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Sample records for cdkn2b p15 gene

  1. Lack of evidence for mutations or deletions in the CDKN2A/p16 and CDKN2B/p15 genes of Brazilian neuroblastoma patients

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    Bassi C.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial tumor in childhood, has a wide spectrum of clinical and biological features. The loss of heterozygosity within the 9p21 region has been reported as a prognostic factor. Two tumor suppressor genes located in this region, the CDKN2B/p15 and CDKN2A/p16 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors 2B and 2A, respectively genes, play a critical role in cell cycle progression and are considered to be targets for tumor inactivation. We analyzed CDKN2B/p15 and CDKN2A/p16 gene alterations in 11 patients, who ranged in age from 4 months to 13 years (male/female ratio was 1.2:1. The most frequent stage of the tumor was stage IV (50%, followed by stages II and III (20% and stage I (10%. The samples were submitted to the multiplex PCR technique for homozygous deletion analysis and to single-strand conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing for mutation analysis. All exons of both genes were analyzed, but no deletion was detected. One sample exhibited shift mobility specific for exon 2 in the CDKN2B/p15 gene, not confirmed by DNA sequencing. Homozygous deletions and mutations are not involved in the inactivation mechanism of the CDKN2B/p15 and CDKN2A/p16 genes in neuroblastoma; however, these two abnormalities do not exclude other inactivation pathways. Recent evidence has shown that the expression of these genes is altered in this disease. Therefore, other mechanisms of inactivation, such as methylation of promoter region and unproperly function of proteins, may be considered in order to estimate the real contribution of these genes to neuroblastoma genesis or disease progression.

  2. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERα-positive breast cancer cells.

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    Ansems, Marleen; Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Looman, Maaike W G; Smid, Marcel; de Graaf, Annemarie M A; de Weerd, Vanja; Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Foekens, John A; Martens, John W M; Adema, Gosse J

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERα) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERα and as a strong and independent prognostic marker in ESR1 (ERα gene)-positive breast cancer patients. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism on how DC-SCRIPT inhibits breast cancer cell growth. DC-SCRIPT mRNA levels from 190 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors were related to global gene expression, followed by gene ontology and pathway analysis. The effect of DC-SCRIPT on breast cancer cell growth and cell cycle arrest was investigated using novel DC-SCRIPT-inducible MCF7 breast cancer cell lines. Genome-wide expression profiling of DC-SCRIPT-expressing MCF7 cells was performed to investigate the effect of DC-SCRIPT on cell cycle-related gene expression. Findings were validated by real-time PCR in a cohort of 1,132 ESR1-positive breast cancer patients. In the primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression negatively correlated with several cell cycle gene ontologies and pathways. DC-SCRIPT expression strongly reduced breast cancer cell growth in vitro, breast tumor growth in vivo, and induced cell cycle arrest. In addition, in the presence of DC-SCRIPT, multiple cell cycles related genes were differentially expressed including the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B. Moreover, in 1,132 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression also correlated with CDKN2B expression. Collectively, these data show that DC-SCRIPT acts as a novel regulator of CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ESR1-positive breast cancer cells.

  3. Mutation analysis of genes that control the G1/S cell cycle in melanoma: TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B

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    López-Nevot Miguel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of genes involved in the control of progression from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle in melanoma tumors in not fully known. The aim of our study was to analyse mutations in TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B genes in melanoma tumors and melanoma cell lines Methods We analysed 39 primary and metastatic melanomas and 9 melanoma cell lines by single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP. Results The single-stranded technique showed heterozygous defects in the TP53 gene in 8 of 39 (20.5% melanoma tumors: three new single point mutations in intronic sequences (introns 1 and 2 and exon 10, and three new single nucleotide polymorphisms located in introns 1 and 2 (C to T transition at position 11701 in intron 1; C insertion at position 11818 in intron 2; and C insertion at position 11875 in intron 2. One melanoma tumor exhibited two heterozygous alterations in the CDKN2A exon 1 one of which was novel (stop codon, and missense mutation. No defects were found in the remaining genes. Conclusion These results suggest that these genes are involved in melanoma tumorigenesis, although they may be not the major targets. Other suppressor genes that may be informative of the mechanism of tumorigenesis in skin melanomas should be studied.

  4. Intronic Polymorphisms in the CDKN2B-AS1 Gene Are Strongly Associated with the Risk of Myocardial Infarction and Coronary Artery Disease in the Saudi Population

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    Sayed AbdulAzeez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide association studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on the chromosome 9p21.3 conferring the risk for CAD (coronary artery disease in individuals of Caucasian ancestry. We performed a genetic association study to investigate the effect of 12 candidate SNPs within 9p21.3 locus on the risk of CAD in the Saudi population of the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. A total of 250 Saudi CAD patients who had experienced an myocardial infarction (MI and 252 Saudi age-matched healthy controls were genotyped using TaqMan assay. Controls with evidenced lack of CAD provided 90% of statistical power at the type I error rate of 0.05. Five percent of the results were rechecked for quality control using Sanger sequencing, the results of which concurred with the TaqMan genotyping results. Association analysis of 12 SNPs indicated a significant difference in the genotype distribution for four SNPs between cases and controls (rs564398 p = 0.0315, χ2 = 4.6, odds ratio (OD = 1.5; rs4977574 p = 0.0336, χ2 = 4.5, OD = 1.4; rs2891168 p = 1.85 × 10 − 10, χ2 = 40.6, OD = 2.1 and rs1333042 p = 5.14 × 10 − 9, χ2 = 34.1, OD = 2.2. The study identified three protective haplotypes (TAAG p = 1.00 × 10 − 4; AGTA p = 0.022 and GGGCC p = 0.0175 and a risk haplotype (TGGA p = 2.86 × 10 − 10 for the development of CAD. This study is in line with others that indicated that the SNPs located in the intronic region of the CDKN2B-AS1 gene are associated with CAD.

  5. CDKN2B expression and subcutaneous adipose tissue expandability: Possible influence of the 9p21 atherosclerosis locus

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    Svensson, Per-Arne; Wahlstrand, Björn; Olsson, Maja [Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Froguel, Philippe; Falchi, Mario [Department of Genomics of Common Disease, School of Public Health, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Bergman, Richard N. [Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McTernan, Philip G. [Division of Metabolic and Vascular Health, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Hedner, Thomas; Carlsson, Lena M.S. [Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Jacobson, Peter, E-mail: peter.jacobson@medfak.gu.se [Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • The tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B is highly expressed in human adipose tissue. • Risk alleles at the 9p21 locus modify CDKN2B expression in a BMI-dependent fashion. • There is an inverse relationship between expression of CDKN2B and adipogenic genes. • CDKN2B expression influences to postprandial triacylglycerol clearance. • CDKN2B expression in adipose tissue is linked to markers of hepatic steatosis. - Abstract: Risk alleles within a gene desert at the 9p21 locus constitute the most prevalent genetic determinant of cardiovascular disease. Previous research has demonstrated that 9p21 risk variants influence gene expression in vascular tissues, yet the biological mechanisms by which this would mediate atherosclerosis merits further investigation. To investigate possible influences of this locus on other tissues, we explored expression patterns of 9p21-regulated genes in a panel of multiple human tissues and found that the tumor suppressor CDKN2B was highly expressed in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). CDKN2B expression was regulated by obesity status, and this effect was stronger in carriers of 9p21 risk alleles. Covariation between expression of CDKN2B and genes implemented in adipogenesis was consistent with an inhibitory effect of CDKN2B on SAT proliferation. Moreover, studies of postprandial triacylglycerol clearance indicated that CDKN2B is involved in down-regulation of SAT fatty acid trafficking. CDKN2B expression in SAT correlated with indicators of ectopic fat accumulation, including markers of hepatic steatosis. Among genes regulated by 9p21 risk variants, CDKN2B appears to play a significant role in the regulation of SAT expandability, which is a strong determinant of lipotoxicity and therefore might contribute to the development of atherosclerosis.

  6. Glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and insulin release in European non-diabetic carriers of a polymorphism upstream of CDKN2A and CDKN2B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hribal, M L; Presta, I; Procopio, T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the rs10811661 polymorphism near the CDKN2B/CDKN2A genes with glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and insulin release in three samples of white people with European ancestry....

  7. Association of CDKN2B-AS1 rs1333049 with Brain Diseases: A Case-control Study and a Meta-analysis

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    Zhao, Jikuang; Wu, Xizheng; Nie, Sheng; Gao, Xiang; Sun, Jie; Li, Keqin; Zhang, Tiefeng; Huang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Objective CDKN2B-AS1 polymorphisms were shown to associate with the risk of stroke in European. The goal of this study was to evaluate the contribution of CDKN2B-AS1 rs1333049 to the risk of hemorrhagic stroke (HS) and brain tumor (BT) in Han Chinese. Methods A total of 142 HSs, 115 BTs, and 494 controls were included in the current association study. The genotyping test was performed using the melting temperature shift method. Results We failed to validate the association of CDKN2B-AS1 rs1333049 with the risk of brain disease. Significantly higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (p=0.027), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (p0.05). The meta-analysis of 10 studies among 133,993 individuals concluded that rs1333049 of CDKN2B-AS1 gene was likely to increase a 16% incidence rate of cerebrovascular disease (CD) among various populations (odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.08–1.25; pLDL-C, HDL-C and TC in the HS patients. Meta-analysis supported the association between rs1333049 and CD risk in various populations, although we were unable to observe association between rs1333049 and the risk of HSs in Han Chinese. PMID:28138111

  8. Disruption of chromosome 11 in canine fibrosarcomas highlights an unusual variability of CDKN2B in dogs

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    Haugland Sean

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In dogs in the western world neoplasia constitutes the most frequently diagnosed cause of death. Although there appear to be similarities between canine and human cancers, rather little is known about the cytogenetic and molecular alterations in canine tumours. Different dog breeds are susceptible to different types of cancer, but the genetic basis of the great majority of these predispositions has yet to be discovered. In some retriever breeds there is a high incidence of soft tissue sarcomas and we have previously reported alterations of chromosomes 11 and 30 in two poorly differentiated fibrosarcomas. Here we extend our observations and present a case report on detail rearrangements on chromosome 11 as well as genetic variations in a tumour suppressor gene in normal dogs. Results BAC hybridisations on metaphases of two fibrosarcomas showed complex rearrangements on chromosome 11, and loss of parts of this chromosome. Microsatellite markers on a paired tumour and blood DNA pointed to loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 11 in the CDKN2B-CDKN2A tumour suppressor gene cluster region. PCR and sequencing revealed the homozygous loss of coding sequences for these genes, except for exon 1β of CDKN2A, which codes for the N-terminus of p14ARF. For CDKN2B exon 1, two alleles were observed in DNA from blood; one of them identical to the sequence in the dog reference genome and containing 4 copies of a 12 bp repeat found only in the canine gene amongst all species so far sequenced; the other allele was shorter due to a missing copy of the repeat. Sequencing of this exon in 141 dogs from 18 different breeds revealed a polymorphic region involving a GGC triplet repeat and a GGGGACGGCGGC repeat. Seven alleles were recorded and sixteen of the eighteen breeds showed heterozygosity. Conclusion Complex chromosome rearrangements were observed on chromosome 11 in two Labrador retriever fibrosarcomas. The chromosome alterations were reflected

  9. Genetic association of SNPs near ATOH7, CARD10, CDKN2B, CDC7 and SIX1/SIX6 with the endophenotypes of primary open angle glaucoma in Indian population.

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    Ferdinamarie Sharmila Philomenadin

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG belonging to a group of optic neuropathies, result from interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Study of associations with quantitative traits (QTs is one of the successful strategies to understand the complex genetics of POAG. The current study attempts to explore the association of variations near/in genes like ATOH7, SIX1/SIX6 complex, CDKN2B, CARD10, and CDC7 with POAG and its QTs including vertical cup to disc ratio (VCDR, central corneal thickness (CCT, intra ocular pressure (IOP, and axial length (AL. Case-control study design was carried out in a sample size of 97 POAG cases and 371 controls from South India. Model-based (additive, recessive, dominant association of the genotypes and their interaction was carried out between cases and controls using chi-square, linear and logistic regression methods. Nominal significance (P<0.05 was observed for QTs like i VCDR with SNPs rs1900004 (ATOH7; rs1192415 (CDC7; rs10483727 (SIX1/SIX6, rs9607469 (CARD10; ii CCT with rs1192415; iii IOP with rs1900004 and iv AL with rs1900004 and rs1063192 (CDKN2B. We were able to replicate previously known interactions between ATOH7-SIX6 and SIX6-CDKN2B along with few novel interactions between ATOH7-CDC7 and SIX6 with genes including CARD10 and CDC7. In summary, our results suggest that a probable interaction among the candidate genes for QTs, play a major role in determining the individual's susceptibility to POAG.

  10. p15(Ink4b) is a critical tumour suppressor in the absence of p16(Ink4a)

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    Krimpenfort, Paul; IJpenberg, Annemieke; Song, Ji-Ying; van der Valk, Martin; Nawijn, Martijn; Zevenhoven, John; Berns, Anton

    2007-01-01

    The CDKN2b-CDKN2a locus on chromosome 9p21 in human (chromosome 4 in mouse) is frequently lost in cancer. The locus encodes three cell cycle inhibitory proteins: p15(INK4b) encoded by CDKN2b, p16(INK4a) encoded by CDKN2a and p14(ARF) (p19(Arf) in mice) encoded by an alternative reading frame of CDKN

  11. DELETION AND 5'CPG ISLAND METHYLATION OF p15 GENE IN BRAIN GLIOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the abnormality of p15 gene in brain glioma and the correlation of it with occurrence or malignant progression of brain glioma. Methods: Deletion and 5'CPG island methylation of p15 gene were detected by the methods of PCR and PCR-based methylation in 56 cases of brain glioma. Results: Out of 43 cases of high grade glioma, 14 cases were found to have homozygous deletion of p15E1, while none of the 13 cases of low grade glioma was found to have deletion of p15E1 (P<0.05). Methylation of 5'CPG Island of p15 gene was found only in four cases of glioma. Conclusion: Abnormality of p15 gene may involved in the occurrence and malignant progression of brain glioma. Homozygous deletion of gene is the major mechanism of inactivation for p15 gene in brain glioma.

  12. Upregulation of MicroRNA-15a Contributes to Pathogenesis of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) by Modulating the Expression of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 2B (CDKN2B)

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    Gao, Peng; Si, Jiyuan; Yang, Bin; Yu, Jixiang

    2017-01-01

    Background The objective of the present study was to identify the association between miR-15a-5p and CDKN2B, and their roles in regulating the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Material/Methods We searched the miRNA database online (www.mirdb.org) and used a luciferase reporter assay system to study the regulatory relationship between miR-15a-5p and CDKN2B. We also conducted real-time PCR and Western blot analysis to study the mRNA and protein expression level of CDKN2B among different patient groups (participants with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and normal controls) or cells treated with scramble control, miR-15a-5p mimics, CDKN2B siRNA, and miR-15a-5p inhibitors. Results We found that CDKN2B was a virtual target of miR-15a-5p with potential binding sites in the 3′UTR of CDKN2B (77–83 bp). We also showed that miR-15a-5p could bind to the CDKN2B 3′UTR, resulting in a significant decrease in luciferase activity compared with the scramble control. Furthermore, we found that the cells isolated from AAA participants showed an over-expression of miR-15a-5p compared to the normal controls, while the CDKN2B mRNA and protein expression level of the AAA group were much lower than the normal control group. Additionally, the expression of CDKN2B mRNA and the protein of the cells transfected with miR-15a-5p mimics and CDKN2B siRNA was downregulated, while the cells showed upregulated expression subsequent to transfection with miR-15a-5p inhibitors compared to the scramble control. Conclusions The data revealed a negative regulatory role of miR-15a-5p in the apoptosis of smooth muscle cells via targeting CDKN2B, and showed that miR-15a-5p could be a novel therapeutic target of AAA. PMID:28214350

  13. Common variants in CDKN2B-AS1 associated with optic-nerve vulnerability of glaucoma identified by genome-wide association studies in Japanese.

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    Masakazu Nakano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, only a small portion of the genetic variation for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, the major type of glaucoma, has been elucidated. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined our two data sets of the genome-wide association studies (GWAS derived from a total of 2,219 Japanese subjects. First, we performed a GWAS by analyzing 653,519 autosomal common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 833 POAG patients and 686 controls. As a result, five variants that passed the Bonferroni correction were identified in CDKN2B-AS1 on chromosome 9p21.3, which was already reported to be a significant locus in the Caucasian population. Moreover, we combined the data set with our previous GWAS data set derived from 411 POAG patients and 289 controls by the Mantel-Haenszel test, and all of the combined variants showed stronger association with POAG (P<5.8 × 10(-10. We then subdivided the case groups into two subtypes based on the value of intraocular pressure (IOP--POAG with high IOP (high pressure glaucoma, HPG and that with normal IOP (normal pressure glaucoma, NPG--and performed the GWAS using the two data sets, as the prevalence of NPG in Japanese is much higher than in Caucasians. The results suggested that the variants from the same CDKN2B-AS1 locus were likely to be significant for NPG patients. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, we successfully identified POAG-associated variants in the CDKN2B-AS1 locus using a Japanese population, i.e., variants originally reported as being associated with the Caucasian population. Although we cannot rule out that the significance could be due to the differences in sample size between HPG and NPG, the variants could be associated specifically with the vulnerability of the optic nerve to IOP, which is useful for investigating the etiology of glaucoma.

  14. A variant at 9p21.3 functionally implicates CDKN2B in paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia aetiology

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    Hungate, Eric A.; Vora, Sapana R.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Moriyama, Takaya; Best, Timothy; Hulur, Imge; Lee, Younghee; Evans, Tiffany-Jane; Ellinghaus, Eva; Stanulla, Martin; Rudant, Jéremie; Orsi, Laurent; Clavel, Jacqueline; Milne, Elizabeth; Scott, Rodney J.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Cox, Nancy J.; Loh, Mignon L.; Yang, Jun J.; Skol, Andrew D.; Onel, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) is the most common cancer of childhood, yet little is known about BCP-ALL predisposition. In this study, in 2,187 cases of European ancestry and 5,543 controls, we discover and replicate a locus indexed by rs77728904 at 9p21.3 associated with BCP-ALL susceptibility (Pcombined=3.32 × 10−15, OR=1.72) and independent from rs3731217, the previously reported ALL-associated variant in this region. Of correlated SNPs tagged by this locus, only rs662463 is significant in African Americans, suggesting it is a plausible causative variant. Functional analysis shows that rs662463 is a cis-eQTL for CDKN2B, with the risk allele associated with lower expression, and suggests that rs662463 influences BCP-ALL risk by regulating CDKN2B expression through CEBPB signalling. Functional analysis of rs3731217 suggests it is associated with BCP-ALL by acting within a splicing regulatory element determining CDKN2A exon 3 usage (P=0.01). These findings provide new insights into the critical role of the CDKN2 locus in BCP-ALL aetiology. PMID:26868379

  15. Frequent abnormalities of the p15 and p16 genes in mycosis fungoides and sezary syndrome.

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    Scarisbrick, Julia J; Woolford, Alison J; Calonje, Eduardo; Photiou, Andrew; Ferreira, Sylvia; Orchard, Guy; Russell-Jones, Robin; Whittaker, Sean J

    2002-03-01

    There are few data on the molecular pathogenesis of cutaneous T cell lymphomas. A recent allelotyping study by our group identified frequent allelic loss on 9p, 10q, and 17p including losses on 9p21 in 16% of patients with mycosis fungoides and 46% with Sezary syndrome. The P15 and P16 genes are intricately linked on 9p21 and can be inactivated in melanoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We have therefore studied 76 patients with either mycosis fungoides or Sezary syndrome for abnormalities of these genes. DNA samples were analyzed for loss of heterozygosity, homozygous deletion, intragenic mutations, and promoter methylation. In addition P15 and P16 protein expression was assessed. Microsatellite analysis was informative in 73 of 76 cases: allelic loss on 9p21 was identified in 18 patients (25%), including 12 of 57 with mycosis fungoides (21%) and six of 16 with Sezary syndrome (37%). Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the entire coding regions of both genes did not identify any mutations, although two polymorphisms were identified including C613A, which has not previously been described. P15 and P16 gene promoter methylation was found in 45% and 29% of patients, respectively. Furthermore aberrant P15 protein expression was detected in 85% of patients analyzed with P15 gene abnormalities and abnormal P16 expression in 59% with P16 gene abnormalities. These abnormalities were not dependent on cutaneous stage of disease. This study suggests that abnormalities of the P15 and P16 genes are common in both early and advanced stages of mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome and that these genes may be inactivated by allelic loss and aberrant promoter methylation.

  16. Oxidative stress levels are correlated with P15 and P16 gene promoter methylation in myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

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    Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Cortesão, Emília; Oliveiros, Barbara; Alves, Vera; Espadana, Ana Isabel; Rito, Luís; Magalhães, Emília; Pereira, Sónia; Pereira, Amélia; Costa, José Manuel Nascimento; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress and abnormal DNA methylation have been implicated in some types of cancer, namely in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Since both mechanisms are observed in MDS patients, we analyzed the correlation of intracellular levels of peroxides, superoxide anion, and glutathione (GSH), as well as ratios of peroxides/GSH and superoxide/GSH, with the methylation status of P15 and P16 gene promoters in bone marrow leukocytes from MDS patients. Compared to controls, these patients had lower GSH content, higher peroxide levels, peroxides/GSH and superoxide/GSH ratios, as well as higher methylation frequency of P15 and P16 gene promoters. Moreover, patients with methylated P15 gene had higher oxidative stress levels than patients without methylation (peroxides: 460 ± 42 MIF vs 229 ± 25 MIF, p = 0.001; superoxide: 383 ± 48 MIF vs 243 ± 17 MIF, p = 0.022; peroxides/GSH: 2.50 ± 0.08 vs 1.04 ± 0.34, p P16 and at least one methylated gene had higher peroxide levels as well as peroxides/GSH ratio than patients without methylation. Interestingly, oxidative stress levels allow the discrimination of patients without methylation from ones with methylated P15, methylated P16, or at least one methylated (P15 or P16) promoter. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that oxidative stress is correlated with P15 and P16 hypermethylation.

  17. CO-DELETION OF BOTH p15/p16 GENES CORRELATES WITH POOR PROGNOSIS NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CNACER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡颖; 廖美琳; 丁嘉安; 周瑾; 许凯黎

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between co-deletion of p15/p16 genes and the prognostic significance in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: By using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the loss of p15/pl6 genes was examined in DNA samples from 140 NSCLC patients. Results: The rate of co-deletion in adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than that in squamous cell carcinoma (P0.05). By a five years' follow-up survey, the survival rate of NSCLC patients with co-deletion of pl5/pl6 genes was obviously lower than that of patients without co-deletion (P<0.01). In the multivariate analysis, co-deletion of p15/p16 genes and TNM stages were identified as independent predictors for overall survival (P<0.01). Conclusion: Since the co-deletion of pl5/pl6 genes is significantly related to the prognosis of NSCLC patients, detecting co-deletion of both genes might be used as a potential marker for NSCLC prognosis.

  18. Influence of Decitabine on Demethylation of P15INK4B Gene and the Growth and Apoptosis of Burkitt Lymphoma Raji Cells

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    LIU Qiao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the methylation status of P15INK4B gene and the biochemical influence of decitabine on the demethylation of P15INK4B gene and the growth and apoptosis of Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells. Methods: Trypan blue was used to test the effects of different concentrations of decitabine on cell growth curve of Burkitt lymphoma Rajj cells. Cell apoptostic rate was detected by flow cytometry (FCM. The expression of P15INK4B gene was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and the degree of methylation of P15INK4B gene by methylation-specific PCR (MSP. Results: Different concentrations of decitabine had an inhibiting effect on the proliferation of Raji cells, and promote the apoptosis of Raji cells. After 48-h treatment of decitabine, the mRNA expression of P15INK4B gene of Raji cells was up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner by inducing the demethylation of P15INK4B gene. . Conclusion: There exists hypermethylated P15INK4B gene in Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells which makes P15INK4B gene down-regulated. However, decitabine can up-regulate the mRNA expression of P15INK4B gene through inducing the demethylation of P15INK4B gene, thus inhibiting the proliferation of lymphoma Raji cells.

  19. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERα-positive breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ansems (Marleen); J.N. Søndergaard (Jonas Nørskov); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); M.W.G. Looman (Maaike W. G.); M. Smid (Marcel); A.M.A. de Graaf (Annemarie M. A.); V. de Weerd (Vanja); M. Zuidscherwoude (Malou); J.A. Foekens (John); J.W.M. Martens (John); G.J. Adema (Gosse J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERα) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERα and as a strong and independent prog

  20. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansems, M.; Sondergaard, J.N.; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Looman, M.W.G.; Smid, M.; Graaf, A.M.A. de; Weerd, V. de; Zuidscherwoude, M.; Foekens, J.A.; Martens, J.W.; Adema, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERalpha) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERalpha and as a strong and independent prognost

  1. Reactivating aberrantly hypermethylated p15 gene in leukemic T cells by a phenylhexyl isothiocyanate mediated inter-active mechanism on DNA and chromatin

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    Jiang Shaohong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously demonstrated that phenylhexyl isothiocyanate (PHI, a synthetic isothiocyanate, inhibits histone deacetylases and remodels chromatins to induce growth arrest in HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Methods To investigate the effect of PHI, a novel histone deacetylases inhibitor (HDACi, on demethylation and activation of transcription of p15 in acute lymphoid leukemia cell line Molt-4, and to further decipher the potential mechanism of demethylation, DNA sequencing and modified methylation specific PCR (MSP were used to screen p15-M and p15-U mRNA after Molt-4 cells were treated with PHI, 5-Aza and TSA. DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1, 3A (DNMT3A, 3B (DNMT3B and p15 mRNA were measured by RT-PCR. P15 protein, acetylated histone H3 and histone H4 were detected by Western Blot. Results The gene p15 in Molt-4 cells was hypermethylated and inactive. Hypermethylation of gene p15 was attenuated and p15 gene was activated de novo after 5 days exposure to PHI in a concentration-dependent manner. DNMT1 and DNMT3B were inhibited by PHI (P Conclusion PHI could induce both DNA demethylation and acetylated H3 and H4 accumulation in Molt-4 cells. Hypermethylation of gene p15 was reversed and p15 transcription could be reactivated de novo by PHI.

  2. Toward the gene(s) for Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome and associated tumors in two different regions of 11p15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, J.; Chehenase, V.; Boulevin, C. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome (WBS) is a malformation syndrome associated with predisposition to different types of tumors (WT, ADCC). Cytogenetic and familial studies mapped the WBS locus to 11p15.5. Genomic imprinting has been implicated in the expression of the syndrome. Using 11p15 specific markers we have determined the parental origin of both chromosomes 11 in sporadic WBS cases. Probands in 5 out of 26 informative families (25%) displayed uniparental disomy (UPD) corresponding to a paternal isodisomy for region 11p15.5. Mosaic phenotypes reflect the timing of their origin and the fate of cells involved as well as the cell-specific pattern of imprinting. Somatic mosaicism for UPD may thus explain the incomplete forms of WBS, the association of hemihypertrophy in sporadic WBS and even some cases of isolated hemihypertrophy. Moreover, the risk (60%) of developing a tumor seems higher for patients with paternal 11p UPD than for WBS patients in general (7.5%). Two different genomic libraries specific for region 11p15.5 were constructed and screened to isolate and characterize the gene(s) responsible for WBS and/or tumor progression. The characterization and and the localization of these cDNAs are in progress. 5 CA repeats genetically mapped in 11p15 were used to isolate YACs (CEPH). These CA repeats are now physically mapped using a panel of hybrids specific for the 11p15 region, and the contigs of YACs mapping in the regions of interest will be used to isolate coding sequences.

  3. Gene Expression Status and Methylation Pattern in Promoter of P15INK4b and P16INK4a in Cord Blood CD34+ Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Azad

    2013-07-01

    : Specific predifferentiation expression of P15INK4b and P16INK4a genes along with reduction in their expression after erythroid differentiation indicated animportant role for these two genes in biology of CD34+ cells in primary stages and before differentiation. In addition, both genes are capable of epigenetic modifications due to the structure of their promoters.

  4. Rearrangements at the 11p15 locus and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II gene in sporadic adrenocortical tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gicquel, C.; Schneid, H.; Le Bouc, Y. [Hopital Trousseau, Paris (France); Bertagna, X.; Francillard-Leblond, M.; Luton, J.P.; Girard, F. [Hopital Cochin, Paris (France)

    1994-06-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiology of sporadic adrenocortical tumors in adults. Because loss of heterozygosity at the 11p15 locus has been described in childhood tumors, particularly in adrenocortical tumors associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, and because insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a crucial regulator of fetal adrenal growth, the authors looked for structural analysis at the 11p15 locus and IGF-II gene expression in 23 sporadic adrenocortical adult tumors: 6 carcinomas (5 with Cushing`s syndrome and 1 nonsecreting) and 17 benign adenomas (13 with Cushing`s syndrome, 1 pure androgen secreting, and 3 nonsecreting). Twenty-one patients were informative at the 11p15 locus, and six (four carcinomas and two adenomas) of them (28.5%) exhibited 11p15 structural abnormalities in tumor DNA (five, a uniparental disomy and one, a mosaicism). In a single case that could be further studied, a paternal isodisomy was observed. Very high IGF-II mRNA contents were detected in seven tumors (30%; 5 of the 6 carcinomas and 2 of the 17 adenomas). They were particularly found in tumors with uniparental disomy at the 11p15 locus. Overall, a strong correlation existed between IGF-II mRNA contents and DNA demethylation at the IGF-II locus. These data show that genetic alterations involving the 11p15 locus were highly frequent in malignant tumors, but found only in rare adenomas. These results in combination with evidence for overexpression of IGF-II from the 11p15.5 locus suggest that abnormalities in structure and/or expression of the IGF-II gene play a role as a late event of a multistep process of tumorigenesis. 58 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. MOLECULAR CLONING AND EXPRESSION OF TRYPANOSOMA EVANSI MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN P15 GENE%伊氏锥虫微管结合蛋白p15基因的分子克隆与表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张广州; 索勋; 侯丽丽

    2007-01-01

    根据报道的布氏锥虫(Trypanosoma brucei)微管结合蛋白p15(Tb-MAP p15)基因及其3'非翻译区保守序列设计引物,采用PCR法从伊氏锥虫云南水牛株(Trypanosoma evansi stock YNB)基因组DNA中克隆得到伊氏锥虫微管结合蛋白p15(Te-MAP p15)基因.克隆片段长273 bp,编码90个氨基酸,预测分子量9.0kDa.经同源性比较,所得基因与Tb-MAP p15基因同源率达到94%.抗原性分析Te-MAP p15基因表达的氨基酸序列比T.brucei微管结合蛋白p15多5个,均参与组成其中1个抗原决定簇,并且此抗原决定簇序列形成在蛋白中常作为识别位点的α螺旋.将该基因亚克隆到pGEX-6P-1原核表达载体,转化大肠杆菌E.coli RS21宿主菌,经IPTG诱导,可成功表达.重组融合蛋白大小为35 kDa,与预期大小一致,经SDS-PAGE和Western-blot鉴定为重组伊氏锥虫微管结合p15蛋白.

  6. A novel familial 11p15.4 microduplication associated with intellectual disability, dysmorphic features, and obesity with involvement of the ZNF214 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofos, Elvera; Pescosolido, Matthew F; Quintos, Jose B; Abuelo, Dianne; Gunn, Shelly; Hovanes, Karine; Morrow, Eric M; Shur, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a patient with mild intellectual disability, obesity, overgrowth, and dysmorphic features. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis showed a single copy number increase of a BAC clone in the 11p15.4 region. Oligonucleotide aCGH refined the duplication to approximately 2.29  megabases (Mb) in size. Testing the parents revealed that the father, who had learning disabilities and overgrowth, also had the 11p15.4 duplication, and the mother had a normal microarray. In addition, the patient's brother and grandmother all share clinical features with the proband and tested positive for the duplication. The duplicated region (Chr11:6,934,067-9,220,605) encompasses 29 genes, including the ZNF214 gene, which has been postulated to play a role in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome [Alders et al., 2000]. This three-generation pedigree outlines features of a novel microduplication syndrome.

  7. The resent progress in relativity of hypermethylation of P15 gene with leukimia (A review)%P15基因甲基化和血液病相关性的研究进展(综述)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭秀枝; 范洪涛; 周涛; 谭广销; 陈鹏

    2001-01-01

    P15基因是肿瘤抑制基因的侯选基因,受细胞生长抑制蛋白TGF-β的诱导,编码周期素依赖激酶4/6(CDK4/6)抑制因子,对细胞周期起负调控作用,P15基因操纵区5'-CpG岛的甲基化被认为是基因缺失之外的又一失活机制.P15基因5'-CpG;岛的异常甲基化导致该基因转录的抑制,5'-杂氮脱氧胞嘧啶(5'-Aza-2cdR)通过共价俘获DNA甲基转移酶抑制DNA的甲基化,使因甲基化失活的生长调控基因重新激活并表达.5'-Aza-2cdR可通过P15基因去甲基化再表达抑制细胞的生长,为临床恶性血液病去甲基化治疗提供实验依据.

  8. Methylation of CpG island of p14(ARK), p15(INK4b) and p16(INK4a) genes in coke oven workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Li, X; Ge, L; Yang, J; Sun, J; Niu, Q

    2015-02-01

    To detect the blood genomic DNA methylation in coke oven workers and find a possible early screening index for occupational lung cancer, 74 coke oven workers as the exposed group and 47 water pump workers as the controls were surveyed, and urine samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected. Airborne benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) levels in workplace and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OH-Py) levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. DNA damage of PBMCs and the p14(ARK), p15(INK4b) and p16(INK4a) gene CpG island methylation in the promoter region were detected by comet assay and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction techniques, respectively. Results show that compared with the controls, concentration of airborne B[a]Ps was elevated in the coke plant, and urinary 1-OH-Py's level and DNA olive tail moment in comet assay were significantly increased in the coke oven workers, and p14(ARK), p15(INK4b) and p16(INK4a) gene methylation rates were also significantly increased. With the working years and urinary 1-OH-Py's level, the rates of p14(ARK) and p16(INK4a) gene methylation were significantly increased while that of p15(INK4b) gene methylation displayed no statistical change. We conclude that PBMCs' p14(ARK) and p16(INK4a) gene methylation may be used for screening and warning lung cancer in coke oven workers.

  9. Gene expression profile of neuronal progenitor cells derived from hESCs: activation of chromosome 11p15.5 and comparison to human dopaminergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Freed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We initiated differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs into dopamine neurons, obtained a purified population of neuronal precursor cells by cell sorting, and determined patterns of gene transcription. METHODOLOGY: Dopaminergic differentiation of hESCs was initiated by culturing hESCs with a feeder layer of PA6 cells. Differentiating cells were then sorted to obtain a pure population of PSA-NCAM-expressing neuronal precursors, which were then analyzed for gene expression using Massive Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS. Individual genes as well as regions of the genome which were activated were determined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A number of genes known to be involved in the specification of dopaminergic neurons, including MSX1, CDKN1C, Pitx1 and Pitx2, as well as several novel genes not previously associated with dopaminergic differentiation, were expressed. Notably, we found that a specific region of the genome located on chromosome 11p15.5 was highly activated. This region contains several genes which have previously been associated with the function of dopaminergic neurons, including the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, IGF2, and CDKN1C, which cooperates with Nurr1 in directing the differentiation of dopaminergic neurons. Other genes in this region not previously recognized as being involved in the functions of dopaminergic neurons were also activated, including H19, TSSC4, and HBG2. IGF2 and CDKN1C were also found to be highly expressed in mature human TH-positive dopamine neurons isolated from human brain samples by laser capture. CONCLUSIONS: The present data suggest that the H19-IGF2 imprinting region on chromosome 11p15.5 is involved in the process through which undifferentiated cells are specified to become neuronal precursors and/or dopaminergic neurons.

  10. 36. Study on p16INK4a and p15INK4b genes of human bronchial epithelial cells malignantly transformed by cyclophosphamide and thiotepa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Transformed human bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B induced by CP and TEPA were used to study abnormity of the tumor suppressor genes p15INK4b and p16INK4a, through which we can provide clues for explanations of the molecular mechanism in carcinogenesis of human bronchial epithelial cells induced by CP and TEPA. Analysis of the genomic DNA from the transformed BEAS-CP, and BEAS-T cells using PCR amplification, singe strand conformation polymorphism(SSCP) and DNA sequencing

  11. 地西他滨对骨髓增生异常综合征患者血浆中P15基因启动子区域甲基化的影响%Changes of P15 gene promoter region methylation following decitabine treatment in the plasma of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓银芬; 张秀群; 张磊; 苏爱玲; 张学忠; 徐燕丽

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To detect the methylation status of P15 gene promoter region in the plasma of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) ,and to investigate the demethylating effects of dicitabine. Method: Methyl-ation-specific PCR (MSP) was used to detect the methylation status of P15 gene promoter region in the plasma of 4 patients,among them.one newly diagnosed MDS,three progressed into acute leukemia, with myelodysplastic syndrome before and after treated with decitabine plus semis CAG therapy. Result; Four cases were found to have an increased methylation in the promoter region,after treated with decitabine plus semis CAG,3 cases were not found increased methylation. In 4 cases.2 cases gain clinical response.and the other 2 cases were useless. Conclusion:P15 gene hypermethylation is associated with MDS pathogenesis. Decitabine has demethylating effect on the plasma from MDS patients The methylation status of P15 gene may serve as an important molecular marker to provide evidence for MDS diagnosis and predict the prognosis.%目的:检测骨髓增生异常综合征(MDS)患者血浆中P15基因启动子区域甲基化状况及地西他滨对其甲基化的影响.方法:采用甲基化特异性聚合酶链反应(methylation-specific PCR,MSP)法检测1例初治的MDS患者、3例MDS转化而来的AML患者使用地西他滨序贯半量CA(方案治疗前后血浆中P15基因启动子区域CPG岛甲基化情况,并分析其临床疗效.结果:4例患者治疗前均有P15基因甲基化,治疗1疗程后有3例患者P15基因甲基化得到逆转,4例患者中有2例获得临床缓解,2例无效.结论:MDS的发生与P15基因甲基化相关,地西他滨对MDS患者血浆P15基因高甲基化具有明显的去甲基化作用.P15基因甲基化检测可能成为MDS辅助诊断和预后判断的分子标记.

  12. A balanced t(5;17 (p15;q22-23 in chondroblastoma: frequency of the re-arrangement and analysis of the candidate genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijers-Koster Pauline

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chondroblastoma is a benign cartilaginous tumour of bone that predominantly affects the epiphysis of long bones in young males. No recurrent chromosomal re-arrangements have so far been observed. Methods: We identified an index case with a balanced translocation by Combined Binary Ratio-Fluorescent in situ Hybridisation (COBRA-FISH karyotyping followed by breakpoint FISH mapping and array-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (aCGH. Candidate region re-arrangement and candidate gene expression were subsequently investigated by interphase FISH and immunohistochemistry in another 14 cases. Results A balanced t(5;17(p15;q22-23 was identified. In the index case, interphase FISH showed that the translocation was present only in mononucleated cells and was absent in the characteristic multinucleated giant cells. The t(5;17 translocation was not observed in the other cases studied. The breakpoint in 5p15 occurred close to the steroid reductase 5α1 (SRD5A1 gene. Expression of the protein was found in all cases tested. Similar expression was found for the sex steroid signalling-related molecules oestrogen receptor alpha and aromatase, while androgen receptors were only found in isolated cells in a few cases. The breakpoint in 17q22-23 was upstream of the carbonic anhydrase × (CA10 gene region and possibly involved gene-regulatory elements, which was indicated by the lack of CA10 protein expression in the index case. All other cases showed variable levels of CA10 expression, with low expression in three cases. Conclusion We report a novel t(5;17(p15;q22-23 translocation in chondroblastoma without involvement of any of the two chromosomal regions in other cases studied. Our results indicate that the characteristic multinucleated giant cells in chondroblastoma do not have the same clonal origin as the mononuclear population, as they do not harbour the same translocation. We therefore hypothesise that they might be either reactive or

  13. 低剂量亚砷酸及维甲酸方案对儿童骨髓增生异常综合征p15INK4B基因的影响%Effect of low-dose arsenious acid combined with retinoic acid on p15INK4B gene in childhood myelodysplastic syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蔚; 王占影; 韩冰虹; 刘生伟; 程焕臣; 赵雪飞; 赵旭; 程曦顺; 邱林

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨低剂量亚砷酸及维甲酸双诱导方案对骨髓增生异常综合征(MDS)患儿p15INK44B基因表达的影响及患儿p15INK4B基因甲基化水平的变化.方法 11例MDS患儿接受低剂量亚砷酸及维甲酸双诱导方案治疗,应用实时荧光定量聚合酶链反应(PCR)方法检测治疗前后p15INK4B基因的表达,应用亚硫酸氢钠修饰及实时荧光定量PCR方法检测p15INK4B基因的甲基化水平.结果 11例MDS患儿经过双诱导方案治疗后,9例获益.治疗后10例患儿p15INK4B基因表达水平显著升高,治疗前后p15INK4B基因甲基化水平分别为(1.68±0.58)%、(1.44±0.65)%,二者差异无统计学意义(t=-0.885,P>0.05).结论 低剂量亚砷酸及维甲酸双诱导方案治疗儿童MDS疗效较好,该方案的作用机制可能与p15INK4B基因表达升高有关,但p15INK4B基因表达升高与去甲基化无相关性.%Objective To observe the effect of low-dose arsenious acid combined with retinoic acid on the expression and methylation level of p15INK4B gene in childhood myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).Methods 11 children with MDS induced by low-dose arsenious acid and retinoic acid were enrolled.The expression and methylation level of p15INK4B gene were detected by real time fluorescence quantitative PCR (RT-PCR).Results There were 9 patients in 11 cases benefited from the bi-induction regimen.The p15INK4B expression was increased in 10 MDS patients after treatment,but there was no significant difference [(1.68± 0.58) % vs (1.44±0.65) %,t =-0.885,P> 0.05)].Conclusions The low-dose arsenious acid combined with retinoic acid has favorable effect for the treatment of childhood MDS.Its mechanism may be related with the increased expression level of p15INK4B,however,methylation level is not associated with the increased expression of p15INK4B.

  14. Ocular expression and distribution of products of the POAG-associated chromosome 9p21 gene region.

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    Glyn Chidlow

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that there are highly significant associations for common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs near the CDKN2B-AS1 gene region at the 9p21 locus with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, a leading cause of irreversible blindness. This gene region houses the CDKN2B/p15(INK4B , CDKN2A/p16(INK4A and p14ARF (rat equivalent, p19(ARF tumour suppressor genes and is adjacent to the S-methyl-5'-thioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP gene. In order to understand the ocular function of these genes and, therefore, how they may be involved in the pathogenesis of POAG, we studied the distribution patterns of each of their products within human and rat ocular tissues. MTAP mRNA was detected in the rat retina and optic nerve and its protein product was localised to the corneal epithelium, trabecular meshwork and retinal glial cells in both human and rat eyes. There was a very low level of p16(INK4A mRNA present within the rat retina and slightly more in the optic nerve, although no protein product could be detected in either rat or human eyes with any of the antibodies tested. P19(ARF mRNA was likewise only present at very low levels in rat retina and slightly higher levels in the optic nerve. However, no unambiguous evidence was found to indicate expression of specific P19(ARF/p14(ARF proteins in either rat or human eyes, respectively. In contrast, p15(INK4B mRNA was detected in much higher amounts in both retina and optic nerve compared with the other genes under analysis. Moreover, p15(INK4B protein was clearly localised to the retinal inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers and the corneal epithelium and trabecular meshwork in rat and human eyes. The presented data provide the basis for future studies that can explore the roles that these gene products may play in the pathogenesis of glaucoma and other models of optic nerve damage.

  15. Insertional mutagenesis in mice deficient for p15Ink4b, p16Ink4a, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1 reveals cancer gene interactions and correlations with tumor phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kool, Jaap; Uren, Anthony G; Martins, Carla P

    2010-01-01

    The cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p15, p16, p21, and p27 are frequently deleted, silenced, or downregulated in many malignancies. Inactivation of CDK inhibitors predisposes mice to tumor development, showing that these genes function as tumor suppressors. Here, we describe high...

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of a 7p15-p21 deletion encompassing the TWIST1 gene involved in Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaggiari, Emmanuel; Aboura, Azzedine; Sinico, Martine; Mabboux, Philippe; Dupont, Céline; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Guimiot, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a craniosynostosis syndrome that is rarely diagnosed prenatally. It is caused by cytogenetic deletions or mutations of the TWIST1 gene. We report here a de novo prenatal case with clinically and molecularly well defined Saethre-Chotzen syndrome due to a TWIST1 deletion. This is the first reported case of a deletion encompassing the TWIST1 gene to be diagnosed prenatally. We recommend screening for a deletion of the TWIST1 gene if signs of coronal craniosynostosis with no clear etiology are observed on ultrasound examination.

  17. Arsenic trioxide induced p15INK4B gene expression in myelodysplastic syndrome cell line MUTZ-1%三氧化二砷诱导人骨髓增生异常综合征细胞株MUTZ-1细胞p15INK4B基因表达的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟红艳; 林茂芳

    2002-01-01

    目的探讨三氧化二砷(As2O3)去甲基化作用的机制.方法采用甲基化特异PCR(MSP)检测p15INK4B基因甲基化,RT-PCR方法检测p15、甲基转移酶(DNMT)1、DNMT3A、DNMT3B的表达,MTT法检测As2O3对MUTZ-1细胞的生长抑制.结果 MUTZ-1细胞有p15INK4B基因甲基化,p15基因弱表达,As2O3作用后p15INK4B基因甲基化程度明显下降,p15基因表达增强,DNMT3A、DNMT3B mRNA的表达下降并呈浓度依赖性.结论 As2O3可能通过抑制甲基转移酶DNMT3A、DNMT3B,或(和)直接对p15INK4B基因去甲基化,使p15基因表达上调,恢复其活性.

  18. 骨髓增生异常综合征P15INK4B基因甲基化及药物去甲基化作用%Methylation of P15INK4B Gene in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Demethylating Effects of Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶雪石; 刘霆; 崔旭; 孟文彤; 席亚明

    2007-01-01

    目的 检测骨髓增生异常综合征(MDS)患者P15INK4B基因甲基化状况;探讨5-氮杂-2′-脱氧胞嘧啶(decitabine)和三氧化二砷(As2O3)对MDS患者细胞的去甲基化作用.方法 采用限制性内切酶联合PCR方法检测14例MDS患者P15INK4B基因甲基化,选择1例由MDS转化为急性白血病患者的外周血单个核细胞,分组分别加入decitabine和As2O3进行处理,分析甲基化程度变化情况.结论 低危组MDS患者(RCMD)均未发现P15INK4B基因甲基化,4例高危组MDS患者(RAEB)和4例 MDS-AL患者发现P15INK4B基因甲基化.经decitabine和As2O3处理后,MDS患者细胞的甲基化程度均降低50%左右.结论 MDS的发生与P15INK4B基因甲基化密切相关,decitabine和As2O3均对MDS患者细胞高度甲基化的P15INK4B基因具明显去甲基化作用.

  19. A Novel Cryptic Three-Way Translocation t(2;9;18)(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33) with Deletion of Tumor Suppressor Genes in 9p21.3 and 13q14 in a T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Moneeb A K; Rincic, Martina; Melo, Joana B; Carreira, Isabel M; Alhourani, Eyad; Hunstig, Friederike; Glaser, Anita; Liehr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Acute leukemia often presents with pure chromosomal resolution; thus, aberrations may not be detected by banding cytogenetics. Here, a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and a normal karyotype after standard GTG-banding was studied retrospectively in detail by molecular cytogenetic and molecular approaches. Besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) were applied. Thus, cryptic chromosomal aberrations not observed before were detected: three chromosomes were involved in a cytogenetically balanced occurring translocation t(2;9;18)(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33). Besides a translocation t(10;14)(q24;q11) was identified, an aberration known to be common in T-ALL. Due to the three-way translocation deletion of tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/INK4A/p16, CDKN2B/INK4B/p15, and MTAP/ARF/p14 in 9p21.3 took place. Additionally RB1 in 13q14 was deleted. This patient, considered to have a normal karyotype after low resolution banding cytogenetics, was treated according to general protocol of anticancer therapy (ALL-BFM 95).

  20. A Novel Cryptic Three-Way Translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33 with Deletion of Tumor Suppressor Genes in 9p21.3 and 13q14 in a T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moneeb A. K. Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia often presents with pure chromosomal resolution; thus, aberrations may not be detected by banding cytogenetics. Here, a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and a normal karyotype after standard GTG-banding was studied retrospectively in detail by molecular cytogenetic and molecular approaches. Besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA and high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH were applied. Thus, cryptic chromosomal aberrations not observed before were detected: three chromosomes were involved in a cytogenetically balanced occurring translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33. Besides a translocation t(10;14(q24;q11 was identified, an aberration known to be common in T-ALL. Due to the three-way translocation deletion of tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/INK4A/p16, CDKN2B/INK4B/p15, and MTAP/ARF/p14 in 9p21.3 took place. Additionally RB1 in 13q14 was deleted. This patient, considered to have a normal karyotype after low resolution banding cytogenetics, was treated according to general protocol of anticancer therapy (ALL-BFM 95.

  1. Fusion of NUP98 and the SET binding protein 1 (SETBP1) gene in a paediatric acute T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia with t(11;18)(p15;q12)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Kerndrup, Gitte; Carlsen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Three NUP98 chimaeras have previously been reported in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL): NUP98/ADD3, NUP98/CCDC28A, and NUP98/RAP1GDS1. We report a T-ALL with t(11;18)(p15;q12) resulting in a novel NUP98 fusion. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation showed NUP98 and SET binding protein 1......(SETBP1) fusion signals; other analyses showed that exon 12 of NUP98 was fused in-frame with exon 5 of SETBP1. Nested polymerase chain reaction did not amplify the reciprocal SETBP1/NUP98, suggesting that NUP98/SETBP1 transcript is pathogenetically important. SETBP1 has previously not been implicated...

  2. Detection of gene copy number aberrations in mantle cell lymphoma by a single quantitative multiplex PCR assay: clinicopathological relevance and prognosis value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Fabrice; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Parmentier, Françoise; Ruminy, Philippe; Cornic, Marie; Penther, Dominique; Bertrand, Philippe; Lanic, Hélène; Cassuto, Ophélie; Humbrecht, Catherine; Lemasle, Emilie; Wautier, Agathe; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé

    2009-09-01

    The t(11;14)(q13;q32) is the hallmark of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Additional genetic alterations occur in the majority of cases. This study aimed to design a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to determine the incidence and relevance of recurrent gene copy number aberrations in this disease. Forty-two MCL cases with frozen- or paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues were selected. Three different quantitative Multiplex PCR of Short Fluorescent Fragments (QMPSF) assays were designed to simultaneously analyse eight genes (CDKN2A, RB1, ATM, CDK2, TP53, MYC, CDKN1B, MDM2), to analyse the 9p21 locus (CDKN2A/CDKN2B) and FFPE tissues. Gains of MYC, CDK2, CDKN1B, and MDM2 were observed in 10% of cases. Losses of RB1, CDKN2A, ATM or TP53 were observed in 38%, 31%, 24% and 10% of cases, respectively. Analysis of the 9p21 locus indicated that, in most cases, tumours displayed a complete inactivation of p14(ARF)/p15I(NK4B)/p16I(NK4A). CDKN2A and MYC aberrations were associated with a high MCL international prognostic index (MIPI). CDK2/MDM2 gains and CDKN2A/TP53 losses correlated with an unfavourable outcome. PCR experiments with frozen and FFPE-tissues indicated that our approach is valid in a routine diagnostic setting, providing a powerful tool that could be used for patient stratification in combination with MIPI in future clinical trials.

  3. Localization of two human autoantigen genes by PCR screening and in situ hybridization-glycyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 7p15 and Alanyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 16q22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R.C.; Pai, S.I.; Liu, P. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Ge, Q.; Targoff, I.N. [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aminoacyl-RS) catalyze the attachment of an amino acid to its cognate tRNA. Five of 20 human aminoacyl-RS (histidyl-RS, threonyl-RS, isoleucyl-RS, glycyl-RS, and alanyl-RS) have been identified as targets of autoantibodies in the autoimmune disease polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM; 9). A sixth autoantigenic amino-acyl-RS, lysyl-RS, was recently reported. The genes for histidyl-RS and threonyl-RS have been assigned to chromosome 5, as have the genes for leucyl-RS and arginyl-RS. Six other aminoacyl-RS (glutamyl-prolyl-RS, valyl-RS, cysteinyl-RS, methionyl-RS, tryptophanyl-RS, and asparaginyl-RS) were assigned to chromosomes 1, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 18, respectively. The reason for a preponderance of aminoacyl-RS genes on chromosome 5 is unknown, but it has been suggested that regulatory relatedness might be a factor. Recently the entire or partial cDNA sequences for two autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS genes, glycyl-RS (gene symbol GARS; 4) and alanyl-RS (gene symbol AARS; 1), were reported. To understand further the genesis of autoimmune responses to aminoacyl-RS and to determine whether genes for autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS colocalize to chromosome 5, we have determined the chromosomal site of the GARS and AARS genes by PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid panels and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of craniosynostosis (compound Saethre-Chotzen syndrome phenotype) caused by a de novo complex chromosomal rearrangement (1; 4; 7) with a microdeletion of 7p21.3-7p15.3, including TWIST1 gene--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massalska, Diana; Bijok, Julia; Kucińska-Chahwan, Anna; Jamsheer, Aleksander; Bogdanowicz, Joanna; Jakiel, Grzegorz; Roszkowski, Tomasz

    2014-07-01

    Craniosynostosis (a premature fusion of the cranial sutures) occurs with a frequency of 1 in 2100-2500 births and in over 40% cases is caused by known genetic factors--either single gene mutations or chromosomal rearrangements. Cases caused by complex chromosomal abnormalities are uncommon and likely associated with compound phenotype. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) [#101400] is caused by TWIST1 gene haploinsufficiency. Its phenotype includes uni- or bicoronal synostosis, short stature, facial dysmorphism and variable anomalies of the hands and feet. Due to its poor sonographic manifestation a prenatal diagnosis of SCS is challenging. We report a case of a prenatally detected craniosynostosis (compound Saethre-Chotzen syndrome phenotype) caused by a de novo complex chromosomal rearrangement (1; 4; 7) with a microdeletion of 7p21.3-7p15.3, including TWIST1 gene.

  5. Excess functional copy of allele at chromosomal region 11p15 may cause Wiedemann-Beckwith (EMG) syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, T.; Saitoh, S.; Jinno, Y.; Niikawa, N.; Matsumoto, T. [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Narahara, K. [Okayama Univ. School of Medicine, Okayama (Japan); Fukushima, Y. [Saitama Children`s Hospital, Iwatsuki (Japan)

    1994-02-15

    Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome (WBS) is a genetic disorder with overgrowth and predisposition to Wilms` tumor. The putative locus of the gene responsible for this syndrome is assigned to chromosome region 11p15.5, and genomic imprinting in this region has been proposed: the paternally derived gene(s) at 11p15.5 is selectively expressed, while the maternally transmitted gene(s) is inactive. The authors examined 18 patients for the parental origin of their 11p15 regions. DNA polymorphism analyses using 6 loci on chromosome 11 showed that 2 patients with duplications of 11p15 regions from their respective fathers and one from the mother, indicating the transmission of an excessive paternal gene at 11p15 to each patient. The result, together with the previous findings in karyotypically normal or abnormal patients and in overgrowth mouse experiments, are consistent with imprinting hypothesis that overexpression of paternally derived gene(s) at 11p15.5, probably the human insulin-like growth factor II (IFG-II) gene, may cause the phenotype. Total constitutional uniparental paternal disomy (UPD) or segmental UPD for the 6 loci examined of chromosome 11 was not observed in our 12 sporadic patients. In order to explain completely the inheritance of this syndrome in patients with various chromosomal constitutions, the authors propose an alternative imprinting mechanism involving the other locus that may be paternally imprinted and may suppress the expression of this gene. 28 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Fine-mapping identifies multiple prostate cancer risk loci at 5p15, one of which associates with TERT expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Saunders, Edward J; Leongamornlert, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 5p15 and multiple cancer types have been reported. We have previously shown evidence for a strong association between prostate cancer (PrCa) risk and rs2242652 at 5p15, intronic in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene that...

  7. Mice Homozygous for a Deletion in the Glaucoma Susceptibility Locus INK4 Show Increased Vulnerability of Retinal Ganglion Cells to Elevated Intraocular Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2016-04-01

    A genomic region located on chromosome 9p21 is associated with primary open-angle glaucoma and normal tension glaucoma in genome-wide association studies. The genomic region contains the gene for a long noncoding RNA called CDKN2B-AS, two genes that code for cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors 2A and 2B (CDKN2A/p16(INK4A) and CDKN2B/p15(INK4B)) and an additional protein (p14(ARF)). We used a transgenic mouse model in which 70 kb of murine chromosome 4, syntenic to human chromosome 9p21, are deleted to study whether this deletion leads to a discernible phenotype in ocular structures implicated in glaucoma. Homozygous mice of this strain were previously reported to show persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Fundus photography and optical coherence tomography confirmed that finding but showed no abnormalities for heterozygous mice. Optokinetic response, eletroretinogram, and histology indicated that the heterozygous and mutant retinas were normal functionally and morphologically, whereas glial cells were activated in the retina and optic nerve head of mutant eyes. In quantitative PCR, CDKN2B expression was reduced by approximately 50% in the heterozygous mice and by 90% in the homozygous mice, which suggested that the CDKN2B knock down had no deleterious consequences for the retina under normal conditions. However, compared with wild-type and heterozygous animals, the homozygous mice are more vulnerable to retinal ganglion cell loss in response to elevated intraocular pressure.

  8. p15(INK4b) in HDAC inhibitor-induced growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Toshiaki; Matsuzaki, Youichirou; Yokota, Tomoya; Takaoka, Yuuki; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2003-11-20

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors arrest human tumor cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle and activate the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21(WAF1/Cip1). However, several studies have suggested the existence of a p21(WAF1/Cip1)-independent molecular pathway. We report here that HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and sodium butyrate, activate the p15(INK4b) gene, a member of the INK4 gene family, through its promoter in HaCaT cells. Furthermore, we show that up-regulation of p15(INK4b) by TSA is associated with cell growth inhibition of HCT116 p21 (-/-) cells. Our findings suggest that p15(INK4b) is one of the important molecular targets of HDAC inhibitors.

  9. Inactivation of p15INK4b in chronic arsenic poisoning cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic exposure from burning high arsenic-containing coal has been associated with human skin lesion and cancer. However, the mechanisms of arsenic-related carcinogenesis are not fully understood. Inactivation of critical tumor suppression genes by epigenetic regulation or genetic modification might contribute to arsenic-induced carcinogenicity. This study aims to clarify the correlation between arsenic pollution and functional defect of p15INK4b gene in arsenic exposure residents from a region of Guizhou Province, China. To this end, 103 arsenic exposure residents and 105 control subjects were recruited in this study. The results showed that the exposure group exhibited higher levels of urinary and hair arsenic compared with the control group (55.28 vs 28.87 μg/L, 5.16 vs 1.36 μg/g. Subjects with higher arsenic concentrations are more likely to have p15INK4b methylation and gene deletion (χ2 = 4.28, P = 0.04 and χ2 = 4.31, P = 0.04. We also found that the degree of p15INK4b hypermethylation and gene deletion occurred at higher incidence in the poisoning cases with skin cancer (3.7% and 14.81% in non-skin cancer group, 41.18% and 47.06 in skin cancer group, and were significantly associated with the stage of skin lesions (χ2 = 12.82, P < 0.01 and χ2 = 7.835, P = 0.005. These observations indicate that inactivation of p15INK4b through genetic alteration or epigenetic modification is a common event that is associated with arsenic exposure and the development of arsenicosis.

  10. TGFbeta influences Myc, Miz-1 and Smad to control the CDK inhibitor p15INK4b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seoane, J; Pouponnot, C; Staller, P;

    2001-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) is a cytokine that arrests epithelial cell division by switching off the proto-oncogene c-myc and rapidly switching on cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors such as p15INK4b. Gene responses to TGFbeta involve Smad transcription factors that are directly...... activated by the TGFbeta receptor. Why downregulation of c-myc expression by TGFbeta is required for rapid activation of p15INK4b has remained unknown. Here we provide evidence that TGFbeta signalling prevents recruitment of Myc to the p15INK4b transcriptional initiator by Myc-interacting zinc......-finger protein 1 (Miz-1). This relieves repression and enables transcriptional activation by a TGFbeta-induced Smad protein complex that recognizes an upstream p15INK4b promoter region and contacts Miz-1. Thus, two separate TGFbeta-dependent inputs - Smad-mediated transactivation and relief of repression by Myc...

  11. A variant of Freeman-Sheldon syndrome maps to 11p15.5-pter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakowiak, P.A.; O`Quinn, J.R.; Watkins, W.S. [Univ. of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Distal arthrogryposis type 1 (DA1) and Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS) are the two most common known causes of inherited multiple congenital contractures. We recently have characterized a new disorder (DA213) with a phenotype intermediate between DA1 and FSS. We report the mapping of a gene that causes DA213 to chromosome 11p15.5-pter. Linkage analysis in a single kindred generated a positive LOD score of 5.31 at {theta} = 0 with the marker D11S922, and recombinants localize the gene to an {approximately}3.5-6.5-cM region between the marker TH and the telomere. Analysis of additional families improves the LOD score to 6.45 at {theta} = 0 and suggests linkage homogeneity for DA213. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Influence of the photoperiod on TGF-β1 and p15 expression in hamster Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Candela R; Calandra, Ricardo S; Gonzalez-Calvar, Silvia I

    2012-07-01

    Adult hamsters exposed to short photoperiods show a marked atrophy of their internal reproductive organs, including a reduction in size, though not number of Leydig cells. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is involved in the regulation of growth and proliferation of different cell types. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of photoperiod on the protein and gene expression of TGF-β1 and its receptors as well as gene expression of p15. The effect of TGF-β1 on the expression of p15 in purified Leydig cells from regressed and non-regressed hamster testes was also tested. Protein and gene expression of TGF-β1 was detected in both regressed and non-regressed testes. In contrast to the activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK-1), the TGF-β1, the activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK-5) and the co-receptor endoglin all showed a greater basal expression in regressed than non-regressed hamster testes. Melatonin induced the TGF-β1 mRNA expression in purified Leydig cells from non-regressed testes. The p15 mRNA level was greater in regressed than non-regressed testes. A high dose of TGF-β1 during a short incubation period increased the p15 mRNA level in Leydig cells from non-regressed testes. ALK-5 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 might have played a role in this process. In regressed hamster testes, the p15 mRNA level increased due to a low dose of TGF-β1 after short incubation periods and to a high dose after longer incubation periods; in both instances, ALK-5, ERK 1/2 and p38 were involved. Collectively, these results suggest that the alterations in p15 expression, mediated by MAPK, are involved in the shift between the active and inactive states in hamster Leydig cells.

  13. Paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 11p15.5 within the pancreas causes isolated hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Flanagan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLoss of function mutations in the genes encoding the pancreatic β-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channel are identified in approximately 80% of patients with diazoxide-unresponsive hyperinsulinaemic-hypoglycaemia (HH. For a small number of patients HH can occur as part of a multisystem disease such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS. In approximately 20% of patients, BWS results from chromosome 11 paternal uniparental disomy (UPD, which causes dysregulation of imprinted growth regulation genes at 11p15.5. There is a considerable range in the clinical features and phenotypic severity associated with BWS which is likely to be due to somatic mosaicism. The cause of HH in these patients is not known.Research Design and methodsWe undertook microsatellite analysis of 12 markers spanning chromosome 11p in two patients with severe HH and diffuse disease requiring a pancreatectomy. In both patients mutations in the KATP channel genes had not been identified. ResultsWe identified segmental paternal UPD in DNA extracted from pancreatic tissue in both patients. UPD was not observed in DNA extracted from the patient’s leukocytes or buccal samples. In both cases the UPD encompassed the differentially methylated region at chromosome 11p15.5. Despite this neither patient had any further features of BWS.ConclusionsPaternal UPD of the chromosome 11p15.5 differentially methylated region limited to the pancreatic tissue may represent a novel cause of isolated diazoxide unresponsive HH. Loss of heterozygosity studies should therefore be considered in all patients with severe HH who have undergone pancreatic surgery when KATP channel mutation(s have not been identified.

  14. Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) photo-quadrat monitoring data table : Site number MAR P15

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This spreadsheet summarizes the number of corals photographed along a 50-meter transect line at Underwater Site P15 off Maro Reef in the Northwestern Hawaiian...

  15. Multiple genetic loci within 11p15 defined by Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome rearrangement breakpoints and subchromosomal transferable fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoovers, J M; Kalikin, L M; Johnson, L A; Alders, M; Redeker, B; Law, D J; Bliek, J; Steenman, M; Benedict, M; Wiegant, J

    1995-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) involves fetal overgrowth and predisposition to a wide variety of embryonal tumors of childhood. We have previously found that BWS is genetically linked to 11p15 and that this same band shows loss of heterozygosity in the types of tumors to which children with BWS are susceptible. However, 11p15 contains > 20 megabases, and therefore, the BWS and tumor suppressor genes could be distinct. To determine the precise physical relationship between these loci, we isolated yeast artificial chromosomes, and cosmid libraries from them, within the region of loss of heterozygosity in embryonal tumors. Five germ-line balanced chromosomal rearrangement breakpoint sites from BWS patients, as well as a balanced chromosomal translocation breakpoint from a rhabdoid tumor, were isolated within a 295- to 320-kb cluster defined by a complete cosmid contig crossing these breakpoints. This breakpoint cluster terminated approximately 100 kb centromeric to the imprinted gene IGF2 and 100 kb telomeric to p57KIP2, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, and was located within subchromosomal transferable fragments that suppressed the growth of embryonal tumor cells in genetic complementation experiments. We have identified 11 transcribed sequences in this BWS/tumor suppressor coincident region, one of which corresponded to p57KIP2. However, three additional BWS breakpoints were > 4 megabases centromeric to the other five breakpoints and were excluded from the tumor suppressor region defined by subchromosomal transferable fragments. Thus, multiple genetic loci define BWS and tumor suppression on 11p15. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8618920

  16. Evaluation of ABM/P-15 versus autogenous bone in an ovine lumbar interbody fusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Blake P; Lindley, Emily M; Turner, A Simon; Seim, Howard B; Benedict, James; Burger, Evalina L; Patel, Vikas V

    2010-12-01

    A prospective, randomized study was performed in an ovine model to compare the efficacy of an anorganic bovine-derived hydroxyapatite matrix combined with a synthetic 15 amino acid residue (ABM/P-15) in facilitating lumbar interbody fusion when compared with autogenous bone harvested from the iliac crest. P-15 is a biomimetic to the cell-binding site of Type-I collagen for bone-forming cells. When combined with ABM, it creates the necessary scaffold to initiate cell invasion, binding, and subsequent osteogenesis. In this study, six adult ewes underwent anterior-lateral interbody fusion at L3/L4 and L4/L5 using PEEK interbody rings filled with autogenous bone at one level and ABM/P-15 at the other level and no additional instrumentation. Clinical CT scans were obtained at 3 and 6 months; micro-CT scans and histomorphometry analyses were performed after euthanization at 6 months. Clinical CT scan analysis showed that all autograft and ABM/P-15 treated levels had radiographically fused outside of the rings at the 3-month study time point. Although the clinical CT scans of the autograft treatment group showed significantly better fusion within the PEEK rings than ABM/P-15 at 3 months, micro-CT scans, clinical CT scans, and histomorphometric analyses showed there were no statistical differences between the two treatment groups at 6 months. Thus, ABM/P-15 was as successful as autogenous bone graft in producing lumbar spinal fusion in an ovine model, and it should be further evaluated in clinical studies.

  17. Maro Reef Site P15 9/21/2002 45-46M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P15 (25.446 N, 170.633 W), between 45 and 46 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Maro Reef Site P15 9/21/2002 43-44M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P15 (25.446 N, 170.633 W), between 43 and 44 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Maro Reef Site P15 9/21/2002 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P15 (25.446 N, 170.633 W), between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Maro Reef Site P15 9/21/2002 49-50M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P15 (25.446 N, 170.633 W), between 49 and 50 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Maro Reef Site P15 9/21/2002 40-41M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P15 (25.446 N, 170.633 W), between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Maro Reef Site P15 9/21/2002 42-43M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P15 (25.446 N, 170.633 W), between 42 and 43 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Maro Reef Site P15 9/21/2002 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P15 (25.446 N, 170.633 W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Maro Reef Site P15 9/21/2002 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P15 (25.446 N, 170.633 W), between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Maro Reef Site P15 9/21/2002 19-20M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P15 (25.446 N, 170.633 W), between 19 and 20 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Maro Reef Site P15 9/21/2002 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P15 (25.446 N, 170.633 W), between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Maro Reef Site P15 9/21/2002 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Maro Reef, site P15 (25.446 N, 170.633 W), between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rapamycin restores p14, p15 and p57 expression and inhibits the mTOR/p70S6K pathway in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huibo; Kong, Xiaolin; Cui, Gang; Ren, Cuicui; Fan, Shengjin; Sun, Lili; Zhang, Yingjie; Cao, Rongyi; Li, Yinghua; Zhou, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin and its underlying mechanisms on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We found that the p14, p15, and p57 genes were not expressed in ALL cell lines (Molt-4 and Nalm-6) and adult ALL patients, whereas mTOR, 4E-BP1, and p70S6K were highly expressed. In Molt-4 and Nalm-6 cells exposed to rapamycin, cell viability decreased and the cell cycle was arrested at the G1/S phase. Rapamycin restored p14, p15, and p57 gene expression through demethylation of the promoters of these genes. As expected, rapamycin also increased p14 and p15 protein expression in both Molt-4 and Nalm-6 cells, as well as p57 protein expression in Nalm-6 cells. Rapamycin additionally decreased mTOR and p70S6K mRNA levels, as well as p70S6K and p-p70S6K protein levels. However, depletion of mTOR by siRNA did not alter the expression and promoter methylation states of p14, p15, and p57. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of rapamycin may be due mainly to increased p14, p15, and p57 expression via promoter demethylation and decreased mTOR and p70S6K expression in ALL cell lines. These results suggest a potential role for rapamycin in the treatment of adult ALL.

  9. Methylation of the Wnt Signaling Antagonist, Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 and Dickkopf-1 Genes in Acute Myeloid Leukemia at the Time of Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghasemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background In acute myeloid leukemia (AML, a large number of tumor suppressor genes are silenced through DNA methylation such as CDKN2B and p73. Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1 and Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1 are negative regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway. Objectives In the present study, we studied the methylation status of WIF1 and DKK-1 genes in AML patients. Patients and Methods In this case-control study, blood samples from 120 AML patients and 25 healthy control subjects collected, isolated DNA was treated with sodium bisulphite and examined by methylation specific PCR (MS-PCR with primers specific for methylated and unmethylated sequences of the WIF1 and DKK-1 genes. Results The frequency of aberrant hypermethylation of WIF1 and DKK-1 genes in AML patients determined 35% (42/120 and 28.3% (34/120, respectively. In addition, for all subjects in control group, methylation of WIF1 and DKK-1 genes were negative. Patients with M0 subtype of French-American-British (FAB-AML had the highest incidence of hypermethylation of WIF1 (P = 0.003 and DKK-1 (P = 0.005 genes. Conclusions The present study showed that, like many solid tumors, WIF1 and DKK-1 genes methylation also occurs in AML. The study of other antagonists of Wnt signaling pathway are recommended.

  10. Clinical and molecular characterization of two patients with overlapping de novo microdeletions in 2p14-p15 and mild mental retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wohlleber, Eva; Kirchhoff, Eva Maria; Zink, Alexander M;

    2011-01-01

    microcephaly. In patient 1, molecular karyotyping detected a 2.23-Mb deletion in chromosome 2p14-p15 including 11 known genes. The second patient, with a 2.84-Mb microdeletion containing 15 genes, was identified in the DECIPHER database. The two deleted regions overlap by a stretch of 1.6 Mb that contains 10...... genes, several of which have functions in neuronal development. This report illustrates the power of databases such as DECIPHER and MRNET in assessing the pathogenicity of copy-number variations (CNVs)....

  11. Complex tissue-specific epigenotypes in Russell-Silver Syndrome associated with 11p15 ICR1 hypomethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, Salah; Blaise, Annick; Steunou, Virginie; Harbison, Madeleine D; Salem, Jennifer; Brioude, Frédéric; Rossignol, Sylvie; Habib, Walid Abi; Thibaud, Nathalie; Neves, Cristina Das; Jule, Marilyne Le; Brachet, Cécile; Heinrichs, Claudine; Bouc, Yves Le; Netchine, Irène

    2014-10-01

    Russell-Silver Syndrome (RSS) is a prenatal and postnatal growth retardation syndrome caused mainly by 11p15 ICR1 hypomethylation. Clinical presentation is heterogeneous in RSS patients with 11p15 ICR1 hypomethylation. We previously identified a subset of RSS patients with 11p15 ICR1 and multilocus hypomethylation. Here, we examine the relationships between IGF2 expression, 11p15 ICR1 methylation, and multilocus imprinting defects in various cell types from 39 RSS patients with 11p15 ICR1 hypomethylation in leukocyte DNA. 11p15 ICR1 hypomethylation was more pronounced in leukocytes than in buccal mucosa cells. Skin fibroblast IGF2 expression was correlated with the degree of ICR1 hypomethylation. Different tissue-specific multilocus methylation defects coexisted in 38% of cases, with some loci hypomethylated and others hypermethylated within the same cell type in some cases. Our new results suggest that tissue-specific epigenotypes may lead to clinical heterogeneity in RSS.

  12. Effects of common germ-line genetic variation in cell cycle genes on ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, H.; Hogdall, E.; Ramus, S.J.;

    2008-01-01

    plausibly influence clinical characteristics of multiple tumors types. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We examined associations between common germ-line genetic variation in 14 genes involved in cell cycle pathway (CCND1, CCND2, CCND3, CCNE1, CDKN1A, CDKN1B, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CDKN2C, CDKN2D, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and RB1.......05) in these genes. The genotypes of each polymorphism were tested for association with survival by Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: A nominally statistically significant association between genotype and ovarian cancer survival was observed for polymorphisms in CCND2 and CCNE1. The per-allele hazard ratios (95......% confidence intervals) were 1.16 (1.03-1.31; P = 0.02) for rs3217933, 1.14 (1.02-1.27; P = 0.024) for rs3217901, and 0.85 (0.73-1.00; P = 0.043) for rs3217862 in CCND2 and 1.39 (1.04-1.85; P = 0.033) for rs3218038 in CCNE1. However, these were not significant after adjusting for multiple hypothesis tests...

  13. Impact of lead ions on biosynthetic capacity of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus 2p-15 strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. P. Kilochok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different concentrations of Pb ions on biosynthetical ability of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus 2P-15, which is the producer of compound complex of extracellular enzymes and growth stimulators, was studied. It has been showed, that Pb ions introduced in agar medium have had a stimulative effect on production of surface and depth mycelia. The Pb ions, which have been inoculated into liquid fermentative medium in concentration of 1,0–2,0 mg/l realized directed synthesis of bacterio- and proteolytic enzymes, had an influence on qualitative and quantitative composition of produced enzymes.

  14. Congenital hyperinsulinism in an infant with paternal uniparental disomy on chromosome 11p15: few clinical features suggestive of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Higashimoto, Ken; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Tamura, Hiroaki; Arai, Hirokazu; Ito, Tomoo; Masue, Michiya; Nishibori, Hironori; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Soejima, Hidenobu

    2013-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is the most common congenital overgrowth syndrome involving tumor predisposition. BWS is caused by various epigenetic or genetic alterations that disrupt the imprinted genes on chromosome 11p15.5 and the clinical findings of BWS are highly variable. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is reported in about half of all babies with BWS. We identified an infant with diazoxide-unresponsive congenital hyperinsulinism (HI) without any apparent clinical features suggestive of BWS, but diagnosed BWS by molecular testing. The patient developed severe hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia within a few hours after birth, with macrosomia and mild hydronephrosis. We excluded mutations in the K(ATP) channel genes on chromosome 11p15.1, but found a rare homozygous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of ABCC8. Parental SNP pattern suggested paternal uniparetal disomy in this region. By microsatellite marker analysis on chromosome 11p15, we could diagnose BWS due to the mosaic of paternal uniparental disomy. Our case suggests that some HI of unknown genetic etiology could involve undiagnosed BWS with no apparent clinical features, which might be diagnosed only by molecular testing.

  15. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome with severe developmental delay associated with deletion of chromosomic region 7p15 --> pter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touliatou, V; Mavrou, A; Kolialexi, A; Kanavakis, E; Kitsiou-Tzeli, S

    2007-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome represents one of the most common types of craniosynostosis inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder while sporadic cases have also been reported. It is characterized by high penetrance and variable expressivity, leading to difficulties in clinical diagnosis. Some patients, who exhibit most of the diagnostic criteria of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, have structural abnormalities of chromosome 7. The case of a 4 year old boy with notable dysmorphic features compatible with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and severe developmental delay is described. Conventional and molecular cytogenetic analysis of peripheral blood samples from the patient and his parents revealed partial monosomy of chromosomal region 7p15 --> pter de novo. The TWIST gene, located on chromosome 7p21.1, is thought to be a negative transcriptional regulator involved in osteoblast differentiation and maturation and it is thought that haploinsufficiency of the gene can cause the disorder. The diagnosis of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and the identification of the chromosomal abnormality in the patient facilitated genetic counseling of the family.

  16. Placental hydroxymethylation vs methylation at the imprinting control region 2 on chromosome 11p15.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. Magalhaes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to methylated cytosines (5-mCs, hydroxymethylcytosines (5-hmCs are present in CpG dinucleotide-enriched regions and some transcription regulator binding sites. Unlike methylation, hydroxymethylation does not result in silencing of gene expression, and the most commonly used methods to study methylation, such as techniques based on restriction enzymatic digestion and/or bisulfite modification, are unable to distinguish between them. Genomic imprinting is a process of gene regulation where only one member of an allelic pair is expressed depending on the parental origin. Chromosome 11p15.5 has an imprinting control region (ICR2 that includes a differentially methylated region (KvDMR1 that guarantees parent-specific gene expression. The objective of the present study was to determine the presence of 5-hmC at the KvDMR1 in human placentas. We analyzed 16 third-trimester normal human placentas (chorionic villi. We compared two different methods based on real-time PCR after enzymatic digestion. The first method distinguished methylation from hydroxymethylation, while the other method did not. Unlike other methylation studies, subtle variations of methylation in ICRs could represent a drastic deregulation of the expression of imprinted genes, leading to important phenotypic consequences, and the presence of hydroxymethylation could interfere with the results of many studies. We observed agreement between the results of both methods, indicating the absence of hydroxymethylation at the KvDMR1 in third-trimester placentas. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study describing the investigation of hydroxymethylation in human placenta using a genomic imprinting model.

  17. Placental hydroxymethylation vs methylation at the imprinting control region 2 on chromosome 11p15.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, H R; Leite, S B P; Paz, C C P de; Duarte, G; Ramos, E S

    2013-10-22

    In addition to methylated cytosines (5-mCs), hydroxymethylcytosines (5-hmCs) are present in CpG dinucleotide-enriched regions and some transcription regulator binding sites. Unlike methylation, hydroxymethylation does not result in silencing of gene expression, and the most commonly used methods to study methylation, such as techniques based on restriction enzymatic digestion and/or bisulfite modification, are unable to distinguish between them. Genomic imprinting is a process of gene regulation where only one member of an allelic pair is expressed depending on the parental origin. Chromosome 11p15.5 has an imprinting control region (ICR2) that includes a differentially methylated region (KvDMR1) that guarantees parent-specific gene expression. The objective of the present study was to determine the presence of 5-hmC at the KvDMR1 in human placentas. We analyzed 16 third-trimester normal human placentas (chorionic villi). We compared two different methods based on real-time PCR after enzymatic digestion. The first method distinguished methylation from hydroxymethylation, while the other method did not. Unlike other methylation studies, subtle variations of methylation in ICRs could represent a drastic deregulation of the expression of imprinted genes, leading to important phenotypic consequences, and the presence of hydroxymethylation could interfere with the results of many studies. We observed agreement between the results of both methods, indicating the absence of hydroxymethylation at the KvDMR1 in third-trimester placentas. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study describing the investigation of hydroxymethylation in human placenta using a genomic imprinting model.

  18. Fibroadenoma in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome with paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 11p15.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takama, Yuichi; Kubota, Akio; Nakayama, Masahiro; Higashimoto, Ken; Jozaki, Kosuke; Soejima, Hidenobu

    2014-12-01

    Herein is described a case of breast fibroadenomas in a 16-year-old girl with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 11p15.5. She was clinically diagnosed with BWS and direct closure was performed for an omphalocele at birth. Subtotal and 90% pancreatectomy were performed for nesidioblastosis at the ages 2 months and 8 years, respectively. Bilateral multiple breast fibroadenomas were noted at the age of 16 and 17 years. In this case, paternal UPD of chromosome 11p15.5 was identified on microsatellite marker analysis. The relevant imprinted chromosomal region in BWS is 11p15.5, and UPD of chromosome 11p15 is a risk factor for BWS-associated tumorigenicity. Chromosome 11p15.5 consists of imprinting domains of IGF2, the expression of which is associated with the tumorigenesis of various breast cancers. This case suggests that fibroadenomas occurred in association with BWS.

  19. Structure of p15PAF-PCNA complex and implications for clamp sliding during DNA replication and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Biasio, Alfredo; de Opakua, Alain Ibáñez; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Molina, Rafael; Cordeiro, Tiago N.; Castillo, Francisco; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Delgado, Sandra; Gil-Cartón, David; Luque, Irene; Diercks, Tammo; Bernadó, Pau; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2015-03-01

    The intrinsically disordered protein p15PAF regulates DNA replication and repair by binding to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) sliding clamp. We present the structure of the human p15PAF-PCNA complex. Crystallography and NMR show the central PCNA-interacting protein motif (PIP-box) of p15PAF tightly bound to the front-face of PCNA. In contrast to other PCNA-interacting proteins, p15PAF also contacts the inside of, and passes through, the PCNA ring. The disordered p15PAF termini emerge at opposite faces of the ring, but remain protected from 20S proteasomal degradation. Both free and PCNA-bound p15PAF binds DNA mainly through its histone-like N-terminal tail, while PCNA does not, and a model of the ternary complex with DNA inside the PCNA ring is consistent with electron micrographs. We propose that p15PAF acts as a flexible drag that regulates PCNA sliding along the DNA and facilitates the switch from replicative to translesion synthesis polymerase binding.

  20. Structural basis for the recognition of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain by CREPT and p15RS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Kunrong; Jin, Zhe; Ren, Fangli; Wang, Yinying; Chang, Zhijie; Wang, Xinquan

    2014-01-01

    CREPT and p15RS are two recently identified homologous proteins that regulate cell proliferation in an opposite way and are closely related to human cancer development. Both CREPT and p15RS consist of an N-terminal RPR domain and a C-terminal domain with high sequence homology. The transcription enhancement by CREPT is attributed to its interaction with RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Here we provide biochemical and structural evidence to support and extend this molecular mechanism. Through fluorescence polarization analysis, we show that the RPR domains of CREPT and p15RS (CREPT-RPR and p15RS-RPR) bind to different Pol II C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphoisoforms with similar affinity and specificity. We also determined the crystal structure of p15RS-RPR. Sequence and structural comparisons with RPR domain of Rtt103, a homolog of CREPT and p15RS in yeast, reveal structural basis for the similar binding profile of CREPT-RPR and p15RS-RPR with Pol II CTD. We also determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of CREPT (CREPT-CTD), which is a long rod-like dimer and each monomer adopts a coiled-coil structure. We propose that dimerization through the C-terminal domain enhances the binding strength between CREPT or p15RS with Pol II by increasing binding avidity. Our results collectively reveal the respective roles of N-terminal RPR domain and C-terminal domain of CREPT and p15RS in recognizing RNA Pol II.

  1. Structure of p15PAF-PCNA complex and implications for clamp sliding during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Biasio, Alfredo; de Opakua, Alain Ibáñez; Mortuza, Gulnahar B;

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsically disordered protein p15(PAF) regulates DNA replication and repair by binding to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) sliding clamp. We present the structure of the human p15(PAF)-PCNA complex. Crystallography and NMR show the central PCNA-interacting protein motif (PIP...... the DNA and facilitates the switch from replicative to translesion synthesis polymerase binding....... free and PCNA-bound p15(PAF) binds DNA mainly through its histone-like N-terminal tail, while PCNA does not, and a model of the ternary complex with DNA inside the PCNA ring is consistent with electron micrographs. We propose that p15(PAF) acts as a flexible drag that regulates PCNA sliding along...

  2. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may pl...

  3. Miz1 is a critical repressor of cdkn1a during skin tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hönnemann

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Miz1 forms repressive DNA-binding complexes with the Myc, Gfi-1 and Bcl-6 oncoproteins. Known target genes of these complexes encode the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs cdkn2b (p15(Ink4, cdkn1a (p21(Cip1, and cdkn1c (p57(Kip2. Whether Miz1-mediated repression is important for control of cell proliferation in vivo and for tumor formation is unknown. Here we show that deletion of the Miz1 POZ domain, which is critical for Miz1 function, restrains the development of skin tumors in a model of chemically-induced, Ras-dependent tumorigenesis. While the stem cell compartment appears unaffected, interfollicular keratinocytes lacking functional Miz1 exhibit a reduced proliferation and an accelerated differentiation of the epidermis in response to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA. Tumorigenesis, proliferation and normal differentiation are restored in animals lacking cdkn1a, but not in those lacking cdkn2b. Our data demonstrate that Miz1-mediated attenuation of cell cycle arrest pathways via repression of cdkn1a has a critical role during tumorigenesis in the skin.

  4. Expressions of p16, p15 and pRb in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas%p16,p15及Rb蛋白在皮肤鳞状细胞癌中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武钦学; 吴志华; 唐慰萍

    2004-01-01

    目的:检测p16,p15及pRb在皮肤鳞癌中的表达及相互关系,探讨它们在皮肤鳞癌发生、发展中的作用.方法:用S-P免疫组化染色法检测48例皮肤鳞癌和10例正常皮肤中p16,p15蛋白及pRb的表达.结果:p16,p15及pRb在皮肤鳞癌中均有不同程度失表达,分别为16/48(33.3%),7/48(14.6%)及8/48(16.7%).而在正常表皮均呈阳性表达:不同分化皮肤鳞癌中,p16,p15的失表达在低分化鳞癌中显著高于高中分化鳞癌(P<0.05),pRb表达无显著性差异.结论:p16,p15及/或pRb的表达异常可能与皮肤鳞癌的发生、发展有关.

  5. Genome-wide linkage study suggests a susceptibility locus for isolated bilateral microtia on 4p15.32-4p16.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Hu, Jintian; Zhang, Jiao; Jin, Qian; Wang, Duen-Mei; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Qingguo; Zhang, Yong-Biao

    2014-01-01

    Microtia is a congenital deformity where the external ear is underdeveloped. Genetic investigations have identified many susceptibility genes of microtia-related syndromes. However, no causal genes were reported for isolated microtia, the main form of microtia. We conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis on a 5-generation Chinese pedigree with isolated bilateral microtia. We identified a suggestive linkage locus on 4p15.32-4p16.2 with parametric LOD score of 2.70 and nonparametric linkage score (Zmean) of 12.28 (simulated occurrence per genome scan equal to 0.46 and 0.47, respectively). Haplotype reconstruction analysis of the 4p15.32-4p16.2 region further confined the linkage signal to a 10-Mb segment located between rs12505562 and rs12649803 (9.65-30.24 cM; 5.54-15.58 Mb). Various human organ developmental genes reside in this 10-Mb susceptibility region, such as EVC, EVC2, SLC2A9, NKX3-2, and HMX1. The coding regions of three genes, EVC known for cartilage development and NKX3-2, HMX1 involved in microtia, were selected for sequencing with 5 individuals from the pedigree. Of the 38 identified sequence variants, none segregates along with the disease phenotype. Other genes or DNA sequences of the 10-Mb region warrant for further investigation. In conclusion, we report a susceptibility locus of isolated microtia, and this finding will encourage future studies on the genetic basis of ear deformity.

  6. Genome-wide linkage study suggests a susceptibility locus for isolated bilateral microtia on 4p15.32-4p16.2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    Full Text Available Microtia is a congenital deformity where the external ear is underdeveloped. Genetic investigations have identified many susceptibility genes of microtia-related syndromes. However, no causal genes were reported for isolated microtia, the main form of microtia. We conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis on a 5-generation Chinese pedigree with isolated bilateral microtia. We identified a suggestive linkage locus on 4p15.32-4p16.2 with parametric LOD score of 2.70 and nonparametric linkage score (Zmean of 12.28 (simulated occurrence per genome scan equal to 0.46 and 0.47, respectively. Haplotype reconstruction analysis of the 4p15.32-4p16.2 region further confined the linkage signal to a 10-Mb segment located between rs12505562 and rs12649803 (9.65-30.24 cM; 5.54-15.58 Mb. Various human organ developmental genes reside in this 10-Mb susceptibility region, such as EVC, EVC2, SLC2A9, NKX3-2, and HMX1. The coding regions of three genes, EVC known for cartilage development and NKX3-2, HMX1 involved in microtia, were selected for sequencing with 5 individuals from the pedigree. Of the 38 identified sequence variants, none segregates along with the disease phenotype. Other genes or DNA sequences of the 10-Mb region warrant for further investigation. In conclusion, we report a susceptibility locus of isolated microtia, and this finding will encourage future studies on the genetic basis of ear deformity.

  7. p16,p15及pRb在表皮肿瘤中的表达%Expressions of p16,p15 and pRb in Neoplasms of Epidermis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武钦学; 吴志华; 唐慰萍

    2004-01-01

    目的检测p16、p15及pRb在表皮肿瘤(基底细胞癌,角化棘皮瘤,脂溢性角化病等)中的表达及相互关系,以探讨它们在表皮肿瘤中发生、发展中的作用.方法用S-P免疫组化染色法检测34例基底细胞癌(BCC),12例角化棘皮瘤(KA),11例脂溢性角化病及10例正常皮肤中p16,p15及pRb蛋白的表达.结果p16、p15及pRb在基底细胞癌中均有不同程度失表达,分别为11/34(32.4%),15/34(44.1%)及10/34(29.4%):除1例脂溢性角化病pRb蛋白阴性表达外,12例角化棘皮瘤,11例脂溢性角化病及10例正常皮肤中p16、p15及pRb蛋白均呈阳性表达;基底细胞癌中,部分肿瘤p16,p15的表达与pRb蛋白的表达呈负相关,即一方的表达伴另一方的不表达.结论p16、p15及/或pRb的表达异常可能与基底细胞癌的发生、发展有关;但与表皮良性肿瘤的发生无关.

  8. Frequency and timing of loss of imprinting at 11p13 and 11p15 in Wilms' tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Keith W; Power, Frances; Moore, Beth; Charles, Adrian K; Malik, Karim T A

    2008-07-01

    Epigenetic changes occur frequently in Wilms' tumor (WT), especially loss of imprinting (LOI) of IGF2/H19 at 11p15. Our previous results have identified imprinted transcripts (WT1-AS and AWT1) from the WT1 locus at 11p13 and showed LOI of these in some WTs. In this article, we set out to test the relationship between LOI at 11p13 and 11p15 and their timing in WT progression relative to other genetic changes. We found a higher level (83%) of 11p13 LOI in WT than of 11p15 LOI (71%). There was no correlation between methylation levels at the 11p13 and 11p15 differentially methylated regions or between allelic expression of WT1-AS/AWT1 and IGF2. Interestingly, retention of normal imprinting at 11p13 was associated with a small group of relatively late-onset, high-stage WTs. An examination of genetic and epigenetic alterations in nephrogenic rests, which are premalignant WT precursors, showed that LOI at both 11p13 and 11p15 occurred before either 16q loss of heterozygosity (LOH) or 7p LOH. This suggests that these LOH events are very unlikely to be a cause of LOI but that LOH may act by potentiating the effects of overexpression of IGF2 and/or WT1-AS/AWT1 that result from LOI.

  9. PD-1 inhibits T cell proliferation by upregulating p27 and p15 and suppressing Cdc25A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Sari, Duygu; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A

    2012-12-01

    The programmed cell death-1 (PD)-1 receptor (CD279) is a potent T cell inhibitor with a critical role in peripheral tolerance, but it can also compromise anti-viral and antitumor T cell responses. The effects of PD-1 on the cell cycle leading to inhibition of T cell expansion are poorly understood. Recently, we examined the effects of PD-1 on the molecular control of the cell cycle machinery and on TCR-activated signaling pathways that regulate these downstream outcomes. Our studies showed that PD-1 blocks cell cycle progression in the G 1 phase. PD-1 did not alter the expression of G 1 phase cyclins or cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) but, instead, suppressed the transcription of SKP2, the substrate recognition component of the SCF (Skp2) ubiquitin ligase that leads p27 (kip1) to degradation and resulted in accumulation of p27 (kip1) . Subsequently, T cells receiving PD-1 signals displayed impaired Cdk2 activation and failed to phosphorylate two critical Cdk2 substrates, the retinoblastoma gene product (Rb) and the TGFβ-specific transcription factor Smad3, leading to suppression of E2F target genes but enhanced Smad3 transactivation. These events resulted in upregulation of the Cdk4/6 inhibitor p15 (INK4B) and repression of the Cdk-activating phosphatase Cdc25A. The suppressive effect of PD-1 on Skp2 expression was mediated by inhibition of both PI3K/Akt and Ras/MEK/Erk pathways and was only partially reversed by IL-2, which restored activation of MEK/Erk but not Akt. Thus, PD-1 targets Ras and PI3K/Akt signaling to inhibit transcription of Skp2 and to activate Smad3 as an integral component of a pathway that regulates blockade of cell cycle progression in T lymphocytes. Here, we discuss the detailed sequence of these signaling events and their implications in mediating cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic mechanisms that inhibit proliferation of T effector cells in response to PD-1-mediated signaling.

  10. Duplication of the Miller-Dieker Critical Region in a Patient with a Subtelomeric Unbalanced Translocation t(10;17)(p15.3;p13.3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, R.; Velázquez-Wong, A.C.; Araujo-Solís, M.A.; Huicochea-Montiel, J.C.; Velázquez-Flores, M.Á.; Salamanca-Gómez, F.; Arenas-Aranda, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Submicroscopic duplications in the Miller-Dieker critical region have been recently described as new genomic disorders. To date, only a few cases have been reported with overlapping 17p13.3 duplications in this region. Also, small deletions that affect chromosome region 10p14→pter are rarely described in the literature. In this study, we describe, to our knowledge for the first time, a 5-year-old female patient with intellectual disability who has an unbalanced 10;17 translocation inherited from the father. The girl was diagnosed by subtelomeric FISH and array-CGH, showing a 4.43-Mb heterozygous deletion on chromosome 10p that involved 14 genes and a 3.22-Mb single-copy gain on chromosome 17p, which includes the critical region of the Miller-Dieker syndrome and 61 genes. The patient's karyotype was established as 46,XX.arr 10p15.3p15.1(138,206–4,574,436)x1,17p13.3(87,009–3,312,600)x3. Because our patient exhibits a combination of 2 imbalances, she has phenotypic features of both chromosome abnormalities, which have been reported separately. Interestingly, the majority of patients who carry the deletion 10p have visual and auditory deficiencies that are attributed to loss of the GATA3 gene. However, our patient also presents severe hearing and visual problems even though GATA3 is present, suggesting the involvement of different genes that affect the development of the visual and auditory systems. PMID:23326253

  11. miR-541 Contributes to Microcystin-LR-Induced Reproductive Toxicity through Regulating the Expression of p15 in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiannan; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Xiang; Xiang, Zou; Li, Dongmei; Han, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Microcystin-leucine arginine (MC-LR) is a harmful cyanotoxin produced by cyanobacteria. MC-LR can exert endocrine-disrupting activities in many organisms. We have previously demonstrated that MC-LR exerts both acute and chronic reproductive toxicity in male mice, resulting in a decline in sperm quality and damage to testicular structure. Moreover, we also observed extensive alterations in a panel of microRNAs in spermatogonial cells after exposure to MC-LR. In this study, we have confirmed that miR-541 was significantly increased both in GC-1 cells (in vitro) and in mouse testes (in vivo) after exposure to MC-LR. Our data support that p15 was the target gene of miR-541. Increase in miR-541 led to a reduction of p15 and murine double minute2 (MDM2), promoting the activation of p53 signaling and MC-LR-mediated cell apoptosis. Moreover, cells responded to MC-LR with reduced viability and increased apoptosis. Consistently, inhibiting miR-541 could upregulate the expression of p15 and MDM2, resulting in the downregulation of phospho-p53. Downregulation of miR-541 promoted cell viability by reducing MC-LR-induced cell apoptosis. In conclusion, we demonstrate here a crucial role for miR-541 in MC-LR-induced toxic effects on the reproductive system, in an attempt to provide a rational strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of MC-LR-induced impairment in the reproductive system. PMID:27608041

  12. Evaluation of cell binding peptide (p15) with silk fibre enhanced hydroxyappatite bone substitute for posterolateral spinal fusion in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.; Jespersen, Stig; Overgaard, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    were assessed with 2D sections and 3D reconstruction images and fusion was defined as intertransverse bridging. Results: Spinal fusion was found in 72 % of levels receiving silk fibre enhanced ABM/P15 graft material. In levels with silk fibre enhanced AMB fusion rate was 41 %. These findings...... on the surface of bone forming cells. The binding initiates natural intra- and extracellular signalling pathways, inducing production of growth factors, bone morphogenic proteins and cytokines. P15 peptide has previously shown to improve osteoinductive properties when coated on graft materials. Purpose...

  13. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis of these diso......Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis...

  14. THE EXPRESSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCES OF p15,p16 AND VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR (VEGF) IN GASTRIC CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王天宝; 高鹏; 曲延刚; 陈咸增; 李兆亭

    2000-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationships between the expressions of p15,p16 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and gastric carcinoma(GC).Methods: Using immunohistochemical staining to examine the expressions of p15, p16and VEGF in archival wax-embedded specimens of 80 GC and 20 gastric benign disease(GBD). Results: The positive expression rate (PER) of p15 was significantly lower in GC than in GBD (43.75% VS. 69.23%, P<0.05). No relationship was found between PER of p15 and clinicopathologic factors. PER of p16 was 20% in GC, 55% in GBD (P<0.01).PER of p16 wasn't significantly different in gross types, histological types, with or without distant metastasis and pTNM stages. PER of p16 was 71.43% in invasive mucosa or suomucosa group, 17. 24% in invasive muscle group and 13. 64% in invoive serosa group (P<0.01); 12.96% in GC with lymph nodes metastasis, 34.62% in GC without lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). PER of VEGF in GC was 75. 00%, in GBD 7.69% (P<0. 001), in ulcerative type of GC and infiltrating type of GC were 81.97% and 40. 00%, respectively (P <0.05), in GC of invasive serosa was 95.45%, in GC of invasive muscle 51.72%(P<0.001), in GC of invasive mucosa or sulomucosa 42.86% (P<0.001). PER of VEGF in GC with lymph node metastasis was 82. 8%, without lymph node metastasis 54. 6%(P<0.05), in GC accompanied with distant metastasis was 100%, in GC without distant metastasis71.1% (P<0.05). PER of VEGF in pTNM Ⅰ and Ⅱ was 53.13%, in Ⅲ and IV 89.56% (P<0. 001). The expression of p15 correlated significantly With that of VEGF (P<0.001) and with that of p16 (P<0.01) in GC. Conclusion: p15 expression down-regulation has relationship with GC, but on relationship with the progress. p16 expression downregulation and VEGF expression up-regulation show significant relationships with clinicopathologic factors. There are significant relations between p15 and p16 negative expressionsand between p15 expression down-regulation and VEGF expression up-regulation.

  15. Recurrent translocation t(10;17)(p15;q21) in minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia results in ZMYND11/MBTD1 fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D E; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Kollen, Wouter J W; Sonneveld, Edwin; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Beverloo, H Berna; Fornerod, Maarten; Pieters, Rob; Zwaan, C Michel

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by different collaborating karyotypic and molecular abnormalities, which are used in risk group stratification. In ∼20% of the pediatric AML cases a specific genetic aberration is still unknown. Minimally differentiated myeloid leukemia or FAB-type M0 is a rare morphological subtype of AML. The translocation t(10;17)(p15;q21) is described to be recurrent in minimally differentiated AML, but the involved genes and location of the breakpoints have so far not been identified. In this study, we show that this translocation results in an in-frame translocation fusing exon 12 of the tumor suppressor gene ZMYND11 to exon 3 of the chromatin protein MBTD1, encoding a protein of 1,054 amino acids, while the reciprocal fusion product is predicted to lack a productive start codon. Gene expression profiling of the leukemic cells showed high HOXA expression. ZMYND11, also known as BS69, is a tumor suppressor that specifically recognizes H3K36me3, which is linked to aberrant HOXA expression in leukemogenesis. Aberrant expression of the genes involved in this fusion may thus contribute to the HOXA-phenotype observed with gene expression profiling.

  16. Effect of P15INK4b/MTS2 on the proliferation of human hepatoma cells SMMC-7721

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The full length cDNA coding for P15 INK4b, which is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, was cloned to plasmid PXJ41-neo (Eco RⅠ/XhoⅠ site) and the new constructed plasmid pXJp15 was obtained. pXJp15 was transferred into the human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells by lipofectine reagent. After G418 selection, a series of cell lines stably expressing high levels of P15 (named SHT) and the clone containing vector PXJ41-neo only (named SVXJ) were obtained by Northern and Western analysis. The results showed that the proliferation of SHT cells is inhibited compared with that of SVXJ cells. Cell cycle analysis indicated that overexpressing of P15 inhibited the growth of SHT cells by decreasing progrssion of cells from G1 to S and G2 to M phases. The levels of c-Myc and c-Fos were obviously decreased in SHT cells compared with control cells by Western blotting. The decreased expression of oncogene may be one of the molecular mechanisms of the effect of P15 on the proliferation of in SHT cells.

  17. Homozygous Deletions and Recurrent Amplifications Implicate New Genes Involved in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennuan Liu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer cell lines provide ideal in vitro systems for the identification and analysis of prostate tumor suppressors and oncogenes. A detailed characterization of the architecture of prostate cancer cell line genomes would facilitate the study of precise roles of various genes in prostate tumorigenesis in general. To contribute to such a characterization, we used the GeneChip 500K single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP array for analysis of genotypes and relative DNA copy number changes across the genome of 11 cell lines derived from both normal and cancerous prostate tissues. For comparison purposes, we also examined the alterations observed in the cell lines in tumor/normal pairs of clinical samples from 72 patients. Along with genome-wide maps of DNA copy number changes and loss of heterozygosity for these cell lines, we report previously unreported homozygous deletions and recurrent amplifications in prostate cancers in this study. The homozygous deletions affected a number of biologically important genes, including PPP2R2A and BNIP3L identified in this study and CDKN2A/CDKN2B reported previously. Although most amplified genomic regions tended to be large, amplifications at 8q24.21 were of particular interest because the affected regions are relatively small, are found in multiple cell lines, are located near MYC, an oncogene strongly implicated in prostate tumorigenesis, and are known to harbor SNPs that are associated with inherited susceptibility for prostate cancer. The genomic alterations revealed in this study provide an important catalog of positional information relevant to efforts aimed at deciphering the molecular genetic basis of prostate cancer.

  18. Fine mapping of chromosome 5p15.33 based on a targeted deep sequencing and high density genotyping identifies novel lung cancer susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuri, Linda; Amos, Christopher I.; McKay, James D.; Johansson, Mattias; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.Bas; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Johansson, Mikael; Quirós, J.Ramón; Sieri, Sabina; Travis, Ruth C.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E.; Wilkens, Lynne; Goodman, Gary E.; Chen, Chu; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Su, Li; Tworoger, Shelley; Zhang, Xuehong; Kraft, Peter; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; Marcus, Michael W.; Davies, Michael P.A.; Hyde, Russell; Caporaso, Neil E.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Severi, Gianluca; Giles, Graham G.; Liu, Geoffrey; McLaughlin, John R.; Li, Yafang; Xiao, Xiangjun; Fehringer, Gord; Zong, Xuchen; Denroche, Robert E.; Zuzarte, Philip C.; McPherson, John D.; Brennan, Paul; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 5p15.33 has been identified as a lung cancer susceptibility locus, however the underlying causal mechanisms were not fully elucidated. Previous fine-mapping studies of this locus have relied on imputation or investigated a small number of known, common variants. This study represents a significant advance over previous research by investigating a large number of novel, rare variants, as well as their underlying mechanisms through telomere length. Variants for this fine-mapping study were identified through a targeted deep sequencing (average depth of coverage greater than 4000×) of 576 individuals. Subsequently, 4652 SNPs, including 1108 novel SNPs, were genotyped in 5164 cases and 5716 controls of European ancestry. After adjusting for known risk loci, rs2736100 and rs401681, we identified a new, independent lung cancer susceptibility variant in LPCAT1: rs139852726 (OR = 0.46, P = 4.73×10–9), and three new adenocarcinoma risk variants in TERT: rs61748181 (OR = 0.53, P = 2.64×10–6), rs112290073 (OR = 1.85, P = 1.27×10–5), rs138895564 (OR = 2.16, P = 2.06×10–5; among young cases, OR = 3.77, P = 8.41×10–4). In addition, we found that rs139852726 (P = 1.44×10–3) was associated with telomere length in a sample of 922 healthy individuals. The gene-based SKAT-O analysis implicated TERT as the most relevant gene in the 5p15.33 region for adenocarcinoma (P = 7.84×10–7) and lung cancer (P = 2.37×10–5) risk. In this largest fine-mapping study to investigate a large number of rare and novel variants within 5p15.33, we identified novel lung and adenocarcinoma susceptibility loci with large effects and provided support for the role of telomere length as the potential underlying mechanism. PMID:26590902

  19. Fine mapping of chromosome 5p15.33 based on a targeted deep sequencing and high density genotyping identifies novel lung cancer susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuri, Linda; Amos, Christopher I; McKay, James D; Johansson, Mattias; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Johansson, Mikael; Quirós, J Ramón; Sieri, Sabina; Travis, Ruth C; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E; Wilkens, Lynne; Goodman, Gary E; Chen, Chu; Doherty, Jennifer A; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Su, Li; Tworoger, Shelley; Zhang, Xuehong; Kraft, Peter; Zaridze, David; Field, John K; Marcus, Michael W; Davies, Michael P A; Hyde, Russell; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa; Severi, Gianluca; Giles, Graham G; Liu, Geoffrey; McLaughlin, John R; Li, Yafang; Xiao, Xiangjun; Fehringer, Gord; Zong, Xuchen; Denroche, Robert E; Zuzarte, Philip C; McPherson, John D; Brennan, Paul; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 5p15.33 has been identified as a lung cancer susceptibility locus, however the underlying causal mechanisms were not fully elucidated. Previous fine-mapping studies of this locus have relied on imputation or investigated a small number of known, common variants. This study represents a significant advance over previous research by investigating a large number of novel, rare variants, as well as their underlying mechanisms through telomere length. Variants for this fine-mapping study were identified through a targeted deep sequencing (average depth of coverage greater than 4000×) of 576 individuals. Subsequently, 4652 SNPs, including 1108 novel SNPs, were genotyped in 5164 cases and 5716 controls of European ancestry. After adjusting for known risk loci, rs2736100 and rs401681, we identified a new, independent lung cancer susceptibility variant in LPCAT1: rs139852726 (OR = 0.46, P = 4.73×10(-9)), and three new adenocarcinoma risk variants in TERT: rs61748181 (OR = 0.53, P = 2.64×10(-6)), rs112290073 (OR = 1.85, P = 1.27×10(-5)), rs138895564 (OR = 2.16, P = 2.06×10(-5); among young cases, OR = 3.77, P = 8.41×10(-4)). In addition, we found that rs139852726 (P = 1.44×10(-3)) was associated with telomere length in a sample of 922 healthy individuals. The gene-based SKAT-O analysis implicated TERT as the most relevant gene in the 5p15.33 region for adenocarcinoma (P = 7.84×10(-7)) and lung cancer (P = 2.37×10(-5)) risk. In this largest fine-mapping study to investigate a large number of rare and novel variants within 5p15.33, we identified novel lung and adenocarcinoma susceptibility loci with large effects and provided support for the role of telomere length as the potential underlying mechanism.

  20. P15INK4B基因甲基化与骨髓增生异常综合征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶雪石; 刘霆

    2004-01-01

    骨髓增生异常综合征(MDS)是一种造血干细胞的克隆性疾病,容易进展为急性白血病.P15INK4B基因为人类肿瘤抑制基因,在负向调节造血细胞增生和阻止其恶性转换中起着重要的作用.近来研究显示P15INK4B基因高度甲基化与MDS的发生、发展具重要关系,越是疾病进展期,P15INK4B基因甲基化出现越频繁.5-氮杂胞苷(5-azacytidine)和5-杂氮-2'-脱氧胞嘧啶(decitabine)用于治疗MDS患者已取得一定效果,三氧化二砷的体外试验显示其具有抑制MDS细胞株生长和去甲基化作用.去甲基化治疗有望成为今后治疗MDS的有效方案之一.

  1. Loss of fragile histidine triad and amplification of 1p36.22 and 11p15.5 in primary gastric adenocarcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yuan Liu; Hai-Ying Chen; Man-Li Zhang; Dan Tian; Shibo Li; Ji-Yun Lee

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the genomic copy number alterations that may harbor key driver genes in gastric tumorigenesis.METHODS:Using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH),we investigated the genomic alterations of 20 advanced primary gastric adenocarcinomas (seventeen tubular and three mucinous)of Chinese patients from the Jilin province.Ten matching adjacent normal regions from the same patients were also studied.RESULTS:The most frequent imbalances detected in these cancer samples were gains of 3q26.31-q27.2,5p,8q,11p,18p,19q and 20q and losses of 3p,4p,18q and 21q.The use of high-resolution array CGH increased the resolution and sensitivity of the observed genomic changes and identified focal genetic imbalances,which included 54 gains and 16 losses that were smaller than 1 Mb in size.The most interesting focal imbalances were the intergenic loss/homozygous deletion of the fragile histidine triad gene and the amplicons 11q13,18q11.2 and 19q12,as well as the novel amplicons 1p36.22 and 11p15.5.CONCLUSION:These regions,especially the focal amplicons,may harbor key driver genes that will serve as biomarkers for either the diagnosis or the prognosis of gastric cancer,and therefore,a large-scale investigation is recommended.

  2. Identification of novel RA susceptibility loci at chromosomes 10p15, 12q13 and 22q13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Anne; Thomson, Wendy; Ke, Xiayi; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Gibbons, Laura J; Wilson, Anthony G; Bax, Deborah E; Morgan, Ann W; Emery, Paul; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Worthington, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The WTCCC study identified 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) putatively associated with RA at p=1×10-4-1×10-5 (Tier 3). Here, we show that 3 of these SNPs, mapping to chromosome 10p15 (rs4750316), 12q13 (rs1678542) and 22q13 (rs3218253), are also associated (trend p = 4×10-5, p=4×10-4 and p=4×10-4, respectively) in a validation study of 4,106 RA cases and an expanded reference group of 11,238 subjects, confirming them as true susceptibility loci in Caucasians. PMID:18794857

  3. Mapping one form of autosomal dominant postaxial polydactyly type A to chromosome 7p15-q11.23 by linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishna, U.; Mehenni, H.; Antonarakis, S.E. [Geneva Medical School (Switzerland)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Postaxial polydactyly type-A (PAP-A) in humans is an autosomal dominant trait characterized by an extra digit in the ulnar and/or fibular side of the upper and/or lower extremities. The extra digit is well formed and articulates with the fifth, or extra, metacarpal/metatarsal, and thus it is usually functional. In order to map the gene responsible for PAP-A, we studied a five-generation Indian family of 37 individuals (15 of whom were affected). A genomewide search with highly informative polymorphic markers on part of the pedigree showed linkage between the PAP-A phenotype and markers on chromosome 7p15-q11.23 (no crossovers were found with D7S526, D7S795, D7S528, D7S521, D7S691, D7S667, D7S478, D7S1830, D7S803, D7S801, or ELN). The highest LOD score was obtained with marker D7S801 (Z{sub max} = 4.21; {theta} = 0). Haplotype analysis enabled the mapping of the PAP-A phenotype in this family between markers D7S2848 and D7S669. Analysis of additional families with PAP-A will narrow down the critical genomic region, facilitate positional cloning of the PAP-A gene, and/or uncover potential genetic heterogeneity. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Genetic variant rs401681 at 5p15.33 modifies susceptibility to lung cancer but not esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human 5p15.33 locus contains two well-known genes, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and cleft lip and palate transmembrane 1-like (CLPTM1L genes, which have been implicated in carcinogenesis. A common sequence variant, rs401681, located in an intronic region of CLPTM1L, has been reported to be associated with lung cancer risk based on genome-wide association study. However, subsequent replication studies in diverse populations have yielded inconsistent results. In addition, genetic variants at 5p15.33, including rs401681, have been shown to be involved in the susceptibility to multiple malignancies. Nevertheless, the role of these TERT-CLPTM1L variants in the etiology of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC remains unknown. METHODS: We genotyped the rs401681 polymorphism using TaqMan methodology and analyzed its association with the risk of lung cancer and ESCC in a case-control study of 1,479 cancer patients (726 with lung cancer and 753 with ESCC and 860 healthy individuals. RESULTS: Logistic regression analyses revealed that rs401681 T genotypes were associated with a significantly decreased risk of lung cancer (CT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.782, 95% CI=0.625-0.978, P=0.031; CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.786; 95% CI=0.635-0.972, P=0.026. Stratification analysis by histology type indicated that rs401681 T genotypes were associated with a significantly reduced risk of both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Furthermore, no significant association was observed between rs401681 and the risk of ESCC (CT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.910, 95% CI=0.734-1.129, P=0.392; TT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.897, 95%CI=0.624-1.290, P=0.558; CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted OR=0.908, 95% CI=0.740-1.114, P=0.355. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide further evidence supporting rs401681 as a genetic variant associated with the risk of lung cancer. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the rs401681 variant and the risk of ESCC in a Han Chinese

  5. A genome-wide screen for interactions reveals a new locus on 4p15 modifying the effect of waist-to-hip ratio on total cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Surakka

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide association (GWA studies described 95 loci controlling serum lipid levels. These common variants explain ∼25% of the heritability of the phenotypes. To date, no unbiased screen for gene-environment interactions for circulating lipids has been reported. We screened for variants that modify the relationship between known epidemiological risk factors and circulating lipid levels in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA data from 18 population-based cohorts with European ancestry (maximum N = 32,225. We collected 8 further cohorts (N = 17,102 for replication, and rs6448771 on 4p15 demonstrated genome-wide significant interaction with waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR on total cholesterol (TC with a combined P-value of 4.79×10(-9. There were two potential candidate genes in the region, PCDH7 and CCKAR, with differential expression levels for rs6448771 genotypes in adipose tissue. The effect of WHR on TC was strongest for individuals carrying two copies of G allele, for whom a one standard deviation (sd difference in WHR corresponds to 0.19 sd difference in TC concentration, while for A allele homozygous the difference was 0.12 sd. Our findings may open up possibilities for targeted intervention strategies for people characterized by specific genomic profiles. However, more refined measures of both body-fat distribution and metabolic measures are needed to understand how their joint dynamics are modified by the newly found locus.

  6. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Hoskins, Jason W; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S.; Abnet, Christian C.; Adjei, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based...

  7. Fusion peptide P15-CSP shows antibiofilm activity and pro-osteogenic activity when deposited as a coating on hydrophilic but not hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Contreras-Garcia, Angel; LoVetri, Karen; Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Wertheimer, Michael R; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2015-12-01

    In the context of porous bone void filler for oral bone reconstruction, peptides that suppress microbial growth and promote osteoblast function could be used to enhance the performance of a porous bone void filler. We tested the hypothesis that P15-CSP, a novel fusion peptide containing collagen-mimetic osteogenic peptide P15, and competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), a cationic antimicrobial peptide, has emerging properties not shared by P15 or CSP alone. Peptide-coated surfaces were tested for antimicrobial activity toward Streptoccocus mutans, and their ability to promote human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment, spreading, metabolism, and osteogenesis. In the osteogenesis assay, peptides were coated on tissue culture plastic and on thin films generated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to have hydrophilic or hydrophobic character (water contact angles 63°, 42°, and 92°, respectively). S. mutans planktonic growth was specifically inhibited by CSP, whereas biofilm formation was inhibited by P15-CSP. MSC adhesion and actin stress fiber formation was strongly enhanced by CSP, P15-CSP, and fibronectin coatings and modestly enhanced by P15 versus uncoated surfaces. Metabolic assays revealed that CSP was slightly cytotoxic to MSCs. MSCs developed alkaline phosphatase activity on all surfaces, with or without peptide coatings, and consistently deposited the most biomineralized matrix on hydrophilic surfaces coated with P15-CSP. Hydrophobic thin films completely suppressed MSC biomineralization, consistent with previous findings of suppressed osteogenesis on hydrophobic bioplastics. Collective data in this study provide new evidence that P15-CSP has unique dual capacity to suppress biofilm formation, and to enhance osteogenic activity as a coating on hydrophilic surfaces.

  8. Chromosome r(10(p15.3q26.12 in a newborn child: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonasson Jon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ring chromosome 10 is a rare cytogenetic finding. Of the less than 10 reported cases we have found in the literature, none was characterized using high-resolution microarray analysis. Ring chromosomes are frequently unstable due to sister chromatid exchanges and mitotic failures. When mosaicism is present, the interpretation of genotype-phenotype correlations becomes extremely difficult. Results We report on a newborn girl with growth retardation, microcephaly, congenital heart defects, dysmorphic features and psychomotor retardation. Karyotyping revealed a non-mosaic apparently stable ring chromosome 10 replacing one of the normal homologues in all analyzed metaphases. High-resolution oligonucleotide microarray analysis showed a de novo approximately 12.5 Mb terminal deletion 10q26.12 -> qter and a corresponding 285 kb terminal deletion of 10pter -> p15.3. Conclusion This case demonstrates that an increased nuchal translucency thickness detected by early ultrasonography should preferably lead to not only QF-PCR for the diagnosis of Down syndrome but also karyotyping. In the future, microarray analysis, which needs further evaluation, might become the method of choice. The clinical phenotype of our patient was in agreement with that of patients with a terminal 10q deletion. For the purpose of genotype-phenotype analysis, there seems to be no need for a "ring syndrome" concept.

  9. Loss of imprinting and loss of heterozygosity on 11p15.5 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainho, C A; Kowalski, L P; Rogatto, S R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IGF2 and H19 are reciprocal imprinted genes with paternal and maternal monoallelic expression, respectively. This is interesting, because IGF2 is known as a growth factor, and H19 encodes a RNA with putative tumor suppressor action. Furthermore, IGF2 and H19 are linked genes located...

  10. Nuclear export of human hepatitis B virus core protein and pregenomic RNA depends on the cellular NXF1-p15 machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Chun; Huang, Er-Yi; Li, Hung-Cheng; Su, Pei-Yi; Shih, Chiaho

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) can shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm. Cytoplasm-predominant HBc is clinically associated with severe liver inflammation. Previously, we found that HBc arginine-rich domain (ARD) can associate with a host factor NXF1 (TAP) by coimmunoprecipitation. It is well known that NXF1-p15 heterodimer can serve as a major export receptor of nuclear mRNA as a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP). In the NXF1-p15 pathway, TREX (transcription/export) complex plays an important role in coupling nuclear pre-mRNA processing with mRNA export in mammalian cells. Here, we tested the hypothesis whether HBc and HBV specific RNA can be exported via the TREX and NXF1-p15 mediated pathway. We demonstrated here that HBc can physically and specifically associate with TREX components, and the NXF1-p15 export receptor by coimmunoprecipitation. Accumulation of HBc protein in the nucleus can be induced by the interference with TREX and NXF1-p15 mediated RNA export machinery. HBV transcripts encodes a non-spliced 3.5 kb pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) which can serve as a template for reverse transcription. Cytoplasmic HBV pgRNA appeared to be reduced by siRNA treatment specific for the NXF1-p15 complex by quantitative RT-qPCR and Northern blot analyses. This result suggests that the pgRNA was also exported via the NXF1-p15 machinery. We entertain the hypothesis that HBc protein can be exported as an RNP cargo via the mRNA export pathway by hijacking the TREX and NXF1-p15 complex. In our current and previous studies, HBc is not required for pgRNA accumulation in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, HBc ARD can mediate nuclear export of a chimeric protein containing HBc ARD in a pgRNA-independent manner. Taken together, it suggests that while both pgRNA and HBc protein exports are dependent on NXF1-p15, they are using the same export machinery in a manner independent of each other.

  11. p16、p15蛋白在小儿急性淋巴细胞白血病的表达及临床相关性研究%Expression of p16 and p15 Proteins in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia of Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡宛如; 张瑞英; 郭承吉; 王立娥; 都姝妍

    2001-01-01

    目的:探讨p16、p15蛋白在急性淋巴细胞白血病(ALL)发病中的意义。方法:对23例ALL细胞进行间接免疫荧光染色,用流式细胞仪检测细胞的荧光强度,间接反映p16、p15蛋白水平。结果:23例ALL患儿p16蛋白阴性10例,p15蛋白阴性8例,p16、p15蛋白均阴性6例。3例T-ALL中p16、p15蛋白皆阴性2例,13例Non T-ALL中,p16蛋白阴性6例,p15蛋白阴性5例。高白细胞组的p16、p15蛋白表达阳性率低于非高白细胞组,差异有显著意义(P<0.05),HR-ALL组p16、p15蛋白阳性表达低于SR-ALL组,差异有显著意义(P<0.05)。结论:p16、p15蛋白参与了部分急性淋巴细胞白血病的发病,p16、p15蛋白阴性的患者可能预后不良。%Objective:Our aim was to To clarify the roles of p16 and p15 proteins in the genesis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia(ALL).Methods:Twenty-three samples of ALL were studied by the method of indirect immunofluorescence.Flow cytometer was used to estimate the cellular fluorescent intensity to determine the levels of p16 and p15 proteins.Results:Negative expression for p16 protein was found in 10 of 23 samples,and 8 of 23 were p15 negative expression.Both kinds of proteins were abscent in 6 samples.2 of 3 cases of T-ALL were negative expression of p16,p15 protein.In non T-ALL,6 of 13 were negative expression for p16 protein,5 of 13 were p15 protein deficient.The expression rates of p16,p15 protein in high leukocyte group were lower than those of non-high leukocyte group(P<0.05).The expression rates of p16,p15 proteins in HR-ALL were lower than those of SR-ALL(P<0.05).Conclusion:The p16 and p15 proteins take part in the genesis of ALL.Negative expression of p16,p15 proteins might imply the poor clinical outcome.

  12. Cytoplasmic TERT Associates to RNA Granules in Fully Mature Neurons: Role in the Translational Control of the Cell Cycle Inhibitor p15INK4B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Iannilli

    Full Text Available The main role of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT is to protect telomere length from shortening during cell division. However, recent works have revealed the existence of a pool of TERT associated to mitochondria, where it plays a role in survival. We here show that in fully differentiated neurons the largest pool of cytoplasmic TERT associates to TIA1 positive RNA granules, where it binds the messenger RNA of the cyclin kinase inhibitor p15INK4B. Upon stress, p15INK4B and TERT dissociate and p15INK4B undergoes efficient translation, allowing its pro-survival function. These results unveil another mechanism implicated in the survival of fully differentiated neurons.

  13. Does fertilizer (N15P15K15) amendment enhance phytoremediation of petroleum-polluted aquatic ecosystem in the presence of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes [Mart.] Solms)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndimele, Prince Emeka; Jenyo-Oni, Adetola; Chukwuka, Kanayo S; Ndimele, Chinatu Charity; Ayodele, Ibukunoluwa Augustine

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of inorganic fertilizer (N15P15K15) amendments on crude oil uptake by water hyacinth. Experimental units (water hyacinth grown in fresh water) were spiked with 0, 20, 40 and 60 mg/L crude oil. After 24 h, they were randomly assigned fertilizer (N15P15K15) at three different concentrations; 0, 6 and 10 mg/L. Crude oil degradation and absorption were determined by measuring total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in the water column and water hyacinth, respectively. The measurements were taken monthly for six months (February-August 2010). The results showed that TPH concentration in the water column in the treatment amended at 6 mg/L (0.30 ± 0.01 mg/L) was significantly lower (p phytoremediation) absorbed significantly higher (p phytoremediation of crude oil by water hyacinth and biostimulation with fertilizer (N15P15K15) is possible.

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies two novel regions at 11p15.5-p13 and 1p31 with major impact on acute-phase serum amyloid A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Marzi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of acute-phase serum amyloid A (A-SAA cause amyloidosis and are a risk factor for atherosclerosis and its clinical complications, type 2 diabetes, as well as various malignancies. To investigate the genetic basis of A-SAA levels, we conducted the first genome-wide association study on baseline A-SAA concentrations in three population-based studies (KORA, TwinsUK, Sorbs and one prospective case cohort study (LURIC, including a total of 4,212 participants of European descent, and identified two novel genetic susceptibility regions at 11p15.5-p13 and 1p31. The region at 11p15.5-p13 (rs4150642; p = 3.20×10(-111 contains serum amyloid A1 (SAA1 and the adjacent general transcription factor 2 H1 (GTF2H1, Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome 5 (HPS5, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA, and lactate dehydrogenase C (LDHC. This region explains 10.84% of the total variation of A-SAA levels in our data, which makes up 18.37% of the total estimated heritability. The second region encloses the leptin receptor (LEPR gene at 1p31 (rs12753193; p = 1.22×10(-11 and has been found to be associated with CRP and fibrinogen in previous studies. Our findings demonstrate a key role of the 11p15.5-p13 region in the regulation of baseline A-SAA levels and provide confirmative evidence of the importance of the 1p31 region for inflammatory processes and the close interplay between A-SAA, leptin, and other acute-phase proteins.

  15. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S.; Abnet, Christian C.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Berg, Christine D.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B.; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A.; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Chu, Lisa W.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A.; Colt, Joanne S.; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Crawford, E. David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P.; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W. Ryan; Duell, Eric J.; Elena, Joanne W.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Giffen, Carol A.; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H.; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H. Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harris, Curtis C.; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B.; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E.; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W.; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J.; Inskip, Peter D.; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P.; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C.; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P.; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mensah, James E.; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mondul, Alison M.; Moore, Lee E.; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H.; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V.; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T.; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C.; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Stram, Daniel O.; Strom, Sara S.; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R.; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Toro, Jorge R.; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A.; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D.; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10−39; Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10−36 and PConditional = 2.36 × 10−8; Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10−12 and PConditional = 5.19 × 10−6, Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10−6; and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10−15 and PConditional = 5.35 × 10−7) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10−18 and PConditional = 7.06 × 10−16). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  16. Bone marrow ectopic expression of a non-coding RNA in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a novel t(2;11(q11.2;p15.1 translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszl Anna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chromosomal translocations play a crucial role in tumorigenesis, often resulting in the formation of chimeric genes or in gene deregulation through position effects. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is associated with a large number of such rearrangements. We report the ectopic expression of the 3' portion of EST DA926692 in the bone marrow of a childhood T-ALL case showing a t(2;11(q11.2;p15.1 translocation as the sole chromosome abnormality. The breakpoints, defined at the sequence level, mapped within HPS5 (Hermansky Pudlak syndrome 5 intron 1 at 11p15.1, and DA926692 exon 2 at 2q11.2. The translocation was accompanied by a submicroscopic inversion that brought the two genes into the same transcriptional orientation. No chimeric trancript was detected. Interestingly, Real-Time Quantitative (RQ-PCR detected, in the patient's bone marrow, expression of a 173 bp product corresponding to the 3' portion of DA926692. Samples from four T-ALL cases with a normal karyotype and normal bone marrow used as controls were negative. It might be speculated that the juxtaposition of this genomic segment to the CpG island located upstream HPS5 activated DA92669 expression. RQ-PCR analysis showed expression positivity in 6 of 23 human tissues examined. Bioinformatic analysis excluded that this small non-coding RNA is a precursor of micro-RNA, although it is conceivable that it has a different, yet unknown, functional role. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report, in cancer, of the activation of a small non-coding RNA as a result of a chromosomal translocation.

  17. Establishment of a Conditionally Immortalized Wilms Tumor Cell Line with a Homozygous WT1 Deletion within a Heterozygous 11p13 Deletion and UPD Limited to 11p15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Brandt

    Full Text Available We describe a stromal predominant Wilms tumor with focal anaplasia and a complex, tumor specific chromosome 11 aberration: a homozygous deletion of the entire WT1 gene within a heterozygous 11p13 deletion and an additional region of uniparental disomy (UPD limited to 11p15.5-p15.2 including the IGF2 gene. The tumor carried a heterozygous p.T41A mutation in CTNNB1. Cells established from the tumor carried the same chromosome 11 aberration, but a different, homozygous p.S45Δ CTNNB1 mutation. Uniparental disomy (UPD 3p21.3pter lead to the homozygous CTNNB1 mutation. The tumor cell line was immortalized using the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT in conjunction with a novel thermolabile mutant (U19dl89-97tsA58 of SV40 large T antigen (LT. This cell line is cytogenetically stable and can be grown indefinitely representing a valuable tool to study the effect of a complete lack of WT1 in tumor cells. The origin/fate of Wilms tumors with WT1 mutations is currently poorly defined. Here we studied the expression of several genes expressed in early kidney development, e.g. FOXD1, PAX3, SIX1, OSR1, OSR2 and MEIS1 and show that these are expressed at similar levels in the parental and the immortalized Wilms10 cells. In addition the limited potential for muscle/ osteogenic/ adipogenic differentiation similar to all other WT1 mutant cell lines is also observed in the Wilms10 tumor cell line and this is retained in the immortalized cells. In summary these Wilms10 cells are a valuable model system for functional studies of WT1 mutant cells.

  18. Clinical and molecular characterization of two patients with overlapping de novo microdeletions in 2p14-p15 and mild mental retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wohlleber, Eva; Kirchhoff, Eva Maria; Zink, Alexander M;

    2011-01-01

    Here, we present two patients with overlapping de novo microdeletions in chromosome 2p14-p15, mild mental retardation concerning especially language development, as well as mild dysmorphic features. Patient 1 also presented with generalized seizures, sensorineural hearing loss, and relative micro...

  19. Replication of lung cancer susceptibility loci at chromosomes 15q25, 5p15, and 6p21: a pooled analysis from the International Lung Cancer Consortium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong, T.; Hung, R.J.; Amos, C.I.; Wu, X.; Bickeboller, H.; Rosenberger, A.; Sauter, W.; Illig, T.; Wichmann, H.E.; Risch, A.; Dienemann, H.; Kaaks, R.; Yang, P.; Jiang, R.; Wiencke, J.K.; Wrensch, M.; Hansen, H.; Kelsey, K.T.; Matsuo, K.; Tajima, K.; Schwartz, A.G.; Wenzlaff, A.; Seow, A.; Ying, C.; Staratschek-Jox, A.; Nurnberg, P.; Stoelben, E.; Wolf, J.; Lazarus, P.; Muscat, J.E.; Gallagher, C.J.; Zienolddiny, S.; Haugen, A.; Heijden, H.F. van der; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Isla, D.; Mayordomo, J.I.; Rafnar, T.; Stefansson, K.; Zhang, Z.F.; Chang, S.C.; Kim, J.H.; Hong, Y.C.; Duell, E.J.; Andrew, A.S.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Rennert, G.; Muller, H.; Brenner, H.; Marchand, L. le; Benhamou, S.; Bouchardy, C.; Teare, M.D.; Xue, X.; McLaughlin, J.; Liu, G.; McKay, J.D.; Brennan, P.; Spitz, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have identified three chromosomal regions at 15q25, 5p15, and 6p21 as being associated with the risk of lung cancer. To confirm these associations in independent studies and investigate heterogeneity of these associations within specific subgroups, we cond

  20. SMARCB1/INI1-deficient sinonasal carcinoma shows methylation of RASSF1 gene: A clinicopathological, immunohistochemical and molecular genetic study of a recently described entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laco, Jan; Chmelařová, Marcela; Vošmiková, Hana; Sieglová, Kateřina; Bubancová, Ivana; Dundr, Pavel; Němejcová, Kristýna; Michálek, Jaroslav; Čelakovský, Petr; Mottl, Radovan; Sirák, Igor; Vošmik, Milan; Ryška, Aleš

    2017-02-01

    , CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CHFR, DAPK1, ESR1, FHIT, GSTP1, HIC1, KLLN, MLH1a, MLH1b, RARB, and VLH) were unmethylated. In summary, we described four cases of SMARCB1/INI1-deficient sinonasal carcinoma with detailed clinicopathological data indicating that these tumors can be regarded as a distinct entity with aggressive behaviour. For the first time, we performed analysis of DNA methylation in SMARCB1/INI1-deficient sinonasal carcinomas, reporting on significantly higher methylation of RASSF1 gene in this neoplasm.

  1. p15INK4B methylation on prognosis and response to decitabine in patients with MDS%p15INK4B甲基化与骨髓增生异常综合征患者预后及地西他滨疗效的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耀; 宋陆茜; 吴凌云; 常春康; 李晓

    2013-01-01

    Objective To detect p15INK4B methylation levels and the kinetics of the methylation status before and after decitabine to explore its influences on prognosis and response to decitabine in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients.Methods We examined 261 MDS patients (143 male and 118 female) with the median age of 52 years (32-78).Of them,172 cases were low-risk group (low-risk 104 cases,intermediate-1 68 cases),89 cases high-risk group (intermediate-2 52 cases,high risk 37 cases).Collections of bone marrow mononuclear cells of MDS patients and extracted the genomic DNA,the methylation status of p15INK4B was detected by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method.Survival analysis was conducted according to the level of p15INK4B methylation in the cohort of patients.The kinetics of the methylation levels of p15INK4B in 58MDS patients before and after 2 courses of decitabine have been assessed with the method of MSP.Results The methyiation level of p15INK4B in low-risk group patients was significantly lower than that in high-risk group (117.22 vs 157.63,P <0.05).The expected 2-year survival rate of p15INK4B methylation positive patients was lower than that of negative ones (91.8% vs 69.8%,P < 0.05) ; the expected 2-year survival rate of p15INK4B methylation positive patients was shorter than that of negative ones in low-risk group (78.2% vs 92.0%,P <0.05),meanwhile there was no significant difference in terms of expected 2-year survival rate and median expected survival between p15INK4B methylation positive and negative patients in high-risk group [35.6% vs 38.5%,(17.0 ± 9.3) month vs (18.0 ± 5.7) month,P > 0.05].Multivariate analysis showed p15INK4B methylation degree was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival.No statistical difference of overall response (OR) rates were found between p15INK4B methylation positive patients and negative patients before decitabine(65.9% vs 76.5%,P > 0.05),and complete remission (CR) rates between

  2. The 5p15.33 locus is associated with risk of lung adenocarcinoma in never-smoking females in Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Agnes Hsiung

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies of lung cancer reported in populations of European background have identified three regions on chromosomes 5p15.33, 6p21.33, and 15q25 that have achieved genome-wide significance with p-values of 10(-7 or lower. These studies have been performed primarily in cigarette smokers, raising the possibility that the observed associations could be related to tobacco use, lung carcinogenesis, or both. Since most women in Asia do not smoke, we conducted a genome-wide association study of lung adenocarcinoma in never-smoking females (584 cases, 585 controls among Han Chinese in Taiwan and found that the most significant association was for rs2736100 on chromosome 5p15.33 (p = 1.30 x 10(-11. This finding was independently replicated in seven studies from East Asia totaling 1,164 lung adenocarcinomas and 1,736 controls (p = 5.38 x 10(-11. A pooled analysis achieved genome-wide significance for rs2736100. This SNP marker localizes to the CLPTM1L-TERT locus on chromosome 5p15.33 (p = 2.60 x 10(-20, allelic risk = 1.54, 95% Confidence Interval (CI 1.41-1.68. Risks for heterozygote and homozygote carriers of the minor allele were 1.62 (95% CI; 1.40-1.87, and 2.35 (95% CI: 1.95-2.83, respectively. In summary, our results show that genetic variation in the CLPTM1L-TERT locus of chromosome 5p15.33 is directly associated with the risk of lung cancer, most notably adenocarcinoma.

  3. Ridge preservation with acellular dermal matrix and anorganic bone matrix cell-binding peptide P-15 after tooth extraction in humans. A histologic and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur B. Novaes Jr

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze by histomorphometric parameters the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM with or without anorganic bovine bone matrix (ABM / synthetic cell-binding peptide P-15 in the formation of bone in human alveoli. Materials and methods: Eighteen patients in need of extraction of maxillary anterior teeth were selected and randomly assigned to the test group (ADM plus ABM/P-15 or the control group (ADM only. Histomorphometric measurements and histological analysis were recorded about 6 months after ridge preservation procedures in ten patients. The amount of newly formed bone, the most recently formed bone, fibrous tissue plus marrow spaces and remaining graft particles were measured and analyzed. Results: At 6 months, the new bone area parameter and the percentage of fibrous tissue plus marrow space areas showed higher values to the control group, and statistically significant differences when compared with the test group (p=0.03. Conclusion: The ADM acted as a membrane. The association of ABM/P-15 with ADM resulted in new bone formation within the alveoli, but the results were not considered relevant when used in this indication.

  4. {sup 99m}Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 imaging for the early and specific diagnosis of chondrosarcoma: proof of concept in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miot-Noirault, E.; Vidal, A.; Rapp, M.; Madelmont, J.C.; Maublant, J.; Moins, N. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), UMR 484, 63 - Clermont Ferrand (France); Redini, F.; Gouin, F.; Heymann, D. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), ERI 7, EA 3822, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2008-02-15

    Aim. - The U.M.R. 484 I.N.S.E.R.M. develops a 'cartilage imaging strategy' with the {sup 99m}Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 tracer that selectively binds to cartilage proteoglycans, allowing a highly specific cartilage imaging. Since chondro-genic tumours are characterized by the presence of cartilaginous matrix, we hypothesized that the {sup 99m}Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 tracer would allow chondrosarcoma imaging, which is currently lacking in clinics. In the rat model of grade II para-tibial chondrosarcoma, we evaluated the relevance of {sup 99m}Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 imaging for an early and specific diagnosis of chondrosarcoma. Methods. - {sup 99m}Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 longitudinal imaging of animals was performed during two months after para-tibial ortho-topic tumour implantation in the right paw, the left being used as control. At regular intervals, animals were submitted to {sup 99m}Tc-M.D.P. bone imaging, the only examination used for SPECT diagnosis of chondrosarcoma in patients. Tumour volume was monitored for two months when the tumours became palpable, with the two perpendicular diameters measured. For both cartilage and bone imaging, the scans were considered positive when areas of tracer uptake were present at sites consistent with the sites of inoculation. For each animal, positive scans were analyzed at each stage using the semiquantitative method of the target to background ratio (T.B.R.), with the target R.O.I. being delineated over the tumour and background R.O.I. over vertebra and muscle. T.B.R. time-course was followed as a function of tumour growth.At study ending, each animal was sacrificed for histopathological control. Results. - {sup 99m}Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 scans were positive in 100% of the animals at very early stage (three days) after implantation, while no palpable nor measurable tumour could be assessed. Quantitative analysis of {sup 99m}Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 scans evidenced a significant uptake of the tracer at the implantation site at early stage. The time-course of T

  5. INK4 locus of the tumor-resistant rodent, the naked mole rat, expresses a functional p15/p16 hybrid isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao; Azpurua, Jorge; Ke, Zhonghe; Augereau, Adeline; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Vijg, Jan; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2015-01-27

    The naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a long-lived and tumor-resistant rodent. Tumor resistance in the naked mole rat is mediated by the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan of very high molecular weight (HMW-HA). HMW-HA triggers hypersensitivity of naked mole rat cells to contact inhibition, which is associated with induction of the INK4 (inhibitors of cyclin dependent kinase 4) locus leading to cell-cycle arrest. The INK4a/b locus is among the most frequently mutated in human cancer. This locus encodes three distinct tumor suppressors: p15(INK4b), p16(INK4a), and ARF (alternate reading frame). Although p15(INK4b) has its own ORF, p16(INK4a) and ARF share common second and third exons with alternative reading frames. Here, we show that, in the naked mole rat, the INK4a/b locus encodes an additional product that consists of p15(INK4b) exon 1 joined to p16(INK4a) exons 2 and 3. We have named this isoform pALT(INK4a/b) (for alternative splicing). We show that pALT(INK4a/b) is present in both cultured cells and naked mole rat tissues but is absent in human and mouse cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that pALT(INK4a/b) expression is induced during early contact inhibition and upon a variety of stresses such as UV, gamma irradiation-induced senescence, loss of substrate attachment, and expression of oncogenes. When overexpressed in naked mole rat or human cells, pALT(INK4a/b) has stronger ability to induce cell-cycle arrest than either p15(INK4b) or p16(INK4a). We hypothesize that the presence of the fourth product, pALT(INK4a/b) of the INK4a/b locus in the naked mole rat, contributes to the increased resistance to tumorigenesis of this species.

  6. Purification of rabbit IgG, obtention of sheep anti rabbit IgG and their use in radioimmunoassay of avian leukosis virus p15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Tomoko; Ogata, Hiroe; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Nogueira, Zelia Maria [Instituto de Quimica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza Felippe, Julia Maria Martins de [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Virus

    1988-01-01

    Immunoglobulin from rabbit serum was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on DEA-cellulose and gel filtration in Sephadex G-200. The efficiency of all steps was followed by protein determination and profiles in sodium dodecyl-sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Sheeps were immunized with purified IgG. The deep anti-rabbit IgG titre was evaluated by double immuno diffusion gel plates. The system rabbit serum vs sheep anti-rabbit IgG serum was used as precipitating system in radioimmunoassay of the retrovirus immunogens, in this case, p15 of avian leukosis virus. (author). 19 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Estudo clínico da aplicação de matriz inorgânica de osso associado a peptídeo sintético de adesão celular (MIO/P-15, PepGen P-15®, em lesões periodontais avançadas de cães Clinical study of effectiveness of an anorganic bone matrix and cell-binding peptide (ABM/P-15, PepGen-P15®: application in advanced periodontal lesions of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G. Ferro

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Os mecanismos biológicos desenvolvidos para aumentar a qualidade da regeneração óssea e da reparação tecidual de sítios periodontais específicos continuam a ser um desafio e têm sido complementado pela capacidade de adesão celular do colágeno do tipo I, promovida por um peptídeo sintético de adesão celular (P-15, associado a uma matriz inorgânica de osso (MIO para formar MIO/P-15. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a perda do nível clínico de inserção e a resposta da bolsa periodontal em dentes após 3 e 6 meses da aplicação de enxerto com MIO/P-15. Vinte e um cães do Hospital Veterinário da Universidade de São Paulo foram anestesiados para realização de tratamento periodontal e 132 faces dentais com perda de nível clínico de inserção foram tratadas, sendo que 36,4% (48 faces receberam o peptídeo de adesão celular e 63,6% (84 faces compuseram o grupo controle que recebeu tratamento convencional (retalho muco-gengival e aplainamento radicular. O procedimento foi documentado através de radiografia intra-oral e todas as sondagens de bolsas periodontais foram fotografadas. Depois de 3 e de 6 meses, os animais foram re-anestesiados a fim de se obter novas avaliações, radiografias, fotografias e sondagens periodontais. As 48 faces com perda de nível clínico de inserção que receberam material de enxertia apresentaram taxa de 40% de recuperação do nível clínico de inserção após 6 meses. O grupo controle de faces dentais não apresentou alteração do nível clínico de inserção. A face palatina foi a que apresentou melhor taxa de regeneração (40% e os dentes caninos e molares mostraram as melhores respostas (57,14% e 65%, respectivamente. Não houve sinais de infecção pós-cirúrgica relacionadas à falta de higienização oral dos animais. Pode-se concluir que o MIO/P-15 auxilia na regeneração e re-aderência das estruturas periodontais, incluindo osso alveolar. Sua aplicação mostrou-se fácil e

  8. The expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p15, p16, p21, and p27 during ovarian follicle growth initiation in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayrak Aykut

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclins regulate the cell cycle in association with cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs. CDKs are under inhibitory control of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs. Method In this study we tested the expression of CDKIs p15, p16, p21 and p27 by immunohistochemistry to determine the role of CDKIs in the initiation of primordial follicle growth. Ovaries were collected from 60-day-old cycling B6D2F1/J mice (n = 16. Results Expression of p15, p16, p21 and p27 did not vary in granulosa and theca cells by the follicle stage. However, p16 staining was stronger (++ in the oocytes of all primordial, and 57.4 ± 3.1% of primary follicles compared to the remaining primary and more advanced follicles (+. Interestingly, primary follicles with weaker (+ oocyte staining for p16 had significantly larger mean follicle diameter compared to the primary and primordial follicles with stronger (++ oocyte staining (55.6 ± 2.1 vs. 32.0 ± 1.0 and 26.5 ± 0.7 μm, respectively, p Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that the initiation of oocyte growth, which seems to lead follicle growth, is associated with diminished p16 expression in the mouse ovary. Further studies are needed to investigate the factors that regulate the expression of p16 in the oocyte, which might also govern the initiation of primordial follicle growth.

  9. Characterization of a balanced complex chromosomal rearrangement carrier ascertained through a fetus with dup15q26.3 and del5p15.33: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lledo, Belen; Ortiz, Jose Antonio; Morales, Ruth; Manchon, Irene; Galan, Francisco; Bernabeu, Andrea; Bernabeu, Rafael

    2013-09-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are structural aberrations involving more than two chromosomes which rarely appear in individuals with normal phenotypes. These individuals report fertility problems, recurrent miscarriages, or congenital anomalies in newborn offspring as a consequence of either meiotic failure or imbalanced chromosome segregation. A CCR involving chromosomes 5, 15, and 18 was discovered in a phenotypically normal man through a fetus with congenital malformations and partial trisomy of chromosome 15 and monosomy of chromosome 5. Ultrasound examination at 20 weeks of gestation showed severe oligoamnios and hydrothorax. Prenatal cytogenetic analysis and array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) revealed a female fetus with dup15q26.3 and del5p15.33. We diagnosed the CCR using three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (three-color FISH), and a balanced CCR using array-CGH and FISH was diagnosed in the paternal karyotype. The father is a carrier of a balanced translocation 46,XY,t(5;15;18)(p15.31;q26.3;p11.2). Due to the complexity of these rearrangements the diagnosis is difficult and the reproductive outcome uncertain. Reporting such rare cases is important to enable such information to be used for genetic counseling in similar situations and help estimate the risk of miscarriage or of newborns with congenital abnormalities.

  10. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  11. A rare case of a three way complex variant positive Philadelphia translocation involving chromosome (9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11) in chronic myeloid leukemia: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Hussain, Abrar; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation is present in 90–95% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Variant complex translocations have been observed in 5–8% of CML patients, in which a third chromosome other than (9;22) is involved. Imatinib mesylate is the first line breakpoint cluster region-Abelson gene (BCR/ABL)-targeted oral therapy for CML, and may produce a complete response in 70–80% of CML patients in the chronic phase. In the present study, a bone marrow sample was used for conventional cytogenetic analysis, and the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test was used for BCR/ABL gene detection. A hematological analysis was also performed to determine the white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell count, hemoglobin levels, packed and mean cell volumes, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and platelet values of the patient. The hematological analysis of the patient indicated the increased WBC of 186.5×103 cells/µl, and decreased hemoglobin levels of 11.1 g/dl. The FISH test revealed that 67% cells demonstrated BCR/ABL gene translocation. The patient was treated with 400 mg imatinib mesylate daily, and was monitored at various intervals over a 6-month period. The present study reports the rare case of a patient that demonstrates a three-way Philadelphia chromosome-positive translocation involving 46XY,t(9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11)[10], alongside CML in the chronic phase. The translocation was analyzed using cytogenetic and FISH tests. PMID:27602125

  12. 利用14N(d,p)15N核反应对各品系小麦种子中蛋白质含量分析初探%THE ANALYSES OF PROTEIN CONTENTS IN WHEAT SEEDS BY USING 14N(d, p)15N REACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗小兵; 宣朴; 等

    2000-01-01

    The rates of 14N/12/C in wheat seeds wene measured by using 14N(d, p)15N and 12C(d,p) 13C reactions induced by 13.4MeV deuterons which wene produced by a cylotron. According to the measured 14N/12C rates, the relative protein contents in different wheat sorts were defermined and compared with the results obtained by the Kjeldahl method.

  13. Miz1 deficiency in the mammary gland causes a lactation defect by attenuated Stat5 expression and phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Sanz-Moreno

    Full Text Available Miz1 is a zinc finger transcription factor with an N-terminal POZ domain. Complexes with Myc, Bcl-6 or Gfi-1 repress expression of genes like Cdkn2b (p15(Ink4 or Cdkn1a (p21(Cip1. The role of Miz1 in normal mammary gland development has not been addressed so far. Conditional knockout of the Miz1 POZ domain in luminal cells during pregnancy caused a lactation defect with a transient reduction of glandular tissue, reduced proliferation and attenuated differentiation. This was recapitulated in vitro using mouse mammary gland derived HC11 cells. Further analysis revealed decreased Stat5 activity in Miz1ΔPOZ mammary glands and an attenuated expression of Stat5 targets. Gene expression of the Prolactin receptor (PrlR and ErbB4, both critical for Stat5 phosphorylation (pStat5 or pStat5 nuclear translocation, was decreased in Miz1ΔPOZ females. Microarray, ChIP-Seq and gene set enrichment analysis revealed a down-regulation of Miz1 target genes being involved in vesicular transport processes. Our data suggest that deranged intracellular transport and localization of PrlR and ErbB4 disrupt the Stat5 signalling pathway in mutant glands and cause the observed lactation phenotype.

  14. Epigenetic mechanisms in the initiation of hematological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Maleki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer development is not restricted to the genetic changes, but also to epigenetic changes. Epigenetic processes are very important in the development of hematological malignancies. The main epigenetic alterations are aberrations in DNA methylation, post-translational modifications of histones, chromatin remodeling and microRNAs patterns, and these are associated with tumor genesis. All the various cellular pathways contributing to the neoplastic phenotype are affected by epigenetic genes in cancer. These pathways can be explored as biomarkers in clinical use for early detection of disease, malignancy classification and response to treatment with classical chemotherapy agents and epigenetic drugs. Materials and Method: A literature review was performed using PUBMED from 1985 to 2008. Cross referencing of discovered articles was also reviewed.Results: In chronic lymphocytic leukemia, regional hypermethylation of gene promoters leads to gene silencing. Many of these genes have tumor suppressor phenotypes. In myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, CDKN2B (alias, P15, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that negatively regulates the cell cycle, has been shown to be hypermethylated in marrow stem (CD34+ cells in patients with MDS. At present both Vidaza and Decitabine (DNA methyltransferase inhibitors are approved for the treatment of MDS.Conclusion: Unlike mutations or deletions, DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation are potentially reversible by pharmacological inhibition, therefore those epigenetic changes have been recognized as promising novel therapeutic targets in hematopoietic malignances. In this review, we discussed molecular mechanisms of epigenetics, epigenetic changes in hematological malignancies and epigenetic based treatments

  15. Aberrations of the p53 pathway components p53, MDM2 and CDKN2A appear independent in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Ino, Y; Gerdes, A M

    1999-01-01

    The two gene products of the CDKN2A gene, p16 and p19ARF, have recently been linked to each of two major tumour suppressor pathways in human carcinogenesis, the RB1 pathway and the p53 pathway. p16 inhibits the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma gene product by cyclin D-dependent kinases...... of aberrations of CDKN2A, MDM2 and p53, since this has not been analysed previously. We investigated 37 DLCL for aberrations of p15, p16, p19ARF, MDM2, and p53 at the epigenetic, genetic and/or protein levels. Homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in seven (19%) of 37 tumours, and another three cases were...... hypermethylated at the 5' CpG island of p16. No point mutations were found in CDKN2B or CDKN2A. Immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue for p16 confirmed these results, as all tumours with alterations of CDKN2A were p16 immunonegative. We found p53 mutations in eight (22%) cases...

  16. Time-resolved fluorescence of 2-aminopurine in DNA duplexes in the presence of the EcoP15I Type III restriction-modification enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Long; Wu, Xiaohua; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Jones, Anita C; Dryden, David T F

    2014-06-20

    EcoP15I is a Type III DNA restriction and modification enzyme of Escherichia coli. We show that it contains two modification (Mod) subunits for sequence-specific methylation of DNA and one copy of a restriction endonuclease (Res) subunit for cleavage of DNA containing unmethylated target sequences. Previously the Mod2 dimer in the presence of cofactors was shown to use nucleotide flipping to gain access to the adenine base targeted for methylation (Reddy and Rao, J. Mol. Biol. 298 (2000) 597-610.). Surprisingly the Mod2 enzyme also appeared to flip a second adenine in the target sequence, one which was not subject to methylation. We show using fluorescence lifetime measurements of the adenine analogue, 2-aminopurine, that only the methylatable adenine undergoes flipping by the complete Res1Mod2 enzyme and that this occurs even in the absence of cofactors. We suggest that this is due to activation of the Mod2 core by the Res subunit.

  17. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders: Silver–Russell and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric; Algar, Elizabeth; Buiting, Karin; Russo, Silvia; Tümer, Zeynep; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun; Antoniadi, Thalia; Macdonald, Fiona; Netchine, Irène; Lombardi, Paolo; Soellner, Lukas; Begemann, Matthias; Prawitt, Dirk; Maher, Eamonn R; Mannens, Marcel; Riccio, Andrea; Weksberg, Rosanna; Lapunzina, Pablo; Grønskov, Karen; Mackay, Deborah JG; Eggermann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver–Russell and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis of these disorders and the demand for molecular testing, it turned out that there is an urgent need for a standardized molecular diagnostic testing and reporting strategy. Based on the results from the first external pilot quality assessment schemes organized by the European Molecular Quality Network (EMQN) in 2014 and in context with activities of the European Network of Imprinting Disorders (EUCID.net) towards a consensus in diagnostics and management of SRS and BWS, best practice guidelines have now been developed. Members of institutions working in the field of SRS and BWS diagnostics were invited to comment, and in the light of their feedback amendments were made. The final document was ratified in the course of an EMQN best practice guideline meeting and is in accordance with the general SRS and BWS consensus guidelines, which are in preparation. These guidelines are based on the knowledge acquired from peer-reviewed and published data, as well as observations of the authors in their practice. However, these guidelines can only provide a snapshot of current knowledge at the time of manuscript submission and readers are advised to keep up with the literature. PMID:27165005

  18. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders: Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric; Algar, Elizabeth; Buiting, Karin; Russo, Silvia; Tümer, Zeynep; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun; Antoniadi, Thalia; Macdonald, Fiona; Netchine, Irène; Lombardi, Paolo; Soellner, Lukas; Begemann, Matthias; Prawitt, Dirk; Maher, Eamonn R; Mannens, Marcel; Riccio, Andrea; Weksberg, Rosanna; Lapunzina, Pablo; Grønskov, Karen; Mackay, Deborah Jg; Eggermann, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis of these disorders and the demand for molecular testing, it turned out that there is an urgent need for a standardized molecular diagnostic testing and reporting strategy. Based on the results from the first external pilot quality assessment schemes organized by the European Molecular Quality Network (EMQN) in 2014 and in context with activities of the European Network of Imprinting Disorders (EUCID.net) towards a consensus in diagnostics and management of SRS and BWS, best practice guidelines have now been developed. Members of institutions working in the field of SRS and BWS diagnostics were invited to comment, and in the light of their feedback amendments were made. The final document was ratified in the course of an EMQN best practice guideline meeting and is in accordance with the general SRS and BWS consensus guidelines, which are in preparation. These guidelines are based on the knowledge acquired from peer-reviewed and published data, as well as observations of the authors in their practice. However, these guidelines can only provide a snapshot of current knowledge at the time of manuscript submission and readers are advised to keep up with the literature.

  19. A three-generation family with terminal microdeletion involving 5p15.33-32 due to a whole-arm 5;15 chromosomal translocation with a steady phenotype of atypical cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmakky, Amira; Carli, Diana; Lugli, Licia; Torelli, Paola; Guidi, Battista; Falcinelli, Cristina; Fini, Sergio; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Percesepe, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is characterized by cat-like cry, facial dysmorphisms, microcephaly, speech delay, intellectual disability and slow growth rate, which are present with variable frequency. The typical cri du chat syndrome, due to 5p15.2 deletion, includes severe intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, neonatal hypotonia and pre- and post-natal growth retardation, whereas more distal deletions in 5p15.3 lead to cat-like cry and speech delay and produce the clinical picture of the atypical cri du chat syndrome, with minimal or absent intellectual impairment. In this article we report a three-generation family with an unbalanced whole arm translocation between chromosome 5 and 15 and a microdeletion of 5.5 Mb involving 5p15.33-32. By reporting the smallest terminal deletion of 5p15.3 described so far and by reviewing the literature we discuss the genotype/phenotype correlations of the distal region of the cri du chat syndrome. The previously described critical region for the speech delay may be narrowed down and microcephaly, growth retardation and dysmorphic facial features can be included in the phenotypic expression of the atypical cri du chat syndrome due to 5p15.3 deletions.

  20. Paternal uniparental disomy 11p15.5 in the pancreatic nodule of an infant with Costello syndrome: Shared mechanism for hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in neonates with Costello and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and somatic loss of heterozygosity in Costello syndrome driving clonal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, Karen W; Robbins, Katherine M; Sheffield, Brandon S; Lee, Anna F; Patel, Millan S; Yip, Stephen; Doyle, Daniel; Stabley, Deborah; Sol-Church, Katia

    2016-03-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) entails a cancer predisposition and is caused by activating HRAS mutations, typically arising de novo in the paternal germline. Hypoglycemia is common in CS neonates. A previously reported individual with the rare HRAS p.Gln22Lys had hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Autopsy showed a discrete pancreatic nodule. The morphologic and immunohistochemistry findings, including loss of p57(Kip2) protein, were identical to a focal lesion of congenital hyperinsulinism, however, no KCNJ11 or ABCC8 mutation was identified and germline derived DNA showed no alternation of the maternal or paternal 11p15 alleles. Here we report paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD) within the lesion, similar to the pUPD11p15.5 in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The similar extent of the pUPD suggests a similar mechanism driving hyperinsulinemia in both conditions. After coincidental somatic LOH and pUPD, the growth promoting effects of the paternally derived HRAS mutation, in combination with the increased function of the adjacent paternally expressed IGF2, may together result in clonal expansion. Although this somatic LOH within pancreatic tissue resulted in hyperinsulinism, similar LOH in mesenchymal cells may drive embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Interestingly, biallelic IGF2 expression has been linked to rhabdomyosarcoma tumorigenesis and pUPD11 occurred in all 8 ERMS samples from CS individuals. Somatic KRAS and HRAS mutations occur with comparable frequency in isolated malignancies. Yet, the malignancy risk in CS is notably higher than in Noonan syndrome with a KRAS mutation. It is conceivable that HRAS co-localization with IGF2 and the combined effect of pUPD 11p15.5 on both genes contributes to the oncogenic potential.

  1. A Genome-Wide Screen for Interactions Reveals a New Locus on 4p15 Modifying the Effect of Waist-to-Hip Ratio on Total Cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surakka, Ida; Isaacs, Aaron; Karssen, Lennart C.; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka P.; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ried, Janina S.; Lamina, Claudia; Mangino, Massimo; Igl, Wilmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Lagou, Vasiliki; van der Harst, Pim; Mateo Leach, Irene; Esko, Tonu; Kutalik, Zoltan; Wainwright, Nicholas W.; Struchalin, Maksim V.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Kangas, Antti J.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Perola, Markus; Rantanen, Taina; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Soininen, Pasi; Johansson, Asa; Soranzo, Nicole; Heath, Andrew C.; Papamarkou, Theodore; Prokopenko, Inga; Toenjes, Anke; Kronenberg, Florian; Doering, Angela; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Montgomery, Grant W.; Whitfield, John B.; Kahonen, Mika; Lehtimaki, Terho; Freimer, Nelson B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Palotie, Aarno; Sandhu, Manj S.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Metspalu, Andres; Stumvoll, Michael; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Jula, Antti; Navis, Gerjan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Spector, Tim D.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Salomaa, Veikko; Oostra, Ben A.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Gieger, Christian; Jaervelin, Marjo-Riitta; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hofman, Albert; McCarthy, Mark I.; Peltonen, Leena; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Ripatti, Samuli

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies described 95 loci controlling serum lipid levels. These common variants explain similar to 25% of the heritability of the phenotypes. To date, no unbiased screen for gene-environment interactions for circulating lipids has been reported. We screened for v

  2. A genome-wide screen for interactions reveals a new locus on 4p15 modifying the effect of waist-to-hip ratio on total cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Surakka (Ida); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); P.-P.P. Laurila; R.P.S. Middelberg (Rita); E. Tikkanen (Emmi); J.S. Ried (Janina); C. Lamina (Claudia); M. Mangino (Massimo); W. Igl (Wilmar); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); V. Lagou (Vasiliki); P. van der Harst (Pim); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); T. Esko (Tõnu); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); N.W. Wainwright (Nicholas); M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); A.-P. Sarin; A.J. Kangas (Antti); J. Viikari (Jorma); M. Perola (Markus); T. Rantanen (Taina); A.K. Petersen; P. Soininen (Pasi); A. Johansson (Åsa); N. Soranzo (Nicole); A.C. Heath (Andrew); T. Papamarkou (Theodore); I. Prokopenko (Inga); A. Tönjes (Anke); F. Kronenberg (Florian); A. Döring (Angela); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); J.B. Whitfield (John); M. Kähönen (Mika); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); N.B. Freimer (Nelson); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); A. Palotie (Aarno); M.S. Sandhu (Manj); D. Waterworth (Dawn); A. Metspalu (Andres); M. Stumvoll (Michael); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Jula (Antti); G. Navis (Gerjan); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce); M.-R. Taskinen; M. Ala-Korpela (Mika); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); K.O. Kyvik (Kirsten Ohm); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); J.F. Wilson (James); I. Rudan (Igor); H. Campbell (Harry); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); V. Salomaa (Veikko); B.A. Oostra (Ben); O. Raitakari (Olli); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); C. Gieger (Christian); M.R. Järvelin; N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A. Hofman (Albert); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); S. Ripatti (Samuli)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractRecent genome-wide association (GWA) studies described 95 loci controlling serum lipid levels. These common variants explain ~25% of the heritability of the phenotypes. To date, no unbiased screen for gene-environment interactions for circulating lipids has been reported. We screened for

  3. A Genome-Wide Screen for Interactions Reveals a New Locus on 4p15 Modifying the Effect of Waist-to-Hip Ratio on Total Cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surakka, I.; Isaacs, A.; Karssen, L. C.;

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies described 95 loci controlling serum lipid levels. These common variants explain similar to 25% of the heritability of the phenotypes. To date, no unbiased screen for gene-environment interactions for circulating lipids has been reported. We screened fo...

  4. In vitro drug resistance and prognostic impact of p16(INK4A)/p15(INK4B) deletions in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakers-van Woerden, NL; Pieters, R; Slater, RM; Loonen, A.H.; Beverloo, HB; van Drunen, E; Heyman, M; Moreno, TC; Rots, MG; van Wering, ER; Kamps, WA; Janka-Schaub, GE; Veerman, AJP

    2001-01-01

    p16 gene deletions are present in about 70% of primary paediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) and 20% of common/precursor B-cell ALL cases. It is not clear what the impact of the frequent p16 deletions is within the subgroup of T-lineage ALL. We studied the relationship between p16/

  5. Association between 9p21 genetic variants and mortality risk in a prospective cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes (ZODIAC-15)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Kleefstra, N.; van Hateren, K.J.J.; Drion, I.; Groenier, K.H.; Gans, R.O.B.; Snieder, H.; Hofker, M.H.; Bilo, H.J.G.; Landman, G.

    2012-01-01

    The genomic region at 9p21 chromosome near the CDKN2A/CDKN2B genes is associated with type 2 diabetes(T2D) and cardiovascular disease(CVD). The effect of the 9p21 locus on long-term mortality in patients with T2D has yet to be determined. We examined three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on 9

  6. Role of heme oxygenase-1 in demethylating effects on SKM-1 cells induced by decitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, R; Ma, D; Wang, P; Sun, J; Wang, J S; Fang, Q

    2015-12-22

    We evaluated the influence of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene inhibition in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cell line SKM-1 on enhancement of the demethylating effects of decitabine on p15, and explored the possible mechanism. DNMT1 gene expression in SKM-1 cells was silenced by being transfected by a constructed siRNA with liposomes. The proliferation inhibition rates after drug treatment were detected by cell counting kit-8 assay. The apoptotic rates were detected by Annexin V/PI assay with flow cytometry. The expressions of p16, p15, TP73, CDH1, ESR1, and PDLIM4 mRNAs were detected by real-time PCR, and those of HO-1, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HDAC, and p15 proteins were measured by western blot. The degree of methylation of the p15 gene was analyzed by using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). CCK-8 assay showed that after HO-1 gene expression was inhibited; the proliferation rate of SKM-1 cells treated by decitabine (70.91 ± 0.05%) was significantly higher than that of the control group (53.67 ± 0.05%). Flow cytometry showed that the apoptotic rate of SKM- 1 cells treated by decitabine in combination with HO-1 expression inhibition (44.25 ± 0.05%) exceeded that of the cells treated by this drug alone (37.70 ± 0.05%). MSP showed that inhibiting HO-1 expression significantly increased the degree of methylation of the p15 gene. As suggested by western blot, the degree of methylation of the p15 protein was changed after decitabine treatment when the expression of the HO-1 protein was changed, being associated with the affected DNMT1 expression. Inhibited HO-1 expression attenuated the hypermethylation of CDKN2B by suppressing DNMT1, which was conducive to treatment by cooperating with decitabine. In conclusion, the findings of this study provide valuable experimental evidence for targeted MDS therapy, and a theoretical basis for further studies.

  7. 乳腺浸润性导管癌染色体8p22、11p15、17p13区杂合性缺失的研究%Invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast is prevalence of loss of heterozygosity at 8p22,11p15 and 17p13

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志刚; 周晓军; 孔庆兖; 易龙; 孟奎

    2004-01-01

    目的:观察乳腺浸润性导管癌中8p22、11p15、17p13三个染色体区的杂合性缺失(LOH)及其与临床病理参数之间的关系. 方法:从石蜡包埋的存档标本中选取34例肿瘤组织和其对应的自身正常对照组织,用PCR方法扩增位于此三个染色体区域的三个微卫星位点D8S136、D11S988、TP53,扩增产物用6%聚丙稀酰胺凝胶电泳,银染显色后进行LOH的判定.用免疫组化方法观察ER、PR、P53和c-erBb-2在乳腺癌中的表达情况. 结果:34例乳腺癌中有12例(35.29%)D8S136位点发生LOH, D11S988和TP53两个位点分别发现5例(14.71%)LOH.D11S988和TP53两个位点的LOH与临床病理参数之间无明显相关性,而D8S136发生LOH的肿瘤平均直径明显高于LOH阴性的肿瘤(P=0.0049). 结论:染色体8p22区域有较高的LOH发生率,位于此区域的肿瘤抑制基因的失活可能与乳腺癌的迅速生长有关.

  8. Analysis of genomic imbalances and gene expression changes in transformed follicular lymphoma (FL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, G.; Farinha, P.; Lam, W.;

    2005-01-01

    ) or down-regulated (11genes). Among upregulated genes were: AIM1L (1p36), SCN11A (3p22), CALM3/CPL (10p15), CPN1 (10q24), and ARF4L (17q21); among the down-regulated ones: DKFZp761B107 (4p15), LOC118812 (10q24), NAP1L4 (11p15), EB-1 (12q23), C14orf135 (14q23), SIRT2 (19q13), and CHD6 (20q12). Conclusions...

  9. A genome-wide association study identifies pancreatic cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Gloria M.; Amundadottir, Laufey; Fuchs, Charles S.; Kraft, Peter; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Arslan, Alan A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gallinger, Steven; Gross, Myron; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Klein, Alison P.; LaCroix, Andrea; Li, Donghui; Mandelson, Margaret T.; Olson, Sara H.; Risch, Harvey A.; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Bamlet, William R.; Berg, Christine D.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Buring, Julie E.; Bracci, Paige M.; Canzian, Federico; Clipp, Sandra; Cotterchio, Michelle; de Andrade, Mariza; Duell, Eric J.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goggins, Michael; Hallmans, Göran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hassan, Manal; Howard, Barbara; Hunter, David J.; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C.; Lynch, Shannon M.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Mendelsohn, Julie B.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Parikh, Hemang; Patel, Alpa V.; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Riboli, Elio; Rodriguez, Laudina; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Thomas, Gilles; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Zhaoming; Wolpin, Brian M.; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hartge, Patricia; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of pancreatic cancer in 3,851 cases and 3,934 controls drawn from twelve prospective cohort studies and eight case-control studies. Based on a logistic regression model for genotype trend effect that was adjusted for study, age, sex, self-described ancestry and five principal components, we identified eight SNPs that map to three loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. Two correlated SNPs, rs9543325 (P=3.27×10−11; per allele odds ratio, OR 1.26, 95% CI=1.18-1.35) and rs9564966 (P=5.86×10−8; per allele OR 1.21, 95% CI=1.13-1.30) map to a non-genic region on chromosome 13q22.1. Five SNPs on 1q32.1 map to NR5A2; the strongest signal was rs3790844 (P=2.45×10−10; per allele OR 0.77, 95% CI=0.71-0.84). A single SNP, rs401681 (P=3.66×10−7; per allele OR 1.19, 95% CI=1.11-1.27) maps to the CLPTM1L-TERT locus on 5p15.33, associated with multiple cancers. Our study has identified common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer that warrant follow-up studies. PMID:20101243

  10. Boundaries of the origin of replication: creation of a pET-28a-derived vector with p15A copy control allowing compatible coexistence with pET vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmitha Sathiamoorthy

    Full Text Available During our studies involving protein-DNA interactions, we constructed plasmid pSAM to fulfill two requirements: 1 to facilitate transfer of cloned sequences from widely used expression vector pET-28a(+, and 2 to provide a vector compatible with pBR322-derived plasmids for use in cells harboring two different plasmids. Vector pSAM is a pET-28a(+-derived plasmid with the p15A origin of replication (ori; pET-28a(+ contains the pBR322 replicon that is incompatible with other pBR322-derived plasmids. By replacing the original pET-28a(+ replicon-comprising the ori, RNAI, RNAII, and Rom-with the p15A replicon, we generated pSAM, which contains the pET-28a(+ multiple cloning site and is now compatible with pBR322-derived vectors. Plasmid copy number was assessed using quantitative PCR: pSAM copy number was maintained at 18±4 copies per cell, consistent with that of other p15A-type vectors. Compatibility with pBR322-derived vectors was tested with pGEX-6p-1 and pSAM, which maintained their copy numbers of 49±10 and 14±4, respectively, when both were present within the same cell. Swapping of the ori is a common practice; however, it is vital that all regions of the original replicon be removed. Additional vector pSAMRNAI illustrated that incompatibility remains when portions of the replicon, such as RNAI and/or Rom, are retained; pSAMRNAI, which contains the intact RNAI but not ROM, lowered the copy number of pGEX-6p-1 to 18±2 in doubly transformed cells due to retention of the pET-28a(+-derived RNAI. Thus, pSAMRNAI is incompatible with vectors controlled by the pBR322 replicon and further demonstrates the need to remove all portions of the original replicon and to quantitatively assess copy number, both individually and in combination, to ensure vector compatibility. To our knowledge, this is the first instance where the nascent vector has been quantitatively assessed for both plasmid copy number and compatibility. New vector pSAM provides ease of

  11. A novel sampling design to explore gene-longevity associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Rango, Francesco; Dato, Serena; Bellizzi, Dina;

    2008-01-01

    longevity-related genes were examined: 6p21.3 (genes TNFalpha, TNFbeta, HSP70.1) and 11p15.5 (genes SIRT3, HRAS1, IGF2, INS, TH). Population pools of 1.6, 2.3 and 2.0 million inhabitants were screened, respectively, in Denmark, France and Italy to identify families matching the design requirements. A total...

  12. Double partial trisomy of 6p23-pter and 9pter-q21.2 in a neonate resulting from 4:2 meiotic segregation of a maternal complex t(6;7;9)(p23;p15;q21.2) translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Z; Mihci, E; Keser, I; Karaali, K; Berker, S; Luleci, G

    2012-01-01

    We report, a newborn presenting multiple congenital abnormalities with karyotype; 47,XY,der(7)t(6;7)(pter-p23::p15-->qter),+der(9)t(7;9)(pter-->p15::q21.2--> pter)t(6;7;9)(p23;p15;q21.2)mat[20]. The mother and her phenotypically normal daughter were carriers of a complex chromosomal rearrangement with karyotypes; 46,XX,t(6;7;9)(p23;p15;q21.2)[20]. Paternal chromosomes were normal. In our case the extra derivative chromosome was the result of a 4:2 segregation of the chromosomes involved in translocation during oogenesis. Double partial trisomy in newborns resulting from 4:2 segregation is a rare event, and double partial trisomies of the 6p23-pter and trisomy 9pter-q22 regions have not reported to date.

  13. Estudio del gen IKZF1 y de microdeleciones intragénicas en la leucemia linfoblástica aguda

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Seguí, Inés

    2015-01-01

    La leucemia Linfoblástica Aguda (LLA) es una neoplasia caracterizada por una gran diversidad de alteraciones genéticas. En los últimos años, se ha descrito la ocurrencia de pequeñas deleciones focales en genes de relevancia para la célula linfoide. En concreto, las que afectan a IKZF1 parecen tener valor pronóstico en la edad pediátrica. OBJETIVOS: Estudiar la presencia de microdeleciones en los genes CDKN2A, CDKN2B, PAX5, ETV6, EBF1, BTG1, RB1, la región pseudoautosómica del cromosoma X/Y...

  14. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  15. LAF4, an AF4-related gene, is fused to MLL in infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Bergh, ARM; Beverloo, HB; Rombout, P; van Wering, ER; van Weel, MH; Beverstock, GC; Kluin, PM; Slater, RM; Schuuring, E

    2002-01-01

    Infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with MLL gene rearrangements is characterized by a proB phenotype and a poor clinical outcome. We analyzed an infant proB ALL with t(2; 11)(p 15;p 14) and an MLL rearrangement on Southern blot analysis, Rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain react

  16. Interaction between 5 genetic variants and allergy in glioma risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoemaker, Minouk J; Robertson, Lindsay; Wigertz, Annette

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of glioma is barely known. Epidemiologic studies have provided evidence for an inverse relation between glioma risk and allergic disease. Genome-wide association data have identified common genetic variants at 5p15.33 (rs2736100, TERT), 8q24.21 (rs4295627, CCDC26), 9p21.3 (rs4977756......, CDKN2A-CDKN2B), 11q23.3 (rs498872, PHLDB1), and 20q13.33 (rs6010620, RTEL1) as determinants of glioma risk. The authors investigated whether there is interaction between the effects of allergy and these 5 variants on glioma risk. Data from 5 case-control studies carried out in Denmark, Finland, Sweden...

  17. Evaluation of genetic association of the INK4 locus with primary open angle glaucoma in East Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishal, Mansi; Sharma, Anchal; Kaurani, Lalit; Chakraborty, Subhadip; Ray, Jharna; Sen, Abhijit; Mukhopadhyay, Arijit; Ray, Kunal

    2014-05-30

    INK4 locus at chromosome 9p21 has been reported to be associated with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and its subtypes along with the associated optic disc parameters across the populations of European, Japanese and African ancestries. The locus encodes three tumor suppressor genes namely CDKN2A, ARF, CDKN2B and a long non-coding RNA CDKN2B-AS1 (also known as ANRIL). Here, we report association study of 34 SNPs from INK4 locus with POAG in a population of Indo-European ancestry from the eastern part of India (350 patients and 354 controls). With 81% power to detect genetic association we observed only nominal association of rs1011970 (uncorrected p = 0.048) with POAG and rs10120688 (uncorrected p = 0.048) in patients without a high intra-ocular pressure (IOPgenetic association of INK4 locus with POAG in East Indian population which needs to be replicated in larger studies in diverse world populations.

  18. Functioning glucagonoma associated with primary hyperparathyroidism: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 or incidental association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdas Enrico

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 is commonly based on clinical criteria, and confirmed by genetic testing. In patients without known MEN1-related germline mutations, the possibility of a casual association between two or more endocrine tumors cannot be excluded and subsequent management may be difficult to plan. We describe a very uncommon case of functioning glucagonoma associated with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT in which genetic testing failed to detect germline mutations of MEN-1 and other known genes responsible for MEN1. Case presentation The patient, a 65-year old woman, had been suffering for more than 1 year from weakness, progressive weight loss, angular cheilitis, glossitis and, more recently, skin rashes on the perineum, perioral skin and groin folds. After multidisciplinary investigations, functioning glucagonoma and asymptomatic pHPT were diagnosed and, since family history was negative, sporadic MEN1 was suspected. However, genetic testing revealed neither MEN-1 nor other gene mutations responsible for rarer cases of MEN1 (CDKN1B/p27 and other cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes CDKN1A/p15, CDKN2C/p18, CDKN2B/p21. The patient underwent distal splenopancreatectomy and at the 4-month follow-up she showed complete remission of symptoms. Six months later, a thyroid nodule, suspected to be a malignant neoplasia, and two hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands were detected respectively by ultrasound with fine needle aspiration cytology and 99mTc-sestamibi scan with SPECT acquisition. Total thyroidectomy was performed, whereas selective parathyroidectomy was preferred to a more extensive procedure because the diagnosis of MEN1 was not supported by genetic analysis and intraoperative intact parathyroid hormone had revealed “adenoma-like” kinetics after the second parathyroid resection. Thirty-nine and 25 months after respectively the first and the second operation, the patient is well

  19. Immunoglobulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honjo, T. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Alt, F.W. (Columbia Univ., Dobbs Ferry, NY (USA). Hudson Labs.); Rabbitts, T.H. (Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK))

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on the structure, function, and expression of the genes encoding antibodies in normal and neoplastic cells. Topics covered are: B Cells; Organization and rearrangement of immunoglobin genes; Immunoglobin genes in disease; Immunoglobin gene expression; and Immunoglobin-related genes.

  20. Identification of NUP98 abnormalities in acute leukemia: JARID1A (12p13) as a new partner gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zutven, Laura J C M; Onen, Emine; Velthuizen, Sandra C J M; van Drunen, Ellen; von Bergh, Anne R M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Veronese, Angelo; Mecucci, Cristina; Negrini, Massimo; de Greef, Georgine E; Beverloo, H Berna

    2006-05-01

    Chromosome rearrangements are found in many acute leukemias. As a result, genes at the breakpoints can be disrupted, forming fusion genes. One of the genes involved in several chromosome aberrations in hematological malignancies is NUP98 (11p15). As NUP98 is close to the 11p telomere, small translocations might easily be missed. Using a NUP98-specific split-signal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe combination, we analyzed 84 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome with either normal karyotypes or 11p abnormalities to investigate whether there are unidentified 11p15 rearrangements. Neither NUP98 translocations nor deletions were identified in cases with normal karyotypes, indicating these aberrations may be very rare in this group. However, NUP98 deletions were observed in four cases with unbalanced 11p aberrations, indicating that the breakpoint is centromeric of NUP98. Rearrangements of NUP98 were identified in two patients, both showing 11p abnormalities in the diagnostic karyotype: a t(4;11)(q1?3;p15) with expression of the NUP98-RAP1GDS1 fusion product detected in a 60-year-old woman with AML-M0, and an add(11)(p15) with a der(21)t(11;21)(p15;p13) observed cytogenetically in a 1-year-old boy with AML-M7. JARID1A was identified as the fusion partner of NUP98 using 3' RACE, RT-PCR, and FISH. JARID1A, at 12p13, codes for retinoblastoma binding protein 2, a protein implicated in transcriptional regulation. This is the first report of JARID1A as a partner gene in leukemia.

  1. Estudo clínico da aplicação de peptídeo sintético de adesão celular (PepGen-P15®) em lesões periodontais graves de cães

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar clinica e radiograficamente a resposta de dentes com perda do nível clínico de inserção (NCI), bolsa periodontal, retração gengival e exposição de furca graus II e III após três e seis meses da intervenção cirúrgica de implante com um peptídeo sintético de adesão celular (PepGen P-15®). Vinte e um cães apresentados ao atendimento do Hospital Veterinário da FMVZ-USP foram anestesiados para tratamento periodontal e um total de 91 faces de dentes com pe...

  2. Gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005147 CNHK200-hA-a gene-viral therapeutic system and its antitumor effect on lung cancer. WANG Wei-guo(王伟国),et al. Viral & Gene Ther Center, Eastern Hepatobilli Surg Instit 2nd Milit Univ, Shanghai 200438. Chin J Oncol,2005:27(2):69-72. Objective: To develop a novel vector system, which combines the advantages of the gene therapy,

  3. Large scale association analysis identifies three susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Saade

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies (GWAS and their replications that have associated DNA variants with myocardial infarction (MI and/or coronary artery disease (CAD are predominantly based on populations of European or Eastern Asian descent. Replication of the most significantly associated polymorphisms in multiple populations with distinctive genetic backgrounds and lifestyles is crucial to the understanding of the pathophysiology of a multifactorial disease like CAD. We have used our Lebanese cohort to perform a replication study of nine previously identified CAD/MI susceptibility loci (LTA, CDKN2A-CDKN2B, CELSR2-PSRC1-SORT1, CXCL12, MTHFD1L, WDR12, PCSK9, SH2B3, and SLC22A3, and 88 genes in related phenotypes. The study was conducted on 2,002 patients with detailed demographic, clinical characteristics, and cardiac catheterization results. One marker, rs6922269, in MTHFD1L was significantly protective against MI (OR=0.68, p=0.0035, while the variant rs4977574 in CDKN2A-CDKN2B was significantly associated with MI (OR=1.33, p=0.0086. Associations were detected after adjustment for family history of CAD, gender, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and smoking. The parallel study of 88 previously published genes in related phenotypes encompassed 20,225 markers, three quarters of which with imputed genotypes The study was based on our genome-wide genotype data set, with imputation across the whole genome to HapMap II release 22 using HapMap CEU population as a reference. Analysis was conducted on both the genotyped and imputed variants in the 88 regions covering selected genes. This approach replicated HNRNPA3P1-CXCL12 association with CAD and identified new significant associations of CDKAL1, ST6GAL1, and PTPRD with CAD. Our study provides evidence for the importance of the multifactorial aspect of CAD/MI and describes genes predisposing to their etiology.

  4. Targeted deletion of the 9p21 noncoding coronary artery disease risk interval in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visel, Axel; Zhu, Yiwen; May, Dalit; Afzal, Veena; Gong, Elaine; Attanasio, Catia; Blow, Matthew J.; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence polymorphisms in a 58kb interval on chromosome 9p21 confer a markedly increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), the leading cause of death worldwide 1,2. The variants have a substantial impact on the epidemiology of CAD and other life?threatening vascular conditions since nearly a quarter of Caucasians are homozygous for risk alleles. However, the risk interval is devoid of protein?coding genes and the mechanism linking the region to CAD risk has remained enigmatic. Here we show that deletion of the orthologous 70kb noncoding interval on mouse chromosome 4 affects cardiac expression of neighboring genes, as well as proliferation properties of vascular cells. Chr4delta70kb/delta70kb mice are viable, but show increased mortality both during development and as adults. Cardiac expression of two genes near the noncoding interval, Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b, is severely reduced in chr4delta70kb/delta70kb mice, indicating that distant-acting gene regulatory functions are located in the noncoding CAD risk interval. Allelespecific expression of Cdkn2b transcripts in heterozygous mice revealed that the deletion affects expression through a cis-acting mechanism. Primary cultures of chr4delta70kb/delta70kb aortic smooth muscle cells exhibited excessive proliferation and diminished senescence, a cellular phenotype consistent with accelerated CAD pathogenesis. Taken together, our results provide direct evidence that the CAD risk interval plays a pivotal role in regulation of cardiac Cdkn2a/b expression and suggest that this region affects CAD progression by altering the dynamics of vascular cell proliferation.

  5. Multi-gene epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphoma cells; delayed expression of the p16 protein upon reversal of the silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagasawa, T; Zhang, Q; Raghunath, P N

    2006-01-01

    To understand better T-cell lymphomagenesis, we examined promoter CpG methylation and mRNA expression of closely related genes encoding p16, p15, and p14 tumor suppressor genes in cultured malignant T-cells that were derived from cutaneous, adult type, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK......)-expressing T-cell lymphomas. p16 gene was epigenetically silenced in all but one of the 10 malignant T-cell lines examined, p15 gene silenced in roughly half of the lines, and p14 was the least frequently affected. Extensive methylation of the p16 promoter was seen in six out of 10 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma...... patient samples and corresponded with lack of p16 protein expression in the cases examined. Treatment of cultured T-cells with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2-deoxy-cytidine, resulted in reversal of the p16 gene silencing. However, expression of p16 protein was delayed in relationship to p16...

  6. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela [Los Altos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Van Solingen, Pieter [Naaldwijk, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  7. Integrated Analysis of Genome-Wide Copy Number Alterations and Gene Expression Profiling of Lung Cancer in Xuanwei, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanliang; Xue, Qiuyue; Pan, Guoqing; Meng, Qing H.; Tuo, Xiaoyu; Cai, Xuemei; Chen, Zhenghui; Li, Ya; Huang, Tao; Duan, Xincen; Duan, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Lung cancer in Xuanwei (LCXW), China, is known throughout the world for its distinctive characteristics, but little is known about its pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to screen potential novel “driver genes” in LCXW. Methods Genome-wide DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) were detected by array-based comparative genomic hybridization and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) by gene expression microarrays in 8 paired LCXW and non-cancerous lung tissues. Candidate driver genes were screened by integrated analysis of CNAs and DEGs. The candidate genes were further validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results Large numbers of CNAs and DEGs were detected, respectively. Some of the most frequently occurring CNAs included gains at 5p15.33-p15.32, 5p15.1-p14.3, and 5p14.3-p14.2 and losses at 11q24.3, 21q21.1, 21q22.12-q22.13, and 21q22.2. Integrated analysis of CNAs and DEGs identified 24 candidate genes with frequent copy number gains and concordant upregulation, which were considered potential oncogenes, including CREB3L4, TRIP13, and CCNE2. In addition, the analysis identified 19 candidate genes with a negative association between copy number change and expression change, considered potential tumor suppressor genes, including AHRR, NKD2, and KLF10. One of the most studied oncogenes, MYC, may not play a carcinogenic role in LCXW. Conclusions This integrated analysis of CNAs and DEGs identified several potential novel LCXW-related genes, laying an important foundation for further research on the pathogenesis of LCXW and identification of novel biomarkers or therapeutic targets. PMID:28056099

  8. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies chromosomal regions involved in ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Mogensen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    the relation of gene expression and chromosomal position to identify chromosomal regions of importance for early recurrence of ovarian cancer. By use of *Gene Set Enrichment Analysis*, we have ranked chromosomal regions according to their association to survival. Over-representation analysis including 1......Ovarian cancer cells exhibit complex karyotypic alterations causing deregulation of numerous genes. Some of these genes are probably causal for cancer formation and local growth, whereas others are causal for metastasis and recurrence. By using publicly available data sets, we have investigated......-4 consecutive cytogenetic bands identified regions with increased expression for chromosome 5q12-14, and a very large region of chromosome 7 with the strongest signal at 7p15-13 among tumors from short-living patients. Reduced gene expression was identified at 4q26-32, 6p12-q15, 9p21-q32, and 11p14-11. We...

  9. Independent Loss of Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase (MTAP) in Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollard, Wesley J; Kalaivani, Nithyha P; Jones, Christine L; Roper, Catherine; Tung, Lam; Lee, Jae Jin; Thomas, Bjorn R; Tosi, Isabella; Ferreira, Silvia; Beyers, Carl Z; McKenzie, Robert C T; Butler, Rosie M; Lorenc, Anna; Whittaker, Sean J; Mitchell, Tracey J

    2016-06-01

    Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) and the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A-CDKN2B are frequently deleted in malignancies. The specific role of MTAP in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma subgroups, mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), is unknown. In 213 skin samples from patients with MF/SS, MTAP copy number loss (34%) was more frequent than CDKN2A (12%) in all cutaneous T-cell lymphoma stages using quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Importantly, in early stage MF, MTAP loss occurred independently of CDKN2A loss in 37% of samples. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with SS, codeletion with CDKN2A occurred in 18% of samples but loss of MTAP alone was uncommon. In CD4(+) cells from SS, reduced MTAP mRNA expression correlated with MTAP copy number loss (P < 0.01) but reduced MTAP expression was also detected in the absence of copy number loss. Deep sequencing of MTAP/CDKN2A-CDKN2B loci in 77 peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA samples from patients with SS did not show any nonsynonymous mutations, but read-depth analysis suggested focal deletions consistent with MTAP and CDKN2A copy number loss detected with quantitative reverse transcription PCR. In a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell line, promoter hypermethylation was shown to downregulate MTAP expression and may represent a mechanism of MTAP inactivation. In conclusion, our findings suggest that there may be selection in early stages of MF for MTAP deletion within the cutaneous tumor microenvironment.

  10. Gene-Diet Interaction between SIRT6 and Soybean Intake for Different Levels of Pulse Wave Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kexin; Xiang, Xiao; Li, Na; Huang, Shaoping; Qin, Xueying; Wu, Yiqun; Tang, Xun; Gao, Pei; Li, Jing; Wu, Tao; Chen, Dafang; Hu, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Soybean is a common food for the Chinese people. We aimed to investigate the risk for brachial ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) with inflammatory-related SNPs and soybean. baPWV was measured, and 16 inflammatory-related SNPs located on ADIPOQ, CDH13, SIRT3, SIRT6, CXCL12, CXCR4, NOS1, PON1 and CDKN2B were genotyped in 1749 Chinese participants recruited from various communities. ADIPOQ rs12495941 (GT/TT vs. GG: crude OR = 1.27, p = 0.044) and SIRT6 rs107251 (CT/TT vs. CC: crude OR = 0.74, p = 0.009) were associated with abnormal baPWV (baPWV ≥ 1700 cm/s). After adjustment for conventional environmental risk factors, rs12495941 was associated with abnormal baPWV (GT/TT vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.43, p = 0.011), but the association between rs107251 and abnormal baPWV was not significant (CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted OR = 0.83, p = 0.173). The interaction between rs107251 and soybean intake for different levels of baPWV was statistically significant (p = 0.017). Compared with a high level of soybean intake, a low level of soybean intake can significantly decrease the risk of abnormal baPWV in individuals of rs107251 CT/TT genotypes (≤100 vs. >100 g/week: adjusted OR = 0.542, p = 0.003). In this study, associations between ADIPOQ rs12495941, SIRT6 rs107251 and baPWV, as well as an interaction between SIRT6 rs107251 and soybean intake for different levels of baPWV were found. PMID:26114387

  11. Gene-Diet Interaction between SIRT6 and Soybean Intake for Different Levels of Pulse Wave Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kexin Sun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is a common food for the Chinese people. We aimed to investigate the risk for brachial ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV with inflammatory-related SNPs and soybean. baPWV was measured, and 16 inflammatory-related SNPs located on ADIPOQ, CDH13, SIRT3, SIRT6, CXCL12, CXCR4, NOS1, PON1 and CDKN2B were genotyped in 1749 Chinese participants recruited from various communities. ADIPOQ rs12495941 (GT/TT vs. GG: crude OR = 1.27, p = 0.044 and SIRT6 rs107251 (CT/TT vs. CC: crude OR = 0.74, p = 0.009 were associated with abnormal baPWV (baPWV ≥ 1700 cm/s. After adjustment for conventional environmental risk factors, rs12495941 was associated with abnormal baPWV (GT/TT vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.43, p = 0.011, but the association between rs107251 and abnormal baPWV was not significant (CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted OR = 0.83, p = 0.173. The interaction between rs107251 and soybean intake for different levels of baPWV was statistically significant (p = 0.017. Compared with a high level of soybean intake, a low level of soybean intake can significantly decrease the risk of abnormal baPWV in individuals of rs107251 CT/TT genotypes (≤100 vs. >100 g/week: adjusted OR = 0.542, p = 0.003. In this study, associations between ADIPOQ rs12495941, SIRT6 rs107251 and baPWV, as well as an interaction between SIRT6 rs107251 and soybean intake for different levels of baPWV were found.

  12. Endothelial Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    8217Department of Surgery, Division of Oncology , and 2Department of BRCA-l and BRCA-2 (breast cancer susceptibility genes), Pathology, University of...Suppression subtractive hybridization re- Cancer: principles and practice of oncology . Philadelphia: Lippincott- vealed an RNA sequence (GenBank accession...Lippman ME. Cancer of the breast: molecular biology angiogenesis in sarcomas and carcinomas. Clin Cancer Res 1999;5: of breast cancer. In: DeVita VT

  13. Gene Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston K. Mazandu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide coverage and biological relevance of the Gene Ontology (GO, confirmed through its successful use in protein function prediction, have led to the growth in its popularity. In order to exploit the extent of biological knowledge that GO offers in describing genes or groups of genes, there is a need for an efficient, scalable similarity measure for GO terms and GO-annotated proteins. While several GO similarity measures exist, none adequately addresses all issues surrounding the design and usage of the ontology. We introduce a new metric for measuring the distance between two GO terms using the intrinsic topology of the GO-DAG, thus enabling the measurement of functional similarities between proteins based on their GO annotations. We assess the performance of this metric using a ROC analysis on human protein-protein interaction datasets and correlation coefficient analysis on the selected set of protein pairs from the CESSM online tool. This metric achieves good performance compared to the existing annotation-based GO measures. We used this new metric to assess functional similarity between orthologues, and show that it is effective at determining whether orthologues are annotated with similar functions and identifying cases where annotation is inconsistent between orthologues.

  14. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called ‘gene doping’. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted...

  15. Microdeletions of 5.5 Mb (4q13.2-q13.3) and 4.1 Mb (7p15.3-p21.1) associated with a saethre-chotzen-like phenotype, severe intellectual disability, and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Shino; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Nomura, Shohei; Fukui, Miho; Shimakawa, Shuichi; Sangu, Noriko; Shimojima, Keiko; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2013-08-01

    We observed a patient with a Saethre-Chotzen-like phenotype with severe neurological features. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly type III; SCS; OMIM #101400) is an autosomal dominant craniosynostosis syndrome characterized by craniofacial and mild limb abnormalities. The phenotypic features of chromosomal microdeletions involving the 7p21.1, where the twist homolog 1 gene (TWIST1) responsible for SCS is located, are recognized as a contiguous gene deletion syndrome with SCS and other phenotypic manifestations. In this study, we identified microdeletions in 4q13.2 and 7p21.1 in a patient with SCS and severe neurological features including developmental delay and autistic behavior. In comparison to other SCS patients with intragenic mutations or small deletions in 7p21.1, neurological features seen in this patient were extremely severe, likely modified by a concurrent deletion of 4q13.2. Both microdeletions were de novo and paternal in origin. Further information on such concurrent chromosomal deletions should be accumulated for better understanding of the mechanism.

  16. GeneEd -- A Genetics Educational Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 GeneEd — A Genetics Educational Resource Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Science ... The Hereditary Material of Life / GeneEd — A Genetics Educational Resource / Using The Genetics Home Reference Website / Understanding the ...

  17. The utility of quantitative methylation assays at imprinted genes for the diagnosis of fetal and placental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, D K; Peñaherrera, M S; Yuen, R K C; Van Allen, M I; McFadden, D E; Robinson, W P

    2011-02-01

    An imbalance of imprinted gene expression within 11p15.5 is observed in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), as well as in a variety of placental abnormalities including complete hydatidiform mole (CHM), placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD) and triploidy. To facilitate the diagnosis of epigenetic errors and chromosomal imbalance of 11p15.5, we validated a pyrosequencing assay to measure methylation at KvDMR1 using blood samples from 13 BWS cases, 8 of which showed reduced methylation as compared to control blood. An imbalance between maternal and paternal genomes as is found in triploidy, CHM or PMD was also associated with altered KvDMR1 methylation. A reciprocal pattern of methylation was obtained in the triploid cases by assaying the proximal 11p15.5 ICR associated with H19. To distinguish chromosome 11 specific alterations from whole genome imbalance, other imprinted differentially methylated regions (DMRs) can be utilized. Thus, pyrosequencing assays for DMRs associated with SGCE, SNRPN, and MEST were also compared for their utility in diagnosing parental imbalance in placental samples. While each of these assays could successfully distinguish parental origin of triploidy, SGCE showed the clearest separation between groups. The combined use of a chromosome 11p15.5 assay (e.g. KvDMR1 or H19-ICR) and non-chromosome 11 assay (e.g. SGCE) provides a potentially valuable diagnostic tool in the rapid screening of methylation errors in placental disorders. These results also show the maintenance of imprinting status at these loci in the human placenta, even in the presence of abnormal pathology.

  18. Association of MC3R gene polymorphisms with body weight in the red fox and comparative gene organization in four canids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorczyk, A; Flisikowski, K; Szydlowski, M; Cieslak, J; Fries, R; Switonski, M

    2011-02-01

    There are five genes encoding melanocortin receptors. Among canids, the genes have mainly been studied in the dog (MC1R, MC2R and MC4R). The MC4R gene has also been analysed in the red fox. In this report, we present a study of chromosome localization, comparative sequence analysis and polymorphism of the MC3R gene in the dog, red fox, arctic fox and Chinese raccoon dog. The gene was localized by FISH to the following chromosome: 24q24-25 in the dog, 14p16 in the red fox, 18q13 in the arctic fox and NPP4p15 in the Chinese raccoon dog. A high identity level of the MC3R gene sequences was observed among the species, ranging from 96.0% (red fox--Chinese raccoon dog) to 99.5% (red fox--arctic fox). Altogether, eight polymorphic sites were found in the red fox, six in the Chinese raccoon dog and two in the dog, while the arctic fox appeared to be monomorphic. In addition, association of several polymorphisms with body weight was analysed in red foxes (the number of genotyped animals ranged from 319 to 379). Two polymorphisms in the red fox, i.e. a silent substitution c.957A>C and c.*185C>T in the 3'-flanking sequence, showed a significant association (P < 0.01) with body weight.

  19. Principles of gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mammen Biju; Ramakrishnan T; Sudhakar Uma; Vijayalakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions to make proteins. When genes are altered so that encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result. Gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a beneficial protein. This article reviews the fundamentals in gene therapy and its various modes of administration with an insight into the role of gene therapy in Periodontics an...

  20. Organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, S; Brack, C; Hozumi, N; Pirrotta, V

    1978-01-01

    The nucleotide-sequence determination of a cloned, embryonic Vlambda gene directly demonstrated that V genes are separate from a corresponding C gene in embryonic cells. Analysis by restriction enzymes of total cellular DNA from various sources strongly suggested that the two separate immunoglobulin genes become continuous during differentiation of B lymphocytes. There seems to be a strict correlation between the joining event and activation of the joined genes. Cloning of more immunoglobulin genes from embryo and plasma cells will not only provide direct demonstration of such a gene-joining event but also help in the elucidation of a possible relationship of the event to gene activation mechanisms.

  1. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, David

    2013-08-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called 'gene doping'. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted from the engineered cells or is retained locally to, or inside engineered cells will, to some extent, determine the likelihood of detection. It is clear that effective gene delivery technologies now exist and it is important that detection and prevention plans are in place.

  2. MycN Is Critical for the Maintenance of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie Ting; Weng, Zhi Hui; Tsang, Kam Sze; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Jiang, Xiao Hua

    2016-01-01

    The biologic studies of human neural crest stem cells (hNCSCs) are extremely challenging due to the limited source of hNCSCs as well as ethical and technical issues surrounding isolation of early human embryonic tissues. On the other hand, vast majority of studies on MycN have been conducted in human tumor cells, thus, the role of MycN in normal human neural crest development is completely unknown. In the present study, we determined the role of MycN in hNCSCs isolated from in vitro-differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). For the first time, we show that suppression of MycN in hNCSCs inhibits cell growth and cell cycle progression. Knockdown of MycN in hNCSCs increases the expression of Cdkn1a, Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b, which encodes the cyclin-dependent kinases p21CIP1, p16 INK4a and p15INK4b. In addition, MycN is involved in the regulation of human sympathetic neurogenesis, as knockdown of MycN enhances the expression of key transcription factors involved in sympathetic neuron differentiation, including Phox2a, Phox2b, Mash1, Hand2 and Gata3. We propose that unlimited source of hNCSCs provides an invaluable platform for the studies of human neural crest development and diseases.

  3. MycN Is Critical for the Maintenance of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ting Zhang

    Full Text Available The biologic studies of human neural crest stem cells (hNCSCs are extremely challenging due to the limited source of hNCSCs as well as ethical and technical issues surrounding isolation of early human embryonic tissues. On the other hand, vast majority of studies on MycN have been conducted in human tumor cells, thus, the role of MycN in normal human neural crest development is completely unknown. In the present study, we determined the role of MycN in hNCSCs isolated from in vitro-differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. For the first time, we show that suppression of MycN in hNCSCs inhibits cell growth and cell cycle progression. Knockdown of MycN in hNCSCs increases the expression of Cdkn1a, Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b, which encodes the cyclin-dependent kinases p21CIP1, p16 INK4a and p15INK4b. In addition, MycN is involved in the regulation of human sympathetic neurogenesis, as knockdown of MycN enhances the expression of key transcription factors involved in sympathetic neuron differentiation, including Phox2a, Phox2b, Mash1, Hand2 and Gata3. We propose that unlimited source of hNCSCs provides an invaluable platform for the studies of human neural crest development and diseases.

  4. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were...

  5. Lateral gene transfer, rearrangement, reconciliation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patterson, M.D.; Szollosi, G.; Daubin, V.; Tannier, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Models of ancestral gene order reconstruction have progressively integrated different evolutionary patterns and processes such as unequal gene content, gene duplications, and implicitly sequence evolution via reconciled gene trees. These models have so far ignored lateral gene transfer,

  6. Promoter hypermethylation-mediated inactivation of multiple Slit-Robo pathway genes in cervical cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansukhani Mahesh

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical Cancer (CC exhibits highly complex genomic alterations. These include hemizygous deletions at 4p15.3, 10q24, 5q35, 3p12.3, and 11q24, the chromosomal sites of Slit-Robo pathway genes. However, no candidate tumor suppressor genes at these regions have been identified so far. Slit family of secreted proteins modulates chemokine-induced cell migration of distinct somatic cell types. Slit genes mediate their effect by binding to its receptor Roundabout (Robo. These genes have shown to be inactivated by promoter hypermethylation in a number of human cancers. Results To test whether Slit-Robo pathway genes are targets of inactivation at these sites of deletion, we examined promoter hypermethylation of SLIT1, SLIT2, SLIT3, ROBO1, and ROBO3 genes in invasive CC and its precursor lesions. We identified a high frequency of promoter hypermethylation in all the Slit-Robo genes resulting in down regulated gene expression in invasive CC, but the inhibitors of DNA methylation and histone deacetylases (HDACs in CC cell lines failed to effectively reactivate the down-regulated expression. These results suggest a complex mechanism of inactivation in the Slit-Robo pathway in CC. By analysis of cervical precancerous lesions, we further show that promoter hypermethylation of Slit-Robo pathway occurs early in tumor progression. Conclusion Taken together, these findings suggest that epigenetic alterations of Slit-Robo pathway genes (i play a role in CC development, (ii further delineation of molecular basis of promoter methylation-mediated gene regulation provides a potential basis for epigenetic-based therapy in advanced stage CC, and (iii form epigenetic signatures to identify precancerous lesions at risk to progression.

  7. Gene doping in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Mehmet; Ozer Unal, Durisehvar

    2004-01-01

    Gene or cell doping is defined by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as "the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements and/or cells that have the capacity to enhance athletic performance". New research in genetics and genomics will be used not only to diagnose and treat disease, but also to attempt to enhance human performance. In recent years, gene therapy has shown progress and positive results that have highlighted the potential misuse of this technology and the debate of 'gene doping'. Gene therapies developed for the treatment of diseases such as anaemia (the gene for erythropoietin), muscular dystrophy (the gene for insulin-like growth factor-1) and peripheral vascular diseases (the gene for vascular endothelial growth factor) are potential doping methods. With progress in gene technology, many other genes with this potential will be discovered. For this reason, it is important to develop timely legal regulations and to research the field of gene doping in order to develop methods of detection. To protect the health of athletes and to ensure equal competitive conditions, the International Olympic Committee, WADA and International Sports Federations have accepted performance-enhancing substances and methods as being doping, and have forbidden them. Nevertheless, the desire to win causes athletes to misuse these drugs and methods. This paper reviews the current status of gene doping and candidate performance enhancement genes, and also the use of gene therapy in sports medicine and ethics of genetic enhancement.

  8. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  9. A novel sampling design to explore gene-longevity associations: the ECHA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rango, Francesco; Dato, Serena; Bellizzi, Dina; Rose, Giuseppina; Marzi, Erika; Cavallone, Luca; Franceschi, Claudio; Skytthe, Axel; Jeune, Bernard; Cournil, Amandine; Robine, Jean Marie; Gampe, Jutta; Vaupel, James W; Mari, Vincenzo; Feraco, Emidio; Passarino, Giuseppe; Novelletto, Andrea; De Benedictis, Giovanna

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the genetic contribution to familial similarity in longevity, we set up a novel experimental design where cousin-pairs born from siblings who were concordant or discordant for the longevity trait were analyzed. To check this design, two chromosomal regions already known to encompass longevity-related genes were examined: 6p21.3 (genes TNFalpha, TNFbeta, HSP70.1) and 11p15.5 (genes SIRT3, HRAS1, IGF2, INS, TH). Population pools of 1.6, 2.3 and 2.0 million inhabitants were screened, respectively, in Denmark, France and Italy to identify families matching the design requirements. A total of 234 trios composed by one centenarian, his/her child and a child of his/her concordant or discordant sib were collected. By using population-specific allele frequencies, we reconstructed haplotype phase and estimated the likelihood of Identical By Descent (IBD) haplotype sharing in cousin-pairs born from concordant and discordant siblings. In addition, we analyzed haplotype transmission from centenarians to offspring, and a statistically significant Transmission Ratio Distortion (TRD) was observed for both chromosomal regions in the discordant families (P=0.007 for 6p21.3 and P=0.015 for 11p15.5). In concordant families, a marginally significant TRD was observed at 6p21.3 only (P=0.06). Although no significant difference emerged between the two groups of cousin-pairs, our study gave new insights on the hindrances to recruiting a suitable sample to obtain significant IBD data on longevity-related chromosomal regions. This will allow to dimension future sampling campaigns to study-genetic basis of human longevity.

  10. Cochlear Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in cochlear gene therapy over the past several years. Cochlear gene therapy has undergone tremendous advances over the past decade. Beginning with some groundbreaking work in 2005 documenting hair cell regeneration using virallymediated delivery of the mouse atonal 1 gene, gene therapy is now being explored as a possible treatment for a variety of causes of hearing loss.

  11. Reading and Generalist Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Harlaar, Nicole; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Twin-study research suggests that many (but not all) of the same genes contribute to genetic influence on diverse learning abilities and disabilities, a hypothesis called "generalist genes". This generalist genes hypothesis was tested using a set of 10 DNA markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) found to be associated with early reading…

  12. Genetic variation in selenoprotein genes, lifestyle, and risk of colon and rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L Slattery

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Associations between selenium and cancer have directed attention to role of selenoproteins in the carcinogenic process. METHODS: We used data from two population-based case-control studies of colon (n = 1555 cases, 1956 controls and rectal (n = 754 cases, 959 controls cancer. We evaluated the association between genetic variation in TXNRD1, TXNRD2, TXNRD3, C11orf31 (SelH, SelW, SelN1, SelS, SepX, and SeP15 with colorectal cancer risk. RESULTS: After adjustment for multiple comparisons, several associations were observed. Two SNPs in TXNRD3 were associated with rectal cancer (rs11718498 dominant OR 1.42 95% CI 1.16,1.74 pACT 0.0036 and rs9637365 recessive 0.70 95% CI 0.55,0.90 pACT 0.0208. Four SNPs in SepN1 were associated with rectal cancer (rs11247735 recessive OR 1.30 95% CI 1.04,1.63 pACT 0.0410; rs2072749 GGvsAA OR 0.53 95% CI 0.36,0.80 pACT 0.0159; rs4659382 recessive OR 0.58 95% CI 0.39,0.86 pACT 0.0247; rs718391 dominant OR 0.76 95% CI 0.62,0.94 pACT 0.0300. Interaction between these genes and exposures that could influence these genes showed numerous significant associations after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Two SNPs in TXNRD1 and four SNPs in TXNRD2 interacted with aspirin/NSAID to influence colon cancer; one SNP in TXNRD1, two SNPs in TXNRD2, and one SNP in TXNRD3 interacted with aspirin/NSAIDs to influence rectal cancer. Five SNPs in TXNRD2 and one in SelS, SeP15, and SelW1 interacted with estrogen to modify colon cancer risk; one SNP in SelW1 interacted with estrogen to alter rectal cancer risk. Several SNPs in this candidate pathway influenced survival after diagnosis with colon cancer (SeP15 and SepX1 increased HRR and rectal cancer (SepX1 increased HRR. CONCLUSIONS: Findings support an association between selenoprotein genes and colon and rectal cancer development and survival after diagnosis. Given the interactions observed, it is likely that the impact of cancer susceptibility from genotype is

  13. Journey from Jumping Genes to Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whartenby, Katharine A

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy for cancer is a still evolving approach that resulted from a long history of studies into genetic modification of organisms. The fascination with manipulating gene products has spanned hundreds if not thousands of years, beginning with observations of the hereditary nature of traits in plants and culminating to date in the alteration of genetic makeup in humans via modern technology. From early discoveries noting the potential for natural mobility of genetic material to the culmination of clinical trials in a variety of disease, gene transfer has had an eventful and sometimes tumultuous course. Within the present review is a brief history of the biology of gene transfer, how it came to be applied to genetic diseases, and its early applications to cancer therapies. Some of the different types of methods used to modify cells, the theories behind the approaches, and some of the limitations encountered along the way are reviewed.

  14. Regulated Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system.

  15. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  16. Gene therapy in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-03-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is 'the use of genes as medicine'. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone.

  17. Gene conversion in human rearranged immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, John M; Stott, David I

    2006-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, many DNA sequences have been published suggesting that all or part of the V(H) segment of a rearranged immunoglobulin gene may be replaced in vivo. Two different mechanisms appear to be operating. One of these is very similar to primary V(D)J recombination, involving the RAG proteins acting upon recombination signal sequences, and this has recently been proven to occur. Other sequences, many of which show partial V(H) replacements with no addition of untemplated nucleotides at the V(H)-V(H) joint, have been proposed to occur by an unusual RAG-mediated recombination with the formation of hybrid (coding-to-signal) joints. These appear to occur in cells already undergoing somatic hypermutation in which, some authors are convinced, RAG genes are silenced. We recently proposed that the latter type of V(H) replacement might occur by homologous recombination initiated by the activity of AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), which is essential for somatic hypermutation and gene conversion. The latter has been observed in other species, but not in human Ig genes, so far. In this paper, we present a new analysis of sequences published as examples of the second type of rearrangement. This not only shows that AID recognition motifs occur in recombination regions but also that some sequences show replacement of central sections by a sequence from another gene, similar to gene conversion in the immunoglobulin genes of other species. These observations support the proposal that this type of rearrangement is likely to be AID-mediated rather than RAG-mediated and is consistent with gene conversion.

  18. Cyanobacterial signature genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kirt A; Siefert, Janet L; Yerrapragada, Sailaja; Lu, Yue; McNeill, Thomas Z; Moreno, Pedro A; Weinstock, George M; Widger, William R; Fox, George E

    2003-01-01

    A comparison of 8 cyanobacterial genomes reveals that there are 181 shared genes that do not have obvious orthologs in other bacteria. These signature genes define aspects of the genotype that are uniquely cyanobacterial. Approximately 25% of these genes have been associated with some function. These signature genes may or may not be involved in photosynthesis but likely they will be in many cases. In addition, several examples of widely conserved gene order involving two or more signature genes were observed. This suggests there may be regulatory processes that have been preserved throughout the long history of the cyanobacterial phenotype. The results presented here will be especially useful because they identify which of the many genes of unassigned function are likely to be of the greatest interest.

  19. Canine Mammary Carcinomas: A Comparative Analysis of Altered Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farruk M. Lutful Kabir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer represents the second most frequent neoplasm in humans and sexually intact female dogs after lung and skin cancers, respectively. Many similar features in human and dog cancers including, spontaneous development, clinical presentation, tumor heterogeneity, disease progression and response to conventional therapies have supported development of this comparative model as an alternative to mice. The highly conserved similarities between canine and human genomes are also key to this comparative analysis, especially when compared to the murine genome. Studies with canine mammary tumor (CMT models have shown a strong genetic correlation with their human counterparts, particularly in terms of altered expression profiles of cell cycle regulatory genes, tumor suppressor and oncogenes and also a large group of non-coding RNAs or microRNAs (miRNAs. Because CMTs are considered predictive intermediate models for human breast cancer, similarities in genetic alterations and cancer predisposition between humans and dogs have raised further interest. Many cancer-associated genetic defects critical to mammary tumor development and oncogenic determinants of metastasis have been reported and appear to be similar in both species. Comparative analysis of deregulated gene sets or cancer signaling pathways has shown that a significant proportion of orthologous genes are comparably up- or down-regulated in both human and dog breast tumors. Particularly, a group of cell cycle regulators called cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs acting as potent tumor suppressors are frequently defective in CMTs. Interestingly, comparative analysis of coding sequences has also shown that these genes are highly conserved in mammals in terms of their evolutionary divergence from a common ancestor. Moreover, co-deletion and/or homozygous loss of the INK4A/ARF/INK4B (CDKN2A/B locus, encoding three members of the CKI tumor suppressor gene families (p16/INK4A, p14ARF and p15

  20. Primetime for Learning Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be “poised” for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli. PMID:28208656

  1. Primetime for Learning Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-02-11

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be "poised" for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli.

  2. LAF4, an AF4-related gene, is fused to MLL in infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergh, Anne R M; Beverloo, H Berna; Rombout, Paul; van Wering, Elisabeth R; van Weel, Margreet H; Beverstock, Geoffrey C; Kluin, Philip M; Slater, Rosalyn M; Schuuring, Ed

    2002-09-01

    Infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with MLL gene rearrangements is characterized by a proB phenotype and a poor clinical outcome. We analyzed an infant proB ALL with t(2;11)(p15;p14) and an MLL rearrangement on Southern blot analysis. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase-PCR identified the LAF4 gene mapped on chromosome region 2q11.2-q12 as a fusion partner of the MLL gene. The LAF4 gene was identified previously by its high sequence homology to the AF4 protein and encodes a protein of 1,227 amino acids. The t(4;11)(q21;q23), creating the MLL-AF4 chimeric transcripts, is the predominant 11q23 chromosome translocation in infant ALL and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Our findings further suggest that fusion of MLL to one of the AF4 family members (AF4/LAF4/AF5Q31) might determine a proB-cell phenotype in infant leukemia.

  3. Genome-wide search for susceptibility genes to type 2 diabetes in West Africans: potential role of C-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanjie; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Yuanxiu; Huang, Hanxia; Doumatey, Ayo; Lashley, Kerrie; Agyenim-Boateng, Kofi; Eghan, Benjamin A; Acheampong, Joseph; Fasanmade, Olufemi; Johnson, Thomas; Okafor, Godfrey; Oli, Johnnie; Amoah, Albert; Rotimi, Charles

    2007-12-01

    C-peptide is a substance that the pancreas releases into the circulation in equimolar amounts to insulin and has demonstrated important physiological effects which relate to the vascular field, in particular the microcirculation. For this analysis, we included 321 full and 36 half sibling pairs affected with type 2 diabetes (T2D) from West Africa. A genome-wide panel of 390 tri-nucleotide and tetra-nucleotide repeats with an average distance of 8.9 cM was performed on a total of 691 persons. Variance components based on multipoint linkage approach as implemented in SOLAR were performed for log C-peptide. Significant linkage evidences were observed on 10q23 at D10S2327 with a LOD score of 4.04 (nominal p-value=0.000008, empirical p-value=0.0004); and on 4p15 at D4S2632 with a LOD score of 3.48 (nominal p-value=0.000031, empirical p-value=0.0013). Other suggestive evidence of linkage were observed on 15q14 at D15S659 with a LOD score 2.41 (nominal p-value=0.000435, empirical p-value=0.0068), and on 18p11 near D18S976 with a LOD score 2.18 (nominal p-value=0.000771 and empirical p-value=0.0094). Interestingly, five positional candidate genes for diabetes and related complications are located in our linkage region (the pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP in 18p11); the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 (PPARGC1 in 4p15); PTEN, PPP1R5, and IDE located in 10q23. In conclusion, we identified four major genetic loci (10q23, 4p15, 15q14, and 18p11) influencing C-peptide concentration in West Africans with T2D.

  4. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality.

  5. Genome-wide association analyses identify new susceptibility loci for oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesseur, Corina; Diergaarde, Brenda; Olshan, Andrew F; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Ness, Andrew R; Liu, Geoffrey; Lacko, Martin; Eluf-Neto, José; Franceschi, Silvia; Lagiou, Pagona; Macfarlane, Gary J; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Boccia, Stefania; Polesel, Jerry; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Zaridze, David; Johansson, Mattias; Menezes, Ana M; Curado, Maria Paula; Robinson, Max; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Canova, Cristina; Znaor, Ariana; Castellsagué, Xavier; Conway, David I; Holcátová, Ivana; Mates, Dana; Vilensky, Marta; Healy, Claire M; Szeszenia-Dąbrowska, Neonila; Fabiánová, Eleonóra; Lissowska, Jolanta; Grandis, Jennifer R; Weissler, Mark C; Tajara, Eloiza H; Nunes, Fabio D; de Carvalho, Marcos B; Thomas, Steve; Hung, Rayjean J; Peters, Wilbert H M; Herrero, Rolando; Cadoni, Gabriella; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Steffen, Annika; Agudo, Antonio; Shangina, Oxana; Xiao, Xiangjun; Gaborieau, Valérie; Chabrier, Amélie; Anantharaman, Devasena; Boffetta, Paolo; Amos, Christopher I; McKay, James D; Brennan, Paul

    2016-12-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study of oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer in 6,034 cases and 6,585 controls from Europe, North America and South America. We detected eight significantly associated loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)), seven of which are new for these cancer sites. Oral and pharyngeal cancers combined were associated with loci at 6p21.32 (rs3828805, HLA-DQB1), 10q26.13 (rs201982221, LHPP) and 11p15.4 (rs1453414, OR52N2-TRIM5). Oral cancer was associated with two new regions, 2p23.3 (rs6547741, GPN1) and 9q34.12 (rs928674, LAMC3), and with known cancer-related loci-9p21.3 (rs8181047, CDKN2B-AS1) and 5p15.33 (rs10462706, CLPTM1L). Oropharyngeal cancer associations were limited to the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, and classical HLA allele imputation showed a protective association with the class II haplotype HLA-DRB1*1301-HLA-DQA1*0103-HLA-DQB1*0603 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.59, P = 2.7 × 10(-9)). Stratified analyses on a subgroup of oropharyngeal cases with information available on human papillomavirus (HPV) status indicated that this association was considerably stronger in HPV-positive (OR = 0.23, P = 1.6 × 10(-6)) than in HPV-negative (OR = 0.75, P = 0.16) cancers.

  6. Iron deficiency alters expression of genes implicated in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Erik S; Magid, Rhamy; Petryk, Anna; Georgieff, Michael K

    2008-10-27

    Neonatal brain iron deficiency occurs after insufficient maternal dietary iron intake, maternal hypertension, and maternal diabetes mellitus and results in short and long-term neurologic and behavioral deficits. Early iron deficiency affects the genomic profile of the developing hippocampus that persists despite iron repletion. The purpose of the present study was threefold: 1) quantitative PCR confirmation of our previous microarray results, demonstrating upregulation of a network of genes leading to beta-amyloid production and implicated in Alzheimer disease etiology in iron-deficient anemic rat pups at the time of hippocampal differentiation; 2) investigation of the potential contributions of iron deficiency anemia and iron treatment to this differential gene expression in the hippocampus; and 3) investigation of these genes over a developmental time course in a mouse model where iron deficiency is limited to hippocampus, is not accompanied by anemia and is not repletable. Quantitative PCR confirmed altered regulation in 6 of 7 Alzheimer-related genes (Apbb1, C1qa, Clu, App, Cst3, Fn1, Htatip) in iron-deficient rats relative to iron-sufficient controls at P15. Comparison of untreated to treated iron-deficient animals at this age suggested the strong role of iron deficiency, not treatment, in the upregulation of this gene network. The non-anemic hippocampal iron-deficient mouse demonstrated upregulation of all 7 genes in this pathway from P5 to P25. Our results suggest a role for neonatal iron deficiency in dysregulation of genes that may set the stage for long-term neurodegenerative disease and that this may occur through a histone modification mechanism.

  7. Delivery Systems in Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hu; Anas El-Aneed; Cui Guohui

    2005-01-01

    1 Gene therapy Gene therapy includes the treatment of both genetically based and infectious diseases by introducing genetic materials which have therapeutic effects[1~3]. In its simplest terms, a wild type gene (which is non-functional in the cell leading to disease development) is introduced into the somatic cell lacking this gene to restore the normal gene function in this cell. Many gene therapy strategies, however, utilize genes to destroy specific cells.

  8. Gene promoters dictate histone occupancy within genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Roberto; Erickson, Benjamin; Zhang, Lian; Kim, Hyunmin; Valiquett, Elan; Bentley, David

    2013-10-01

    Spt6 is a transcriptional elongation factor and histone chaperone that reassembles transcribed chromatin. Genome-wide H3 mapping showed that Spt6 preferentially maintains nucleosomes within the first 500 bases of genes and helps define nucleosome-depleted regions in 5' and 3' flanking sequences. In Spt6-depleted cells, H3 loss at 5' ends correlates with reduced pol II density suggesting enhanced transcription elongation. Consistent with its 'Suppressor of Ty' (Spt) phenotype, Spt6 inactivation caused localized H3 eviction over 1-2 nucleosomes at 5' ends of Ty elements. H3 displacement differed between genes driven by promoters with 'open'/DPN and 'closed'/OPN chromatin conformations with similar pol II densities. More eviction occurred on genes with 'closed' promoters, associated with 'noisy' transcription. Moreover, swapping of 'open' and 'closed' promoters showed that they can specify distinct downstream patterns of histone eviction/deposition. These observations suggest a novel function for promoters in dictating histone dynamics within genes possibly through effects on transcriptional bursting or elongation rate.

  9. XLMR genes: update 2000.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiurazzi, P.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Neri, G.

    2001-01-01

    This is the sixth edition of the catalogue of XLMR genes, ie X-linked genes whose malfunctioning causes mental retardation. The cloning era is not yet concluded, actually much remains to be done to account for the 202 XLMR conditions listed in this update. Many of these may eventually prove to be du

  10. Smart Genes, Stupid Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, Sherman; Mahadeva, Madhu N.

    1983-01-01

    Because many people still believe that specific, identifiable genes dictate the level of human intelligence and that the number/quality of these genes can be evaluated, presents evidence from human genetics (related to nervous system development) to counter this view. Also disputes erroneous assumptions made in "heritability studies" of human…

  11. Glaucoma Genes and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggs, Janey L

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have yielded important genes contributing to both early-onset and adult-onset forms of glaucoma. The proteins encoded by the current collection of glaucoma genes participate in a broad range of cellular processes and biological systems. Approximately half the glaucoma-related genes function in the extracellular matrix, however proteins involved in cytokine signaling, lipid metabolism, membrane biology, regulation of cell division, autophagy, and ocular development also contribute to the disease pathogenesis. While the function of these proteins in health and disease are not completely understood, recent studies are providing insight into underlying disease mechanisms, a critical step toward the development of gene-based therapies. In this review, genes known to cause early-onset glaucoma or contribute to adult-onset glaucoma are organized according to the cell processes or biological systems that are impacted by the function of the disease-related protein product.

  12. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, M K; Evens, H; VandenDriessche, T

    2013-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders resulting from deficiencies of factor VIII and FIX, respectively. Purified clotting factor concentrates are currently intravenously administered to treat hemophilia, but this treatment is non-curative. Therefore, gene-based therapies for hemophilia have been developed to achieve sustained high levels of clotting factor expression to correct the clinical phenotype. Over the past two decades, different types of viral and non-viral gene delivery systems have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy research with a variety of target cells, particularly hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, skeletal muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lentiviral and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. In preclinical hemophilia A and B animal models, the bleeding phenotype was corrected with these vectors. Some of these promising preclinical results prompted clinical translation to patients suffering from a severe hemophilic phenotype. These patients receiving gene therapy with AAV vectors showed long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels, which is a major step forwards in this field. Nevertheless, the levels were insufficient to prevent trauma or injury-induced bleeding episodes. Another challenge that remains is the possible immune destruction of gene-modified cells by effector T cells, which are directed against the AAV vector antigens. It is therefore important to continuously improve the current gene therapy approaches to ultimately establish a real cure for hemophilia.

  13. Gene amplification in carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimari Bizari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene amplification increases the number of genes in a genome and can give rise to karyotype abnormalities called double minutes (DM and homogeneously staining regions (HSR, both of which have been widely observed in human tumors but are also known to play a major role during embryonic development due to the fact that they are responsible for the programmed increase of gene expression. The etiology of gene amplification during carcinogenesis is not yet completely understood but can be considered a result of genetic instability. Gene amplification leads to an increase in protein expression and provides a selective advantage during cell growth. Oncogenes such as CCND1, c-MET, c-MYC, ERBB2, EGFR and MDM2 are amplified in human tumors and can be associated with increased expression of their respective proteins or not. In general, gene amplification is associated with more aggressive tumors, metastases, resistance to chemotherapy and a decrease in the period during which the patient stays free of the disease. This review discusses the major role of gene amplification in the progression of carcinomas, formation of genetic markers and as possible therapeutic targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of some types of tumors.

  14. Cloning of human RTEF-1, a transcriptional enhancer factor-1-related gene preferentially expressed in skeletal muscle: evidence for an ancient multigene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A F; Richard, C W; Suzow, J; Stephan, D; Weremowicz, S; Morton, C C; Adra, C N

    1996-10-01

    Transcriptional Enhancer Factor-1 (TEF-1) is a transcription factor required for cardiac muscle gene activation. Since ablation of TEF-1 does not abolish cardiac gene expression, we sought to identify a human gene related to TEF-1 (RTEF-1) that might also participate in cardiac gene regulation. A human heart cDNA library was screened to obtain a full-length RTEF-1 cDNA. Fluorescence in situ hybridization assigned the RTEF-1 gene to chromosome 12p13.2-p13.3. In contrast, PCR screening of human/rodent cell hybrid panels identified TEF-1 on chromosome 11p15.2, between D11S1315 and D11S1334, extending a region of known synteny between human chromosomes 11 and 12 and arguing for an ancient divergence between these two closely related genes. Northern blot analysis revealed a striking similarity in the tissue distribution of RTEF-1 and TEF-1 mRNAs; skeletal muscle showed the highest abundance of both mRNAs, with lower levels detected in pancreas, placenta, and heart. Phylogenetic analysis of all known TEF-1-related proteins identified human RTEF-1 as one of four vertebrate members of this multigene family and further suggests that these genes diverged in the earliest metazoan ancestors.

  15. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF METHYLATION STATUS OF TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES IN PAIRED BIOPSY AND SERUM SAMPLES FROM CERVICAL CANCER PATIENTS AMONG NORTH INDIAN POPULATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, A K; Sharma, V; Nikbakht, M; Jain, V; Sehgal, A; Capalash, N; Kaur, J

    2016-02-01

    Tumor-specific genetic or epigenetic alterations have been detected in serum DNA in case of various types of cancers. In breast cancer, the detection of tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation has been reported in several body fluids. Promoter hypermethylation of some genes like MYOD1, CALCA, hTERT etc. has also been detected in serum samples from cervical cancer. The present study is the first report on the comparison of promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes likep14, p15, p16, p21, p27, p57, p53, p73, RARβ2, FHIT, DAPK, STAT1 and-RB1 genes in paired biopsy and serum samples from cervical cancer patients among north Indian population. This is also the first report on the hypermethylation of these genes in serum samples from cervical cancer patients among north Indian population. According to the results of the present study, promoter hypermethylation of these genes can also be detected in serum samples of cervical cancer patients. The sensitivity of detection of promoter hypermethylation in serum samples of cervical cancer patients as compared to paired biopsy samples was found to be around 83.3%. It was observed that promoter hypermethylation was mainly observed in the serum samples in the higher stages and very rarely in the lower stages. The present study clearly showed that serum of patients with cervical cancer can also be used to study methylated genes as biomarkers.

  16. Antisense gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels T; Nielsen, Jørgen E

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied...... to mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how...

  17. TAGCNA: a method to identify significant consensus events of copy number alterations in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiguo Yuan

    Full Text Available Somatic copy number alteration (CNA is a common phenomenon in cancer genome. Distinguishing significant consensus events (SCEs from random background CNAs in a set of subjects has been proven to be a valuable tool to study cancer. In order to identify SCEs with an acceptable type I error rate, better computational approaches should be developed based on reasonable statistics and null distributions. In this article, we propose a new approach named TAGCNA for identifying SCEs in somatic CNAs that may encompass cancer driver genes. TAGCNA employs a peel-off permutation scheme to generate a reasonable null distribution based on a prior step of selecting tag CNA markers from the genome being considered. We demonstrate the statistical power of TAGCNA on simulated ground truth data, and validate its applicability using two publicly available cancer datasets: lung and prostate adenocarcinoma. TAGCNA identifies SCEs that are known to be involved with proto-oncogenes (e.g. EGFR, CDK4 and tumor suppressor genes (e.g. CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and provides many additional SCEs with potential biological relevance in these data. TAGCNA can be used to analyze the significance of CNAs in various cancers. It is implemented in R and is freely available at http://tagcna.sourceforge.net/.

  18. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Valenčáková, A.; Dziaková, A.; Hatalová, E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purp...

  19. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  20. "Bad genes" & criminal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tapia, María Isabel; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The genetics of the accused is trying to break into the courts. To date several candidate genes have been put forward and their links to antisocial behavior have been examined and documented with some consistency. In this paper, we focus on the so called "warrior gene", or the low-activity allele of the MAOA gene, which has been most consistently related to human behavior and specifically to violence and antisocial behavior. In preparing this paper we had two objectives. First, to summarize and analyze the current scientific evidence, in order to gain an in depth understanding of the state of the issue and determine whether a dominant line of generally accepted scientific knowledge in this field can be asserted. Second, to derive conclusions and put forward recommendations related to the use of genetic information, specifically the presence of the low-activity genotype of the MAOA gene, in modulation of criminal responsibility in European and US courts.

  1. Evidence for homosexuality gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, R.

    1993-07-16

    A genetic analysis of 40 pairs of homosexual brothers has uncovered a region on the X chromosome that appears to contain a gene or genes for homosexuality. When analyzing the pedigrees of homosexual males, the researcheres found evidence that the trait has a higher likelihood of being passed through maternal genes. This led them to search the X chromosome for genes predisposing to homosexuality. The researchers examined the X chromosomes of pairs of homosexual brothers for regions of DNA that most or all had in common. Of the 40 sets of brothers, 33 shared a set of five markers in the q28 region of the long arm of the X chromosome. The linkage has a LOD score of 4.0, which translates into a 99.5% certainty that there is a gene or genes in this area that predispose males to homosexuality. The chief researcher warns, however, that this one site cannot explain all instances of homosexuality, since there were some cases where the trait seemed to be passed paternally. And even among those brothers where there was no evidence that the trait was passed paternally, seven sets of brothers did not share the Xq28 markers. It seems likely that homosexuality arises from a variety of causes.

  2. Gene-gene, gene-environment, gene-nutrient interactionsand single nucleotide polymorphisms of inflammatorycytokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in the etiologyof type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The rise in thepro-inflammatory cytokines is the essential step inglucotoxicity and lipotoxicity induced mitochondrialinjury, oxidative stress and beta cell apoptosis inT2DM. Among the recognized markers are interleukin(IL)-6, IL-1, IL-10, IL-18, tissue necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α), C-reactive protein, resistin, adiponectin, tissueplasminogen activator, fibrinogen and heptoglobins.Diabetes mellitus has firm genetic and very strongenvironmental influence; exhibiting a polygenic modeof inheritance. Many single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in various genes including those of pro and antiinflammatorycytokines have been reported as a riskfor T2DM. Not all the SNPs have been confirmed byunifying results in different studies and wide variationshave been reported in various ethnic groups. Theinter-ethnic variations can be explained by the factthat gene expression may be regulated by gene-gene,gene-environment and gene-nutrient interactions. Thisreview highlights the impact of these interactions ondetermining the role of single nucleotide polymorphismof IL-6, TNF-α, resistin and adiponectin in pathogenesisof T2DM.

  3. Effects of si-DNMT1 to Methylation of Tumor Suppressor Genes of Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma%si-DNMT1对肝门部胆管癌细胞抑癌基因甲基化的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向吉锋; 罗放; 王济明; 李修红

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of RNA interference on hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes of hilar cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939,to explore its value in the treatment of rholangiocarcinoma. Methods hairpin siRNA expression vector targeting hDNMTl was constructed ,and then transfected into hilar cholangiocareinoma cell line QBC939 using liposome. The expression level of hDNMTl,CDH1 , pl5 was detected by RT-PCR at different time points. The methylation status of tumor suppressor genes CDH1 ,p15 was detected by MSP. The cell proliferation ability was detected by MTT. Results 1 ) Targeted gene knockout of hDNMTl restored the expression level of tumor suppressor genes CDH1 and pl5. 2 ) The expression silencing of CDH1 ,pl5 is caused by promoter hypermethylation. 3 ) Transfection with hairpin siR-NA plasmid expression vector targeting hDNMTl can effectively inhibit the cell proliferation ability of QBC939. Conclusion The transfection of hairpin siRNA plasmid expression vector targeting hDNMTl can play a effective,sustainable and stable role on gene silencing,and restore the expression level of tumor suppressor,thereby,inhibit the proliferation of QBC939.%目的 研究RNA干扰对肝门部胆管癌细胞株QBC939抑癌基因甲基化的影响,初步探讨其在胆管癌治疗中的价值.方法 构建靶向hDNMT1的发夹式siRNA表达载体;运用脂质体介导法将其转染人胆管癌细胞QBC939;RT-PCR法检测不同时间点hDNMT1、CDH1、p15的表达水平;MSP方法检测转染前后抑癌基因CDH1、p15的甲基化状态;MTT检测各组细胞的增殖能力.结果1) hDNMT1的基因沉默恢复了抑癌基因CDH1、p15的表达水平;2)CDH1、p15的表达沉默是由启动予高甲基化导致的;3)转染靶向hDNMT1的发夹式siRNA表达载体能有效地抑制QBC939的增殖能力.结论 靶向hDNMT1的发夹式siRNA表达载体能有效、持续、稳定发挥对hDNMT1的基因沉默作用,恢复抑癌基因CDH1、p15

  4. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  5. The Mycoplasma hominis vaa gene displays a mosaic gene structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Emmersen, Jeppe M. G.; Jensen, Lise T.;

    1998-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis contains a variable adherence-associated (vaa) gene. To classify variants of the vaa genes, we examined 42 M. hominis isolated by PCR, DNA sequencing and immunoblotting. This uncovered the existence of five gene categories. Comparison of the gene types revealed a modular compos...

  6. Hox genes and study of Hox genes in crustacean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Lin; CHEN Zhijuan; XU Mingyu; LIN Shengguo; WANG Lu

    2004-01-01

    Homeobox genes have been discovered in many species. These genes are known to play a major role in specifying regional identity along the anterior-posterior axis of animals from a wide range of phyla.The products of the homeotic genes are a set of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that control elaborate developmental processes and specify cell fates in metazoans. Crustacean, presenting a variety of body plans not encountered in any other class or phylum of the Metazoa, has been shown to possess a single set of homologous Hox genes like insect. The ancestral crustacean Hox gene complex comprised ten genes: eight homologous to the hometic Hox genes and two related to nonhomeotic genes presented within the insect Hox complexes. The crustacean in particular exhibits an abundant diversity segment specialization and tagmosis. This morphological diversity relates to the Hox genes. In crustacean body plan, different Hox genes control different segments and tagmosis.

  7. Entrez Gene: gene-centered information at NCBI

    OpenAIRE

    Maglott, Donna; Ostell, Jim; Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2006-01-01

    Entrez Gene () is NCBI's database for gene-specific information. Entrez Gene includes records from genomes that have been completely sequenced, that have an active research community to contribute gene-specific information or that are scheduled for intense sequence analysis. The content of Entrez Gene represents the result of both curation and automated integration of data from NCBI's Reference Sequence project (RefSeq), from collaborating model organism databases and from other databases wit...

  8. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray Analysis in Cortisol-Secreting Adrenocortical Adenomas Identifies New Candidate Genes and Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina L. Ronchi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The genetic mechanisms underlying adrenocortical tumor development are still largely unknown. We used high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (Affymetrix SNP 6.0 to detect copy number alterations (CNAs and copy-neutral losses of heterozygosity (cnLOH in 15 cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas with matched blood samples. We focused on microalterations aiming to discover new candidate genes involved in early tumorigenesis and/or autonomous cortisol secretion. We identified 962 CNAs with a median of 18 CNAs per sample. Half of them involved noncoding regions, 89% were less than 100 kb, and 28% were found in at least two samples. The most frequently gained regions were 5p15.33, 6q16.1, 7p22.3-22.2, 8q24.3, 9q34.2-34.3, 11p15.5, 11q11, 12q12, 16q24.3, 20p11.1-20q21.11, and Xq28 (≥20% of cases, most of them being identified in the same three adenomas. These regions contained among others genes like NOTCH1, CYP11B2, HRAS, and IGF2. Recurrent losses were less common and smaller than gains, being mostly localized at 1p, 6q, and 11q. Pathway analysis revealed that Notch signaling was the most frequently altered. We identified 46 recurrent CNAs that each affected a single gene (31 gains and 15 losses, including genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11B1 or tumorigenesis (CTNNB1, EPHA7, SGK1, STIL, FHIT. Finally, 20 small cnLOH in four cases affecting 15 known genes were found. Our findings provide the first high-resolution genome-wide view of chromosomal changes in cortisol-secreting adenomas and identify novel candidate genes, such as HRAS, EPHA7, and SGK1. Furthermore, they implicate that the Notch1 signaling pathway might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors.

  9. Introns in higher plant genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The intron is an important component of eukaryotic gene. Extensive studies have been conducted to get a better understanding of its structure and function. This paper presents a brief review of the structure and function of introns in higher plant genes. It is shown that higher plant introns possess structural properties shared by all eukaryotic introns, however, they also exhibit a striking degree of diversity. The process of intron splicing in higher plant genes involves interaction between multiple cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors, such as 5′ splicing site, 3′ splicing site and many protein factors. The process of intron splicing is an important level at which gene expression is regulated. Especially alternative splicing of intron can regulate time and space of gene expression. In addition, some introns in higher plant genes also regulate gene expression by affecting the pattern of gene expression, enhancing the level of gene expression and driving the gene expression.

  10. Gene therapy for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, K; Engelhard, H H

    2000-09-01

    "Gene therapy" can be defined as the transfer of genetic material into a patient's cells for therapeutic purposes. To date, a diverse and creative assortment of treatment strategies utilizing gene therapy have been devised, including gene transfer for modulating the immune system, enzyme prodrug ("suicide gene") therapy, oncolytic therapy, replacement/therapeutic gene transfer, and antisense therapy. For malignant glioma, gene-directed prodrug therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene was the first gene therapy attempted clinically. A variety of different strategies have now been pursued experimentally and in clinical trials. Although, to date, gene therapy for brain tumors has been found to be reasonably safe, concerns still exist regarding issues related to viral delivery, transduction efficiency, potential pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Improved viral vectors are being sought, and potential use of gene therapy in combination with other treatments is being investigated.

  11. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  12. FunGene: the Functional Gene Pipeline and Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan A. Fish

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomal RNA genes have become the standard molecular markers for microbial community analysis for good reasons, including universal occurrence in cellular organisms, availability of large databases, and ease of rRNA gene region amplification and analysis. As markers, however, rRNA genes have some significant limitations. The rRNA genes are often present in multiple copies, unlike most protein-coding genes. The slow rate of change in rRNA genes means that multiple species sometimes share identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, while many more species share identical sequences in the short 16S rRNA regions commonly analyzed. In addition, the genes involved in many important processes are not distributed in a phylogenetically coherent manner, potentially due to gene loss or horizontal gene transfer.While rRNA genes remain the most commonly used markers, key genes in ecologically important pathways, e.g., those involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling, can provide important insights into community composition and function not obtainable through rRNA analysis. However, working with ecofunctional gene data requires some tools beyond those required for rRNA analysis. To address this, our Functional Gene Pipeline and Repository (FunGene; http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/ offers databases of many common ecofunctional genes and proteins, as well as integrated tools that allow researchers to browse these collections and choose subsets for further analysis, build phylogenetic trees, test primers and probes for coverage, and download aligned sequences. Additional FunGene tools are specialized to process coding gene amplicon data. For example, FrameBot produces frameshift-corrected protein and DNA sequences from raw reads while finding the most closely related protein reference sequence. These tools can help provide better insight into microbial communities by directly studying key genes involved in important ecological processes.

  13. A review on microcephaly genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad S.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to summarize the recent findings regarding microcephaly genes. We have discussed the molecular genetics studies of microcephaly genes including a comprehensive appraisal of the seven mapped loci (MCPH1–MCPH7, their corresponding genes and protein products of the genes, their likely role in normal brain development and the details of the mutations reported in these genes.

  14. Gene therapy for skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorell, Emily; Nguyen, Ngon; Lane, Alfred; Siprashvili, Zurab

    2014-04-01

    The skin possesses qualities that make it desirable for gene therapy, and studies have focused on gene therapy for multiple cutaneous diseases. Gene therapy uses a vector to introduce genetic material into cells to alter gene expression, negating a pathological process. This can be accomplished with a variety of viral vectors or nonviral administrations. Although results are promising, there are several potential pitfalls that must be addressed to improve the safety profile to make gene therapy widely available clinically.

  15. Gene Therapy for Skin Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The skin possesses qualities that make it desirable for gene therapy, and studies have focused on gene therapy for multiple cutaneous diseases. Gene therapy uses a vector to introduce genetic material into cells to alter gene expression, negating a pathological process. This can be accomplished with a variety of viral vectors or nonviral administrations. Although results are promising, there are several potential pitfalls that must be addressed to improve the safety profile to make gene thera...

  16. Gene decay in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. J. van Passel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene-dense chromosomes of archaea and bacteria were long thought to be devoid of pseudogenes, but with the massive increase in available genome sequences, whole genome comparisons between closely related species have identified mutations that have rendered numerous genes inactive. Comparative analyses of sequenced archaeal genomes revealed numerous pseudogenes, which can constitute up to 8.6% of the annotated coding sequences in some genomes. The largest proportion of pseudogenes is created by gene truncations, followed by frameshift mutations. Within archaeal genomes, large numbers of pseudogenes contain more than one inactivating mutation, suggesting that pseudogenes are deleted from the genome more slowly in archaea than in bacteria. Although archaea seem to retain pseudogenes longer than do bacteria, most archaeal genomes have unique repertoires of pseudogenes.

  17. Detection of Fetomaternal Genotype Associations in Early-Onset Disorders: Evaluation of Different Methods and Their Application to Childhood Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Healy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Several designs and analytical approaches have been proposed to dissect offspring from maternal genetic contributions to early-onset diseases. However, lack of parental controls halts the direct verification of the assumption of mating symmetry (MS required to assess maternally-mediated effects. In this study, we used simulations to investigate the performance of existing methods under mating asymmetry (MA when parents of controls are missing. Our results show that the log-linear, likelihood-based framework using a case-triad/case-control hybrid design provides valid tests for maternal genetic effects even under MA. Using this approach, we examined fetomaternal associations between 29 SNPs in 12 cell-cycle genes and childhood pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. We identified putative fetomaternal effects at loci CDKN2A rs36228834 (P=.017 and CDKN2B rs36229158 (P=.022 that modulate the risk of childhood ALL. These data further corroborate the importance of the mother's genotype on the susceptibility to early-onset diseases.

  18. Cross-Cancer Genome-Wide Analysis of Lung, Ovary, Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Reveals Novel Pleiotropic Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D; Eeles, Rosalind A; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward L; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J; Stevens, Victoria L; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C; Goode, Ellen L; Permuth, Jennifer B; Risch, Harvey A; Reid, Brett M; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J; Kocarnik, Jonathan K; Newcomb, Polly A; Schoen, Robert E; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Southey, Melissa C; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S; Yang, Xiaohong R; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V; Edlund, Christopher K; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Jenkins, Mark; Le Marchand, Loïc; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Schmit, Stephanie L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Woods, Michael O; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Easton, Douglas F; Hunter, David J; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-09-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5103-14. ©2016 AACR.

  19. High-resolution Whole-Genome Analysis of Skull Base Chordomas Implicates FHIT Loss in Chordoma Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Jose Diaz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a rare tumor arising in the sacrum, clivus, or vertebrae. It is often not completely resectable and shows a high incidence of recurrence and progression with shortened patient survival and impaired quality of life. Chemotherapeutic options are limited to investigational therapies at present. Therefore, adjuvant therapy for control of tumor recurrence and progression is of great interest, especially in skull base lesions where complete tumor resection is often not possible because of the proximity of cranial nerves. To understand the extent of genetic instability and associated chromosomal and gene losses or gains in skull base chordoma, we undertook whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis of flash frozen surgical chordoma specimens, 21 from the clivus and 1 from C1 to C2 vertebrae. We confirm the presence of a deletion at 9p involving CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and MTAP but at a much lower rate (22% than previously reported for sacral chordoma. At a similar frequency (21%, we found aneuploidy of chromosome 3. Tissue microarray immunohistochemistry demonstrated absent or reduced fragile histidine triad (FHIT protein expression in 98% of sacral chordomas and 67%of skull base chordomas. Our data suggest that chromosome 3 aneuploidy and epigenetic regulation of FHIT contribute to loss of the FHIT tumor suppressor in chordoma. The finding that FHIT is lost in a majority of chordomas provides new insight into chordoma pathogenesis and points to a potential new therapeutic target for this challenging neoplasm.

  20. Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fred; Schildkraut, Joellen; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir; Stevens, Victoria L.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter; Goode, Ellen L.; Permuth, Jennifer; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brett M.; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J.; Kocarnik, Jonathan K.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Schoen, Robert E.; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Zheng, Wei; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N.; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y. Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma’en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L.; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B.; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-staged approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. PMID:27197191

  1. Hypermethylation of CCND2 May Reflect a Smoking-Induced Precancerous Change in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Salskov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It remains unknown whether tobacco smoke induces DNA hypermethylation as an early event in carcinogenesis or as a late event, specific to overt cancer tissue. Using MethyLight assays, we analyzed 316 lung tissue samples from 151 cancer-free subjects (121 ever-smokers and 30 never-smokers for hypermethylation of 19 genes previously observed to be hypermethylated in nonsmall cell lung cancers. Only APC (39%, CCND2 (21%, CDH1 (7%, and RARB (4% were hypermethylated in >2% of these cancer-free subjects. CCND2 was hypermethylated more frequently in ever-smokers (26% than in never-smokers (3%. CCND2 hypermethylation was also associated with increased age and upper lobe sample location. APC was frequently hypermethylated in both ever-smokers (41% and never-smokers (30%. BVES, CDH13, CDKN2A (p16, CDKN2B, DAPK1, IGFBP3, IGSF4, KCNH5, KCNH8, MGMT, OPCML, PCSK6, RASSF1, RUNX, and TMS1 were rarely hypermethylated (<2% in all subjects. Hypermethylation of CCND2 may reflect a smoking-induced precancerous change in the lung.

  2. Correlating Expression Data with Gene Function Using Gene Ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Qi; DENG,Yong; WANG,Chuan; SHI,Tie-Liu; LI,Yi-Xue

    2006-01-01

    Clustering is perhaps one of the most widely used tools for microarray data analysis. Proposed roles for genes of unknown function are inferred from clusters of genes similarity expressed across many biological conditions.However, whether function annotation by similarity metrics is reliable or not and to what extent the similarity in gene expression patterns is useful for annotation of gene functions, has not been evaluated. This paper made a comprehensive research on the correlation between the similarity of expression data and of gene functions using Gene Ontology. It has been found that although the similarity in expression patterns and the similarity in gene functions are significantly dependent on each other, this association is rather weak. In addition, among the three categories of Gene Ontology, the similarity of expression data is more useful for cellular component annotation than for biological process and molecular function. The results presented are interesting for the gene functions prediction research area.

  3. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth > For Parents > Gene Therapy and ... by a "bad" gene. continue Two Types of Gene Therapy The two forms of gene therapy are: Somatic ...

  4. The gene tree delusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level relationships among placental mammals are mostly resolved, but several polytomies remain contentious. Song et al. (2012) claimed to have resolved three of these using shortcut coalescence methods (MP-EST, STAR) and further concluded that these methods, which assume no within-locus recombination, are required to unravel deep-level phylogenetic problems that have stymied concatenation. Here, we reanalyze Song et al.'s (2012) data and leverage these re-analyses to explore key issues in systematics including the recombination ratchet, gene tree stoichiometry, the proportion of gene tree incongruence that results from deep coalescence versus other factors, and simulations that compare the performance of coalescence and concatenation methods in species tree estimation. Song et al. (2012) reported an average locus length of 3.1 kb for the 447 protein-coding genes in their phylogenomic dataset, but the true mean length of these loci (start codon to stop codon) is 139.6 kb. Empirical estimates of recombination breakpoints in primates, coupled with consideration of the recombination ratchet, suggest that individual coalescence genes (c-genes) approach ∼12 bp or less for Song et al.'s (2012) dataset, three to four orders of magnitude shorter than the c-genes reported by these authors. This result has general implications for the application of coalescence methods in species tree estimation. We contend that it is illogical to apply coalescence methods to complete protein-coding sequences. Such analyses amalgamate c-genes with different evolutionary histories (i.e., exons separated by >100,000 bp), distort true gene tree stoichiometry that is required for accurate species tree inference, and contradict the central rationale for applying coalescence methods to difficult phylogenetic problems. In addition, Song et al.'s (2012) dataset of 447 genes includes 21 loci with switched taxonomic names, eight duplicated loci, 26 loci with non-homologous sequences that are

  5. Novel Genomic Aberrations in Testicular Germ Cell Tumors by Array-CGH, and Associated Gene Expression Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf I. Skotheim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Testicular germ cell tumors of adolescent and young adult men (TGCTs generally have near triploid and complex karyotypes. The actual genes driving the tumorigenesis remain essentially to be identified. Materials and Methods: To determine the detailed DNA copy number changes, and investigate their impact on gene expression levels, we performed an integrated microarray profiling of TGCT genomes and transcriptomes. We analyzed 17 TGCTs, three precursor lesions, and the embryonal carcinoma cell lines, NTERA2 and 2102Ep, by comparative genomic hybridization microarrays (array-CGH, and integrated the data with transcriptome profiles of the same samples. Results: The gain of chromosome arm 12p was, as expected, the most common aberration, and we found CCND2, CD9, GAPD, GDF3, NANOG, and TEAD4 to be the therein most highly over-expressed genes. Additional frequent genomic aberrations revealed some shorter chromosomal segments, which are novel to TGCT, as well as known aberrations for which we here refined boundaries. These include gains from 7p15.2 and 21q22.2, and losses of 4p16.3 and 22q13.3. Integration of DNA copy number information to gene expression profiles identified that BRCC3, FOS, MLLT11, NES, and RAC1 may act as novel oncogenes in TGCT. Similarly, DDX26, ERCC5, FZD4, NME4, OPTN, and RB1 were both lost and under-expressed genes, and are thus putative TGCT suppressor genes. Conclusion: This first genome-wide integrated array-CGH and gene expression profiling of TGCT provides novel insights into the genome biology underlying testicular tumorigenesis.

  6. Searching for speciation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Benjamin George; Côté, Isabelle M; Emerson, Brent C

    2011-01-01

    Closely related species that show clear phenotypic divergence, but without obvious geographic barriers, can provide opportunities to study how diversification can occur when opportunities for allopatric speciation are limited. We examined genetic divergence in the coral reef fish genus Hypoplectr...... evidence for genes that may be associated with colour morphotype in the genus Hypoplectrus....

  7. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannenfelser Ruth

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs, researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our

  8. Industrial scale gene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notka, Frank; Liss, Michael; Wagner, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The most recent developments in the area of deep DNA sequencing and downstream quantitative and functional analysis are rapidly adding a new dimension to understanding biochemical pathways and metabolic interdependencies. These increasing insights pave the way to designing new strategies that address public needs, including environmental applications and therapeutic inventions, or novel cell factories for sustainable and reconcilable energy or chemicals sources. Adding yet another level is building upon nonnaturally occurring networks and pathways. Recent developments in synthetic biology have created economic and reliable options for designing and synthesizing genes, operons, and eventually complete genomes. Meanwhile, high-throughput design and synthesis of extremely comprehensive DNA sequences have evolved into an enabling technology already indispensable in various life science sectors today. Here, we describe the industrial perspective of modern gene synthesis and its relationship with synthetic biology. Gene synthesis contributed significantly to the emergence of synthetic biology by not only providing the genetic material in high quality and quantity but also enabling its assembly, according to engineering design principles, in a standardized format. Synthetic biology on the other hand, added the need for assembling complex circuits and large complexes, thus fostering the development of appropriate methods and expanding the scope of applications. Synthetic biology has also stimulated interdisciplinary collaboration as well as integration of the broader public by addressing socioeconomic, philosophical, ethical, political, and legal opportunities and concerns. The demand-driven technological achievements of gene synthesis and the implemented processes are exemplified by an industrial setting of large-scale gene synthesis, describing production from order to delivery.

  9. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V;

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  10. Endovascular Gene Delivery from a Stent Platform: Gene- Eluting Stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Ilia; Chorny, Michael; Adamo, Richard F; Forbes, Scott P; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    A synergistic impact of research in the fields of post-angioplasty restenosis, drug-eluting stents and vascular gene therapy over the past 15 years has shaped the concept of gene-eluting stents. Gene-eluting stents hold promise of overcoming some biological and technical problems inherent to drug-eluting stent technology. As the field of gene-eluting stents matures it becomes evident that all three main design modules of a gene-eluting stent: a therapeutic transgene, a vector and a delivery system are equally important for accomplishing sustained inhibition of neointimal formation in arteries treated with gene delivery stents. This review summarizes prior work on stent-based gene delivery and discusses the main optimization strategies required to move the field of gene-eluting stents to clinical translation.

  11. Tumor-specific gene expression patterns with gene expression profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Xiaogang; LI Yingxin; LI Jiangeng; GONG Daoxiong; WANG Jinlian

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of 14 common tumors and their counterpart normal tissues were analyzed with machine learning methods to address the problem of selection of tumor-specific genes and analysis of their differential expressions in tumor tissues. First, a variation of the Relief algorithm, "RFE_Relief algorithm" was proposed to learn the relations between genes and tissue types. Then, a support vector machine was employed to find the gene subset with the best classification performance for distinguishing cancerous tissues and their counterparts. After tissue-specific genes were removed, cross validation experiments were employed to demonstrate the common deregulated expressions of the selected gene in tumor tissues. The results indicate the existence of a specific expression fingerprint of these genes that is shared in different tumor tissues, and the hallmarks of the expression patterns of these genes in cancerous tissues are summarized at the end of this paper.

  12. Entrez Gene: gene-centered information at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglott, Donna; Ostell, Jim; Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    Entrez Gene (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene) is National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)'s database for gene-specific information. Entrez Gene maintains records from genomes which have been completely sequenced, which have an active research community to submit gene-specific information, or which are scheduled for intense sequence analysis. The content represents the integration of curation and automated processing from NCBI's Reference Sequence project (RefSeq), collaborating model organism databases, consortia such as Gene Ontology and other databases within NCBI. Records in Entrez Gene are assigned unique, stable and tracked integers as identifiers. The content (nomenclature, genomic location, gene products and their attributes, markers, phenotypes and links to citations, sequences, variation details, maps, expression, homologs, protein domains and external databases) is available via interactive browsing through NCBI's Entrez system, via NCBI's Entrez programming utilities (E-Utilities) and for bulk transfer by FTP.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of VP2 gene of canine parvovirus and comparison with Indian and world isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, G; Chandra, M; Dwivedi, P N

    2016-03-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) causes hemorrhagic enteritis, especially in young dogs, leading to high morbidity and mortality. It has four main antigenic types CPV-2, CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. Virus protein 2 (VP2) is the main capsid protein and mutations affecting VP2 gene are responsible for the evolution of various antigenic types of CPV. Full length VP2 gene from field isolates was amplified and cloned for sequence analysis. The sequences were submitted to the GenBank and were assigned Acc. Nos., viz. KP406928.1 for P12, KP406927.1 for P15, KP406930.1 for P32, KP406926.1 for Megavac-6 and KP406929.1 for NobivacDHPPi. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the samples were forming a separate clad with vaccine strains. When the samples were compared with the world and Indian isolates, it was observed that samples formed a separate node indicating regional genetic variation in CPV.

  14. Gene set analysis for longitudinal gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piepho Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene set analysis (GSA has become a successful tool to interpret gene expression profiles in terms of biological functions, molecular pathways, or genomic locations. GSA performs statistical tests for independent microarray samples at the level of gene sets rather than individual genes. Nowadays, an increasing number of microarray studies are conducted to explore the dynamic changes of gene expression in a variety of species and biological scenarios. In these longitudinal studies, gene expression is repeatedly measured over time such that a GSA needs to take into account the within-gene correlations in addition to possible between-gene correlations. Results We provide a robust nonparametric approach to compare the expressions of longitudinally measured sets of genes under multiple treatments or experimental conditions. The limiting distributions of our statistics are derived when the number of genes goes to infinity while the number of replications can be small. When the number of genes in a gene set is small, we recommend permutation tests based on our nonparametric test statistics to achieve reliable type I error and better power while incorporating unknown correlations between and within-genes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has a greater power than other methods for various data distributions and heteroscedastic correlation structures. This method was used for an IL-2 stimulation study and significantly altered gene sets were identified. Conclusions The simulation study and the real data application showed that the proposed gene set analysis provides a promising tool for longitudinal microarray analysis. R scripts for simulating longitudinal data and calculating the nonparametric statistics are posted on the North Dakota INBRE website http://ndinbre.org/programs/bioinformatics.php. Raw microarray data is available in Gene Expression Omnibus (National Center for Biotechnology Information with

  15. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  16. Dominance from the perspective of gene-gene and gene-chemical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladki, Arkadiusz; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Kaczanowski, Szymon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we used genetic interaction (GI) and gene-chemical interaction (GCI) data to compare mutations with different dominance phenotypes. Our analysis focused primarily on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where haploinsufficient genes (HI; genes with dominant loss-of-function mutations) were found to be participating in gene expression processes, namely, the translation and regulation of gene transcription. Non-ribosomal HI genes (mainly regulators of gene transcription) were found to have more GIs and GCIs than haplosufficient (HS) genes. Several properties seem to lead to the enrichment of interactions, most notably, the following: importance, pleiotropy, gene expression level and gene expression variation. Importantly, after these properties were appropriately considered in the analysis, the correlation between dominance and GI/GCI degrees was still observed. Strikingly, for the GCIs of heterozygous strains, haploinsufficiency was the only property significantly correlated with the number of GCIs. We found ribosomal HI genes to be depleted in GIs/GCIs. This finding can be explained by their high variation in gene expression under different genetic backgrounds and environmental conditions. We observed the same distributions of GIs among non-ribosomal HI, ribosomal HI and HS genes in three other species: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens. One potentially interesting exception was the lack of significant differences in the degree of GIs between non-ribosomal HI and HS genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

  17. Gene-gene interaction between tuberculosis candidate genes in a South African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Erika; van der Merwe, Lize; van Helden, Paul D; Hoal, Eileen G

    2011-02-01

    In a complex disease such as tuberculosis (TB) it is increasingly evident that gene-gene interactions play a far more important role in an individual's susceptibility to develop the disease than single polymorphisms on their own, as one gene can enhance or hinder the expression of another gene. Gene-gene interaction analysis is a new approach to elucidate susceptibility to TB. The possibility of gene-gene interactions was assessed, focusing on 11 polymorphisms in nine genes (DC-SIGN, IFN-γ, IFNGR1, IL-8, IL-1Ra, MBL, NRAMP1, RANTES, and SP-D) that have been associated with TB, some repeatedly. An optimal model, which best describes and predicts TB case-control status, was constructed. Significant interactions were detected between eight pairs of variants. The models fitted the observed data extremely well, with p activation is greatly enhanced by IFN-γ and IFN-γ response elements that are present in the human NRAMP1 promoter region, providing further evidence for their interaction. This study enabled us to test the theory that disease outcome may be due to interaction of several gene effects. With eight instances of statistically significant gene-gene interactions, the importance of epistasis is clearly identifiable in this study. Methods for studying gene-gene interactions are based on a multilocus and multigene approach, consistent with the nature of complex-trait diseases, and may provide the paradigm for future genetic studies of TB.

  18. Gene doping in modern sport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAREK SAWCZUK

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The subject of this paper is gene doping, which should be understood as "he non-therapeutic use of cells, genes, genetic elements, or of the modulation of gene expression, having the capacity to improve athletic performance". The authors of this work, based on the review of literature and previous research, make an attempt at wider characterization of gene doping and the discussion of related potential threats.Methods: This is a comprehensive survey of literature on the latest applications of molecular biology in medicine. The analysis involves a dozen scientific databases examined in order to find genes used in gene therapy and potentially useful in gene doping. Results: The obtained results enable better recognition of gene doping and indicate genes used in medicine that could be used in gene doping. This paper describes potential effects of their use and associated risk, and predicts the possible developments of gene doping in the future. Conclusion: Gene doping is undoubtedly a part of modern sport. Although WADA included gene doping on the list of banned methods as early as 2004, as previously stated above, it has not managed to develop efficient methods of detection.

  19. [Gene pool and gene geography of the USSR population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychkov, Iu G; Balanovskaia, E V

    1992-01-01

    Gene pool and gene geography are discussed from the point of view of their conceptual history beginning from the original concept of A.S. Serebrovskiĭ (1928). Difference between the present-day gene geography and gene geography of gene pool is accentuated: the former only represents a portion of the latter. Historical and territorial integrity of the USSR population gene pool, in conjunction with its huge diversity, is the main problem being analysed by various means of computerized genetic cartography. Coupled with the gene frequency mapping, following methods were also used: mapping of average heterozygosity, of interpopulation differentiation, of principal component scores and mapping of geographical trend for each mapped genetic parameter. The work is based on 100 allelic genes and haplotypes from 30 independent loci studied on the average in 225 local populations. Statistical analysis of gene geographical maps is based on 3975 nodes of regular cartographic net for the USSR territory. The wind rose of systematic changes in the USSR gene pool has three main geographic orientations: W-E, SW-NE and S-N. At the same time, there are only two main systematic forces of gene pool evolution: the force of social history with predominant W-E orientation and the force of natural history with predominant S-N orientation of their actions. The heterozygosity level of gene pool declines strictly in accordance with the resultant in the SW-NE direction.

  20. Immunotherapy and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2004-02-01

    The Immunotherapy and Gene Therapy meeting of the Academy of Medical Sciences reviewed the state-of-the-art and translational prospects for therapeutic interventions aimed at killing tumor cells, correcting genetic defects and developing vaccines for chronic infections. Crucial basic science concepts and information about dendritic cells, the structure and function of T-cell receptors, and manipulation of the immune response by cytokine antagonists and peptides were presented. This information underpins vaccine design and delivery, as well as attempts to immunomodulate autoimmune disease. Results from studies using anticancer DNA vaccines, which include appropriate signals for both the innate and adaptive immune response, were presented in several talks. The vaccines incorporated helper epitopes and cancer target epitopes such as immunoglobulin idiotypes (for lymphomas and myelomas), melanoma-associated antigens (for melanoma and other solid tumors) and minor histocompatibility antigens (for leukemia). The results of using vaccines employing similar principles and designed to reduce viral load in HIV/AIDS patients were also presented. The introduction of suicide genes incorporating the bacterial enzyme nitroreductase gene (ntr) targeted at tumor cells prior to administration of the prodrug CB-1954, converted by ntr into a toxic alkylating agent, was discussed against the background of clinical trials and improved suicide gene design. The introduction into hematopoietic stem cells of missing genes for the common gamma-chain, deficiency of which causes severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), used similar retroviral transduction. The outcome of treating six SCID patients in the UK, and ten in France was successful immune reconstitution in the majority of patients, but in two of the French cases a complication of lymphoproliferative disease due to insertional mutagenesis was observed. The adoptive transfer of T-cells specific for minor histocompatibility antigens (for

  1. The gene coding for PGC-1α modifies age at onset in Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberkofler Hannes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Huntington's disease (HD is one of the most common autosomal dominant inherited, neurodegenerative disorders. It is characterized by progressive motor, emotional and cognitive dysfunction. In addition metabolic abnormalities such as wasting and altered energy expenditure are increasingly recognized as clinical hallmarks of the disease. HD is caused by an unstable CAG repeat expansion in the HD gene (HTT, localized on chromosome 4p16.3. The number of CAG repeats in the HD gene is the main predictor of disease-onset, but the remaining variation is strongly heritable. Transcriptional dysregulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and enhanced oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathogenesis. Recent studies suggest that PGC-1α, a transcriptional master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism, is defective in HD. A genome wide search for modifier genes of HD age-of-onset had suggested linkage at chromosomal region 4p16-4p15, near the locus of PPARGC1A, the gene coding for PGC-1α. We now present data of 2-loci PPARGC1A block 2 haplotypes, showing an effect upon age-at-onset in 447 unrelated HD patients after statistical consideration of CAG repeat lengths in both HTT alleles. Block 1 haplotypes were not associated with the age-at-onset. Homozygosity for the 'protective' block 2 haplotype was associated with a significant delay in disease onset. To our knowledge this is the first study to show clinically relevant effects of the PGC-1α system on the course of Huntington's disease in humans.

  2. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  3. SOX genes: architects of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, H M; Walter, M A

    1996-07-01

    Development in higher organisms involves complex genetic regulation at the molecular level. The emerging picture of development control includes several families of master regulatory genes which can affect the expression of down-stream target genes in developmental cascade pathways. One new family of such development regulators is the SOX gene family. The SOX genes are named for a shared motif called the SRY box a region homologous to the DNA-binding domain of SRY, the mammalian sex determining gene. Like SRY, SOX genes play important roles in chordate development. At least a dozen human SOX genes have been identified and partially characterized (Tables 1 and 2). Mutations in SOX9 have recently been linked to campomelic dysplasia and autosomal sex reversal, and other SOX genes may also be associated with human disease.

  4. Alphaviruses in Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are enveloped single stranded RNA viruses, which as gene therapy vectors provide high-level transient gene expression. Semliki Forest virus (SFV, Sindbis virus (SIN and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis (VEE virus have been engineered as efficient replication-deficient and -competent expression vectors. Alphavirus vectors have frequently been used as vehicles for tumor vaccine generation. Moreover, SFV and SIN vectors have been applied for intratumoral injections in animals implanted with tumor xenografts. SIN vectors have demonstrated natural tumor targeting, which might permit systemic vector administration. Another approach for systemic delivery of SFV has been to encapsulate replication-deficient viral particles in liposomes, which can provide passive targeting to tumors and allow repeated administration without host immune responses. This approach has demonstrated safe delivery of encapsulated SFV particles to melanoma and kidney carcinoma patients in a phase I trial. Finally, the prominent neurotropism of alphaviruses make them attractive for the treatment of CNS-related diseases.

  5. Brains, genes, and primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Callaway, Edward M; Caddick, Sarah J; Churchland, Patricia; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A; Miller, Cory T; Mitchell, Jude F; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R; Movshon, J Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Silva, Afonso C; Strick, Peter L; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-05-06

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators, and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive, and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward.

  6. Gene Disease Diagnostic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄国亮; 张腾飞; 程京; 周玉祥; 刘诚迅; 金国藩; 邬敏贤; 严瑛白; 杨蓉

    2002-01-01

    Binary optics, where the optical element can be fabricated on a thin glass plate with micro-ion-etching film layer, has been widely applied in recent years. A novel optical scanning system for gene disease diagnostics described in this paper has four kinds of optical devices, including beam splitters, an array lens, an array filter and detection arrays. A software was developed to design the binary optics system using an iterative method. Two beam splitters were designed and fabricated, which can divide a beam into a 9×9 array or into a 13×13 array. The beam splitters have good diffraction efficiencies (>70%) and an even energy distribution. The gene disease diagnostic system is a portable biochip and binary optics technology. The binary optical devices in the non-confocal scanning system can raise the fluorescence detection sensitivity of the micro-array hybrid biochip.

  7. Gene therapy in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chang-tai; Guo Xue-gang; Pan Bo-rong

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction We have reviewed the gene therapy in gastrointestinal diseases[1]. Gastric cancer is common in China[2~20] ,and its early diagnosis andtreatment are still difficult up to now[13~36]. The expression of anexogenous gene introduced by gene therapy into patients with gliomascan be monitored non- invasively by positron- emission tomography[4]. In recent years, gene study in cancer is a hotspot, and great progress hasbeen achieved[33~41].

  8. Gene therapy for gastric diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Fumoto, Shintaro; Nishi, Junya; Nakamura, Junzo; Nishida, Koyo

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy for gastric cancer and gastric ulcer is a rationalized strategy since various genes correlate with these diseases. Since gene expressions in non-target tissues/cells cause side effects, a selective gene delivery system targeted to the stomach and/or cancer must be developed. The route of vector transfer (direct injection, systemic, intraperitoneal, gastric serosal surface and oral administration) is an important issue which can determine efficacy and safety. Strategies for cancer...

  9. Gene Porter Bridwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Gene Porter Bridwell served as the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 6, 1994 until February 3, 1996, when he retired from NASA after thirty-four years service. Bridwell, a Marshall employee since 1962, had been Marshall's Space Shuttle Projects Office Director and Space Station Redesign Team deputy manager. Under Bridwell, Marshall worked to develop its role as a Center of Excellence for propulsion and for providing access to space.

  10. Gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions of childhood asthma: a multifactor dimension reduction approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on asthma is well documented in literature, but a systematic analysis on the interaction between various genetic and environmental factors is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a population-based, case-control study comprised of seventh-grade children from 14 Taiwanese communities. A total of 235 asthmatic cases and 1,310 non-asthmatic controls were selected for DNA collection and genotyping. We examined the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions between 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidative, inflammatory and obesity-related genes, and childhood asthma. Environmental exposures and disease status were obtained from parental questionnaires. The model-free and non-parametrical multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method was used for the analysis. A three-way gene-gene interaction was elucidated between the gene coding glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1, the gene coding interleukin-4 receptor alpha chain (IL4Ra and the gene coding insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2 on the risk of lifetime asthma. The testing-balanced accuracy on asthma was 57.83% with a cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10. The interaction of preterm birth and indoor dampness had the highest training-balanced accuracy at 59.09%. Indoor dampness also interacted with many genes, including IL13, beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. We also used likelihood ratio tests for interaction and chi-square tests to validate our results and all tests showed statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study suggest that GSTP1, INSIG2 and IL4Ra may influence the lifetime asthma susceptibility through gene-gene interactions in schoolchildren. Home dampness combined with each one of the genes STAT6, IL13 and ADRB2 could raise the asthma risk.

  11. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  12. Genealogy and gene trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmuson, Marianne

    2008-02-01

    Heredity can be followed in persons or in genes. Persons can be identified only a few generations back, but simplified models indicate that universal ancestors to all now living persons have occurred in the past. Genetic variability can be characterized as variants of DNA sequences. Data are available only from living persons, but from the pattern of variation gene trees can be inferred by means of coalescence models. The merging of lines backwards in time leads to a MRCA (most recent common ancestor). The time and place of living for this inferred person can give insights in human evolutionary history. Demographic processes are incorporated in the model, but since culture and customs are known to influence demography the models used ought to be tested against available genealogy. The Icelandic data base offers a possibility to do so and points to some discrepancies. Mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome patterns give a rather consistent view of human evolutionary history during the latest 100 000 years but the earlier epochs of human evolution demand gene trees with longer branches. The results of such studies reveal as yet unsolved problems about the sources of our genome.

  13. Compositional gradients in Gramineae genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun; Tao, Lin

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we describe a property of Gramineae genes, and perhaps all monocot genes, that is not observed in eudicot genes. Along the direction of transcription, beginning at the junction of the 5'-UTR and the coding region, there are gradients in GC content, codon usage, and amino-acid usage...

  14. Ascidian gene-expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery, William R.

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of gene-expression profiling, a large number of genes can now be investigated simultaneously during critical stages of development. This approach will be particularly informative in studies of ascidians, basal chordates whose genomes and embryology are uniquely suited for mapping developmental gene networks.

  15. Decationized polyplexes for gene delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novo, L.; Mastrobattista, E.; Nostrum, van C.F.; Lammers, T.G.G.M.; Hennink, W.E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy has received much attention in the field of drug delivery. Synthetic, nonviral gene delivery systems have gained increasing attention as vectors for gene therapy mainly due to a favorable immunogenicity profile and ease of manufacturing as compared to viral vectors. The great majority o

  16. Independent Gene Discovery and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsule, Vrushalee; Coric, Dijana; Delancy, Russell; Dunham, Heather; Melancon, Caleb; Thompson, Dennis; Toms, Jamie; White, Ashley; Shultz, Jeffry

    2010-01-01

    A clear understanding of basic gene structure is critical when teaching molecular genetics, the central dogma and the biological sciences. We sought to create a gene-based teaching project to improve students' understanding of gene structure and to integrate this into a research project that can be implemented by instructors at the secondary level…

  17. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruben Hernandez-Alcoceba; Bruno Sangro; Jesus Prieto

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition,gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy.These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reached clinical phases. We present a review on the basis and the actual status of gene therapy approaches applied to liver cancer.

  18. Gene electrotransfer in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapte...... describes how gene therapy may be performed using electric pulses to enhance uptake and expression.......Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapter...

  19. Gene finding in novel genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Ian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational gene prediction continues to be an important problem, especially for genomes with little experimental data. Results I introduce the SNAP gene finder which has been designed to be easily adaptable to a variety of genomes. In novel genomes without an appropriate gene finder, I demonstrate that employing a foreign gene finder can produce highly inaccurate results, and that the most compatible parameters may not come from the nearest phylogenetic neighbor. I find that foreign gene finders are more usefully employed to bootstrap parameter estimation and that the resulting parameters can be highly accurate. Conclusion Since gene prediction is sensitive to species-specific parameters, every genome needs a dedicated gene finder.

  20. Alzheimer's Genes: Are You at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzheimer's genes: Are you at risk? Several genes have been associated with Alzheimer's disease, but more research is needed. By Mayo ... Certain genes make you more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease. Genes control the function of every cell ...

  1. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show details National Center for ... 45K) PDF version of this title (3.8M) Gene sequence Genome view see gene locations Entrez Gene ...

  2. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  3. Genes, Children and Pediatricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Correia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A male newborn, presenting hipotonia and posterior parietal bossing, developed, in the first 12 hours of life, refusal to feed and hypoglycaemia. A cranial ultrasound, skull X-ray and CT scan revealed an occipital and parietal fracture with an underlying haematoma and extensive extracranial soft-tissue swelling. He was submitted to surgical drainage. After 24 hours: new intracerebral bleeding. At the age of two-months he presented abnormal skin and sparse kinky hair. Serum copper and caeruloplasmin levels were below the normal range. Molecular diagnosis of Menkes disease was made by the identification of a new mutation in ATP7A gene.

  4. P15 - Reduced Physical Activity Correlates with Osteopenic or Osteoporotic Status in Postmenopausal Women: Preliminary Results from the Prof Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, P.; Coli, G.; Argentiero, A.; Neglia, C.; Chitano, G.; Paladini, D.; Mundi, S.; Paladini, L.; Greco, M.; Girasoli, C.; Gianicolo, M. E.; Pantile, V.; Argentiero, D.; De Padova, G.; Pansa, L.; Nibio, L.; Di Giuseppe, P.; Minosi, A.; Cirasino, L.; Laselva, G.; Scialpi, M.; Benvenuto, M.; D’Angela, D.; Brandi, M. L.; Distante, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Italy has a considerable yearly incidence of osteoporotic fractures: about 300,000. In this context, preventive strategies are based mainly on early identification of people at higher risk of fractures and of clinical risk factors. Within the PROF (Prevention of Osteoporotic Fractures) project, i.e. a synergic effort of researchers and clinicians aimed at preventing osteoporotic fractures in Southern Apulia (Salento), a region with an increasing number of elderly people, we investigated the correlation between reduced physical activity and osteopenic or osteoporotic status in postmenopausal women. Methods: During the years 2009–2010, 5665 postmenopausal women (mean age 62 years, range 39 to 86) underwent quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS) measurement at the heel and phalanx. Demographic and anamnestic data were recorded for all the patients, including BMI, nutrition, menopause, physical activity, previous fractures, familial fragility fractures. Three demineralisation categories were identified a priori: a) Demineralisation, when any T-score <−1.0 SD was observed; b) Severe demineralisation, whenever a T-score <−2.0 was observed, corresponding to a higher risk of fracture; c) Osteoporosis, whenever a T-score <−2.5±0.2 (for the heel) or T-score <−3.2±0.2 (for the phalanx) was observed. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed in order to assess the correlation between low physical activity (patients declaring themselves to be completely sedentary) and osteopenic or osteoporotic status. Results: Of the 5665 women, demineralisation was observed in 4487 patients (79%), corresponding to severe osteopenia or osteoporotic status in 2823 women (50% of all the examined subjects) and frank osteoporosis in 846 patients (15%). In total, of the 1255 women with a clinical history of reduced physical activity, 1058 (84.3%) presented demineralisation corresponding at least to an osteopenic status. In addition, demineralisation typical of severe osteopenia or osteoporosis was diagnosed in 752 “sedentary” patients (60%), 309 of whom (25%) were frankly osteoporotic. Conclusions: In the PROF dataset, a sedentary lifestyle was found to be associated with an increased occurrence of osteopenic or osteoporotic status in postmenopausal women.

  5. Neutralisation des porzinen endogenen Retrovirus (PERV) durch Antikörper gegen das transmembrane Hüllprotein p15E

    OpenAIRE

    Wächter, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Die Xenotransplantation von porzinem Gewebe stellt eine Möglichkeit der Organtransplantation dar, die es ermöglichen soll, Menschen mit Organschäden zu retten bzw. deren Lebensbedingungen dauerhaft zu verbessern. Neben dem Risiko einer Infektion mit Bakterien, Pilzen oder anderen Parasiten stellt die Übertragung von porzinen endogenen Retroviren (PERV) ein weiteres potentielles Risiko dar. Trotz der Möglichkeit, dass PERV in der Lage ist, in vitro humane Zellen zu infizieren, konnte bis heut...

  6. Common sequence variants on 2p15 and Xp11.22 confer susceptibility to prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gudmundsson, J.; Sulem, P.; Rafnar, T.; Bergthorsson, J.T.; Manolescu, A.; Gudbjartsson, D.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Sigurdsson, A.; Benediktsdottir, K.R.; Blondal, T.; Jakobsdottir, M.; Stacey, S.N.; Kostic, J.; Kristinsson, K.T.; Birgisdottir, B.; Ghosh, S.; Magnusdottir, D.N.; Thorlacius, S.; Thorleifsson, G.; Zheng, S.L.; Sun, J.; Chang, B.L.; Elmore, J.B.; Breyer, J.P.; McReynolds, K.M.; Bradley, K.M.; Yaspan, B.L.; Wiklund, F.; Stattin, P.; Lindstrom, S.; Adami, H.O.; McDonnell, S.K.; Schaid, D.J.; Cunningham, J.M.; Wang, L.; Cerhan, J.R.; Sauver, J.L. St; Isaacs, S.D.; Wiley, K.E.; Partin, A.W.; Walsh, P.C.; Polo, S.; Ruiz-Echarri, M.; Navarrete, S.; Fuertes, F.; Saez, B.; Godino, J.; Weijerman, P.C.; Swinkels, D.W.; Aben, K.K.H.; Witjes, J.A.M.; Suarez, B.K.; Helfand, B.T.; Frigge, M.L.; Kristjansson, K.; Ober, C.; Jonsson, E.; Einarsson, G.V.; Xu, J.; Gronberg, H.; Smith, J.R.; Thibodeau, S.N.; Isaacs, W.B.; Catalona, W.J.; Mayordomo, J.I.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Gulcher, J.R.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Kong, A.; Stefansson, K.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide SNP association study on prostate cancer on over 23,000 Icelanders, followed by a replication study including over 15,500 individuals from Europe and the United States. Two newly identified variants were shown to be associated with prostate cancer: rs5945572 on Xp11.22 and

  7. Estilos educativos familiares: valoración en un grupo de familias españolas (p. 15-41)

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano, María José Hernández; Grande, María Dolores Pérez; González, Sara Serrate

    2015-01-01

    ResumenLas prácticas educativas familiares han sido analizadas y diferenciadas en función de distintos estilos educativos parentales. En este estudio revisamos las características más significativas de los principales estilos educativos familiares y sus consecuencias sobre el desarrollo infantil. Para ello, nos basamos fundamentalmente en las clásicas tipologías de Baumrind (1978), revisadas por MacCoby y Martín (1983). A continuación presentamos los datos de un estudio con familias españolas...

  8. P15.12SURVIVAL AND QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER SURGERY FOR BENIGN INTRACRANIAL TUMOURS: AGE MATTERS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocchi, N.; Iacoangeli, M.; Dobran, M.; Di Rienzo, A.; di Somma, L.; Alvaro, L.; Nasi, D.; Benigni, R.; Sessa, F.; Scerrati, M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intracranial benign tumours are an increasingly common condition in the elderly population (>70 years) thanks to the prolonged life expectancy and the improvement of neuroradiological studies. Surgical resection in these patients, even if indicated, could be controversial due to patient's ageing physiology and eventual comorbidities, so it is difficult for surgeons to compare the advantages of a surgical removal against radiosurgery or a “wait and see” behaviour. We report our experience in dealing with patients (>70 years) surgically treated for benign intracranial neoplastic lesions (deep-seated and/or located in eloquent areas). We report how surgery in the elderly could be effective as in younger patients with no higher incidence of complications and reduction of the quality of life and/or survival. METHODS: From January 2010 to January 2014, 42 patients (12 male and 30 female with a mean age of 75 years) were submitted to a benign intracranial tumours surgical removal. The oldest patient was 86 years old. Neurological and physical conditions were assessed preoperatively and neuroradiological examination (MRI or, if it is contraindicated, a CT scan) revealed size and location of the lesions. Intraoperatively we used neuronavigation and neurophysiological monitoring. Outcome data included mortality, recurrence, complications and length of hospital stay (LoS). RESULTS: The patients' pathologies were: meningiomas in 32 patients, followed by 7 pituitary adenomas and 3 acoustic neuromas. In 35 pts a gross total removal was obtained whereas a sub total removal and partial removal were achieved in 5 and 2 pts respectively. Patients had a mean length of hospital stay of 9,7 days. Postoperative complications were observed in 6 patients, represented by CSF leaks (4 pts) and intracerebral haemorrhage (2 pts). There were better postoperative results in patients with few comorbidities and tumours of small dimensions and accessible location. The mortality rate was 2,4 %. Neurological symptoms improved in 38 patients and deteriorated in 4 pts. Patients with recurrent tumours seems to have a higher operative risk. CONCLUSIONS: While in the past age itself often represented a contraindication to surgical removal of benign intracranial tumours, nowadays, thanks the improvements in surgical technique and the minimally invasive attitude along with tailored surgical instruments (microneurosurgery or endoscopy) and new technologies such as neuronavigation and intraoperative brain mapping, these surgical procedures could be effectively performed without higher incidence of postoperative complications, when compared to the same surgery performed in younger patients. Obviously a careful preoperative anaesthetic evaluation is mandatory, and above all a meticulous postoperative management. Patients too long intubated or kept in bed easly develop complications.

  9. NUP98/11p15 translocations affect CD34+ cells in myeloid and T lymphoid leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, Barbara; Nofrini, Valeria; Barba, Gianluca; Matteucci, Caterina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gorello, Paolo; Beverloo, Berna; Vitale, Antonella; Wlodarska, Iwona; Vandenberghe, Peter; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    We assessed lineage involvement by NUP98 translocations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). Single cell analysis by FICTION (Fluorescence Immunophenotype and Interphase Cytogenetics as a Tool for Investigation of Neoplasms) showed that, despite diverse partners, i.e. NSD1, DDX10, RAP1GDS1, and LNP1, NUP98 translocations always affected a CD34+/CD133+ hematopoietic precursor. Interestingly the abnormal clone included myelomonocytes, erythroid cells, B- and T- lymphocytes in MDS/AML and only CD7+/CD3+ cells in T-ALL. The NUP98-RAP1GDS1 affected different hematopoietic lineages in AML and T-ALL. Additional specific genomic events, were identified, namely FLT3 and CEBPA mutations in MDS/AML, and NOTCH1 mutations and MYB duplication in T-ALL.

  10. Chromatin analysis of occluded genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyun; Gaetz, Jedidiah; Bugarija, Branimir; Fernandes, Croydon J.; Snyder, Gregory E.; Bush, Eliot C.; Lahn, Bruce T.

    2009-01-01

    We recently described two opposing states of transcriptional competency. One is termed ‘competent’ whereby a gene is capable of responding to trans-acting transcription factors of the cell, such that it is active if appropriate transcriptional activators are present, though it can also be silent if activators are absent or repressors are present. The other is termed ‘occluded’ whereby a gene is silenced by cis-acting, chromatin-based mechanisms in a manner that blocks it from responding to trans-acting factors, such that it is silent even when activators are present in the cellular milieu. We proposed that gene occlusion is a mechanism by which differentiated cells stably maintain their phenotypic identities. Here, we describe chromatin analysis of occluded genes. We found that DNA methylation plays a causal role in maintaining occlusion for a subset of occluded genes. We further examined a variety of other chromatin marks typically associated with transcriptional silencing, including histone variants, covalent histone modifications and chromatin-associated proteins. Surprisingly, we found that although many of these marks are robustly linked to silent genes (which include both occluded genes and genes that are competent but silent), none is linked specifically to occluded genes. Although the observation does not rule out a possible causal role of these chromatin marks in occlusion, it does suggest that these marks might be secondary effect rather than primary cause of the silent state in many genes. PMID:19380460

  11. PROAPOPTOTIC FUNCTION OF FHIT GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Zhe-fu; HAN De-min; ZHANG Luo; ZHANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene plays an important role in maintaining the homeostasis between cell loss and growth. Fragile in maintaining the homeostasis between cell loss and growth. Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene found recently was studied in a deep going way; it becomes the focus as a result of its roleof ep going way; it becomes the focus as a result of its roleof anti-tumor in human various type of tissue. Due to the high efficiency of FHIT gene benefiting the anti-tumor, it is proposed gh efficiency of FHIT gene benefiting the anti-tumor, it is proposed as a candidate of tumor suppressor gene though there are several opposite opinions.several opposite opinions. We stress the summary of some properties of FHIT gene on proapoptosis according to the published data which showed gene on proapoptosis according to the published data which showed the stronger proapoptotic function of FHIT gene; the apoptosis induced by FHIT depends on the expression level and status of ene; the apoptosis induced by FHIT depends on the expression level and status of FHIT; and FHIT gene can alternate the cell cycling properties and reduce the tumorigenic potential; the apoptotic process e can alternate the cell cycling properties and reduce the tumorigenic potential; the apoptotic process induced by FHIT has no relation to p53 gene. In a ward, in consideration of its multiple functions against malignancies, FHIT in consideration of its multiple functions against malignancies, FHIT gene deserves attention and exploration as a selective target for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical et for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical therapeutic applications in further.le histidine triad (FHIT) gene; Apoptosis; Tumorigenesis; Tumor suppressor gene deserves attention and exploration as a selective target for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical therapeutic applications in further.

  12. Identification of genes and gene products necessary for bacterial bioluminescence.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Expression of luminescence in Escherichia coli was recently achieved by cloning genes from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. One DNA fragment on a hybrid plasmid encoded regulatory functions and enzymatic activities necessary for light production. We report the results of a genetic analysis to identify the luminescence genes (lux) that reside on this recombinant plasmid. lux gene mutations were generated by hydroxylamine treatment, and these mutations were ordered on a linear map by compl...

  13. GENE MUTATIONS, GENETIC DISEASE AND PHARMACOGENETIC GENES DISORDER

    OpenAIRE

    Ishak

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell mutation is able to create genetic variance in a cell population and can induce cancer and tumor when gene mutations took place at repressor gene in controlling cell cycles such as p53 gene. Whereas germline cell mutation can cause genetic disease such as sickle cell anemia, breast cancer, thalassemia, parkinson’s as well as defect of biochemical pathway that influence drug-receptor interaction, which has negative effect and lead to hospitalized of patient. Most of reports mentio...

  14. Alcoholism: genes and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroszi, Gabor; Goldman, David

    2004-12-01

    Alcoholism is a chronic relapsing/remitting disease that is frequently unrecognized and untreated, in part because of the partial efficacy of treatment. Only approximately one-third of patients remain abstinent and one-third have fully relapsed 1 year after withdrawal from alcohol, with treated patients doing substantially better than untreated [1]. The partial effectiveness of strategies for prevention and treatment, and variation in clinical course and side effects, represent a challenge and an opportunity to better understand the neurobiology of addiction. The strong heritability of alcoholism suggests the existence of inherited functional variants of genes that alter the metabolism of alcohol and variants of other genes that alter the neurobiologies of reward, executive cognitive function, anxiety/dysphoria, and neuronal plasticity. Each of these neurobiologies has been identified as a critical domain in the addictions. Functional alleles that alter alcoholism-related intermediate phenotypes include common alcohol dehydrogenase 1B and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 variants that cause the aversive flushing reaction; catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met leading to differences in three aspects of neurobiology: executive cognitive function, stress/anxiety response, and opioid function; opioid receptor micro1 (OPRM1) Asn40Asp, which may serve as a gatekeeper molecule in the action of naltrexone, a drug used in alcoholism treatment; and HTTLPR, which alters serotonin transporter function and appears to affect stress response and anxiety/dysphoria, which are factors relevant to initial vulnerability, the process of addiction, and relapse.

  15. Tetraspanin genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Vandepoele, Klaas; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2012-07-01

    Tetraspanins represent a four-transmembrane protein superfamily with a conserved structure and amino acid residues that are present in mammals, insects, fungi and plants. Tetraspanins interact with each other or with other membrane proteins to form tetraspanin-enriched microdomains that play important roles in development, pathogenesis and immune responses via facilitating cell-cell adhesion and fusion, ligand binding and intracellular trafficking. Here, we emphasize evolutionary aspects within the plant kingdom based on genomic sequence information. A phylogenetic tree based on 155 tetraspanin genes of 11 plant species revealed ancient and fast evolving clades. Tetraspanins were only present in multicellular plants, were often duplicated in the plant genomes and predicted by the electronic Fluorescent Pictograph for gene expression analysis to be either functionally redundant or divergent. Tetraspanins contain a large extracellular loop with conserved cysteines that provide the binding sites for the interactions. The Arabidopsis thaliana TETRASPANIN1/TORNADO2/EKEKO has a function in leaf and root patterning and TETRASPANIN3 was identified in the plasmodesmatal proteome, suggesting a role in cell-cell communication during plant development.

  16. Gene: a gene-centered information resource at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Garth R; Hem, Vichet; Katz, Kenneth S; Ovetsky, Michael; Wallin, Craig; Ermolaeva, Olga; Tolstoy, Igor; Tatusova, Tatiana; Pruitt, Kim D; Maglott, Donna R; Murphy, Terence D

    2015-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI) Gene database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene) integrates gene-specific information from multiple data sources. NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq) genomes for viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes are the primary foundation for Gene records in that they form the critical association between sequence and a tracked gene upon which additional functional and descriptive content is anchored. Additional content is integrated based on the genomic location and RefSeq transcript and protein sequence data. The content of a Gene record represents the integration of curation and automated processing from RefSeq, collaborating model organism databases, consortia such as Gene Ontology, and other databases within NCBI. Records in Gene are assigned unique, tracked integers as identifiers. The content (citations, nomenclature, genomic location, gene products and their attributes, phenotypes, sequences, interactions, variation details, maps, expression, homologs, protein domains and external databases) is available via interactive browsing through NCBI's Entrez system, via NCBI's Entrez programming utilities (E-Utilities and Entrez Direct) and for bulk transfer by FTP.

  17. Regulation of gene expression by Goodwin's loop with many genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; Łopaciuk, Agata

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a simple analysis of a long Goodwin's loop containing many genes. The genes form a closed series. The rate of transcription of any gene is up or down regulated by theprotein product of the preceding gene. We describe the loop with a system of ordinary differential equations of order s. Oscillatory solutions of the system are possible at the odd number of repressions and any number of inductions if the product of all Hill's coefficients, related to both repressions and inductions, is larger than:

  18. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata;

    2015-01-01

    expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles...... for these components, we observed that the residual expression levels (in 'functional genomic mRNA' profiling) correlated strongly with copy number. DNA copy number correlated positively with expression levels for 99% of all abundantly expressed human genes, indicating global gene dosage sensitivity. By applying...

  19. CDKN1C/p57kip2 is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistey Robert

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CDKN1C (also known as p57KIP2 is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor previously implicated in several types of human cancer. Its family members (CDKN1A/p21CIP1 and B/p27KIP1 have been implicated in breast cancer, but information about CDKN1C's role is limited. We hypothesized that decreased CDKN1C may be involved in human breast carcinogenesis in vivo. Methods We determined rates of allele imbalance or loss of heterozygosity (AI/LOH in CDKN1C, using an intronic polymorphism, and in the surrounding 11p15.5 region in 82 breast cancers. We examined the CDKN1C mRNA level in 10 cancers using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR, and the CDKN1C protein level in 20 cancers using immunohistochemistry (IHC. All samples were obtained using laser microdissection. Data were analyzed using standard statistical tests. Results AI/LOH at 11p15.5 occurred in 28/73 (38% informative cancers, but CDKN1C itself underwent AI/LOH in only 3/16 (19% cancers (p = ns. In contrast, CDKN1C mRNA levels were reduced in 9/10 (90% cancers (p Conclusion CDKN1C is expressed in normal epithelium of most breast cancer cases, mainly in the myothepithelial layer. This expression decreases, at both the mRNA and protein level, in the large majority of breast cancers, and does not appear to be mediated by AI/LOH at the gene. Thus, CDKN1C may be a breast cancer tumor suppressor.

  20. Type I oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1) associated with a large deletion of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spritz, R.A.; Wick, P.A.; Holmes, S.A.; Schnur, R.E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    OCA1 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin is reduced or absent in skin, hair, and eyes, due to deficient enzymatic activity of tyrosinase. TYR consists of 5 exons spanning over 65 kb at 11q14-q21. Analyses of TYR in >400 unrelated patients with OCA1 have identified more than 50 different point mutations; however, no large deletions have been detected. Here we report a large deletion of TYR in a Caucasian boy with OCA1B. Simultaneous SSCP/heteroduplex screening and DNA sequence analysis indicated that the patient was apparently homozygous for a previously described TYR mutation, adjacent to the 3` splice site of IVS2 (-7, t{r_arrow}a). To distinguish between possible gene deletion vs. maternal uniparental isodisomy, we characterized several chromosome 11 polymorphisms. Maternal uniparental isodisomy was excluded by the patient`s heterozygosity for alleles at D11S35 (11q21-122) and HBG2 (11p15.5). In addition, the patient failed to inherit paternal alleles at an MboI RFLP in exon 1 of TYR and at a TaqI RFLP in the promoter region of the gene. To detect a possible submicroscopic deletion, we performed quantitative Southern blot hybridization using a full length TYR cDNA. Compared with controls, both the patient and his father appeared deleted for two or three TYR-derived PstI fragments; the two TYRL-derived fragments appeared normal. These data indicate that the patient and his father have a partial TYR deletion, including at least exons 1, 2, and IVS2. Based on the organization of the gene, this deletion is at least 50 kb in size. The patient is thus hemizygous for the maternally-inherited mutation in IVS2, accounting for his OCA1B phenotype.

  1. Gene targeting with retroviral vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J.; Bernstein, A. (Toronto Univ., ON (Canada))

    1989-04-01

    The authors have designed and constructed integration-defective retroviral vectors to explore their potential for gene targeting in mammalian cells. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of the bacterial neomycin resistance (neo) gene were used to detect homologous recombination events between viral and chromosomal sequences. Stable neo gene correction events were selected at a frequency of approximately 1 G418/sup r/ cell per 3 x 10/sup 6/ infected cells. Analysis of the functional neo gene in independent targeted cell clones indicated that unintegrated retroviral linear DNA recombined with the target by gene conversion for variable distances into regions of nonhomology. In addition, transient neo gene correction events which were associated with the complete loss of the chromosomal target sequences were observed. These results demonstrated that retroviral vectors can recombine with homologous chromosomal sequences in rodent and human cells.

  2. PDMAEMA based gene delivery materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Agarwal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gene transfection is the transfer of genetic material like DNA into cells. Cationic polymers which form nanocomplexes with DNA, so-called non-viral gene vectors, are a highly promising platform for efficient gene transfection. Despite intensive research efforts and some of the on-going clinical trials on gene transfection, none of the existing cationic polymer systems are generally acceptable for human gene therapy. Since the process of gene transfection is complex and puts different challenges and demands on the delivery system, there is a strong requirement for the design and development of a multifunctional system in a simple way. This review will discuss recent efforts in design, synthesis, and performance of poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (PDMAEMA nanocomplexes with DNA.

  3. Gene set analysis for GWAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We discuss the use of modified Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) statistics in the context of gene set analysis and review corresponding null and alternative hypotheses. Especially, we show that, when enhancing the impact of highly significant genes in the calculation of the test statistic...... parameter and the genesis and distribution of the gene-level statistics, and illustrate the effects of differential weighting in a real-life example....

  4. Testing for gene-gene interaction with AMMI models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhdadi, Amina; Dubé, Marie-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown that many common diseases are influenced by multiple genes and their interactions. There is currently a strong interest in testing for association between combinations of these genes and disease, in particular because genes that affect the risk of disease only in the presence of another genetic variant may not be detected in marginal analysis. In this paper we propose the use of additive main effect and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) models to detect and to quantify gene-gene interaction effects for a quantitative trait. The objective of the present research is to demonstrate the practical advantages of these models to describe complex interaction between two unlinked loci. Although gene-gene interactions have often been defined as a deviance from additive genetic effects, the residual term has generally not been appropriately treated. The AMMI models allow for the analysis of a two way factorial data structure and combine the analysis of variance of the two main genotype effects with a principal component analysis of the residual multiplicative interaction. The AMMI models for gene-gene interaction presented here allow for the testing of non additivity between the two loci, and also describe how their interaction structure fits the existing non-additivity. Moreover, these models can be used to identify the specific two genotypes combinations that contribute to the significant gene-gene interaction. We describe the use of the biplot to display the structure of the interaction and evaluate the performance of the AMMI and the special cases of the AMMI previously described by Tukey and Mandel with simulated data sets. Our simulated study showed that the AMMI model is as powerful as general linear models when the interaction is not modeled in the presence of marginal effects. However, in the presence of pure epitasis, i.e. in the absence of marginal effects, the AMMI method was not found to be superior to other tested regression methods.

  5. Introduction: Cancer Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Constructing, evaluating, and interpreting gene networks generally sits within the broader field of systems biology, which continues to emerge rapidly, particular with respect to its application to understanding the complexity of signaling in the context of cancer biology. For the purposes of this volume, we take a broad definition of systems biology. Considering an organism or disease within an organism as a system, systems biology is the study of the integrated and coordinated interactions of the network(s) of genes, their variants both natural and mutated (e.g., polymorphisms, rearrangements, alternate splicing, mutations), their proteins and isoforms, and the organic and inorganic molecules with which they interact, to execute the biochemical reactions (e.g., as enzymes, substrates, products) that reflect the function of that system. Central to systems biology, and perhaps the only approach that can effectively manage the complexity of such systems, is the building of quantitative multiscale predictive models. The predictions of the models can vary substantially depending on the nature of the model and its inputoutput relationships. For example, a model may predict the outcome of a specific molecular reaction(s), a cellular phenotype (e.g., alive, dead, growth arrest, proliferation, and motility), a change in the respective prevalence of cell or subpopulations, a patient or patient subgroup outcome(s). Such models necessarily require computers. Computational modeling can be thought of as using machine learning and related tools to integrate the very high dimensional data generated from modern, high throughput omics technologies including genomics (next generation sequencing), transcriptomics (gene expression microarrays; RNAseq), metabolomics and proteomics (ultra high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry), and "subomic" technologies to study the kinome, methylome, and others. Mathematical modeling can be thought of as the use of ordinary

  6. Gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuck, Stephen B; McCaffery, Jeanne M

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of increasingly accessible technologies for typing genetic variation, studies of gene-environment (G×E) interactions have proliferated in psychological research. Among the aims of such studies are testing developmental hypotheses and models of the etiology of behavioral disorders, defining boundaries of genetic and environmental influences, and identifying individuals most susceptible to risk exposures or most amenable to preventive and therapeutic interventions. This research also coincides with the emergence of unanticipated difficulties in detecting genetic variants of direct association with behavioral traits and disorders, which may be obscured if genetic effects are expressed only in predisposing environments. In this essay we consider these and other rationales for positing G×E interactions, review conceptual models meant to inform G×E interpretations from a psychological perspective, discuss points of common critique to which G×E research is vulnerable, and address the role of the environment in G×E interactions.

  7. Angiogenin gene polymorphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongli Wang; Dongsheng Fan; Yingshuang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenin is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Here, we se-quenced the coding region of the angiogenin gene in genomic DNA from 207 patients with type 2 diabetes mel itus (129 diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and 78 diabetic non-neuropathy pa-tients) and 268 healthy controls. Al subjects were from the Han population of northern China. No mutations were found. We then compared the genotype and allele frequencies of the angiogenin synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism rs11701 between the diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and controls, and between the diabetic neuropathy and non-neuropathy patients, using a case-control design. We detected no statistical y significant genetic associations. Angiogenin may not be associated with genetic susceptibility to diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the Han population of northern China.

  8. Genes, evolution and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    I argue that the g factor meets the fundamental criteria of a scientific construct more fully than any other conception of intelligence. I briefly discuss the evidence regarding the relationship of brain size to intelligence. A review of a large body of evidence demonstrates that there is a g factor in a wide range of species and that, in the species studied, it relates to brain size and is heritable. These findings suggest that many species have evolved a general-purpose mechanism (a general biological intelligence) for dealing with the environments in which they evolved. In spite of numerous studies with considerable statistical power, we know of very few genes that influence g and the effects are very small. Nevertheless, g appears to be highly polygenic. Given the complexity of the human brain, it is not surprising that that one of its primary faculties-intelligence-is best explained by the near infinitesimal model of quantitative genetics.

  9. Deletions in chromosome 4 differentially associated with the development of cervical cancer: evidence of slit2 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ratnesh Kumar; Indra, Dipanjana; Mitra, Sraboni; Mondal, Ranajit Kumar; Basu, Partha Sarathi; Roy, Anup; Roychowdhury, Susanta; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) loci in the chromosomal 4p15-16, 4q22-23 and 4q34-35 regions associated with the development of uterine cervical carcinoma (CA-CX). Deletion mapping of the regions by microsatellite markers identified six discrete areas with high frequency of deletions, viz. 4p16.2 (D1: 40%), 4p15.31 (D2: 35-38%), 4p15.2 (D3: 37-40%), 4q22.2 (D4: 34%), 4q34.2-34.3 (D5: 37-59%) and 4q35.1 (D6: 40-50%). Significant correlation was noted among the deleted regions D1, D2 and D3. The deletions in D1, D2, D5 and D6 regions are suggested to be associated with the cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and deletions in the D2, D3, D5 and D6 regions seems to be associated with progression of CA-CX. The deletions in the D2 and D6 regions showed significant prognostic implications (P = 0.001; 0.02). The expression of the candidate TSG SLIT2 mapped to D2 region gradually reduced from normal cervix uteri -->CIN --> CA-CX. SLIT2 promoter hypermethylation was seen in 28% CIN samples and significantly increased with tumor progression (P = 0.04). Significant correlation was seen between SLIT2 deletion and its promoter methylation (P = 0.001), indicating that both these phenomena could occur simultaneously to inactivate this gene. Immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced expression of SLIT2 in cervical lesions and CA-CX cell lines. Although no mutation was detected in the SLIT2 promoter region (-432 to + 55 bp), CC and AA haplotypes were seen in -227 and -195 positions, respectively. Thus, it indicates that inactivation of SLIT2-ROBO1 signaling pathway may have an important role in CA-CX development.

  10. Genomic imbalances in esophageal carcinoma cell lines involve Wnt pathway genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacqueline Brown; Hannelie Bothma; Robin Veale; Pascale Willem

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify molecular markers shared across South African esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines using cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array copy number analysis. METHODS: We used conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and multicolor FISH to characterize the chromosomal rearrangements of five ESCC cell lines established in South Africa. The whole genome copy number profile was established from 250K SNP arrays, and data was analyzed with the CNAT 4.0 and GISTIC software. RESULTS: We detected common translocation breakpoints involving chromosomes 1p11-12 and 3p11.2, the latter correlated with the deletion, or interruption of the EPHA3 gene. The most significant amplifications involved the following chromosomal regions and genes: 11q13.3 ( CCND1, FGF3, FGF4, FGF19, MYEOV), 8q24.21( C-MYC, FAM84B), 11q22.1-q22.3 ( BIRC2, BIRC3), 5p15.2 ( CTNND2), 3q11.2-q12.2 ( MINA) and 18p11.32 ( TYMS, YES1). The significant deletions included 1p31.2-p31.1 ( CTH, GADD45α, DIRAS3), 2q22.1 ( LRP1B), 3p12.1-p14.2 ( FHIT), 4q22.1-q32.1 ( CASP6, SMAD1), 8p23.2-q11.1 ( BNIP3L) and 18q21.1-q21.2 ( SMAD4, DCC). The 3p11.2 translocation breakpoint was shared across four cell lines, supporting a role for genes involved at this site, in particular, the EPHA3 gene which has previously been reported to be deleted in ESCC. CONCLUSION: The finding that a significant number of genes that were amplified (FGF3 , FGF4 , FGF19 , CCND1 and C-MYC ) or deleted (SFRP2 gene) are involved in the Wnt and fibroblast growth factor signaling pathways, suggests that these pathways may be activated in these cell lines.

  11. Gene-gene Interaction Analyses for Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Honghuang; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V; Arking, Dan E; Barnard, John; Bartz, Traci M; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lohman, Kurt; Kleber, Marcus E; Lubitz, Steven A; Geelhoed, Bastiaan; Trompet, Stella; Niemeijer, Maartje N; Kacprowski, Tim; Chasman, Daniel I; Klarin, Derek; Sinner, Moritz F; Waldenberger, Melanie; Meitinger, Thomas; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Chen, Lin Y; Smith, Jonathan D; Van Wagoner, David R; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Xie, Zhijun; Hendricks, Audrey E; Ding, Jingzhong; Delgado, Graciela E; Verweij, Niek; van der Harst, Pim; Macfarlane, Peter W; Ford, Ian; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André; Heeringa, Jan; Franco, Oscar H; Kors, Jan A; Weiss, Stefan; Völzke, Henry; Rose, Lynda M; Natarajan, Pradeep; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Alonso, Alvaro; Chung, Mina K; Heckbert, Susan R; Benjamin, Emelia J; Liu, Yongmei; März, Winfried; Rienstra, Michiel; Jukema, J Wouter; Stricker, Bruno H; Dörr, Marcus; Albert, Christine M; Ellinor, Patrick T

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heritable disease that affects more than thirty million individuals worldwide. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of genetic determinants of AF. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of gene-gene interaction on AF susceptibility. We performed

  12. Gene-gene Interaction Analyses for Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lin (Honghuang); M. Mueller-Nurasyid; A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); D.E. Arking (Dan); J. Barnard (John); T.M. Bartz (Traci M.); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); K. Lohman (Kurt); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); S.A. Lubitz (Steven); Geelhoed, B. (Bastiaan); S. Trompet (Stella); M.N. Niemeijer (Maartje); T. Kacprowski (Tim); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); Klarin, D. (Derek); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); T. Meitinger (Thomas); T.B. Harris (Tamara); Launer, L.J. (Lenore J.); E.Z. Soliman (Elsayed Z.); L. Chen (Lin); J.D. Smith (Jonathan); D.R. van Wagoner (David); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); Xie, Z. (Zhijun); A.E. Hendricks (Audrey E.); Ding, J. (Jingzhong); G.E. Delgado (Graciela E.); N. Verweij (Niek); P. van der Harst (Pim); P.W. MacFarlane (Peter); I. Ford (Ian); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J. Heeringa (Jan); O.H. Franco (Oscar); J.A. Kors (Jan); Weiss, S. (Stefan); H. Völzke (Henry); L.M. Rose (Lynda); Natarajan, P. (Pradeep); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); S. Kääb (Stefan); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Alonso (Alvaro); M.K. Chung (Mina); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); E.J. Benjamin (Emelia); Y. Liu (Yongmei); W. März (Winfried); S.A. Rienstra; J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); M. Dörr (Marcus); C.M. Albert (Christine); P.T. Ellinor (Patrick)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) is a heritable disease that affects more than thirty million individuals worldwide. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of genetic determinants of AF. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of gene-gene interaction on AF susceptibility.

  13. Are TMEM genes potential candidate genes for panic disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NO, Gregersen; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hedemand, Anne;

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12...

  14. Methylation profiling of twenty promoter-CpG islands of genes which may contribute to hepatocellular carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lisheng

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC presents one of the major health threats in China today. A better understanding of the molecular genetics underlying malignant transformation of hepatocytes is critical to success in the battle against this disease. The methylation state of C5 of the cytosine in the CpG di-nucleotide that is enriched within or near the promoter region of over 50 % of the polymerase II genes has a drastic effect on transcription of these genes. Changes in the methylation profile of the promoters represent an alternative to genetic lesions as causative factors for the tumor-specific aberrant expression of the genes. Methods We have used the methylation specific PCR method in conjunction with DNA sequencing to assess the methylation state of the promoter CpG islands of twenty genes. Aberrant expression of these genes have been attributed to the abnormal methylation profile of the corresponding promoter CpG islands in human tumors. Results While the following sixteen genes remained the unmethylated in all tumor and normal tissues: CDH1, APAF1, hMLH1, BRCA1, hTERC, VHL, RARβ, TIMP3, DAPK1, SURVIVIN, p14ARF, RB1, p15INK4b, APC, RASSF1c and PTEN, varying degrees of tumor specific hypermethylation were associated with the p16INK4a , RASSF1a, CASP8 and CDH13 genes. For instance, the p16INK4a was highly methylated in HCC (17/29, 58.6% and less significantly methylated in non-cancerous tissue (4/29. 13.79%. The RASSF1a was fully methylated in all tumor tissues (29/29, 100%, and less frequently methylated in corresponding non-cancerous tissue (24/29, 82.75%. Conclusions Furthermore, co-existence of methylated with unmethylated DNA in some cases suggested that both genetic and epigenetic (CpG methylation mechanisms may act in concert to inactivate the p16INK4a and RASSF1a in HCC. Finally, we found a significant association of cirrhosis with hypermethylation of the p16INK4a and hypomethylation of the CDH13 genes. For the

  15. Classifying genes to the correct Gene Ontology Slim term in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using neighbouring genes with classification learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsatsoulis Costas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that gene location and surrounding genes influence the functionality of genes in the eukaryotic genome. Knowing the Gene Ontology Slim terms associated with a gene gives us insight into a gene's functionality by informing us how its gene product behaves in a cellular context using three different ontologies: molecular function, biological process, and cellular component. In this study, we analyzed if we could classify a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to its correct Gene Ontology Slim term using information about its location in the genome and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes using classification learning. Results We performed experiments to establish that the MultiBoostAB algorithm using the J48 classifier could correctly classify Gene Ontology Slim terms of a gene given information regarding the gene's location and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes for training. Different neighbourhood sizes were examined to determine how many nearest neighbours should be included around each gene to provide better classification rules. Our results show that by just incorporating neighbour information from each gene's two-nearest neighbours, the percentage of correctly classified genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term for each ontology reaches over 80% with high accuracy (reflected in F-measures over 0.80 of the classification rules produced. Conclusions We confirmed that in classifying genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term, the inclusion of neighbour information from those genes is beneficial. Knowing the location of a gene and the Gene Ontology Slim information from neighbouring genes gives us insight into that gene's functionality. This benefit is seen by just including information from a gene's two-nearest neighbouring genes.

  16. On meme--gene coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, L; Holland, O; Blackmore, S

    2000-01-01

    In this article we examine the effects of the emergence of a new replicator, memes, on the evolution of a pre-existing replicator, genes. Using a version of the NKCS model we examine the effects of increasing the rate of meme evolution in relation to the rate of gene evolution, for various degrees of interdependence between the two replicators. That is, the effects of memes' (suggested) more rapid rate of evolution in comparison to that of genes is investigated using a tunable model of coevolution. It is found that, for almost any degree of interdependence between the two replicators, as the rate of meme evolution increases, a phase transition-like dynamic occurs under which memes have a significantly detrimental effect on the evolution of genes, quickly resulting in the cessation of effective gene evolution. Conversely, the memes experience a sharp increase in benefit from increasing their rate of evolution. We then examine the effects of enabling genes to reduce the percentage of gene-detrimental evolutionary steps taken by memes. Here a critical region emerges as the comparative rate of meme evolution increases, such that if genes cannot effectively select memes a high percentage of the time, they suffer from meme evolution as if they had almost no selective capability.

  17. The flow of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misteli, Tom

    2004-03-01

    Gene expression is a highly interconnected multistep process. A recent meeting in Iguazu Falls, Argentina, highlighted the need to uncover both the molecular details of each single step as well as the mechanisms of coordination among processes in order to fully understand the expression of genes.

  18. Candidate genes for behavioural ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitzpatrick, M.J.; Ben-Sahar, Y.; Smid, H.M.; Vet, L.E.M.; Robinson, G.E.; Sokolowski, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    In spite of millions of years of evolutionary divergence, the conservation of gene function is common across distant lineages. As such, genes that are known to influence behaviour in one organism are likely to influence similar behaviours in other organisms. Recent studies of the evolution of behavi

  19. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter H. Quail

    2007-01-01

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent comprehensive studies in Arabidopsis that have identified the genome-wide set of phy-regulated genes that respond rapidly to red-light signals upon first exposure of dark-grown seedlings, and have tested the functional relevance to normal seedling photomorphogenesis of an initial subset of these genes. The data: (a) reveal considerable complexity in the channeling of the light signals through the different phy-family members (phyA to phyE) to responsive genes; (b) identify a diversity of transcription-factor-encoding genes as major early, if not primary, targets of phy signaling, and, therefore, as potentially important regulators in the transcriptional-network hierarchy; and (c) identify auxin-related genes as the dominant class among rapidly-regulated, hormone-related genes. However, reverse-genetic functional profiling of a selected subset of these genes reveals that only a limited fraction are necessary for optimal phy-induced seedling deetiolation.

  20. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-07-08

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using 'gold standard' gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene-phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/.

  1. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4 and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg. Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity.

  2. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  3. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was

  4. Gene targeting in malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, R; Janse, C

    1997-10-01

    Gene targeting, which permits alteration of a chosen gene in a predetermined way by homologous recombination, is an emerging technology in malaria research. Soon after the development of techniques for stable transformation of red blood cell stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei, genes of interest were disrupted in the two species. The main limitations of gene targeting in malaria parasites result from the intracellular growth and slow replication of these parasites. On the other hand, the technology is facilitated by the very high rate of homologous recombination following transformation with targeting constructs (approximately 100%). Here, we describe (i) the vector design and the type of mutation that may be generated in a target locus, (ii) the selection and screening strategies that can be used to identify clones with the desired modification, and (iii) the protocol that was used for disrupting the circumsporozoite protein (CS) and thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) genes of P. berghei.

  5. Delivery systems for gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of DNA was unraveled by Watson and Crick in 1953, and two decades later Arber, Nathans and Smith discovered DNA restriction enzymes, which led to the rapid growth in the field of recombinant DNA technology. From expressing cloned genes in bacteria to expressing foreign DNA in transgenic animals, DNA is now slated to be used as a therapeutic agent to replace defective genes in patients suffering from genetic disorders or to kill tumor cells in cancer patients. Gene therapy provides modern medicine with new perspectives that were unthinkable two decades ago. Progress in molecular biology and especially, molecular medicine is now changing the basics of clinical medicine. A variety of viral and non-viral possibilities are available for basic and clinical research. This review summarizes the delivery routes and methods for gene transfer used in gene therapy.

  6. Gene expression profiling: can we identify the right target genes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Loyd

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling allows the simultaneous monitoring of the transcriptional behaviour of thousands of genes, which may potentially be involved in disease development. Several studies have been performed in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, which aim to define genetic links to the disease in an attempt to improve the current understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of the disease and target pathways for intervention. Expression profiling has shown a clear difference in gene expression between IPF and normal lung tissue, and has identified a wide range of candidate genes, including those known to encode for proteins involved in extracellular matrix formation and degradation, growth factors and chemokines. Recently, familial pulmonary fibrosis cohorts have been examined in an attempt to detect specific genetic mutations associated with IPF. To date, these studies have identified families in which IPF is associated with mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein C, or with mutations in genes encoding components of telomerase. Although rare and clearly not responsible for the disease in all individuals, the nature of these mutations highlight the importance of the alveolar epithelium in disease pathogenesis and demonstrate the potential for gene expression profiling in helping to advance the current understanding of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Characterization of human gene encoding SLA/LP autoantigen and its conserved homologs in mouse,fish,fly,and worm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Xia Wang; Andreas Teufel; Uta Cheruti; Joachim Gr(o)tzinger; Peter R Galle; Ansgar W Lohse; Johannes Herkel

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To approach the elusive function of the SLA/LP molecule, we have characterized genomic organization and conservation of the major antigenic and functional properties of the SLA/LP molecule in various species.METHODS: By means of computational biology, we have characterized the complete SLA/LP gene, mRNA and deduced protein sequences in man, mouse,zebrafish, fly, and worm.RESULTS: The human SLA/LP gene sequence of approximately 39 kb, which maps to chromosome 4p15.2, is organized in 11 exons, of which 10 or 11 are translated, depending on the splice variant. Homologous molecules were identified in several biological model organisms. The various homologous protein sequences showed a high degree of similarity or homology, notably at those residues that are of functional importance. The only domain of the human protein sequence that lacks significant homology with homologous sequences is the major antigenic epitope recognized by autoantibodies from autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) patients.CONCLUSION: The SLA/LP molecule and its functionally relevant residues have been highly conserved throughout the evoluti n, suggesting an indispensable function of the molecule. The finding that the only non-conserved domain is the dominant antigenic epitope of the human SLA/LP sequence, suggests that SLA/LP autoimmunity is autoantigen-driven rather than being driven by molecular mimicry.

  8. Paternally transmitted IDDM2 influences diabetes susceptibility despite biallelic expression of the insulin gene in human pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, M M; Luo, D F; She, J Y; Maclaren, N K; Muir, A; Thomson, G; She, J X

    1996-02-01

    Whereas it is well known that the insulin gene (INS) region at 11p15.5 (IDDM2) confers susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), it is still controversial whether the parental origin of IDDM2 influences IDDM susceptibility. We have analysed the Pst I + 1127 polymorphism in 123 USA multiplex families and detected linkage only in male meioses using the affected sibpair analysis (P = 0.009). Application of the transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) found significantly increased transmission of the IDDM-associated INS allele from fathers heterozygous for INS to their diabetic offspring (P = 0.00002), but the transmission from heterozygous mothers was not significantly different from random expectation. In non-diabetic families, the transmission from parents heterozygous for INS was not significantly different from random expectation in either paternal or maternal meioses. Maternal imprinting of the INS gene in pancreatic islets was originally considered the most favorable explanation for the observed gender-related difference. However, our study has demonstrated biallelic expression of INS in pancreatic tissues from the human fetuses and thus suggests that INS is probably not imprinted in the pancreatic islets.

  9. Clinical impact of extensive molecular profiling in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Sophie; Grellety, Thomas; Toulmonde, Maud; Auzanneau, Céline; Khalifa, Emmanuel; Laizet, Yec'han; Tran, Kevin; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Floquet, Anne; Garbay, Delphine; Robert, Jacques; Hostein, Isabelle; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-02-08

    Previous precision medicine studies have investigated conventional molecular techniques and/or limited sets of gene alterations. The aim of this study was to describe the impact of the next-generation sequencing of the largest panel of genes used to date in tumour tissue and blood in the context of institutional molecular screening programmes. DNA analysis was performed by next-generation sequencing using a panel of 426 cancer-related genes and by comparative genomic hybridization from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded archived tumour samples when available or from fresh tumour samples. Five hundred sixty-eight patients were enrolled. The median number of prior lines of treatment was 2 (range 0-9). The most common primary tumour types were lung (16.9%), colorectal (14.4%), breast (10.6%), ovarian (10.2%) and sarcoma (10.2%). The median patient age was 63 years (range 19-88). A total of 292 patients (51.4%) presented with at least one actionable genetic alteration. The 20 genes most frequently altered were TP53, CDKN2A, KRAS, PTEN, PI3KCA, RB1, APC, ERBB2, MYC, EGFR, CDKN2B, ARID1A, SMAD4, FGFR1, MDM2, BRAF, ATM, CCNE1, FGFR3 and FRS2. One hundred fifty-nine patients (28%) were included in early phase trials. The treatment was matched with a tumour profile in 86 cases (15%). The two main reasons for non-inclusion were non-progressive disease (31.5%) and general status deterioration (25%). Twenty-eight percent of patients presented with a growth modulation index (time to progression under the early phase trial treatment/time to progression of the previous line of treatment) >1.3.Extensive molecular profiling using high-throughput techniques allows for the identification of actionable mutations in the majority of cases and is associated with substantial clinical benefit in up to one in four patients.

  10. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  11. Progress of gene targeting in mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Gene targeting is a powerful approach of study- ing the genefunction in vivo. Specific genetic modifications, including simple gene disruption, point mutations, large chromosomal deletions and rearrangements, targeted incor- poration of foreign genes, could be introduced into the mouse genome by gene targeting. Recent studies make it possible to do the gene targeting with temporal and spatial control.

  12. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakalu, Vinay Kumar; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Bahroos, Neil; Shah, Dhara; Ali, Marwan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    Background The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development. Methods We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium. Results The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described. Conclusions Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas. PMID:28081151

  13. Linking Genes to Cardiovascular Diseases: Gene Action and Gene-Environment Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2015-12-01

    A unique myocardial characteristic is its ability to grow/remodel in order to adapt; this is determined partly by genes and partly by the environment and the milieu intérieur. In the "post-genomic" era, a need is emerging to elucidate the physiologic functions of myocardial genes, as well as potential adaptive and maladaptive modulations induced by environmental/epigenetic factors. Genome sequencing and analysis advances have become exponential lately, with escalation of our knowledge concerning sometimes controversial genetic underpinnings of cardiovascular diseases. Current technologies can identify candidate genes variously involved in diverse normal/abnormal morphomechanical phenotypes, and offer insights into multiple genetic factors implicated in complex cardiovascular syndromes. The expression profiles of thousands of genes are regularly ascertained under diverse conditions. Global analyses of gene expression levels are useful for cataloging genes and correlated phenotypes, and for elucidating the role of genes in maladies. Comparative expression of gene networks coupled to complex disorders can contribute insights as to how "modifier genes" influence the expressed phenotypes. Increasingly, a more comprehensive and detailed systematic understanding of genetic abnormalities underlying, for example, various genetic cardiomyopathies is emerging. Implementing genomic findings in cardiology practice may well lead directly to better diagnosing and therapeutics. There is currently evolving a strong appreciation for the value of studying gene anomalies, and doing so in a non-disjointed, cohesive manner. However, it is challenging for many-practitioners and investigators-to comprehend, interpret, and utilize the clinically increasingly accessible and affordable cardiovascular genomics studies. This survey addresses the need for fundamental understanding in this vital area.

  14. Viral vectors for gene transfer: current status of gene therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronn, Regine; Weger, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy for the correction of inherited or acquired disease has gained increasing importance in recent years. Successful treatment of children suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was achieved using retrovirus vectors for gene transfer. Encouraging improvements of vision were reported in a genetic eye disorder (LCA) leading to early childhood blindness. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors were used for gene transfer in these trials. This chapter gives an overview of the design and delivery of viral vectors for the transport of a therapeutic gene into a target cell or tissue. The construction and production of retrovirus, lentivirus, and AAV vectors are covered. The focus is on production methods suitable for biopharmaceutical upscaling and for downstream processing. Quality control measures and biological safety considerations for the use of vectors in clinical trials are discussed.

  15. [Pathogenicity and pneumococcal capsular genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, E; García, P; López, R

    1994-01-01

    Pneumococci remain to be one of the most prominent human pathogens. Increasing efforts are being dedicated to the development of improved vaccines with wider specificity. Since a clear understanding of the genetics of capsular types in Streptococcus pneumoniae is missing, our efforts are oriented to characterize, at the molecular level, the genes involved in capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis. We have cloned and sequenced a chromosomal DNA fragment of a clinical isolate of type 3 pneumococcus and showed that it contains a type 3 specific gene as well as genes common to other serotypes.

  16. Panspermia and horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyce, Brig

    2009-08-01

    Evidence that extremophiles are hardy and ubiquitous is helping to make panspermia a respectable theory. But even if life on Earth originally came from space, biologists assume that the subsequent evolution of life is still governed by the darwinian paradigm. In this review we show how panspermia could amend darwinism and point to a cosmic source for, not only extremophiles but, all of life. This version of panspermia can be called "strong panspermia." To support this theory we will discuss recent evidence pertaining to horizontal gene transfer, viruses, genes apparently older than the Earthly evolution of the features they encode, and primate-specific genes without identifiable precursors.

  17. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapy - Nucleic Acids Molecular Therapy - Oncolytics Home ASGCT Gene Therapy for Diseases Gene Therapy has made important medical ... Among the most notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA- ...

  18. Integrating Gene Ontology and Blast to predict gene functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng-gang; MO Zhi-hong

    2007-01-01

    A GoBlast system was built to predict gene function by integrating Blast search and Gene Ontology (GO) annotations together. The operation system was based on Debian Linux 3.1, with Apache as the web server and Mysql database as the data storage system. FASTA files with GO annotations were taken as the sequence source for blast alignment, which were formatted by wu-formatdb program. The GoBlast system includes three Bioperl modules in Perl: a data input module, a data process module and a data output module. A GoBlast query starts with an amino acid or nucleotide sequence. It ends with an output in an html page, presenting high scoring gene products which are of a high homology to the queried sequence and listing associated GO terms beside respective gene poducts. A simple click on a GO term leads to the detailed explanation of the specific gene function. This avails gene function prediction by Blast. GoBlast can be a very useful tool for functional genome research and is available for free at http://bioq.org/goblast.

  19. Gene function prediction based on the Gene Ontology hierarchical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liangxi; Lin, Hongfei; Hu, Yuncui; Wang, Jian; Yang, Zhihao

    2014-01-01

    The information of the Gene Ontology annotation is helpful in the explanation of life science phenomena, and can provide great support for the research of the biomedical field. The use of the Gene Ontology is gradually affecting the way people store and understand bioinformatic data. To facilitate the prediction of gene functions with the aid of text mining methods and existing resources, we transform it into a multi-label top-down classification problem and develop a method that uses the hierarchical relationships in the Gene Ontology structure to relieve the quantitative imbalance of positive and negative training samples. Meanwhile the method enhances the discriminating ability of classifiers by retaining and highlighting the key training samples. Additionally, the top-down classifier based on a tree structure takes the relationship of target classes into consideration and thus solves the incompatibility between the classification results and the Gene Ontology structure. Our experiment on the Gene Ontology annotation corpus achieves an F-value performance of 50.7% (precision: 52.7% recall: 48.9%). The experimental results demonstrate that when the size of training set is small, it can be expanded via topological propagation of associated documents between the parent and child nodes in the tree structure. The top-down classification model applies to the set of texts in an ontology structure or with a hierarchical relationship.

  20. MADS-box gene evolution - structure and transcription patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Pedersen, Louise Buchholt; Skipper, Martin;

    2002-01-01

    Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs......Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs...

  1. cDNA cloning, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of Ocp2, a gene encoding a putative transcription-associated factor predominantly expressed in the auditory organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hong; Thalmann, I.; Thalmann, R. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-10

    We report the cloning of the Ocp2 gene encoding OCP-II from a guinea pig organ-of-Corti cDNA library. The predicted open reading frame encodes a protein of 163 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 18.6 kDa. A homology search revealed that Ocp2 shares significant sequence similarity with p15, a sub-unit of transcription factor SIII that regulates the activity of the RNA polymerase II elongation complex. The Ocp2 messenger RNA is expressed abundantly in the cochlea while not significantly in any other tissues examined, including brain, eye, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, thigh muscle, and testis, demonstrating that the expression of this gene may be restricted to auditory organs. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against the N-terminal region of OCP-II. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin-embedded sections of the cochlea showed that OCP-II is localized abundantly in nonsensory cells in the organ of Corti; in addition, it was also detected, at a lower concentration, in vestibular sensory organs, as well as auditory and vestibular brain stem nuclei. The Ocp2 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 4 as well as 11. Our results suggest that OCP-II may be involved in transcription regulation for the development or maintenance of specialized functions of the inner ear. 40 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Novel and recurrent tyrosine aminotransferase gene mutations in tyrosinemia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hühn, R; Stoermer, H; Klingele, B; Bausch, E; Fois, A; Farnetani, M; Di Rocco, M; Boué, J; Kirk, J M; Coleman, R; Scherer, G

    1998-03-01

    Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome, RHS) is a disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by keratitis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, mental retardation, and elevated blood tyrosine levels. The disease results from deficiency in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). We have previously described one deletion and six different point mutations in four RHS patients. We have now analyzed the TAT genes in a further seven unrelated RHS families from Italy, France, the United Kingdom, and the United States. We have established PCR conditions for the amplification of all twelve TAT exons and have screened the products for mutations by direct sequence analysis or by first performing single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. We have thus identified the presumably pathological mutations in eight RHS alleles, including two nonsense mutations (R57X, E411X) and four amino acid substitutions (R119W, L201R, R433Q, R433W). Only the R57X mutation, which was found in one Scottish and two Italian families, has been previously reported in another Italian family. Haplotype analysis indicates that this mutation, which involves a CpG dinucleotide hot spot, has a common origin in the three Italian families but arose independently in the Scottish family. Two polymorphisms have also been detected, viz., a protein polymorphism, P15S, and a silent substitution S103S (TCG-->TCA). Expression of R433Q and R433W demonstrate reduced activity of the mutant proteins. In all, twelve different TAT gene mutations have now been identified in tyrosinemia type II.

  3. Mutation of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly gene IBA57 causes fatal infantile leukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debray, François-Guillaume; Stümpfig, Claudia; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Dideberg, Vinciane; Josse, Claire; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Boemer, François; Bours, Vincent; Stevens, René; Seneca, Sara; Smet, Joél; Lill, Roland; van Coster, Rudy

    2015-11-01

    Leukodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of severe genetic neurodegenerative disorders. A multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome was found in an infant presenting with a progressive leukoencephalopathy. Homozygosity mapping, whole exome sequencing, and functional studies were used to define the underlying molecular defect. Respiratory chain studies in skeletal muscle isolated from the proband revealed a combined deficiency of complexes I and II. In addition, western blotting indicated lack of protein lipoylation. The combination of these findings was suggestive for a defect in the iron-sulfur (Fe/S) protein assembly pathway. SNP array identified loss of heterozygosity in large chromosomal regions, covering the NFU1 and BOLA3, and the IBA57 and ABCB10 candidate genes, in 2p15-p11.2 and 1q31.1-q42.13, respectively. A homozygous c.436C > T (p.Arg146Trp) variant was detected in IBA57 using whole exome sequencing. Complementation studies in a HeLa cell line depleted for IBA57 showed that the mutant protein with the semi-conservative amino acid exchange was unable to restore the biochemical phenotype indicating a loss-of-function mutation of IBA57. In conclusion, defects in the Fe/S protein assembly gene IBA57 can cause autosomal recessive neurodegeneration associated with progressive leukodystrophy and fatal outcome at young age. In the affected patient, the biochemical phenotype was characterized by a defect in the respiratory chain complexes I and II and a decrease in mitochondrial protein lipoylation, both resulting from impaired assembly of Fe/S clusters.

  4. Systematic association mapping identifies NELL1 as a novel IBD disease gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Franke

    Full Text Available Crohn disease (CD, a sub-entity of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, is a complex polygenic disorder. Although recent studies have successfully identified CD-associated genetic variants, these susceptibility loci explain only a fraction of the heritability of the disease. Here, we report on a multi-stage genome-wide scan of 393 German CD cases and 399 controls. Among the 116,161 single-nucleotide polymorphisms tested, an association with the known CD susceptibility gene NOD2, the 5q31 haplotype, and the recently reported CD locus at 5p13.1 was confirmed. In addition, SNP rs1793004 in the gene encoding nel-like 1 precursor (NELL1, chromosome 11p15.1 showed a consistent disease-association in independent German population- and family-based samples (942 cases, 1082 controls, 375 trios. Subsequent fine mapping and replication in an independent sample of 454 French/Canadian CD trios supported the authenticity of the NELL1 association. Further confirmation in a large German ulcerative colitis (UC sample indicated that NELL1 is a ubiquitous IBD susceptibility locus (combined p<10(-6; OR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.30-2.11. The novel 5p13.1 locus was also replicated in the French/Canadian sample and in an independent UK CD patient panel (453 cases, 521 controls, combined p<10(-6 for SNP rs1992660. Several associations were replicated in at least one independent sample, point to an involvement of ITGB6 (upstream, GRM8 (downstream, OR5V1 (downstream, PPP3R2 (downstream, NM_152575 (upstream and HNF4G (intron.

  5. Investigation of anticancer mechanism of oleuropein via cell cycle and apoptotic pathways in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seçme, Mücahit; Eroğlu, Canan; Dodurga, Yavuz; Bağcı, Gülseren

    2016-07-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common types of pediatric tumors that can spread quickly in neuronal tissues. Oleuropein which is active compound of olive leaves, belongs to polyphenols group and has antioxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensive and anti-carcinogenic effects. The aim of the study is to determine the therapeutic effects of oleuropein on cell proliferation, invasion, colony formation, cell cycle and apoptotic mechanisms in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line under in vitro conditions. The effect of oleuropein on cell viability was determined by XTT method. 84 cell cycle control and 84 apoptosis related genes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Effects of oleuropein on apoptosis were researched by TUNEL assay. Protein expressions were determined by western blot analysis. Effects of oleuropein on cell invasion, colony formation and migration were detected by matrigel-chamber, colony formation assay and wound-healing assay, respectively. IC50 value of oleuropein in SH-SY5Y cells was detected as 350 μM at 48th hours. It is determined that oleuropein causes cell cycle arrest by down-regulating of CylinD1,CylinD2,CyclinD3,CDK4,CDK6 and up-regulating of p53 and CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CDKN1A gene expressions. Oleuropein also induces apoptosis by inhibiting of Bcl-2 and activating of Bax,caspase-9 and caspase-3 gene expressions. Apoptotic cell ratio was found 36.4 ± 3.27% in oleuropein dose group. Oleuropein decreased invasion in SH-SY5Y cells and suppressed colony numbers in ratio of 53.6 ± 4.71%.Our results demonstrated that oleuropein can be a therapeutic agent in the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  6. The evolution of resistance gene in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEN Haiyan; LIU Xuemin; LI Lijun; LIU Li

    2007-01-01

    Resistance genes enable plants to fight against plant pathogens. Plant resistance genes (R gene) are organized complexly in genome. Some resistance gene sequence data enable an insight into R gene structure and gene evolution. Some sites like Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) are of specific interest since homologous recombination can happen. Crossing over, transposon insertion and excision and mutation can produce new specificity. Three models explaining R gene evolution were discussed. More information needed for dissection of R gene evolution though some step can be inferred from genetic and sequence analysis.

  7. Gene therapy in ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vijay

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a novel form of drug delivery that enlists the synthetic machinery of the patient′s cells to produce a therapeutic agent. Genes may be delivered into cells in vitro or in vivo utilising viral or non-viral vectors. Recent technical advances have led to the demonstration of the molecular basis of various ocular diseases. Ocular disorders with the greatest potential for benefit of gene therapy include hereditary diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, tumours such as retinoblastoma or melanoma, and acquired proliferative and neovascular retinal disorders. Gene transfer into ocular tissues has been demonstrated with growing functional success and may develop into a new therapeutic tool for clinical ophthalmology in future.

  8. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine ... variant of the gene for the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1) with a decreased risk for addiction to ...

  9. Genes That Influence Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Influence Blood Pressure Gene Linked to Optimism and Self-Esteem Designing New Diabetes Drugs Connect with Us Subscribe to get NIH Research Matters by email RSS Feed Facebook Email us Mailing Address: NIH Research Matters Bldg. ...

  10. Genes de defensa en plantas

    OpenAIRE

    Carbonero Zalduegui, Pilar; García Olmedo, Francisco

    1994-01-01

    Se revisan los avances realizados en la caracterización de los genes que codifican para ciertas familias de proteínas vegetales que son tóxicas o inhibitorias frente a insectos, hongos y bacterias. La caracterización incluye el estudio in vitro de las propiedades de las proteínas purificadas y la experimentación in vivo con plantas transgénicas que expresan los genes correspondientes.

  11. Rice's Salt Tolerance Gene Cloned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ In cooperation with US colleagues, CAS researchers have made significant progress in their studies into functional genes for key agronomic traits by cloning SKC1, a salt-tolerant functional gene of rice and making clear its biological functions and mechanisms. This pioneering work,which was reported in the Oct. issue of Nature Genetics (37:1141-1146), is believed to hold promise to increase the output of the crop plant in this country.

  12. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  13. The Insect SNMP Gene Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    B 1 ( b o v ) Clade 3 - SNMPs Clade 2 Clade 1 CD36 Insect (Holometabola) CD36 Gene family Holometabola Phylogeny (11 Orders) Tribolium castaneum...melanogaster genes (see Nichols and Vogt, 2008). Bootstrap support (1000 replicates) is indicated for the major clades. B. Phylogeny of holometabolous...A. aegypti eggs were graciously provided by Mark Brown (University of Georgia, Department of Entomology) and raised on a larval diet (pond fish food

  14. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  15. Gene Polymorphisms in Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja L. Laine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to conduct a review of the literature for gene polymorphisms associated with chronic periodontitis (CP susceptibility. A comprehensive search of the literature in English was performed using the keywords: periodontitis, periodontal disease, combined with the words genes, mutation, or polymorphism. Candidate gene polymorphism studies with a case-control design and reported genotype frequencies in CP patients were searched and reviewed. There is growing evidence that polymorphisms in the IL1, IL6, IL10, vitamin D receptor, and CD14 genes may be associated with CP in certain populations. However, carriage rates of the rare (-allele of any polymorphism varied considerably among studies and most of the studies appeared under-powered and did not correct for other risk factors. Larger cohorts, well-defined phenotypes, control for other risk factors, and analysis of multiple genes and polymorphisms within the same pathway are needed to get a more comprehensive insight into the contribution of gene polymorphisms in CP.

  16. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each p...... with a high frequency of loss of heterozygosity. The genes and ESTs presented in this study encode new potential tumor markers as well as potential novel therapeutic targets for prevention or therapy of CRC.......Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  17. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  18. Origin and evolution of new genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; YANG Shuang; PENG Lixin; CHEN Hong; WANG Wen

    2004-01-01

    Organisms have variable genome sizes andcontain different numbers of genes. This difference demonstrates that new gene origination is a fundamental process in evolutionary biology. Though the study of the origination of new genes dated back more than half a century ago, it is not until the 1990s when the first young genejingwei was found that empirical investigation of the molecular mechanisms of origination of new genes became possible. In the recent years,several young genes were identified and the studies on these genes have greatly enriched the knowledge of this field. Yet more details in a general picture of new genes origination are to be clarified. We have developed a systematic approach to searching for young genes at the genomic level, in the hope to summarize a general pattern of the origination and evolution of new genes, such as the rate of new gene appearance, impact of new genes on their host genomes, etc.

  19. Reduced rates of gene loss, gene silencing, and gene mutation in Dnmt1-deficient embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, M.F.; van Amerongen, R.; Nijjar, T.; Cuppen, E.; Jones, P.A.; Laird, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene inactivation is a crucial event in oncogenesis. Gene inactivation mechanisms include events resulting in loss of heterozygosity (LOH), gene mutation, and transcriptional silencing. The contribution of each of these different pathways varies among tumor suppressor genes and by c

  20. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  1. Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Leishmania tropica LACK Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Hammoudeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania Homologue of receptors for Activated C Kinase (LACK antigen is a 36-kDa protein, which provokes a very early immune response against Leishmania infection. There are several reports on the expression of LACK through different life-cycle stages of genus Leishmania, but only a few of them have focused on L.tropica.The present study provides details of the cloning, DNA sequencing and gene expression of LACK in this parasite species. First, several local isolates of Leishmania parasites were typed in our laboratory using PCR technique to verify of Leishmania parasite species. After that, LACK gene was amplified and cloned into a vector for sequencing. Finally, the expression of this molecule in logarithmic and stationary growth phase promastigotes, as well as in amastigotes, was evaluated by Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR technique.The typing result confirmed that all our local isolates belong to L.tropica. LACK gene sequence was determined and high similarity was observed with the sequences of other Leishmania species. Furthermore, the expression of LACK gene in both promastigotes and amastigotes forms was confirmed.Overall, the data set the stage for future studies of the properties and immune role of LACK gene products.

  2. Newer gene editing technologies toward HIV gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, N; Yi, Guohua; Dang, Ying; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-11-14

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called "Berlin patient" who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  3. Seven Novel and Stable Translocations Associated with Oncogenic Gene Expression in Malignant Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Okamoto

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetics has not only precipitated the discovery of several oncogenes, but has also led to the molecular classification of numerous malignancies. The correct identification of aberrations in many tumors has, however, been hindered by extensive tumor complexity and the limitations of molecular cytogenetic techniques. In this study, we have investigated five malignant melanoma (MM cell lines from at least three different passages using high-resolution R-banding and the recently developed methods of comparative genomic hybridization and multicolor or multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization. We subsequently detected nine consistent translocations, seven of which were novel: dic(1;11(p10;q14, der(9t(3;9(p12;p11, der(4t(9;4;7(q33::p15-q23::q21, der(14t(5;14 (q12;q32, der(9t(9;22(p21;q11, der(19t(19;20(p13.3;p11, der(10t(2;12;7;10(q31::p12→pter::q11.2→q31::q21,der(19t(10;19(q23;q13, and der(20t(Y;20(q11.23;q13.3. Furthermore, using the human HG-U133A Gene-Chip, positive expression levels of oncogenes or tumor-related genes located at the regions of chromosomal breakpoints were identified, including AKT1, BMI1, CDK6, CTNNB1, E2F1, GPNMB, GPRK7, KBRAS2, LDB2, LIMK1, MAPK1, MEL, MP1, MUC18, NRCAM, PBX3, RAB22A, RAB38, SNK, and STK4, indicating an association between chromosomal breakpoints and altered gene expression. Moreover, we also show that growth of all five cell lines can be significantly reduced by downregulating CDK6 gene expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA. Because the majority of these breakpoints have been reported previously in MM, our results support the idea of commonmechanisms in this disease.

  4. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern......BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have......) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...

  5. Imaging reporter gene for monitoring gene therapy; Imagerie par gene rapporteur: un atout pour la therapie genique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beco, V. de; Baillet, G.; Tamgac, F.; Tofighi, M.; Weinmann, P.; Vergote, J.; Moretti, J.L. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Avicenne, Service Central de Medecine Nucleaire et Biophysique, UPRES 2360, 93 - Bobigny (France); Tamgac, G. [Univetsite d' Uludag, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Bursa (Turkey)

    2002-06-01

    Scintigraphic images can be obtained to document gene function at cellular level. This approach is presented here and the use of a reporter gene to monitor gene therapy is described. Two main ways are presented: either the use of a reporter gene coding for an enzyme the action of which will be monitored by radiolabeled pro-drug, or a cellular receptor gene, the action of which is documented by a radio labeled cognate receptor ligand. (author)

  6. Analysis of Duplicate Genes in Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.M. Cai; K.J. Van; M.Y. Kim; S.H. Lee

    2007-01-01

    @@ Gene duplication is a major determinant of the size and gene complement of eukaryotic genomes (Lockton and Gaut, 2005). There are a number of different ways in which duplicate genes can arise (Sankoff, 2001), but the most spectacular method of gene duplication may be whole genome duplication via polyploidization.

  7. Gene Therapy Applications in Gastroenterology and Hepatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine H Wu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Advantages and disadvantages of viral vectors and nonviral vectors for gene delivery to digestive organs are reviewed. Advances in systems for the introduction of new gene expression are described, including self-deleting retroviral transfer vectors, chimeric viruses and chimeric oligonucleotides. Systems for inhibition of gene expression are discussed, including antisense oligonucleotides, ribozymes and dominant-negative genes.

  8. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  9. Using GenePattern for Gene Expression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Heidi; Liberzon, Arthur; Reich, Michael; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2013-01-01

    The abundance of genomic data now available in biomedical research has stimulated the development of sophisticated statistical methods for interpreting the data, and of special visualization tools for displaying the results in a concise and meaningful manner. However, biologists often find these methods and tools difficult to understand and use correctly. GenePattern is a freely available software package that addresses this issue by providing more than 100 analysis and visualization tools for genomic research in a comprehensive user-friendly environment for users at all levels of computational experience and sophistication. This unit demonstrates how to prepare and analyze microarray data in GenePattern. PMID:18551415

  10. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S

    2011-01-01

    The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere...... as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic...

  11. Delineating an Epigenetic Continuum for Initiation, Transformation and Progression to Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kang Mei; Stephen, Josena K. [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, 1 Ford Place, 1D, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Raju, Usha [Department of Pathology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, 1 Ford Place, 1D, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Worsham, Maria J., E-mail: mworsha1@hfhs.org [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, 1 Ford Place, 1D, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Aberrant methylation of promoter CpG islands is a hallmark of human cancers and is an early event in carcinogenesis. We examined whether promoter hypermethylation contributes to the pathogenesis of benign breast lesions along a progression continuum to invasive breast cancer. The exploratory study cohort comprised 17 breast cancer patients with multiple benign and/or in situ lesions concurrently present with invasive carcinoma within a tumor biopsy. DNA from tumor tissue, normal breast epithelium when present, benign lesions (fibroadenoma, hyperplasia, papilloma, sclerosing adenosis, apocrine metaplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia or atypical ductal hyperplasia), and in situ lesions of lobular carcinoma and ductal carcinoma were interrogated for promoter methylation status in 22 tumor suppressor genes using the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (MS-MLPA). Methylation specific PCR was performed to confirm hypermethylation detected by MS-MLPA. Promoter methylation was detected in 11/22 tumor suppressor genes in 16/17 cases. Hypermethylation of RASSF1 was most frequent, present in 14/17 cases, followed by APC in 12/17, and GSTP1 in 9/17 cases with establishment of an epigenetic monocloncal progression continuum to invasive breast cancer. Hypermethylated promoter regions in normal breast epithelium, benign, and premalignant lesions within the same tumor biopsy implicate RASSF1, APC, GSTP1, TIMP3, CDKN2B, CDKN2A, ESR1, CDH13, RARB, CASP8, and TP73 as early events. DNA hypermethylation underlies the pathogenesis of step-wise transformation along a monoclonal continuum from normal to preneoplasia to invasive breast cancer.

  12. An encyclopedia of mouse genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, M; Hillier, L; Kucaba, T; Allen, M; Barstead, R; Beck, C; Blistain, A; Bonaldo, M; Bowers, Y; Bowles, L; Cardenas, M; Chamberlain, A; Chappell, J; Clifton, S; Favello, A; Geisel, S; Gibbons, M; Harvey, N; Hill, F; Jackson, Y; Kohn, S; Lennon, G; Mardis, E; Martin, J; Mila, L; McCann, R; Morales, R; Pape, D; Person, B; Prange, C; Ritter, E; Soares, M; Schurk, R; Shin, T; Steptoe, M; Swaller, T; Theising, B; Underwood, K; Wylie, T; Yount, T; Wilson, R; Waterston, R

    1999-02-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier model system for studies of mammalian development due to the powerful classical genetic analysis possible (see also the Jackson Laboratory web site, http://www.jax.org/) and the ever-expanding collection of molecular tools. To enhance the utility of the mouse system, we initiated a program to generate a large database of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that can provide rapid access to genes. Of particular significance was the possibility that cDNA libraries could be prepared from very early stages of development, a situation unrealized in human EST projects. We report here the development of a comprehensive database of ESTs for the mouse. The project, initiated in March 1996, has focused on 5' end sequences from directionally cloned, oligo-dT primed cDNA libraries. As of 23 October 1998, 352,040 sequences had been generated, annotated and deposited in dbEST, where they comprised 93% of the total ESTs available for mouse. EST data are versatile and have been applied to gene identification, comparative sequence analysis, comparative gene mapping and candidate disease gene identification, genome sequence annotation, microarray development and the development of gene-based map resources.

  13. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  14. Gene replacement in Penicillium roqueforti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goarin, Anne; Silar, Philippe; Malagnac, Fabienne

    2015-05-01

    Most cheese-making filamentous fungi lack suitable molecular tools to improve their biotechnology potential. Penicillium roqueforti, a species of high industrial importance, would benefit from functional data yielded by molecular genetic approaches. This work provides the first example of gene replacement by homologous recombination in P. roqueforti, demonstrating that knockout experiments can be performed in this fungus. To do so, we improved the existing transformation method to integrate transgenes into P. roqueforti genome. In the meantime, we cloned the PrNiaD gene, which encodes a NADPH-dependent nitrate reductase that reduces nitrate to nitrite. Then, we performed a deletion of the PrNiaD gene from P. roqueforti strain AGO. The ΔPrNiaD mutant strain is more resistant to chlorate-containing medium than the wild-type strain, but did not grow on nitrate-containing medium. Because genomic data are now available, we believe that generating selective deletions of candidate genes will be a key step to open the way for a comprehensive exploration of gene function in P. roqueforti.

  15. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology.

  16. Clock Genes in Glia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Castañeda, Donají

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are periodic patterns in biological processes that allow the organisms to anticipate changes in the environment. These rhythms are driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in vertebrates. At a molecular level, circadian rhythms are regulated by the so-called clock genes, which oscillate in a periodic manner. The protein products of clock genes are transcription factors that control their own and other genes’ transcription, collectively known as “clock-controlled genes.” Several brain regions other than the SCN express circadian rhythms of clock genes, including the amygdala, the olfactory bulb, the retina, and the cerebellum. Glia cells in these structures are expected to participate in rhythmicity. However, only certain types of glia cells may be called “glial clocks,” since they express PER-based circadian oscillators, which depend of the SCN for their synchronization. This contribution summarizes the current information about clock genes in glia cells, their plausible role as oscillators and their medical implications. PMID:27666286

  17. Molecular Studies on Preproinsulin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabir Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin plays an important role in maintaining the blood glucose level of the body. The β-cells of pancreas produce insulin in the form of precursor that is preproinsulin. The gene of preproinsulin provides an interesting system for addressing question related to molecular evolution. Recombinant DNA technology has made it possible to isolate and sequence the chromosomal genes coding for unique protein products. Although preproinsulin of various organism has been isolated and cloned, but there is no report from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis that is our major livestock. The genomic DNA of buffalo was isolated using Laura-Lee-Boodram method. The part of preproinsulin gene (596bp and 520bp using BPPI-UPS and bpiful_F as forward and BC1-C as reverse primer was amplified. Cloning of amplified fragments of gene were performed in pCR 2.1 vector. Positive clones were screened on the basis of blue white selection. The band obtained on 596bp and 520bp after colony PCR confirmed the successful cloning of preproinsulin gene in pCR 2.1 vector.

  18. Microarray analysis of ox-LDL (oxidized low-density lipoprotein)-regulated genes in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minta, Joe; Jungwon Yun, James; St Bernard, Rosanne

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that circulating LDL (low-density lipoproteins) play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and the oxidized form (ox-LDL) is highly atherogenic. Deposits of ox-LDL have been found in atherosclerotic plaques, and ox-LDL has been shown to promote monocyte recruitment, foam cell formation and the transition of quiescent and contractile vascular SMCs (smooth muscle cells) to the migratory and proliferative phenotype. SMC phenotype transition and hyperplasia are the pivotal events in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. To comprehend the complex molecular mechanisms involved in ox-LDL-mediated SMC phenotype transition, we have compared the differential gene expression profiles of cultured quiescent human coronary artery SMCs with cells induced with ox-LDL for 3 and 21 h using Affymetrix HG-133UA cDNA microarray chips. Assignment of the regulated genes into functional groups indicated that several genes involved in metabolism, membrane transport, cell-cell interactions, signal transduction, transcription, translation, cell migration, proliferation and apoptosis were differentially expressed. Our data suggests that the interaction of ox-LDL with its cognate receptors on SMCs modulates the induction of several growth factors and cytokines, which activate a variety of intracellular signalling mechanisms (including PI3K, MAPK, Jak/STAT, sphingosine, Rho kinase pathways) that contribute to SMC transition from the quiescent and contractile phenotype to the proliferative and migratory phenotype. Our study has also identified several genes (including CDC27, cyclin A1, cyclin G2, glypican 1, MINOR, p15 and apolipoprotein) not previously implicated in ox-LDL-induced SMC phenotype transition and substantially extends the list of potential candidate genes involved in atherogenesis.

  19. Clinico-pathological features and somatic gene alterations in refractory ceramic fibre-induced murine mesothelioma reveal mineral fibre-induced mesothelioma identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andujar, Pascal; Lecomte, Céline; Renier, Annie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Kheuang, Laurence; Daubriac, Julien; Janin, Anne; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2007-07-01

    Although human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) is mainly caused by asbestos exposure, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans on the basis of their biological effects in rodents' lung and pleura and in cultured cells. Hence, further investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of fibre-induced carcinogenicity and to prevent use of harmful particles. In a previous study, mesotheliomas were found in hemizygous Nf2 (Nf2(+/-)) mice exposed to asbestos fibres, and showed similar alterations in genes at the Ink4 locus and in Trp53 as described in HMM. Here we found that Nf2(+/-) mice developed mesotheliomas after intra-peritoneal inoculation of a RCF sample (RCF1). Clinical features in exposed mice were similar to those observed in HMM, showing association between ascite and mesothelioma. Early passages of 12 mesothelioma cell cultures from ascites developed in RCF1-exposed Nf2(+/-) mice demonstrated frequent inactivation by deletion of genes at the Ink4 locus, and low rate of Trp53 point and insertion mutations. Nf2 gene was inactivated in all cultures. In most cases, co-inactivation of genes at the Ink4 locus and Nf2 was found and, at a lower rate, of Trp53 and Nf2. These results are the first to identify mutations in RCF-induced mesothelioma. They suggest that nf2 mutation is complementary of p15(Ink4b), p16(Ink4a) and p19(Arf) or p53 mutations and show similar profile of gene alterations resulting from exposure to ceramic or asbestos fibres in Nf2(+/-) mice, also consistent with the one found in HMM. These somatic genetic changes define different pathways of mesothelial cell transformation.

  20. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Qing-Tao Wang; He Liu; Zhen-Zhu Zhang; Wen-Lin Huang

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucieotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell- and T cell-based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy.

  1. Genes Contributing to the Development of Alcoholism

    OpenAIRE

    Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors (i.e., variations in specific genes) account for a substantial portion of the risk for alcoholism. However, identifying those genes and the specific variations involved is challenging. Researchers have used both case–control and family studies to identify genes related to alcoholism risk. In addition, different strategies such as candidate gene analyses and genome-wide association studies have been used. The strongest effects have been found for specific variants of genes that...

  2. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  3. The plant ADH gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strommer, Judith

    2011-04-01

    The structures, evolution and functions of alcohol dehydrogenase gene families and their products have been scrutinized for half a century. Our understanding of the enzyme structure and catalytic activity of plant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-P) is based on the vast amount of information available for its animal counterpart. The probable origins of the enzyme from a simple β-coil and eventual emergence from a glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase have been well described. There is compelling evidence that the small ADH gene families found in plants today are the survivors of multiple rounds of gene expansion and contraction. To the probable original function of their products in the terminal reaction of anaerobic fermentation have been added roles in yeast-like aerobic fermentation and the production of characteristic scents that act to attract animals that serve as pollinators or agents of seed dispersal and to protect against herbivores.

  4. Novel genes in LDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    of these findings still require independent replications and/or functional studies to confirm the exact role in LDL metabolism and the clinical implications for human health. SUMMARY: GWAS, exome sequencing studies, and recently 'exome chip' studies have suggested several novel genes with effects on LDL cholesterol....... Novel genes in LDL metabolism will improve our understanding of mechanisms in LDL metabolism, and may lead to the identification of new drug targets to reduce LDL cholesterol levels.......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize recent findings from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), whole-exome sequencing of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and 'exome chip' studies pointing to novel genes in LDL metabolism. RECENT FINDINGS: The genetic loci for ATP-binding cassette...

  5. Gene Therapy for Bone Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eRosado Balmayor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bone has an intrinsic healing capacity that may be exceeded when the fracture gap is too big or unstable. In that moment, osteogenic measures needs to be taken by physicians. It is important to combine cells, scaffolds and growth factors and the correct mechanical conditions. Growth factors are clinically administered as recombinant proteins. They are, however, expensive and needed in high supraphysiological doses. Moreover, their half-life is short when administered to the fracture. Therefore, gene therapy may be an alternative. Cells can constantly produce the protein of interest in the correct folding, with the physiological glycosylation and in the needed amounts. Genes can be delivered in vivo or ex vivo by viral or non-viral methods. Adenovirus is mostly used. For the non-viral methods, hydrogels and recently sonoporation seem to be promising means. This review will give an overview of recent advancements in gene therapy approaches for bone regeneration strategies.

  6. Electroporation-mediated gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jennifer L; Dean, David A

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation has been used extensively to transfer DNA to bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells in culture for the past 30 years. Over this time, numerous advances have been made, from using fields to facilitate cell fusion, delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to cells and tissues, and most importantly, gene and drug delivery in living tissues from rodents to man. Electroporation uses electrical fields to transiently destabilize the membrane allowing the entry of normally impermeable macromolecules into the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, at the appropriate field strengths, the application of these fields to tissues results in little, if any, damage or trauma. Indeed, electroporation has even been used successfully in human trials for gene delivery for the treatment of tumors and for vaccine development. Electroporation can lead to between 100 and 1000-fold increases in gene delivery and expression and can also increase both the distribution of cells taking up and expressing the DNA as well as the absolute amount of gene product per cell (likely due to increased delivery of plasmids into each cell). Effective electroporation depends on electric field parameters, electrode design, the tissues and cells being targeted, and the plasmids that are being transferred themselves. Most importantly, there is no single combination of these variables that leads to greatest efficacy in every situation; optimization is required in every new setting. Electroporation-mediated in vivo gene delivery has proven highly effective in vaccine production, transgene expression, enzyme replacement, and control of a variety of cancers. Almost any tissue can be targeted with electroporation, including muscle, skin, heart, liver, lung, and vasculature. This chapter will provide an overview of the theory of electroporation for the delivery of DNA both in individual cells and in tissues and its application for in vivo gene delivery in a number of animal models.

  7. Detecting Sequence Homology at the Gene Cluster Level with MultiGeneBlast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer; Nowick, Katja

    2013-01-01

    The genes encoding many biomolecular systems and pathways are genomically organized in operons or gene clusters. With MultiGeneBlast, we provide a user-friendly and effective tool to perform homology searches with operons or gene clusters as basic units, instead of single genes. The contextualizatio

  8. Genomics of local adaptation with gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigano, Anna; Friesen, Vicki L

    2016-05-01

    Gene flow is a fundamental evolutionary force in adaptation that is especially important to understand as humans are rapidly changing both the natural environment and natural levels of gene flow. Theory proposes a multifaceted role for gene flow in adaptation, but it focuses mainly on the disruptive effect that gene flow has on adaptation when selection is not strong enough to prevent the loss of locally adapted alleles. The role of gene flow in adaptation is now better understood due to the recent development of both genomic models of adaptive evolution and genomic techniques, which both point to the importance of genetic architecture in the origin and maintenance of adaptation with gene flow. In this review, we discuss three main topics on the genomics of adaptation with gene flow. First, we investigate selection on migration and gene flow. Second, we discuss the three potential sources of adaptive variation in relation to the role of gene flow in the origin of adaptation. Third, we explain how local adaptation is maintained despite gene flow: we provide a synthesis of recent genomic models of adaptation, discuss the genomic mechanisms and review empirical studies on the genomics of adaptation with gene flow. Despite predictions on the disruptive effect of gene flow in adaptation, an increasing number of studies show that gene flow can promote adaptation, that local adaptations can be maintained despite high gene flow, and that genetic architecture plays a fundamental role in the origin and maintenance of local adaptation with gene flow.

  9. A gene-based information gain method for detecting gene-gene interactions in case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Huang, Dongli; Guo, Maozu; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Zhang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yongshuai; Lv, Hongchao; Wang, Limei

    2015-11-01

    Currently, most methods for detecting gene-gene interactions (GGIs) in genome-wide association studies are divided into SNP-based methods and gene-based methods. Generally, the gene-based methods can be more powerful than SNP-based methods. Some gene-based entropy methods can only capture the linear relationship between genes. We therefore proposed a nonparametric gene-based information gain method (GBIGM) that can capture both linear relationship and nonlinear correlation between genes. Through simulation with different odds ratio, sample size and prevalence rate, GBIGM was shown to be valid and more powerful than classic KCCU method and SNP-based entropy method. In the analysis of data from 17 genes on rheumatoid arthritis, GBIGM was more effective than the other two methods as it obtains fewer significant results, which was important for biological verification. Therefore, GBIGM is a suitable and powerful tool for detecting GGIs in case-control studies.

  10. From gene to disease; hypophosphataemic rickets and the PHEX gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M; van Dael, C.M.L.; Verrijn Stuart, A.A.; van der Hout, A.H.; Rump, P.

    2006-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets is associated with mutations in the PHEX gene on the short arm of the X chromosome, encoding a membrane-bound endoprotease which is predominantly expressed in osteoblasts. Defective PHEX function leaves phosphaturic peptides such as FGF23 uncleaved, enabling these

  11. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moolman-Smook Johanna C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, a genetic disease associated with an improper hypertrophic response. Results The coding regions of KCNE1, KCNE2, KCNE3, KCNE4, and KCNE5 were examined, by direct DNA sequencing, in a cohort of 93 unrelated HCM probands and 188 blood donor controls. Fifteen genetic variants, four previously unknown, were identified in the HCM probands. Eight variants were non-synonymous and one was located in the 3'UTR-region of KCNE4. No disease-causing mutations were found and no significant difference in the frequency of genetic variants was found between HCM probands and controls. Two variants of likely functional significance were found in controls only. Conclusions Mutations in KCNE genes are not a common cause of HCM and polymorphisms in these genes do not seem to be associated with a propensity to develop arrhythmia

  12. FunGeneClusterS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2016-01-01

    and industrial biotechnology applications. We have previously published a method for accurate prediction of clusters from genome and transcriptome data, which could also suggest cross-chemistry, however, this method was limited both in the number of parameters which could be adjusted as well as in user......Secondary metabolites of fungi are receiving an increasing amount of interest due to their prolific bioactivities and the fact that fungal biosynthesis of secondary metabolites often occurs from co-regulated and co-located gene clusters. This makes the gene clusters attractive for synthetic biology...

  13. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    CERN Document Server

    Furusawa, C; Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2002-01-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1, i.e., they obey Zipf's law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intra-cellular reaction network, we found that Zipf's law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  14. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-02-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1; i.e., they obey Zipf’s law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intracellular reaction network, we found that Zipf’s law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  15. Shuffling Yeast Gene Expression Data

    CERN Document Server

    Bilke, S

    2000-01-01

    A new method to sort gene expression patterns into functional groups is presented. The method is based on a sorting algorithm using a non-local similarity score, which takes all other patterns in the dataset into account. The method is therefore very robust with respect to noise. Using the expression data for yeast, we extract information about functional groups. Without prior knowledge of parameters the cell cycle regulated genes in yeast can be identified. Furthermore a second, independent cell clock is identified. The capability of the algorithm to extract information about signal flow in the regulatory network underlying the expression patterns is demonstrated.

  16. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin;

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies...... an analytical approach to examine the suitability of correction methods by considering the inter-treatment bias as well as the inter-replicate variance, which allows use of the best correction method with minimum residual bias. Analyses of RNA sequencing and microarray data showed that the efficiencies...

  17. Clock genes, chronotypes and diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan I. Voinescu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Many common diseases in humans (such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes mellitus orpsychiatric disorders, such as depression seem to be linked to disruptions of circadian cycles and toclock genes variation. It is unlikely that such diseases to be caused by a genetic variation within a singlegene. They must be influenced by complex interactions among multiple genes, as well as environmentaland lifestyle factors. Therefore, it is important to understand how the resulting perturbations in ourcircadian biology could affect our physiological processes and susceptibility to disease. Associationsbetween the polymorphisms of the main components of the circadian molecular clock, circadian type(also known as diurnal preference or chronotype and diseases are presented.

  18. Homeobox genes and melatonin synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based indu......Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a c......AMP response element-based circadian melatonin production....

  19. Genome-Wide association study identifies candidate genes for Parkinson's disease in an Ashkenazi Jewish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xinmin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, nine Parkinson disease (PD genome-wide association studies in North American, European and Asian populations have been published. The majority of studies have confirmed the association of the previously identified genetic risk factors, SNCA and MAPT, and two studies have identified three new PD susceptibility loci/genes (PARK16, BST1 and HLA-DRB5. In a recent meta-analysis of datasets from five of the published PD GWAS an additional 6 novel candidate genes (SYT11, ACMSD, STK39, MCCC1/LAMP3, GAK and CCDC62/HIP1R were identified. Collectively the associations identified in these GWAS account for only a small proportion of the estimated total heritability of PD suggesting that an 'unknown' component of the genetic architecture of PD remains to be identified. Methods We applied a GWAS approach to a relatively homogeneous Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ population from New York to search for both 'rare' and 'common' genetic variants that confer risk of PD by examining any SNPs with allele frequencies exceeding 2%. We have focused on a genetic isolate, the AJ population, as a discovery dataset since this cohort has a higher sharing of genetic background and historically experienced a significant bottleneck. We also conducted a replication study using two publicly available datasets from dbGaP. The joint analysis dataset had a combined sample size of 2,050 cases and 1,836 controls. Results We identified the top 57 SNPs showing the strongest evidence of association in the AJ dataset (p -5. Six SNPs located within gene regions had positive signals in at least one other independent dbGaP dataset: LOC100505836 (Chr3p24, LOC153328/SLC25A48 (Chr5q31.1, UNC13B (9p13.3, SLCO3A1(15q26.1, WNT3(17q21.3 and NSF (17q21.3. We also replicated published associations for the gene regions SNCA (Chr4q21; rs3775442, p = 0.037, PARK16 (Chr1q32.1; rs823114 (NUCKS1, p = 6.12 × 10-4, BST1 (Chr4p15; rs12502586, p = 0.027, STK39 (Chr2q24.3; rs3754775, p = 0

  20. Gene therapy on demand: site specific regulation of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazwa, Agnieszka; Florczyk, Urszula; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2013-08-10

    Since 1990 when the first clinical gene therapy trial was conducted, much attention and considerable promise have been given to this form of treatment. Gene therapy has been used with success in patients suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes (X-SCID and ADA-deficiency), Leber's congenital amaurosis, hemophilia, β-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy. Last year, the first therapeutic vector (Glybera) for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been registered in the European Union. Nevertheless, there are still several numerous issues that need to be improved to make this technique more safe, effective and easily accessible for patients. Introduction of the therapeutic gene to the given cells should provide the level of expression which will restore the production of therapeutic protein to normal values or will provide therapeutic efficacy despite not fully physiological expression. However, in numerous diseases the expression of therapeutic genes has to be kept at certain level for some time, and then might be required to be switched off to be activated again when worsening of the symptoms may aggravate the risk of disease relapse. In such cases the promoters which are regulated by local conditions may be more required. In this article the special emphasis is to discuss the strategies of regulation of gene expression by endogenous stimuli. Particularly, the hypoxia- or miRNA-regulated vectors offer the possibilities of tight but, at the same time, condition-dependent and cell-specific expression. Such means have been already tested in certain pathophysiological conditions. This creates the chance for the translational approaches required for development of effective treatments of so far incurable diseases.

  1. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part I. Gene delivery technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective gene delivery is a prerequisite for successful gene therapy. In the early age of human gene therapy, setbacks due to problematic gene delivery vehicles plagued the exciting therapeutic outcome. However, gene delivery technologies rapidly evolved ever since. With the advancement of gene delivery techniques, gene therapy clinical trials surged during the past decade. As the first gene therapy product (Glybera) has obtained regulatory approval and reached clinic, human gene therapy finally realized the promise that genes can be medicines. The diverse gene delivery techniques available today have laid the foundation for gene therapy applications in treating a wide range of human diseases. Some of the most urgent unmet medical needs, such as cancer and pandemic infectious diseases, have been tackled by gene therapy strategies with promising results. Furthermore, combining gene transfer with other breakthroughs in biomedical research and novel biotechnologies opened new avenues for gene therapy. Such innovative therapeutic strategies are unthinkable until now, and are expected to be revolutionary. In part I of this review, we introduced recent development of non-viral and viral gene delivery technology platforms. As cell-based gene therapy blossomed, we also summarized the diverse types of cells and vectors employed in ex vivo gene transfer. Finally, challenges in current gene delivery technologies for human use were discussed.

  2. Genome-wide Analysis of Gene Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun

    cells are capable of regulating their gene expression, so that each cell can only express a particular set of genes yielding limited numbers of proteins with specialized functions. Therefore a rigid control of differential gene expression is necessary for cellular diversity. On the other hand, aberrant...... gene regulation will disrupt the cell’s fundamental processes, which in turn can cause disease. Hence, understanding gene regulation is essential for deciphering the code of life. Along with the development of high throughput sequencing (HTS) technology and the subsequent large-scale data analysis......, genome-wide assays have increased our understanding of gene regulation significantly. This thesis describes the integration and analysis of HTS data across different important aspects of gene regulation. Gene expression can be regulated at different stages when the genetic information is passed from gene...

  3. Evidence based selection of housekeeping genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik J M de Jonge

    Full Text Available For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes (reference or internal control genes is required. It is known that commonly used housekeeping genes (e.g. ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, and B2M vary considerably under different experimental conditions and therefore their use for normalization is limited. We performed a meta-analysis of 13,629 human gene array samples in order to identify the most stable expressed genes. Here we show novel candidate housekeeping genes (e.g. RPS13, RPL27, RPS20 and OAZ1 with enhanced stability among a multitude of different cell types and varying experimental conditions. None of the commonly used housekeeping genes were present in the top 50 of the most stable expressed genes. In addition, using 2,543 diverse mouse gene array samples we were able to confirm the enhanced stability of the candidate novel housekeeping genes in another mammalian species. Therefore, the identified novel candidate housekeeping genes seem to be the most appropriate choice for normalizing gene expression data.

  4. Gene therapy and respiratory neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Carlos B

    2017-01-01

    Breathing is a life-sustaining behavior that in mammals is accomplished by activation of dedicated muscles responsible for inspiratory and expiratory forces acting on the lung and chest wall. Motor control is exerted by specialized pools of motoneurons in the medulla and spinal cord innervated by projections from multiple centers primarily in the brainstem that act in concert to generate both the rhythm and pattern of ventilation. Perturbations that prevent the accomplishment of the full range of motor behaviors by respiratory muscles commonly result in significant morbidity and increased mortality. Recent developments in gene therapy and novel targeting strategies have contributed to deeper understanding of the organization of respiratory motor systems. Gene therapy has received widespread attention and substantial progress has been made in recent years with the advent of improved tools for vector design. Genes can be delivered via a variety of plasmids, synthetic or viral vectors and cell therapies. In recent years, adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have become one of the most commonly used vector systems, primarily because of the extensive characterization conducted to date and the versatility in targeting strategies. Recent studies highlight the power of using AAV to selectively and effectively transduce respiratory motoneurons and muscle fibers with promising therapeutic effects. This brief review summarizes current evidence for the use of gene therapy in respiratory disorders with a primary focus on interventions that address motor control and neuroplasticity, including regeneration, in the respiratory system.

  5. Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should be reviewed. • Psychological assessment/Counseling – prior to testing, psychological evaluation is recommended to ensure the person being tested is as prepared as possible to receive the test results, and to ... Before gene testing is ordered, the coordinating physician may choose to ...

  6. [From gene to disease: cystinosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levtchenko, E.N.; Wilmer, M.J.G.; Graaf-Hess, A.C. de; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Blom, H.J.; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2004-01-01

    Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by an impaired transport of cystine out of lysosomes. The most severe infantile form of cystinosis starts with Fanconi syndrome at the age of 3-6 months. Untreated patients develop renal failure before the age of 10. The cystinosis gene (CTNS) map

  7. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. Not...

  8. Codon Adaptation of Plastid Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Haruo; Morton, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Codon adaptation is codon usage bias that results from selective pressure to increase the translation efficiency of a gene. Codon adaptation has been studied across a wide range of genomes and some early analyses of plastids have shown evidence for codon adaptation in a limited set of highly expressed plastid genes. Here we study codon usage bias across all fully sequenced plastid genomes which includes representatives of the Rhodophyta, Alveolata, Cryptophyta, Euglenozoa, Glaucocystophyceae, Rhizaria, Stramenopiles and numerous lineages within the Viridiplantae, including Chlorophyta and Embryophyta. We show evidence that codon adaptation occurs in all genomes except for two, Theileria parva and Heicosporidium sp., both of which have highly reduced gene contents and no photosynthesis genes. We also show evidence that selection for codon adaptation increases the representation of the same set of codons, which we refer to as the adaptive codons, across this wide range of taxa, which is probably due to common features descended from the initial endosymbiont. We use various measures to estimate the relative strength of selection in the different lineages and show that it appears to be fairly strong in certain Stramenopiles and Chlorophyta lineages but relatively weak in many members of the Rhodophyta, Euglenozoa and Embryophyta. Given these results we propose that codon adaptation in plastids is widespread and displays the same general features as adaptation in eubacterial genomes. PMID:27196606

  9. Codon Adaptation of Plastid Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruo Suzuki

    Full Text Available Codon adaptation is codon usage bias that results from selective pressure to increase the translation efficiency of a gene. Codon adaptation has been studied across a wide range of genomes and some early analyses of plastids have shown evidence for codon adaptation in a limited set of highly expressed plastid genes. Here we study codon usage bias across all fully sequenced plastid genomes which includes representatives of the Rhodophyta, Alveolata, Cryptophyta, Euglenozoa, Glaucocystophyceae, Rhizaria, Stramenopiles and numerous lineages within the Viridiplantae, including Chlorophyta and Embryophyta. We show evidence that codon adaptation occurs in all genomes except for two, Theileria parva and Heicosporidium sp., both of which have highly reduced gene contents and no photosynthesis genes. We also show evidence that selection for codon adaptation increases the representation of the same set of codons, which we refer to as the adaptive codons, across this wide range of taxa, which is probably due to common features descended from the initial endosymbiont. We use various measures to estimate the relative strength of selection in the different lineages and show that it appears to be fairly strong in certain Stramenopiles and Chlorophyta lineages but relatively weak in many members of the Rhodophyta, Euglenozoa and Embryophyta. Given these results we propose that codon adaptation in plastids is widespread and displays the same general features as adaptation in eubacterial genomes.

  10. Patching genes to fight disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzman, D.

    1990-09-03

    The National Institutes of Health has approved the first gene therapy experiments, one of which will try to cure cancer by bolstering the immune system. The applications of such therapy are limited, but the potential aid to people with genetic diseases is great.

  11. Gene expression studies using microarrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette

    2001-01-01

    1. The rapid progression of the collaborative sequencing programmes that are unravelling the complete genome sequences of many organisms are opening pathways for new approaches to gene analysis. As the sequence data become available, the bottleneck in biological research will shift to understanding

  12. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  13. Gene Expression in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Martínez-Calvillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa.

  14. Evolution of the chicken Toll-like receptor gene family: A story of gene gain and gene loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paton Ian R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs perform a vital role in disease resistance through their recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. Recent advances in genomics allow comparison of TLR genes within and between many species. This study takes advantage of the recently sequenced chicken genome to determine the complete chicken TLR repertoire and place it in context of vertebrate genomic evolution. Results The chicken TLR repertoire consists of ten genes. Phylogenetic analyses show that six of these genes have orthologs in mammals and fish, while one is only shared by fish and three appear to be unique to birds. Furthermore the phylogeny shows that TLR1-like genes arose independently in fish, birds and mammals from an ancestral gene also shared by TLR6 and TLR10. All other TLRs were already present prior to the divergence of major vertebrate lineages 550 Mya (million years ago and have since been lost in certain lineages. Phylogenetic analysis shows the absence of TLRs 8 and 9 in chicken to be the result of gene loss. The notable exception to the tendency of gene loss in TLR evolution is found in chicken TLRs 1 and 2, each of which underwent gene duplication about 147 and 65 Mya, respectively. Conclusion Comparative phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate TLR genes provides insight into their patterns and processes of gene evolution, with examples of both gene gain and gene loss. In addition, these comparisons clarify the nomenclature of TLR genes in vertebrates.

  15. Gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, M J; Gaballa, M A

    2001-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy of vascular diseases is a promising new field in modern medicine. Recent advancements in gene transfer technology have greatly evolved our understanding of the pathophysiologic role of candidate disease genes. With this knowledge, the expression of selective gene products provides the means to test the therapeutic use of gene therapy in a multitude of medical conditions. In addition, with the completion of genome sequencing programs, gene transfer can be used also to study the biologic function of novel genes in vivo. Novel genes are delivered to targeted tissue via several different vehicles. These vectors include adenoviruses, retroviruses, plasmids, plasmid/liposomes, and oligonucleotides. However, each one of these vectors has inherent limitations. Further investigations into developing delivery systems that not only allow for efficient, targeted gene transfer, but also are stable and nonimmunogenic, will optimize the clinical application of gene therapy in vascular diseases. This review further discusses the available mode of gene delivery and examines six major areas in vascular gene therapy, namely prevention of restenosis, thrombosis, hypertension, atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease in congestive heart failure, and ischemia. Although we highlight some of the recent advances in the use of gene therapy in treating vascular disease discovered primarily during the past two years, many excellent studies published during that period are not included in this review due to space limitations. The following is a selective review of practical uses of gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases. This review primarily covers work performed in the last 2 years. For earlier work, the reader may refer to several excellent review articles. For instance, Belalcazer et al. (6) reviewed general aspects of somatic gene therapy and the different vehicles used for the delivery of therapeutic genes. Gene therapy in restenosis and stimulation of

  16. Empirical study of supervised gene screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Shuangge

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray studies provide a way of linking variations of phenotypes with their genetic causations. Constructing predictive models using high dimensional microarray measurements usually consists of three steps: (1 unsupervised gene screening; (2 supervised gene screening; and (3 statistical model building. Supervised gene screening based on marginal gene ranking is commonly used to reduce the number of genes in the model building. Various simple statistics, such as t-statistic or signal to noise ratio, have been used to rank genes in the supervised screening. Despite of its extensive usage, statistical study of supervised gene screening remains scarce. Our study is partly motivated by the differences in gene discovery results caused by using different supervised gene screening methods. Results We investigate concordance and reproducibility of supervised gene screening based on eight commonly used marginal statistics. Concordance is assessed by the relative fractions of overlaps between top ranked genes screened using different marginal statistics. We propose a Bootstrap Reproducibility Index, which measures reproducibility of individual genes under the supervised screening. Empirical studies are based on four public microarray data. We consider the cases where the top 20%, 40% and 60% genes are screened. Conclusion From a gene discovery point of view, the effect of supervised gene screening based on different marginal statistics cannot be ignored. Empirical studies show that (1 genes passed different supervised screenings may be considerably different; (2 concordance may vary, depending on the underlying data structure and percentage of selected genes; (3 evaluated with the Bootstrap Reproducibility Index, genes passed supervised screenings are only moderately reproducible; and (4 concordance cannot be improved by supervised screening based on reproducibility.

  17. Gene functional similarity search tool (GFSST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo James J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the genome sequences of human, mouse, and other species and the advent of high throughput functional genomic research technologies such as biomicroarray chips, more and more genes and their products have been discovered and their functions have begun to be understood. Increasing amounts of data about genes, gene products and their functions have been stored in databases. To facilitate selection of candidate genes for gene-disease research, genetic association studies, biomarker and drug target selection, and animal models of human diseases, it is essential to have search engines that can retrieve genes by their functions from proteome databases. In recent years, the development of Gene Ontology (GO has established structured, controlled vocabularies describing gene functions, which makes it possible to develop novel tools to search genes by functional similarity. Results By using a statistical model to measure the functional similarity of genes based on the Gene Ontology directed acyclic graph, we developed a novel Gene Functional Similarity Search Tool (GFSST to identify genes with related functions from annotated proteome databases. This search engine lets users design their search targets by gene functions. Conclusion An implementation of GFSST which works on the UniProt (Universal Protein Resource for the human and mouse proteomes is available at GFSST Web Server. GFSST provides functions not only for similar gene retrieval but also for gene search by one or more GO terms. This represents a powerful new approach for selecting similar genes and gene products from proteome databases according to their functions.

  18. STATE-OF-THE-ART HUMAN GENE THERAPY: PART II. GENE THERAPY STRATEGIES AND APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In Part I of this Review, we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene...

  19. Vascular Gene Expression: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Concepción eMartínez-Navarro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a primitive vascular tissue (a lycophyte, as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte, and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non- vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants.

  20. Gene doping: the hype and the harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKanna, Trudy A; Toriello, Helga V

    2010-06-01

    "Gene doping" is the term used to describe the potential abuse of gene therapy as a performance-enhancing agent. Gene doping would apply the techniques used in gene therapy to provide altered expression of genes that would promote physical superiority. For example, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a primary target for growth hormone; overexpression of IGF-1 can lead to increased muscle mass and power. Although gene doping is still largely theoretical, its implications for sports, health, ethics, and medical genetics are significant.

  1. Msx homeobox gene family and craniofacial development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SYLVIA ALAPPAT; ZUN YI ZHANG; YI PING CHEN

    2003-01-01

    Vertebrate Msx genes are unlinked,homeobox-containing genes that bear homology to the Drosophila muscle segment homeobox gene.These genes are expressed at multiple sites of tissue-tissue interactions during vertebrate embryonic development.Inductive interactions mediated by the Msx genes are essential for normal craniofacial,limb and ectodermal organ morphogenesis,and are also essential to survival in mice,as manifested by the phenotypic abnormalities shown in knockout mice and in humans.This review summarizes studies on the expression,regulation,and functional analysis of Msx genes that bear relevance to craniofacial development in humans and mice.

  2. Polypeptide composition and gag gene-coded products of type-D oncovirus from HEp-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, V A

    1982-01-01

    The protein composition of type-D oncovirus HEp-2, isolated from cell-free medium of continuous human HEp-2 cell line, has been investigated using electrophoresis on gradient polyacrylamide gels with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Labeling with 14C-amino acids revealed five viral polypeptides with molecular weights of 70 000 (gp70), 27 000 (p27), 19 000 (p19), 15 000 (p15), 12 000-10 000 (p12-10). The 70 000 dalton protein was shown to be the only glycoprotein by incorporation of radioactive glucosamine. A polypeptide with molecular weight of 78 000 has been specifically precipitated from pulse-labeled type-D oncovirus producing HEp-2 cells with goat anti Mason-Pfizer p27 serum. This protein was shown to be gag gene-coded polyprotein precursor (Pr78gag) of the major virus polypeptide p27. Pulse-labeled HEp-2 and Mason-Pfizer infected Tu 197 cells were rinsed, lysed, clarified and precipitated with goat anti Mason-Pfizer p27 serum. In both cases Pr78gag was detected.

  3. GenePRIMP: A GENE PRediction IMprovement Pipeline for Prokaryotic genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2010-04-01

    We present 'gene prediction improvement pipeline' (GenePRIMP; http://geneprimp.jgi-psf.org/), a computational process that performs evidence-based evaluation of gene models in prokaryotic genomes and reports anomalies including inconsistent start sites, missed genes and split genes. We found that manual curation of gene models using the anomaly reports generated by GenePRIMP improved their quality, and demonstrate the applicability of GenePRIMP in improving finishing quality and comparing different genome-sequencing and annotation technologies.

  4. Detection of gene expression pattern in the early stage after spinal cord injury by gene chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成龙; 靳安民; 童斌辉

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of the gene expression pattern of spinal cord tissues in the early stage after injury by DNA microarray (gene chip). Methods: The contusion model of rat spinal cord was established according to Allen's falling strike method and the gene expression patterns of normal and injured spinal cord tissues were studied by gene chip. Results: The expression of 45 genes was significantly changed in the early stage after spinal cord injury, in which 22 genes up-regulated and 23 genes down-regulated. Conclusions: The expression of some genes changes significantly in the early stage after spinal cord injury, which indicates the complexity of secondary spinal cord injury.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes from Mesobuthus martensii reveals Hox gene duplication in scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Zhiyong; Yu, Yao; Wu, Yingliang; Hao, Pei; He, Yawen; Zhao, Huabin; Li, Yixue; Zhao, Guoping; Li, Xuan; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-06-01

    Homeobox genes belong to a large gene group, which encodes the famous DNA-binding homeodomain that plays a key role in development and cellular differentiation during embryogenesis in animals. Here, one hundred forty-nine homeobox genes were identified from the Asian scorpion, Mesobuthus martensii (Chelicerata: Arachnida: Scorpiones: Buthidae) based on our newly assembled genome sequence with approximately 248 × coverage. The identified homeobox genes were categorized into eight classes including 82 families: 67 ANTP class genes, 33 PRD genes, 11 LIM genes, five POU genes, six SINE genes, 14 TALE genes, five CUT genes, two ZF genes and six unclassified genes. Transcriptome data confirmed that more than half of the genes were expressed in adults. The homeobox gene diversity of the eight classes is similar to the previously analyzed Mandibulata arthropods. Interestingly, it is hypothesized that the scorpion M. martensii may have two Hox clusters. The first complete genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes in Chelicerata not only reveals the repertoire of scorpion, arachnid and chelicerate homeobox genes, but also shows some insights into the evolution of arthropod homeobox genes.

  6. The relationship among gene expression, the evolution of gene dosage, and the rate of protein evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Gout

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of selective constraints affecting genes is a major issue in biology. It is well established that gene expression level is a major determinant of the rate of protein evolution, but the reasons for this relationship remain highly debated. Here we demonstrate that gene expression is also a major determinant of the evolution of gene dosage: the rate of gene losses after whole genome duplications in the Paramecium lineage is negatively correlated to the level of gene expression, and this relationship is not a byproduct of other factors known to affect the fate of gene duplicates. This indicates that changes in gene dosage are generally more deleterious for highly expressed genes. This rule also holds for other taxa: in yeast, we find a clear relationship between gene expression level and the fitness impact of reduction in gene dosage. To explain these observations, we propose a model based on the fact that the optimal expression level of a gene corresponds to a trade-off between the benefit and cost of its expression. This COSTEX model predicts that selective pressure against mutations changing gene expression level or affecting the encoded protein should on average be stronger in highly expressed genes and hence that both the frequency of gene loss and the rate of protein evolution should correlate negatively with gene expression. Thus, the COSTEX model provides a simple and common explanation for the general relationship observed between the level of gene expression and the different facets of gene evolution.

  7. Genes from scratch--the evolutionary fate of de novo genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Although considered an extremely unlikely event, many genes emerge from previously noncoding genomic regions. This review covers the entire life cycle of such de novo genes. Two competing hypotheses about the process of de novo gene birth are discussed as well as the high death rate of de novo genes. Despite the high death rate, some de novo genes are retained and remain functional, even in distantly related species, through their integration into gene networks. Further studies combining gene expression with ribosome profiling in multiple populations across different species will be instrumental for an improved understanding of the evolutionary processes operating on de novo genes.

  8. Gene expression profiles in squamous cell cervical carcinoma using array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y-W; Bae, S M; Kim, Y-W; Lee, H N; Kim, Y W; Park, T C; Ro, D Y; Shin, J C; Shin, S J; Seo, J-S; Ahn, W S

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to identify novel genomic regions of interest and provide highly dynamic range information on correlation between squamous cell cervical carcinoma and its related gene expression patterns by a genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). We analyzed 15 cases of cervical cancer from KangNam St Mary's Hospital of the Catholic University of Korea. Microdissection assay was performed to obtain DNA samples from paraffin-embedded cervical tissues of cancer as well as of the adjacent normal tissues. The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array used in this study consisted of 1440 human BACs and the space among the clones was 2.08 Mb. All the 15 cases of cervical cancer showed the differential changes of the cervical cancer-associated genetic alterations. The analysis limit of average gains and losses was 53%. A significant positive correlation was found in 8q24.3, 1p36.32, 3q27.1, 7p21.1, 11q13.1, and 3p14.2 changes through the cervical carcinogenesis. The regions of high level of gain were 1p36.33-1p36.32, 8q24.3, 16p13.3, 1p36.33, 3q27.1, and 7p21.1. And the regions of homozygous loss were 2q12.1, 22q11.21, 3p14.2, 6q24.3, 7p15.2, and 11q25. In the high level of gain regions, GSDMDC1, RECQL4, TP73, ABCF3, ALG3, HDAC9, ESRRA, and RPS6KA4 were significantly correlated with cervical cancer. The genes encoded by frequently lost clones were PTPRG, GRM7, ZDHHC3, EXOSC7, LRP1B, and NR3C2. Therefore, array-CGH analyses showed that specific genomic alterations were maintained in cervical cancer that were critical to the malignant phenotype and may give a chance to find out possible target genes present in the gained or lost clones.

  9. Evaluation of candidate stromal epithelial cross-talk genes identifies association between risk of serous ovarian cancer and TERT, a cancer susceptibility "hot-spot".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon E Johnatty

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that variants in genes expressed as a consequence of interactions between ovarian cancer cells and the host micro-environment could contribute to cancer susceptibility. We therefore used a two-stage approach to evaluate common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 173 genes involved in stromal epithelial interactions in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC. In the discovery stage, cases with epithelial ovarian cancer (n=675 and controls (n=1,162 were genotyped at 1,536 SNPs using an Illumina GoldenGate assay. Based on Positive Predictive Value estimates, three SNPs-PODXL rs1013368, ITGA6 rs13027811, and MMP3 rs522616-were selected for replication using TaqMan genotyping in up to 3,059 serous invasive cases and 8,905 controls from 16 OCAC case-control studies. An additional 18 SNPs with Pper-alleleor=0.5. However genotypes at TERT rs7726159 were associated with ovarian cancer risk in the smaller, five-study replication study (Pper-allele=0.03. Combined analysis of the discovery and replication sets for this TERT SNP showed an increased risk of serous ovarian cancer among non-Hispanic whites [adj. ORper-allele 1.14 (1.04-1.24 p=0.003]. Our study adds to the growing evidence that, like the 8q24 locus, the telomerase reverse transcriptase locus at 5p15.33, is a general cancer susceptibility locus.

  10. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne S Schaefer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a genetic susceptibility locus shared by both diseases. We confirm the known association of two neighboring linkage disequilibrium regions on human chromosome 9p21.3 with CHD and show the additional strong association of these loci with the risk of aggressive periodontitis. For the lead SNP of the main associated linkage disequilibrium region, rs1333048, the odds ratio of the autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance is 1.99 (95% confidence interval 1.33-2.94; P = 6.9 x 10(-4 for generalized aggressive periodontitis, and 1.72 (1.06-2.76; P = 2.6 x 10(-2 for localized aggressive periodontitis. The two associated linkage disequilibrium regions map to the sequence of the large antisense noncoding RNA ANRIL, which partly overlaps regulatory and coding sequences of CDKN2A/CDKN2B. A closely located diabetes-associated variant was independent of the CHD and periodontitis risk haplotypes. Our study demonstrates that CHD and periodontitis are genetically related by at least one susceptibility locus, which is possibly involved in ANRIL activity and independent of diabetes associated risk variants within this region. Elucidation of the interplay of ANRIL transcript variants and their involvement in increased susceptibility to the interactive diseases CHD and periodontitis promises new insight into the underlying shared pathogenic mechanisms of these complex common diseases.

  11. cis sequence effects on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Kevin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence and transcriptional variability within and between individuals are typically studied independently. The joint analysis of sequence and gene expression variation (genetical genomics provides insight into the role of linked sequence variation in the regulation of gene expression. We investigated the role of sequence variation in cis on gene expression (cis sequence effects in a group of genes commonly studied in cancer research in lymphoblastoid cell lines. We estimated the proportion of genes exhibiting cis sequence effects and the proportion of gene expression variation explained by cis sequence effects using three different analytical approaches, and compared our results to the literature. Results We generated gene expression profiling data at N = 697 candidate genes from N = 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines for this study and used available candidate gene resequencing data at N = 552 candidate genes to identify N = 30 candidate genes with sufficient variance in both datasets for the investigation of cis sequence effects. We used two additive models and the haplotype phylogeny scanning approach of Templeton (Tree Scanning to evaluate association between individual SNPs, all SNPs at a gene, and diplotypes, with log-transformed gene expression. SNPs and diplotypes at eight candidate genes exhibited statistically significant (p cis sequence effects in our study, respectively. Conclusion Based on analysis of our results and the extant literature, one in four genes exhibits significant cis sequence effects, and for these genes, about 30% of gene expression variation is accounted for by cis sequence variation. Despite diverse experimental approaches, the presence or absence of significant cis sequence effects is largely supported by previously published studies.

  12. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realist...

  13. Gene based therapies for kidney regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Manoe J; Arcolino, Fanny O; Schoor, Perry; Kok, Robbert Jan; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-11-05

    In this review we provide an overview of the expanding molecular toolbox that is available for gene based therapies and how these therapies can be used for a large variety of kidney diseases. Gene based therapies range from restoring gene function in genetic kidney diseases to steering complex molecular pathways in chronic kidney disorders, and can provide a treatment or cure for diseases that otherwise may not be targeted. This approach involves the delivery of recombinant DNA sequences harboring therapeutic genes to improve cell function and thereby promote kidney regeneration. Depending on the therapy, the recombinant DNA will express a gene that directly plays a role in the function of the cell (gene addition), that regulates the expression of an endogenous gene (gene regulation), or that even changes the DNA sequence of endogenous genes (gene editing). Some interventions involve permanent changes in the genome whereas others are only temporary and leave no trace. Efficient and safe delivery are important steps for all gene based therapies and also depend on the mode of action of the therapeutic gene. Here we provide examples on how the different methods can be used to treat various diseases, which technologies are now emerging (such as gene repair through CRISPR/Cas9) and what the opportunities, perspectives, potential and the limitations of these therapies are for the treatment of kidney diseases.

  14. Genomic evidence for adaptation by gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wenfeng; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2014-08-01

    Gene duplication is widely believed to facilitate adaptation, but unambiguous evidence for this hypothesis has been found in only a small number of cases. Although gene duplication may increase the fitness of the involved organisms by doubling gene dosage or neofunctionalization, it may also result in a simple division of ancestral functions into daughter genes, which need not promote adaptation. Hence, the general validity of the adaptation by gene duplication hypothesis remains uncertain. Indeed, a genome-scale experiment found similar fitness effects of deleting pairs of duplicate genes and deleting individual singleton genes from the yeast genome, leading to the conclusion that duplication rarely results in adaptation. Here we contend that the above comparison is unfair because of a known duplication bias among genes with different fitness contributions. To rectify this problem, we compare homologous genes from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We discover that simultaneously deleting a duplicate gene pair in S. cerevisiae reduces fitness significantly more than deleting their singleton counterpart in S. pombe, revealing post-duplication adaptation. The duplicates-singleton difference in fitness effect is not attributable to a potential increase in gene dose after duplication, suggesting that the adaptation is owing to neofunctionalization, which we find to be explicable by acquisitions of binary protein-protein interactions rather than gene expression changes. These results provide genomic evidence for the role of gene duplication in organismal adaptation and are important for understanding the genetic mechanisms of evolutionary innovation.

  15. Thesaurus-based disambiguation of gene symbols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wain Hester M

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Massive text mining of the biological literature holds great promise of relating disparate information and discovering new knowledge. However, disambiguation of gene symbols is a major bottleneck. Results We developed a simple thesaurus-based disambiguation algorithm that can operate with very little training data. The thesaurus comprises the information from five human genetic databases and MeSH. The extent of the homonym problem for human gene symbols is shown to be substantial (33% of the genes in our combined thesaurus had one or more ambiguous symbols, not only because one symbol can refer to multiple genes, but also because a gene symbol can have many non-gene meanings. A test set of 52,529 Medline abstracts, containing 690 ambiguous human gene symbols taken from OMIM, was automatically generated. Overall accuracy of the disambiguation algorithm was up to 92.7% on the test set. Conclusion The ambiguity of human gene symbols is substantial, not only because one symbol may denote multiple genes but particularly because many symbols have other, non-gene meanings. The proposed disambiguation approach resolves most ambiguities in our test set with high accuracy, including the important gene/not a gene decisions. The algorithm is fast and scalable, enabling gene-symbol disambiguation in massive text mining applications.

  16. Gene Therapy and Gene Editing for the Corneal Dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Keryn A; Irani, Yazad D

    2016-01-01

    Despite ever-increasing understanding of the genetic underpinnings of many corneal dystrophies, gene therapy designed to ameliorate disease has not yet been reported in any human patient. In this review, we explore the likely reasons for this apparent failure of translation. We identify the requirements for success: the genetic defect involved must have been identified and mapped, vision in the affected patient must be significantly impaired or likely to be impaired, no better or equivalently effective treatment must be available, the treatment must be capable of modulating corneal pathology, and delivery of the construct to the appropriate cell must be practicable. We consider which of the corneal dystrophies might be amenable to treatment by genetic manipulations, summarize existing therapeutic options for treatment, and explore gene editing using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas and other similar transformative technologies as the way of the future. We then summarize recent laboratory-based advances in gene delivery and the development of in vitro and in vivo models of the corneal dystrophies. Finally, we review recent experimental work that has increased our knowledge of the pathobiology of these conditions.

  17. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-12-22

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows.

  18. Progress in Chimeric Vector and Chimeric Gene Based Cardiovascular Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chun-Song; YOON Young-sup; ISNER Jeffrey M.; LOSORDO Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy for cardiovascular diseases has developed from preliminary animal experiments to clinical trials. However, vectors and target genes used currently in gene therapy are mainly focused on viral, nonviral vector and single target gene or monogene. Each vector system has a series of advantages and limitations. Chimeric vectors which combine the advantages of viral and nonviral vector,chimeric target genes which combine two or more target genes and novel gene delivery modes are being developed. In this article, we summarized the progress in chimeric vectors and chimeric genes based cardiovascular gene therapy, which including proliferative or occlusive vascular diseases such as atheroslerosis and restenosis, hypertonic vascular disease such as hypertension and cardiac diseases such as myocardium ischemia, dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure, even heart transplantation. The development of chimeric vector, chimeric gene and their cardiovascular gene therapy is promising.

  19. ETS-related transcription factors ETV4 and ETV5 are involved in proliferation and induction of differentiation-associated genes in embryonic stem (ES) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Tadayuki; Kuure, Satu; Uranishi, Kousuke; Koide, Hiroshi; Costantini, Frank; Yokota, Takashi

    2015-09-11

    The pluripotency and self-renewal capacity of embryonic stem (ES) cells is regulated by several transcription factors. Here, we show that the ETS-related transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5 (Etv4/5) are specifically expressed in undifferentiated ES cells, and suppression of Oct3/4 results in down-regulation of Etv4/5. Simultaneous deletion of Etv4 and Etv5 (Etv4/5 double knock-out (dKO)) in ES cells resulted in a flat, epithelial cell-like appearance, whereas the morphology changed into compact colonies in a 2i medium (containing two inhibitors for GSK3 and MEK/ERK). Expression levels of self-renewal marker genes, including Oct3/4 and Nanog, were similar between wild-type and dKO ES cells, whereas proliferation of Etv4/5 dKO ES cells was decreased with overexpression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p16/p19, p15, and p57). A differentiation assay revealed that the embryoid bodies derived from Etv4/5 dKO ES cells were smaller than the control, and expression of ectoderm marker genes, including Fgf5, Sox1, and Pax3, was not induced in dKO-derived embryoid bodies. Microarray analysis demonstrated that stem cell-related genes, including Tcf15, Gbx2, Lrh1, Zic3, and Baf60c, were significantly repressed in Etv4/5 dKO ES cells. The artificial expression of Etv4 and/or Etv5 in Etv4/5 dKO ES cells induced re-expression of Tcf15 and Gbx2. These results indicate that Etv4 and Etv5, potentially through regulation of Gbx2 and Tcf15, are involved in the ES cell proliferation and induction of differentiation-associated genes in ES cells.

  20. Cattle Candidate Genes for Milk Production Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Kadlec, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to make an overview of important candidate genes affecting milk yield and milk quality parameters, with an emphasis on genes associated with the quantity and quality of milk proteins and milk fat.

  1. Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... egg and the other half from your father's sperm cell. A male child receives an X chromosome from ... If the gene mutation exists in egg or sperm cells, children can inherit the gene mutation from their ...

  2. Gene therapy for stroke: 2006 overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yi; Miller, Jordan D; Heistad, Donald D

    2007-03-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases, although it may take many years to realize. Gene therapy could occur prior to a stroke (eg, to stabilize atherosclerotic plaques) and/or following a stroke (eg, to prevent vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage or reduce injury to neurons by ischemic insult). We have transferred the gene coding for vasoactive calcitonin gene-related peptide via cerebrospinal fluid, and demonstrated attenuation of vasospasm after SAH. Transfer of neuroprotective genes or small interfering RNA for neurotoxic genes has good potential for ischemic stroke. In this brief report, we review recent developments in experimental gene therapy for stroke. Fundamental advances, including development of safer, more specific gene transfer vectors, are discussed.

  3. Bioinformatics methods for identifying candidate disease genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, M.A. van; Brunner, H.G.

    2006-01-01

    With the explosion in genomic and functional genomics information, methods for disease gene identification are rapidly evolving. Databases are now essential to the process of selecting candidate disease genes. Combining positional information with disease characteristics and functional information i

  4. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@mail.ntust.edu.tw; He, Wen-Jie [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Chiang, Chiao-Hsi [School of Pharmacy, National Defense Medical Center (China); Hong, Po-Da [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Institute of Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and The Alex Grass Center for Drug Design and Synthesis (Israel); Ou, Keng-Liang [College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production (China)

    2013-07-15

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes.

  5. Researchers Pinpoint More Genes Linked to Vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 161452.html Researchers Pinpoint More Genes Linked to Vitiligo Genetic clues to this autoimmune disease could lead ... identified more genes linked to the autoimmune disease vitiligo, which causes patches of white skin and hair. ...

  6. What Is a Gene? (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tested is replacing sick genes with healthy ones. Gene therapy trials — where the research is tested on people — and ... ON THIS TOPIC How to Deal With Hemophilia What's the Right Weight for Me? Do You ...

  7. Immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin genes of the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    Antibodies of the horse were studied intensively by many notable immunologists throughout the past century until the early 1970's. After a large gap of interest in horse immunology, additional basic studies on horse immunoglobulin genes performed during the past 10 years have resulted in new insights into the equine humoral immune system. These include the characterization of the immunoglobulin lambda and kappa light chain genes, the immunoglobulin heavy chain constant (IGHC) gene regions, and initial studies regarding the heavy chain variable genes. Horses express predominately lambda light chains and seem to have a relatively restricted germline repertoire of both lambda and kappa chain variable genes. The IGHC region contains eleven constant heavy chain genes, seven of which are gamma heavy chain genes. It is suggested that all seven genes encoding IgG isotypes are expressed and have distinct functions in equine immune responses.

  8. NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News From NIH NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... and Alcoholism (NIAAA) have identified a previously unknown gene variant that doubles an individual's risk for obsessive- ...

  9. Mutation analysis of the preproghrelin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lesli H; Gjesing, Anette P; Sørensen, Thorkild I A;

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the preproghrelin gene for variants and their association with obesity and type 2 diabetes.......To investigate the preproghrelin gene for variants and their association with obesity and type 2 diabetes....

  10. In The Genes? Searching for Methuselah

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section In The Genes? Searching for Methuselah Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table ... 18 million effort to learn more about the genes, lifestyle or other factors that contribute to long, ...

  11. 'Uncombable' Hair? Maybe Genes Are to Blame

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162727.html 'Uncombable' Hair? Maybe Genes Are to Blame Condition is rare, tends to ... combed normally. Now researchers say they've found genes linked to what's known as "uncombable hair syndrome." " ...

  12. Modulation of gene expression made easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for modulating gene expression, based on randomization of promoter (spacer) sequences, was developed. The method was applied to chromosomal genes in Lactococcus lactis and shown to generate libraries of clones with broad ranges of expression levels of target genes. In one example...... beta-glucuronidase, resulting in an operon structure in which both genes are transcribed from a common promoter. We show that there is a linear correlation between the expressions of the two genes, which facilitates screening for mutants with suitable enzyme activities. In a second example, we show......, overexpression was achieved by introducing an additional gene copy into a phage attachment site on the chromosome. This resulted in a series of strains with phosphofructokinase activities from 1.4 to 11 times the wild-type activity level. In this example, the pfk gene was cloned upstream of a gusA gene encoding...

  13. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of br east ca ncer. What is the BRCA Gene Mutation? BRCA1 and BRCA2 are genes that ... even negative results, with your genetic counselor. References BRCA and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing. National ...

  14. Are there tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 4p in sporadic colorectal carcinoma?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Tao Zheng; Li-Xin Jiang; Zhong-Chuan Lv; Da-Peng Li; Chong-Zhi Zhou; Jian-Jun Gao; Lin He; Zhi-Hai Peng

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To study the candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSG) on chromosome 4p by detecting the high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in sporadic colorectal carcinoma in Chinese patients. METHODS: Seven fluorescent labeled polymorphic microsatellite markers were analyzed in 83 cases of colorectal carcinoma and matched normal tissue DNA by PCR. PCR products were eletrophoresed on an ABI 377 DNA sequencer. Genescan 3.7 and Genotype 3.7 software were used for LOH scanning and analysis. The same procedure was performed by the other six microsatellite markers spanning D4S3013 locus to make further detailed deletion mapping. Comparison between LOH frequency and clinicopathological factors was performed by . RESULTS: Data were collected from all informative loci.The average LOH frequency on 4p was 24.25%, and 42.3% and 35.62% on D4S405 and D4S3013 locus, respectively. Adjacent markers of D4S3013 displayed a low LOH frequency (< 30%) by detailed deletion mapping. Significant opposite difference was observed between LOH frequency and tumor diameter on D4S412 and D4S1546 locus (0% vs 16.67%, P = 0.041; 54.55% vs 11.11%, P = 0.034, respectively). On D4S403 locus, LOH was significantly associated with tumor gross pattern (11.11%, 0, 33.33%, P = 0.030). No relationship was detected on other loci compared with clinicopathologial features. CONCLUSION: By deletion mapping, two obvious high frequency LOH regions spanning D4S3013 (4p15.2) and D4S405 (4p14) locus are detected. Candidate TSG, which is involved in carcinogenesis and progression of sporadic colorectal carcinoma on chromosome 4p, may be located between D4S3017 and D4S2933 (about 1.7 cm).

  15. Neonatal hyper- and hypothyroidism alter the myoglobin gene expression program in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. de Picoli Souza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobin acts as an oxygen store and a reactive oxygen species acceptor in muscles. We examined myoglobin mRNA in rat cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles during the first 42 days of life and the impact of transient neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the myoglobin gene expression pattern. Cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles of Wistar rats at 7-42 days of life were quickly removed, and myoglobin mRNA was determined by Northern blot analysis. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil (5-10 mg/100 g and triiodothyronine (0.5-50 µg/100 g for 5, 15, or 30 days after birth to induce hypo- and hyperthyroidism and euthanized either just after treatment or at 90 days. During postnatal (P days 7-28, the ventricle myoglobin mRNA remained unchanged, but it gradually increased in skeletal muscle (12-fold. Triiodothyronine treatment, from days P0-P5, increased the skeletal muscle myoglobin mRNA 1.5- to 4.5-fold; a 2.5-fold increase was observed in ventricle muscle, but only when triiodothyronine treatment was extended to day P15. Conversely, hypothyroidism at P5 markedly decreased (60% ventricular myoglobin mRNA. Moreover, transient hyperthyroidism in the neonatal period increased ventricle myoglobin mRNA (2-fold, and decreased heart rate (5%, fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30% and body weight (20% in adulthood. Transient hypothyroidism in the neonatal period also permanently decreased fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30% and body weight (14%. These results indicated that changes in triiodothyronine supply in the neonatal period alter the myoglobin expression program in ventricle and skeletal muscle, leading to specific physiological repercussions and alterations in other parameters in adulthood.

  16. Neonatal hyper- and hypothyroidism alter the myoglobin gene expression program in adulthood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picoli Souza, K. de [Faculdade de Ciências Biológicas e Ambientais, Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Nunes, M.T. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-24

    Myoglobin acts as an oxygen store and a reactive oxygen species acceptor in muscles. We examined myoglobin mRNA in rat cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles during the first 42 days of life and the impact of transient neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the myoglobin gene expression pattern. Cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles of Wistar rats at 7-42 days of life were quickly removed, and myoglobin mRNA was determined by Northern blot analysis. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil (5-10 mg/100 g) and triiodothyronine (0.5-50 µg/100 g) for 5, 15, or 30 days after birth to induce hypo- and hyperthyroidism and euthanized either just after treatment or at 90 days. During postnatal (P) days 7-28, the ventricle myoglobin mRNA remained unchanged, but it gradually increased in skeletal muscle (12-fold). Triiodothyronine treatment, from days P0-P5, increased the skeletal muscle myoglobin mRNA 1.5- to 4.5-fold; a 2.5-fold increase was observed in ventricle muscle, but only when triiodothyronine treatment was extended to day P15. Conversely, hypothyroidism at P5 markedly decreased (60%) ventricular myoglobin mRNA. Moreover, transient hyperthyroidism in the neonatal period increased ventricle myoglobin mRNA (2-fold), and decreased heart rate (5%), fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (20%) in adulthood. Transient hypothyroidism in the neonatal period also permanently decreased fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (14%). These results indicated that changes in triiodothyronine supply in the neonatal period alter the myoglobin expression program in ventricle and skeletal muscle, leading to specific physiological repercussions and alterations in other parameters in adulthood.

  17. Gene myths in public perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalastog, Anna Lydia

    2012-05-01

    In this article I examine myths in the gene science debate, and their use as a tool in analysis of popular perceptions and public opinion of genetic science and gene technology. In daily language myth means something untrue, though theories of myth present them as carriers of knowledge and truth. I understand myth as a narrative, a cultural construct that aims to describe the world, its origin, and its constituent elements. I compare scholars' usage of myths, considering their implications. I conclude that i) As an analytical tool the concept of myth is too loosely defined, or understood through theories which leave out context, social relations and interaction. This provides limited insight about myths and myth-making in present day society. ii) An updated understanding of myths, including location/context and interaction/process would enrich analysis.

  18. Mitochondriogenesis genes and extreme longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Catalina; Garatachea, Nuria; Yvert, Thomas; Rodríguez-Romo, Gabriel; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Lucia, Alejandro

    2013-02-01

    Genes of the proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD)-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A, also termed PGC1-α)-nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-mitochondrial transcription Factor A (TFAM) mitochondriogenesis pathway can influence health/disease phenotypes, yet their association with extreme longevity is not known. We studied the association of five common polymorphisms in genes of this pathway (rs2267668, rs8192678, rs6949152, rs12594956, rs1937) and extreme longevity using a case (107 centenarians)-control (284 young adults) design. We found no between-group differences in allele/genotype frequencies, except for CC genotype in rs1937 (p=0.003), with no representation in controls (0%), versus 2.8% in centenarians (2 men, 1 woman). In summary, the studied genetic variants of the PPARD-PPARGC1A-NRF-TFAM pathway were not associated with extreme longevity, yet a marginal association could exist for rs1937.

  19. Pumilio genes from the Platyhelminthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Uriel; Marín, Monica; Castillo, Estela

    2008-01-01

    Pumilio proteins are proposed to have a conserved primordial function in the maintenance of proliferation in stem cells through post-transcriptional regulation. In this work, a search for pumilio homology domain (PUM-HD) sequences of pumilio genes from several Platyhelminthes species was performed, including representatives form Cestoda, Trematoda and Tricladida. Only one PUM-HD sequence was found in each triclad species; however, two PUM-HD homologues were found in all the parasitic species. These sequences formed two clearly separated clades: PlatyPum1, with sequences from all species, and PlatyPum2, composed exclusively of neodermatan sequences. Therefore, at least one duplication of the pumilio gene must have occurred before the divergence of cestodes and trematodes. Further duplications of PUM-HD were found in Fasciola hepatica, but these consist of retropseudogenes. This is the first comparative analysis of PUM-HD sequences in the Platyhelminthes and, more generally, in any lophotrochozoan phylum.

  20. Phenotypic deconstruction of gene circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Jason G; Savageau, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    It remains a challenge to obtain a global perspective on the behavioral repertoire of complex nonlinear gene circuits. In this paper, we describe a method for deconstructing complex systems into nonlinear sub-systems, based on mathematically defined phenotypes, which are then represented within a system design space that allows the repertoire of qualitatively distinct phenotypes of the complex system to be identified, enumerated, and analyzed. This method efficiently characterizes large regions of system design space and quickly generates alternative hypotheses for experimental testing. We describe the motivation and strategy in general terms, illustrate its use with a detailed example involving a two-gene circuit with a rich repertoire of dynamic behavior, and discuss experimental means of navigating the system design space.

  1. Leader genes in osteogenesis: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Bruno; Giacomelli, Luca; Ricci, Massimiliano; Barone, Antonio; Covani, Ugo

    2013-01-01

    Little is still known about the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of osteogenesis. In this paper, the leader genes approach, a new bioinformatics method which has already been experimentally validated, is adopted in order to identify the genes involved in human osteogenesis. Interactions among genes are then calculated and genes are ranked according to their relative importance in this process. In total, 167 genes were identified as being involved in osteogenesis. Genes were divided into 4 groups, according to their main function in the osteogenic processes: skeletal development; cell adhesion and proliferation; ossification; and calcium ion binding. Seven genes were consistently identified as leader genes (i.e. the genes with the greatest importance in osteogenesis), while 14 were found to have slightly less importance (class B genes). It was interesting to notice that the larger part of leader and class B genes belonged to the cell adhesion and proliferation or to the ossification sub-groups. This finding suggested that these two particular sub-processes could play a more important role in osteogenesis. Moreover, among the 7 leader genes, it is interesting to notice that RUNX2, BMP2, SPARC, PTH play a direct role in bone formation, while the 3 other leader genes (VEGF, IL6, FGF2) seem to be more connected with an angiogenetic process. Twenty-nine genes have no known interactions (orphan genes). From these results, it may be possible to plan an ad hoc experimentation, for instance by microarray analyses, focused on leader, class B and orphan genes, with the aim to shed new light on the molecular mechanisms underlying osteogenesis.

  2. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Toshikazu Sasabe; Shoichi Ishiura

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports sugg...

  3. The evolution of heart gene delivery vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wasala, Nalinda B.; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for treating numerous heart diseases. A key premise for the success of cardiac gene therapy is the development of powerful gene transfer vehicles that can achieve highly efficient and persistent gene transfer specifically in the heart. Other features of an ideal vector include negligible toxicity, minimal immunogenicity and easy manufacturing. Rapid progress in the fields of molecular biology and virology has offered great opportunities to engineer various genetic m...

  4. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    structures suggestive of angiogenesis are visible (arrows). (B) Omitting the anti-FGF-2 primary antibody eliminated the immunostaining. 28...Several major families of growth factors, signaling molecules and structural genes are represented, providing one of the most comprehensive surveys...receptor accessory protein NM_012968 IL1 inflammation 1.6 NS 45 IL3 regulated nuclear factor NM_053727 IL3 MHC, eosinphil, basophil stimulation

  5. Gene Therapy for Childhood Neurofibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    of cells heterozygous for the neurofibromin ( NF1 ) gene. Cells with two functional alleles of NF1 did not support tumor growth. The treatment...objective was therefore to increase the level of expression from the one active copy of NF1 to complement the haploinsufficiency in the cells of the tumor... NF1 ), artificial transcription factor, TALE DNA-binding protein, bacterial delivery vector 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  6. Genes for super-intelligence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofaer, J A; Emery, A E

    1981-12-01

    The results of a postal questionnaire distributed to British members of Mensa failed to confirm an association of superior intelligence with torsion dystonia, retinoblastoma, or phenylketonuria, but were consistent with real associations between high IQ and infantile autism, gout, and myopia. Further confirmation of these findings in other populations might well indicate that genes producing these disorders have more or less direct effects on cerebral development and function.

  7. Genes for super-intelligence?

    OpenAIRE

    Sofaer, J A; Emery, A E

    1981-01-01

    The results of a postal questionnaire distributed to British members of Mensa failed to confirm an association of superior intelligence with torsion dystonia, retinoblastoma, or phenylketonuria, but were consistent with real associations between high IQ and infantile autism, gout, and myopia. Further confirmation of these findings in other populations might well indicate that genes producing these disorders have more or less direct effects on cerebral development and function.

  8. Gene Therapy : myth or reality ?

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Alain

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Gene therapy has become a reality, although still a fragile one. Clinical benefit has beenachieved over the last 17 years in a limited number of medical conditions for whichpathophysiological studies determined that they were favorable settings. They includeinherited disorders of the immune system, leukodystrophies, possibly hemoglobinopathies,hemophilia B, and retinal dystrophies. Advances in the treatment of B-cell leukemiasand lymphomas have also been achieved. Adva...

  9. Classification with binary gene expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Tuna, Salih; Niranjan, Mahesan

    2009-01-01

    Microarray gene expression measurements are reported, used and archived usually to high numerical precision. However, properties of mRNA molecules, such as their low stability and availability in small copy numbers, and the fact that measurements correspond to a population of cells, rather than a single cell, makes high precision meaningless. Recent work shows that reducing measurement precision leads to very little loss of information, right down to binary levels. In this paper we show how p...

  10. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  11. Targeted gene flow for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ella; Phillips, Ben L

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic threats often impose strong selection on affected populations, causing rapid evolutionary responses. Unfortunately, these adaptive responses are rarely harnessed for conservation. We suggest that conservation managers pay close attention to adaptive processes and geographic variation, with an eye to using them for conservation goals. Translocating pre-adapted individuals into recipient populations is currently considered a potentially important management tool in the face of climate change. Targeted gene flow, which involves moving individuals with favorable traits to areas where these traits would have a conservation benefit, could have a much broader application in conservation. Across a species' range there may be long-standing geographic variation in traits or variation may have rapidly developed in response to a threatening process. Targeted gene flow could be used to promote natural resistance to threats to increase species resilience. We suggest that targeted gene flow is a currently underappreciated strategy in conservation that has applications ranging from the management of invasive species and their impacts to controlling the impact and virulence of pathogens.

  12. Horizontal gene transfer in chromalveolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Debashish

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT, the non-genealogical transfer of genetic material between different organisms, is considered a potentially important mechanism of genome evolution in eukaryotes. Using phylogenomic analyses of expressed sequence tag (EST data generated from a clonal cell line of a free living dinoflagellate alga Karenia brevis, we investigated the impact of HGT on genome evolution in unicellular chromalveolate protists. Results We identified 16 proteins that have originated in chromalveolates through ancient HGTs before the divergence of the genera Karenia and Karlodinium and one protein that was derived through a more recent HGT. Detailed analysis of the phylogeny and distribution of identified proteins demonstrates that eight have resulted from independent HGTs in several eukaryotic lineages. Conclusion Recurring intra- and interdomain gene exchange provides an important source of genetic novelty not only in parasitic taxa as previously demonstrated but as we show here, also in free-living protists. Investigating the tempo and mode of evolution of horizontally transferred genes in protists will therefore advance our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in eukaryotes.

  13. Chromatin structure regulates gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Jason Cummings

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Homology-directed repair is a powerful mechanism for maintaining and altering genomic structure. We asked how chromatin structure contributes to the use of homologous sequences as donors for repair using the chicken B cell line DT40 as a model. In DT40, immunoglobulin genes undergo regulated sequence diversification by gene conversion templated by pseudogene donors. We found that the immunoglobulin Vlambda pseudogene array is characterized by histone modifications associated with active chromatin. We directly demonstrated the importance of chromatin structure for gene conversion, using a regulatable experimental system in which the heterochromatin protein HP1 (Drosophila melanogaster Su[var]205, expressed as a fusion to Escherichia coli lactose repressor, is tethered to polymerized lactose operators integrated within the pseudo-Vlambda donor array. Tethered HP1 diminished histone acetylation within the pseudo-Vlambda array, and altered the outcome of Vlambda diversification, so that nontemplated mutations rather than templated mutations predominated. Thus, chromatin structure regulates homology-directed repair. These results suggest that histone modifications may contribute to maintaining genomic stability by preventing recombination between repetitive sequences.

  14. Gene Therapy In Oral Cancer : An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The treatment and prevention of oral cancer is one of the major hurdles in the field ofcancer. Gene therapy is one of the recent advances in this field to tackle this hurdle with promisingprospects. This overview introduces the reader into the basic idea of gene therapy, types of genetherapy and the various modes of introduction of therapeutic gene into the cancer affected cell.

  15. Gene based therapies for kidney regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Manoe J; Arcolino, Fanny O; Schoor, Perry; Kok, Robbert Jan; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    In this review we provide an overview of the expanding molecular toolbox that is available for gene based therapies and how these therapies can be used for a large variety of kidney diseases. Gene based therapies range from restoring gene function in genetic kidney diseases to steering complex molec

  16. Structure of the murine Thy-1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Giguere; K-I. Isobe; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractWe have cloned the murine Thy-1.1 (AKR) and Thy-1.2 (Balb/c) genes. The complete exon/intron structure and the nucleotide sequence of the Thy-1.2 gene was determined. The gene contains four exons and three intervening sequences. The complete transcriptional unit gives rise to a tissue an

  17. Targeting Gene-Virotherapy for Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Yuan LIU; Jing-Fa GU; Wen-Fang SHI

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy and viral therapy for cancer have therapeutic effects, but there has been no significant breakthrough in these two forms of therapy. Therefore, a new strategy called "targeting genevirotherapy", which combines the advantages of gene therapy and viral therapy, has been formulated. This new therapy has stronger antitumor effects than either gene therapy or viral therapy. A tumor-specific replicative adenovirus vector ZD55 (E1B55KD deleted Adv.) was constructed and various single therapeutic genes were inserted into ZD55 to form ZD55-gene. These are the targeting gene-virotherapy genes. But experiments showed that a single gene was not effective in eliminating the tumor mass, and therefore two genes were separately inserted into ZD55. This strategy is called "targeting dual gene-virotherapy" (with PCT patent). Better results were obtained with this strategy, and all the xenograft tumor masses were completely eliminated in all mice when two suitable genes producing a synergetic or compensative effect were chosen. Twenty-six papers on these strategies have been published by researchers in our laboratory.Furthermore, an adenoviral vector with two targeting promoters harboring two antitumor genes has been constructed for cancer therapy. Promising results have been obtained with this adenoviral vectorand another patent has been applied for. This antitumor strategy can be used to kill tumor cells completely with minimum damage to normal cells.

  18. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Zhan-Kui Liu

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is common in China, and its early diagnosis and treatment are difficult. In recent years great progress has been achieved in gene therapy, and a wide array of gene therapy systems for gastric cancer has been investigated. The present article deals with the general principles of gene therapy and then focuses on how these principles may be applied to gastric cancer.

  19. Genes Causing Male Infertility in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lawrence C. Layman

    2002-01-01

    There are an accumulating number of identified gene mutations that cause infertility in humans. Most of the known gene mutations impair normal puberty and subsequently cause infertility by either hypothalamic /pituitary deficiency of important tropic factors to the gonad or by gonadal genes.

  20. Uses of antimicrobial genes from microbial genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorek, Rotem; Rubin, Edward M.

    2013-08-20

    We describe a method for mining microbial genomes to discover antimicrobial genes and proteins having broad spectrum of activity. Also described are antimicrobial genes and their expression products from various microbial genomes that were found using this method. The products of such genes can be used as antimicrobial agents or as tools for molecular biology.

  1. Association between endogenous gene expression and growth regulation induced by TGF-β1 in human gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Li; Yun-Yan Zhang; Qi Wang; Song-Bin Fu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between endogenous gene expression and growth regulation including proliferation and apoptosis induced by transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) in human gastric cancer (GC) cells.METHODS: Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to detect the main components of the TGF-β1/Smads signal pathway in human poorly differentiated GC cell line BGC-823. Localization of Smad proteins was also determined using immunofluorescence.Then, the BGC-823 cells were cultured in the presence or absence of TGF-β1 (10 ng/mL) for 24 and 48 h, and the effects of TGF-β1 on proliferation and apoptosis were measured by cell growth curve and flow cytometry (FCM)analysis. The ultrastructural features of BGC-823 cells with or without TGF-β1 treatment were observed under transmission electron microscope. The apoptotic cells were visualized by means of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dTUPin situ nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method. Meanwhile, the expression levels of endogenous p15, p21 and Smad7 mRNA and the corresponding proteins in the cells were detected at 1, 2and 3 h after culture in the presence or absence of TGF-β1(10 ng/mL) by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot,respectively.RESULTS: The TGF-β1/Smad signaling was found to be intact and functional in BGC-823 cells. The growth curve revealed the most evident inhibition of cell proliferation by TGF-β1 at 48 h, and FCM assay showed G1 arrest accompanied with apoptosis induced by TGF-β1. The typical morphological changes of apoptosis were observed in cells exposed to TGF-β1. The apoptosis index (AI) in TGF-β1-treated cells was significantly higher than that in the untreated controls (10.7±1.3% vs 0.32±0.06%, P<0.01).The levels of p15, p21 and Smad7mRNA and corresponding proteins in cells were significantly up-regulated at 1 h, but gradually returned to basal levels at 3 h following TGF-β1(10 ng/mL) treatment.CONCLUSION: TGF-β1

  2. Reranking candidate gene models with cross-species comparison for improved gene prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Fernando CN

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most gene finders score candidate gene models with state-based methods, typically HMMs, by combining local properties (coding potential, splice donor and acceptor patterns, etc. Competing models with similar state-based scores may be distinguishable with additional information. In particular, functional and comparative genomics datasets may help to select among competing models of comparable probability by exploiting features likely to be associated with the correct gene models, such as conserved exon/intron structure or protein sequence features. Results We have investigated the utility of a simple post-processing step for selecting among a set of alternative gene models, using global scoring rules to rerank competing models for more accurate prediction. For each gene locus, we first generate the K best candidate gene models using the gene finder Evigan, and then rerank these models using comparisons with putative orthologous genes from closely-related species. Candidate gene models with lower scores in the original gene finder may be selected if they exhibit strong similarity to probable orthologs in coding sequence, splice site location, or signal peptide occurrence. Experiments on Drosophila melanogaster demonstrate that reranking based on cross-species comparison outperforms the best gene models identified by Evigan alone, and also outperforms the comparative gene finders GeneWise and Augustus+. Conclusion Reranking gene models with cross-species comparison improves gene prediction accuracy. This straightforward method can be readily adapted to incorporate additional lines of evidence, as it requires only a ranked source of candidate gene models.

  3. 抑癌基因CpG岛甲基化与结直肠癌关系的研究进展%CpG island methylation of tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭星宇

    2012-01-01

    CpG island methylation can lead to epigenetic transcription inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene, and in some circumstances it maybe the only mechanism of tumor suppressor gene inactivation, which directly results in the occurrence of the tumors. This paper overviews the relations of the CpG island methylation of the tumor suppressor gene such as Syk; and of pi5 with colorectal cancer, and also presents related problems and future considerations.%CpG岛甲基化可导致抑癌基因的表观遗传学转录失活,在某些情况下可能是抑癌基因失活的惟一机制,直接导致肿瘤的发生.笔者对Syk,p15,hMLH1,APC,DCC,p16等抑癌基因CpG岛甲基化与结直肠癌的关系进行简要综述,并提出存在的问题和展望.

  4. Diabetes susceptibility at IDDM2 cannot be positively mapped to the VNTR locus of the insulin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, A; Lee, J; Warram, J H; Krolewski, A S

    1996-05-01

    An inconsistency has come to light between the conclusion of Lucassen et al. that IDDM2 (11p15.5) must lie within a 4.1 kilobase (kb) segment at the insulin (INS) locus and their own data showing statistically significant associations between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and markers beyond the boundaries of that segment. We present data from an independent study of 201 IDDM patients and 107 non-diabetic control subjects that also show significant association with a marker 5' of the INS locus. Patients and control subjects were genotyped at INS/+ 1140 A/C (a surrogate for the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the regulatory part of the INS gene) and a marker 5' of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, TH/pINS500-RsaI, making it 10 kb 5' of the VNTR. Homozygotes for INS/ + 1140 allele '+' were significantly more frequent among IDDM patients than among control subjects (73 vs 45%, p < 0.001) giving an odds ratio of 3.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.0-5.3). A very similar association was found for homozygotes for the TH/RsaI allele '+' (53 vs 31%, p < 0.001) giving an odds ratio of 2.6 (95%CI 1.6-4.2). By multilocus analysis, the TH/RsaI allele '+' identified a subset of INS/ + 1140 alleles '+' haplotypes that are more specifically associated with IDDM (odds ratio = 5.4, 95%CI 2.9-10.4) than allele + 1140 '+' as a whole. In conclusion, the segment of chromosome 11 that is associated with IDDM spans, at least, the INS and TH loci. No legitimate claim can be made that IDDM2 corresponds to the VNTR polymorphism at the INS locus until the correct boundaries for IDDM2 have been defined and other loci within them have been excluded as determinants of IDDM.

  5. Updates on current advances in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Jowy; Faustine; Sufian, Jomiany Tani

    2011-03-01

    Gene therapy is the attempt to treat diseases by means of genetic manipulation. Numerous challenges remain to be overcome before it becomes available as a safe and effective treatment option. Retroviruses and adenoviruses are among the most commonly used viral vectors in trials. The retrovirus introduces the gene it carries into the target cell genome while the adenovirus introduces the gene into the target cell nucleus without incorporating it into the target cell genome. Other viral vectors such as adeno-associated viruses, pseudotyped viruses and herpes simplex viruses, are also gaining popularity. Proposed non-viral methods for gene transfer include physical methods and the employment of chemical vectors (lipoplexes, polyplexes and inorganic nanoparticles). Recent studies have investigated potential applications of gene therapy in correcting genetic diseases, treating malignant disorders and for treatment of other diseases. Trials on gene therapy for SCID and Leber's congenital amaurosis have achieved considerable success, but the widely publicized adverse reaction in X-linked SCID patient receiving gene therapy raised concerns for safety profile of gene therapy. For that, several methods of improving safety and efficacy of gene therapy have been proposed. At present, the three main gene therapy strategies for treatment of cancer are application to oncolytic viruses, suicide-gene therapy and gene-based immunotherapy. Gendicine, the first approved anticancer drugs based on the use of gene therapy principle, is based on the use of oncolytic viruses. More evidence for wider clinical applications of gene therapy are expected as more gene therapy studies progress from the preclinical phase to clinical trial.

  6. Comparative genomic analysis of soybean flowering genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chol-Hee Jung

    Full Text Available Flowering is an important agronomic trait that determines crop yield. Soybean is a major oilseed legume crop used for human and animal feed. Legumes have unique vegetative and floral complexities. Our understanding of the molecular basis of flower initiation and development in legumes is limited. Here, we address this by using a computational approach to examine flowering regulatory genes in the soybean genome in comparison to the most studied model plant, Arabidopsis. For this comparison, a genome-wide analysis of orthologue groups was performed, followed by an in silico gene expression analysis of the identified soybean flowering genes. Phylogenetic analyses of the gene families highlighted the evolutionary relationships among these candidates. Our study identified key flowering genes in soybean and indicates that the vernalisation and the ambient-temperature pathways seem to be the most variant in soybean. A comparison of the orthologue groups containing flowering genes indicated that, on average, each Arabidopsis flowering gene has 2-3 orthologous copies in soybean. Our analysis highlighted that the CDF3, VRN1, SVP, AP3 and PIF3 genes are paralogue-rich genes in soybean. Furthermore, the genome mapping of the soybean flowering genes showed that these genes are scattered randomly across the genome. A paralogue comparison indicated that the soybean genes comprising the largest orthologue group are clustered in a 1.4 Mb region on chromosome 16 of soybean. Furthermore, a comparison with the undomesticated soybean (Glycine soja revealed that there are hundreds of SNPs that are associated with putative soybean flowering genes and that there are structural variants that may affect the genes of the light-signalling and ambient-temperature pathways in soybean. Our study provides a framework for the soybean flowering pathway and insights into the relationship and evolution of flowering genes between a short-day soybean and the long-day plant

  7. Integrating Ontological Knowledge and Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-08

    With the rising influence of the Gene On-tology, new approaches have emerged where the similarity between genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology code annotations associ-ated with them. So far, these approaches have solely relied on the knowledge en-coded in the Gene Ontology and the gene annotations associated with the Gene On-tology database. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that improvements to these approaches can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  8. Review: the dominant flocculation genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae constitute a new subtelomeric gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, A W; Steensma, H Y

    1995-09-15

    The quality of brewing strains is, in large part, determined by their flocculation properties. By classical genetics, several dominant, semidominant and recessive flocculation genes have been recognized. Recent results of experiments to localize the flocculation genes FLO5 and FLO8, combined with the in silicio analysis of the available sequence data of the yeast genome, have revealed that the flocculation genes belong to a family which comprises at least four genes and three pseudogenes. All members of this gene family are located near the end of chromosomes, just like the SUC, MEL and MAL genes, which are also important for good quality baking or brewing strains. Transcription of the flocculation genes is repressed by several regulatory genes. In addition, a number of genes have been found which cause cell aggregation upon disruption or overexpression in an as yet unknown manner. In total, 33 genes have been reported that are involved in flocculation or cell aggregation.

  9. Novel susceptibility genes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colin Noble; Elaine Nimmo; Daniel Gaya; Richard K Russell; Jack Satsangi

    2006-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are polygenic disorders with important environmental interactions. To date, the most widely adopted approach to identifying susceptibility genes in complex diseases has involved genome wide linkage studies followed by studies of positional candidate genes in loci of interest. This review encompasses data from studies into novel candidate genes implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Novel techniques to identify candidate genes-genome wide association studies, yeast-two hybrid screening, microarray gene expression studies and proteomic profiling,are also reviewed and their potential role in unravelling the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease are discussed.

  10. Phoenix rising: gene therapy makes a comeback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria P.Limberis

    2012-01-01

    Despite the first application of gene therapy in 1990,gene therapy has until recently failed to meet the huge expectations set forth by researchers,clinicians,and patients,thus dampening enthusiasm for an imminent cure for many life-threatening genetic diseases.Nonetheless,in recent years we have witnessed a strong comeback for gene therapy,with clinical successes in young and adult subjects suffering from inherited forms of blindness or from X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease.In this review,various gene therapy vectors progressing into clinical development and pivotal advances in gene therapy trials will be discussed.

  11. Liposomes as a gene delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ropert

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is an active field that has progressed rapidly into clinical trials in a relatively short time. The key to success for any gene therapy strategy is to design a vector able to serve as a safe and efficient gene delivery vehicle. This has encouraged the development of nonviral DNA-mediated gene transfer techniques such as liposomes. Many liposome-based DNA delivery systems have been described, including molecular components for targeting given cell surface receptors or for escaping from the lysosomal compartment. Another recent technology using cationic lipids has been evaluated and has generated substantial interest in this approach to gene transfer.

  12. Gene conversion in the rice genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shuqing; Clark, Terry; Zheng, Hongkun;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene conversion causes a non-reciprocal transfer of genetic information between similar sequences. Gene conversion can both homogenize genes and recruit point mutations thereby shaping the evolution of multigene families. In the rice genome, the large number of duplicated genes...... is not tightly linked to natural selection in the rice genome. To assess the contribution of segmental duplication on gene conversion statistics, we determined locations of conversion partners with respect to inter-chromosomal segment duplication. The number of conversions associated with segmentation is less...

  13. The evolution of mammalian gene families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery P Demuth

    Full Text Available Gene families are groups of homologous genes that are likely to have highly similar functions. Differences in family size due to lineage-specific gene duplication and gene loss may provide clues to the evolutionary forces that have shaped mammalian genomes. Here we analyze the gene families contained within the whole genomes of human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, and dog. In total we find that more than half of the 9,990 families present in the mammalian common ancestor have either expanded or contracted along at least one lineage. Additionally, we find that a large number of families are completely lost from one or more mammalian genomes, and a similar number of gene families have arisen subsequent to the mammalian common ancestor. Along the lineage leading to modern humans we infer the gain of 689 genes and the loss of 86 genes since the split from chimpanzees, including changes likely driven by adaptive natural selection. Our results imply that humans and chimpanzees differ by at least 6% (1,418 of 22,000 genes in their complement of genes, which stands in stark contrast to the oft-cited 1.5% difference between orthologous nucleotide sequences. This genomic "revolving door" of gene gain and loss represents a large number of genetic differences separating humans from our closest relatives.

  14. Integrating various resources for gene name normalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuncui Hu

    Full Text Available The recognition and normalization of gene mentions in biomedical literature are crucial steps in biomedical text mining. We present a system for extracting gene names from biomedical literature and normalizing them to gene identifiers in databases. The system consists of four major components: gene name recognition, entity mapping, disambiguation and filtering. The first component is a gene name recognizer based on dictionary matching and semi-supervised learning, which utilizes the co-occurrence information of a large amount of unlabeled MEDLINE abstracts to enhance feature representation of gene named entities. In the stage of entity mapping, we combine the strategies of exact match and approximate match to establish linkage between gene names in the context and the EntrezGene database. For the gene names that map to more than one database identifiers, we develop a disambiguation method based on semantic similarity derived from the Gene Ontology and MEDLINE abstracts. To remove the noise produced in the previous steps, we design a filtering method based on the confidence scores in the dictionary used for NER. The system is able to adjust the trade-off between precision and recall based on the result of filtering. It achieves an F-measure of 83% (precision: 82.5% recall: 83.5% on BioCreative II Gene Normalization (GN dataset, which is comparable to the current state-of-the-art.

  15. Gene therapy oversight: lessons for nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Susan M; Gupta, Rishi; Kohlhepp, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Oversight of human gene transfer research ("gene therapy") presents an important model with potential application to oversight of nanobiology research on human participants. Gene therapy oversight adds centralized federal review at the National Institutes of Health's Office of Biotechnology Activities and its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee to standard oversight of human subjects research at the researcher's institution (by the Institutional Review Board and, for some research, the Institutional Biosafety Committee) and at the federal level by the Office for Human Research Protections. The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research oversees human gene transfer research in parallel, including approval of protocols and regulation of products. This article traces the evolution of this dual oversight system; describes how the system is already addressing nanobiotechnology in gene transfer: evaluates gene therapy oversight based on public opinion, the literature, and preliminary expert elicitation; and offers lessons of the gene therapy oversight experience for oversight of nanobiotechnology.

  16. Apolipoprotein gene involved in lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Edward; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-07-03

    Methods and materials for studying the effects of a newly identified human gene, APOAV, and the corresponding mouse gene apoAV. The sequences of the genes are given, and transgenic animals which either contain the gene or have the endogenous gene knocked out are described. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene are described and characterized. It is demonstrated that certain SNPs are associated with diseases involving lipids and triglycerides and other metabolic diseases. These SNPs may be used alone or with SNPs from other genes to study individual risk factors. Methods for intervention in lipid diseases, including the screening of drugs to treat lipid-related or diabetic diseases are also disclosed.

  17. Recent advances in gene therapy for thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J V Raja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemias are genetically transmitted disorders. Depending upon whether the genetic defects or deletion lies in transmission of α or β globin chain gene, thalassemias are classified into α and β-thalassemias. Thus, thalassemias could be cured by introducing or correcting a gene into the hematopoietic compartment or a single stem cell. Initial attempts at gene transfer have proved unsuccessful due to limitations of available gene transfer vectors. The present review described the newer approaches to overcome these limitations, includes the introduction of lentiviral vectors. New approaches have also focused on targeting the specific mutation in the globin genes, correcting the DNA sequence or manipulating the development in DNA translocation and splicing to restore globin chain synthesis. This review mainly discusses the gene therapy strategies for the thalassemias, including the use of lentiviral vectors, generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells, gene targeting, splice-switching and stop codon readthrough.

  18. Recent advances in gene therapy for thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, J V; Rachchh, M A; Gokani, R H

    2012-07-01

    Thalassemias are genetically transmitted disorders. Depending upon whether the genetic defects or deletion lies in transmission of α or β globin chain gene, thalassemias are classified into α and β-thalassemias. Thus, thalassemias could be cured by introducing or correcting a gene into the hematopoietic compartment or a single stem cell. Initial attempts at gene transfer have proved unsuccessful due to limitations of available gene transfer vectors. The present review described the newer approaches to overcome these limitations, includes the introduction of lentiviral vectors. New approaches have also focused on targeting the specific mutation in the globin genes, correcting the DNA sequence or manipulating the development in DNA translocation and splicing to restore globin chain synthesis. This review mainly discusses the gene therapy strategies for the thalassemias, including the use of lentiviral vectors, generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, gene targeting, splice-switching and stop codon readthrough.

  19. Simulation of gene pyramiding in Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Gene pyramiding has been successfully practiced in plant breeding for developing new breeds or lines in which favorable genes from several different lines were integrated.But it has not been used in animal breeding,and some theoretical investigation and simulation analysis with respect to its strategies,feasibility and efficiency are needed before it can be implemented in animals.In this study,we used four different pure fines of Drosophila melanogaster,each of which is homozygous at a specific mutant gene with a visible effect on phenotype,to simulate the gene pyramiding process and analyze the duration and population size required in different pyramiding strategies.We finally got the ideal individuals,which are homozygous at the four target genes simultaneously.This study demonstrates that gene pyramiding is feasible in animal breeding and the interaction between genes may affect the final results.

  20. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.