200 MWh in 1983. The reactor was still operated without a rotary specimen rack, several irradiation positions were provided by tubes. The damaged Lazy Susan was finally shipped in a concrete container to a waste storage facility. Some problems were encountered with reactor components due to aging or wear such as the control rod drive motors, the fuel handling tool and the rod magnets. To increase the use and to facilitate the access to the thermal column a movable shielding platform was designed and constructed. Within the next year reinspection of the reactor tank and the supporting facilities will take place, especially the thermalizing column, presently housing a cold neutron source facility will be replaced by a neutron radiography installation

  18. Experience on the refurbishment of the cooling system of the 3 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor of Bangladesh and the modernization plan of the reactor control console

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) achieved its first criticality on 14 September 1986. Since then, the reactor has been used for manpower training, radioisotope production, and various R and D activities in the field of neutron activation analysis (NAA), neutron radiography (NR), and neutron scattering. Full power reactor operations remained suspended from 1997-2001 when a corrosion leakage problem in the 16N decay tank threatened the integrity of the primary cooling loop. The new tank was installed in 2001 and some modification and upgrades were carried out in the reactor cooling system such that the operational safety of the reactor could be strengthened. The cooling system upgrade mainly included replacement of the fouled shell and tube-type heat exchanger by a new plate-type one, modification of the cooling system piping layout, installation of isolation valves, installation of a chemical injection system for the secondary cooling system, modification of the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), etc. After successful completion of all these modifications, the reactor was made operational again at full power of 3 MW in August 2001. BAEC, the operating organization, is now implementing a government-funded project to replace the old analogue control console of the research reactor with a digital control console. This paper focuses on the modification of the cooling system as well as the I and C system and the upcoming control console upgrade of the 3 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor of Bangladesh. It also presents short descriptions of major incidents encountered so far in the reactor facility. (author)

  19. Distributed TRIDAQ systems for large HEP experiments: Part II. Implementation for BAC (ZEUS at HERA) and RPC (CMS at LMC) detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2008-01-01

    The paper debates design, construction, commissioning and exploitation of photonic and electronic TRIDAQ systems for two generations of HEP experiments. The Author participated personally in these developments during the last two decades. TRIDAQ system for Backing Calorimeter at HERA accelerator in DESY was presented. It was exploited during the period of 1991-2007. RPC Muon Trigger in CMS experiment at LHC accelerator was also presented. It will be exploited during the period of 2008-2015. Both TRIDAQ systems were designed, optimized and constructed for particular HEP experiment, thus, they have a unique functional structure. There are presented evolution of functional requirements of TRIDAQ systems and used technologies adapting to the ever changing research demands.

  20. Coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical experiment at Kamaishi Mine. Technical note 16-99-03. Analyses of Task 2C, DECOVALEX II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is an important part of the near field performance assesment of nuclear waste disposal to evaluate coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (T-H-M) phenomena, e.g., thermal effects on groundwater flow through rock matrix and water seepage into the buffer material, the generation of swelling pressure of the buffer material, and thermal stresses potentially affecting porosity and fracture apertures of the rock. An in-situ T-H-M experiment named Engineered Barrier Experiment' has been conducted at the Kamaishi Mine, of which host rock is granodiorite, in order to establish conceptual models of the coupled T-H-M processes and to build confidence in mathematical models and computer codes. The coupled T-H-M experiment is one of tasks in DECOVALEX (DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation against EXperiments) project which is an international co-operative project and it is defined as Task 2. The Task 2 for the DECOVALEX project are divided into three subtasks (A-C) in accordance with the programme and availability of data, called subtasks. This note describes the results of subtask C. Subtask C is a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical analysis in the near field. (author)

  1. Results from SAGE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66-13+18 (stat) -7+5 (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73-16+18 (stat) -75 (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69-11+11 (stat) -7+5 (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models

  2. Adubação do algodoeiro: II - Ensaios com tortas de mamona e algodão Fertilizer experiments with cotton: II - Trials with castor pomace and cottonseed meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Neves

    1957-01-01

    ensaios em que os dois últimos métodos foram estudados não permitiram tirar conclusões definitivas sôbre o mais eficiente para a produção. Entretanto, tendo-se em vista inconvenientes que se opõem à aplicação antecipada, e, por outro lado, fatôres que militam a favor da aplicação lateral, parece que esta é a mais apropriada para se conseguir das tortas - e de vários outros adubos - muito melhores resultados que os obtidos pelo método usual. Sugere-se, por isso, que se continui a experimentá-la com as modificações apresentadas.In this paper are reported the results of 37 experiments - six repeated in the same plots for two or three consecutive years - designed to study the effect of castor pomace and cottonseed meal as fertilizers for the cotton crop. In these experiments, conducted between 1937 and 1945 and located at eleven different sites comprising the main soil types of the Planalto Paulista, were compared sources of nitrogen (castor pomace, Chilean nitrate, ammonium sulphate etc., increasing rates of application of cottonseed meal, and methods of application of cottonseed meal. Applied by the usual method, consisting in the addition of the fertilizer to the seed furrow and mixing it with the soil just before planting, castor pomace and cottonseed meal generally gave poor results; in a few cases only were obtained satisfactory responses, but in several others they did not increase or even depressed the yield. This was observed in the absence as well as in the presence of phosphorus and potassium fertilizers. Rates of 600 and 800 kilograms of cottonseed meal per hectare generally gave no better results than 400 kilograms. Castor pomace was inferior to the soluble nitrogenous fertilizers used. The poor performance of the organic fertilizers is attributed principally to the serious injury they caused to the germinating seed and the little efficiency of the subsequent replanting of the missing hills. The method of application used in the experiments

  3. Heteroleptic tin(II) initiators for the ring-opening (co)polymerization of lactide and trimethylene carbonate: mechanistic insights from experiments and computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfang; Kefalidis, Christos E; Sinbandhit, Sourisak; Dorcet, Vincent; Carpentier, Jean-François; Maron, Laurent; Sarazin, Yann

    2013-09-27

    The tin(II) complexes {LO(x)}Sn(X) ({LO(x)}(-) =aminophenolate ancillary) containing amido (1-4), chloro (5), or lactyl (6) coligands (X) promote the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of cyclic esters. Complex 6, which models the first insertion of L-lactide, initiates the living ROP of L-LA on its own, but the amido derivatives 1-4 require the addition of alcohol to do so. Upon addition of one to ten equivalents of iPrOH, precatalysts 1-4 promote the ROP of trimethylene carbonate (TMC); yet, hardly any activity is observed if tert-butyl (R)-lactate is used instead of iPrOH. Strong inhibition of the reactivity of TMC is also detected for the simultaneous copolymerization of L-LA and TMC, or for the block copolymerization of TMC after that of L-LA. Experimental and computational data for the {LO(x)}Sn(OR)complexes (OR=lactyl or lactidyl) replicating the active species during the tin(II)-mediated ROP of L-LA demonstrate that the formation of a five-membered chelate is largely favored over that of an eight-membered one, and that it constitutes the resting state of the catalyst during this (co)polymerization. Comprehensive DFT calculations show that, out of the four possible monomer insertion sequences during simultaneous copolymerization of L-LA and TMC: 1) TMC then TMC, 2) TMC then L-LA, 3) L-LA then L-LA, and 4) L-LA then TMC, the first three are possible. By contrast, insertion of L-LA followed by that of TMC (i.e., insertion sequence 4) is endothermic by +1.1 kcal mol(-1), which compares unfavorably with consecutive insertions of two L-LA units (i.e., insertion sequence 3) (-10.2 kcal mol(-1)). The copolymerization of L-LA and TMC thus proceeds under thermodynamic control. PMID:23955851

  4. Column and Batch Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Gardea-Torresdey

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Batch and column experiments were performed to determine the Cu(II binding capacity of silica-immobilized humin biomass. For column studies, 500 bed volumes of a 0.1 mM Cu(II solution were passed through humin packed columns at the flow rates of 1, 1.5, 2, and 3 mL/min. The biopolymer showed an average Cu binding capacity of 12 ± 1.5 mg/g and a Cu recovery of about 96.5 % ± 1.5. The breakthrough points for Cu(II alone were approximately 420, 390, 385, and 300 bed volumes for the flow rates of 1, 1.5, 2 and 3 mL/min, respectively. The interference studies demonstrated that at low concentrations, the hard cations Ca(II and Mg(II did not seem to represent a major interference on Cu(II binding to the humin biopolymer. The selectivity showed by this biopolymer was Cu(II>Ca(II>Mg(II. On the other hand, batch experiments showed that Ca(II + Mg(II at 100mM each reduced the Cu(II binding to 73 %. However, 1000 mM concentrations of Ca(II and Mg(II, separately and in mixture, reduced the Cu(II binding to 47 %, 44 % and 31 %, respectively. The results of this study showed that immobilized humin in a silica matrix could represent an inexpensive bio-source for Cu removal from contaminated water, even in the presence of low concentrations of the hard cations Ca(II and Mg(II.

  5. Searching for Dark Absorption with Direct Detection Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bloch, Itay M; Tobioka, Kohsaku; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2016-01-01

    We consider the absorption by bound electrons of dark matter in the form of dark photons and axion-like particles, as well as of dark photons from the Sun, in current and next-generation direct detection experiments. Experiments sensitive to electron recoils can detect such particles with masses between a few eV to more than 10 keV. For dark photon dark matter, we update a previous bound based on XENON10 data and derive new bounds based on data from XENON100 and CDMSlite. We find these experiments to disfavor previously allowed parameter space. Moreover, we derive sensitivity projections for SuperCDMS at SNOLAB for silicon and germanium targets, as well as for various possible experiments with scintillating targets (cesium iodide, sodium iodide, and gallium arsenide). The projected sensitivity can probe large new regions of parameter space. For axion-like particles, the same current direction detection data improves on previously known direct-detection constraints but does not bound new parameter space beyond...

  6. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdeño, David G; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A N; Vincent, Aaron C; hm, Céline Bøe

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle to date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neutrinos, and use these estimates to infer errors on future measurements of the neutrino fluxes, weak mixing angle and solar observables, as well as to constrain new physics in the neutrino sector. The combined rates of solar neutrino events in second generation experiments (SuperCDMS and LZ) can yield a measurement of the pp flux to 2.5% accuracy via electron recoil, and slightly improve the boron-8 flux determination. Assuming a low-mass argon phase, projected tonne-scale experiments like DARWIN can reduce the uncertainty on bo...

  7. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 3; Material Model Development and Simulation of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, J.; Erlich, D.; Shockey, D.

    2009-01-01

    A team consisting of Arizona State University, Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center, and SRI International collaborated to develop computational models and verification testing for designing and evaluating turbine engine fan blade fabric containment structures. This research was conducted under the Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence and was sponsored by the Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program. The research was directed toward improving the modeling of a turbine engine fabric containment structure for an engine blade-out containment demonstration test required for certification of aircraft engines. The research conducted in Phase II began a new level of capability to design and develop fan blade containment systems for turbine engines. Significant progress was made in three areas: (1) further development of the ballistic fabric model to increase confidence and robustness in the material models for the Kevlar(TradeName) and Zylon(TradeName) material models developed in Phase I, (2) the capability was improved for finite element modeling of multiple layers of fabric using multiple layers of shell elements, and (3) large-scale simulations were performed. This report concentrates on the material model development and simulations of the impact tests.

  8. Experiments in the Underground Laboratory for Dosimetry and Spectrometry (UDO) of the PTB in the Asse II salt mine - summary highlighting work performed and outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Neumaier, S; Zwiener, R

    2003-01-01

    Due to its extremely low area dose rate, the Underground Laboratory for Dosimetry and Spectrometry (UDO) of the PTB at the 925 m level of the Asse II Salt Mine offers unique possibilities for the investigation and calibration of dosimetry systems of high sensitivity as are used, for example, in environmental monitoring. Due to its low area dose rate, this laboratory has an outstanding position worldwide. The low ambient dose equivalent rate in the UDO of approx. 1 nSv/h, that means of only approx. 1 percent of the ambient dose rate typically encountered at the Earth's surface, is mainly due to the following reasons: - At the depth at which the UDO is situated, the penetrating muon component of cosmic radiation which considerably contributes to the environmental equivalent dose rate at the Earth's surface (in Braunschweig, for example, approx. one third) is already attenuated by more than five orders of magnitude and is therefore completely negligible for dosimetric investigations; - The activity concentration...

  9. The Influence of Injection Pockets on the Performance of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings - Part II: Comparison Between Theory and Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrichson, Niels; Fuerst, Axel; Santos, Ilmar

    2007-01-01

    This is Part II of a two-part series of papers describing the effects of high-pressure injection pockets on the operating conditions of tilting-pad thrust bearings. The paper has two main objectives. One is an experimental investigation of the influence of an oil injection pocket on the pressure...... without oil injection) on the pressure distribution and oil film thickness. Measurements of the distribution of pressure and oil film thickness are presented for tilting-pad thrust bearing pads of approx. 100 cm^2 surface area. Two pads are measured in a laboratory test rig at loads of approx. 1.5 MPa and...... approx. 4.0 MPa and velocities of up to 33 m/s. One pad has a plain surface. The other pad has a conical injection pocket at the pivot point and a leading-edge taper. The measurements are compared to theoretical values obtained using a three-dimensional thermoelastohydrodynamic (TEHD) numerical model. At...

  10. Identification of photons in double beta-decay experiments using segmented germanium detectors - studies with a GERDA Phase II prototype detector

    OpenAIRE

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kröninger, K.; Liu, J; X. Liu; Majorovits, B.

    2007-01-01

    The sensitivity of experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta-decay of germanium was so far limited by the background induced by external gamma-radiation. Segmented germanium detectors can be used to identify photons and thus reduce this background component. The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, will use highly segmented germanium detectors in its second phase. The identification of photonic events is investigated using a prototype detector. The results are compared with Monte Carlo d...

  11. Analysis methods of neutrons induced resonances in the transmission experiments by time-of-flight and automation of these methods on IBM 7094 II computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron induced resonances analysis aims to determine the neutrons characteristics, leading to the excitation energies, de-excitation probabilities by gamma radiation emission, by neutron emission or by fission, their spin, their parity... This document describes the methods developed, or adapted, the calculation schemes and the algorithms implemented to realize such analysis on a computer, from data obtained during time-of-flight experiments on the linear accelerator of Saclay. (A.L.B.)

  12. Measurement of the top quark mass using dilepton events and a neutrino weighting algorithm with the DOe experiment at the Tevatron (Run II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.

    2007-07-01

    Several measurements of the top quark mass in the dilepton final states with the DOe experiment are presented. The theoretical and experimental properties of the top quark are described together with a brief introduction of the Standard Model of particle physics and the physics of hadron collisions. An overview over the experimental setup is given. The Tevatron at Fermilab is presently the highest-energy hadron collider in the world with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. There are two main experiments called CDF and DOe, A description of the components of the multipurpose DOe detector is given. The reconstruction of simulated events and data events is explained and the criteria for the identification of electrons, muons, jets, and missing transverse energy is given. The kinematics in the dilepton final state is underconstraint. Therefore, the top quark mass is extracted by the so-called Neutrino Weighting method. This method is introduced and several different approaches are described, compared, and enhanced. Results for the international summer conferences 2006 and winter 2007 are presented. The top quark mass measurement for the combination of all three dilepton channels with a dataset of 1.05 1/fb yields: mtop=172.5{+-}5.5 (stat.) {+-} 5.8 (syst.) GeV. This result is presently the most precise top quark mass measurement of the DOe experiment in the dilepton chann el. It entered the top quark mass wold average from March 2007. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of the top quark mass using dilepton events and a neutrino weighting algorithm with the DOe experiment at the Tevatron (Run II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several measurements of the top quark mass in the dilepton final states with the DOe experiment are presented. The theoretical and experimental properties of the top quark are described together with a brief introduction of the Standard Model of particle physics and the physics of hadron collisions. An overview over the experimental setup is given. The Tevatron at Fermilab is presently the highest-energy hadron collider in the world with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. There are two main experiments called CDF and DOe, A description of the components of the multipurpose DOe detector is given. The reconstruction of simulated events and data events is explained and the criteria for the identification of electrons, muons, jets, and missing transverse energy is given. The kinematics in the dilepton final state is underconstraint. Therefore, the top quark mass is extracted by the so-called Neutrino Weighting method. This method is introduced and several different approaches are described, compared, and enhanced. Results for the international summer conferences 2006 and winter 2007 are presented. The top quark mass measurement for the combination of all three dilepton channels with a dataset of 1.05 1/fb yields: mtop=172.5±5.5 (stat.) ± 5.8 (syst.) GeV. This result is presently the most precise top quark mass measurement of the DOe experiment in the dilepton chann el. It entered the top quark mass wold average from March 2007. (orig.)

  14. Operation experience and maintenance of the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna in the period July 1984 to September 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna operated in the period from July 1984 to September 1986 without any major undesired shut down. The energy produced during this period accumulated approximately to 460 MWh. During a four month period in summer 1985 a major maintenance and service programme was carried out after 24 years of operation. These works included a complete removal of all fuel - and graphite elements from the core, the removal of the topgrid plate and the visual inspection by on underwater telescope of all surfaces in the reactor tank. Prior to this work the reactor bridge was removed and all iron parts were repainted before reinstallation. Also two of the beam tubes were inspected optically with an endoscope. During this shut down period a new water purification circuit independent from the main cooling circuit was installed and the reactor block repainted. While the reactor was empty from all fuel elements the cold neutron source installed in the previous thermalizing column was removed and replaced by a neutron radiography collimator. The experimental tank being empty since two decades was repainted and roll-away concrete shielding blocks were designed to shield the experimental tanks. During a one month shut down period in summer 1986 a new primary cooling circuit was installed, replacing the original cooling circuit which has been modified several times during the past decades. In the near future two main investments will be necessary which are new fuel elements (approx 50 units) and replacement of the reactor instrumentation being now 18 years of age. (author)

  15. Search for supersymmetric particles decaying into tri-leptons through R-parity violation, with D0 Run-II experiment at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the first data taken by the D0 detector during the Run II of the Tevatron. Supersymmetric particles have been search for in proton-antiproton collisions, with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. In the framework of supersymmetry with R-parity violation, I have studied the pair production of Gauginos, leading to a pair of LSP (0,χ1), each one decaying into eeνμ or eμνe with a λ(121) coupling. The final state contains at least two electrons: I have thus paid special attention in this work to the methods concerning identification and mis-identification of electromagnetic particles, as well as reconstruction, triggering, and correction (of the reconstructed energy). In a selection of tri-leptons, with at least two electrons, and some transverse missing energy, we observed 0 event in the 350 pb-1 of analyzed data, for 0.4 + 0.35 - 0.05 (sta) ± 0.16 (sys) expected from the Standard Model contributions. In the signal considered in this analysis, the selection efficiency is around 12 per cent. Results have been studied in two models: mSUGRA and MSSM. In mSUGRA model, limits on m(1/2) and lightest gauginos's masses have been obtained, with tan(β) = 5, A0 = 0, m0 = 100 and 1000 GeV.c-2 and both signs of μ. In MSSM, with the hypothesis of massive sfermions (1000 GeV.c-2), we can exclude, at 95% Confidence Level, the region m(χ1±) -2 for all masses of χ10 LSP. (author)

  16. Measurement of the Dipion Mass Spectrum in the Decay X(3872) → J/ψπ+π- at the CDF II Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present a measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in the decay X(3872) → J/ψπ+π- using a 360 pb-1 sample of p(bar p) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. As a benchmark, they also extract the dipion mass distribution for ψ(2S) → J/ψπ+π- decay. The X(3872) dipion mass spectrum is compared to QCD multipole expansion predictions for various charmonium states, as well as to the hypothesis X(3872) → J/ψp0. They find that the measured spectrum is compatible with 3S1 charmonium decaying to J/ψπ+π- and with the X(3872) → J/ψp0 hypothesis. There is, however, no 3S1 charmonium state available for assignment to the X(3872). The multipole expansion calculations for 1P1 and 3DJ states are in clear disagreement with the X(3872) data. For the ψ(2S) the data agrees well with previously published results and to multipole expansion calculations for 3S1 charmonium. Other, non-charmonium, models for the X(3872) are described too. The authors conclude that since the dipion mass spectrum for X(3872) is compatible with J/ψp0 hypothesis, the X(3872) should be C-positive. This conclusion is supported by recent results from Belle Collaboration which observed X(3872) → J/ψγ decay. They argue that if X(3872) is a charmonium, then it should be either 11D2-+ or 23P1++ state, decaying into J/ψπ+π- in violation of isospin conservation. A non-charmonium assignment, such as D(bar D)* molecule, is also quite possible

  17. Experience and challenges on safeguards practices and approaches for BAEC 3 MW TRIGA Mk-II research reactor and other establishment of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangladesh is deeply committed to nuclear non-proliferation. Signing and accesses to different unilateral protocols, agreements and treaties like Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), Safeguards Agreements, Nuclear Cooperation Agreements with the USA and other countries etc. are the manifestations of such commitment. The first of such agreements, the NPT was signed in August 1979. Subsequently a bilateral agreement entitled 'Safeguards Agreements' was signed with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in June 1982. This provides for international verification of facilities and balancing of nuclear materials and the facility, TRIGA Mark-II Research Reactor Facility of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) is inspected physically by the IAEA Safeguards Inspectors on an annual basis. For this purpose, a subsidiary arrangement was made with the IAEA, which had defined the scope of such verification. Bangladesh has also signed a Nuclear Cooperation Agreement with the USA on September 17, 1981, which facilitated export of nuclear technology from USA to Bangladesh. Bangladesh also signed another bilateral agreement entitled 'Protocol Additional to the Safeguards Agreements' with the IAEA in March 30, 2001. This protocol till to-date is the highest level of verification under the non-proliferation regime. The commitment of Bangladesh to non-proliferation is adequately reflected in this document. IAEA would decide on the modalities, frequency and scope of conducting its verification program on the basis of the declaration. Bangladesh signed the CTBT in October 1996. The Treaty was ratified in March 2000. This is a manifestation of Bangladesh's potential nuclear capabilities and by signing this Bangladesh has adequately and convincingly reiterated its commitment to the international community about its peaceful intentions. Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE) is the largest R and D establishment of the BAEC. It is

  18. Variational assimilation in combination with a regularization method for sea level pressure retrieval from QuikSCAT scatterometer data II: simulation experiment and actual case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sea level pressure field can be computed from sea surface winds retrieved from satellite microwave scatterometer measurements, based on variational assimilation in combination with a regularization method given in part I of this paper. First, the validity of the new method is proved with a simulation experiment. Then, a new processing procedure for the sea level pressure retrieval is built by combining the geostrophic wind, which is computed from the scatterometer 10-meter wind using the University of Washington planetary boundary layer model using this method. Finally, the feasibility of the method is proved using an actual case study. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  19. LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a plan for two rapid-cycling synchrotrons - a 45 GeV, 40 μA proton synchrotron with a 9 GeV, 200 μA booster. These machines can provide simultaneously 45 GeV slow-extracted beam for the production of kaons, antiprotons, and other secondary particles, and 9 GeV fast-extracted beam for neutrino and pulsed muon physics. The LAMPF II machines are compared with existing and proposed kaon factories. Relative to the Brookhaven AGS as it exists today, LAMPF II will provide 90 times as many neutrino events per year and 300 times as many kaons per year. Some design features of the LAMPF II accelerators that are important for reducing beam losses and increasing beam availability are discussed. Because of the large rf power and voltage required, an innovative design of the ferrite-tuned cavities is necessary. A commercially available Mg-Mn ferrite with perpendicular bias has been shown to raise the available ferrite Q by more than a factor of 10 when compared with materials now in use at other accelerators. The 45 GeV LAMPF II synchrotron would produce far more neutrinos, kaons, and antiprotons per unit cost than an upgraded conventional machine. The LAMPF II booster by itself, which can provide 100 μA at 12 GeV, is a very interesting option at moderate cost. (orig.)

  20. Tratamento do megaesôfago chagásico grau II por laparoscopia: experiência em 12 casos Laparoscopic management of esophageal achalasia: experience in 12 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Valezi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados da cardiomiotomia com fundoplicatura parcial por vídeolaparoscopia (Heller-Dor no tratamento de 12 pacientes portadores de megaesôfago grau II. MÉTODO: Foram analisados prospectivamente 12 pacientes com megaesôfago não avançado (grau II segundo classificação de Ferreira - Santos , submetidos a cardiomiotomia à Heller por laparoscopia associado à confecção de vávula anti-refluxo ( fundoplicatura à Dor , no Hospital Universitário da Universidade Estadual de Londrina, no período de Janeiro de 1999 a Dezembro de 2001. RESULTADOS: Não houve necessidade de conversão para laparotomia em nenhum caso. A pressão média do esfincter inferior do esôfago ( EIE no pré-operatório foi de 39,1 mmHg (normal de 15 a 30 mm Hg, e no pós-operatório (seis meses de 12,5 mmHg. Em relação à sintomatologia pós-operatória, nove dos 12 pacientes ficaram assintomáticos, sendo que três pacientes apresentaram disfagia, sialorréia e pirose, respectivamente. Ocorreram três complicações intra-operatórias: dois casos de perfuração gástrica e um de perfuração esofágica. Não houve mortalidade no intra ou pós-operatório. CONCLUSÕES: Podemos concluir, baseado neste estudo, que a cardiomiotomia a Heller associada à fundoplicatura a Dor por vídeo-laparoscopia, após seis meses de acompanhamento, mostrou-se eficaz no tratamento do megaesôfago grau II.BACKGROUND: Various techniques have been used for the surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia, however, the best results for non - advanced esophageal achalasia has been achieved by miotomy. Laparoscopy for non advanced esophageal achalasia have been showing similar results than convencional surgery, with the benefits of a minimally invasive procedure. The aim of this study was to analyze the results of laparoscopy Heller miotomy and Dor fundoplication for non - advanced esophageal achalasia. METHODS: Twelve patients with non - advanced esophageal achalasia

  1. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air. Part I: Experiments; Part II: Separate Effects Tests and Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  2. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air. Part I: Experiments; Part II: Separate Effects Tests and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradin, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Muci, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Hassan, Yassin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Dominguez, A. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tokuhiro, Akira [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Hamman, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2014-10-15

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  3. Two experiments with cold atoms: I. Application of Bessel beams for atom optics, and II. Spectroscopic measurements of Rydberg blockade effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelyan, Ilya

    In this dissertation we report the results of two experimental projects with laser-cooled rubidium atoms: I. Application of Bessel beams for atom optics, and II. Spectroscopic measurements of Rydberg blockade effect. The first part of the thesis is devoted to the development of new elements of atom optics based on blue-detuned high-order Bessel beams. Properties of a 4thorder Bessel beam as an atomic guide were investigated for various parameters of the hollow beam, such as the detuning from an atomic resonance, size and the order of the Bessel beam. We extended its application to create more complicated interferometer-type structures by demonstrating a tunnel lock, a novel device that can split an atomic cloud, transport it, delay, and switch its propagation direction between two guides. We reported a first-time demonstration of an atomic beam switch based on the combination of two crossed Bessel beams. We achieved the 30% efficiency of the switch limited by the geometrical overlap between the cloud and the intersection volume of the two tunnels, and investigate the heating processes induced by the switch. We also showed other applications of crossed Bessel beams, such as a 3-D optical trap for atoms confined in the intersection volume of two hollow beams and a splitter of the atomic density. The second part of this dissertation is devoted to the spectroscopic measurements of the Rydberg blockade effect, a conditional suppression of Rydberg excitations depending on the state of a control atom. We assembled a narrow-linewidth, tunable, frequency stabilized laser system at 480 nm to excite laser-cooled rubidium atoms to Rydberg states with a high principal quantum number n ˜ 50 through a two-photon transition. We applied the laser system to observe the Autler-Townes splitting of the intermediate 5p3/2 state and used the broadening of the resonance features to investigate the enhancement of Rydberg-Rydberg interactions in the presence of an external electric field.

  4. Clinical experience with the MammoSite[reg] radiation therapy system for brachytherapy of breast cancer: Results from an international phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In a prospective multi-center phase II trial, we investigated the MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System, a new device for delivering intracavitary brachytherapy following breast conserving surgery. The MammoSite[reg] is a dual lumen, closed ended catheter with a small, spherical inflatable balloon and a port for connecting a remote afterloader to the central lumen. We analyzed the surgical procedure and placement of the MammoSite[reg], treatment planning and radiation delivery complications and cosmesis, as well the comfort for the patients. Patients and methods: Between 2002 and 2004 a total of 32 patients (pts) were implanted using the MammoSite[reg]. The reference isodose was defined 1 cm from the balloon surface. We analyzed the post-implant anatomic position of the applicator and the geometric form of the balloon via ultrasound, CT and X-ray, related side effects, cosmetic outcome and patient quality of life. Results: Twenty-three out of 32 patients (72%) were eligible for MammoSite[reg] intracavitary brachytherapy. Twenty-eight percentage had to be excluded because of different reasons. Eleven patients were treated with primary brachytherapy with a total dose of 34 Gy (2x3.4 Gy) and 12 had a boost with a mean dose of 13.3 Gy (range: 7.5-15 Gy; 2x2.5 Gy) combined with EBRT and doses ranged between 46 and 50 Gy. In three cases a balloon rupture occurred. We observed two abscesses within 3 months of implantation and serious seroma development in 10 patients (39%). Skin related side effects were erythema in 21 patients (91%), hyperpigmentation in 13 patients (56%) and teleangiectasia in six patients (26%) after mean follow-up 20 months. Conclusions: The MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System is a feasible treatment modality for intracavitary brachytherapy of breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. The advantage of the system is only one applicator is necessary for the delivery of a fractionated radiotherapy. In addition, patient

  5. Measurement of the Dipion Mass Spectrum in the Decay X(3872) -> J/psi pi+ pi- at the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakitin, Alexander Y

    2005-06-01

    The author presents a measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in the decay X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using a 360 pb{sup -1} sample of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. As a benchmark, they also extract the dipion mass distribution for {psi}(2S) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay. The X(3872) dipion mass spectrum is compared to QCD multipole expansion predictions for various charmonium states, as well as to the hypothesis X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{rho}{sup 0}. They find that the measured spectrum is compatible with {sup 3}S{sub 1} charmonium decaying to J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and with the X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{rho}{sup 0} hypothesis. There is, however, no {sup 3}S{sub 1} charmonium state available for assignment to the X(3872). The multipole expansion calculations for {sup 1}P{sub 1} and {sup 3}D{sub J} states are in clear disagreement with the X(3872) data. For the {psi}(2S) the data agrees well with previously published results and to multipole expansion calculations for {sup 3}S{sub 1} charmonium. Other, non-charmonium, models for the X(3872) are described too. They conclude that since the dipion mass spectrum for X(3872) is compatible with J/{psi}{rho}{sup 0} hypothesis, the X(3872) should be C-positive. This conclusion is supported by recent results from Belle Collaboration which observed X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{gamma} decay. They argue that if X(3872) is a charmonium, then it should be either 1{sup 1}D{sub 2{sup -+}} or 2{sup 3}P{sub 1{sup ++}} state, decaying into J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} in violation of isospin conservation. A non-charmonium assignment, such as D{bar D}* molecule, is also quite possible.

  6. Investigations of the effects of cosmic rays on Artemia cysts and tobacco seeds: results of Exobloc II experiment, flown aboard Biocosmos 1887

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemia (Brine shrimp) cysts and tobacco seeds, dormant biological material devoid of metabolic activity, were flown aboard the Soviet Biocosmos 1887 in order to investigate the effects of cosmic rays. Artemia cysts and tobacco seeds were used in bulk or in monolayers sandwiched with track detectors. Biological and physical units were located outside and inside the spacecraft. Stacks included lead shielding in order to expose the objects to different doses of radiation. Total dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent detectors. In spite of low levels of doses, the space flight resulted in a decrease in developmental capacity of Artemia cysts, and in a higher mutation rate in tobacco seeds. The more obvious responses occurred, in both cases, in biological objects exposed to the highest doses. These results are compared to those of previous space experiments. (author)

  7. Fractionated BNCT for locally recurrent head and neck cancer: Experience from a phase I/II clinical trial at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To introduce our experience of treating locally and regionally recurrent head and neck cancer patients with BNCT at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor in Taiwan, 12 patients (M/F=10/2, median age 55.5 Y/O) were enrolled and 11 received two fractions of treatment. Fractionated BNCT at 30-day interval with adaptive planning according to changed T/N ratios was feasible, effective and safe for selected recurrent head and neck cancer in this trial. - Highlights: • We treated 12 patients with recurrent Head and Neck (H and N) cancer after radical surgery and radiotherapy since 2010. • Four complete response (CR) and 3 partial response (PR) were found. Total response rate was 58%. • Two patients had local control longer than one year. • No grade 4 or higher toxicity was noted for both acute and chronic effects

  8. On the feasibility of monitoring carbon monoxide in the lower troposphere from a constellation of northern hemisphere geostationary satellites: Global scale assimilation experiments (Part II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Jérôme; Edwards, David; Worden, Helen; Arellano, Avelino; Gaubert, Benjamin; Da Silva, Arlindo; Lahoz, William; Anderson, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the second phase of an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) that utilizes the synthetic measurements from a constellation of satellites measuring atmospheric composition from geostationary (GEO) Earth orbit presented in part I of the study. Our OSSE is focused on carbon monoxide observations over North America, East Asia and Europe where most of the anthropogenic sources are located. Here we assess the impact of a potential GEO constellation on constraining northern hemisphere (NH) carbon monoxide (CO) using data assimilation. We show how cloud cover affects the GEO constellation data density with the largest cloud cover (i.e., lowest data density) occurring during Asian summer. We compare the modeled state of the atmosphere (Control Run), before CO data assimilation, with the known "true" state of the atmosphere (Nature Run) and show that our setup provides realistic atmospheric CO fields and emission budgets. Overall, the Control Run underestimates CO concentrations in the northern hemisphere, especially in areas close to CO sources. Assimilation experiments show that constraining CO close to the main anthropogenic sources significantly reduces errors in NH CO compared to the Control Run. We assess the changes in error reduction when only single satellite instruments are available as compared to the full constellation. We find large differences in how measurements for each continental scale observation system affect the hemispherical improvement in long-range transport patterns, especially due to seasonal cloud cover. A GEO constellation will provide the most efficient constraint on NH CO during winter when CO lifetime is longer and increments from data assimilation associated with source regions are advected further around the globe.

  9. GRID Computing at Belle II

    CERN Document Server

    Bansal, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Tsukuba, Japan, will start physics data taking in 2018 and will accumulate 50 ab$^{-1}$ of e$^{+}$e$^{-}$ collision data, about 50 times larger than the data set of the earlier Belle experiment. The computing requirements of Belle II are comparable to those of a run I high-p$_T$ LHC experiment. Computing will make full use of such grids in North America, Asia, Europe, and Australia, and high speed networking. Results of an initial MC simulation campaign with 3 ab$^{-1}$ equivalent luminosity will be described

  10. Optimising of design parameters of the TESLA vertex detector and search for events with isolated leptons and large missing transverse momentum with the ZEUS-experiment (HERA II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, V.

    2006-06-15

    In this thesis, a search for events with isolated leptons and large missing transverse momentum at HERA is presented. Data with an integrated luminosity of 40.76 pb{sup -1} of e{sup +}p-collisions collected with the ZEUS detector at a CMS energy of 318 GeV during the HERA II running period in the years 2003 and 2004 were used. Some extensions of the SM contain FCNC processes at tree level, which could lead to a significantly enhanced rate of singly produced t-quarks at HERA (e{sup {+-}}p {yields} e{sup {+-}}tX). The signature of interest originates from the decay t {yields} bW{sup +} with a subsequent leptonic decay of the W-boson (W{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}, {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}, {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}). After the final selection, one event was found in data in the combined e- and {mu}-channels, where 1.27{+-}0.15 were expected from SM predictions. The selection efficiency in these channels was 13.4{sup +1.8}{sub -0.8}% for a t-quark mass of 175 GeV. In combination with independent searches in HERA I data in both, the leptonic and hadronic channel, limits on the FCNC couplings through photon and Z-boson exchange were derived. The NLO limit {kappa}{sub tu{gamma}}<0.160{sup +0.014}{sub -0.012} at 95% CL for a t-quark mass of 175 GeV is the most stringent so far. Together with the most stingent limit on v{sub tuz} of 0.37, an upper cross section limit of {sigma}{sub single} {sub t}<0.186{sup +0.029}{sub -0.012} pb was obtained.Also a limit on the cross section of single W-boson production of {sigma}{sub single} {sub W}<1.54{sup +0.67}{sub -0.41} pb was obtained at 95% CL. In this thesis, also a simulation study to optimise design parameters of a MAPS based vertex detector for a future ILC is presented. The study was based on the TESLA TDR. In order to evaluate the effect of different design options for the vertex detector on the physics performance of the whole detector, the reconstruction of the t-quark mass from the signal process e{sup +}e

  11. Optimising of design parameters of the TESLA vertex detector and search for events with isolated leptons and large missing transverse momentum with the ZEUS-experiment (HERA II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, a search for events with isolated leptons and large missing transverse momentum at HERA is presented. Data with an integrated luminosity of 40.76 pb-1 of e+p-collisions collected with the ZEUS detector at a CMS energy of 318 GeV during the HERA II running period in the years 2003 and 2004 were used. Some extensions of the SM contain FCNC processes at tree level, which could lead to a significantly enhanced rate of singly produced t-quarks at HERA (e±p → e±tX). The signature of interest originates from the decay t → bW+ with a subsequent leptonic decay of the W-boson (W+ → e+νe, μ+νμ, τ+ντ). After the final selection, one event was found in data in the combined e- and μ-channels, where 1.27±0.15 were expected from SM predictions. The selection efficiency in these channels was 13.4+1.8-0.8% for a t-quark mass of 175 GeV. In combination with independent searches in HERA I data in both, the leptonic and hadronic channel, limits on the FCNC couplings through photon and Z-boson exchange were derived. The NLO limit κtuγ+0.014-0.012 at 95% CL for a t-quark mass of 175 GeV is the most stringent so far. Together with the most stingent limit on vtuz of 0.37, an upper cross section limit of σsinglet+0.029-0.012 pb was obtained.Also a limit on the cross section of single W-boson production of σsingleW+0.67-0.41 pb was obtained at 95% CL. In this thesis, also a simulation study to optimise design parameters of a MAPS based vertex detector for a future ILC is presented. The study was based on the TESLA TDR. In order to evaluate the effect of different design options for the vertex detector on the physics performance of the whole detector, the reconstruction of the t-quark mass from the signal process e+e-→t anti t in the all-hadronic decay channel was used. The fast simulation program SGV was equipped with a neural-network based heavy-flavour tagging, where the b-tagging achieved a purity of 86% at an efficiency of 70%. It was found that the

  12. Transimssion and compression of an intense relativistic electron beam produced by a converging annular diode with return current feedback through the cathode. Part II. The experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.G.; Schuch, R.L.

    1976-02-01

    The complete results of the experiments with the converging annular diode within return current feedback through the cathode (Triax) are reported herein. The diode was designed to focus a relativistic high-current electron beam to a small focus. It did confirm the Triaxial theory detailed in Part I, and it did achieve a factor of 10 areal compression with 50% efficiency (which was below expectations). There were two principal reasons for this shortfall. First, the rapid diode plasma motion of 10 cm/..mu..sec that was discovered necessitated the use of larger A-K gaps than expected and led to thicker beam sheets than are needed for good focusing. Second, the intrinsic angular spread of the electrons, even from the best cathode surfaces, introduced excessive angular momentum into the beam so that only a minor portion of the electrons could reach the axis. However, the yield of useful information about diode physics in general and about the influence of prepulse, the role of diode plasmas, the motion of energetic beams within conducting boundaries, diode emission properties, and diode diagnostic techniques in particle has had a significant and useful impact on the electron beam program at Sandia.

  13. Linfoma de Hodgkin na infância e adolescência: 15 anos de experiência com o protocolo DH-II-90 Hodgkin's lymphoma in children and adolescents: 15 years of experience with the DH-II-90 protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana N. S. Souza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O desafio do tratamento do linfoma de Hodgkin na infância reside na redução da toxicidade aguda e tardia sem afetar os bons resultados terapêuticos. Crianças e adolescentes portadores de linfoma de Hodgkin recém-diagnosticado foram tratados com o protocolo institucional DH-II-90. Os objetivo deste trabalho foram: 1avaliar as taxas de sobrevida global (SG e livre de eventos (SLE do protocolo DH-II-90 aplicado a portadores de LH; 2avaliar as taxas de SG e SLE conforme estádio, idade, tumor "bulky", massa mediastinal, sintomas B, dose de radioterapia e 3descrever os efeitos tardios. Sessenta e oito pacientes portadores de LH recém-diagnosticado, com idade entre 0 e 21 anos (idade mediana 9 anos, 20F:48M, foram tratados com quimioterapia (baixo risco:ABVD; alto risco:ABVD+MOP/COP e radioterapia. O estadiamento foi distribuído desta forma: nove (13,2% estádio I A; 29 (42,6% II A; cinco (7,4% II B; nove (13,2% III A; dez (14,7% III B; dois (2,9% IV A e quatro (5,9% IV B. A SG em dez anos foi de 96,1% ± 3,8 para o grupo de baixo risco e 93,3% ± 4,5 para o de alto risco (p:0,402. A SLE foi de 88,9% ± 5,2 em dez anos para o de alto risco e 86,5% ± 6,3 para o de baixo risco (p: 0,969. A presença de massa mediastinal e doses de radioterapia maiores que 2100 cGy (p= 0,020 e p= 0,014, respectivamente apresentam impacto negativo na SLE e a doença estádio I tem impacto positivo na SLE. Disfunção e carcinoma de tireoide são os efeitos tardios mais frequentes neste grupo de doentes. O protocolo DH-II-90 obteve resultados terapêuticos favoráveis, porém as taxas de complicações tardias, embora aceitáveis, demandam revisão do programa terapêutico.The challenge of new protocols for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL treatment is to decrease the toxicity without impairing the results. The DH-II-90 protocol was designed to treat children and adolescents with HL. The objectives of this work were: 1 to assess the overall and event free survival of

  14. Study of new germanium bolometers with interleaved concentric electrodes for non-baryonic cold dark matter direct detection in the Edelweiss-II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDELWEISS is a direct non-baryonic cold dark matter detection experiment in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (also known as WIMPs), which currently constitute the most popular candidates to account for the missing mass in the Universe. To this purpose, EDELWEISS uses germanium bolometers at cryogenic temperature (20 mK approximately) in the Underground Laboratory of Modane (LSM) at the French-Italian border. Since 2008, a new type of detector is operated, equipped with concentric electrodes to optimize the rejection of surface events (coplanar-grid detectors). This thesis work is divided into several research orientations. First, we carried out measurements concerning charge collection in the crystals. The velocity laws of the carriers (electrons and holes) have been determined in germanium at 20 mK in the orientation, and a complete study of charge sharing has been done, including an evaluation of the transport anisotropy and of the straggling of the carriers. These results lead to a better understanding of the inner properties of the EDELWEISS detectors. Then, studies relating to the improvement of the performances were carried out. In particular, we have optimized the space-charge cancellation procedure in the crystals and improved the passive rejection of surface events (β). The fiducial volume of the detectors has been evaluated using two X-ray lines from cosmically activated radionuclides: 68Ge and 65Zn. Finally, an exhaustive study of the low energy spectra has been carried out, which makes it possible to develop a systematic analysis method for the search of low-mass WIMPs in EDELWEISS. (author)

  15. Next-generation seismic experiments - II: wide-angle, multi-azimuth, 3-D, full-waveform inversion of sparse field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael; Arnoux, Gillean; Hooft, Emilie; Toomey, Douglas; VanderBeek, Brandon; Wilcock, William

    2016-02-01

    3-D full-waveform inversion (FWI) is an advanced seismic imaging technique that has been widely adopted by the oil and gas industry to obtain high-fidelity models of P-wave velocity that lead to improvements in migrated images of the reservoir. Most industrial applications of 3-D FWI model the acoustic wavefield, often account for the kinematic effect of anisotropy, and focus on matching the low-frequency component of the early arriving refractions that are most sensitive to P-wave velocity structure. Here, we have adopted the same approach in an application of 3-D acoustic, anisotropic FWI to an ocean-bottom-seismometer (OBS) field data set acquired across the Endeavour oceanic spreading centre in the northeastern Pacific. Starting models for P-wave velocity and anisotropy were obtained from traveltime tomography; during FWI, velocity is updated whereas anisotropy is kept fixed. We demonstrate that, for the Endeavour field data set, 3-D FWI is able to recover fine-scale velocity structure with a resolution that is 2-4 times better than conventional traveltime tomography. Quality assurance procedures have been employed to monitor each step of the workflow; these are time consuming but critical to the development of a successful inversion strategy. Finally, a suite of checkerboard tests has been performed which shows that the full potential resolution of FWI can be obtained if we acquire a 3-D survey with a slightly denser shot and receiver spacing than is usual for an academic experiment. We anticipate that this exciting development will encourage future seismic investigations of earth science targets that would benefit from the superior resolution offered by 3-D FWI.

  16. SPARTUVIX II: An improved x-ray ultraviolet spectrograph with temporal and spatial capabilities for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved version of the initial x-ray ultraviolet spectrograph SPARTUVIX1 has been developed to record the time evolution of spatially resolved spectra in the soft x-ray range (from 30 to 300 Angstrom). This diagnostic can be applied to the new class of laser produced plasma experiments now performed in order to better understand the physical evolution of x-ray indirect drive plasmas. Instead of a one-dimensional streak camera used for the first version, a new widely used 2-D soft x-ray time gated imager allows us to follow the time evolution of the spatially resolved soft x-ray spectra. This instrument was designed for plastic foam soft x-ray opacity measurements. The soft x-rays, emitted by an auxiliary radiography laser plasma source, are transmitted through the foam and dispersed into two parts (+1 and -1 order of the transmission grating). Each dispersed spectrum is placed on two different gated striplines of the soft x-ray imager and thus recorded at two different times (exposure time 300 ps, adjustable interframe 600 ps). The spatial resolution is obtained with a slit added in front of the spectrograph, that images the plasma onto the detector with a magnification ratio of 15 and a spatial resolution of 50 μm. A detailed description of this instrument and the main results obtained for two different plastic foam opacity measurements (undoped and doped with chlorine) will be presented. This work is supported by European Community Contract No. CEE/CHGF-CT-92-0016. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass using Dilepton Events and a Neutrino Weighting Algorithm with the D0 Experiment at the Tevatron (Run II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Joerg; /Bonn U.

    2007-01-01

    measurement of the top quark mass by the D0 experiment at Fermilab in the dilepton final states. The comparison of the measured top quark masses in different final states allows an important consistency check of the Standard Model. Inconsistent results would be a clear hint of a misinterpretation of the analyzed data set. With the exception of the Higgs boson, all particles predicted by the Standard Model have been found. The search for the Higgs boson is one of the main focuses in high energy physics. The theory section will discuss the close relationship between the physics of the Higgs boson and the top quark.

  18. Application of 'Six SigmaTM' and 'Design of Experiment' for Cementation - Recipe Development for Evaporator Concentrate for NPP Ling AO, Phase II (China) - 12555

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementation of radioactive waste is a common technology. The waste is mixed with cement and water and forms a stable, solid block. The physical properties like compression strength or low leach ability depends strongly on the cement recipe. Due to the fact that this waste cement mixture has to fulfill special requirements, a recipe development is necessary. The Six SigmaTM' DMAIC methodology, together with the Design of experiment (DoE) approach, was employed to optimize the process of a recipe development for cementation at the Ling Ao nuclear power plant (NPP) in China. The DMAIC offers a structured, systematical and traceable process to derive test parameters. The DoE test plans and statistical analysis is efficient regarding the amount of test runs and the benefit gain by getting a transfer function. A transfer function enables simulation which is useful to optimize the later process and being responsive to changes. The DoE method was successfully applied for developing a cementation recipe for both evaporator concentrate and resin waste in the plant. The key input parameters were determined, evaluated and the control of these parameters were included into the design. The applied Six SigmaTM tools can help to organize the thinking during the engineering process. Data are organized and clearly presented. Various variables can be limited to the most important ones. The Six SigmaTM tools help to make the thinking and decision process trace able. The tools can help to make data driven decisions (e.g. C and E Matrix). But the tools are not the only golden way. Results from scoring tools like the C and E Matrix need close review before using them. The DoE is an effective tool for generating test plans. DoE can be used with a small number of tests runs, but gives a valuable result from an engineering perspective in terms of a transfer function. The DoE prediction results, however, are only valid in the tested area. So a careful selection of input parameter and their

  19. Current-drive and plasma-formation experiments on the Versator-II tokamak using lower-hybrid and electron-cyclotron waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colborn, J.A.

    1992-08-01

    During lower-hybrid current-driven (LHCD) tokamak, discharges with thermal electron temperature T{sub e} {approx} 150 eV, a two-parallel-temperature tail is observed in the electron distribution function. The cold tail extends to parallel energy E{parallel} {approx} 4.5 keV with temperature T {approx} 1.5 keV, and the hot tail extends to E{parallel} {approx} 4.5 keV with T > 40 keV. Fokker-Planck computer simulations suggest the cold tail is created by low power, high N{parallel} sidelobes in the lower-hybrid antenna spectrum, and that these sidelobes bridge the ``spectral gap,`` enabling current drive on small tokamaks such as Versator. During plasma-formation experiments using 28 GHz electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, the plasma is born near the EC layer, then moves toward the upper-hybrid (UH) layer within 100--200{mu}s. Wave power is detected in the plasma with frequency f = 300 MHz, indicating the EC waves decay into ion modes and electron Bernstein waves during plasma formation. Measured turbulent plasma fluctuations are correlated with decay-wave amplitude. Toroidal currents up to I{sub p} {approx} 1 kA are generated, consistent with theory, which predicts asymmetric electron confinement. Electron-cyclotron current-drive (ECCD) is observed with loop voltage V{sub loop} {le} 0 and fully sustained plasma current I{sub p} {approx_lt} 15 kA at densities up to {l_angle}n{sub e}{r_angle} = 2 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}. The ECCD efficiency {eta} {equivalent_to} {l_angle}n{sub e}{r_angle}I{sub p}R{sub 0}/P{sub rf} = 0.003, which is 30%--40% of the maximum achievable LHCD efficiency on Versator. The efficiency falls rapidly to zero as the density is raised above {l_angle}n{sub e}{r_angle} = 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}, suggesting the ECCD depends on low collisionality. X-ray measurements indicate the current is carried primarily by electrons with energies 1 keV {approx_lt} E {approx_lt} 10 keV.

  20. Current-drive and plasma-formation experiments on the Versator-II tokamak using lower-hybrid and electron-cyclotron waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colborn, J.A.

    1992-08-01

    During lower-hybrid current-driven (LHCD) tokamak, discharges with thermal electron temperature T[sub e] [approx] 150 eV, a two-parallel-temperature tail is observed in the electron distribution function. The cold tail extends to parallel energy E[parallel] [approx] 4.5 keV with temperature T [approx] 1.5 keV, and the hot tail extends to E[parallel] [approx] 4.5 keV with T > 40 keV. Fokker-Planck computer simulations suggest the cold tail is created by low power, high N[parallel] sidelobes in the lower-hybrid antenna spectrum, and that these sidelobes bridge the spectral gap,'' enabling current drive on small tokamaks such as Versator. During plasma-formation experiments using 28 GHz electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, the plasma is born near the EC layer, then moves toward the upper-hybrid (UH) layer within 100--200[mu]s. Wave power is detected in the plasma with frequency f = 300 MHz, indicating the EC waves decay into ion modes and electron Bernstein waves during plasma formation. Measured turbulent plasma fluctuations are correlated with decay-wave amplitude. Toroidal currents up to I[sub p] [approx] 1 kA are generated, consistent with theory, which predicts asymmetric electron confinement. Electron-cyclotron current-drive (ECCD) is observed with loop voltage V[sub loop] [le] 0 and fully sustained plasma current I[sub p] [approx lt] 15 kA at densities up to [l angle]n[sub e][r angle] = 2 [times] 10[sup 12] cm[sup [minus]3]. The ECCD efficiency [eta] [equivalent to] [l angle]n[sub e][r angle]I[sub p]R[sub 0]/P[sub rf] = 0.003, which is 30%--40% of the maximum achievable LHCD efficiency on Versator. The efficiency falls rapidly to zero as the density is raised above [l angle]n[sub e][r angle] = 3 [times] 10[sup 12] cm[sup [minus]3], suggesting the ECCD depends on low collisionality. X-ray measurements indicate the current is carried primarily by electrons with energies 1 keV [approx lt] E [approx lt] 10 keV.

  1. Current-drive and plasma-formation experiments on the Versator-II tokamak using lower-hybrid and electron-cyclotron waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During lower-hybrid current-driven (LHCD) tokamak, discharges with thermal electron temperature Te ∼ 150 eV, a two-parallel-temperature tail is observed in the electron distribution function. The cold tail extends to parallel energy E parallel ∼ 4.5 keV with temperature T ∼ 1.5 keV, and the hot tail extends to E parallel ∼ 4.5 keV with T > 40 keV. Fokker-Planck computer simulations suggest the cold tail is created by low power, high N parallel sidelobes in the lower-hybrid antenna spectrum, and that these sidelobes bridge the ''spectral gap,'' enabling current drive on small tokamaks such as Versator. During plasma-formation experiments using 28 GHz electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, the plasma is born near the EC layer, then moves toward the upper-hybrid (UH) layer within 100--200μs. Wave power is detected in the plasma with frequency f = 300 MHz, indicating the EC waves decay into ion modes and electron Bernstein waves during plasma formation. Measured turbulent plasma fluctuations are correlated with decay-wave amplitude. Toroidal currents up to Ip ∼ 1 kA are generated, consistent with theory, which predicts asymmetric electron confinement. Electron-cyclotron current-drive (ECCD) is observed with loop voltage Vloop ≤ 0 and fully sustained plasma current Ip approx-lt 15 kA at densities up to left-angle ne right-angle = 2 x 1012 cm-3. The ECCD efficiency η ≡ left-angle ne right-angle IpR0/Prf = 0.003, which is 30%--40% of the maximum achievable LHCD efficiency on Versator. The efficiency falls rapidly to zero as the density is raised above left-angle ne right-angle = 3 x 1012 cm-3, suggesting the ECCD depends on low collisionality. X-ray measurements indicate the current is carried primarily by electrons with energies 1 keV approx-lt E approx-lt 10 keV

  2. Light mediators in dark matter direct detections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an extended effective operator framework, we investigate in detail the effects of light mediators on the event spectra of dark matter (DM)-nucleus scatterings. The presence of light mediators changes the interpretation of the current experimental data, especially the determination of DM particle mass. We show by analytic and numerical illustrations that in general for all the operators relevant to spin-independent scatterings, the DM particle mass allowed by a given set of experimental data increases significantly when the mediator particle becomes lighter. For instance, in the case of CDMS-II-Si experiment, the allowed DM particle mass can reach ∼50 (100) GeV at 68% (90%) confidence level, which is much larger than ∼10 GeV in the case with contact interactions. The increase of DM particle mass saturates when the mediator mass is below O(10) MeV. The upper limits from other experiments such as SuperCDMS, CDMSlite, CDEX, XENON10/100, LUX, PandaX etc. all tend to be weaker toward high DM mass regions. In a combined analysis, we show that the presence of light mediators can partially relax the tension in the current results of CDMS-II-Si, SuperCDMS and LUX

  3. PORT II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  4. How well will ton-scale dark matter direct detection experiments constrain minimal supersymmetry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are amongst the most interesting dark matter (DM) candidates. Many DM candidates naturally arise in theories beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics, like weak-scale supersymmetry (SUSY). Experiments aim to detect WIMPs by scattering, annihilation or direct production, and thereby determine the underlying theory to which they belong, along with its parameters. Here we examine the prospects for further constraining the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) with future ton-scale direct detection experiments. We consider ton-scale extrapolations of three current experiments: CDMS, XENON and COUPP, with 1000 kg-years of raw exposure each. We assume energy resolutions, energy ranges and efficiencies similar to the current versions of the experiments, and include backgrounds at target levels. Our analysis is based on full likelihood constructions for the experiments. We also take into account present uncertainties on hadronic matrix elements for neutralino-quark couplings, and on halo model parameters. We generate synthetic data based on four benchmark points and scan over the CMSSM parameter space using nested sampling. We construct both Bayesian posterior PDFs and frequentist profile likelihoods for the model parameters, as well as the mass and various cross-sections of the lightest neutralino. Future ton-scale experiments will help substantially in constraining supersymmetry, especially when results of experiments primarily targeting spin-dependent nuclear scattering are combined with those directed more toward spin-independent interactions

  5. Ex-vessel boiling experiments: laboratory- and reactor-scale testing of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention. Pt. II. Reactor-scale boiling experiments of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For pt.I see ibid., p.77-88 (1997). This paper summarizes the results of a reactor-scale ex-vessel boiling experiment for assessing the flooded cavity design of the heavy water new production reactor. The simulated reactor vessel has a cylindrical diameter of 3.7 m and a torispherical bottom head. Boiling outside the reactor vessel was found to be subcooled nucleate boiling. The subcooling mainly results from the gravity head, which in turn results from flooding the side of the reactor vessel. The boiling process exhibits a cyclic pattern with four distinct phases: direct liquid-solid contact, bubble nucleation and growth, coalescence, and vapor mass dispersion. The results show that, under prototypic heat load and heat flux distributions, the flooded cavity will be effective for in-vessel core retention in the heavy water new production reactor. The results also demonstrate that the heat dissipation requirement for in-vessel core retention, for the central region of the lower head of an AP-600 advanced light water reactor, can be met with the flooded cavity design. (orig.)

  6. Assess the key physics that underpins high-hydro coupling-efficiency in NDCX-II experiments and high-gain heavy ion direct drive target designs using proven hydro codes like HYDRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, J. J.; Hay, M. J.; Logan, B. G.; Ng, S. F.; Perkins, L. J.; Veitzer, S.; Yu, S. S.

    2010-07-01

    The simulations provided in this milestone have solidified the theoretical underpinning of direct drive targets and also the ability to design experiments on NDCX II that will enhance our understanding of ion-beam hydrodynamic coupling, and thus be relevant to IFE. For the case of the IFE targets, we have studied hydro and implosion efficiency using HYDRA in ID, a starting point towards the goal of polar direct drive in geometry compatible with liquid wall chambers. Recent analysis of direct drive fusion energy targets using heavy ion beams has found high coupling efficiency of ion beam energy into implosion energy. However, to obtain optimal coupling, the ion energy must increase during the pulse in order to penetrate the outflowing ablated material, and deposit the energy close enough to the fuel so that the fuel achieves sufficient implosion velocity. We have computationally explored ID (radial) time dependent models of ion driven direct drive capsule implosions using the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) code HYDRA, to help validate the theoretical analysis done so far, particularly exploring the effects of varying the ion energy and ion current over the course of the pulse. On NDCX II, experiments have been proposed to explore issues of ion penetration of the outflowing plasma over the course of the ion pulse. One possibility is to create a first pulse of ions that heats a planar target, and produces an outflow of material. A second pulse, {approx}10 ns after the first, of higher ion energy (and hence larger projected range) will interact with this outflow before reaching and further heating the target. We have investigated whether the change in range can be tailored to match the evolution of the ablation front. We have carried out simulations using the one-dimensional hydrodynamic code DISH and HYDRA to set parameters for this class of experiments. DISH was upgraded with an ion deposition algorithm, and we have carried out ID (planar) simulations. HYDRA was

  7. Raft River Geothermal Aquaculture Experiment. Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.K.; Rose, F.L.; Kent, J.C.; Watson, L.R.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1979-08-01

    Channel catfish, tilapia and Malaysian prawns were cultured directly in geothermal water for approximately seven months at the Department of Energy, Raft River Geothermal Site, to evaluate the organisms throughout a grow-out cycle. Parameters evaluated included survival, growth, bioaccumulation of metals and fluoride, collagen synthesis, and bone calcium levels. Growth at Raft River was slightly lower than at a companion commercial facility at Buhl, Idaho, but was attributed to facility differences rather than an adverse impact of geothermal water. No significant differences were recorded between Raft River and Buhl fish for bone calcium or collagen concentrations. No significant accumulation of heavy metals by fish or prawns was recorded.

  8. Present status of the experiment TGV II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štekl, I.; Čermák, P.; Beneš, P.; Brudanin, V. B.; Rukhadze, NI.; Egorov, VG.; Kovalenko, VE.; Kovalík, Alojz; Salamatin, AV.; Vylov, T.; Simkovič, F.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 4 (2002), s. 541-545. ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0157 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : double-beta decay * CD-106 * CA-48 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics , Colliders Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  9. Single-conformation infrared spectra of model peptides in the amide I and amide II regions: Experiment-based determination of local mode frequencies and inter-mode coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; James, William H.; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guo, Li; Gellman, Samuel H.; Müller, Christian W.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-09-01

    Single-conformation infrared spectra in the amide I and amide II regions have been recorded for a total of 34 conformations of three α-peptides, three β-peptides, four α/β-peptides, and one γ-peptide using resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of the jet-cooled, isolated molecules. Assignments based on the amide NH stretch region were in hand, with the amide I/II data providing additional evidence in favor of the assignments. A set of 21 conformations that represent the full range of H-bonded structures were chosen to characterize the conformational dependence of the vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of the local amide I and amide II modes and their amide I/I and amide II/II coupling constants. Scaled, harmonic calculations at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory accurately reproduce the experimental frequencies and infrared intensities in both the amide I and amide II regions. In the amide I region, Hessian reconstruction was used to extract local mode frequencies and amide I/I coupling constants for each conformation. These local amide I frequencies are in excellent agreement with those predicted by DFT calculations on the corresponding 13C = 18O isotopologues. In the amide II region, potential energy distribution analysis was combined with the Hessian reconstruction scheme to extract local amide II frequencies and amide II/II coupling constants. The agreement between these local amide II frequencies and those obtained from DFT calculations on the N-D isotopologues is slightly worse than for the corresponding comparison in the amide I region. The local mode frequencies in both regions are dictated by a combination of the direct H-bonding environment and indirect, "backside" H-bonds to the same amide group. More importantly, the sign and magnitude of the inter-amide coupling constants in both the amide I and amide II regions is shown to be characteristic of the size of the H-bonded ring linking the two amide groups. These amide I/I and

  10. Search for supersymmetric particles decaying into tri-leptons through R-parity violation, with D0 Run-II experiment at Fermilab; Recherche de particules supersymetriques se desintegrant en R-parite violee (couplage {lambda}(121)) dans un etat final a trois leptons, avec les donnees du Run-II de l'experience D0 au TeVatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnan, A.M

    2005-07-15

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the first data taken by the D0 detector during the Run II of the Tevatron. Supersymmetric particles have been search for in proton-antiproton collisions, with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. In the framework of supersymmetry with R-parity violation, I have studied the pair production of Gauginos, leading to a pair of LSP (0,{chi}{sub 1}), each one decaying into ee{nu}{sub {mu}} or e{mu}{nu}{sub e} with a {lambda}(121) coupling. The final state contains at least two electrons: I have thus paid special attention in this work to the methods concerning identification and mis-identification of electromagnetic particles, as well as reconstruction, triggering, and correction (of the reconstructed energy). In a selection of tri-leptons, with at least two electrons, and some transverse missing energy, we observed 0 event in the 350 pb{sup -1} of analyzed data, for 0.4 + 0.35 - 0.05 (sta) {+-} 0.16 (sys) expected from the Standard Model contributions. In the signal considered in this analysis, the selection efficiency is around 12 per cent. Results have been studied in two models: mSUGRA and MSSM. In mSUGRA model, limits on m(1/2) and lightest gauginos's masses have been obtained, with tan({beta}) = 5, A{sub 0} = 0, m{sub 0} = 100 and 1000 GeV.c{sup -2} and both signs of {mu}. In MSSM, with the hypothesis of massive sfermions (1000 GeV.c{sup -2}), we can exclude, at 95% Confidence Level, the region m({chi}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) < 200 GeV.c{sup -2} for all masses of {chi}{sub 1}{sup 0} LSP. (author)

  11. Prospects for HERMES Run II

    OpenAIRE

    Nowak, Wolf-Dieter

    2001-01-01

    Data taking for Run II of the HERMES experiment will start in late 2001 with three main physics objectives for the next 4-5 years: a measurement of transversity distributions, an improved measurement of helicity distributions, and measurements of exclusive reactions to access Generalized Parton Distributions.

  12. Elizabeth II uus kunstigalerii

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Tähistamaks oma troonile asumise 50. aastapäeva, avab Elizabeth II 6. II 2002 Buckinghami palees uue kunstigalerii, mis ehitatakse palee tiibhoonena. Arhitekt John Simpson. Elizabeth II kunstikogust

  13. Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere: Validation Experiments (MOHAVE I and MOHAVE II). Results Overview and Implication for the Long-Term Lidar Monitoring of Water Vapor in the UT/LS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. S.; Vomel, H.; Whiteman, D.; Twigg, Larry; McGee, T. G.

    2008-01-01

    1. MOHAVE+MOHAVE II = very successful. 2. MOHAVE -> Fluorescence was found to be inherent to all three participating lidars. 3. MOHAVE II -> Fluorescence was removed and agreement with CFH was extremely good up to 16-18 km altitude. 4. MOHAVE II -> Calibration tests revealed unsuspected shortfalls of widely used techniques, with important implications for their applicability to longterm measurements. 5. A factor of 5 in future lidar signal-to-noise ratio is reasonably achievable. When this level is achieved water vapor Raman lidar will become a key instrument for the long-term monitoring of water vapor in the UT/LS

  14. First results from SAGE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76+21-18(stat)+5-7(sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74+13-12(stat)+5-7(sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  15. First results from SAGE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76-18+21 (stat) -7+5 (sys) SNU. combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74-12+13 (stat) -7+5 (sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models

  16. Experiments in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, J M; Denaro, A R

    1968-01-01

    Experiments in Physical Chemistry, Second Edition provides a compilation of experiments concerning physical chemistry. This book illustrates the link between the theory and practice of physical chemistry. Organized into three parts, this edition begins with an overview of those experiments that generally have a simple theoretical background. Part II contains experiments that are associated with more advanced theory or more developed techniques, or which require a greater degree of experimental skill. Part III consists of experiments that are in the nature of investigations wherein these invest

  17. RTNS-II: present status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkinen, D.W.; Logan, C.M.

    1980-10-01

    The present status of the RTNS-II facility is described and typical operating parameters are given. A brief discussion is given of the methods used in production of the TiT/sub 2/ targets as well as their performance and tritium handling at RTNS-II. The various types of non-interactive beam diagnostics presently in use at the neutron sources are outlined. The on-line computer system which provides a time history of an irradiation and records target performance is described. Examples are listed of several representative experimental programs which have been carried out thus far at RTNS-II. These include both active and passive experiments. Finally, several of the major improvements to the facility made since the beginning of the experimental program are given.

  18. The XENON100 Dark Matter Experiment: Design, Construction, Calibration and 2010 Search Results with Improved Measurement of the Scintillation Response of Liquid Xenon to Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Guillaume

    An impressive array of astrophysical observations suggest that 83% of the matter in the universe is in a form of non-luminous, cold, collisionless, non-baryonic dark matter. Several extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics aimed at solving the hierarchy problem predict stable weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) that could naturally have the right cosmological relic abundance today to compose most of the dark matter if their interactions with normal matter are on the order of a weak scale cross section. These candidates also have the added benefit that their properties and interaction rates can be computed in a well defined particle physics model. A considerable experimental effort is currently under way to uncover the nature of dark matter. One method of detecting WIMP dark matter is to look for its interactions in terrestrial detectors where it is expected to scatter off nuclei. In 2007, the XENON10 experiment took the lead over the most sensitive direct detection dark matter search in operation, the CDMS II experiment, by probing spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction cross sections down to sigmachi N ˜ 5 x 10-44 cm 2 at 30 GeV/c2. Liquefied noble gas detectors are now among the technologies at the forefront of direct detection experiments. Liquid xenon (LXe), in particular, is a well suited target for WIMP direct detection. It is easily scalable to larger target masses, allows discrimination between nuclear recoils and electronic recoils, and has an excellent stopping power to shield against external backgrounds. A particle losing energy in LXe creates both ionization electrons and scintillation light. In a dual-phase LXe time projection chamber (TPC) the ionization electrons are drifted and extracted into the gas phase where they are accelerated to amplify the charge signal into a proportional scintillation signal. These two signals allow the three-dimensional localization of events with millimeter precision and the ability to

  19. Angiotensin II stimulates melanogenesis via the protein kinase C pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Li-hong LIU; Fan, Xin; XIA, ZHI-KUAN; AN, XU-XI; Yang, Rong-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis is a physiological process that results in the synthesis of melanin pigments, which serve a crucial function in hyperpigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on melanogenesis and to elucidate the molecular events of Ang II-induced melanogenesis. Experiments were performed on human melanocytes to elucidate the pigmenting effect of Ang II and the underlying mechanisms. The elements involved in melanogenesis, including melan...

  20. Interactions of tetracycline with Cd (II), Cu (II) and Pb (II) and their cosorption behavior in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetracycline (TC), a common antibiotic, can behave as an efficient ligand with cations, but the effect of its interaction with heavy metal cations on the mobility of both species in soils has not been well evaluated. In this study, the complexation affinities of TC with Cd (II), Cu (II) and Pb (II) were examined using potentiometric titration and spectroscopic methods. The cosorption behavior of TC and metal ions onto three selected Chinese soils was evaluated using batch adsorption experiments. The presence of metal cations promoted TC adsorption through an ion bridging effect in the order Cu (II) > Pb (II) > Cd (II), which is in accordance with their complexation ability with TC. The addition of TC affects metal adsorption differently depending on the solution pH and metal type. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the complexation ability of TC and divalent metal cations when evaluating their mobility in soils. -- Highlights: •The complex affinity with TC has an order of Cu(II) > Pb(II) > Cd(II). •The complexation constants of TC with the three metals are obtained. •The cosorption behavior in soils greatly depends on the complexation affinity. -- The interaction between tetracycline and metal cations can influence the adsorption behavior of these species in soils, depending on their complexation ability