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Sample records for cdk2 associating protein

  1. Cyclin A-Cdk2 Phosphorylates BH3 only Protein Bad in vitro and in vivo

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    HE Kan; CHEN Yue; LI Jing-hua; ZHAN Zhuo; WU Yong-ge; KONG Wei; JIN Ying-hua

    2007-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Cyclin A-Cdk2 activity is required in the apoptosis process induced by various stimuli. To determine a specific substrate of Cyclin A-Cdk2 for apoptosis, in this study, we carried out anin vitro kinase assay using immunoprecipitated complex Cyclin A-Cdk2 as an enzyme source, and recombinant protein GST-Bad as a substrate. Our study showed that Bad was clearly phosphorylated by Cyclin A-Cdk2 in vitro. To examine whether protein Bad can also be phosphorylated by Cyclin A-Cdk2 kinase in vivo, we transiently overexpressed protein Bad with Cyclin A or Cdk2-dn, a dominant negative version of Cdk2, in Hela cells and determined the phosphorylation status of protein Bad. The test showed that protein Bad was clearly phosphorylated in Cyclin A overexpressed cells,but not in Cdk2-dn or mock transfectent. Moreover, etoposide also caused the phosphorylation of endogenetic Bad. In conclusion, here we provide first time evidence that protein Bad can be a substrate of Cyclin A-Cdk2 apoptosis for in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Expression of serine/threonine protein-kinases and related factors in normal monkey and human retinas: the mechanistic understanding of a CDK2 inhibitor induced retinal toxicity.

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    Saturno, Grazia; Pesenti, Manuela; Cavazzoli, Cristiano; Rossi, Anna; Giusti, Anna M; Gierke, Berthold; Pawlak, Michael; Venturi, Miro

    2007-12-01

    Protein-kinase inhibitors are among the most advanced compounds in development using the new drug discovery paradigm of developing small-molecule drugs against specific molecular targets in cancer. After treatment with a cyclin dependent kinase CDK2 inhibitor in monkey, histopathological analysis of the eye showed specific cellular damage in the photoreceptor layer. Since this CDK2 inhibitor showed activity also on other CDKs, in order to investigate the mechanism of toxicity of this compound, we isolated cones and rods from the retina of normal monkey and humans by Laser Capture Microdissection. Using Real-Time PCR we first measured the expression of cyclin dependent protein-kinases (CDK)1, 2, 4, 5, Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) and microtubule associated protein TAU. We additionally verified the presence of these proteins in monkey eye sections by immuno-histochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis and afterwards quantified GSK3beta, phospho-GSK3beta and TAU by Reverse Phase Protein Microarrays. With this work we demonstrate how complementary gene expression and protein-based technologies constitute a powerful tool for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of a CDK2 inhibitor induced toxicity. Moreover, this investigative approach is helpful to better understand and characterize the mechanism of species-specific toxicities and further support a rational, molecular mechanism-based safety assessment in humans.

  3. Genetic substitution of Cdk1 by Cdk2 leads to embryonic lethality and loss of meiotic function of Cdk2.

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    Satyanarayana, Ande; Berthet, Cyril; Lopez-Molina, Javier; Coppola, Vincenzo; Tessarollo, Lino; Kaldis, Philipp

    2008-10-01

    It was believed that Cdk2-cyclin E complexes are essential to drive cells through the G1-S phase transition. However, it was discovered recently that the mitotic kinase Cdk1 (Cdc2a) compensates for the loss of Cdk2. In the present study, we tested whether Cdk2 can compensate for the loss of Cdk1. We generated a knockin mouse in which the Cdk2 cDNA was knocked into the Cdk1 locus (Cdk1Cdk2KI). Substitution of both copies of Cdk1 by Cdk2 led to early embryonic lethality, even though Cdk2 was expressed from the Cdk1 locus. In addition, we generated Cdk2-/- Cdk1+/Cdk2KI mice in which one copy of Cdk2 and one copy of Cdk1 were expressed from the Cdk1 locus and the Cdk2 gene was deleted from the endogenous Cdk2 locus. We found that both male and female Cdk2-/- Cdk1+/Cdk2KI mice were sterile, similar to Cdk2-/- mice, even though they expressed the Cdk2 protein from the Cdk1 locus in testes. The translocational and cell cycle properties of knockin Cdk2 in Cdk2-/- Cdk1+/Cdk2KI cells were comparable to those of endogenous Cdk2, but we detected premature transcriptional activation of Cdk1 during liver regeneration in the absence of Cdk2. This study provides evidence of the molecular differences between Cdk2 and Cdk1 and highlights that the timing of transcriptional activation and the genetic locus play important roles in determining the function of Cdk proteins in vivo.

  4. Association of germline variation in CCNE1 and CDK2 with breast cancer risk, progression and survival among Chinese Han women.

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    Ji-Yuan Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Somatic alterations of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2-cyclin E complex have been shown to contribute to breast cancer (BC development and progression. This study aimed to explore the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in CDK2 and CCNE1 (a gene encoding G1/S specific cyclin E1 protein, formerly called cyclin E on BC risk, progression and survival in a Chinese Han population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We herein genotyped 6 haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPs of CCNE1 and 2 htSNPs of CDK2 in 1207 BC cases and 1207 age-matched controls among Chinese Han women, and then reconstructed haplotype blocks according to our genotyping data and linkage disequilibrium status of these htSNPs. For CCNE1, the minor allele homozygotes of three htSNPs were associated with BC risk (rs3218035: adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.69-6.67; rs3218038: aOR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.22-2.70; rs3218042: aOR = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.31-5.34, and these three loci showed a dose-dependent manner in increasing BC risk (P(trend = 0.0001. Moreover, the 5-SNP haplotype CCGTC, which carried none of minor alleles of the 3 at-risk SNPs, was associated with a favorable event-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.32-0.90. Stratified analysis suggested that the minor-allele homozygote carriers of rs3218038 had a worse event-free survival among patients with aggressive tumours (in tumour size>2 cm group: HR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.06-3.99; in positive lymph node metastasis group: HR = 2.41, 95% CI = 1.15-5.03; in stage II-IV group: HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.09-3.79. For CDK2, no significant association was found. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study indicates that genetic variants in CCNE1 may contribute to BC risk and survival in Chinese Han population. They may become molecular markers for individual evaluation of BC susceptibility and prognosis. Nevertheless, further validation studies are needed.

  5. Knockdown of CDK2AP1 in primary human fibroblasts induces p53 dependent senescence.

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    Khaled N Alsayegh

    Full Text Available Cyclin Dependent Kinase-2 Associated Protein-1 (CDK2AP1 is known to be a tumor suppressor that plays a role in cell cycle regulation by sequestering monomeric CDK2, and targeting it for proteolysis. A reduction of CDK2AP1 expression is considered to be a negative prognostic indicator in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and also associated with increased invasion in human gastric cancer tissue. CDK2AP1 overexpression was shown to inhibit growth, reduce invasion and increase apoptosis in prostate cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the effect of CDK2AP1 downregulation in primary human dermal fibroblasts. Using a short-hairpin RNA to reduce its expression, we found that knockdown of CDK2AP1 in primary human fibroblasts resulted in reduced proliferation and in the induction of senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity. CDK2AP1 knockdown also resulted in a significant reduction in the percentage of cells in the S phase and an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Immunocytochemical analysis also revealed that the CDK2AP1 knockdown significantly increased the percentage of cells that exhibited γ-H2AX foci, which could indicate presence of DNA damage. CDK2AP1 knockdown also resulted in increased mRNA levels of p53, p21, BAX and PUMA and p53 protein levels. In primary human fibroblasts in which p53 and CDK2AP1 were simultaneously downregulated, there was: (a no increase in senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity, (b decrease in the number of cells in the G1-phase and increase in number of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle, and (c decrease in the mRNA levels of p21, BAX and PUMA when compared with CDK2AP1 knockdown only fibroblasts. Taken together, this suggests that the observed phenotype is p53 dependent. We also observed a prominent increase in the levels of ARF protein in the CDK2AP1 knockdown cells, which suggests a possible role of ARF in p53 stabilization following CDK2AP1

  6. PKCeta associates with cyclin E/Cdk2 complex in serum-starved MCF-7 and NIH-3T3 cells.

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    Shtutman, Marat; Hershko, Tzippi; Maissel, Adva; Fima, Eyal; Livneh, Etta

    2003-05-15

    Protein kinase C (PKC) encodes a family of enzymes implicated in cellular differentiation, growth control, and tumor promotion. However, very little is known with respect to the molecular mechanisms that link protein kinase C to cell cycle control. Here we report that PKCeta associates with the cyclin E/Cdk2 complex. This is shown for the ectopically overexpressed PKCeta in NIH-3T3 cells, the inducibly expressed PKCeta in MCF-7 cells (under control of the tetracycline-responsive promoter), and the endogenously expressed PKCeta in mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cells. Subcellular cell fractionation experiments revealed that the complex with cyclin E is formed mostly in the nuclear fractions, although in these cells PKCeta is predominantly expressed in the cytosolic fractions. The complex of PKCeta and cyclin E was studied at various phases of the cell cycle, in serum-starved quiescent cells and in cells stimulated with serum to reenter the cell cycle. Interestingly, the interaction between PKCeta and cyclin E was most prominent in serum-starved cells and was disintegrated when cells entered the cells cycle. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that in serum-starved cells PKCeta is concentrated at the perinuclear zone, which is also the site of its colocalization with cyclin E. Colocalization of PKCeta and cyclin E in the perinuclear region was observed in serum-starved cells, and less in proliferating cells. These experiments suggest that the interaction between PKCeta and cyclin E is carefully regulated, and is correlated with the inactivated form of the cyclin E/Cdk2 complex. Thus, our studies support an important link between PKC and cell cycle control.

  7. A computational study of the protein-ligand interactions in CDK2 inhibitors: using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics interaction energy as a predictor of the biological activity.

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    Alzate-Morales, Jans H; Contreras, Renato; Soriano, Alejandro; Tuñon, Iñaki; Silla, Estanislao

    2007-01-15

    We report a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study to determine the protein-ligand interaction energy between CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and five inhibitors with the N(2)-substituted 6-cyclohexyl-methoxy-purine scaffold. The computational results in this work show that the QM/MM interaction energy is strongly correlated to the biological activity and can be used as a predictor, at least within a family of substrates. A detailed analysis of the protein-ligand structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations shows specific interactions within the active site that, in some cases, have not been reported before to our knowledge. The computed interaction energy gauges the strength of protein-ligand interactions. Finally, energy decomposition and multiple regression analyses were performed to check the contribution of the electrostatic and van der Waals energies to the total interaction energy and to show the capabilities of the computational model to identify new potent inhibitors.

  8. LMW-E/CDK2 deregulates acinar morphogenesis, induces tumorigenesis, and associates with the activated b-Raf-ERK1/2-mTOR pathway in breast cancer patients.

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    MyLinh T Duong

    Full Text Available Elastase-mediated cleavage of cyclin E generates low molecular weight cyclin E (LMW-E isoforms exhibiting enhanced CDK2-associated kinase activity and resistance to inhibition by CDK inhibitors p21 and p27. Approximately 27% of breast cancers express high LMW-E protein levels, which significantly correlates with poor survival. The objective of this study was to identify the signaling pathway(s deregulated by LMW-E expression in breast cancer patients and to identify pharmaceutical agents to effectively target this pathway. Ectopic LMW-E expression in nontumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs was sufficient to generate xenografts with greater tumorigenic potential than full-length cyclin E, and the tumorigenicity was augmented by in vivo passaging. However, cyclin E mutants unable to interact with CDK2 protected hMECs from tumor development. When hMECs were cultured on Matrigel, LMW-E mediated aberrant acinar morphogenesis, including enlargement of acinar structures and formation of multi-acinar complexes, as denoted by reduced BIM and elevated Ki67 expression. Similarly, inducible expression of LMW-E in transgenic mice generated hyper-proliferative terminal end buds resulting in enhanced mammary tumor development. Reverse-phase protein array assay of 276 breast tumor patient samples and cells cultured on monolayer and in three-dimensional Matrigel demonstrated that, in terms of protein expression profile, hMECs cultured in Matrigel more closely resembled patient tissues than did cells cultured on monolayer. Additionally, the b-Raf-ERK1/2-mTOR pathway was activated in LMW-E-expressing patient samples, and activation of this pathway was associated with poor disease-specific survival. Combination treatment using roscovitine (CDK inhibitor plus either rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor or sorafenib (a pan kinase inhibitor targeting b-Raf effectively prevented aberrant acinar formation in LMW-E-expressing cells by inducing G1/S cell cycle arrest

  9. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of cyclin E and CDK2 from Penaeus monodon.

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    Zhao, C; Fu, M J; Qiu, L H

    2016-09-16

    Reduced reproductive performance of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) has caused economic losses and hampered the fishing industry. Detailed investigation of the molecular mechanism by which the cell cycle is regulated in this organism is needed to understand the development and maturation of ovaries and oocytes, with a view to improving reproductive capacity. Cell cycle progression is mainly determined by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and cyclin complexes, the cyclin E/CDK2 complex playing a key role in G1/S transition. However, knowledge of the interplay between cyclin E and CDK2 in invertebrates remains limited. In this study, full-length P. monodon cyclin E (Pmcyclin E) and CDK2 (PmCDK2) sequences were cloned. The open reading frame of Pmcyclin E was 1263 bp in length and encoded a 47.9-kDa protein, while that of PmCDK2 was 921 bp, encoding a protein of 34.9 kDa. Recombinant cyclin E and CDK2 proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by Ni-chelating affinity chromatography. In addition, a pull-down assay was performed to identify any interaction between Pmcyclin E and PmCDK2. This research provides a basis for the study of the functional mechanisms of the cyclin E/CDK2 complex in shrimp, further enriching our knowledge of invertebrate cell cycle regulation.

  10. ImageJ软件在重组质粒pET32a-CDK2中蛋白表达的应用%Application of Image J software in analyzing protein expression of recombinant plasmid pET32a-CDK2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈炜烨; 刘冬冬; 徐建华; 陈丹娜; 何敏; 张战锋; 黄宪章

    2014-01-01

    目的 应用Image J软件探索细胞周期依赖性蛋白激酶2(CDK2)在重组质粒pET32a-CDK2中的蛋白表达条件.方法 将重组质粒pET32a-CDK2转入表达菌株BL21 (DE3),然后在不同时间点(0、1、2、3、4h)和不同浓度(0.5、1、2 mmol/L)异丙基-β-D-硫代半乳糖苷(IPTG)下诱导表达目的蛋白CDK2,对CDK2采用SDS-PAGE法进行蛋白电泳,并应用Image J软件对电泳条带进行灰度分析.结果 CDK2诱导表达量在不同时间点差异有统计学意义(P<0.001),其中0h与1h、2h、3h、4h诱导表达量的差异均有统计学意义(P=0.007,P<0.001,P<0.001,P<0.001);1h与3h和4h诱导表达量的差异均有统计学意义(P=0.001);而2h和1h、3h、4h诱导表达量的差异均无统计学意义(均有P>0.05);不同浓度IPTG下的CDK2诱导表达量差异无统计学意义(P=0.336,P=0.240,P=1.000).结论 根据Image J软件分析结果,采用0.5 mmol/L浓度IPTG 2h的条件,节约诱导时间和试剂用量.

  11. Cyclin A2 and CDK2 as Novel Targets of Aspirin and Salicylic acid: a Potential Role in Cancer Prevention

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    Dachineni, Rakesh; Ai, Guoqiang; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Sadhu, Satya S.; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2015-01-01

    Data emerging from the past 10 years have consolidated the rationale for investigating the use of aspirin as a chemopreventive agent; however, the mechanisms leading to its anti-cancer effects are still being elucidated. We hypothesized that aspirin’s chemopreventive actions may involve cell cycle regulation through modulation of the levels or activity of cyclin A2/cyclin dependent kinase-2 (CDK2). In this study, HT-29 and other diverse panel of cancer cells were used to demonstrate that both aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decreased cyclin A2 (CCNA2) and CDK2 protein and mRNA levels. The down regulatory effect of either drugs on cyclin A2 levels was prevented by pretreatment with lactacystin, an inhibitor of proteasomes, suggesting the involvement of 26S proteasomes. In-vitro kinase assays showed that lysates from cells treated with salicylic acid had lower levels of CDK2 activity. Importantly, three independent experiments revealed that salicylic acid directly binds to CDK2. Firstly, inclusion of salicylic acid in naïve cell lysates, or in recombinant CDK2 preparations, increased the ability of the anti-CDK2 antibody to immunoprecipitate CDK2, suggesting that salicylic acid may directly bind and alter its conformation. Secondly, in 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate (ANS)-CDK2 fluorescence assays, pre-incubation of CDK2 with salicylic acid, dose-dependently quenched the fluorescence due to ANS. Thirdly, computational analysis using molecular docking studies identified Asp145 and Lys33 as the potential sites of salicylic acid interactions with CDK2. These results demonstrate that aspirin and salicylic acid down-regulate cyclin A2/CDK2 proteins in multiple cancer cell lines, suggesting a novel target and mechanism of action in chemoprevention. Implications Biochemical and structural studies indicate that the anti-proliferative actions of aspirin are mediated through cyclin A2/CDK2. PMID:26685215

  12. Antimitogenic effect of green tea (-)-epigallocatechin gallate on 3T3-L1 preadipocytes depends on the ERK and Cdk2 pathways.

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    Hung, Pei-Fang; Wu, Bo-Tsung; Chen, Hui-Chian; Chen, Yen-Hang; Chen, Chia-Lin; Wu, Ming-Hua; Liu, Hsien-Chun; Lee, Meng-Jung; Kao, Yung-Hsi

    2005-05-01

    Green tea catechins, especially (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), have been proposed as a chemopreventative for obesity, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. However, relatively little is known about the mechanism of the action of EGCG on fat cell function. This study was designed to investigate the pathways of EGCG's modulation of the mitogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Preadipocyte proliferation as indicated by an increased number of cells and greater incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was inhibited by EGCG in dose-, time-, and growth phase-dependent manners. Also, EGCG dose and time dependently decreased levels of phospho-ERK1/2, Cdk2, and cyclin D(1) proteins, reduced Cdk2 activity, and increased levels of G(0)/G(1) growth arrest, p21(waf/cip), and p27(kip1), but not p18(ink), proteins and their associations to Cdk2. However, neither MEK1, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, phospho-p38, JNK, nor phospho-JNK was changed. Increased phospho-ERK1/2 content and Cdk2 activity, respectively, via the transfection of MEK1 and Cdk2 cDNA into preadipocytes prevented EGCG from reducing cell numbers. These data demonstrate the ERK- and Cdk2-dependent antimitogenic effects of EGCG. Moreover, EGCG was more effective than epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin in changing the mitogenic signals. The signal of EGCG in reducing growth of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes differed from that of 3T3 fibroblasts. Results of this study may relate to the mechanism by which EGCG modulates body weight.

  13. A dual role of Cdk2 in DNA damage response

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    Kaldis Philipp

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Once it was believed that Cdk2 was the master regulator of S phase entry. Gene knockout mouse studies of cell cycle regulators revealed that Cdk2 is dispensable for S phase initiation and progression whereby Cdk1 can compensate for the loss of Cdk2. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates that Cdk2 is involved in cell cycle independent functions such as DNA damage repair. Whether these properties are unique to Cdk2 or also being compensated by other Cdks in the absence of Cdk2 is under extensive investigation. Here we review the emerging new role of Cdk2 in DNA damage repair and also discuss how the loss of Cdk2 impacts the G1/S phase DNA damage checkpoint.

  14. A dual role of Cdk2 in DNA damage response.

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    Satyanarayana, Ande; Kaldis, Philipp

    2009-05-18

    Once it was believed that Cdk2 was the master regulator of S phase entry. Gene knockout mouse studies of cell cycle regulators revealed that Cdk2 is dispensable for S phase initiation and progression whereby Cdk1 can compensate for the loss of Cdk2. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates that Cdk2 is involved in cell cycle independent functions such as DNA damage repair. Whether these properties are unique to Cdk2 or also being compensated by other Cdks in the absence of Cdk2 is under extensive investigation. Here we review the emerging new role of Cdk2 in DNA damage repair and also discuss how the loss of Cdk2 impacts the G1/S phase DNA damage checkpoint.

  15. CDK2 Regulates HIV-1 Transcription by Phosphorylation of CDK9 on Serine 90

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    Breuer Denitra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 transcription is activated by the viral Tat protein that recruits host positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb containing CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. P-TEFb in the cells exists as a lower molecular weight CDK9/cyclin T1 dimer and a high molecular weight complex of 7SK RNA, CDK9/cyclin T1, HEXIM1 dimer and several additional proteins. Our previous studies implicated CDK2 in HIV-1 transcription regulation. We also found that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators leads to the inhibition of CDK9 activity, suggesting a functional link between CDK2 and CDK9. Here, we investigate whether CDK2 phosphorylates CDK9 and regulates its activity. Results The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CDK2 inhibited CDK9 kinase activity and reduced CDK9 phosphorylation. Stable shRNA-mediated CDK2 knockdown inhibited HIV-1 transcription, but also increased the overall level of 7SK RNA. CDK9 contains a motif (90SPYNR94 that is consensus CDK2 phosphorylation site. CDK9 was phosphorylated on Ser90 by CDK2 in vitro. In cultured cells, CDK9 phosphorylation was reduced when Ser90 was mutated to an Ala. Phosphorylation of CDK9 on Ser90 was also detected with phospho-specific antibodies and it was reduced after the knockdown of CDK2. CDK9 expression decreased in the large complex for the CDK9-S90A mutant and was correlated with a reduced activity and an inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. In contrast, the CDK9-S90D mutant showed a slight decrease in CDK9 expression in both the large and small complexes but induced Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcription. Molecular modeling showed that Ser 90 of CDK9 is located on a flexible loop exposed to solvent, suggesting its availability for phosphorylation. Conclusion Our data indicate that CDK2 phosphorylates CDK9 on Ser 90 and thereby contributes to HIV-1 transcription. The phosphorylation of Ser90 by CDK2 represents a novel mechanism of HIV-1 regulated transcription and provides a new strategy for

  16. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

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    Yan Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP binding site (Site I and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III. In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV. All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate. In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2.

  17. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

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    Li, Yan; Zhang, Jingxiao; Gao, Weimin; Zhang, Lilei; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding site (Site I) and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III). In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV). All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate). In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2. PMID:25918937

  18. Phosphorylation of CDK2 on threonine 160 influences silencing of sex chromosome during male meiosis.

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    Wang, Lu; Liu, Wenjing; Zhao, Weidong; Song, Gendi; Wang, Guishuan; Wang, Xiaorong; Sun, Fei

    2014-06-01

    In mammalian meiosis, the X and Y chromosomes are largely unsynapsed and transcriptionally silenced during the pachytene stage of meiotic prophase (meiotic sex chromosome inactivation), forming a specialized nuclear territory called sex or XY body. An increasing number of proteins and noncoding RNAs were found to localize to the sex body and take part in influencing expression of sex chromosome genes. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2 (-/-)) spermatocytes show incomplete sex chromosome pairing. Here, we further showed that phosphorylation of CDK2 isoform 1 (p-CDK2(39) [39 kDa]) on threonine 160 localizes to the sites of asynapsis and the sex body, interacting with phosphorylated gamma-H2AX. Meanwhile, p-CDK2(39) is frequently mislocalized throughout the sex body, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation is disrupted in PWK×C57BL/6J hybrid mice. Furthermore, pachytene spermatocytes treated with mevastatin (an inhibitor of p-CDK2) showed overexpression of sex chromosome-linked genes. Our results highlight an important role for p-CDK2(39) in influencing silencing of the sex chromosomes during male meiosis by interacting with gamma-H2AX.

  19. The cloning of the cdk2 transcript and the localization of its expression during gametogenesis in the freshwater giant prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

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    Chen, Jie; Liu, Ping; Li, Zhen; Chen, Ying; Qiu, Gao-Feng

    2013-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) are key regulators of the cell cycle. In mammals, cdk2 plays an essential role in the meiosis of spermatocytes and oocytes. To investigate the role of cdk2 kinase during gametogenesis in crustaceans, we cloned a complete cDNA sequence of cdk2 from the freshwater giant prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, and examined its localization and expression in the developing gonads. The prawn cdk2 cDNA is 1,745 bp in length and encodes a putative protein of 305 amino acids. The deduced protein contains a conserved cyclin binding motif PSTAIRE and shares high homology with reported cdk2 kinases of other species. RT-PCR analysis showed a wide distribution of the cdk2 mRNA in all tested organs including the testis, ovary, heart, muscles, hepatopancreas and gills, and the highest level of expression in the ovary and testis. Localization by in situ hybridization of cdk2 mRNA in the ovary showed high expression in the ooplasm of previtellogenic and the nuclei of late vitellogenic oocytes. In testicular sections, cdk2 transcript is low in spermatogonia, high in spermatocytes, but reduced in spermatids and sperm. The high expression of the cdk2 transcripts in meiotic spermatocytes and oocytes indicated that the cdk2 gene has the conservative function in the germ cells meiosis during gametogenesis.

  20. Molecular basis for viral selective replication in cancer cells: activation of CDK2 by adenovirus-induced cyclin E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in cancer cells and have been used in cancer therapies. We have previously shown that Ad E1B55K protein is involved in induction of cyclin E for Ad replication, but this E1B55K function is not required in cancer cells in which deregulation of cyclin E is frequently observed. In this study, we investigated the interaction of cyclin E and CDK2 in Ad-infected cells. Ad infection significantly increased the large form of cyclin E (cyclin EL, promoted cyclin E/CDK2 complex formation and increased CDK2 phosphorylation at the T160 site. Activated CDK2 caused pRb phosphorylation at the S612 site. Repression of CDK2 activity with the chemical inhibitor roscovitine or with specific small interfering RNAs significantly decreased pRb phosphorylation, with concomitant repression of viral replication. Our results suggest that Ad-induced cyclin E activates CDK2 that targets the transcriptional repressor pRb to generate a cellular environment for viral productive replication. This study reveals a new molecular basis for oncolytic replication of E1b-deleted Ads and will aid in the development of new strategies for Ad oncolytic virotherapies.

  1. Anticancer screening of medicinal plant phytochemicals against Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-2 (CDK2: An in-silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajahat Khan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-2 (CDK2 is a member of serine/threonine protein kinases family and plays an important role in regulation of various eukaryotic cell division events. Over-expression of CDK2 during cell cycle may lead to several cellular functional aberrations including diverse types of cancers (lung cancer, primary colorectal carcinoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma and pancreatic carcinoma in humans. Medicinal plants phytochemicals which have anticancer potential can be used as an alternative drug resource. Methods: This study was designed to find out anticancer phytochemicals from medicinal plants which could inhibit CDK2 with the help of molecular docking technique. Molecular Operating Environment (MOE v2009 software was used to dock 2300 phytochemicals in this study. Results: The outcome of this study shows that four phytochemicals Kushenol T, Remangiflavanone B, Neocalyxins A and Elenoside showed the lowest S-score (-17.83, -17.57, -17.26, -17.17 respectively and binds strongly with all eight active residues Tyr15, Lys33, Ileu52, Lys56, Leu78, phe80, Asp145 and Phe146 of CDK2 binding site. These phytochemicals could successfully inhibit the CDK2. Conclusion: These phytochemicals can be considered as potential anticancer agents and used in drug development against CDK2. We anticipate that this study would pave way for phytochemical based novel small molecules as more efficacious and selective anti-cancer therapeutic compounds.

  2. Amygdalin blocks bladder cancer cell growth in vitro by diminishing cyclin A and cdk2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Reiter, Michael; Tsaur, Igor; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug.

  3. Amygdalin blocks bladder cancer cell growth in vitro by diminishing cyclin A and cdk2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP. Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug.

  4. Phosphorylation of Rad9 at serine 328 by cyclin A-Cdk2 triggers apoptosis via interfering Bcl-xL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Zhan

    Full Text Available Cyclin A-Cdk2, a cell cycle regulated Ser/Thr kinase, plays important roles in a variety of apoptoticprocesses. However, the mechanism of cyclin A-Cdk2 regulated apoptosis remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that Rad9, a member of the BH3-only subfamily of Bcl-2 proteins, could be phosphorylated by cyclin A-Cdk2 in vitro and in vivo. Cyclin A-Cdk2 catalyzed the phosphorylation of Rad9 at serine 328 in HeLa cells during apoptosis induced by etoposide, an inhibitor of topoisomeraseII. The phosphorylation of Rad9 resulted in its translocation from the nucleus to the mitochondria and its interaction with Bcl-xL. The forced activation of cyclin A-Cdk2 in these cells by the overexpression of cyclin A,triggered Rad9 phosphorylation at serine 328 and thereby promoted the interaction of Rad9 with Bcl-xL and the subsequent initiation of the apoptotic program. The pro-apoptotic effects regulated by the cyclin A-Cdk2 complex were significantly lower in cells transfected with Rad9S328A, an expression vector that encodes a Rad9 mutant that is resistant to cyclin A-Cdk2 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that cyclin A-Cdk2 regulates apoptosis through a mechanism that involves Rad9phosphorylation.

  5. Cdk2 silencing via a DNA/PCL electrospun scaffold suppresses proliferation and increases death of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Achille

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a promising approach for cancer treatment. Site specific and controlled delivery of RNAi could be beneficial to the patient, while at the same time reducing undesirable off-target side effects. We utilized electrospinning to generate a biodegradable scaffold capable of incorporating and delivering a bioactive plasmid encoding for short hairpin (sh RNA against the cell cycle specific protein, Cdk2. Three electrospun scaffolds were constructed, one using polycaprolactone (PCL alone (Control and PCL with plasmid DNA encoding for either Cdk2 (Cdk2i and EGFP (EGFPi, also served as a control shRNA. Scaffold fiber diameters ranged from 1 to 20 µm (DNA containing and 0.2-3 µm (Control. While the electrospun fibers remained intact for more than two weeks in physiological buffer, degradation was visible during the third week of incubation. Approximately 20-60 ng/ml (~2.5% cumulative release of intact and bioactive plasmid DNA was released over 21 days. Further, Cdk2 mRNA expression in cells plated on the Cdk2i scaffold was decreased by ~51% and 30%, in comparison with that of cells plated on Control or EGFPi scaffold, respectively. This decrease in Cdk2 mRNA by the Cdk2i scaffold translated to a ~40% decrease in the proliferation of the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, as well as the presence of increased number of dead cells. Taken together, these results represent the first successful demonstration of the delivery of bioactive RNAi-based plasmid DNA from an electrospun polymer scaffold, specifically, in disrupting cell cycle regulation and suppressing proliferation of cancer cells.

  6. KAP regulates ROCK2 and Cdk2 in an RNA-activated glioblastoma invasion pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Jiang, X; Yu, Y; Huang, W; Xing, H; Agar, N Y; Yang, H W; Yang, B; Carroll, R S; Johnson, M D

    2015-03-12

    Aberrant splicing of the cyclin-dependent kinase-associated phosphatase, KAP, promotes glioblastoma invasion in a Cdc2-dependent manner. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we show that miR-26a, which is often amplified in glioblastoma, promotes invasion in phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-competent and PTEN-deficient glioblastoma cells by directly downregulating KAP expression. Mechanistically, we find that KAP binds and activates ROCK2. Thus, RNA-mediated downregulation of KAP leads to decreased ROCK2 activity and this, in turn, increases Rac1-mediated invasion. In addition, the decrease in KAP expression activates the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdk2, and this directly promotes invasion by increasing retinoblastoma phosphorylation, E2F-dependent Cdc2 expression and Cdc2-mediated inactivation of the actomyosin inhibitor, caldesmon. Importantly, glioblastoma cell invasion mediated by this pathway can be antagonized by Cdk2/Cdc2 inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. Thus, two distinct RNA-based mechanisms activate this novel KAP/ROCK2/Cdk2-dependent invasion pathway in glioblastoma.

  7. Influence of CDK1 and CDK2 siRNA interference on tumor cell cycle and cell apoptosis%CDK1、CDK2 siRNA干扰对肿瘤细胞凋亡和细胞周期的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Xiao; Wanjun Gong; Jingpeng Cao; Xiaolan Li; Deding Tao; Junbo Hu; Jianping Gong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the influence of CDK1 and CDK2 expression inhibited by cotransfection of CDK1 and CDK2 siRNA on cell cycle and apoptosis, explored the exact role of cell cycle master regulator in tumor cell apoptosis process. Methods: The siRNA targeting the CDK1 and CDK2 genes were synthesized and simultaneously cotransfected into Hela cells by lipofectamine 2000.48 or 60 h after the cotransfection, CDK1 and CDK2 protein expressions were examined by Western blot. Cell cycle distribution was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell apoptosis was detected by the Annexin V/PI method. The changes of the transfected cell morphological under a microscope after Wright-Giemsa Staining were studied. Results: CDK1 and CDK2 protein expression was decreased at 48 or 60 h after cotransfection. The accumulation of the G2/M and S phase population in cell cycle of the cotrensfected cells at 48 or 60 h after transfection was enhanced obviously compared with control. The ratio of apoptotic cell of cotransfected cells at 48 or 60 h after transfection was increased significantly compared with control. More binucleate or multinucleate cells among cotransfected cells were observed under the microscope. Conclu- sion: The decreased expression of CDK1 and CDK2 by cotransfection of CDK1 and CDK2 siRNA not only leads to tumor cell cycle arrest in S phase and G2/M phase, but also induces tumor cell apoptosis.

  8. Interferon regulatory factor-1 together with reactive oxygen species promotes the acceleration of cell cycle progression by up-regulating the cyclin E and CDK2 genes during high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Liu, Long; Chen, Chao; Chi, Ya-Li; Yang, Xiang-Qun; Xu, Yan; Li, Xiao-Tong; Guo, Shi-Lei; Xiong, Shao-Hu; Shen, Man-Ru; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Chuan-Sen; Hu, Kai-Meng

    2013-10-14

    The high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the development of diabetic vascular diseases. In a previous study, we confirmed that Interferon regulatory factor-1 (Irf-1) is a positive regulator of the high glucose-induced proliferation of VSMCs. However, the mechanisms remain to be determined. The levels of cyclin/CDK expression in two cell models involving Irf-1 knockdown and overexpression were quantified to explore the relationship between Irf-1 and its downstream effectors under normal or high glucose conditions. Subsequently, cells were treated with high glucose/NAC, normal glucose/H₂O₂, high glucose/U0126 or normal glucose/H₂O₂/U0126 during an incubation period. Then proliferation, cyclin/CDK expression and cell cycle distribution assays were performed to determine whether ROS/Erk1/2 signaling pathway was involved in the Irf-1-induced regulation of VSMC growth under high glucose conditions. We found that Irf-1 overexpression led to down-regulation of cyclin D1/CDK4 and inhibited cell cycle progression in VSMCs under normal glucose conditions. In high glucose conditions, Irf-1 overexpression led to an up-regulation of cyclin E/CDK2 and an acceleration of cell cycle progression, whereas silencing of Irf-1 suppressed the expression of both proteins and inhibited the cell cycle during the high glucose-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with antioxidants prevented the Irf-1 overexpression-induced proliferation of VSMCs, the up-regulation of cyclin E/CDK2 and the acceleration of cell cycle progression in high glucose conditions. In contrast, under normal glucose conditions, H₂O₂ stimulation and Irf-1 overexpression induced cell proliferation, up-regulated cyclin E/CDK2 expression and promoted cell cycle acceleration. In addition, overexpression of Irf-1 promoted the activation of Erk1/2 and when VSMCs overexpressing Irf-1 were treated with U0126, the specific Erk1/2 inhibitor

  9. Functional ablation of pRb activates Cdk2 and causes antiestrogen resistance in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Varma

    Full Text Available Estrogens are required for the proliferation of hormone dependent breast cancer cells, making estrogen receptor (ER positive tumors amenable to endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens. However, resistance to these agents remains a significant cause of treatment failure. We previously demonstrated that inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb family tumor suppressors causes antiestrogen resistance in MCF-7 cells, a widely studied model of estrogen responsive human breast cancers. In this study, we investigate the mechanism by which pRb inactivation leads to antiestrogen resistance. Cdk4 and cdk2 are two key cell cycle regulators that can phosphorylate and inactivate pRb, therefore we tested whether these kinases are required in cells lacking pRb function. pRb family members were inactivated in MCF-7 cells by expressing polyomavirus large tumor antigen (PyLT, and cdk activity was inhibited using the cdk inhibitors p16(INK4A and p21(Waf1/Cip1. Cdk4 activity was no longer required in cells lacking functional pRb, while cdk2 activity was required for proliferation in both the presence and absence of pRb function. Using inducible PyLT cell lines, we further demonstrated that pRb inactivation leads to increased cyclin A expression, cdk2 activation and proliferation in antiestrogen arrested cells. These results demonstrate that antiestrogens do not inhibit cdk2 activity or proliferation of MCF-7 cells in the absence of pRb family function, and suggest that antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cells resulting from pRb pathway inactivation would be susceptible to therapies that target cdk2.

  10. Functional ablation of pRb activates Cdk2 and causes antiestrogen resistance in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Hemant; Skildum, Andrew J; Conrad, Susan E

    2007-12-05

    Estrogens are required for the proliferation of hormone dependent breast cancer cells, making estrogen receptor (ER) positive tumors amenable to endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens. However, resistance to these agents remains a significant cause of treatment failure. We previously demonstrated that inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) family tumor suppressors causes antiestrogen resistance in MCF-7 cells, a widely studied model of estrogen responsive human breast cancers. In this study, we investigate the mechanism by which pRb inactivation leads to antiestrogen resistance. Cdk4 and cdk2 are two key cell cycle regulators that can phosphorylate and inactivate pRb, therefore we tested whether these kinases are required in cells lacking pRb function. pRb family members were inactivated in MCF-7 cells by expressing polyomavirus large tumor antigen (PyLT), and cdk activity was inhibited using the cdk inhibitors p16(INK4A) and p21(Waf1/Cip1). Cdk4 activity was no longer required in cells lacking functional pRb, while cdk2 activity was required for proliferation in both the presence and absence of pRb function. Using inducible PyLT cell lines, we further demonstrated that pRb inactivation leads to increased cyclin A expression, cdk2 activation and proliferation in antiestrogen arrested cells. These results demonstrate that antiestrogens do not inhibit cdk2 activity or proliferation of MCF-7 cells in the absence of pRb family function, and suggest that antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cells resulting from pRb pathway inactivation would be susceptible to therapies that target cdk2.

  11. 采用蛋白质组学技术研究 CDK2在肝癌发生中的作用%Proteomic Technologies for Analysis of Role of CDK2 in Pathogenesis of Hepatocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽梅; 阿茹娜

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of stable cyclin-dependent kinase 2(CDK2)siRNA transfection on proteomic expression in human hepatoma HepG2 cells,and to investigate the role of CDK2 in the pathogenesis of hepatocarcinoma.Methods Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-mass spectrometry(2-DE-MS)was used to detect the protein expression in CDK2shRNA-trans-fected HepG2 cells(HepG2-CDK2shRNA cells)and HepG2 cells.Results Ten differential ex-pression proteins were identified by 2-DE-MS.Of them,7 proteins(cytokeratin 18,chaperonin 10-related proteins(HSP10,HSPE1 and CPNl0),human chorionic gonadotropin,Kv channel interac-ting protein 3,olfactory receptors(family 2,subfamily L and member 2),chromosome 9 open read-ing frame 3,and ELYS transcription factor-like protein TMBS62)were not expressed in HepG2-CDK2shRNA cells,and 3 proteins(high-mobility group box 1,heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleo-protein H1 and immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region)were down-regulated in HepG2-CDK2shRNA cells.Conclusion There were significant changes in expressed proteins involved in cell cycle,signal transduction,and tumor metastasis and infiltration after the inhibition of CDK2 expression in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.%目的:观察稳定转染细胞周期蛋白依赖性激酶2(cyclin-dependent kinase 2,CDK2)干扰 RNA 对人肝癌细胞株 HepG2蛋白质组表达的变化,探讨 CDK2在肝癌发生中的作用。方法采用双向凝胶电泳-质谱技术比较稳定转染 CDK2干扰 RNA 的 HepG2-CDK2shRNA 细胞株及 HepG2细胞株蛋白质表达的变化。结果经双向电泳-图像分析-质谱技术得到10个差异表达的蛋白质。其中7种[细胞角蛋白18((cytokeratin18,CK18))、热休克蛋白家族成员伴侣素10(chaperonin 10-related protein,Hsp10、HSPE1、CPNl0)、人绒毛膜促性腺激素(hCG2039058)、钾离子通道蛋白3(Kv channel interacting protein 3,Kv3)、嗅觉受体(olfactory receptor,family 2、subfamily L

  12. Structure-based drug design to the discovery of new 2-aminothiazole CDK2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulpetti, Anna; Casale, Elena; Roletto, Fulvia; Amici, Raffaella; Villa, Manuela; Pevarello, Paolo

    2006-03-01

    N-(5-Bromo-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)butanamide (compound 1) was found active (IC50=808 nM) in a high throughput screening (HTS) for CDK2 inhibitors. By exploiting crystal structures of several complexes between CDK2 and inhibitors and applying structure-based drug design (SBDD), we rapidly discovered a very potent and selective CDK2 inhibitor 4-[(5-isopropyl-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)amino] benzenesulfonamide (compound 4, IC50=20 nM). The syntheses, structure-based analog design, kinases inhibition data and X-ray crystallographic structures of CDK2/inhibitor complexes are reported.

  13. Tumors initiated by constitutive Cdk2 activation exhibit transforming growth factor beta resistance and acquire paracrine mitogenic stimulation during progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corsino, P.; Davis, B.; Law, M.;

    2007-01-01

    mediate some of the transforming effects that result from cyclin D1 overexpression in human breast cancers. MMTV-DIK2 cancer cells express the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor, c-Met. MMTV-D1K2 cancer cells also secrete transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta), but are relatively resistant to TGF......Cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) complexes are present at high frequency in human breast cancer cell lines, but the significance of this observation is unknown. This report shows that expression of a cyclin D1-Cdk2 fusion protein under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMITV...... beta antiproliferative effects. Fibroblasts derived from MMTV-DIK2 tumors secrete factors that stimulate the proliferation of MMTV-D1K2 cancer cells, stimulate c-Met tyrosine phosphorylation, and stimulate the phosphorylation of the downstream signaling intermediates p70(s6k) and Akt on activating...

  14. Loss of p12CDK2-AP1 Expression in Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Disrupted Transforming Growth Factor-β-Smad Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Peng

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined correlations between TGF-β1, TβR-I and TβR-II, p12CDK2-AP1 p21WAF1 p27KIP1 Smad2, and p-Smad2 in 125 cases of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC to test the hypothesis that resistance to TGF-β1-induced growth suppression is due to the disruption of its signaling pathway as a consequence of reduced or lost p12CDK2-AP1. Immunoreactivity for TβR-II decreased in OSCC with increasing disease aggressiveness; however, no differences were observed for TβR-I and TGF-β1. The expression of TβR-II significantly correlated with p12CDK2-AP1 and p27KIP1 (P<.001 and P<.01, respectively. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between TβR-II expression and p-Smad2 (P < .001. The in vivo correlation of the levels of TβR-II, p12CDK2-AP1 and p27 KIP1 was confirmed in normal and OSCC cell lines. Additionally, in vitro analysis of TGF-β-treated cells showed that TGF-β1 treatment of normal keratinocytes suppressed cell growth with upregulation of p-Smad2, p12CDK2-API and p21WAF1 expression, whereas there was no effect on OSCC cell lines. These results provide evidence of a link between a disrupted TGF-β-Smad signaling pathway and loss of induction of cell cycle-inhibitory proteins, especially p12CDK2-AP1 in OSCC, which may lead to the resistance of TGF-β1 growth-inhibitory effect on OSCC.

  15. The proline-histidine-rich CDK2/CDK4 interaction region of C/EBPalpha is dispensable for C/EBPalpha-mediated growth regulation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Bo Torben; Pedersen, Thomas Askov; Hasemann, Marie Sigurd

    2006-01-01

    that a short, centrally located, 15-amino-acid proline-histidine-rich region (PHR) of C/EBPalpha is responsible for the growth-inhibitory function of the protein through its ability to interact with CDK2 and CDK4, thereby inhibiting their activities. Homozygous Cebpa(DeltaPHR/DeltaPHR) (DeltaPHR) mice...

  16. Cdk1, but not Cdk2, is the sole Cdk that is essential and sufficient to drive resumption of meiosis in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Zheng, Wenjing; Shen, Yan; Gorre, Nagaraju; Ning, Yao; Halet, Guillaume; Kaldis, Philipp; Liu, Kui

    2012-06-01

    Mammalian oocytes are arrested at the prophase of meiosis I during fetal or postnatal development, and the meiosis is resumed by the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone. The in vivo functional roles of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) during the resumption of meiosis in mammalian oocytes are largely unknown. Previous studies have shown that deletions of Cdk3, Cdk4 or Cdk6 in mice result in viable animals with normal oocyte maturation, indicating that these Cdks are not essential for the meiotic maturation of oocytes. In addition, conventional knockout of Cdk1 and Cdk2 leads to embryonic lethality and postnatal follicular depletion, respectively, making it impossible to study the functions of Cdk1 and Cdk2 in oocyte meiosis. In this study, we generated conditional knockout mice with oocyte-specific deletions of Cdk1 and Cdk2. We showed that the lack of Cdk1, but not of Cdk2, leads to female infertility due to a failure of the resumption of meiosis in the oocyte. Re-introduction of Cdk1 mRNA into Cdk1-null oocytes largely resumed meiosis. Thus, Cdk1 is the sole Cdk that is essential and sufficient to drive resumption of meiosis in mouse oocytes. We also found that Cdk1 maintains the phosphorylation status of protein phosphatase 1 and lamin A/C in oocytes in order for meiosis resumption to occur.

  17. CDK2 and mTOR are direct molecular targets of isoangustone A in the suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eunjung; Son, Joe Eun; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yeong A [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Kangdong [The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Kim, Jiyoung [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Natural Science, Hallym University, Chuncheon, 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Zigang [The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Lee, Ki Won, E-mail: kiwon@snu.ac.kr [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyong Joo, E-mail: leehyjo@snu.ac.kr [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    Licorice extract which is used as a natural sweetener has been shown to possess inhibitory effects against prostate cancer, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Here, we report a compound, isoangustone A (IAA) in licorice that potently suppresses the growth of aggressive prostate cancer and sought to clarify its mechanism of action. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on the growth of PTEN-deleted human prostate cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Administration of IAA significantly attenuated the growth of prostate cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. These effects were found to be attributable to inhibition of the G1/S phase cell cycle transition and the accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. The elevated p27{sup kip1} expression levels were concurrent with the decrease of its phosphorylation at threonine 187 through suppression of CDK2 kinase activity and the reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473 by diminishing the kinase activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Further analysis using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitated cell lysates determined that IAA exerts suppressive effects against CDK2 and mTOR kinase activity by direct binding with both proteins. These findings suggested that the licorice compound IAA is a potent molecular inhibitor of CDK2 and mTOR, with strong implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, licorice-derived extracts with high IAA content warrant further clinical investigation for nutritional sources for prostate cancer patients. - Highlights: • Isoangustone A suppresses growth of PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. • Administration of isoangustone A inhibits tumor growth in mice. • Treatment of isoangustone A induces cell cycle arrest and accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. • Isoangustone A inhibits CDK2 and mTOR activity. • Isoangustone A directly binds with CDK2 and mTOR complex in prostate cancer cells.

  18. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Kokontis

    Full Text Available The majority of prostate cancer (PCa patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1; and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1 and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  19. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokontis, John M; Lin, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yu; Fukuchi, Junichi; Hiipakka, Richard A; Chung, Chi-Jung; Chan, Tzu-Min; Liao, Shutsung; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR) and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1); and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1) and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  20. In silico study of porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids as CDK2 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba, Muhammad; Ihsan, Sunandar; Ramadhan, La Ode Ahmad Nur; Tjahjono, Daryono Hadi

    2017-04-01

    Cyclin-Dependent Kinases (CDKs) are known to play crucial roles in controlling cell cycle progression of eukaryotic cell and inhibition of their activity has long been considered as potential strategy in anti-cancer drug research. In the present work, a series of porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids bearing meso-substituents, i.e. either pyridine or pyrazole rings were designed and computationally evaluated for their Cyclin Dependent Kinase-2 (CDK2) inhibitory activity using molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation. The molecular docking simulation revealed that all six porphyrin hybrids were able to bind to ATP-binding site of CDK2 and interacted with key residues constituted the active cavity of CDK2, while molecular dynamics simulation indicated that all porphyrins bound to CDK2 were stable for 6ns. The binding free energies predicted by MM-PBSA method showed that most compounds exhibited higher affinity than that of native ligand (4-anilinoquinazoline, DTQ) and the affinity of mono-H2PyP-AQ was about three times better than that of DTQ, indicating its potential to be advanced as a new CDK2 inhibitor.

  1. TNFα signaling regulates cystic epithelial cell proliferation through Akt/mTOR and ERK/MAPK/Cdk2 mediated Id2 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie X Zhou

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα is present in cyst fluid and promotes cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. However, the cross-talk between TNFα and PKD associated signaling pathways remains elusive. In this study, we found that stimulation of renal epithelial cells with TNFα or RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a member of the TNFα cytokine family, activated either the PI3K pathway, leading to AKT and mTOR mediated the increase of Id2 protein, or MAPK and Cdk2 to induce Id2 nuclear translocation. The effects of TNFα/RANKL on increasing Id2 protein and its nuclear translocation caused significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of the Cdk inhibitor p21, allowing increased cell proliferation. TNFα levels increase in cystic kidneys in response to macrophage infiltration and thus might contribute to cyst growth and enlargement during the progression of disease. As such, this study elucidates a novel mechanism for TNFα signaling in regulating cystic renal epithelial cell proliferation in ADPKD.

  2. 甲状腺乳头状癌中MCM7、CDK2、p27蛋白的表达及意义%The expression of MCM7, CDK2 and p27 in papillary thyroid carcinoma and their significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史琳; 张安文; 罗宇; 杨燕初

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨MCM7、CDK2及p27蛋白与人甲状腺乳头状癌(papillary thyroid carcinoma,PTC)发生、发展的关系.方法 采用免疫组织化学SP法检测40例PTC、30例甲状腺腺瘤、30例结节性甲状腺肿及20例正常甲状腺组织中MCM7、CDK2、p27蛋白的表达.结果 PTC中MCM7、CDK2蛋白的阳性表达率分别为100.00%(40/40)、80.00%(32/40),两者均明显高于甲状腺腺瘤、结节性甲状腺肿及正常甲状腺组织(P<0.01,P<0.01).PTC中p27蛋白的阳性表达率为22.50%(9/40),明显低于甲状腺腺瘤、结节性甲状腺肿及正常甲状腺组织(P<0.01).PTC中MCM7与CDK2蛋白的表达呈正相关(r=0.550,P<0.01),MCM7、CDK2及p27蛋白的表达呈负相关(r=-0.334,P<0.05;r=-0.413,P<0.01).结论 MCM7、CDK2蛋白的高表达及p27蛋白的低表达变化与PTC可能存在关联,三者联合检测或许可以作为临床早期诊断和评价甲状腺肿瘤细胞增殖活性的潜在的参考指标.%Purpose To explore the expression of MCM7 , CDK2 and p27 in papillary thyroid carcinoma and the mechanisms involved in the carcinogenesis and development of papillary thyroid carcinoma.Methods Immunohistochemical SP method was used to detect the expression of MCM7 , CDK2 and p27 protein in 40 cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma, 30 cases of thyroid adenoma.30 cases of nodular goitre and 20 cases of normal thyroid gland tissue.Results The positive rates of MCM7 and CDK2 expressions in papillary thyroid carcinoma were 100.00%( 40/40 ) and 80.00% (32/40 ).The expression of MCM7 and CDK2 protein in the papillary thyroid carcinoma group was significantly higher than that in the thyroid adenoma.nodular goitre and normal thyroid tissue groups ( P < 0.01 ,P < 0.01 ).The positive rates of p27 expressions in papillary thyroid carcinoma were 22.50%( 9/40 ).The expression of p27 protein in the papillary thyroid carcinoma group was significantly lower than that in the thyroid adenoma.nodular goitre and normal thyroid tissue

  3. A novel approach to the discovery of small molecule ligands of CDK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mathew P.; Alam, Riazul; Betzi, Stephane; Ingles, Donna J.; Zhu, Jin-Yi

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to identify novel small molecule ligands of CDK2 with potential as allosteric inhibitors, we devised a robust and cost-effective fluorescence-based high-throughput screening assay. The assay is based on the specific interaction of CDK2 with the extrinsic fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), which binds to a large allosteric pocket adjacent to the ATP site. Hit compounds which displace ANS directly or indirectly from CDK2 are readily classified as ATP site binders or allosteric ligands through the use of staurosporine, which blocks the ATP site without displacing ANS. Pilot screening of 1,453 compounds led to the discovery of 12 compounds with displacement activities (EC50 values) ranging from 6 to 44 μM, all of which were classified as ATP site-directed ligands. Four new Type I inhibitor scaffolds were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. While this small compound library contained only ATP-site directed ligands, the application of this assay to large compound libraries has the potential to reveal previously unrecognized chemical scaffolds suitable for structure-based design of CDK2 inhibitors with new mechanisms of action. PMID:22893598

  4. Identification of New Substrates for Breast Tumor-Specific LMW Cyclin E/CDk2 Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    electromobility shift of GST-Rb. The two CDK2 mutants generated are the phenylalanine (F) to alanine (A) and a F to glycine (G) exchange at position 80... electromobility shift, only the F80G mutant can use PE-ATP-γ-S. We will use the F80G mutant for all our subsequent experiments. The next steps will be to

  5. Benzamide capped peptidomimetics as non-ATP competitive inhibitors of CDK2 using the REPLACE strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Craig, Sandra N; Liu, Shu; McInnes, Campbell

    2016-08-01

    Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) in complex with cyclin A in G1/S phase of the cell cycle has been shown to promote selective apoptosis of cancer cells through the E2F1 pathway. An alternative approach to catalytic inhibition is to target the substrate recruitment site also known as the cyclin binding groove (CBG) to generate selective non-ATP competitive inhibitors. The REPLACE strategy has been applied to identify fragment alternatives and substituted benzoic acid derivatives were evaluated as a promising scaffold to present appropriate functionality to mimic key peptide determinants. Fragment Ligated Inhibitory Peptides (FLIPs) are described which potently inhibit both CDK2/cyclin A and CDK4/cyclin D1 and have preliminary anti-tumor activity. A structural rationale for binding was obtained through molecular modeling further demonstrating their potential for further development as next generation non ATP competitive CDK inhibitors.

  6. Cdk2 deficiency decreases ras/CDK4-dependent malignant progression, but not myc-induced tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Everardo; Kim, Yongbaek; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2007-10-15

    We have previously shown that forced expression of CDK4 in mouse skin (K5CDK4 mice) results in increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development in a chemical carcinogenesis protocol. This protocol induces skin papilloma development, causing a selection of cells bearing activating Ha-ras mutations. We have also shown that myc-induced epidermal proliferation and oral tumorigenesis (K5Myc mice) depends on CDK4 expression. Biochemical analysis of K5CDK4 and K5Myc epidermis as well as skin tumors showed that keratinocyte proliferation is mediated by CDK4 sequestration of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and activation of CDK2. Here, we studied the role of CDK2 in epithelial tumorigenesis. In normal skin, loss of CDK2 rescues CDK4-induced, but not myc-induced epidermal hyperproliferation. Ablation of CDK2 in K5CDK4 mice results in decreased incidences and multiplicity of skin tumors as well as malignant progression to SCC. Histopathologic analysis showed that K5CDK4 tumors are drastically more aggressive than K5CDK4/CDK2-/- tumors. On the other hand, we show that CDK2 is dispensable for myc-induced tumorigenesis. In contrast to our previous report of K5Myc/CDK4-/-, K5Myc/CDK2-/- mice developed oral tumors with the same frequency as K5Myc mice. Overall, we have established that ras-induced tumors are more susceptible to CDK2 ablation than myc-induced tumors, suggesting that the efficacy of targeting CDK2 in tumor development and malignant progression is dependent on the oncogenic pathway involved.

  7. Phosphorylation of mammalian CDC6 by cyclin A/CDK2 regulates its subcellular localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B O; Lukas, J; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    1999-01-01

    by CDKs. CDC6 interacts specifically with the active Cyclin A/CDK2 complex in vitro and in vivo, but not with Cyclin E or Cyclin B kinase complexes. The cyclin binding domain of CDC6 was mapped to an N-terminal Cy-motif that is similar to the cyclin binding regions in p21(WAF1/SDI1) and E2F-1. The in vivo...

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits cancer cell growth via p27Kip1, CDK2, ERK1/ERK2, and retinoblastoma phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naim A; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Aires, Virginie; Yamashita, Tomoko; Oaxaca-Castillo, David; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2006-10-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a PUFA of the n-3 family, inhibited the growth of FM3A mouse mammary cancer cells by arresting their progression from the late-G(1) to the S phase of the cell cycle. DHA upregulated p27(Kip1) levels by inhibiting phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, i.e., ERK1/ERK2. Indeed, inhibition of ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation by DHA, U0126 [chemical MAPK extracellularly signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor], and MEK(SA) (cells expressing dominant negative constructs of MEK) resulted in the accumulation of p27(Kip1). MAP kinase (MAPK) inhibition by DHA did not increase p27(Kip1) mRNA levels. Rather, this fatty acid stabilized p27(Kip1) contents and inhibited MAPK-dependent proteasomal degradation of this protein. DHA also diminished cyclin E phosphorylation, cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) activity, and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein in these cells. Our study shows that DHA arrests cell growth by modulating the phosphorylation of cell cycle-related proteins.

  9. Explicit treatment of active-site waters enhances quantum mechanical/implicit solvent scoring: Inhibition of CDK2 by new pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylsová, Michaela; Carbain, Benoit; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Musilová, Lenka; Haldar, Susanta; Köprülüoğlu, Cemal; Ajani, Haresh; Brahmkshatriya, Pathik S; Jorda, Radek; Kryštof, Vladimír; Hobza, Pavel; Echalier, Aude; Paruch, Kamil; Lepšík, Martin

    2017-01-27

    We present comprehensive testing of solvent representation in quantum mechanics (QM)-based scoring of protein-ligand affinities. To this aim, we prepared 21 new inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) with the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core, whose activities spanned three orders of magnitude. The crystal structure of a potent inhibitor bound to the active CDK2/cyclin A complex revealed that the biphenyl substituent at position 5 of the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine scaffold was located in a previously unexplored pocket and that six water molecules resided in the active site. Using molecular dynamics, protein-ligand interactions and active-site water H-bond networks as well as thermodynamics were probed. Thereafter, all the inhibitors were scored by the QM approach utilizing the COSMO implicit solvent model. Such a standard treatment failed to produce a correlation with the experiment (R(2) = 0.49). However, the addition of the active-site waters resulted in significant improvement (R(2) = 0.68). The activities of the compounds could thus be interpreted by taking into account their specific noncovalent interactions with CDK2 and the active-site waters. In summary, using a combination of several experimental and theoretical approaches we demonstrate that the inclusion of explicit solvent effects enhance QM/COSMO scoring to produce a reliable structure-activity relationship with physical insights. More generally, this approach is envisioned to contribute to increased accuracy of the computational design of novel inhibitors.

  10. 采用蛋白质组学技术研究 CDK2在肝癌发生中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽梅; 阿茹娜

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察稳定转染细胞周期蛋白依赖性激酶2(cyclin-dependent kinase 2,CDK2)干扰 RNA 对人肝癌细胞株 HepG2蛋白质组表达的变化,探讨 CDK2在肝癌发生中的作用。方法采用双向凝胶电泳-质谱技术比较稳定转染 CDK2干扰 RNA 的 HepG2-CDK2shRNA 细胞株及 HepG2细胞株蛋白质表达的变化。结果经双向电泳-图像分析-质谱技术得到10个差异表达的蛋白质。其中7种[细胞角蛋白18((cytokeratin18,CK18))、热休克蛋白家族成员伴侣素10(chaperonin 10-related protein,Hsp10、HSPE1、CPNl0)、人绒毛膜促性腺激素(hCG2039058)、钾离子通道蛋白3(Kv channel interacting protein 3,Kv3)、嗅觉受体(olfactory receptor,family 2、subfamily L、member 2)、染色体9开放性读码框架3(chromosome 9 open reading frame 3)、ELYS 转录因子样蛋白(ELYS transcription factor-like protein TMBS62)]在 HepG2-CDK2shRNA 细胞中不表达,3种[高迁移率族蛋白1(high-mobility group box 1,HMGB1)、异源核糖核蛋白 H1(heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1,hnRNP H1)、免疫球蛋白重链可变区(immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region,IgVH)]表达下调。结论CDK2表达抑制后人肝癌细胞 HepG2在细胞周期、信号转导、肿瘤转移和浸润等方面的蛋白质表达存在显著差异。

  11. The prolyl isomerase Pin1 acts synergistically with CDK2 to regulate the basal activity of estrogen receptor α in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Lucchetti

    Full Text Available In hormone receptor-positive breast cancers, most tumors in the early stages of development depend on the activity of the estrogen receptor and its ligand, estradiol. Anti-estrogens, such as tamoxifen, have been used as the first line of therapy for over three decades due to the fact that they elicit cell cycle arrest. Unfortunately, after an initial period, most cells become resistant to hormonal therapy. Peptidylprolyl isomerase 1 (Pin1, a protein overexpressed in many tumor types including breast, has been demonstrated to modulate ERalpha activity and is involved in resistance to hormonal therapy. Here we show a new mechanism through which CDK2 drives an ERalpha-Pin1 interaction under hormone- and growth factor-free conditions. The PI3K/AKT pathway is necessary to activate CDK2, which phosphorylates ERalphaSer294, and mediates the binding between Pin1 and ERalpha. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that ERalphaSer294 is essential for Pin1-ERalpha interaction and modulates ERalpha phosphorylation on Ser118 and Ser167, dimerization and activity. These results open up new drug treatment opportunities for breast cancer patients who are resistant to anti-estrogen therapy.

  12. p21 Inhibits Cdk1 in the absence of Cdk2 to maintain the G1/S phase DNA damage checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Ande; Hilton, Mary Beth; Kaldis, Philipp

    2008-01-01

    Cdk1 was proposed to compensate for the loss of Cdk2. Here we present evidence that this is possible due to premature translocation of Cdk1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in the absence of Cdk2. We also investigated the consequence of loss of Cdk2 on the maintenance of the G1/S DNA damage checkpoint. Cdk2(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro as well as regenerating liver cells after partial hepatectomy (PH) in Cdk2(-/-) mice, arrest promptly at the G1/S checkpoint in response to gamma-irradiation due to activation of p53 and p21 inhibiting Cdk1. Furthermore re-entry into S phase after irradiation was delayed in Cdk2(-/-) cells due to prolonged and impaired DNA repair activity. In addition, Cdk2(-/-) mice were more sensitive to lethal irradiation compared to wild-type and displayed delayed resumption of DNA replication in regenerating liver cells. Our results suggest that the G1/S DNA damage checkpoint is intact in the absence of Cdk2, but Cdk2 is important for proper repair of the damaged DNA.

  13. Expression of cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 suppresses tumor cell phenotype by non-cell autonomous mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Zolochevska, Olga; Figueiredo, Marxa L

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of expressing the cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 in epithelial or stromal cell compartments to reduce SCC growth in vitro and in vivo. Cell autonomous and/or non-cell autonomous expression of cdk2ap1 reduced tumor growth and invasion and altered cell cycle, adhesion, invasion, angiogenesis, and apoptotic gene expression, as assessed by several in vitro phenotype assays, quantitative real time PCR, and in vivo molecular imaging using a novel three-way xenograft animal mod...

  14. A conserved cyclin-binding domain determines functional interplay between anaphase-promoting complex-Cdh1 and cyclin A-Cdk2 during cell cycle progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, C; Kramer, E R; Peters, J M;

    2001-01-01

    Periodic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) ubiquitin ligase determines progression through multiple cell cycle transitions by targeting cell cycle regulators for destruction. At the G(1)/S transition, phosphorylation-dependent dissociation of the Cdh1-activating subunit inhibits...... the APC, allowing stabilization of proteins required for subsequent cell cycle progression. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that initiate and maintain Cdh1 phosphorylation have been identified. However, the issue of which cyclin-CDK complexes are involved has been a matter of debate, and the mechanism...... of how cyclin-CDKs interact with APC subunits remains unresolved. Here we substantiate the evidence that mammalian cyclin A-Cdk2 prevents unscheduled APC reactivation during S phase by demonstrating its periodic interaction with Cdh1 at the level of endogenous proteins. Moreover, we identified...

  15. In Silico Identification and In Vitro and In Vivo Validation of Anti-Psychotic Drug Fluspirilene as a Potential CDK2 Inhibitor and a Candidate Anti-Cancer Drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Nan Shi

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Surgical resection and conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy ultimately fail due to tumor recurrence and HCC's resistance. The development of novel therapies against HCC is thus urgently required. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK pathways are important and well-established targets for cancer treatment. In particular, CDK2 is a key factor regulating the cell cycle G1 to S transition and a hallmark for cancers. In this study, we utilized our free and open-source protein-ligand docking software, idock, prospectively to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 FDA-approved small molecule drugs using a repurposing strategy and an ensemble docking methodology. Sorted by average idock score, nine compounds were purchased and tested in vitro. Among them, the anti-psychotic drug fluspirilene exhibited the highest anti-proliferative effect in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Huh7 cells. We demonstrated for the first time that fluspirilene treatment significantly increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase, and decreased the expressions of CDK2, cyclin E and Rb, as well as the phosphorylations of CDK2 on Thr160 and Rb on Ser795. We also examined the anti-cancer effect of fluspirilene in vivo in BALB/C nude mice subcutaneously xenografted with human hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7 cells. Our results showed that oral fluspirilene treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth. Fluspirilene (15 mg/kg exhibited strong anti-tumor activity, comparable to that of the leading cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (10 mg/kg. Moreover, the cocktail treatment with fluspirilene and 5-fluorouracil exhibited the highest therapeutic effect. These results suggested for the first time that fluspirilene is a potential CDK2 inhibitor and a candidate anti-cancer drug for the treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma. In view of the fact that fluspirilene has a long history

  16. Inferring Protein Associations Using Protein Pulldown Assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, Julia L.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Borkowski, John J.; Cannon, William R.

    2007-02-01

    Background: One method to infer protein-protein associations is through a “bait-prey pulldown” assay using a protein affinity agent and an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry)-based protein identification method. False positive and negative protein identifications are not uncommon, however, leading to incorrect inferences. Methods: A pulldown experiment generates a protein association matrix wherein each column represents a sample from one bait protein, each row represents one prey protein and each cell contains a presence/absence association indicator. Our method evaluates the presence/absence pattern across a prey protein (row) with a Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT), computing its p-value with simulated LRT test statistic distributions after a check with simulated binomial random variates disqualified the large sample 2 test. A pulldown experiment often involves hundreds of tests so we apply the false discovery rate method to control the false positive rate. Based on the p-value, each prey protein is assigned a category (specific association, non-specific association, or not associated) and appraised with respect to the pulldown experiment’s goal and design. The method is illustrated using a pulldown experiment investigating the protein complexes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Results: The Monte Carlo simulated LRT p-values objectively reveal specific and ubiquitous prey, as well as potential systematic errors. The example analysis shows the results to be biologically sensible and more realistic than the ad hoc screening methods previously utilized. Conclusions: The method presented appears to be informative for screening for protein-protein associations.

  17. ALDH maintains the stemness of lung adenoma stem cells by suppressing the Notch/CDK2/CCNE pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjun Li

    Full Text Available To evaluate the expression of ALDH1A1 in lung adenoma stem cells (LASCs and maintenance of their stemness through the Notch pathway.LASCs (A549s were isolated from lung adenoma cells (A549 and identified by their coexpression of CD133 and CD326 and their capacity formulti-directional differentiation. Expression of ALDH1A1 in A549 and A549s cells were evaluated by Real-time PCR. Effects of ALDH1A1 upregulation in A549 cells and its downregulation in A549s cells on the clonogenicity and cell cycle were assessed by colony-forming unit assay. Moreover, the effects of ALDH1A1 on the Notch pathway, and thus on the cell cycle, were studied.A549s cells were successfully isolated and identified.ALDH1A1expression was significantly higher in A549s than in A549 cells. Clonogenicity was significantly decreased in A549s cells treated with ALDH1A1 siRNA. Duration of the G1 stage of the cell cycle increased after ALDH1A1 was overexpressed, or decreased with ALDH1A1 siRNA. ALDH1A1, Notch1, -2, and -3, CDK2, and CCNE1 expression levels were higher in A549s cells than in A549 cells. Expression of Notch1, -2, and -3, CDK2, and CCNE1 was significantly decreased by upregulation of ALDH1A1 in A549 cells, but increased by its interruption in A549s cells. When Notch3 or CDK2 expression was downregulated, the expression levels of ALDH1A1, Notch1, -2, and -3, CDK2, and CCNE1 were reduced in all cell types.ALDH1A1 expression improved clonogenicity and inhibited the cell cycle, maintaining the stemness of the A549s cells; this may involve suppression of the Notch/CDK2/Cyclin pathway.

  18. Microtubules, Tubulins and Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raxworthy, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews much of what is known about microtubules, which are biopolymers consisting predominantly of subunits of the globular protein, tubulin. Describes the functions of microtubules, their structure and assembly, microtube associated proteins, and microtubule-disrupting agents. (TW)

  19. Fluorine Substituted 1,2,4-Triazinones as Potential Anti-HIV-1 and CDK2 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. I. Makki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine substituted 1,2,4-triazinones have been synthesized via alkylation, amination, and/or oxidation of 6-(2-amino-5-fluorophenyl-3-thioxo-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-5(2H-one 1 and 4-fluoro-N-(4-fluoro-2-(5-oxo-3-thioxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,2,4-triazin-6-ylphenylbenzamide 5 as possible anti-HIV-1 and CDK2 inhibitors. Alkylation on positions 2 and 4 in 1,2,4-triazinone gave compounds 6–8. Further modification was performed by selective alkylation and amination on position 3 to form compounds 9–15. However oxidation of 5 yielded compounds 16–18. Structures of the target compounds have been established by spectral analysis data. Five compounds (5, 11, 14, 16, and 17 have shown very good anti-HIV activity in MT-4 cells. Similarly, five compounds (1, 3, and 14–16 have exhibited very significant CDK2 inhibition activity. Compounds 14 and 16 were found to have dual anti-HIV and anticancer activities.

  20. Activation of P27kip1-cyclin D1/E-CDK2 pathway by polysaccharide from Phellinus linteus leads to S-phase arrest in HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shi; Ji, Dong-Feng; Li, You-Gui; Lin, Tian-Bao; Lv, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Hua-Ping

    2013-11-25

    Our previous study showed that polysaccharide (P1) from Phellinus linteus exhibits a significant inhibitive activity on human colorectal carcinoma cells (HT-29). However its novel molecular mechanism remains unknown. To obtain insights into P1's mechanism of action, we examined its effects on cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, autophagy, and expression of several cell cycle interrelated proteins in HT-29 cells. Interestingly, we found that volume and weight of the solid tumor significantly decreased in P1 (200mg/kg)-treated mice compared with the control. However, slightly increased the body weight of the P1 treated tumor-bearing mice, with no significant increased ALT, AST levels in serum and LPO concentration in liver and kidney indicated that P1 has no toxicity to mammals at a dose of 200mg/kg. Furthermore, P1 caused a significantly dose-dependent increase in the S-phase cell cycle, but no apoptosis and autophagy in HT-29 cells. RT-PCR and Western blot results showed significantly down-regulated expressions of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and CDK2, as well as increased expressions of P27kip1 in P1 (100 μg/mL)-treated HT-29 cells. These results suggested that the activation of P27kip1-cyclin D1/E-CDK2 pathway is involved in P1-induced S-phase cell cycle arrest in HT-29 cells.

  1. Novel miR-5582-5p functions as a tumor suppressor by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells through direct targeting of GAB1, SHC1, and CDK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hyun-Ju; Kwak, Seo-Young; Yoo, Je-Ok; Kim, Jae-Sung; Bae, In-Hwa; Park, Myung-Jin; Cho, Mee-Yon; Kim, Joon; Han, Young-Hoon

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play pivotal roles in tumorigenesis as either tumor suppressors or oncogenes. In the present study, we discovered and demonstrated the tumor suppressive function of a novel miRNA miR-5582-5p. miR-5582-5p induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells, but not in normal cells. GAB1, SHC1, and CDK2 were identified as direct targets of miR-5582-5p. Knockdown of GAB1/SHC1 or CDK2 phenocopied the apoptotic or cell cycle arrest-inducing function of miR-5582-5p, respectively. The expression of miR-5582-5p was lower in tumor tissues than in adjacent normal tissues of colorectal cancer patients, while the expression of the target proteins exhibited patterns opposite to that of miR-5582-5p. Intratumoral injection of a miR-5582-5p mimic or induced expression of miR-5582-5p in tumor cells suppressed tumor growth in HCT116 xenografts. Collectively, our results suggest a novel tumor suppressive function for miR-5582-5p and its potential applicability for tumor control.

  2. Bufalin induces G0/G1 phase arrest through inhibiting the levels of cyclin D, cyclin E, CDK2 and CDK4, and triggers apoptosis via mitochondrial signaling pathway in T24 human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Wen; Yang, Jai-Sing; Pai, Shu-Jen; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chang, Shu-Jen; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Fan, Ming-Jen; Chiou, Shang-Ming; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Yeh, Chin-Chung; Chen, Po-Yuan; Tsuzuki, Minoru; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-04-01

    Most of the chemotherapy treatments for bladder cancer aim to kill the cancer cells, but a high recurrence rate after medical treatments is still occurred. Bufalin from the skin and parotid venom glands of toad has been shown to induce apoptotic cell death in many types of cancer cell lines. However, there is no report addressing that bufalin induced cell death in human bladder cancer cells. The purpose of this study was investigated the mechanisms of bufalin-induced apoptosis in a human bladder cancer cell line (T24). We demonstrated the effects of bufalin on the cell growth and apoptosis in T24 cells by using DAPI/TUNEL double staining, a PI exclusion and flow cytometric analysis. The effects of bufalin on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the level of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and DNA content including sub-G1 (apoptosis) in T24 cells were also determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of G(0)/G(1) phase-regulated and apoptosis-associated protein levels in bufalin-treated T24 cells. The results indicated that bufalin significantly decreased the percentage of viability, induced the G(0)/G(1) phase arrest and triggered apoptosis in T24 cells. The down-regulation of the protein levels for cyclin D, CDK4, cyclin E, CDK2, phospho-Rb, phospho-AKT and Bcl-2 with the simultaneous up-regulation of the cytochrome c, Apaf-1, AIF, caspase-3, -7 and -9 and Bax protein expressions and caspase activities were observed in T24 cells after bufalin treatment. Based on our results, bufalin induces apoptotic cell death in T24 cells through suppressing AKT activity and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein as well as inducing pro-apoptotic Bax protein. The levels of caspase-3, -7 and -9 are also mediated apoptosis in bufalin-treated T24 cells. Therefore, bufalin might be used as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of human bladder cancer in the future.

  3. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated protein induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human hepatocellular carcinoma by activating the p53–Fbxw7 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haihe [The Key Laboratory of Molecular Diagnosis in Laboratory Medicine, Department of Pathogenobiology, Daqing Branch of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China); Yang, Zhanchun [Department of General Surgery of Fifth Clinical Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China); Liu, Chunbo; Huang, Shishun; Wang, Hongzhi; Chen, Yingli [The Key Laboratory of Molecular Diagnosis in Laboratory Medicine, Department of Pathogenobiology, Daqing Branch of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China); Chen, Guofu, E-mail: zhangyanjie3@aliyun.com [Department of General Surgery of Fifth Clinical Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. • RITA can significantly inhibit the in vitro growth of SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. • RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC. - Abstract: Aberrant Notch signaling is observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and has been associated with the modulation of cell growth. However, the role of Notch signaling in HCC and its underlying mechanism remain elusive. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated (RITA) mediates the nuclear export of RBP-J to tubulin fibers and downregulates Notch-mediated transcription. In this study, we found that RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. These changes led to growth inhibition and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. Our findings indicate that RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC.

  4. Constitutive Cdk2 activity promotes aneuploidy while altering the spindle assembly and tetraploidy checkpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Stephan C; Corsino, Patrick E; Davis, Bradley J;

    2013-01-01

    instability. Expression of these complexes in the MCF10A cell line leads to retinoblastoma protein (Rb) hyperphosphorylation, a subsequent increase in proliferation rate, and increased expression of the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2. This results in a strengthening of the spindle assembly...

  5. Constitutive CCND1/CDK2 activity substitutes for p53 loss, or MYC or oncogenic RAS expression in the transformation of human mammary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Junk

    Full Text Available Cancer develops following the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that inactivate tumor suppressor genes and activate proto-oncogenes. Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK activity has oncogenic potential in breast cancer due to its ability to inactivate key tumor suppressor networks and drive aberrant proliferation. Accumulation or over-expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1 occurs in a majority of breast cancers and over-expression of CCND1 leads to accumulation of activated CCND1/CDK2 complexes in breast cancer cells. We describe here the role of constitutively active CCND1/CDK2 complexes in human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC transformation. A genetically-defined, stepwise HMEC transformation model was generated by inhibiting p16 and p53 with shRNA, and expressing exogenous MYC and mutant RAS. By replacing components of this model, we demonstrate that constitutive CCND1/CDK2 activity effectively confers anchorage independent growth by inhibiting p53 or replacing MYC or oncogenic RAS expression. These findings are consistent with several clinical observations of luminal breast cancer sub-types that show elevated CCND1 typically occurs in specimens that retain wild-type p53, do not amplify MYC, and contain no RAS mutations. Taken together, these data suggest that targeted inhibition of constitutive CCND1/CDK2 activity may enhance the effectiveness of current treatments for luminal breast cancer.

  6. Microfibrillar-Associated Protein 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sækmose, Susanne Gjørup; Mössner, Belinda; Christensen, Peer Brehm

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: A method for assessment of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis without the need for a liver biopsy is desirable. Microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) is a suggested biomarker for identification of high-risk patients with severe fibrosis stages. This study aimed to examine...

  7. Microfibrillar-associated protein 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sofie Lock; Roberts, Nassim Bazeghi; Schlosser, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) is a matricellular glycoprotein that co-localises with elastic fibres and is highly expressed in the lungs. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that plasma MFAP4 (pMFAP4) reflects clinical outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary...

  8. The Role of Cdkn1A-Interacting Zinc Finger Protein 1 (CIZ1 in DNA Replication and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cdkn1A-interacting zinc finger protein 1 (CIZ1 was first identified in a yeast-2-hybrid system searching for interacting proteins of CDK2 inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1. Ciz1 also binds to CDK2, cyclin A, cyclin E, CDC6, PCNA, TCF4 and estrogen receptor-α. Recent studies reveal numerous biological functions of CIZ1 in DNA replication, cell proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, splicing variants of CIZ1 mRNA is associated with a variety of cancers and Alzheimer’s disease, and mutations of the CIZ1 gene lead to cervical dystonia. CIZ1 expression is increased in cancers and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we will summarize the biological functions and molecular mechanisms of CIZ1 in these physiological and pathological processes.

  9. Parathyroid hormone-related protein enhances human ß-cell proliferation and function with associated induction of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and cyclin E expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthalu Kondegowda, Nagesha; Joshi-Gokhale, Sheela; Harb, George; Williams, Katoura; Zhang, Xiao Ying; Takane, Karen K; Zhang, Pili; Scott, Donald K; Stewart, Andrew F; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Vasavada, Rupangi C

    2010-12-01

    Inducing human β-cell growth while enhancing function is a major goal in the treatment of diabetes. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) enhances rodent β-cell growth and function through the parathyroid hormone-1 receptor (PTH1R). Based on this, we hypothesized that PTH1R is expressed in human β-cells and that PTHrP has the potential to enhance human β-cell proliferation and/or function. PTH1R expression, β-cell proliferation, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and expression of differentiation and cell-cycle genes were analyzed in human islets transduced with adenoviral PTHrP constructs or treated with PTHrP peptides. The effect of overexpression of late G1/S cell cycle molecules was also assessed on human β-cell proliferation. We found that human β-cells express PTH1R. More importantly, overexpression of PTHrP causes a significant approximately threefold increase in human β-cell proliferation. Furthermore, the amino terminus PTHrP(1-36) peptide is sufficient to increase replication as well as expression of the late G1/S cell-cycle proteins cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) in human islets. Notably, PTHrP(1-36) also enhances GSIS. Finally, overexpression of cyclin E alone, but not cdk2, augments human β-cell proliferation, and when both molecules are expressed simultaneously there is a further marked synergistic increase in replication. PTHrP(1-36) peptide enhances human β-cell proliferation as well as function, with associated upregulation of two specific cell-cycle activators that together can induce human β-cell proliferation several fold. The future therapeutic potential of PTHrP(1-36) for the treatment of diabetes is especially relevant given the complementary therapeutic efficacy of PTHrP(1-36) in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  10. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Pyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidine CDK2 Inhibitors as Anti-Tumor Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Moghazy, Samir M.; Ibrahim, Diaa A.; Abdelgawad, Nagwa M.; Farag, Nahla A. H.; El-Khouly, Ahmad S.

    2011-01-01

    A series of 2,5,7-trisubstituted pyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidine cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK2) inhibitors is designed and synthesized. 6-Amino-2-thiouracil is reacted with an aldehyde and thiourea to prepare the pyrimido[4,5-d]-pyrimidines. Alkylation and amination of the latter ones give different amino derivatives. These compounds show potent and selective CDK inhibitory activities and inhibit in vitro cellular proliferation in cultured human tumor cells. PMID:21886895

  11. Inhibition of the melanoma cell cycle and regulation at the G1/S transition by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) by modulation of CDK2 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppock, D L; Buffolino, P; Kopman, C; Nathanson, L

    1995-11-01

    The growth of malignant melanoma cells is inhibited by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) while the growth of normal melanocytes is stimulated. We previously demonstrated that TPA inhibits the growth of Demel melanoma cells and leads to arrest at both at the G1/S and G2/M cell cycle transitions. To investigate the mechanism by which TPA arrests melanoma cell growth at the G1/S transition we have examined its effects on the levels of cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and activation of CDK2 kinase activity. Addition of TPA in G1 blocked the increase in the level of p34cdc2 mRNA, but not of CDK2 mRNA. When TPA was added in G1, it inhibited the mobility shift of CDK2 reflecting a change in phosphorylation state. This corresponded to inhibition of the increase in CDK2 histone H1 kinase activity. There was little effect on the level of CDK4. Treatment with TPA during G1 caused a three to four fold increase in cyclin D1 mRNA expression, but blocked the increase in the expression of cyclin A and cyclin B mRNAs later in the cell cycle. TPA caused a small increase in levels of cyclin D1 and had little effect on cyclin E, suggesting these G1 cyclins were not limiting. Addition of TPA in G1 prevented an increase in cyclin A levels, suggesting cyclin A might play an important role in mediating the growth inhibition. Examination of the levels of the CDK inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 showed that the level of these inhibitors was higher in G1 and dropped as cells entered S phase. In the presence of TPA this decrease did not occur. These results demonstrate that TPA blocks the G1/S transition in Demel melanoma cells in late G1 by mechanisms which regulate phosphorylation and activation of the CDK2 kinase. These mechanisms include preventing the decrease in p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 kinase inhibitors and limiting the amount of cyclin A.

  12. CDK4 T172 phosphorylation is central in a CDK7-dependent bidirectional CDK4/CDK2 interplay mediated by p21 phosphorylation at the restriction point.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Bisteau

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell cycle progression, including genome duplication, is orchestrated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. CDK activation depends on phosphorylation of their T-loop by a CDK-activating kinase (CAK. In animals, the only known CAK for CDK2 and CDK1 is cyclin H-CDK7, which is constitutively active. Therefore, the critical activation step is dephosphorylation of inhibitory sites by Cdc25 phosphatases rather than unrestricted T-loop phosphorylation. Homologous CDK4 and CDK6 bound to cyclins D are master integrators of mitogenic/oncogenic signaling cascades by initiating the inactivation of the central oncosuppressor pRb and cell cycle commitment at the restriction point. Unlike the situation in CDK1 and CDK2 cyclin complexes, and in contrast to the weak but constitutive T177 phosphorylation of CDK6, we have identified the T-loop phosphorylation at T172 as the highly regulated step determining CDK4 activity. Whether both CDK4 and CDK6 phosphorylations are catalyzed by CDK7 remains unclear. To answer this question, we took a chemical-genetics approach by using analogue-sensitive CDK7(as/as mutant HCT116 cells, in which CDK7 can be specifically inhibited by bulky adenine analogs. Intriguingly, CDK7 inhibition prevented activating phosphorylations of CDK4/6, but for CDK4 this was at least partly dependent on its binding to p21 (cip1 . In response to CDK7 inhibition, p21-binding to CDK4 increased concomitantly with disappearance of the most abundant phosphorylation of p21, which we localized at S130 and found to be catalyzed by both CDK4 and CDK2. The S130A mutation of p21 prevented the activating CDK4 phosphorylation, and inhibition of CDK4/6 and CDK2 impaired phosphorylations of both p21 and p21-bound CDK4. Therefore, specific CDK7 inhibition revealed the following: a crucial but partly indirect CDK7 involvement in phosphorylation/activation of CDK4 and CDK6; existence of CDK4-activating kinase(s other than CDK7; and novel CDK7-dependent positive

  13. Iron depletion results in Src kinase inhibition with associated cell cycle arrest in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardana, Gamini; Seligman, Paul A

    2015-03-01

    Iron is required for cellular proliferation. Recently, using systematic time studies of neuroblastoma cell growth, we better defined the G1 arrest caused by iron chelation to a point in mid-G1, where cyclin E protein is present, but the cyclin E/CDK2 complex kinase activity is inhibited. In this study, we again used the neuroblastoma SKNSH cells lines to pinpoint the mechanism responsible for this G1 block. Initial studies showed in the presence of DFO, these cells have high levels of p27 and after reversal of iron chelation p27 is degraded allowing for CDK2 kinase activity. The initial activation of CDK2 kinase allows cells to exit G1 and enter S phase. Furthermore, we found that inhibition of p27 degradation by DFO is directly associated with inhibition of Src kinase activity measured by lack of phosphorylation of Src at the 416 residue. Activation of Src kinase occurs very early after reversal from the DFO G1 block and is temporally associated with initiation of cellular proliferation associated with entry into S phase. For the first time therefore we show that iron chelation inhibits Src kinase activity and this activity is a requirement for cellular proliferation.

  14. Mammalian E-type cyclins control chromosome pairing, telomere stability and CDK2 localization in male meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Martinerie

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Loss of function of cyclin E1 or E2, important regulators of the mitotic cell cycle, yields viable mice, but E2-deficient males display reduced fertility. To elucidate the role of E-type cyclins during spermatogenesis, we characterized their expression patterns and produced additional deletions of Ccne1 and Ccne2 alleles in the germline, revealing unexpected meiotic functions. While Ccne2 mRNA and protein are abundantly expressed in spermatocytes, Ccne1 mRNA is present but its protein is detected only at low levels. However, abundant levels of cyclin E1 protein are detected in spermatocytes deficient in cyclin E2 protein. Additional depletion of E-type cyclins in the germline resulted in increasingly enhanced spermatogenic abnormalities and corresponding decreased fertility and loss of germ cells by apoptosis. Profound meiotic defects were observed in spermatocytes, including abnormal pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, heterologous chromosome associations, unrepaired double-strand DNA breaks, disruptions in telomeric structure and defects in cyclin-dependent-kinase 2 localization. These results highlight a new role for E-type cyclins as important regulators of male meiosis.

  15. Identifying allosteric fluctuation transitions between different protein conformational states as applied to Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Jenny

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms underlying protein function and associated conformational change are dominated by a series of local entropy fluctuations affecting the global structure yet are mediated by only a few key residues. Transitional Dynamic Analysis (TDA is a new method to detect these changes in local protein flexibility between different conformations arising from, for example, ligand binding. Additionally, Positional Impact Vertex for Entropy Transfer (PIVET uses TDA to identify important residue contact changes that have a large impact on global fluctuation. We demonstrate the utility of these methods for Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2, a system with crystal structures of this protein in multiple functionally relevant conformations and experimental data revealing the importance of local fluctuation changes for protein function. Results TDA and PIVET successfully identified select residues that are responsible for conformation specific regional fluctuation in the activation cycle of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2. The detected local changes in protein flexibility have been experimentally confirmed to be essential for the regulation and function of the kinase. The methodologies also highlighted possible errors in previous molecular dynamic simulations that need to be resolved in order to understand this key player in cell cycle regulation. Finally, the use of entropy compensation as a possible allosteric mechanism for protein function is reported for CDK2. Conclusion The methodologies embodied in TDA and PIVET provide a quick approach to identify local fluctuation change important for protein function and residue contacts that contributes to these changes. Further, these approaches can be used to check for possible errors in protein dynamic simulations and have the potential to facilitate a better understanding of the contribution of entropy to protein allostery and function.

  16. Induction of cell cycle arrest via the p21, p27–cyclin E,A/Cdk2 pathway in SMMC-7721 hepatoma cells by clioquinol

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    Huang Zhiwei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clioquinol has been shown to have anticancer activity in several carcinoma cells. In this study, we preliminarily examined the effect of clioquinol in human SMMC-7721 hepatoma and QSG-7701 normal hepatic cells. Our results indicated that clioquinol did not significantly affect survival of QSG-7701 cells, whereas it reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in SMMC-7721 cells. Clioquinol did not trigger autophagy and apoptosis, while it induced cell cycle arrest in the S-phase in SMMC- 7721 cells. Additionally, down-regulation of cyclin D1, A2, E1, Cdk2 and up-regulation of p21, p27 were detected after the treatment with clioquinol. The results demonstrated for the first time that clioquinol suppressed cell cycle progression in the S-phase in SMMC-7721 cells via the p21, p27-cyclin E,A/Cdk2 pathway. This suggests that clioquinol may have a therapeutic potential as an anticancer drug for certain malignances.

  17. Phenethyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression and the levels of protein associated with cell cycle regulation in human glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Chang, Shu-Jen; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain malignancy. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a member of the isothiocyanate family, can induce apoptosis in many human cancer cells. Our previous study disclosed that PEITC induces apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway, dysfunction of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathway in human brain glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) 8401 cells. To the best of our knowledge, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the genetic levels of GBM 8401 cells in vitro. PEITC may induce G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest through affecting the proteins such as cdk2, cyclin E, and p21 in GBM 8401 cells. Many genes associated with cell-cycle regulation of GBM 8401 cells were changed after PEITC treatment: 48 genes were upregulated and 118 were downregulated. The cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), Budding uninhibited by benzimidazole 1 homolog beta (BUB1B), and cyclin B1 were downregulated, and clusterin was upregulated in GBM 8401 cells treated with PEITC. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of PEITC on the genetic levels and potential biomarkers for glioblastoma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 176-187, 2017.

  18. Parathyroid Hormone–Related Protein Enhances Human β-Cell Proliferation and Function With Associated Induction of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 and Cyclin E Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthalu Kondegowda, Nagesha; Joshi-Gokhale, Sheela; Harb, George; Williams, Katoura; Zhang, Xiao Ying; Takane, Karen K.; Zhang, Pili; Scott, Donald K.; Stewart, Andrew F.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Vasavada, Rupangi C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Inducing human β-cell growth while enhancing function is a major goal in the treatment of diabetes. Parathyroid hormone–related protein (PTHrP) enhances rodent β-cell growth and function through the parathyroid hormone-1 receptor (PTH1R). Based on this, we hypothesized that PTH1R is expressed in human β-cells and that PTHrP has the potential to enhance human β-cell proliferation and/or function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS PTH1R expression, β-cell proliferation, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and expression of differentiation and cell-cycle genes were analyzed in human islets transduced with adenoviral PTHrP constructs or treated with PTHrP peptides. The effect of overexpression of late G1/S cell cycle molecules was also assessed on human β-cell proliferation. RESULTS We found that human β-cells express PTH1R. More importantly, overexpression of PTHrP causes a significant approximately threefold increase in human β-cell proliferation. Furthermore, the amino terminus PTHrP(1-36) peptide is sufficient to increase replication as well as expression of the late G1/S cell-cycle proteins cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) in human islets. Notably, PTHrP(1-36) also enhances GSIS. Finally, overexpression of cyclin E alone, but not cdk2, augments human β-cell proliferation, and when both molecules are expressed simultaneously there is a further marked synergistic increase in replication. CONCLUSIONS PTHrP(1-36) peptide enhances human β-cell proliferation as well as function, with associated upregulation of two specific cell-cycle activators that together can induce human β-cell proliferation several fold. The future therapeutic potential of PTHrP(1-36) for the treatment of diabetes is especially relevant given the complementary therapeutic efficacy of PTHrP(1-36) in postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:20876711

  19. Chk1 is activated at the midblastula transition in Xenopus laevis embryos independently of DNA content and the cyclin E/Cdk2 developmental timer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjerid, Nassiba; Wroble, Brian N; Sible, Jill C

    2008-04-15

    Cell cycle checkpoints that are engaged in response to damaged and unreplicated DNA may serve additional, constitutive functions. In the developing Xenopus laevis embryo, the checkpoint kinase Chk1 is transiently activated at the midblastula transition (MBT), a period of extensive cell cycle remodeling including the acquisition of cell cycle checkpoints. The timing of many cell cycle remodeling events at the MBT, such as the lengthening of cell cycles, depends upon a critical nucleocytoplasmic (N/C) ratio. However, other events, including the degradation of maternal cyclin E, do not depend upon the N/C ratio, and are regulated by an autonomous developmental timer. To better understand what regulates Chk1 activation at the MBT, embryos were treated with aphidicolin, at different developmental times and for different lengths of time, to reduce the DNA content at the MBT. Chk1 was activated at the MBT in these embryos establishing that Chk1 activation occurs independently of the N/C ratio. Cdc25A is normally phosphorylated by Chk1 at the MBT and then degraded. The degradation of Cdc25A demonstrated partial dependence on DNA content, suggesting that factors other than Chk1 regulate its degradation. When the cyclin E developmental timer was disrupted with the Cdk2 inhibitor delta34-Xic1, Chk1 was still activated at the MBT, indicating that activation of Chk1 at the MBT was not directly linked to the cyclin E timer. Conversely, unreplicated or damaged DNA, delayed the degradation of cyclin E at the MBT, indicating that the cyclin E/Cdk2 timer is sensitive to engagement of cell cycle checkpoints.

  20. The change of CyclinE and CDK2's expression in Intermedin pretreatment in rat renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and repair%Intermedin预处理大鼠肾脏缺血再灌注损伤修复过程中CyclinE和CDK2表达的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高雁鸿; 褚宇东; 周晓霜; 李荣山

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Intermedin(IMD)pretreatment in rat renal ischemia-reperfusion injury(IRI)during the repair process cyclin E(cyclinE)and its dependent kinase 2(CDK2)expression changes,IMD may promote kidney tissue regeneration and repair mechanisms.Methods Male Wistar rats weighing 180~220g,144were randomly divided into control group,IRI group,empty vector transfected group,turn IMD group.Control group and the removal of the right kidney IRI group; turn empty plasmid group,turn right kidney removed after the IMDgroup,the sulfur hexafluoride microbubbles(SonoVue)mediated plasmid and empty plasmid transfected into the left renal IMD ; were made after 1 week of renal IRI model.Each group in the reperfusion 1d,2d,3d,4d,7d,14dfrom each of six specimens from the time of renal tissues.Renal tissue were detected by cyclinE and CDK2 expression.Results IRI group cyclin E,CDK2 after reperfusion 1 d,2d,3d,4d,7d expression gradually increased,7d reach the peak time,then gradually decreased expression,14d when the minimum,but there is still a small amount of expression,compared with the control group the difference was significant(p < 0.05).IMD Group switch indicators began in 1d significantly increased on 2d,3d,4d,7d decreased progressively,from 14d to resume normal,compared with the IRI and the differences were statistically significant(p < 0.05); empty vector transfected group and the IRI group no significant difference between the above indicators.Conclusions IMD pretreatment in rat kidney after ischemia and reperfusion injury early,cyclinE,CDK2 expression was significantly increased,suggesting that IMD could promote cell cycle progression through to speed up the regeneration of kidney tissue.%目的 观察Intermedin(IMD)预处理大鼠肾脏缺血再灌注损伤(IRI)修复过程中细胞周期蛋白E(cyclinE)和其依赖性激酶2(CDK2)表达的变化,IMD可能的促进肾组织再生修复的作用机制.方法 健康雄性Wistar大鼠,体重180~220g,共144只随机分

  1. Lin-28 homologue A (LIN28A) promotes cell cycle progression via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and cell division cycle 25 homolog A (CDC25A) expression in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-05-18

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1-17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent).

  2. Lin-28 Homologue A (LIN28A) Promotes Cell Cycle Progression via Regulation of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2), Cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Cell Division Cycle 25 Homolog A (CDC25A) Expression in Cancer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L.; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1–17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent). PMID:22467868

  3. Cell cycle actions of parathyroid hormone-related protein in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgrain, Philippe R.; Quintana, Rick; Rascon, Yvette; Deftos, Leonard J.; Healy, Erin

    2009-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a paraneoplastic protein expressed by two-thirds of human non-small cell lung cancers, has been reported to slow progression of lung carcinomas in mouse models and to lengthen survival of patients with lung cancer. This study investigated the effects of ectopic expression of PTHrP on proliferation and cell cycle progression of two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines that are normally PTHrP negative. Stable transfection with PTHrP decreased H1944 cell DNA synthesis, measured by thymidine incorporation, bromodeoxyuridine uptake, and MTT proliferation assay. A substantial fraction of PTHrP-positive cells was arrested in or slowly progressing through G1. Cyclin D2 and cyclin A2 protein levels were 60–70% lower in PTHrP-expressing cells compared with control cells (P PTHrP. Expression of other cyclins, including cyclins D1 and D3, and cyclin-dependent kinases was unaffected by PTHrP. PTHrP did not alter the phosphorylation state of Rb, but decreased cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2-cyclin A2 complex formation. Ectopic expression of PTHrP stimulated ERK phosphorylation. In MV522 cells, PTHrP had similar effects on DNA synthesis, cyclin A2 expression, pRb levels, CDK2-cyclin A2 association, and ERK activation. In summary, PTHrP appears to slow progression of lung cancer cells into S phase, possibly by decreasing activation of CDK2. Slower cancer cell proliferation could contribute to slower tumor progression and increased survival of patients with PTHrP-positive lung cancer. PMID:19633068

  4. Evolution of organelle-associated protein profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raines, Elaine W

    2009-02-15

    Identification of the protein constituents of cell organelles forms the basis for studies to define the roles of specific proteins in organelle structure and functions. Over the past decade, the use of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has dissected various organelles and allowed the association of many novel proteins with particular organelles. This review chronicles the evolution of organelle proteomics technology, and discusses how many limitations, such as organelle heterogeneity and purity, can be avoided with recently developed quantitative profiling approaches. Although many challenges remain, quantitative profiling of organelles holds the promise to begin to address the complex and dynamic shuttling of proteins among organelles that will be critical for application of this advanced technology to disease-based changes in organelle function.

  5. Tracking membrane protein association in model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Reffay

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue.We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well.After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 A, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the

  6. Tumors initiated by constitutive Cdk2 activation exhibit transforming growth factor beta resistance and acquire paracrine mitogenic stimulation during progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corsino, P.; Davis, B.; Law, M.;

    2007-01-01

    sites. Together, these results suggest that deregulation of the Cdk/Rb/E2F axis reprograms mammary epithelial cells to initiate a paracrine loop with tumor-associated fibroblasts involving TGF beta and HGF, resulting in desmoplasia. The MMTV-DIK2 mice should provide a useful model system...... for the development of therapeutic approaches to block the stromal desmoplastic reaction that likely plays an important role in the progression of multiple types of human tumors...

  7. Sneddon syndrome associated with Protein S deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Refah; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Tombul, Temel

    2012-01-01

    Sneddon syndrome (SS) is rare, arterio-occlusive disorder characterized by generalized livedo racemosa of the skin and various central nervous symptoms due to occlusion of medium-sized arteries of unknown. Seizure, cognitive impairment, hypertension, and history of repetitive miscarriages are the other symptoms seen in this disease. Livedo racemosa involves persisting irreversible skin lesions red or blue in color with irregular margins. Usually, SS occurs in women of childbearing age. Protein S deficiency is an inherited or acquired disorder associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We present a 33-year-old woman with SS with diffuse livedo racemosa, recurrent cerebrovascular diseases, migraine-type headache, sinus vein thrombosis, and protein S deficiency. Protein S deficiency and with Sneddon syndrome rarely encountered in the literature.

  8. Sneddon syndrome associated with Protein S deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refah Sayin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sneddon syndrome (SS is rare, arterio-occlusive disorder characterized by generalized livedo racemosa of the skin and various central nervous symptoms due to occlusion of medium-sized arteries of unknown. Seizure, cognitive impairment, hypertension, and history of repetitive miscarriages are the other symptoms seen in this disease. Livedo racemosa involves persisting irreversible skin lesions red or blue in color with irregular margins. Usually, SS occurs in women of childbearing age. Protein S deficiency is an inherited or acquired disorder associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We present a 33-year-old woman with SS with diffuse livedo racemosa, recurrent cerebrovascular diseases, migraine-type headache, sinus vein thrombosis, and protein S deficiency. Protein S deficiency and with Sneddon syndrome rarely encountered in the literature.

  9. CDK2 and PKA mediated-sequential phosphorylation is critical for p19INK4d function in the DNA damage response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela C Marazita

    Full Text Available DNA damage triggers a phosphorylation-based signaling cascade known as the DNA damage response. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK4/6 inhibitors, has been reported to participate in the DNA damage response promoting DNA repair and cell survival. Here, we provide mechanistic insight into the activation mechanism of p19INK4d linked to the response to DNA damage. Results showed that p19INK4d becomes phosphorylated following UV radiation, β-amyloid peptide and cisplatin treatments. ATM-Chk2/ATR-Chk1 signaling pathways were found to be differentially involved in p19INK4d phosphorylation depending on the type of DNA damage. Two sequential phosphorylation events at serine 76 and threonine 141 were identified using p19INK4d single-point mutants in metabolic labeling assays with (32P-orthophosphate. CDK2 and PKA were found to participate in p19INK4d phosphorylation process and that they would mediate serine 76 and threonine 141 modifications respectively. Nuclear translocation of p19INK4d induced by DNA damage was shown to be dependent on serine 76 phosphorylation. Most importantly, both phosphorylation sites were found to be crucial for p19INK4d function in DNA repair and cell survival. In contrast, serine 76 and threonine 141 were dispensable for CDK4/6 inhibition highlighting the independence of p19INK4d functions, in agreement with our previous findings. These results constitute the first description of the activation mechanism of p19INK4d in response to genotoxic stress and demonstrate the functional relevance of this activation following DNA damage.

  10. A Novel High-Throughput 3D Screening System for EMT Inhibitors: A Pilot Screening Discovered the EMT Inhibitory Activity of CDK2 Inhibitor SU9516

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Takanori; Rahman, M. Mamunur; Sakamoto, Ruriko; Masuda, Norio; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Calderwood, Stuart K.; Kozaki, Ken-ichi; Itoh, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial pathological event in cancer, particularly in tumor cell budding and metastasis. Therefore, control of EMT can represent a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer. Here, we introduce an innovative three-dimensional (3D) high-throughput screening (HTS) system that leads to an identification of EMT inhibitors. For the establishment of the novel 3D-HTS system, we chose NanoCulture Plates (NCP) that provided a gel-free micro-patterned scaffold for cells and were independent of other spheroid formation systems using soft-agar. In the NCP-based 3D cell culture system, A549 lung cancer cells migrated, gathered, and then formed multiple spheroids within 7 days. Live cell imaging experiments showed that an established EMT-inducer TGF-β promoted peripheral cells around the core of spheroids to acquire mesenchymal spindle shapes, loss of intercellular adhesion, and migration from the spheroids. Along with such morphological change, EMT-related gene expression signatures were altered, particularly alteration of mRNA levels of ECAD/CDH1, NCAD/CDH2, VIM and ZEB1/TCF8. These EMT-related phenotypic changes were blocked by SB431542, a TGF-βreceptor I (TGFβR1) inhibitor. Inside of the spheroids were highly hypoxic; in contrast, spheroid-derived peripheral migrating cells were normoxic, revealed by visualization and quantification using Hypoxia Probe. Thus, TGF-β-triggered EMT caused spheroid hypoplasia and loss of hypoxia. Spheroid EMT inhibitory (SEMTIN) activity of SB431542 was calculated from fluorescence intensities of the Hypoxia Probe, and then was utilized in a drug screening of EMT-inhibitory small molecule compounds. In a pilot screening, 9 of 1,330 compounds were above the thresholds of the SEMTIN activity and cell viability. Finally, two compounds SB-525334 and SU9516 showed SEMTIN activities in a dose dependent manner. SB-525334 was a known TGFβR1 inhibitor. SU9516 was a cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) inhibitor

  11. A Novel High-Throughput 3D Screening System for EMT Inhibitors: A Pilot Screening Discovered the EMT Inhibitory Activity of CDK2 Inhibitor SU9516.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kazuya; Eguchi, Takanori; Rahman, M Mamunur; Sakamoto, Ruriko; Masuda, Norio; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Calderwood, Stuart K; Kozaki, Ken-Ichi; Itoh, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial pathological event in cancer, particularly in tumor cell budding and metastasis. Therefore, control of EMT can represent a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer. Here, we introduce an innovative three-dimensional (3D) high-throughput screening (HTS) system that leads to an identification of EMT inhibitors. For the establishment of the novel 3D-HTS system, we chose NanoCulture Plates (NCP) that provided a gel-free micro-patterned scaffold for cells and were independent of other spheroid formation systems using soft-agar. In the NCP-based 3D cell culture system, A549 lung cancer cells migrated, gathered, and then formed multiple spheroids within 7 days. Live cell imaging experiments showed that an established EMT-inducer TGF-β promoted peripheral cells around the core of spheroids to acquire mesenchymal spindle shapes, loss of intercellular adhesion, and migration from the spheroids. Along with such morphological change, EMT-related gene expression signatures were altered, particularly alteration of mRNA levels of ECAD/CDH1, NCAD/CDH2, VIM and ZEB1/TCF8. These EMT-related phenotypic changes were blocked by SB431542, a TGF-βreceptor I (TGFβR1) inhibitor. Inside of the spheroids were highly hypoxic; in contrast, spheroid-derived peripheral migrating cells were normoxic, revealed by visualization and quantification using Hypoxia Probe. Thus, TGF-β-triggered EMT caused spheroid hypoplasia and loss of hypoxia. Spheroid EMT inhibitory (SEMTIN) activity of SB431542 was calculated from fluorescence intensities of the Hypoxia Probe, and then was utilized in a drug screening of EMT-inhibitory small molecule compounds. In a pilot screening, 9 of 1,330 compounds were above the thresholds of the SEMTIN activity and cell viability. Finally, two compounds SB-525334 and SU9516 showed SEMTIN activities in a dose dependent manner. SB-525334 was a known TGFβR1 inhibitor. SU9516 was a cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) inhibitor

  12. Structure prediction of magnetosome-associated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila eNudelman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB are Gram-negative bacteria that can navigate along geomagnetic fields. This ability is a result of a unique intracellular organelle, the magnetosome. These organelles are composed of membrane-enclosed magnetite (Fe3O4 or greigite (Fe3S4 crystals ordered into chains along the cell. Magnetosome formation, assembly and magnetic nano-crystal biomineralization are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins (MAPs. Most MAP-encoding genes are located in a conserved genomic region – the magnetosome island (MAI. The MAI appears to be conserved in all MTB that were analyzed so far, although the MAI size and organization differs between species. It was shown that MAI deletion leads to a non-magnetic phenotype, further highlighting its important role in magnetosome formation. Today, about 28 proteins are known to be involved in magnetosome formation, but the structures and functions of most MAPs are unknown. To reveal the structure-function relationship of MAPs we used bioinformatics tools in order to build homology models as a way to understand their possible role in magnetosome formation. Here we present a predicted 3D structural models’ overview for all known Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 MAPs.

  13. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 phosphorylates s/t-p sites in the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain and is incorporated into viral capsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludgate, Laurie; Ning, Xiaojun; Nguyen, David H; Adams, Christina; Mentzer, Laura; Hu, Jianming

    2012-11-01

    Phosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is important for viral RNA packaging, reverse transcription, and subcellular localization. Hepadnavirus capsids also package a cellular kinase. The identity of the host kinase that phosphorylates the core CTD or gets packaged remains to be resolved. In particular, both the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core CTDs harbor several conserved serine/threonine-proline (S/T-P) sites whose phosphorylation state is known to regulate CTD functions. We report here that the endogenous kinase in the HBV capsids was blocked by chemical inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), in particular, CDK2 inhibitors. The kinase phosphorylated the HBV CTD at the serine-proline (S-P) sites. Furthermore, we were able to detect CDK2 in purified HBV capsids by immunoblotting. Purified CDK2 phosphorylated the S/T-P sites of the HBV and DHBV CTD in vitro. Inhibitors of CDKs, of CDK2 in particular, decreased both HBV and DHBV CTD phosphorylation in vivo. Moreover, CDK2 inhibitors blocked DHBV CTD phosphorylation, specifically at the S/T-P sites, in a mammalian cell lysate. These results indicate that cellular CDK2 phosphorylates the functionally critical S/T-P sites of the hepadnavirus core CTD and is incorporated into viral capsids.

  14. Multidrug resistance associated proteins in multidrug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Sodani, Kamlesh; Patel, Atish; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These ABC transporters together form the largest branch of proteins within the human body. The MRP family comprises of 13 members, of which MRP1 to MRP9 are the major transporters indicated to cause multidrug resistance in tumor cells by extruding anticancer drugs out of the cell. They are mainly lipophilic anionic transporters and are reported to transport fr...

  15. Assessment of the Potential of CDK2 Inhibitor NU6140 to Influence the Expression of Pluripotency Markers NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2 in 2102Ep and H9 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ade Kallas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs regulate cell cycle progression and RNA transcription, CDKs are attractive targets for creating cancer cell treatments. In this study we investigated the effects of the small molecular agent NU6140 (inhibits CDK2 and cyclin A interaction on human embryonic stem (hES cells and embryonal carcinoma-derived (hEC cells via the expression of transcription factors responsible for pluripotency. A multiparameter flow cytometric method was used to follow changes in the expression of NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2 together in single cells. Both hES and hEC cells responded to NU6140 treatment by induced apoptosis and a decreased expression of NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2 in surviving cells. A higher sensitivity to NU6140 application in hES than hEC cells was detected. NU6140 treatment arrested hES and hEC cells in the G2 phase and inhibited entry into the M phase as evidenced by no significant increase in histone 3 phosphorylation. When embryoid bodies (EBs formed from NU6104 treated hES cells were compared to EBs from untreated hES cells differences in ectodermal, endodermal, and mesodermal lineages were found. The results of this study highlight the importance of CDK2 activity in maintaining pluripotency of hES and hEC cells and in differentiation of hES cells.

  16. Regulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-ARegulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaidamauskas, Ervinas

    During his PhD studies, Ervinas Gaidamauskas researched the proteins pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and its homologue PAPP-A2 in vitro. As suggested by its name, PAPP-A plays an important role in pregnancy and fetal development. Additionally, recent studies indicate a newly...

  17. Regulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-ARegulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaidamauskas, Ervinas

    During his PhD studies, Ervinas Gaidamauskas researched the proteins pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and its homologue PAPP-A2 in vitro. As suggested by its name, PAPP-A plays an important role in pregnancy and fetal development. Additionally, recent studies indicate a newly...

  18. 细胞周期蛋白依赖性激酶cdk2和cdk4在前列腺增生和癌变组织中的表达%Expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and 4 in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢庆祥; 林福地; 孟家榕; 汪鸿; 缪友仁; 李金雨

    1999-01-01

    目的:探讨细胞周期蛋白依赖性激酶cdk2和cdk4在前列腺增生(BPH)和前列腺癌(PC)的发生发展过程中作用及其与PCNA之间关系.方法:应用免疫组化S-P法检测18例正常前列腺(NP)、62例BPH和33例PC组织中cdk2、cdk4和PCNA的表达.结果:前列腺上皮和间质组织中均见cdk2和cdk4表达.NP中两者表达均分别显著低于BPH和PC;BPH的上皮细胞中两者表达均分别显著低于PC,但BPH的间质细胞中两者表达与PC相比均无显著性差异.BPH和PC中cdk2及cdk4表达与PCNA指数均呈正相关.结论:cdk2和cdk4异常表达参与BPH和PC的发生发展过程,其可能是通过改变细胞周期及促进细胞异常增殖而起作用的.

  19. RAIN: RNA-protein Association and Interaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Alexander; Refsgaard, Jan Christian; Garde, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Protein association networks can be inferred from a range of resources including experimental data, literature mining and computational predictions. These types of evidence are emerging for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) as well. However, integration of ncRNAs into protein association networks...

  20. Associations between milk protein polymorphisms and milk production traits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovenhuis, H.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Korver, S.

    1992-01-01

    Associations between milk protein genotypes and milk production traits were estimated from 6803 first lactation records. Exact tests of associated hypotheses and unbiased estimates of genotype effects were from an animal model. Milk protein genotype effects were estimated using a model in which each

  1. Interactions of the HSV-1 UL25 Capsid Protein with Cellular Microtubule-associated Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei GUO; Ying ZHANG; Yan-chun CHE; Wen-juan WU; Wei-zhong LI; Li-chun WANG; Yun LIAO; Long-ding LIU; Qi-han LI

    2008-01-01

    An interaction between the HSV-1 UL25 capsid protein and cellular microtubule-associated protein was found using a yeast two-hybrid screen and β-D-galactosidase activity assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy of the UL25 protein demonstrated its co-localization with cellular microtubule-associated protein in the plasma membrane. Further investigations with deletion mutants suggest that UL25 is likely to have a function in the nucleus.

  2. Surface-Associated Host Proteins on Virulent Treponema pallidum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, John F.; Baseman, Joel B.

    1979-01-01

    A surface coat of host serum proteins was detected on virulent Treponema pallidum by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. The loosely associated serum proteins could be removed by repeated washings in a protein-free medium. Washed T. pallidum retained the ability to readsorb numerous host proteins from rabbit serum as well as iodinated rabbit or human albumin. In addition, various avidly associated host serum proteins including albumin, α2-macroglobulin, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M, and C3 were identified on the outer envelope of washed treponemes by an immunoadsorbent technique with protein A-bearing staphylococcus. Hyaluronidase treatment did not remove the avidly associated host proteins from the surface of washed treponemes, whereas trypsin treatment resulted in decreased levels of agglutination. Electrophoretic patterns of trypsin-treated treponemes showed that treponemal proteins as well as adsorbed host proteins were released concurrently by protease digestion. Reacquisition studies involving α2-macroglobulin and transferrin suggested the presence of noncompetitive binding sites for serum proteins on the treponemal outer envelope. Finally, differences among the T. pallidum preparations from individual rabbits with respect to incorporation of [35S]methionine, extent of agglutination with antisera, and length of time required for removal of avidly associated host proteins by trypsin treatment indicated biological variability among the treponemal populations. Images PMID:93574

  3. Determination of reversible protein equilibrium association coefficients using light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The characterization in solution of reversible protein associations as well as associations between proteins and small molecules is essential in many areas of science. Understanding cellular function or developing and formulating pharmaceuticals or other biologically active materials often requires quantitation of such associations. Most pharmaceuticals have functionality due solely to association with molecules within the body, and the discovery and accurate characterization of these associations is a key element for pharmaceutical development. Unfortunately, most methods used to measure associations of proteins require either immobilizing the protein on a surface (e.g. surface plasmon resonance), which potentially alters the protein characteristics, or require considerable time and effort and large quantities of sample (e.g. analytical ultracentrifugation, isothermal titration calorimetry). Light scattering based measurements of reversible association coefficients require much less sample and may be performed much more rapidly than other free solution techniques. In this talk I describe how static and dynamic light scattering may each independently be used to measure equilibrium association coefficients between proteins in free solution, and may also be used to observe and quantitate the association of small molecules with them. I present background theory for both static and dynamic light scattering measurements of equilibrium associations, and examples of measurements made of both model systems and of systems with commercial relevance in the pharmaceutical industry.

  4. Multidrug resistance associated proteins in multidrug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamlesh Sodani; Atish Patel; Rishil J. Kathawala; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters.These ABC transporters together form the largest branch of proteins within the human body.The MRP family comprises of 13 members,of which MRP1 to MRP9 are the major transporters indicated to cause multidrug resistance in tumor cells by extruding anticancer drugs out of the cell.They are mainly lipophilic anionic transporters and are reported to transport free or conjugates of glutathione (GSH),glucuronate,or sulphate.In addition,MRP1 to MRP3 can transport neutral organic drugs in free form in the presence of free GSH.Collectively,MRPs can transport drugs that differ structurally and mechanistically,including natural anticancer drugs,nucleoside analogs,antimetabolites,and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.Many of these MRPs transport physiologically important anions such as leukotriene C4,bilirubin glucuronide,and cyclic nucleotides.This review focuses mainly on the physiological functions,cellular resistance characteristics,and probable in vivo role of MRP1 to MRP9.

  5. Neurodegenerative diseases and widespread aggregation are associated with supersaturated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciryam, Prajwal; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Morimoto, Richard I.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Summary The maintenance of protein solubility is a fundamental aspect of protein homeostasis, as aggregation is associated with cytotoxicity and a variety of human diseases. Numerous proteins unrelated in sequence and structure, however, can misfold and aggregate, and widespread aggregation can occur in living systems under stress or ageing. A crucial question in this context is why only certain proteins aggregate in vivo while others do not. We identify here the proteins most vulnerable to aggregation as those whose cellular concentrations are high relative to their solubilities. These supersaturated proteins represent a metastable sub-proteome involved in pathological aggregation during stress and ageing, and are overrepresented in biochemical processes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Consequently, such cellular processes become dysfunctional when the ability to keep intrinsically supersaturated proteins soluble is compromised. Thus, the simultaneous analysis of abundance and solubility can rationalize the diverse cellular pathologies linked to neurodegenerative diseases and aging. PMID:24183671

  6. Reverse Nearest Neighbor Search on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network to Infer Protein-Disease Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suratanee, Apichat; Plaimas, Kitiporn

    2017-01-01

    The associations between proteins and diseases are crucial information for investigating pathological mechanisms. However, the number of known and reliable protein-disease associations is quite small. In this study, an analysis framework to infer associations between proteins and diseases was developed based on a large data set of a human protein-protein interaction network integrating an effective network search, namely, the reverse k-nearest neighbor (RkNN) search. The RkNN search was used to identify an impact of a protein on other proteins. Then, associations between proteins and diseases were inferred statistically. The method using the RkNN search yielded a much higher precision than a random selection, standard nearest neighbor search, or when applying the method to a random protein-protein interaction network. All protein-disease pair candidates were verified by a literature search. Supporting evidence for 596 pairs was identified. In addition, cluster analysis of these candidates revealed 10 promising groups of diseases to be further investigated experimentally. This method can be used to identify novel associations to better understand complex relationships between proteins and diseases.

  7. The association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits in lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are nonmembrane spanning cell surface proteins that have been demonstrated to be signal transduction molecules. Because these proteins do not extend into the cytoplasm, the mechanism by which cross-linking of these molecules leads to intracellular signal transduction events is obscure. Previous analysis has indicated that these proteins are associated with src family member tyrosine kinases; however, the role this interaction plays in the g...

  8. Sox2 uses multiple domains to associate with proteins present in Sox2-protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse L Cox

    Full Text Available Master regulators, such as Sox2, Oct4 and Nanog, control complex gene networks necessary for the self-renewal and pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESC. These master regulators associate with co-activators and co-repressors to precisely control their gene targets. Recent studies using proteomic analysis have identified a large, diverse group of co-activators and co-repressors that associate with master regulators, including Sox2. In this report, we examined the size distribution of nuclear protein complexes containing Sox2 and its associated proteins HDAC1, Sall4 and Lin28. Interestingly, we determined that Sox2 and HDAC1 associate with protein complexes that vary greatly in size; whereas, Lin28 primarily associates with smaller complexes, and Sall4 primarily associates with larger complexes. Additionally, we examined the domains of Sox2 necessary to mediate its association with its partner proteins Sall4, HDAC1 and HDAC2. We determined that Sox2 uses multiple and distinct domains to associate with its partner proteins. We also examined the domains of Sox2 necessary to mediate its self-association, and we determined that Sox2 self-association is mediated through multiple domains. Collectively, these studies provide novel insights into how Sox2 is able to associate with a wide array of nuclear proteins that control gene transcription.

  9. Programming Molecular Association and Viscoelastic Behavior in Protein Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooling, Lawrence J; Buck, Maren E; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Tirrell, David A

    2016-06-01

    A set of recombinant artificial proteins that can be cross-linked, by either covalent bonds or association of helical domains or both, is described. The designed proteins can be used to construct molecular networks in which the mechanism of crosslinking determines the time-dependent responses to mechanical deformation.

  10. CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors and their Associated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Allyn C.; Blume, Lawrence C.; Dalton, George D.

    2011-01-01

    CB1 receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) abundant in neurons, in which they modulate neurotransmission. The CB1 receptor influence on memory and learning is well recognized, and disease states associated with CB1 receptors are observed in addiction disorders, motor dysfunction, schizophrenia, and in bipolar, depression, and anxiety disorders. Beyond the brain, CB1 receptors also function in liver and adipose tissues, vascular as well as cardiac tissue, reproductive tissues and bone. Signal transduction by CB1 receptors occurs through interaction with Gi/o proteins to inhibit adenylyl cyclase, activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), inhibit voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, activate K+ currents (Kir), and influence Nitric Oxide (NO) signaling. CB1 receptors are observed in internal organelles as well as plasma membrane. β-Arrestins, adaptor protein AP-3, and G-protein receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP1) modulate cellular trafficking. Cannabinoid Receptor Interacting Protein 1a (CRIP1a) is an accessory protein whose function has not been delineated. Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase (FAN) regulates ceramide signaling. Such diversity in cellular signaling and modulation by interacting proteins suggests that agonists and allosteric modulators could be developed to specifically regulate unique, cell type-specific responses. PMID:20166926

  11. Associations between milk protein polymorphisms and milk production traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovenhuis, H; Van Arendonk, J A; Korver, S

    1992-09-01

    Associations between milk protein genotypes and milk production traits were estimated from 6803 first lactation records. Exact tests of associated hypotheses and unbiased estimates of genotype effects were from an animal model. Milk protein genotype effects were estimated using a model in which each milk protein gene was analyzed separately (single-gene analysis) and a model in which all milk protein genes were analyzed simultaneously (multigene analysis). The results of the two models indicate that some effects ascribed to certain milk protein genes in the single-gene analysis are not effects of the milk protein gene itself but of linked genes. Results from this study and from literature indicate that the kappa-casein gene or a very closely linked gene affects protein percentage, and the beta-lactoglobulin gene or a very closely linked gene affects fat percentage. Furthermore, effects of beta-casein genotypes on milk production, fat percentage, and protein yield were significant, and beta-lactoglobulin genotypes had significant effects on milk production and protein yield. It is less clear whether those effects are due to effects of milk protein genes themselves or to effects of linked genes.

  12. BioID Identification of Lamin-Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehus, Aaron A; Anderson, Ruthellen H; Roux, Kyle J

    2016-01-01

    A- and B-type lamins support the nuclear envelope, contribute to heterochromatin organization, and regulate a myriad of nuclear processes. The mechanisms by which lamins function in different cell types and the mechanisms by which lamin mutations cause over a dozen human diseases (laminopathies) remain unclear. The identification of proteins associated with lamins is likely to provide fundamental insight into these mechanisms. BioID (proximity-dependent biotin identification) is a unique and powerful method for identifying protein-protein and proximity-based interactions in living cells. BioID utilizes a mutant biotin ligase from bacteria that is fused to a protein of interest (bait). When expressed in living cells and stimulated with excess biotin, this BioID-fusion protein promiscuously biotinylates directly interacting and vicinal endogenous proteins. Following biotin-affinity capture, the biotinylated proteins can be identified using mass spectrometry. BioID thus enables screening for physiologically relevant protein associations that occur over time in living cells. BioID is applicable to insoluble proteins such as lamins that are often refractory to study by other methods and can identify weak and/or transient interactions. We discuss the use of BioID to elucidate novel lamin-interacting proteins and its applications in a broad range of biological systems, and provide detailed protocols to guide new applications.

  13. Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK), a novel membrane-associated, ankyrin repeat-containing protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Haider, K; Ponda, M; Cariappa, A; Rowitch, D; Pillai, S

    2001-06-15

    A novel murine membrane-associated protein kinase, PKK (protein kinase C-associated kinase), was cloned on the basis of its physical association with protein kinase Cbeta (PKCbeta). The regulated expression of PKK in mouse embryos is consistent with a role for this kinase in early embryogenesis. The human homolog of PKK has over 90% identity to its murine counterpart, has been localized to chromosome 21q22.3, and is identical to the PKCdelta-interacting kinase, DIK (Bahr, C., Rohwer, A., Stempka, L., Rincke, G., Marks, F., and Gschwendt, M. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 36350-36357). PKK comprises an N-terminal kinase domain and a C-terminal region containing 11 ankyrin repeats. PKK exhibits protein kinase activity in vitro and associates with cellular membranes. PKK exists in three discernible forms at steady state: an underphosphorylated form of 100 kDa; a soluble, cytosolic, phosphorylated form of 110 kDa; and a phosphorylated, detergent-insoluble form of 112 kDa. PKK is initially synthesized as an underphosphorylated soluble 100-kDa protein that is quantitatively converted to a detergent-soluble 110-kDa form. This conversion requires an active catalytic domain. Although PKK physically associates with PKCbeta, it does not phosphorylate this PKC isoform. However, PKK itself may be phosphorylated by PKCbeta. PKK represents a developmentally regulated protein kinase that can associate with membranes. The functional significance of its association with PKCbeta remains to be ascertained.

  14. Identification of proteins associated with amyloidosis by polarity index method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Uversky, Vladimir N; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas; Leopold-Sordo, Marili; Madero-Arteaga, Alejandro; Morales-Reyes, Alicia; Tavera-Sierra, Lourdes; González-Bernal, Jesus A; Arias-Estrada, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    There is a natural protein form, insoluble and resistant to proteolysis, adopted by many proteins independently of their amino acid sequences via specific misfolding-aggregation process. This dynamic process occurs in parallel with or as an alternative to physiologic folding, generating toxic protein aggregates that are deposited and accumulated in various organs and tissues. These proteinaceous deposits typically represent bundles of β-sheet-enriched fibrillar species known as the amyloid fibrils that are responsible for serious pathological conditions, including but not limited to neurodegenerative diseases, grouped under the term amyloidoses. The proteins that might adopt this fibrillar conformation are some globular proteins and natively unfolded (or intrinsically disordered) proteins. Our work shows that intrinsically disordered and intrinsically ordered proteins can be reliably identified, discriminated, and differentiated by analyzing their polarity profiles generated using a computational tool known as the polarity index method (Polanco & Samaniego, 2009; Polanco et al., 2012; 2013; 2013a; 2014; 2014a; 2014b; 2014c; 2014d). We also show that proteins expressed in neurons can be differentiated from proteins in these two groups based on their polarity profiles, and also that this computational tool can be used to identify proteins associated with amyloidoses. The efficiency of the proposed method is high (i.e. 70%) as evidenced by the analysis of peptides and proteins in the APD2 database (2012), AVPpred database (2013), and CPPsite database (2013), the set of selective antibacterial peptides from del Rio et al. (2001), the sets of natively unfolded and natively folded proteins from Oldfield et al. (2005), the set of human revised proteins expressed in neurons, and non-human revised proteins expressed in neurons, from the Uniprot database (2014), and also the set of amyloidogenic proteins from the AmyPDB database (2014).

  15. Brain protein oxidation in age-related neurodegenerative disorders that are associated with aggregated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D A; Kanski, J

    2001-07-15

    Protein oxidation, one of a number of brain biomarkers of oxidative stress, is increased in several age-related neurodegenerative disorders or animal models thereof, including Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, prion disorders, such as Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, and alpha-synuclein disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia. Each of these neurodegenerative disorders is associated with aggregated proteins in brain. However, the relationship among protein oxidation, protein aggregation, and neurodegeneration remain unclear. The current rapid progress in elucidation of mechanisms of protein oxidation in neuronal loss should provide further insight into the importance of free radical oxidative stress in these neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Low protein silage associated with rumen impaction in suckler cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-23

    Rumen impaction associated with low protein diets in a suckler cowCampylobacteriosis in suckler cowsPlant toxicity in ewesListerial encephalitis in ewes ITALIC! Chorioptes bovis-associated infertility in ramsThese are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for January 2016 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS).

  17. Integral and peripheral association of proteins and protein complexes with Yersinia pestis inner and outer membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunai Christine L

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Yersinia pestis proteins were sequentially extracted from crude membranes with a high salt buffer (2.5 M NaBr, an alkaline solution (180 mM Na2CO3, pH 11.3 and membrane denaturants (8 M urea, 2 M thiourea and 1% amidosulfobetaine-14. Separation of proteins by 2D gel electrophoresis was followed by identification of more than 600 gene products by MS. Data from differential 2D gel display experiments, comparing protein abundances in cytoplasmic, periplasmic and all three membrane fractions, were used to assign proteins found in the membrane fractions to three protein categories: (i integral membrane proteins and peripheral membrane proteins with low solubility in aqueous solutions (220 entries; (ii peripheral membrane proteins with moderate to high solubility in aqueous solutions (127 entries; (iii cytoplasmic or ribosomal membrane-contaminating proteins (80 entries. Thirty-one proteins were experimentally associated with the outer membrane (OM. Circa 50 proteins thought to be part of membrane-localized, multi-subunit complexes were identified in high Mr fractions of membrane extracts via size exclusion chromatography. This data supported biologically meaningful assignments of many proteins to the membrane periphery. Since only 32 inner membrane (IM proteins with two or more predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs were profiled in 2D gels, we resorted to a proteomic analysis by 2D-LC-MS/MS. Ninety-four additional IM proteins with two or more TMDs were identified. The total number of proteins associated with Y. pestis membranes increased to 456 and included representatives of all six β-barrel OM protein families and 25 distinct IM transporter families.

  18. Nanoparticles-cell association predicted by protein corona fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, S.; Digiacomo, L.; Pozzi, D.; Peruzzi, G.; Micarelli, E.; Mahmoudi, M.; Caracciolo, G.

    2016-06-01

    In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface chemistry (unmodified and PEGylated) to investigate the relationships between NP physicochemical properties (nanoparticle size, aggregation state and surface charge), protein corona fingerprints (PCFs), and NP-cell association. We found out that none of the NPs' physicochemical properties alone was exclusively able to account for association with human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). For the entire library of NPs, a total of 436 distinct serum proteins were detected. We developed a predictive-validation modeling that provides a means of assessing the relative significance of the identified corona proteins. Interestingly, a minor fraction of the HC, which consists of only 8 PCFs were identified as main promoters of NP association with HeLa cells. Remarkably, identified PCFs have several receptors with high level of expression on the plasma membrane of HeLa cells.In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface

  19. Quantitative protein localization signatures reveal an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  20. Quantitative protein localization signatures reveal an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lit-Hsin Loo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST, an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to

  1. Screening serum hepatocellular carcinoma-associated proteins by SELDI-based protein spectrum analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To find out potential serum hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-associated proteins with low molecular weight and low abundance by SELDI-based serum protein spectra analysis, that will have much application in the diagnosis or differentiated diagnosis of HCC, as well as giving a better undersyanding of the mechanism of hepato-carcinogenesis. METHODS: Total serum samples were collected with informed consent from 81 HCC patients with HBV (+)/cirrhosis(+),36 cirrhosis patients and 43 chronic hepatitis B patients. Serum protein fingerprint profiles were first generated by selected WCX2 protein chip capture integrating with SELDI-TOF-MS, then normalized and aligned by Ciphergen SELDI Software 3.1.1 with Biomarker Wizard.. Comparative analysis of the intensity of corresponding protein fingerprint peaks in normalized protein spectra, some protein peaks with significant difference between H.CC and cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis B were found. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-eight serum protein peaks between.2000 and 30000Da were identified under the condition of signal-to-noise>5 and minimum threshold for cluster>20%.Eight-seven of these proteins were showed significant differences in intensity between HCC and cirrhosis (P<0.05=.Of the above differential proteins, 45 proteins had changes greater than two-fold, including 15 upregulated proteins and 30downregulated proteins in HCC serum. Between HCC and chronic hepatitis B,9 of 52 differential proteins (P<0.05= had intensities of more than two-fold, including 2 upregulated proteins and 7 downregulated proteins in HCC serum. Between cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B,28 of 79 significant differential proteins (P<0.05= changes greater than two-fold in intensity, including 17 upregulated proteins and 11 downregulated proteins in cirrhosis serum. For the analysis of these leading differential proteins in subtraction difference mode among three diseases, the five common downregulated proteins in HCC serum (M/Z 2870

  2. Repression of c-Myc responsive genes in cycling cells causes G1 arrest through reduction of cyclin E/CDK2 kinase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berns, K.; Hijmans, E.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The c-myc gene encodes a sequence-specific DNA binding protein involved in proliferation and oncogenesis. Activation of c-myc expression in quiescent cells is sufficient to mediate cell cycle entry, whereas inhibition of c-myc expression causes cycling cells to withdraw from the cell cycle. To searc

  3. Dickkopf-related protein 3 is a potential Abeta-associated protein in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, K.A.; Kuiperij, H.B.; Gloerich, J.; Otte-Holler, I.; Rozemuller, A.J.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Kusters, B.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) is the most prominent protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) senile plaques. In addition, Abeta interacts with a variety of Abeta-associated proteins (AAPs), some of which can form complexes with Abeta and influence its clearance, aggregation or toxicity. Identification of novel AA

  4. Dickkopf-related protein 3 is a potential Abeta-associated protein in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, K.A.; Kuiperij, H.B.; Gloerich, J.; Otte-Holler, I.; Rozemuller, A.J.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Kusters, B.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) is the most prominent protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) senile plaques. In addition, Abeta interacts with a variety of Abeta-associated proteins (AAPs), some of which can form complexes with Abeta and influence its clearance, aggregation or toxicity. Identification of novel

  5. VAMP-1: a synaptic vesicle-associated integral membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, W S; Cowan, D M; Scheller, R H

    1988-01-01

    Several proteins are associated with, or are integral components of, the lipid bilayer that forms the delineating membrane of neuronal synaptic vesicles. To characterize these molecules, we used a polyclonal antiserum raised against purified cholinergic synaptic vesicles from Torpedo to screen a cDNA expression library constructed from mRNA of the electromotor nucleus. One clone encodes VAMP-1 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 1), a nervous-system-specific protein of 120 amino acids whose primary sequence can be divided into three domains: a proline-rich amino terminus, a highly charged internal region, and a hydrophobic carboxyl-terminal domain that is predicted to comprise a membrane anchor. Tryptic digestion of intact and lysed vesicles suggests that the protein faces the cytoplasm, where it may play a role in packaging, transport, or release of neurotransmitters. Images PMID:3380805

  6. Quality control of the proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuechao Gao; Hongyu Hu

    2008-01-01

    Most neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer'sdisease,Parkinson's disease,Huntington's disease and other polyglutamine diseases are associated with degeneration and death of specific neuronal populations due to misfolding or aggregation of certain proteins.These aggregates often contain ubiquitin that is the signal for proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system,and chaperone proteins that are involved in the assistance of protein folding.Here we review the role of protein quality control systems in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases,and aim to learn more from the cooperation between molecular chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome system responding to cellular protein aggregates,in order to find molecular targets for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Radioimmunoassay for pregnancy-associated plasma protein A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinosich, M.J. (Royal North Shore Hospital, Sidney, New South Wales, Australia); Teisner, B.; Folkerson, J.; Saunders, D.M.; Grudzinskas, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    A specific and highly sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in human serum is described. The minimum detection limit for this protein was 2.9 ..mu..g/L. The within- and between-assay coefficients of variation were 4.0 and 4.5%, respectively. The circulating protein was detected within 32 days of conception in eight normal pregnancies and within 21 days in a twin pregnancy. Circulating concentrations in the mother at term were consistently higher (10-fold) than in matched amniotic fluid; none was detected in the umbilical circulation. This protein was also detected in the circulation of patients with hydatidiform mole. This assay will permit investigations into the clinical evaluation of measurements of the protein during early pregnancy and trophoblastic disease.

  8. Protein-Based Three-Dimensional Memories and Associative Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge, Robert

    2008-03-01

    The field of bioelectronics has benefited from the fact that nature has often solved problems of a similar nature to those which must be solved to create molecular electronic or photonic devices that operate with efficiency and reliability. Retinal proteins show great promise in bioelectronic devices because they operate with high efficiency (˜0.65%), high cyclicity (>10^7), operate over an extended wavelength range (360 -- 630 nm) and can convert light into changes in voltage, pH, absorption or refractive index. This talk will focus on a retinal protein called bacteriorhodopsin, the proton pump of the organism Halobacterium salinarum. Two memories based on this protein will be described. The first is an optical three-dimensional memory. This memory stores information using volume elements (voxels), and provides as much as a thousand-fold improvement in effective capacity over current technology. A unique branching reaction of a variant of bacteriorhodopsin is used to turn each protein into an optically addressed latched AND gate. Although three working prototypes have been developed, a number of cost/performance and architectural issues must be resolved prior to commercialization. The major issue is that the native protein provides a very inefficient branching reaction. Genetic engineering has improved performance by nearly 500-fold, but a further order of magnitude improvement is needed. Protein-based holographic associative memories will also be discussed. The human brain stores and retrieves information via association, and human intelligence is intimately connected to the nature and enormous capacity of this associative search and retrieval process. To a first order approximation, creativity can be viewed as the association of two seemingly disparate concepts to form a totally new construct. Thus, artificial intelligence requires large scale associative memories. Current computer hardware does not provide an optimal environment for creating artificial

  9. Cancer associated proteins in blood plasma: Determining normal variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenemo, Markus; Teleman, Johan; Sjöström, Martin; Grubb, Gabriel; Malmström, Erik; Malmström, Johan; Niméus, Emma

    2016-07-01

    Protein biomarkers have the potential to improve diagnosis, stratification of patients into treatment cohorts, follow disease progression and treatment response. One distinct group of potential biomarkers comprises proteins which have been linked to cancer, known as cancer associated proteins (CAPs). We determined the normal variation of 86 CAPs in 72 individual plasma samples collected from ten individuals using SRM mass spectrometry. Samples were collected weekly during 5 weeks from ten volunteers and over one day at nine fixed time points from three volunteers. We determined the degree of the normal variation depending on interpersonal variation, variation due to time of day, and variation over weeks and observed that the variation dependent on the time of day appeared to be the most important. Subdivision of the proteins resulted in two predominant protein groups containing 21 proteins with relatively high variation in all three factors (day, week and individual), and 22 proteins with relatively low variation in all factors. We present a strategy for prioritizing biomarker candidates for future studies based on stratification over their normal variation and have made all data publicly available. Our findings can be used to improve selection of biomarker candidates in future studies and to determine which proteins are most suitable depending on study design.

  10. Identification of urinary proteins potentially associated with diabetic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Marikanty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease. Although several parameters are used to evaluate renal damage, in many instances, there is no pathological change until damage is already advanced. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a novel tool to identify newer diagnostic markers. To identify urinary proteins associated with renal complications in diabetes, we collected urine samples from 10 type 2 diabetes patients each with normoalbuminuria, micro- and macro-albuminuria and compared their urinary proteome with that of 10 healthy individuals. Urinary proteins were concentrated, depleted of albumin and five other abundant plasma proteins and in-gel trypsin digested after prefractionation on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The peptides were analyzed using a nanoflow reverse phase liquid chromatography system coupled to linear trap quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. We identified large number of proteins in each group, of which many were exclusively present in individual patient groups. A total of 53 proteins were common in all patients but were absent in the controls. The majority of the proteins were functionally binding, biologically involved in metabolic processes, and showed enrichment of alternative complement and blood coagulation pathways. In addition to identifying reported proteins such as α2-HS-glycoprotein and Vitamin D binding protein, we detected novel proteins such as CD59, extracellular matrix protein 1 (ECM1, factor H, and myoglobin in the urine of macroalbuminuria patients. ECM1 and factor H are known to influence mesangial cell proliferation, and CD59 causes microvascular damage by influencing membrane attack complex deposition, suggestive their biological relevance to DN. Thus, we have developed a proteome database where various proteins exclusively present in the patients may be further investigated for their role as stage-specific markers and possible therapeutic

  11. Associating genes and protein complexes with disease via network propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oron Vanunu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental challenge in human health is the identification of disease-causing genes. Recently, several studies have tackled this challenge via a network-based approach, motivated by the observation that genes causing the same or similar diseases tend to lie close to one another in a network of protein-protein or functional interactions. However, most of these approaches use only local network information in the inference process and are restricted to inferring single gene associations. Here, we provide a global, network-based method for prioritizing disease genes and inferring protein complex associations, which we call PRINCE. The method is based on formulating constraints on the prioritization function that relate to its smoothness over the network and usage of prior information. We exploit this function to predict not only genes but also protein complex associations with a disease of interest. We test our method on gene-disease association data, evaluating both the prioritization achieved and the protein complexes inferred. We show that our method outperforms extant approaches in both tasks. Using data on 1,369 diseases from the OMIM knowledgebase, our method is able (in a cross validation setting to rank the true causal gene first for 34% of the diseases, and infer 139 disease-related complexes that are highly coherent in terms of the function, expression and conservation of their member proteins. Importantly, we apply our method to study three multi-factorial diseases for which some causal genes have been found already: prostate cancer, alzheimer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PRINCE's predictions for these diseases highly match the known literature, suggesting several novel causal genes and protein complexes for further investigation.

  12. Ribosomal protein S6 associates with alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 and mediates expression from alphavirus messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stephanie A; Berglund, Peter; Beard, Clayton W; Johnston, Robert E

    2006-08-01

    Although alphaviruses dramatically alter cellular function within hours of infection, interactions between alphaviruses and specific host cellular proteins are poorly understood. Although the alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) is an essential component of the viral replication complex, it also has critical auxiliary functions that determine the outcome of infection in the host. To gain a better understanding of nsP2 function, we sought to identify cellular proteins with which Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2 interacted. We demonstrate here that nsP2 associates with ribosomal protein S6 (RpS6) and that nsP2 is present in the ribosome-containing fractions of a polysome gradient, suggesting that nsP2 associates with RpS6 in the context of the whole ribosome. This result was noteworthy, since viral replicase proteins have seldom been described in direct association with components of the ribosome. The association of RpS6 with nsP2 was detected throughout the course of infection, and neither the synthesis of the viral structural proteins nor the presence of the other nonstructural proteins was required for RpS6 interaction with nsP2. nsP1 also was associated with RpS6, but other nonstructural proteins were not. RpS6 phosphorylation was dramatically diminished within hours after infection with alphaviruses. Furthermore, a reduction in the level of RpS6 protein expression led to diminished expression from alphavirus subgenomic messages, whereas no dramatic diminution in cellular translation was observed. Taken together, these data suggest that alphaviruses alter the ribosome during infection and that this alteration may contribute to differential translation of host and viral messages.

  13. Crystallization of cyclase-associated protein from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Andreas; Hess, Sonja; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2002-10-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved two-domain protein that helps to activate the catalytic activity of adenylyl cyclase in the cyclase-bound state through interaction with Ras, which binds to the cyclase in a different region. With its other domain, CAP can bind monomeric actin and therefore also carries a cytoskeletal function. The protein is thus involved in Ras/cAMP-dependent signal transduction and most likely serves as an adapter protein translocating the adenylyl cyclase complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.2, b = 75.1, c = 162.9 A, have been obtained from Dictyostelium discoideum CAP carrying a C-terminal His tag. A complete native data set extending to 2.2 A resolution was collected from a single crystal using an in-house X-ray system. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of CAP.

  14. Enzymes associated with protein bodies isolated from ungerminated barley seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory, R L; Henningsen, K W

    1969-11-01

    Protein bodies were isolated intact from dormant barley seeds, Hordeum vulgare, var. Kenia, by a combination of buffer extractions and centrifugations over a sucrose gradient. Examination of the protein bodies pellet in the electron microscope shows 2 types of protein bodies in a wide variation of sizes. The majority of them stain evenly with osmium, are contained within a single membrane, and have no other structural components. The other type, mostly the larger particles, has a fine structure of orderly dark and light-stained layers attached to the protein bodies. Two acid hydrolases are associated with these particles: acid phosphatase activity, specific for sodium phytate but inactive on beta-glycerol phosphate, glucose 1-phosphate, fructose 1,6-diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate; and acid protease activity.

  15. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphisms are associated with coronary artery calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is a key regulator of vascular calcification. Genetic variation at the MGP locus could modulate the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). We examined the cross-sectional association between MGP SNPs [rs1800802 (T-138C), rs1800801 (G-7A),and rs4236 (Ala102Thr)...

  16. Demodex-associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Background: Patients with rosacea demonstrate a higher density of Demodex mites in their skin than controls. A bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite from a patient with papulopustular rosacea (PPR) was previously shown to provoke an immune response in patients with PPR or ocular rosacea thus suggesting a possible role for bacterial proteins in the etiology of this condition. Objectives: To examine the response of neutrophils to proteins derived from a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite. Methods: Bacterial cells were lysed and proteins were partially purified by AKTA-FPLC. Isolated neutrophils were exposed to bacterial proteins and monitored for alterations in migration, degranulation and cytokine production. Results: Neutrophils exposed to proteins from Bacillus cells demonstrated increased levels of migration and elevated release of MMP-9, an enzyme known to degrade collagen and cathelicidin, an antimicrobial peptide. In addition neutrophils exposed to the bacterial proteins demonstrated elevated rates of Il-8 and TNF-alpha production. Conclusions: Proteins produced by a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite have the ability to increase the migration, degranulation and cytokine production abilities of neutrophils. These results suggest that bacteria may play a role in the inflammatory erythema associated with rosacea.

  17. Lipid nanotechnologies for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Grushin, Kirill; Dalm, Daniela; Miller, Jaimy

    2014-11-01

    We present a methodology of lipid nanotubes (LNT) and nanodisks technologies optimized in our laboratory for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins at close to physiological conditions. The application of these lipid nanotechnologies for structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is fundamental for understanding and modulating their function. The LNTs in our studies are single bilayer galactosylceramide based nanotubes of ∼20 nm inner diameter and a few microns in length, that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. The lipid nanodisks (NDs) are self-assembled discoid lipid bilayers of ∼10 nm diameter, which are stabilized in aqueous solutions by a belt of amphipathic helical scaffold proteins. By combining LNT and ND technologies, we can examine structurally how the membrane curvature and lipid composition modulates the function of the membrane-associated proteins. As proof of principle, we have engineered these lipid nanotechnologies to mimic the activated platelet's phosphtaidylserine rich membrane and have successfully assembled functional membrane-bound coagulation factor VIII in vitro for structure determination by cryo-EM. The macromolecular organization of the proteins bound to ND and LNT are further defined by fitting the known atomic structures within the calculated three-dimensional maps. The combination of LNT and ND technologies offers a means to control the design and assembly of a wide range of functional membrane-associated proteins and complexes for structural studies by cryo-EM. The presented results confirm the suitability of the developed methodology for studying the functional structure of membrane-associated proteins, such as the coagulation factors, at a close to physiological environment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Chicken Egg Shell Membrane Associated Proteins and Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkar, Sarbjeet; Liyanage, Rohana; Kannan, Lakshmi; Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Lay, Jack O; Rath, Narayan C

    2015-11-11

    Egg shells are poultry industry byproducts with potential for use in various biological and agricultural applications. We have been interested in the membranes underlying the calcareous shell as a feed supplement, which showed potential to improve immunity and performance of post hatch poultry. Therefore, to determine their protein and peptide profiles, we extracted the egg shell membranes (ESM) from fresh unfertilized eggs with methanol and guanidine hydrochloride (GdHCl) to obtain soluble proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. The methanol extract was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), high-performance reverse phase liquid chromatographic separation (HPLC), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to determine its peptide and protein profiles. The GdHCl extract was subjected to ESI-HPLC-MS/MS following trypsin digestion of reduced/alkylated proteins. Nine proteins from the methanol extract and >275 proteins from the GdHCl extract were tentatively identified. The results suggested the presence of several abundant proteins from egg whites, such as ovoalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme as well as many others associated with antimicrobial, biomechanical, cytoskeletal organizational, cell signaling, and enzyme activities. Collagens, keratin, agrin, and laminin were some of the structural proteins present in the ESM. The methanol-soluble fraction contained several clusterin peptides and defensins, particularly, two isoforms of gallin. The ratios of the two isoforms of gallin differed between the membranes obtained from brown and white eggs. The high abundance of several antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and other bioactive proteins in the ESM along with its potential to entrap various microbes and antigens may make it a suitable vehicle for oral immunization of post hatch poultry and improve their disease resistance.

  19. Decomposition of overlapping protein complexes: A graph theoretical method for analyzing static and dynamic protein associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães Katia S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cellular processes are carried out by multi-protein complexes, groups of proteins that bind together to perform a specific task. Some proteins form stable complexes, while other proteins form transient associations and are part of several complexes at different stages of a cellular process. A better understanding of this higher-order organization of proteins into overlapping complexes is an important step towards unveiling functional and evolutionary mechanisms behind biological networks. Results We propose a new method for identifying and representing overlapping protein complexes (or larger units called functional groups within a protein interaction network. We develop a graph-theoretical framework that enables automatic construction of such representation. We illustrate the effectiveness of our method by applying it to TNFα/NF-κB and pheromone signaling pathways. Conclusion The proposed representation helps in understanding the transitions between functional groups and allows for tracking a protein's path through a cascade of functional groups. Therefore, depending on the nature of the network, our representation is capable of elucidating temporal relations between functional groups. Our results show that the proposed method opens a new avenue for the analysis of protein interaction networks.

  20. Structural basis of divergent cyclin-dependent kinase activation by Spy1/RINGO proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Denise A.; Fifield, Bre-Anne; Marceau, Aimee H.; Tripathi, Sarvind; Porter, Lisa A.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (Windsor)

    2017-06-30

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are principal drivers of cell division and are an important therapeutic target to inhibit aberrant proliferation. Cdk enzymatic activity is tightly controlled through cyclin interactions, posttranslational modifications, and binding of inhibitors such as the p27 tumor suppressor protein. Spy1/RINGO (Spy1) proteins bind and activate Cdk but are resistant to canonical regulatory mechanisms that establish cell-cycle checkpoints. Cancer cells exploit Spy1 to stimulate proliferation through inappropriate activation of Cdks, yet the mechanism is unknown. We have determined crystal structures of the Cdk2-Spy1 and p27-Cdk2-Spy1 complexes that reveal how Spy1 activates Cdk. We find that Spy1 confers structural changes to Cdk2 that obviate the requirement of Cdk activation loop phosphorylation. Spy1 lacks the cyclin-binding site that mediates p27 and substrate affinity, explaining why Cdk-Spy1 is poorly inhibited by p27 and lacks specificity for substrates with cyclin-docking sites. We identify mutations in Spy1 that ablate its ability to activate Cdk2 and to proliferate cells. Our structural description of Spy1 provides important mechanistic insights that may be utilized for targeting upregulated Spy1 in cancer.

  1. Effect of association with adenylyl cyclase-associated protein on the interaction of yeast adenylyl cyclase with Ras protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, F; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Tamada, M; Okada, T; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1997-03-01

    Posttranslational modification of Ras protein has been shown to be critical for interaction with its effector molecules, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase. However, the mechanism of its action was unknown. In this study, we used a reconstituted system with purified adenylyl cyclase and Ras proteins carrying various degrees of the modification to show that the posttranslational modification, especially the farnesylation step, is responsible for 5- to 10-fold increase in Ras-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase activity even though it has no significant effect on their binding affinity. The stimulatory effect of farnesylation is found to depend on the association of adenylyl cyclase with 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP), which was known to be required for proper in vivo response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras protein, by comparing the levels of Ras-dependent activation of purified adenylyl cyclase with and without bound CAP. The region of CAP required for this effect is mapped to its N-terminal segment of 168 amino acid residues, which coincides with the region required for the in vivo effect. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect is successfully reconstituted by in vitro association of CAP with the purified adenylyl cyclase molecule lacking the bound CAP. These results indicate that the association of adenylyl cyclase with CAP is responsible for the stimulatory effect of posttranslational modification of Ras on its activity and that this may be the mechanism underlying its requirement for the proper in vivo cyclic AMP response.

  2. Regulation of human endometrial stromal proliferation and differentiation by C/EBPβ involves cyclin E-cdk2 and STAT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Taylor, Robert N; Bagchi, Indrani C; Bagchi, Milan K

    2012-12-01

    During each menstrual cycle, the human uterus undergoes a unique transformation, known as decidualization, which involves endometrial stromal proliferation and differentiation. During this process, the stromal cells are transformed into decidual cells, which produce factors that prepare the uterus for potential embryo implantation. We previously identified the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)β as a regulator of endometrial stromal proliferation and differentiation in mice. In this study, we addressed the role of C/EBPβ in human endometrial decidualization. Using small interfering RNA targeted to C/EBPβ mRNA, we demonstrated that C/EBPβ controls the proliferation of primary human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) by regulating the expression of several key cell cycle-regulatory factors during the G(1)-S phase transition. Additionally, loss of C/EBPβ expression blocked the differentiation of HESCs in response to estrogen, progesterone, and cyclic AMP. Gene expression profiling of normal and C/EBPβ-deficient HESCs revealed that the receptor for the cytokine IL-11 and its downstream signal transducer signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) are targets of regulation by C/EBPβ. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that C/EBPβ controls the expression of STAT3 gene by directly interacting with a distinct regulatory sequence in its 5'-flanking region. Attenuation of STAT3 mRNA expression in HESCs resulted in markedly reduced differentiation of these cells, indicating an important role for STAT3 in decidualization. Gene expression profiling, using STAT3-deficient HESCs, showed an extensive overlap of pathways downstream of STAT3 and C/EBPβ during stromal cell differentiation. Collectively, these findings revealed a novel functional link between C/EBPβ and STAT3 that is a critical regulator of endometrial differentiation in women.

  3. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  4. Identification of novel Drosophila centromere-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Teresa K; Schade, Georg O M; Schmidt, Andreas; Vetter, Irene; Wirth, Marc; Heun, Patrick; Thomae, Andreas W; Imhof, Axel

    2014-10-01

    Centromeres are chromosomal regions crucial for correct chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. They are epigenetically defined by centromeric proteins such as the centromere-specific histone H3-variant centromere protein A (CENP-A). In humans, 16 additional proteins have been described to be constitutively associated with centromeres throughout the cell cycle, known as the constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN). In contrast, only one additional constitutive centromeric protein is known in Drosophila melanogaster (D.mel), the conserved CCAN member CENP-C. To gain further insights into D.mel centromere composition and biology, we analyzed affinity-purified chromatin prepared from D.mel cell lines expressing green fluorescent protein tagged histone three variants by MS. In addition to already-known centromeric proteins, we identified novel factors that were repeatedly enriched in affinity purification-MS experiments. We analyzed the cellular localization of selected candidates by immunocytochemistry and confirmed localization to the centromere and other genomic regions for ten factors. Furthermore, RNA interference mediated depletion of CG2051, CG14480, and hyperplastic discs, three of our strongest candidates, leads to elevated mitotic defects. Knockdowns of these candidates neither impair the localization of several known kinetochore proteins nor CENP-A(CID) loading, suggesting their involvement in alternative pathways that contribute to proper centromere function. In summary, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the proteomic composition of Drosophila centromeres. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000758 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000758).

  5. Transcriptional robustness and protein interactions are associated in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conant Gavin C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robustness to insults, both external and internal, is a characteristic feature of life. One level of biological organization for which noise and robustness have been extensively studied is gene expression. Cells have a variety of mechanisms for buffering noise in gene expression, but it is not completely clear what rules govern whether or not a given gene uses such tools to maintain appropriate expression. Results Here, we show a general association between the degree to which yeast cells have evolved mechanisms to buffer changes in gene expression and whether they possess protein-protein interactions. We argue that this effect bears an affinity to epistasis, because yeast appears to have evolved regulatory mechanisms such that distant changes in gene copy number for a protein-protein interaction partner gene can alter a gene's expression. This association is not unexpected given recent work linking epistasis and the deleterious effects of changes in gene dosage (i.e., the dosage balance hypothesis. Using gene expression data from artificial aneuploid strains of bakers' yeast, we found that genes coding for proteins that physically interact with other proteins show less expression variation in response to aneuploidy than do other genes. This effect is even more pronounced for genes whose products interact with proteins encoded on aneuploid chromosomes. We further found that genes targeted by transcription factors encoded on aneuploid chromosomes were more likely to change in expression after aneuploidy. Conclusions We suggest that these observations can be best understood as resulting from the higher fitness cost of misexpression in epistatic genes and a commensurate greater regulatory control of them.

  6. A novel family of plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Vidya; Poulet, Axel; Détourné, Gwénaëlle; Tatout, Christophe; Vanrobays, Emmanuel; Evans, David E; Graumann, Katja

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the characterisation of a new family of higher plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins (NEAPs) that interact with other proteins of the nuclear envelope. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the family consists of three genes expressed ubiquitously (AtNEAP1-3) and a pseudogene (AtNEAP4). NEAPs consist of extensive coiled-coil domains, followed by a nuclear localisation signal and a C-terminal predicted transmembrane domain. Domain deletion mutants confirm the presence of a functional nuclear localisation signal and transmembrane domain. AtNEAP proteins localise to the nuclear periphery as part of stable protein complexes, are able to form homo- and heteromers, and interact with the SUN domain proteins AtSUN1 and AtSUN2, involved in the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. An A. thaliana cDNA library screen identified a putative transcription factor called AtbZIP18 as a novel interactor of AtNEAP1, which suggest a connection between NEAP and chromatin. An Atneap1 Atneap3 double-knockout mutant showed reduced root growth, and altered nuclear morphology and chromatin structure. Thus AtNEAPs are suggested as inner nuclear membrane-anchored coiled-coil proteins with roles in maintaining nuclear morphology and chromatin structure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Characterization of associated proteins and phospholipids in natural rubber latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansatsadeekul, Jitlada; Sakdapipanich, Jitladda; Rojruthai, Porntip

    2011-06-01

    Non-rubber components present in natural rubber (NR) latex, such as proteins and phospholipids, are presumed to be distributed in the serum fraction as well as surrounding the rubber particle surface. The phospholipid-protein layers covering the rubber particle surface are especially interesting due to their ability to enhance the colloidal stability of NR latex. In this study, we have characterized the components surrounding the NR particle surface and investigated their role in the colloidal stability of NR particles. Proteins from the cream fraction were proteolytically removed from the NR latex and compare to those from the serum fractions using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealing that both fractions contained similar proteins in certain molecular weights such as 14.5, 25 and 27 kDa. Phospholipids removed from latex by treatment with NaOH were analyzed using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and several major signals were assignable to -(CH(2))(n)-, -CH(2)OP, -CH(2)OC═O and -OCH(2)CH(2)NH-. These signals are important evidence that indicates phospholipids associate with the rubber chain. The colloidal behavior of rubber lattices before and after removal of protein-lipid membrane was evaluated by zeta potential analysis and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The lowest zeta potential value of NR particles was observed at pH 10, consequently leading to the highest stability of rubber particles. Additionally, SEM micrographs clearly displayed a gray ring near the particle surface corresponding to the protein-lipid membrane layer.

  8. Association between specific proteins and dimorphic growth of penicillium marneffei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the difference of proteome between yeast form and mould form of Penicillium marneffei,and to investigate the association of specific proteins expressed with biochemical properties, susceptibility of antifungal agent with dimorphic growth. Methods: Biochemisay identity plates were used to test the assimilation of carbohydrates and E-test strips were used to detect the minimum inhibitory concentration (M IC) of mould form and yeast form 16 P. marneffei. Surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) mass spectrometry with ProteinChip WCX2 was performed to compare the expressed proteins in yeast form and mould form.Protein profiles were read by PBSⅡ proteinchip reader and the proteome database was analyzed by proteinchip software 3.2.0. Results:Mould form assimilated lactose, melibiose significantly stronger ( P < 0.01 ), while yeast form assimilated sorbinose significantly stronger (P< 0.05). The mean MIC of fluconazole against mould form increased significantly ( P < 0.01 ) compared with yeast form. Seventy-five distinct proteins were found in yeast form and mould form of P. marneffei, in which proteins of 2900Da and 3151Da were specifically expressed in yeast form and other two proteins of 13151Da and 13285Da were specifically expressed in mould form ( P < 0.01 ).Conclusion: The assimilation of carbohydrates and drug susceptibility of P. marneffei may change partly due to the morphogenetic conversion and different temperature. Specific proteins may be involved in the regulation, the change of biochemical reaction and drug susceptibility during dimorphic growth.

  9. Protein domains and architectural innovation in plant-associated Proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie J Allan

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of new complex biological behaviour tends to arise by novel combinations of existing building blocks. The functional and evolutionary building blocks of the proteome are protein domains, the function of a protein being dependent on its constituent domains. We clustered completely-sequenced proteomes of prokaryotes on the basis of their protein domain content, as defined by Pfam (release 16.0. This revealed that, although there was a correlation between phylogeny and domain content, other factors also have an influence. This observation motivated an investigation of the relationship between an organism's lifestyle and the complement of domains and domain architectures found within its proteome. Results We took a census of all protein domains and domain combinations (architectures encoded in the completely-sequenced proteobacterial genomes. Nine protein domain families were identified that are found in phylogenetically disparate plant-associated bacteria but are absent from non-plant-associated bacteria. Most of these are known to play a role in the plant-associated lifestyle, but they also included domain of unknown function DUF1427, which is found in plant symbionts and pathogens of the alpha-, beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria, but not known in any other organism. Further, several domains were identified as being restricted to phytobacteria and Eukaryotes. One example is the RolB/RolC glucosidase family, which is found only in Agrobacterium species and in plants. We identified the 0.5% of Pfam protein domain families that were most significantly over-represented in the plant-associated Proteobacteria with respect to the background frequencies in the whole set of available proteobacterial proteomes. These included guanylate cyclase, domains implicated in aromatic catabolism, cellulase and several domains of unknown function. We identified 459 unique domain architectures found in phylogenetically diverse plant pathogens

  10. Association of protein C23 with rapidly labeled nucleolar RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, A.H.; Olson, M.O.

    1986-10-07

    The association of nucleolar phosphoprotein C23 with preribosomal ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles was examined in Novikoff hepatoma nucleoli. RNA was labeled with (/sup 3/H)uridine for various times in cell suspensions, and RNP particles were extracted from isolated nucleoli and fractionated by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. The majority of protein C23 cosedimented with fractions containing rapidly labeled RNA (RL fraction). To determine whether there was a direct association of RNA with protein C23, the RL fraction was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light (254 nm) for short periods of time. After 2 min of exposure there was a 50% decrease in C23 as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analyses, with no significant further decrease at longer times. When UV-treated fractions were subjected to phenol/chloroform extractions, as much as 30% of the labeled RNA was found in the phenol (protein) layer, indicating that RNA became cross-linked to protein. Similarly, there was an increase in protein C23 extracted into the water layer after irradiation. By SDS-PAGE analyses the cross-linked species migrated more slowly than protein C23, appearing as a smear detected either by (/sup 3/H)uridine radioactivity or by anti-C23 antibody. With anti-C23 antibodies, up to 25% of the labeled RNA was precipitated from the RL fraction. Dot-blot hybridizations, using cloned rDNA fragments as probes, indicated that the RNA in the RL fraction and the immunoprecipitated RNA contained sequences from 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA.

  11. Oil bodies and their associated proteins, oleosin and caleosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gitte I.; Mundy, John; Tzen, Jason T. C.

    2001-01-01

    Oil bodies are lipid storage organelles which have been analyzed biochemically due to the economic importance of oil seeds. Although oil bodies are structurally simple, the mechanisms involved in their formation and degradation remain controversial. At present, only two proteins associated with oil...... bodies have been described, oleosin and caleosin. Oleosin is thought to be important for oil body stabilization in the cytosol, although neither the structure nor the function of oleosin has been fully elucidated. Even less is known about caleosin, which has only recently been described [Chen et al....... (1999) Plant Cell Physiol 40: 1079-1086; Naested et al. (2000) Plant Mol Biol 44: 463-476]. Caleosin and caleosin-like proteins are not unique to oil bodies and are associated with an endoplasmatic reticulum subdomain in some cell types. Here we review the synthesis and degradation of oil bodies...

  12. Expression of Recombinant Pregnancy-associated Plasma Protein-A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Bin-yan; LI; Zi-ying; ZHANG; Xue-feng; LIU; Yi-bing

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A(PAPP-A)is producted by the syntrophoblast tissue of the placenta and decidual cells.It belongs to macromolecular glycoprotein.PAPP-A is a sensitive serum marker of Down’s syndrome and has clinical valuable in the early identification of acute coronary syndrome(ACS).According to the structure of PAPP-A,PAPP-A DNA is divided into five segments(S1-S5)for

  13. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Claire Thornton; Carina Mallard; Rajanikant Krishnamurthy; Syam Nair; Henrik Hagberg

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk) family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebr...

  14. Association between Depression and C-Reactive Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsheng Ma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Depression has been associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, and a depression-related elevation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP has been proposed as a possible mechanism. The objective of this paper is to examine association between depression and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP. Methods. Subjects consisted of 508 healthy adults (mean age 48.5 years; 49% women, 88% white residing in central Massachusetts. Data were collected at baseline and at quarterly intervals over a one-year period per individual. Multivariable linear mixed models were used to assess the association for the entire sample and by gender. Results. The mean Beck Depression Inventory score was 5.8 (standard deviation (SD 5.4; median 4.3, and average serum hs-CRP was 1.8 mg/L (SD 1.7; median 1.2. Results from the multivariable linear mixed models show that individuals with higher depression scores have higher levels of hs-CRP. Analyses by gender show persistence of an independent association among women, but not among men. Body mass index (BMI = weight(kg/height(m2 appears to be a partial mediator of this relationship. Conclusion. Depression score was correlated to hs-CRP levels in women. Further studies are required to elucidate the biological mechanisms underlying these associations and their implications.

  15. Why are proteins with glutamine- and asparagine-rich regions associated with protein misfolding diseases?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor [CCMAR and FCT, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8000 Faro (Portugal)

    2005-12-21

    The possibility that vibrational excited states (VESs) are the drivers of protein folding and function (the VES hypothesis) is explored to explain the reason why Gln- and Asn-rich proteins are associated with degenerative diseases. The Davydov/Scott model is extended to describe energy transfer from the water solution to the protein and vice versa. Computer simulations show that, on average, Gln and Asn residues lead to an initial larger absorption of energy from the environment to the protein, something that can explain the greater structural instability of prions. The sporadic, inherited and infectious character of prion diseases is discussed in the light of the VES hypothesis. An alternative treatment for prion diseases is suggested.

  16. A review of the thermodynamics of protein association to ligands, protein adsorption, and adsorption isotherms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    The application of thermodynamic models in the development of chromatographic separation processes is discussed. The paper analyses the thermodynamic principles of protein adsorption. It can be modeled either as a reversible association between the adsorbate and the ligands or as a steady...... of adsorption is discussed. Hydrophobic and reversed phase chromatography are useful techniques for measuring solute activity coefficients at infinite dilution....

  17. Modeling associated protein-DNA pattern discovery with unified scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tak-Ming; Lo, Leung-Yau; Sze-To, Ho-Yin; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Xiao, Xinshu; Wong, Man-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding protein-DNA interactions, specifically transcription factor (TF) and transcription factor binding site (TFBS) bindings, is crucial in deciphering gene regulation. The recent associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery combines one-sided motif discovery on both the TF and the TFBS sides. Using sequences only, it identifies the short protein-DNA binding cores available only in high-resolution 3D structures. The discovered patterns lead to promising subtype and disease analysis applications. While the related studies use either association rule mining or existing TFBS annotations, none has proposed any formal unified (both-sided) model to prioritize the top verifiable associated patterns. We propose the unified scores and develop an effective pipeline for associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery. Our stringent instance-level evaluations show that the patterns with the top unified scores match with the binding cores in 3D structures considerably better than the previous works, where up to 90 percent of the top 20 scored patterns are verified. We also introduce extended verification from literature surveys, where the high unified scores correspond to even higher verification percentage. The top scored patterns are confirmed to match the known WRKY binding cores with no available 3D structures and agree well with the top binding affinities of in vivo experiments.

  18. Structural and functional characterization of synapse-associated protein-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei

    Synapse-associated protein-97 (SAP97) as a scaffold protein plays an important role in regulating neural signal transmission in the central nervous system by coupling with activated membrane receptors, ion channels, and downstream signaling proteins. SAP97 consists of six functional domains: L27, PDZ1, PDZ2, PDZ3, SH3, and GK. Each of these domains mediates the interactions of SAP97 with other proteins. Understanding the molecular mechanism of these interactions in neural signal transmission is a goal of this study. Here high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy are employed towards the goal of the structural and functional characterization of SAP97; specifically, we (a) characterize the binding of the PDZ domains of SAP97 with the C-terminus of NR2B, and determine the structure of the PDZ1-NR2B; (b) characterize the binding of the PDZ domains with the C-terminus of stargazin and multiple mutants, and identify the perturbed amino acids in PDZ2 upon the binding of stargazin; (c) characterize the binding specificity carried by the beta2/beta3 loop of the PDZ3 domain. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism for the binding specificities of the PDZ domains of SAP97, thereby furthering the development of drugs that target these domains to treat neurological diseases.

  19. Study on interaction between microtubule associated protein tau and prion protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jun; ZHOU Wei; DONG Xiaoping; ZHANG Jin; YAO Hailan; WANG Xiaofan; LI Feng; CHEN Lan; GAO Chen; GAO Jianmei; NIE Kai

    2006-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is considered to play roles in many neurodegenerative diseases including some transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. To address the possible molecular linkage of prion protein (PrP) and tau, a GST-fusion segment of human tau covering the three-repeat region and various PrP segments was used in the tests of GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation. We found tau protein interacted with various style prion proteins such as native prion protein (PrPC) or protease-resistant isoform (prpSc). Co-localization signals of tau and PrP were found in the CHO cell tranfected with both PrP and tau gene. The domain of interaction with tau was located at N-terminal of PrP (residues 23 to 91). The evidence of molecular interactions between PrP and tau protein highlights a potential role of tau in the biological function of PrP and the pathogenesis of TSEs.

  20. Microtubule Associated Proteins in Plants and the Processes They Manage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) are proteins that physically bind to microtubules in eukaryotes. MAPs play important roles in regulating the polymerization and organization of microtubules and in using the ensuing microtubule arrays to carry out a variety of cellular functions. In plants, MAPs manage the construction, repositioning, and dismantling of four distinct microtubule arrays throughout the cell cycle. Three of these arrays, the cortical array, the preprophase band,and the phragmoplast, are prominent to plants and are responsible for facilitating cell wall deposition and modification,transducing signals, demarcating the plane of cell division, and forming the new cell plate during cytokinesis, This review highlights important aspects of how MAPs in plants establish and maintain microtubule arrays as well as regulate cell growth, cell division, and cellular responses to the environment.

  1. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Huang, Jianbin; Ma, Zhixin; Zhang, Jing; Zou, Yapeng; Gao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html.

  2. The Epc-N domain: a predicted protein-protein interaction domain found in select chromatin associated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Jason

    2006-01-01

    interaction module found in chromatin associated proteins. It is possible that the Epc-N domain serves as a direct link between histone acetylation and methylation statuses. The unusual phyletic distribution of Epc-N-containing proteins may provide a conduit for future insight into how different organisms form, perceive and respond to epigenetic information.

  3. Association of limbic system-associated membrane protein (LSAMP) to male completed suicide

    OpenAIRE

    Maron Eduard; Kõks Sulev; Vasar Eero; Lang Aavo; Tasa Gunnar; Must Anne; Väli Marika

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated volumetric abnormalities in limbic structures of suicide victims. The morphological changes might be caused by some inherited neurodevelopmental defect, such as failure to form proper axonal connections due to genetically determined dysfunction of neurite guidance molecules. Limbic system-associated membrane protein (LSAMP) is a neuronal adhesive molecule, preferentially expressed in developing limbic system neuronal dendrites and som...

  4. Regulation of neuronal differentiation by proteins associated with nuclear bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Förthmann

    Full Text Available Nuclear bodies are large sub-nuclear structures composed of RNA and protein molecules. The Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN protein localizes to Cajal bodies (CBs and nuclear gems. Diminished cellular concentration of SMN is associated with the neurodegenerative disease Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA. How nuclear body architecture and its structural components influence neuronal differentiation remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed the effects of SMN and two of its interaction partners in cellular models of neuronal differentiation. The nuclear 23 kDa isoform of Fibroblast Growth Factor - 2 (FGF-2(23 is one of these interacting proteins - and was previously observed to influence nuclear bodies by destabilizing nuclear gems and mobilizing SMN from Cajal bodies (CBs. Here we demonstrate that FGF-2(23 blocks SMN-promoted neurite outgrowth, and also show that SMN disrupts FGF-2(23-dependent transcription. Our results indicate that FGF-2(23 and SMN form an inactive complex that interferes with neuronal differentiation by mutually antagonizing nuclear functions. Coilin is another nuclear SMN binding partner and a marker protein for Cajal bodies (CBs. In addition, coilin is essential for CB function in maturation of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs. The role of coilin outside of Cajal bodies and its putative impacts in tissue differentiation are poorly defined. The present study shows that protein levels of nucleoplasmic coilin outside of CBs decrease during neuronal differentiation. Overexpression of coilin has an inhibitory effect on neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we find that nucleoplasmic coilin inhibits neurite outgrowth independent of SMN binding revealing a new function for coilin in neuronal differentiation.

  5. Simultaneous time-lamination imaging of protein association using a split fluorescent timer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Ayari; Hattori, Mitsuru; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2015-03-17

    Studies of temporal behaviors of protein association in living cells are crucially important for elucidating the fundamental roles and the mechanism of interactive coordination for cell activities. We developed a method for investigating the temporal alternation of a particular protein assembly using monomeric fluorescent proteins, fluorescent timers (FTs), of which the fluorescent color changes from blue to red over time. We identified a dissection site of the FTs, which allows complementation of the split FT fragments. The split fragments of each FT variant recovered their fluorescence and maintained inherent rates of the color changes upon the reassembly of the fragments in vitro. We applied this method to visualize the aggregation process of α-synuclein in living cells. The size of the aggregates with the temporal information was analyzed from ratio values of the blue and red fluorescence of the reconstituted FTs, from which the aggregation rates were evaluated. This method using the split FT fragments enables tracing and visualizing temporal alternations of various protein associations by single fluorescence measurements at a given time point.

  6. Identification of an RNA Polymerase III Regulator Linked to Disease-Associated Protein Aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sin, Olga; de Jong, Tristan; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Kudron, Michelle; Zaini, Mohamad Amr; Aprile, Francesco A.; Seinstra, Renee I.; Stroo, Esther; Prins, Romeo Willinge; Martineau, Celine N.; Wang, Hai Hui; Hogewerf, Wytse; Steinhof, Anne; Wanker, Erich E.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Calkhoven, Cornelis F.; Reinke, Valerie; Guryev, Victor; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Protein aggregation is associated with age-related neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and polyglutamine diseases. As a causal relationship between protein aggregation and neurodegeneration remains elusive, understanding the cellular mechanisms regulating protein aggregation will help

  7. Purification and partial characterization of the opacity-associated proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Gonococci, grown on agar, frequently give rise to opaque colonies. This opacity phenotype is associated with the presence of one or more outer membrane proteins of approximately 28,000 mol weight. These proteins are included within a class of proteins named proteins II. A method is described to isolate and purify the opacity-associated proteins from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This method uses high concentrations of calcium and a zwitterionic detergent at pH 4.0. Under these conditions proteins II...

  8. Conservation of Oxidative Protein Stabilization in an Insect Homologue of Parkinsonism-Associated Protein DJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiusheng; Prahlad, Janani; Wilson, Mark A. (UNL)

    2012-08-21

    DJ-1 is a conserved, disease-associated protein that protects against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in multiple organisms. Human DJ-1 contains a functionally essential cysteine residue (Cys106) whose oxidation is important for regulating protein function by an unknown mechanism. This residue is well-conserved in other DJ-1 homologues, including two (DJ-1{alpha} and DJ-1{beta}) in Drosophila melanogaster. Because D. melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying DJ-1 function, we have determined the crystal structure and impact of cysteine oxidation on Drosophila DJ-1{beta}. The structure of D. melanogaster DJ-1{beta} is similar to that of human DJ-1, although two important residues in the human protein, Met26 and His126, are not conserved in DJ-1{beta}. His126 in human DJ-1 is substituted with a tyrosine in DJ-1{beta}, and this residue is not able to compose a putative catalytic dyad with Cys106 that was proposed to be important in the human protein. The reactive cysteine in DJ-1 is oxidized readily to the cysteine-sulfinic acid in both flies and humans, and this may regulate the cytoprotective function of the protein. We show that the oxidation of this conserved cysteine residue to its sulfinate form (Cys-SO{sub 2{sup -}}) results in considerable thermal stabilization of both Drosophila DJ-1{beta} and human DJ-1. Therefore, protein stabilization is one potential mechanism by which cysteine oxidation may regulate DJ-1 function in vivo. More generally, most close DJ-1 homologues are likely stabilized by cysteine-sulfinic acid formation but destabilized by further oxidation, suggesting that they are biphasically regulated by oxidative modification.

  9. Identification of autophagosome-associated proteins and regulators by quantitative proteomic analysis and genetic screens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Jörn; Høyer-Hansen, Maria; Nielsen, Maria;

    2012-01-01

    deprivation or rapamycin or concanamycin A treatment. The autophagosome-associated proteins were dependent on stimulus, but a core set of proteins was stimulus-independent. Remarkably, proteasomal proteins were abundant among the stimulus-independent common autophagosome-associated proteins...

  10. Inference of gene-phenotype associations via protein-protein interaction and orthology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panwen Wang

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental goals of genetics is to understand gene functions and their associated phenotypes. To achieve this goal, in this study we developed a computational algorithm that uses orthology and protein-protein interaction information to infer gene-phenotype associations for multiple species. Furthermore, we developed a web server that provides genome-wide phenotype inference for six species: fly, human, mouse, worm, yeast, and zebrafish. We evaluated our inference method by comparing the inferred results with known gene-phenotype associations. The high Area Under the Curve values suggest a significant performance of our method. By applying our method to two human representative diseases, Type 2 Diabetes and Breast Cancer, we demonstrated that our method is able to identify related Gene Ontology terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. The web server can be used to infer functions and putative phenotypes of a gene along with the candidate genes of a phenotype, and thus aids in disease candidate gene discovery. Our web server is available at http://jjwanglab.org/PhenoPPIOrth.

  11. Collagenous Colitis Associated with Protein Losing Enteropathy in a Toddler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama F. Almadhoun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous mucosal inflammatory disease is a rare gastrointestinal disorder that involves the columnar lining of gastric and intestinal mucosa and is characterized by a distinct subepithelial collagen deposition. Recent clinical and pathological evidence have indicated that collagenous mucosal inflammatory disease can be extensive disease that may concomitantly involve several gastrointestinal sites at the same time. This entity, however, occurs infrequently in children. It is even less common to find concomitant depositions of collagen in the mucosa of gastrointestinal sites other than the colon. Only two cases in pediatric literature reported concomitant involvement, one with gastric and colonic involvement and the other one with gastroduodenocolitis. We are reporting a 15-month-old boy who presented with severe diarrhea and diffuse edema secondary to hypoalbuminemia. Further testing documented protein losing enteropathy (PLE associated with collagenous colitis.

  12. Mammalian Clusterin associated protein 1 is an evolutionarily conserved protein required for ciliogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasek Raymond C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clusterin associated protein 1 (CLUAP1 was initially characterized as a protein that interacts with clusterin, and whose gene is frequently upregulated in colon cancer. Although the consequences of these observations remain unclear, research of CLUAP1 homologs in C. elegans and zebrafish indicates that it is needed for cilia assembly and maintenance in these models. To begin evaluating whether Cluap1 has an evolutionarily conserved role in cilia in mammalian systems and to explore the association of Cluap1 with disease pathogenesis and developmental abnormalities, we generated Cluap1 mutant mice. Methods Cluap1 mutant embryos were generated and examined for gross morphological and anatomical defects using light microscopy. Reverse transcription PCR, β-galactosidase staining assays, and immunofluorescence analysis were used to determine the expression of the gene and localization of the protein in vivo and in cultured cell lines. We also used immunofluorescence analysis and qRT-PCR to examine defects in the Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in mutant embryos. Results Cluap1 mutant embryos die in mid-gestation, indicating that it is necessary for proper development. Mutant phenotypes include a failure of embryonic turning, an enlarged pericardial sac, and defects in neural tube development. Consistent with the diverse phenotypes, Cluap1 is widely expressed. Furthermore, the Cluap1 protein localizes to primary cilia, and mutant embryos were found to lack cilia at embryonic day 9.5. The phenotypes observed in Cluap1 mutant mice are indicative of defects in Sonic hedgehog signaling. This was confirmed by analyzing hedgehog signaling activity in Cluap1 mutants, which revealed that the pathway is repressed. Conclusions These data indicate that the function of Cluap1 is evolutionarily conserved with regard to ciliogenesis. Further, the results implicate mammalian Cluap1 as a key regulator of hedgehog signaling and as an

  13. The Metastasis-associated Proteins 1 and 2 Form Distinct Protein Complexes with Histone Deacetylase Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-LiYao; Wcn-MingYang

    2005-01-01

    The metastasis-associated protein MTA1 has been shown to express differentially to high levels in metastatic cells. MTA2, which is homologous to MTA1, is a component of the NURD ATP-dependcnt chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylase complex. Here we report evidence that although both human MTA1 and MTA2 repress transcription specifically, are located in the nucleus, and contain associated histone deacetylase activity, they exist in two biochemically distinct protein complexes and may perform different functions pertaining to tumor metastasis. Specifically, both MTA1 and MTA2 complexes exert histone deacetylase activity. However, the MTA1 complex contained HDAC1/2, RbAp46/48, and MBD3, but not Sin3 or Mi2, two important components of the MTA2 complex. Moreover, the MTA2 complex is similar to the HDAC1 complex, suggesting a housekeeping role of the MTA2 complex. The MTA1 complex could be further separated, resulting in acore MTA1-HDAC complex, showing that the histone deacetylase activity and transcriptional repression activity were integral properties of the MTA1 complex. Finally, MTA1, unlike MTA2, did not interact with the pleotropic transcription factor YY1 or the immunophilin FKBP25. We suggest that MTA1 associates with adifferent set of transcription factors from MTA2 and that this property may contribute to the metastatic potential of cells overexpressing MTA1. We also report the finding of human MTA3, which is highly homologous toboth MTA1 and MTA2. However, MTA3 does not repress transcription to a significant level and appears to have a diffused pattern of subcellular localization, suggesting a biological role distinct from that of the other two MTA proteins.

  14. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mutant vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein-B transgenic mice develop TAR-DNA-binding protein-43 pathology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tudor, E L

    2010-05-19

    Cytoplasmic ubiquitin-positive inclusions containing TAR-DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) within motor neurons are the hallmark pathology of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). TDP-43 is a nuclear protein and the mechanisms by which it becomes mislocalized and aggregated in ALS are not properly understood. A mutation in the vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein-B (VAPB) involving a proline to serine substitution at position 56 (VAPBP56S) is the cause of familial ALS type-8. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which VAPBP56S induces disease, we created transgenic mice that express either wild-type VAPB (VAPBwt) or VAPBP56S in the nervous system. Analyses of both sets of mice revealed no overt motor phenotype nor alterations in survival. However, VAPBP56S but not VAPBwt transgenic mice develop cytoplasmic TDP-43 accumulations within spinal cord motor neurons that were first detected at 18 months of age. Our results suggest a link between abnormal VAPBP56S function and TDP-43 mislocalization.

  15. GCK-MODY diabetes associated with protein misfolding, cellular self-association and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, Maria; Aukrust, Ingvild; Johansson, Bente B; Molnes, Janne; Molven, Anders; Matschinsky, Franz M; Søvik, Oddmund; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2012-11-01

    GCK-MODY, dominantly inherited mild fasting hyperglycemia, has been associated with >600 different mutations in the glucokinase (GK)-encoding gene (GCK). When expressed as recombinant pancreatic proteins, some mutations result in enzymes with normal/near-normal catalytic properties. The molecular mechanism(s) of GCK-MODY due to these mutations has remained elusive. Here, we aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms for two such catalytically 'normal' GCK mutations (S263P and G264S) in the F260-L270 loop of GK. When stably overexpressed in HEK293 cells and MIN6 β-cells, the S263P- and G264S-encoded mutations generated misfolded proteins with an increased rate of degradation (S263P>G264S) by the protein quality control machinery, and a propensity to self-associate (G264S>S263P) and form dimers (SDS resistant) and aggregates (partly Triton X-100 insoluble), as determined by pulse-chase experiments and subcellular fractionation. Thus, the GCK-MODY mutations S263P and G264S lead to protein misfolding causing destabilization, cellular dimerization/aggregation and enhanced rate of degradation. In silico predicted conformational changes of the F260-L270 loop structure are considered to mediate the dimerization of both mutant proteins by a domain swapping mechanism. Thus, similar properties may represent the molecular mechanisms for additional unexplained GCK-MODY mutations, and may also contribute to the disease mechanism in other previously characterized GCK-MODY inactivating mutations.

  16. Transient phosphorylation of tumor associated microtubule associated protein (TMAP)/cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2) at Thr-596 during early phases of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Choi, Yong-Bock; Lee, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Kwon, Hye-Rim; Seong, Yeon-Sun; Kim, Heung Tae; Park, Joobae; Bae, Chang-Dae; Hong, Kyeong-Man

    2008-08-31

    Tumor associated microtubule associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2) is a mitotic spindle-associated protein whose expression is cell cycle-regulated and also frequently deregulated in cancer cells. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against TMAP/CKAP2 were produced: B-1-13 and D-12-3. Interestingly, the reactivity of mAb D-12-3 to TMAP/CKAP2 was markedly decreased specifically in mitotic cell lysate. The epitope mapping study showed that mAb D-12-3 recognizes the amino acid sequence between 569 and 625 and that phosphorylation at T596 completely abolishes the reactivity of the antibody, suggesting that the differential reactivity originates from the phosphorylation status at T596. Immunofluorescence staining showed that mAb D-12-3 fails to detect TMAP/CKAP2 in mitotic cells between prophase and metaphase, but the staining becomes evident again in anaphase, suggesting that phosphorylation at T596 occurs transiently during early phases of mitosis. These results suggest that the cellular functions of TMAP/CKAP2 might be regulated by timely phosphorylation and dephosphorylation during the course of mitosis.

  17. Huntingtin-associated protein 1 interacts with breakpoint cluster region protein to regulate neuronal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai-Tsang Huang

    Full Text Available Alterations in microtubule-dependent trafficking and certain signaling pathways in neuronal cells represent critical pathogenesis in neurodegenerative diseases. Huntingtin (Htt-associated protein-1 (Hap1 is a brain-enriched protein and plays a key role in the trafficking of neuronal surviving and differentiating cargos. Lack of Hap1 reduces signaling through tropomyosin-related kinases including extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK, resulting in inhibition of neurite outgrowth, hypothalamic dysfunction and postnatal lethality in mice. To examine how Hap1 is involved in microtubule-dependent trafficking and neuronal differentiation, we performed a proteomic analysis using taxol-precipitated microtubules from Hap1-null and wild-type mouse brains. Breakpoint cluster region protein (Bcr, a Rho GTPase regulator, was identified as a Hap1-interacting partner. Bcr was co-immunoprecipitated with Hap1 from transfected neuro-2a cells and co-localized with Hap1A isoform more in the differentiated than in the nondifferentiated cells. The Bcr downstream effectors, namely ERK and p38, were significantly less activated in Hap1-null than in wild-type mouse hypothalamus. In conclusion, Hap1 interacts with Bcr on microtubules to regulate neuronal differentiation.

  18. Hepatitis B virus x protein induces autophagy via activating death-associated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H-T; Chen, G G; Hu, B-G; Zhang, Z-Y; Yun, J-P; He, M-L; Lai, P B S

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus x protein (HBX), a product of hepatitis B virus (HBV), is a multifunctional protein that regulates viral replication and various cellular functions. Recently, HBX has been shown to induce autophagy; however, the responsible mechanism is not fully known. In this study, we established stable HBX-expressing epithelial Chang cells as the platform to study how HBX induced autophagy. The results showed that the overexpression of HBX resulted in starvation-induced autophagy. HBX-induced autophagy was related to its ability to dephosphorylate/activate death-associated protein kinase (DAPK). The block of DAPK by its siRNA significantly counteracted HBX-mediated autophagy, confirming the positive role of DAPK in this process. HBX also induced Beclin 1, which functions at the downstream of the DAPK-mediated autophagy pathway. Although HBX could activate JNK, a kinase known to participate in autophagy in certain conditions, the change in JNK failed to influence HBX-induced autophagy. In conclusion, HBX induces autophagy via activating DAPK in a pathway related to Beclin 1, but not JNK. This new finding should help us to understand the role of autophagy in HBX-mediated pathogenesis and thus may provide targets for intervening HBX-related disorders.

  19. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D; Meade, Bryan R; Dowdy, Steven F

    2015-04-20

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms.

  20. Promyelocytic leukemia protein enhances apoptosis of gastric cancer cells through Yes-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhipeng; Chen, Jiamin; Shao, Liming; Ma, Wangqian; Xu, Dingting

    2015-09-01

    It has been shown that Yes-associated protein (YAP) acts as a transcriptional co-activator to regulate p73-dependent apoptosis in response to DNA damage in some cell types, and promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is involved in the regulation loop through stabilization of YAP through sumoylation. Although YAP has been shown to be significantly upregulated in gastric cancer, whether the YAP/PML/p73 regulation loop also functions in gastric cancer is unknown. Here, we show significantly higher levels of YAP and significantly lower levels of PML in the gastric cancer specimen. Overexpression of YAP in gastric cancer cells significantly increased cell growth, but did not affect apoptosis. However, overexpression of PML in gastric cancer cells significantly increased cell apoptosis, resulting in decreases in cell growth, which seemed to require the presence of YAP. The effect of PML on apoptosis appeared to be conducted through p73-mediated modulation of apoptosis-associated genes, Bcl-2, Bak, and caspase9. Thus, our study suggests the presence of a YAP/PML/p73 regulatory loop in gastric cancer, and highlights PML as a promising tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through YAP-coordinated cancer cell apoptosis.

  1. Genetic and biochemical analysis of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, cap, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamukai, M; Gerst, J; Field, J.; Riggs, M.; Rodgers, L; Wigler, M; Young, D

    1992-01-01

    We have identified, cloned, and studied a gene, cap, encoding a protein that is associated with adenylyl cyclase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This protein shares significant sequence homology with the adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CAP is a bifunctional protein; the N-terminal domain appears to be involved in cellular responsiveness to RAS, whereas loss of the C-terminal portion is associated with morphological and nutritional...

  2. Staphylococcus saprophyticus surface-associated protein (Ssp) is associated with lifespan reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabados, Florian; Mohner, Amelie; Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören G

    2013-10-01

    Staphylococcal lipases have been proposed as pathogenicity factors. In Staphylococcus saprophyticus the surface-associated protein (Ssp) has been previously characterized as a cell wall-associated true lipase. A S. saprophyticus Δssp::ermB mutant has been described as less virulent in an in vivo model of urinary tract infection compared with its wild-type. This is the first report showing that S. saprophyticus induced a lifespan reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans similar to that of S. aureus RN4220. In two S. saprophyticus Δssp::ermB mutants lifespan reduction in C. elegans was partly abolished. In order to attribute virulence to the lipase activity itself and distinguish this phenomenon from the presence of the Ssp-protein, the conserved active site of the lipase was modified by site-directed ligase-independent mutagenesis and lipase activity-deficient mutants were constructed. These results indicate that the Ssp is associated with pathogenicity in C. elegans and one could speculate that the lipase activity itself is responsible for this virulence.

  3. Self-association of the Lentivirus protein, Nef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia J Victor

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 pathogenic factor, Nef, is a multifunctional protein present in the cytosol and on membranes of infected cells. It has been proposed that a spatial and temporal regulation of the conformation of Nef sequentially matches Nef's multiple functions to the process of virion production. Further, it has been suggested that dimerization is required for multiple Nef activities. A dimerization interface has been proposed based on intermolecular contacts between Nefs within hexagonal Nef/FynSH3 crystals. The proposed dimerization interface consists of the hydrophobic B-helix and flanking salt bridges between R105 and D123. Here, we test whether Nef self-association is mediated by this interface and address the overall significance of oligomerization. Results By co-immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrated that HIV-1Nef exists as monomers and oligomers with about half of the Nef protomers oligomerized. Nef oligomers were found to be present in the cytosol and on membranes. Removal of the myristate did not enhance the oligomerization of soluble Nef. Also, SIVNef oligomerizes despite lacking a dimerization interface functionally homologous to that proposed for HIV-1Nef. Moreover, HIV-1Nef and SIVNef form hetero-oligomers demonstrating the existence of homologous oligomerization interfaces that are distinct from that previously proposed (R105-D123. Intracellular cross-linking by formaldehyde confirmed that SF2Nef dimers are present in intact cells, but surprisingly self-association was dependent on R105, but not D123. SIVMAC239Nef can be cross-linked at its only cysteine, C55, and SF2Nef is also cross-linked, but at C206 instead of C55, suggesting that Nefs exhibit multiple dimeric structures. ClusPro dimerization analysis of HIV-1Nef homodimers and HIV-1Nef/SIVNef heterodimers identified a new potential dimerization interface, including a dibasic motif at R105-R106 and a six amino acid hydrophobic surface. Conclusions We have

  4. Fontan-associated protein-losing enteropathy and plastic bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Stringer, Kathleen A; Donohue, Janet E; Yu, Sunkyung; Shaver, Ashley; Caruthers, Regine L; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Fifer, Carlen; Goldberg, Caren; Russell, Mark W

    2015-04-01

    To characterize the medical history, disease progression, and treatment of current-era patients with the rare diseases Fontan-associated protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) and plastic bronchitis. A novel survey that queried demographics, medical details, and treatment information was piloted and placed online via a Facebook portal, allowing social media to power the study. Participation regardless of PLE or plastic bronchitis diagnosis was allowed. Case control analyses compared patients with PLE and plastic bronchitis with uncomplicated control patients receiving the Fontan procedure. The survey was completed by 671 subjects, including 76 with PLE, 46 with plastic bronchitis, and 7 with both. Median PLE diagnosis was 2.5 years post-Fontan. Hospitalization for PLE occurred in 71% with 41% hospitalized ≥ 3 times. Therapy varied significantly. Patients with PLE more commonly had hypoplastic left ventricle (62% vs 44% control; OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.43-5.53), chylothorax (66% vs 41%; OR 2.96, CI 1.65-5.31), and cardiothoracic surgery in addition to staged palliation (17% vs 5%; OR 4.27, CI 1.63-11.20). Median plastic bronchitis diagnosis was 2 years post-Fontan. Hospitalization for plastic bronchitis occurred in 91% with 61% hospitalized ≥ 3 times. Therapy was very diverse. Patients with plastic bronchitis more commonly had chylothorax at any surgery (72% vs 51%; OR 2.47, CI 1.20-5.08) and seasonal allergies (52% vs 36%; OR 1.98, CI 1.01-3.89). Patient-specific factors are associated with diagnoses of PLE or plastic bronchitis. Treatment strategies are diverse without clear patterns. These results provide a foundation upon which to design future therapeutic studies and identify a clear need for forming consensus approaches to treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Complete protein-protein association kinetics in atomic detail revealed by molecular dynamics simulations and Markov modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Nuria; Doerr, Stefan; de Fabritiis, Gianni; Noé, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Protein-protein association is fundamental to many life processes. However, a microscopic model describing the structures and kinetics during association and dissociation is lacking on account of the long lifetimes of associated states, which have prevented efficient sampling by direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here we demonstrate protein-protein association and dissociation in atomistic resolution for the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar by combining adaptive high-throughput MD simulations and hidden Markov modelling. The model reveals experimentally consistent intermediate structures, energetics and kinetics on timescales from microseconds to hours. A variety of flexibly attached intermediates and misbound states funnel down to a transition state and a native basin consisting of the loosely bound near-native state and the tightly bound crystallographic state. These results offer a deeper level of insight into macromolecular recognition and our approach opens the door for understanding and manipulating a wide range of macromolecular association processes.

  6. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Thornton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  7. The Hippo-Yes Association Protein Pathway in Liver Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer mortality. Despite continuing development of new therapies, prognosis for patients with HCC remains extremely poor. In recent years, control of organ size becomes a hot topic in HCC development. The Hippo signaling pathway has been delineated and shown to be critical in controlling organ size in both Drosophila and mammals. The Hippo kinase cascade, a singling pathway that antagonizes the transcriptional coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP, plays an important role in animal organ size control by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis rates. During HCC development, this pathway is likely inactivated in tumor initiated cells that escape suppressive constrain exerted by the surrounding normal tissue, thus allowing clonal expansion and tumor development. We have reviewed evolutionary changes in YAP as well as other components of the Hippo pathway and described the relationships between YAP genes and HCC. We also discuss regulation of transcription factors that are up- and downstream of YAP in liver cancer development.

  8. Lacritin and other autophagy associated proteins in ocular surface health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnati, Roy; Talla, Venu; Peterson, Katherine; Laurie, Gordon W

    2016-03-01

    Advantage may be taken of macroautophagy ('autophagy') to promote ocular health. Autophagy continually captures aged or damaged cellular material for lysosomal degradation and recyling. When autophagic flux is chronically elevated, or alternatively deficient, health suffers. Chronic elevation of flux and stress are the consequence of inflammatory cytokines or of dry eye tears but not normal tears invitro. Exogenous tear protein lacritin transiently accelerates flux to restore homeostasis invitro and corneal health invivo, and yet the monomeric active form of lacritin appears to be selectively deficient in dry eye. Tissue transglutaminase-dependent cross-linking of monomer decreases monomer quantity and monomer affinity for coreceptor syndecan-1 thereby abrogating activity. Tissue transglutaminase is elevated in dry eye. Mutation of arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal 3, mucolipin, or Niemann-Pick disease type C1 respectively underlie several diseases of apparently insufficient autophagic flux that affect the eye, including: metachromatic leukodystrophy, mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, juvenile-onset Batten disease, mucolipidosis IV, and Niemann-Pick type C associated with myelin sheath destruction of corneal sensory and ciliary nerves and of the optic nerve; corneal clouding, ocular hypertension, glaucoma and optic nerve atrophy; accumulation of 'ceroid-lipofuscin' in surface conjunctival cells, and in ganglion and neuronal cells; decreased visual acuity and retinal dystrophy; and neurodegeneration. For some, enzyme or gene replacement, or substrate reduction, therapy is proving to be successful. Here we discuss examples of restoring ocular surface homeostasis through alteration of autophagy, with particular attention to lacritin.

  9. Death associated protein kinases: molecular structure and brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Syam; Hagberg, Henrik; Krishnamurthy, Rajanikant; Thornton, Claire; Mallard, Carina

    2013-07-04

    Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk) family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  10. BSE case associated with prion protein gene mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen A Richt

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE of cattle and was first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans. The origin of BSE remains an enigma. Here we report an H-type BSE case associated with the novel mutation E211K within the prion protein gene (Prnp. Sequence analysis revealed that the animal with H-type BSE was heterozygous at Prnp nucleotides 631 through 633. An identical pathogenic mutation at the homologous codon position (E200K in the human Prnp has been described as the most common cause of genetic CJD. This finding represents the first report of a confirmed case of BSE with a potential pathogenic mutation within the bovine Prnp gene. A recent epidemiological study revealed that the K211 allele was not detected in 6062 cattle from commercial beef processing plants and 42 cattle breeds, indicating an extremely low prevalence of the E211K variant (less than 1 in 2000 in cattle.

  11. Sequencing Analysis of Mutant Allele $cdc$28-$srm$ of Protein Kinase CDC28 and Molecular Dynamics Study of Glycine-Rich Loop in Wild-Type and Mutant Allele G16S of CDK2 as Model

    CERN Document Server

    Koltovaya, N A; Kholmurodov, Kh T; Kretov, D A

    2005-01-01

    The central role that cyclin-dependent kinases play in the timing of cell division and the high incidence of genetic alteration of CDKs or deregulation of CDK inhibitors in a number of cancers make CDC28 of the yeast \\textit{Saccharomyces cerevisiae }very attractive model for studies of mechanisms of CDK regulation. Earlier it was found that certain gene mutations including \\textit{cdc28-srm} affect cell cycle progression, maintenance of different genetic structures and increase cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation. A~\\textit{cdc28-srm} mutation is not temperature-sensitive mutation and differs from the known \\textit{cdc28-ts }mutations because it has the evident phenotypic manifestations at 30 $^{\\circ}$C. Sequencing analysis of \\textit{cdc28-srm} revealed a single nucleotide substitution G20S. This is a third glycine in a conserved sequence GxGxxG in the G-rich loop positioned opposite the activation T-loop. Despite its demonstrated importance, the role of the G-loop has remained unclear. The crystal stru...

  12. CAP2, cyclase-associated protein 2, is a dual compartment protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peche, V; Shekar, S; Leichter, M; Korte, H; Schröder, R; Schleicher, M; Holak, T A; Clemen, C S; Ramanath-Y, B; Pfitzer, G; Karakesisoglou, I; Noegel, A A

    2007-10-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins with roles in regulating the actin cytoskeleton and in signal transduction. Mammals have two CAP genes encoding the related CAP1 and CAP2. We studied the distribution and subcellular localization of CAP1 and CAP2 using specific antibodies. CAP1 shows a broad tissue distribution, whereas CAP2 is significantly expressed only in brain, heart and skeletal muscle, and skin. CAP2 is found in the nucleus in undifferentiated myoblasts and at the M-line of differentiated myotubes. In PAM212, a mouse keratinocyte cell line, CAP2 is enriched in the nucleus, and sparse in the cytosol. By contrast, CAP1 localizes to the cytoplasm in PAM212 cells. In human skin, CAP2 is present in all living layers of the epidermis localizing to the nuclei and the cell periphery. In in vitro studies, a C-terminal fragment of CAP2 interacts with actin, indicating that CAP2 has the capacity to bind to actin.

  13. Expression of Yes-associated protein 1 gene and protein in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Song-ying; HU Ji-an; WANG Hui-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common malignancies in the oral and maxillofaoial region.Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) has been implicated as a bona fide oncogene in solid tumors.We seek to elucidate the role of YAP1 in OSCC tissue.Methods We identified YAP1 gene and protein overexpression in 30 OSCC patients and 10 normal oral mucosa tissues by immunohistochemistry,Western blotting and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results In the normal oral mucosa by immunohistochemical staining,YAP1 mainly located in both the cytoplasm and nucleus mainly the nuclei of the basal cells.In OSCC,the expression of YAP1 translocated from the nucleus to cytoplasm;YAP1 being mainly located in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of the adjacent mucosa.The expression of YAP1 gradual increased in normal oral mucosa,tumor adjacent mucosa and low grade,middle grade,high grade OSCC tissue by Western blotting.Significant difference was found between the expressions of the normal oral mucosa and OSCC tissue (P <0.05).The coincidence was detected between the normal oral mucosa and OSCC tissue by RT-PCR (P <0.05).Conclusions YAP1 is involved in the carcinogenesis and development of OSCC.There is a transformation between nucleus and cytoplasm.

  14. PANADA: protein association network annotation, determination and analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto J M Martin

    Full Text Available Increasingly large numbers of proteins require methods for functional annotation. This is typically based on pairwise inference from the homology of either protein sequence or structure. Recently, similarity networks have been presented to leverage both the ability to visualize relationships between proteins and assess the transferability of functional inference. Here we present PANADA, a novel toolkit for the visualization and analysis of protein similarity networks in Cytoscape. Networks can be constructed based on pairwise sequence or structural alignments either on a set of proteins or, alternatively, by database search from a single sequence. The Panada web server, executable for download and examples and extensive help files are available at URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/panada/.

  15. Novel intracellular proteins associated with cellular vitamin D action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Giana; Wood, Richard J; Mayer, Jean

    2002-07-01

    Work with vitamin D-resistant New World primates has revealed novel cellular proteins involved in vitamin D action. An "intracellular vitamin D-binding protein" functions to bind vitamin D metabolites in the cell and enhances vitamin D action. By contrast, a "vitamin D response element-binding protein" inhibits vitamin D receptor binding to the DNA and is responsible for vitamin D resistance in New World primates.

  16. Association of limbic system-associated membrane protein (LSAMP to male completed suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maron Eduard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated volumetric abnormalities in limbic structures of suicide victims. The morphological changes might be caused by some inherited neurodevelopmental defect, such as failure to form proper axonal connections due to genetically determined dysfunction of neurite guidance molecules. Limbic system-associated membrane protein (LSAMP is a neuronal adhesive molecule, preferentially expressed in developing limbic system neuronal dendrites and somata. Some evidence for the association between LSAMP gene and behavior has come from both animal as well as human studies but further investigation is required. In current study, polymorphic loci in human LSAMP gene were examined in order to reveal any associations between genetic variation in LSAMP and suicidal behaviour. Methods DNA was obtained from 288 male suicide victims and 327 healthy male volunteers. Thirty SNPs from LSAMP gene and adjacent region were selected by Tagger algorithm implemented in Haploview 3.32. Genotyping was performed using the SNPlex™ (Applied Biosystems platform. Data was analyzed by Genemapper 3.7, Haploview 3.32 and SPSS 13.0. Results Chi square test revealed four allelic variants (rs2918215, rs2918213, rs9874470 and rs4821129 located in the intronic region of the gene to be associated with suicide, major alleles being overrepresented in suicide group. However, the associations did not survive multiple correction test. Defining the haplotype blocks using confidence interval algorithm implemented in Haploview 3.32, we failed to detect any associated haplotypes. Conclusion Despite a considerable amount of investigation on the nature of suicidal behaviour, its aetiology and pathogenesis remain unknown. This study examined the variability in LSAMP gene in relation to completed suicide. Our results indicate that LSAMP might play a role in pathoaetiology of suicidal behaviour but further studies are needed to understand its exact

  17. Chromatin proteins and RNA are associated with DNA during all phases of mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    L Black, Kathryn; Petruk, Svetlana; Fenstermaker, Tyler K.; Hodgson, Jacob W.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Brock, Hugh W; Mazo, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis brings about major changes to chromosome and nuclear structure. We used recently developed proximity ligation assay-based techniques to investigate the association with DNA of chromatin-associated proteins and RNAs in Drosophila embryos during mitosis. All groups of tested proteins, histone-modifying and chromatin-remodeling proteins and methylated histones remained in close proximity to DNA during all phases of mitosis. We also found that RNA transcripts are associated with DNA durin...

  18. Association of connexin43 with a receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G; Feiken, Elles; Gebbink, Martijn F B G; Moolenaar, Wouter H

    2003-01-01

    Connexin-43(Cx43)-based gap junctional communication is transiently inhibited by certain G protein-coupled receptor agonists, including lysophosphatidic acid, endothelin and thrombin. Our previous studies have implicated the c-Src protein tyrosine kinase in mediating closure of Cx43 based gap juncti

  19. Interaction of maize chromatin-associated HMG proteins with mononucleosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichota, J.; Grasser, Klaus D.

    2003-01-01

    maize HMGA and five different HMGB proteins with mononucleosomes (containing approx. 165 bp of DNA) purified from micrococcal nuclease-digested maize chromatin. The HMGB proteins interacted with the nucleosomes independent of the presence of the linker histone H1, while the binding of HMGA...

  20. Identification of calcium-binding proteins associated with the human sperm plasma membrane

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naaby-Hansen, Soren; Diekman, Alan; Shetty, Jagathpala; Flickinger, Charles J; Westbrook, Anne; Herr, John C

    2010-01-01

    The precise composition of the human sperm plasma membrane, the molecular interactions that define domain specific functions, and the regulation of membrane associated proteins during the capacitation...

  1. G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1), a ubiquitous tumor marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoyi; Chang, Frank; Zhang, Xinmin; Rothman, Vicki L; Tuszynski, George P

    2012-08-01

    Using an innovative "2-D high performance liquid electrophoresis" (2-D HPLE) technology we identified that a specific fragment of G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1) was present in the sera of breast cancer patients and was over-expressed in early and late stage breast tumors (Tuszynski, G.P. et al., 2011). In this study we further investigated the significance of GASP-1 as a tumor marker by investigating the expression GASP-1 in different kinds of tumors as well as in the sera of patients with various cancers. Over expression of GASP-1 was detected in brain, pancreatic, and breast cancers as compared to their respective normal tissues as assessed by immunohistochemical staining of tissue arrays using a "peptide specific" GASP-1 antibody. We found that across these cancers, GASP-1 was expressed approximately 10 fold more in the cancer as compared to normal tissue. The increase in GASP-1 expression was also seen in hyperplastic and inflammatory lesions of breast and pancreatic cancers as compared to normal tissue. GASP-1 was primarily expressed in the tumor epithelium of the epithelial-derived cancers and in the transformed glial cells of the brain tumors. Using a sensitive "competitive ELISA" for GASP-1, we found that sera from patients with brain, liver, breast and lung cancers expressed 4-7 fold more GASP-1 peptide than sera from normal healthy individuals. These studies identify GASP-1 as a potential new serum and tumor biomarker for several cancers and suggest that GASP-1 may be a novel target for development of cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Overexpression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 is associated with metastasis of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Min; Song, Xiaolian; Zhang, Guoliang; Peng, Aimei; Li, Xuan; Li, Ming; Liu, Yang; Wang, Changhui

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancer ranks first in both prevalence and mortality rates among all types of cancer. Metastasis is the main cause of treatment failure. Biomarkers are critical to early diagnosis and prediction and monitoring of progressive lesions. Several biomarkers have been identified for lung cancer but none have been routinely used clinically. The present study assessed the diagnostic and prognostic value of cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) for lung cancer. CAP1 mRNA abundance and protein content were determined by real-time PCR and western blot analysis and/or immunostaining in biopsy specimens (24 neoplastic and 6 non-neoplastic) freshly collected at surgical lung resection, in 82 pathologically banked lung cancer specimens and in cultured non-invasive (95-C) and invasive (95-D) lung cancer cells. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to correlate immunoreactive CAP1 signal with cancer type and stage. In vitro cell migration was performed to determine the effect of RNA interference-mediated CAP1 gene silencing on invasiveness of 95-D cells. These analyses collectively demonstrated that: i) both CAP1 mRNA abundance and protein content were significantly higher in neoplastic compared to non-neoplastic specimens and in metastatic compared to non-metastatic specimens but not different between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma; ii) immunoreactive CAP1 signal was significantly stronger in metastatic specimens and 95-D cells compared to non-metastatic specimens and 95-C cells; and iii) RNA interference-mediated CAP1 gene silencing adequately attenuated the invasive capacity of 95-D cells in vitro. These findings suggest that overexpression of CAP1 in lung cancer cells, particularly at the metastatic stage, may have significant clinical implications as a diagnostic/prognostic factor for lung cancer.

  3. Expression of Yes-associated protein modulates Survivin expression in primary liver malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F; Lam-Himlin, Dora M; Klein, Alison P; Nayar, Suresh K; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies, the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing, and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice after genetic manipulation of Yes-associated protein, a transcription coactivator. Here, we comprehensively documented Yes-associated protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression is significantly increased in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. We found that increased Yes-associated protein levels in hepatocellular carcinoma are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification and transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. We found that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress Yes-associated protein in the liver, we found that Survivin messenger RNA expression depends upon Yes-associated protein levels. Our findings suggested that Yes-associated protein contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression.

  4. Study of Myelin Basic Protein Associated with Pediatric Systematic Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Sida; He Xin; Yang Yiyu; Zhu Huihua; He Dansha; Deng Weiyi

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the quantitative myelin basic protein (MBP) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum in pediatric systematic epilepsy (SEP), study the relation between SEP and MBP, and the possibility predicating'the injury of myelin and blood-brain barrier (BBB) from pediatric SEP. Background: While tactors induced destroy of cerebral and Myelin, MBP was released out into CSF to increase its concentration. On the other hand, the BBB was involved to make serum MBP increased. The related studies had confirmed these viewpoints above. The test for quantitative MBP was recognized as the specific biochemical index, which diagnose if there is or not organic injury of cerebral and myelin. There was few reports about the studies of quantitative MBP in CSF and serum of EP, not mention to those published in domestic pediatric academia. Methods: 47 cases were studied during one month after the SEP attack, whose MBP in serum were quantitatively and 31 inside in CSF were also tested by easy MBP-ELISA method; the quantitative MBP in serum of 30 control cases and 10 in CSF were tested, too. Results: MBP values in CSF and serum of SEP pediatric patients were 2.95±0.61 ng/ml and 3.17±0.53 ng/ml; whereas 1.41 ±0.19 ng/ml and 1.30±0.04 ng/ml in control group. Both mean valves of MBP in CSF and serum in study group were significantly higher than control group (either P< 0.01). Discussion: In general, electrophysiological evidences supported the issue that epileptic episode was originated from abnormal electrical activities of nervous cells. Pathological studies revealed degeneration and necrosis of nerve existed in temporal epileptic focus, where there was morphological change of myelin. This study showed MBP values in CSF and serum of SEEP, during one month after attack, increased significantly; suggested there was changed component of MBP, while SEP could not be controled. Those above indicated the destroy of myelin, increasing of BBB permeability that induced its

  5. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    Many processes, cell motility being an example, require cells to remodel the actin cytoskeleton in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton involves the rapid disassembly and reassembly of actin filaments, a phenomenon regulated by the action of particular actin-binding proteins. In recent years, an interest in studying actin regulation in unicellular organisms has arisen. Parasitic protozoan are among these organisms and studies of the cytoskeleton functions of these protozoan are relevant related to either cell biology or pathogenicity. To discuss recent data in this field, a symposium concerning "Actin and actin-binding proteins in protists" was held on May 8-11 in Paris, France, during the XXXV meeting of the French Society of Protistology. As a brief summary of the symposium we report here findings concerning the in vitro actin dynamic assembly, as well as the characterization of several actin-binding proteins from the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis and Plasmodium knowlesi. In addition, localization of actin in non-pathogen protists such as Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii is also presented. The data show that some actin-binding proteins facilitate organization of filaments into higher order structures as pseudopods, while others have regulatory functions, indicating very particular roles for actin-binding proteins. One of the proteins discussed during the symposium, the actin depolymerizing factor ADF, was shown to enhance the treadmilling rate of actin filaments. In vitro, ADF binds to the ADP-bound forms of G-actin and F-actin, thereby participating in and changing the rate of actin assembly. Biochemical approaches allowed the identification of a protein complex formed by HSP/C70-cap32-34 which might also be involved in depolymerization of F-actin in P. knowlesi. Molecular and cellular approaches were used to identify proteins such as ABP-120 and myosin

  6. Phosphorylation of acidic ribosomal proteins by ribosome-associated protein kinases of ``Saccharomyces cerevisiae`` and ``Schizosaccharomyces pombe``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowicz, T.; Cytrynska, M.; Kowalczyk, W.; Gasior, E. [Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej, Lublin (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Two proteins of 13 kDa and 38 kDa, the components of 60S ribosomal subunits, were identified as phosphorylation substrates for protein tightly associated with ``S. cerevisiae`` and ``Schizosaccharomyces pombe`` ribosomes. An enzyme with properties of multifunctional casein kinase II was detected in ribosome preparations from both yeast species. In S. cerevisiae another protein kinase with high substrate specificity toward those proteins was also identified. By using isoelectric focusing, the protein band of 13 kDa from ``S. cerevisiae`` and ``S. pombe`` was resolved respectively into three and four major forms of different charge. The same protein forms were phosphorylated in the in vivo {sup 32}P-labelling experiments. (author). 33 refs, 6 figs.

  7. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphism, but not concentrations, is associated with radiographic hand osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective. Factors associated with mineralization and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis (OA) are incompletely understood. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a mineralization inhibitor, have been associated clinically with conditions of abnormal calcification. We therefore evalua...

  8. Ileal Mucosal and Fecal Pancreatitis Associated Protein Levels Reflect Severity of Salmonella Inflection in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ampting, van M.T.J.; Rodenburg, G.C.H.; Vink, C.; Kramer, E.; Schonewille, A.; Keijer, J.; Meer, van der R.; Bovee-Oudenhoven, I.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Microbial infections induce ileal pancreatitis-associated protein/regenerating gene III (PAP/RegIII) mRNA expression. Despite increasing interest, little is known about the PAP/RegIII protein. Therefore, ileal mucosal PAP/RegIII protein expression, localization, and fecal excretion were s

  9. Cancer-associated mutations are preferentially distributed in protein kinase functional sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Redfern, Oliver C; Orengo, Christine A; Valencia, Alfonso

    2009-12-01

    Protein kinases are a superfamily involved in many crucial cellular processes, including signal transmission and regulation of cell cycle. As a consequence of this role, kinases have been reported to be associated with many types of cancer and are considered as potential therapeutic targets. We analyzed the distribution of pathogenic somatic point mutations (drivers) in the protein kinase superfamily with respect to their location in the protein, such as in structural, evolutionary, and functionally relevant regions. We find these driver mutations are more clearly associated with key protein features than other somatic mutations (passengers) that have not been directly linked to tumor progression. This observation fits well with the expected implication of the alterations in protein kinase function in cancer pathogenicity. To explain the relevance of the detected association of cancer driver mutations at the molecular level in the human kinome, we compare these with genetically inherited mutations (SNPs). We find that the subset of nonsynonymous SNPs that are associated to disease, but sufficiently mild to the point of being widespread in the population, tend to avoid those key protein regions, where they could be more detrimental for protein function. This tendency contrasts with the one detected for cancer associated-driver-mutations, which seems to be more directly implicated in the alteration of protein function. The detailed analysis of protein kinase groups and a number of relevant examples, confirm the relation between cancer associated-driver-mutations and key regions for protein kinase structure and function.

  10. Identification of a novel protein-protein interaction motif mediating interaction of GPCR-associated sorting proteins with G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornert, Olivier; Møller, Thor Christian; Boeuf, Julien

    2013-01-01

    GPCR desensitization and down-regulation are considered key molecular events underlying the development of tolerance in vivo. Among the many regulatory proteins that are involved in these complex processes, GASP-1 have been shown to participate to the sorting of several receptors toward the degra......GPCR desensitization and down-regulation are considered key molecular events underlying the development of tolerance in vivo. Among the many regulatory proteins that are involved in these complex processes, GASP-1 have been shown to participate to the sorting of several receptors toward...... the degradation pathway. This protein belongs to the recently identified GPCR-associated sorting proteins (GASPs) family that comprises ten members for which structural and functional details are poorly documented. We present here a detailed structure-function relationship analysis of the molecular interaction...... between GASPs and a panel of GPCRs. In a first step, GST-pull down experiments revealed that all the tested GASPs display significant interactions with a wide range of GPCRs. Importantly, the different GASP members exhibiting the strongest interaction properties were also characterized by the presence...

  11. Protein Mediated Oxidative Stress in Patients with Diabetes and its Associated Neuropathy: Correlation with Protein Carbonylation and Disease Activity Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almogbel, Ebtehal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Free radicals have been implicated as Diabetes Mellitus (DM) contributors in type 2 DM and its associated Diabetes Mellitus Neuropathy (DMN). However, the potential for protein mediated oxidative stress to contribute disease pathogenesis remains largely unexplored. Aim To investigate the status and contribution of protein mediated oxidative stress in patients with DM or DMN and to explore whether oxidative protein modification has a role in DM progression to DM associated neuropathy. Materials and Methods Sera from 42 DM and 37 DMN patients with varying levels of disease activities biomarkers (HbA1C, patients’ age or disease duration) and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated for serum levels of protein mediated oxidative stress. Results Serum analysis showed significantly higher levels of protein carbonyl contents in both DM and DMN patients compared with healthy controls. Importantly, not only was there an increased number of subjects positive for protein carbonylation, but also the levels of protein carbonyl contents were significantly higher among DM and DMN patients, whose HbA1C were ≥8.8 as compared with patients with lower HbA1C (HbA1Cdiabetes to diabetes neuropathy. Conclusion These findings support an association between protein oxidation and DM or DMN progression. The stronger response observed in patients with higher HbA1C or patients’ ages or disease durations suggests, that protein mediated oxidative stress may be useful in evaluating the progression of DM and its associated DMN and in elucidating the mechanisms of these disorders pathogenesis.

  12. Computational Framework for Prediction of Peptide Sequences That May Mediate Multiple Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasree Sarkar

    Full Text Available A considerable proportion of protein-protein interactions (PPIs in the cell are estimated to be mediated by very short peptide segments that approximately conform to specific sequence patterns known as linear motifs (LMs, often present in the disordered regions in the eukaryotic proteins. These peptides have been found to interact with low affinity and are able bind to multiple interactors, thus playing an important role in the PPI networks involving date hubs. In this work, PPI data and de novo motif identification based method (MEME were used to identify such peptides in three cancer-associated hub proteins-MYC, APC and MDM2. The peptides corresponding to the significant LMs identified for each hub protein were aligned, the overlapping regions across these peptides being termed as overlapping linear peptides (OLPs. These OLPs were thus predicted to be responsible for multiple PPIs of the corresponding hub proteins and a scoring system was developed to rank them. We predicted six OLPs in MYC and five OLPs in MDM2 that scored higher than OLP predictions from randomly generated protein sets. Two OLP sequences from the C-terminal of MYC were predicted to bind with FBXW7, component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex involved in proteasomal degradation of MYC. Similarly, we identified peptides in the C-terminal of MDM2 interacting with FKBP3, which has a specific role in auto-ubiquitinylation of MDM2. The peptide sequences predicted in MYC and MDM2 look promising for designing orthosteric inhibitors against possible disease-associated PPIs. Since these OLPs can interact with other proteins as well, these inhibitors should be specific to the targeted interactor to prevent undesired side-effects. This computational framework has been designed to predict and rank the peptide regions that may mediate multiple PPIs and can be applied to other disease-associated date hub proteins for prediction of novel therapeutic targets of small molecule PPI

  13. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  14. Associations between heat shock protein 70 genetic polymorphisms and calving traits in crossbred Brahman cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stressors such as heat, cold, toxins, and oxygen deprivation are known to induce heat shock proteins. Genetic polymorphisms associated with heat shock protein genes have been associated with decreased male and female fertility. Our objectives were to 1) confirm single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) ...

  15. Localized mRNA translation and protein association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    Recent direct observations of localization of mRNAs and proteins both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells can be related to slowdown of diffusion of these species due to macromolecular crowding and their ability to aggregate and form immobile or slowly mobile complexes. Here, a generic kinetic model describing both these factors is presented and comprehensively analyzed. Although the model is non-linear, an accurate self-consistent analytical solution of the corresponding reaction-diffusion equation has been constructed, the types of localized protein distributions have been explicitly shown, and the predicted kinetic regimes of gene expression have been classified.

  16. Isolated Central Nervous System Vasculitis Associated with Antiribonuclear Protein Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer M. Awad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a young woman who was referred to a tertiary care center with unexplained subacute progressive encephalopathy preceded by long-standing severe headaches. Her extensive workup was remarkable for abnormal intracranial angiography suggestive of small- and medium-vessel vasculitis, persistently elevated protein in the cerebrospinal fluid and persistently high titers of antiribonuclear protein antibody. The patient showed a modest response to intravenous high-dose steroids. We propose that the patient's neurologic disease is secondary to immune-mediated central nervous system vasculitis, possibly as an initial manifestation of mixed connective tissue disease.

  17. Continuous monitoring of membrane protein micro-domain association during cell signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Heng

    2011-01-01

    Central to understanding membrane bound cell signaling is to quantify how the membrane ultra-structure consisting of transient spatial domains modulates signaling and how the signaling influences this ultra-structure. Yet, measuring the association of membrane proteins with domains in living, intact cells poses considerable challenges. Here, we describe a non-destructive method to quantify protein-lipid domain and protein cytoskeleton interactions in single, intact cells enabling continuous monitoring of the protein domains interaction over time during signaling.

  18. Is there a biological cost of protein disorder? Analysis of cancer-associated mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajkos, Mátyás; Mészáros, Bálint; Simon, István; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna

    2012-01-01

    As many diseases can be traced back to altered protein function, studying the effect of genetic variations at the level of proteins can provide a clue to understand how changes at the DNA level lead to various diseases. Cellular processes rely not only on proteins with well-defined structure but can also involve intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that exist as highly flexible ensembles of conformations. Disordered proteins are mostly involved in signaling and regulatory processes, and their functional repertoire largely complements that of globular proteins. However, it was also suggested that protein disorder entails an increased biological cost. This notion was supported by a set of individual IDPs involved in various diseases, especially in cancer, and the increased amount of disorder observed among disease-associated proteins. In this work, we tested if there is any biological risk associated with protein disorder at the level of single nucleotide mutations. Specifically, we analyzed the distribution of mutations within ordered and disordered segments. Our results demonstrated that while neutral polymorphisms were more likely to occur within disordered segments, cancer-associated mutations had a preference for ordered regions. Additionally, we proposed an alternative explanation for the association of protein disorder and the involvement in cancer with the consideration of functional annotations. Individual examples also suggested that although disordered segments are fundamental functional elements, their presence is not necessarily accompanied with an increased mutation rate in cancer. The presented study can help to understand how the different structural properties of proteins influence the consequences of genetic mutations.

  19. Peroxisome Fission is Associated with Reorganization of Specific Membrane Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krygowska, Malgorzata; Veenhuis, Marten; Klei, Ida J. van der; Nagotu, Shirisha

    2011-01-01

    Membrane remodeling is an important aspect in organelle biogenesis. We show that different peroxisome membrane proteins that play a role in organelle biogenesis and proliferation (Pex8, Pex10, Pex14, Pex25 and Pex11) are subject to spatiotemporal behavior during organelle development. Using fluoresc

  20. Seed storage protein components are associated with curled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... Some research about the charac- ters of cotyledon mutant in many plants is developing. .... Focusing was carried out in a Bio-Rad Protein IEF Cell. The voltage .... A rapid and sensitive method for the quantitation of microgram ...

  1. The urokinase receptor associated protein (uPARAP/endo180)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, L H; Nielsen, B S; Danø, K

    2001-01-01

    The urokinase-mediated plasminogen activation system plays a central role in the extracellular proteolytic degradation reactions in cancer invasion. In this review article we discuss a number of recent findings identifying a new cellular receptor protein, uPARAP, that interacts with components...

  2. Identification of cell wall-associated proteins from Phytophthora ramorum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, H.J.G.; Vondervoort, van de P.J.I.; Yin, Q.Y.; Koster, de C.G.; Klis, F.M.; Govers, F.; Groot, de P.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    The oomycete genus Phytophthora comprises a large group of fungal-like plant pathogens. Two Phytophthora genomes recently have been sequenced; one of them is the genome of Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death. During plant infection, extracellular proteins, either soluble secre

  3. Identification of cell wall-associated proteins from Phytophthora ramorum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, H.J.G.; Vondervoort, van de P.J.I.; Yin, Q.Y.; Koster, de C.G.; Klis, F.M.; Govers, F.; Groot, de P.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    The oomycete genus Phytophthora comprises a large group of fungal-like plant pathogens. Two Phytophthora genomes recently have been sequenced; one of them is the genome of Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death. During plant infection, extracellular proteins, either soluble

  4. The Bmi-1 polycomb protein antagonizes the (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate-dependent suppression of skin cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Adhikary, Gautam; Eckert, Richard L

    2010-03-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of gene expression that enhance cell survival. This regulation is achieved via action of two multiprotein PcG complexes--PRC2 (EED) and PRC1 [B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1)]. These complexes modulate gene expression by increasing histone methylation and reducing acetylation--leading to a closed chromatin conformation. Activity of these proteins is associated with increased cell proliferation and survival. We show increased expression of key PcG proteins in immortalized keratinocytes and skin cancer cell lines. We examine the role of two key PcG proteins, Bmi-1 and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), and the impact of the active agent in green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), on the function of these regulators. EGCG treatment of SCC-13 cells reduces Bmi-1 and Ezh2 level and this is associated with reduced cell survival. The reduction in survival is associated with a global reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, a hallmark of PRC2 complex action. This change in PcG protein expression is associated with reduced expression of key proteins that enhance progression through the cell cycle [cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin A and cyclin B1] and increased expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression (p21 and p27). Apoptosis is also enhanced, as evidenced by increased caspase 9, 8 and 3 cleavage and increased poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase cleavage. EGCG treatment also increases Bax and suppresses Bcl-xL expression. Vector-mediated enhanced Bmi-1 expression reverses these EGCG-dependent changes. These findings suggest that green tea polyphenols reduce skin tumor cell survival by influencing PcG-mediated epigenetic regulatory mechanisms.

  5. Computational Framework for Prediction of Peptide Sequences That May Mediate Multiple Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debasree; Patra, Piya; Ghosh, Abhirupa; Saha, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    A considerable proportion of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in the cell are estimated to be mediated by very short peptide segments that approximately conform to specific sequence patterns known as linear motifs (LMs), often present in the disordered regions in the eukaryotic proteins. These peptides have been found to interact with low affinity and are able bind to multiple interactors, thus playing an important role in the PPI networks involving date hubs. In this work, PPI data and de novo motif identification based method (MEME) were used to identify such peptides in three cancer-associated hub proteins—MYC, APC and MDM2. The peptides corresponding to the significant LMs identified for each hub protein were aligned, the overlapping regions across these peptides being termed as overlapping linear peptides (OLPs). These OLPs were thus predicted to be responsible for multiple PPIs of the corresponding hub proteins and a scoring system was developed to rank them. We predicted six OLPs in MYC and five OLPs in MDM2 that scored higher than OLP predictions from randomly generated protein sets. Two OLP sequences from the C-terminal of MYC were predicted to bind with FBXW7, component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex involved in proteasomal degradation of MYC. Similarly, we identified peptides in the C-terminal of MDM2 interacting with FKBP3, which has a specific role in auto-ubiquitinylation of MDM2. The peptide sequences predicted in MYC and MDM2 look promising for designing orthosteric inhibitors against possible disease-associated PPIs. Since these OLPs can interact with other proteins as well, these inhibitors should be specific to the targeted interactor to prevent undesired side-effects. This computational framework has been designed to predict and rank the peptide regions that may mediate multiple PPIs and can be applied to other disease-associated date hub proteins for prediction of novel therapeutic targets of small molecule PPI modulators. PMID

  6. Effect of microtubule-associated protein tau in dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A

    CERN Document Server

    Sparacino, J; Lamberti, P W

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with non-motile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al. Science 319, 1086 (2008)] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduce experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

  7. Membrane Recruitment of the Non-receptor Protein GIV/Girdin (Gα-interacting, Vesicle-associated Protein/Girdin) Is Sufficient for Activating Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; Leyme, Anthony; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Marivin, Arthur; Broselid, Stefan; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-12-30

    GIV (aka Girdin) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates heterotrimeric G protein signaling downstream of RTKs and integrins, thereby serving as a platform for signaling cascade cross-talk. GIV is recruited to the cytoplasmic tail of receptors upon stimulation, but the mechanism of activation of its G protein regulatory function is not well understood. Here we used assays in humanized yeast models and G protein activity biosensors in mammalian cells to investigate the role of GIV subcellular compartmentalization in regulating its ability to promote G protein signaling. We found that in unstimulated cells GIV does not co-fractionate with its substrate G protein Gαi3 on cell membranes and that constitutive membrane anchoring of GIV in yeast cells or rapid membrane translocation in mammalian cells via chemically induced dimerization leads to robust G protein activation. We show that membrane recruitment of the GIV "Gα binding and activating" motif alone is sufficient for G protein activation and that it does not require phosphomodification. Furthermore, we engineered a synthetic protein to show that recruitment of the GIV "Gα binding and activating" motif to membranes via association with active RTKs, instead of via chemically induced dimerization, is also sufficient for G protein activation. These results reveal that recruitment of GIV to membranes in close proximity to its substrate G protein is a major mechanism responsible for the activation of its G protein regulatory function.

  8. Retinal proteins associated with redox regulation and protein folding play central roles in response to high glucose conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ssu-Han; Lee, Wen-Chi; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy typically causes poor vision and blindness. A previous study revealed that a high blood glucose concentration induces glycoxidation and weakens the retinal capillaries. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of high blood glucose induced diabetic retinopathy remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we cultured the retinal pigmented epithelial cell line ARPE-19 in mannitol-balanced 5.5, 25, and 100 mM glucose media and investigated protein level alterations. Proteomic analysis revealed significant changes in 137 protein features, of which 124 demonstrated changes in a glucose concentration dependent manner. Several proteins functionally associated with redox regulation, protein folding, or the cytoskeleton are affected by increased glucose concentrations. Additional analyses also revealed that cellular oxidative stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, was significantly increased after treatment with high glucose concentrations. However, the mitochondrial membrane potential and cell survival remained unchanged during treatment with high glucose concentrations. To summarize, in this study, we used a comprehensive retinal pigmented epithelial cell based proteomic approach for identifying changes in protein expression associated retinal markers induced by high glucose concentrations. Our results revealed that a high glucose condition can induce cellular oxidative stress and modulate the levels of proteins with functions in redox regulation, protein folding, and cytoskeleton regulation; however, cell viability and mitochondrial integrity are not significantly disturbed under these high glucose conditions.

  9. ABNORMAL PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN HAEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To survey the role of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in the pathogenesis of several hematopoietic malignancies. Methods: By reviewing the published laboratory and clinical studies on PTK-related oncoproteins and their causative role in some leukemias and lymphomas. Results: Protein tyrosine kinases are key participants in signal transduction pathways that regulate cellular growth, activation and differentiations. Aberrant PTK activity resulting from gene mutation (often accompanying chromosome translocation) plays an etiologic role in several clonal hematopoietic malignancies. For example, the PTK product of the BCR-ABL fusion gene resulting from the t (9; 22) translocation exhibits several fold higher tyrosine kinase activity than the product of the ABL gene. Evidence suggests that the BCR-ABL oncoprotein alone is sufficient to case chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other Ph positive acute leukemia. PTK over-activity resulting from chromosomal translocations creating TEL-ABL, TEL-JAK2 and TEL-PDGFR( fusion proteins plays an important role in the pathogenesis of other types of leukemia. Another example occurs in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Experimental and clinical evidences indicate that translocations involving ALK gene on chromosome 2p23, most commonly resulting in an NPM-ALK fusion oncogene, result in constitutive activation of ALK and cause ALCL. This group of lymphomas is now named ALK positive lymphoma or ALKoma. Conclusion: Genetic lesions creating aberrant fusion proteins that result in excessive PTK activity are increasingly being recognized as central to the pathogenesis of hemotopoietic malignancies. These chimeric PTK molecules represent attractive disease-specific targets against which new classes therapeutic agents are being developed.

  10. Progress and perspective of the kinetochore-associated motor proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The kinetochore is structurally composed of four layers. We know that three microtubule-based motor proteins such as CENP-E, dynein, and MCAK are located at the outmost region of the kinetochore. Experimentation of these motor functions betters our understanding of mitotic regulation, and chromosome movements in particular. With real-time studies of chromosome movements in live cells, we hope to illustrate the molecular mechanisms underlying mitotic regulation.

  11. Association between protein C levels and mortality in patients with advanced prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilts, I T; Hutten, B A; Meijers, J C M; Spek, C A; Büller, H R; Kamphuisen, P W

    2017-06-01

    Procoagulant factors promote cancer progression and metastasis. Protein C is involved in hemostasis, inflammation and signal transduction, and has a protective effect on the endothelial barrier. In mice, administration of activated protein C reduced experimental metastasis. We assessed the association between protein C and mortality in patients with three types of cancer. The study population consisted of patients with advanced prostate, non-small cell lung or pancreatic cancer, who participated in the INPACT trial (NCT00312013). The trial evaluated the addition of nadroparin to chemotherapy in patients with advanced malignancy. Patients were divided into tertiles based on protein C at baseline. The association between protein C levels and mortality was evaluated with Cox proportional hazard models. We analysed 477 patients (protein C tertiles: C level was 107% (IQR 92-129). In the lowest tertile, 75 patients per 100 patient-years died, as compared to 60 and 54 in the middle and high tertile, respectively. Lower levels of protein C were associated with increased mortality (in tertiles: HR for trend 1.18, 95%CI 1.02-1.36, adjusted for age, sex and nadroparin use; as a continuous variable: HR 1.004, 95%CI 1.00-1.008, p=0.07). Protein C seems inversely associated with mortality in patients with advanced prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer. Further research should validate protein C as a biomarker for mortality, and explore the effects of protein C on progression of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Association of factor VII protein concentration with lifestyle factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, E-M; Møller, L; Jespersen, J

    1998-01-01

    -sectional study examined the association between several behavioural variables (body mass index, physical activity, tobacco or alcohol consumption) or physiological variables (total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, fibrinogen, resting pulse, systolic blood pressure, bleeding time......) and FVII:Ag in 439 51-y-old Danish men. In the multivariate analyses, body mass index (BMI), low physical activity, total cholesterol, short bleeding time, and insulin showed an independent positive association with FVII:Ag. The strongest independent association with FVII:Ag was found for total cholesterol...

  13. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation.

  14. M-Finder: Uncovering functionally associated proteins from interactome data integrated with GO annotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a key role in understanding the mechanisms of cellular processes. The availability of interactome data has catalyzed the development of computational approaches to elucidate functional behaviors of proteins on a system level. Gene Ontology (GO) and its annotations are a significant resource for functional characterization of proteins. Because of wide coverage, GO data have often been adopted as a benchmark for protein function prediction on the genomic scale. Results We propose a computational approach, called M-Finder, for functional association pattern mining. This method employs semantic analytics to integrate the genome-wide PPIs with GO data. We also introduce an interactive web application tool that visualizes a functional association network linked to a protein specified by a user. The proposed approach comprises two major components. First, the PPIs that have been generated by high-throughput methods are weighted in terms of their functional consistency using GO and its annotations. We assess two advanced semantic similarity metrics which quantify the functional association level of each interacting protein pair. We demonstrate that these measures outperform the other existing methods by evaluating their agreement to other biological features, such as sequence similarity, the presence of common Pfam domains, and core PPIs. Second, the information flow-based algorithm is employed to discover a set of proteins functionally associated with the protein in a query and their links efficiently. This algorithm reconstructs a functional association network of the query protein. The output network size can be flexibly determined by parameters. Conclusions M-Finder provides a useful framework to investigate functional association patterns with any protein. This software will also allow users to perform further systematic analysis of a set of proteins for any specific function. It is available online at http

  15. A novel ER J-protein DNAJB12 accelerates ER-associated degradation of membrane proteins including CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yo-hei; Kimura, Taiji; Momohara, Shuku; Takeuchi, Masato; Tani, Tokio; Kimata, Yukio; Kadokura, Hiroshi; Kohno, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Cytosolic Hsc70/Hsp70 are known to contribute to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation of membrane proteins. However, at least in mammalian cells, its partner ER-localized J-protein for this cellular event has not been identified. Here we propose that this missing protein is DNAJB12. Protease protection assay and immunofluorescence study revealed that DNAJB12 is an ER-localized single membrane-spanning protein carrying a J-domain facing the cytosol. Using co-immunoprecipitation assay, we found that DNAJB12 is able to bind Hsc70 and thus can recruit Hsc70 to the ER membrane. Remarkably, cellular overexpression of DNAJB12 accelerated the degradation of misfolded membrane proteins including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), but not a misfolded luminal protein. The DNAJB12-dependent degradation of CFTR was compromised by a proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin, suggesting that this process requires the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Conversely, knockdown of DNAJB12 expression attenuated the degradation of CFTR. Thus, DNAJB12 is a novel mammalian ER-localized J-protein that plays a vital role in the quality control of membrane proteins.

  16. Membrane-Associated RING-CH proteins associate with Bap31 and target CD81 and CD44 to lysosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bartee

    Full Text Available Membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH proteins represent a family of transmembrane ubiquitin ligases modulating intracellular trafficking and turnover of transmembrane protein targets. While homologous proteins encoded by gamma-2 herpesviruses and leporipoxviruses have been studied extensively, limited information is available regarding the physiological targets of cellular MARCH proteins. To identify host cell proteins targeted by the human MARCH-VIII ubiquitin ligase we used stable isotope labeling of amino-acids in cell culture (SILAC to monitor MARCH-dependent changes in the membrane proteomes of human fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of Bap31, a chaperone that predominantly resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. We demonstrate that Bap31 associates with the transmembrane domains of several MARCH proteins and controls intracellular transport of MARCH proteins. In addition, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of the hyaluronic acid-receptor CD44 and both MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV sequestered the tetraspanin CD81 in endo-lysosomal vesicles. Moreover, gene knockdown of MARCH-IV increased surface levels of endogenous CD81 suggesting a constitutive involvement of this family of ubiquitin ligases in the turnover of tetraspanins. Our data thus suggest a role of MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV in the regulated turnover of CD81 and CD44, two ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional proteins.

  17. Membrane-Associated RING-CH proteins associate with Bap31 and target CD81 and CD44 to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartee, Eric; Eyster, Craig A; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Mansouri, Mandana; Donaldson, Julie G; Früh, Klaus

    2010-12-02

    Membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) proteins represent a family of transmembrane ubiquitin ligases modulating intracellular trafficking and turnover of transmembrane protein targets. While homologous proteins encoded by gamma-2 herpesviruses and leporipoxviruses have been studied extensively, limited information is available regarding the physiological targets of cellular MARCH proteins. To identify host cell proteins targeted by the human MARCH-VIII ubiquitin ligase we used stable isotope labeling of amino-acids in cell culture (SILAC) to monitor MARCH-dependent changes in the membrane proteomes of human fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of Bap31, a chaperone that predominantly resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We demonstrate that Bap31 associates with the transmembrane domains of several MARCH proteins and controls intracellular transport of MARCH proteins. In addition, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of the hyaluronic acid-receptor CD44 and both MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV sequestered the tetraspanin CD81 in endo-lysosomal vesicles. Moreover, gene knockdown of MARCH-IV increased surface levels of endogenous CD81 suggesting a constitutive involvement of this family of ubiquitin ligases in the turnover of tetraspanins. Our data thus suggest a role of MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV in the regulated turnover of CD81 and CD44, two ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional proteins.

  18. Analysis of low-density lipoprotein-associated proteins using the method of digitized native protein mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ya; Chen, Jin; Wang, Ahui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shumin; Manabe, Takashi; Tan, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The method of digitized native protein mapping, combining nondenaturing micro 2DE, grid gel-cutting, and quantitative LC-MS/MS (in data-independent acquisition mode, or MS(E) ), was improved by using a new MS/MS mode, ion mobility separation enhanced-MS(E) (HDMS(E) ), and applied to analyze the area of human plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). An 18 mm × 4.8 mm rectangular area which included LDL on a nondenaturing micro 2D gel of human plasma was grid-cut into 72 square gel pieces and subjected to quantitative LC-MS/MS. Compared with MS(E) , HDMS(E) showed significantly higher performance, by assigning 50% more proteins and detecting each protein in more squares. A total of 253 proteins were assigned with LC-HDMS(E) and the quantity distribution of each was reconstructed as a native protein map. The maps showed that Apo B-100 was the most abundant protein in the grid-cut area, concentrated at pI ca. 5.4-6.1 and apparent mass ca. 1000 kDa, which corresponded to four gel pieces, squares 39-42. An Excel macro was prepared to search protein maps which showed protein quantity peaks localized within this concentrated region of Apo B-100. Twenty-two proteins out of the 252 matched this criterion, in which 19 proteins have been reported to be associated with LDL. This method only requires several microliters of a plasma sample and the principle of the protein separation is totally different from the commonly used ultracentrifugation. The results obtained by this method would provide new insights on the structure and function of LDL.

  19. Associations between milk protein concentration at various stages of lactation and reproductive performance in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, J M; Auldist, M J; Douglas, M L; Macmillan, K L

    2016-12-01

    Milk protein concentration has been positively associated with a range of measures of reproductive performance in dairy cows. These beneficial associations are most likely due to factors affecting both milk protein concentration and reproductive performance possibly being mediated, in part, by energy balance during early lactation. However, it is likely that factors other than energy balance are also involved in these relationships. A retrospective single cohort study was conducted using subsets of data collected from 74 dairy herds with seasonal or split calving patterns. Associations between milk protein concentration at various stages of lactation and reproductive performance in Holstein dairy cows were assessed using random effects logistic regression and survival analysis with milk protein concentration during the cow's breeding period fitted as a time-varying covariate. The beneficial associations between milk protein concentration and each of the 4 selected indices for measuring reproductive performance were evident when milk protein concentration was derived for each 30-d period from calving up to 300d in milk. For the first 150d of lactation the adjusted odds ratios were highest from 31 to 60d and only slightly lower for all periods up to 150d of lactation. Estimated associations for 31 to 60d were stronger than for 0 to 30d. In addition, milk protein concentration during a cow's breeding period was positively associated with the subsequent daily hazard of conception, even after adjusting for milk protein concentration in the cow's first or second month of lactation. Milk protein concentrations from 0 to 30d of lactation were less closely correlated with concentrations measured at subsequent 30-d intervals; correlations were closer between other periods in lactation. These results indicate that the association between milk protein concentration and reproductive performance is partly due to factors other than the extent of negative energy balance in early

  20. Surfactant protein A2 mutations associated with pulmonary fibrosis lead to protein instability and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Wang, Yongyu; Gerard, Robert D; Mendelson, Carole R; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2010-07-16

    Rare heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2, SFTPA2) are associated with adult-onset pulmonary fibrosis and adenocarcinoma of the lung. We have previously shown that two recombinant SP-A2 mutant proteins (G231V and F198S) remain within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of A549 cells and are not secreted into the culture medium. The pathogenic mechanism of the mutant proteins is unknown. Here we analyze all common and rare variants of the surfactant protein A2, SP-A2, in both A549 cells and in primary type II alveolar epithelial cells. We show that, in contrast with all other SP-A2 variants, the mutant proteins are not secreted into the medium with wild-type SP-A isoforms, form fewer intracellular dimer and trimer oligomers, are partially insoluble in 0.5% Nonidet P-40 lysates of transfected A549 cells, and demonstrate greater protein instability in chymotrypsin proteolytic digestions. Both the G231V and F198S mutant SP-A2 proteins are destroyed via the ER-association degradation pathway. Expression of the mutant proteins increases the transcription of a BiP-reporter construct, expression of BiP protein, and production of an ER stress-induced XBP-1 spliced product. Human bronchoalveolar wash samples from individuals who are heterozygous for the G231V mutation have similar levels of total SP-A as normal family members, which suggests that the mechanism of disease does not involve an overt lack of secreted SP-A but instead involves an increase in ER stress of resident type II alveolar epithelial cells.

  1. Association of filamin A and vimentin with hepatitis C virus proteins in infected human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Ahrens, W A; Phatak, S U; Hwang, S; Schrum, L W; Bonkovsky, H L

    2011-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease and remains a major therapeutic challenge. A variety of host proteins interact with HCV proteins. The definitive role of cytoskeletal (CS) proteins in HCV infection remains to be determined. In this study, our aim was to determine the expression profile of differentially regulated and expressed selected CS proteins and their association with HCV proteins in infected hepatocytes as possible therapeutic targets. Using proteomics, qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence techniques, we revealed that filamin A (fila) and vimentin (vim) were prominently increased proteins in HCV-expressing human hepatoma cells compared with parental cells and in liver biopsies from patients with CHC vs controls. HCV nonstructural (NS) 3 and NS5A proteins were associated with fila, while core protein partially with fila and vim. Immunoprecipitation showed interactions among fila and NS3 and NS5A proteins. Cells treated with interferon-α showed a dose- and time-dependent decrease in CS and HCV proteins. NS proteins clustered at the perinuclear region following cytochalasin b treatment, whereas disperse cytoplasmic and perinuclear distribution was observed in the no-treatment group. This study demonstrates and signifies that changes occur in the expression of CS proteins in HCV-infected hepatocytes and, for the first time, shows the up-regulation and interaction of fila with HCV proteins. Association between CS and HCV proteins may have implications in future design of CS protein-targeted therapy for the treatment for HCV infection.

  2. Expanding the substantial interactome of NEMO using protein microarrays.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fenner, Beau J

    2010-01-01

    Signal transduction by the NF-kappaB pathway is a key regulator of a host of cellular responses to extracellular and intracellular messages. The NEMO adaptor protein lies at the top of this pathway and serves as a molecular conduit, connecting signals transmitted from upstream sensors to the downstream NF-kappaB transcription factor and subsequent gene activation. The position of NEMO within this pathway makes it an attractive target from which to search for new proteins that link NF-kappaB signaling to additional pathways and upstream effectors. In this work, we have used protein microarrays to identify novel NEMO interactors. A total of 112 protein interactors were identified, with the most statistically significant hit being the canonical NEMO interactor IKKbeta, with IKKalpha also being identified. Of the novel interactors, more than 30% were kinases, while at least 25% were involved in signal transduction. Binding of NEMO to several interactors, including CALB1, CDK2, SAG, SENP2 and SYT1, was confirmed using GST pulldown assays and coimmunoprecipitation, validating the initial screening approach. Overexpression of CALB1, CDK2 and SAG was found to stimulate transcriptional activation by NF-kappaB, while SYT1 overexpression repressed TNFalpha-dependent NF-kappaB transcriptional activation in human embryonic kidney cells. Corresponding with this finding, RNA silencing of CDK2, SAG and SENP2 reduced NF-kappaB transcriptional activation, supporting a positive role for these proteins in the NF-kappaB pathway. The identification of a host of new NEMO interactors opens up new research opportunities to improve understanding of this essential cell signaling pathway.

  3. Proteomic Study of Retinal Proteins Associated with Transcorneal Electric Stimulation in Rats

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    Takashi Kanamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To investigate how transcorneal electric stimulation (TES affects the retina, by identifying those proteins up- and downregulated by transcorneal electric stimulation (TES in the retina of rats. Methods. Adult Wistar rats received TES on the left eyes at different electrical currents while the right eyes received no treatment and served as controls. After TES, the eye was enucleated and the retina was isolated. The retinas were analyzed by proteomics. Results. Proteomics showed that twenty-five proteins were upregulated by TES. The identified proteins included cellular signaling proteins, proteins associated with neuronal transmission, metabolic proteins, immunological factors, and structural proteins. Conclusions. TES induced changes in expression of various functional proteins in the retina.

  4. Parathyroid hormone-related protein is a hypertrophy factor for human mesangial cells: Implications for diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Arantxa; Romero, Montserrat; Izquierdo, Adriana; Troyano, Nuria; Arce, Yolanda; Ardura, Juan Antonio; Arenas, María Isabel; Bover, Jordi; Esbrit, Pedro; Bosch, Ricardo J

    2012-05-01

    Hypertrophy of human mesangial cells (HMC) is among the earliest characteristics in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN). Recently, we observed the upregulation of parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related protein (PTHrP) in experimental DN, associated with renal hypertrophy. Herein, we first examined whether PTHrP was overexpressed in human DN, and next assessed the putative role of this protein on high glucose (HG)-induced HMC hypertrophy. As previously found in mice, kidneys from diabetic patients showed an increased tubular and glomerular immunostaining for PTHrP. In HMC, HG medium increased PTHrP protein expression associated with the development of hypertrophy as assessed by cell protein content. This effect was also induced by PTHrP(1-36). HG and PTHrP(1-36)-induced hypertrophy were associated with an increase in cyclin D1 and p27Kip1 protein expression, a decreased cyclin E expression, and the prevention of cyclin E/cdk2 complex activation. Both PTHrP neutralizing antiserum (α-PTHrP) and the PTH/PTHrP receptor antagonist (JB4250) were able to abolish HG induction of hypertrophy, the aforementioned changes in cell cycle proteins, and also TGF-β1 up-regulation. Moreover, the capability of both HG and PTHrP(1-36) to induce HMC hypertrophy was abolished by α-TGFβ1. These data show for the first time that PTHrP is upregulated in the kidney of patients with DN. Our findings also demonstrate that PTHrP acts as an important mediator of HG-induced HMC hypertrophy by modulating cell cycle regulatory proteins and TGF-β1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Simulations of HIV capsid protein dimerization reveal the effect of chemistry and topography on the mechanism of hydrophobic protein association

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Naiyin

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the hydrophobic protein surfaces in aqueous solution sit near a drying transition. The tendency for these surfaces to expel water from their vicinity leads to self assembly of macromolecular complexes. In this article we show with a realistic model for a biologically pertinent system how this phenomenon appears at the molecular level. We focus on the association of the C-terminal domain (CA-C) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) capsid protein. By combining all-atom simulations with specialized sampling techniques we measure the water density distribution during the approach of two CA-C proteins as a function of separation and amino acid sequence in the interfacial region. The simulations demonstrate that CA-C protein-protein interactions sit at the edge of a dewetting transition and that this mesoscopic manifestation of the underlying liquid-vapor phase transition can be readily manipulated by biology or protein engineering to significantly affect association behavior. While ...

  6. Proteins associated with SF3a60 in T. brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Nyambega

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei relies on Spliced leader trans splicing to generate functional messenger RNAs. Trans splicing joins the specialized SL exon from the SL RNA to pre-mRNAs and is mediated by the trans-spliceosome, which is made up of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles and non-snRNP factors. Although the trans spliceosome is essential for trypanosomatid gene expression, not all spliceosomal protein factors are known and of these, only a few are completely characterized. In this study, we have characterized the trypanosome Splicing Factor, SF3a60, the only currently annotated SF3a component. As expected, epitope-tagged SF3a60 localizes in the trypanosome nucleus. SF3a60 is essential for cell viability but its depletion seem to have no detectable effect on trans-splicing. In addition, we used SF3a60 as bait in a Yeast-2-hybrid system screen and identified its interacting protein factors. The interactions with SF3a120, SF3a66 and SAP130 were confirmed by tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry.

  7. A large solvent isotope effect on protein association thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eginton, Christopher; Beckett, Dorothy

    2013-09-24

    Solvent reorganization can contribute significantly to the energetics of protein-protein interactions. However, our knowledge of the magnitude of the energetic contribution is limited, in part, by a dearth of quantitative experimental measurements. The biotin repressor forms a homodimer as a prerequisite to DNA binding to repress transcription initiation. At 20 °C, the dimerization reaction, which is thermodynamically coupled to binding of a small ligand, bio-5'-AMP, is characterized by a Gibbs free energy of -7 kcal/mol. This modest net dimerization free energy reflects underlying, very large opposing enthalpic and entropic driving forces of 41 ± 3 and -48 ± 3 kcal/mol, respectively. The thermodynamics have been interpreted as indicating coupling of solvent release to dimerization. In this work, this interpretation has been investigated by measuring the effect of replacing H2O with D2O on the dimerization thermodynamics. Sedimentation equilibrium measurements performed at 20 °C reveal a solvent isotope effect of -1.5 kcal/mol on the Gibbs free energy of dimerization. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the reaction in D2O indicates enthalpic and entropic contributions of 28 and -37 kcal/mol, respectively, considerably smaller than the values measured in H2O. These large solvent isotope perturbations to the thermodynamics are consistent with a significant contribution of solvent release to the dimerization reaction.

  8. Analysis of close associations of uropod-associated proteins in human T-cells using the proximity ligation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Baumann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have shown previously that the raft-associated proteins flotillin-1 and -2 are rapidly recruited to the uropods of chemoattractant-stimulated human neutrophils and T-cells and are involved in cell polarization. Other proteins such as the adhesion receptor PSGL-1, the actin-membrane linker proteins ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM and the signaling enzyme phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ90 (PIPKIγ90 also accumulate in the T-cell uropod. Using the in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA we now have investigated putative close associations of these proteins in human freshly isolated T-cells before and after chemokine addition. The PLA allows in situ subcellular localization of close proximity of endogenous proteins at single-molecule resolution in fixed cells. It allows detection also of weaker and transient complexes that would not be revealed with co-immunoprecipitation approaches. We previously provided evidence for heterodimer formation of tagged flotillin-1 and -2 in T-cells before and after chemokine addition using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET. We now confirm these findings using PLA for the endogenous flotillins in fixed human T-cells. Moreover, in agreement with the literature, our PLA findings confirm a close association of endogenous PSGL-1 and ERM proteins both in resting and chemokine-activated human T-cells. In addition, we provide novel evidence using the PLA for close associations of endogenous activated ERM proteins with PIPKIγ90 and of endogenous flotillins with PSGL-1 in human T-cells, before and after chemokine addition. Our findings suggest that preformed clusters of these proteins coalesce in the uropod upon cell stimulation.

  9. Ribotrap Analysis of Proteins Associated with FHL3 3’Untranslated Region in Glioma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Han; Qing Xia; Bin Yin Xiao-zhong Peng

    2014-01-01

    Objective To screen the proteins associated with four-and-a-half LIM domains 3 (FHL3) 3’ untranslated region (3’UTR) in glioma cells. Methods Western blot was adopted to detect the regulatory effect of poly(C)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) on FHL3. Biotin pull-down and sliver staining were employed to screen and verify the candidate binding proteins of FHL3 3’UTR. Then liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and molecule annotation system were used to identify and analyze the candidate binding proteins. Immuno-precipitation was conducted to study the interaction between PCBP2 and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1), a binding protein identified by LC-MS/MS. Results PCBP2 could bind to FHL3 mRNA 3’UTR-A and inhibited the expression of FHL3 in T98G glioms cells. 22 candidate binding proteins were identified. Among them, there were 11 RNA binding proteins, including PCBP2. PTBP1 associated with FHL3 mRNA 3’UTR and interacted with PCBP2 protein. Conclusion PCBP2 and PTBP1 can both associate with FHL3 mRNA 3’UTR through forming a protein complex.

  10. Identification of Mitosis-Specific Phosphorylation in Mitotic Chromosome-Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Kimura, Michiko; Takagi, Shunsuke; Toramoto, Iyo; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2016-09-01

    During mitosis, phosphorylation of chromosome-associated proteins is a key regulatory mechanism. Mass spectrometry has been successfully applied to determine the complete protein composition of mitotic chromosomes, but not to identify post-translational modifications. Here, we quantitatively compared the phosphoproteome of isolated mitotic chromosomes with that of chromosomes in nonsynchronized cells. We identified 4274 total phosphorylation sites and 350 mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites in mitotic chromosome-associated proteins. Significant mitosis-specific phosphorylation in centromere/kinetochore proteins was detected, although the chromosomal association of these proteins did not change throughout the cell cycle. This mitosis-specific phosphorylation might play a key role in regulation of mitosis. Further analysis revealed strong dependency of phosphorylation dynamics on kinase consensus patterns, thus linking the identified phosphorylation sites to known key mitotic kinases. Remarkably, chromosomal axial proteins such as non-SMC subunits of condensin, TopoIIα, and Kif4A, together with the chromosomal periphery protein Ki67 involved in the establishment of the mitotic chromosomal structure, demonstrated high phosphorylation during mitosis. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for regulation of chromosome restructuring in mitosis via protein phosphorylation. Our study generated a large quantitative database on protein phosphorylation in mitotic and nonmitotic chromosomes, thus providing insights into the dynamics of chromatin protein phosphorylation at mitosis onset.

  11. Targeting of pseudorabies virus structural proteins to axons requires association of the viral Us9 protein with lipid rafts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew G Lyman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The pseudorabies virus (PRV Us9 protein plays a central role in targeting viral capsids and glycoproteins to axons of dissociated sympathetic neurons. As a result, Us9 null mutants are defective in anterograde transmission of infection in vivo. However, it is unclear how Us9 promotes axonal sorting of so many viral proteins. It is known that the glycoproteins gB, gC, gD and gE are associated with lipid raft microdomains on the surface of infected swine kidney cells and monocytes, and are directed into the axon in a Us9-dependent manner. In this report, we determined that Us9 is associated with lipid rafts, and that this association is critical to Us9-mediated sorting of viral structural proteins. We used infected non-polarized and polarized PC12 cells, a rat pheochromocytoma cell line that acquires many of the characteristics of sympathetic neurons in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF. In these cells, Us9 is highly enriched in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs. Moreover, reducing the affinity of Us9 for lipid rafts inhibited anterograde transmission of infection from sympathetic neurons to epithelial cells in vitro. We conclude that association of Us9 with lipid rafts is key for efficient targeting of structural proteins to axons and, as a consequence, for directional spread of PRV from pre-synaptic to post-synaptic neurons and cells of the mammalian nervous system.

  12. Death-associated Protein 3 Regulates Mitochondrial-encoded Protein Synthesis and Mitochondrial Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Xian, Hongxu; Lee, Kit Yee; Xiao, Bin; Wang, Hongyan; Yu, Fengwei; Shen, Han-Ming; Liou, Yih-Cherng

    2015-10-09

    Mitochondrial morphologies change over time and are tightly regulated by dynamic machinery proteins such as dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), mitofusion 1/2, and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1). However, the detailed mechanisms of how these molecules cooperate to mediate fission and fusion remain elusive. DAP3 is a mitochondrial ribosomal protein that involves in apoptosis, but its biological function has not been well characterized. Here, we demonstrate that DAP3 specifically localizes in the mitochondrial matrix. Knockdown of DAP3 in mitochondria leads to defects in mitochondrial-encoded protein synthesis and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics. Moreover, depletion of DAP3 dramatically decreases the phosphorylation of Drp1 at Ser-637 on mitochondria, enhancing the retention time of Drp1 puncta on mitochondria during the fission process. Furthermore, autophagy is inhibited in the DAP3-depleted cells, which sensitizes cells to different types of death stimuli. Together, our results suggest that DAP3 plays important roles in mitochondrial function and dynamics, providing new insights into the mechanism of a mitochondrial ribosomal protein function in cell death.

  13. RAID: a comprehensive resource for human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wu, Deng; Chen, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinxurong; Fan, Dandan; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Mingyue; Tan, Puwen; Xu, Jintian; Yi, Ying; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Hua; Hu, Yongfei; Fan, Kaili; Kang, Juanjuan; Huang, Yan; Miao, Zhengqiang; Bi, Miaoman; Jin, Nana; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Xu, Jianzhen; Wang, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity in the eukaryote transcriptome, which includes not only protein-coding transcripts but also an expanding catalog of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Diverse coding and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) perform functions through interaction with each other in various cellular processes. In this project, we have developed RAID (http://www.rna-society.org/raid), an RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction database. RAID intends to provide the scientific community with all-in-one resources for efficient browsing and extraction of the RNA-associated interactions in human. This version of RAID contains more than 6100 RNA-associated interactions obtained by manually reviewing more than 2100 published papers, including 4493 RNA-RNA interactions and 1619 RNA-protein interactions. Each entry contains detailed information on an RNA-associated interaction, including RAID ID, RNA/protein symbol, RNA/protein categories, validated method, expressing tissue, literature references (Pubmed IDs), and detailed functional description. Users can query, browse, analyze, and manipulate RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction. RAID provides a comprehensive resource of human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction network. Furthermore, this resource will help in uncovering the generic organizing principles of cellular function network.

  14. Genome-wide association study of CSF levels of 59 alzheimer's disease candidate proteins: significant associations with proteins involved in amyloid processing and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S K Kauwe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF 42 amino acid species of amyloid beta (Aβ42 and tau levels are strongly correlated with the presence of Alzheimer's disease (AD neuropathology including amyloid plaques and neurodegeneration and have been successfully used as endophenotypes for genetic studies of AD. Additional CSF analytes may also serve as useful endophenotypes that capture other aspects of AD pathophysiology. Here we have conducted a genome-wide association study of CSF levels of 59 AD-related analytes. All analytes were measured using the Rules Based Medicine Human DiscoveryMAP Panel, which includes analytes relevant to several disease-related processes. Data from two independently collected and measured datasets, the Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC and Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI, were analyzed separately, and combined results were obtained using meta-analysis. We identified genetic associations with CSF levels of 5 proteins (Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2, Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 4 (CCL4, Interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R and Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3 with study-wide significant p-values (p<1.46×10-10 and significant, consistent evidence for association in both the Knight ADRC and the ADNI samples. These proteins are involved in amyloid processing and pro-inflammatory signaling. SNPs associated with ACE, IL6R and MMP3 protein levels are located within the coding regions of the corresponding structural gene. The SNPs associated with CSF levels of CCL4 and CCL2 are located in known chemokine binding proteins. The genetic associations reported here are novel and suggest mechanisms for genetic control of CSF and plasma levels of these disease-related proteins. Significant SNPs in ACE and MMP3 also showed association with AD risk. Our findings suggest that these proteins/pathways may be valuable therapeutic targets for AD. Robust associations in cognitively normal

  15. Specific association of growth-associated protein 43 with calcium release units in skeletal muscles of lower vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Caprara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43, is a strictly conserved protein among vertebrates implicated in neuronal development and neurite branching. Since GAP43 structure contains a calmodulin-binding domain, this protein is able to bind calmodulin and gather it nearby membrane network, thus regulating cytosolic calcium and consequently calcium-dependent intracellular events. Even if for many years GAP43 has been considered a neuronal-specific protein, evidence from different laboratories described its presence in myoblasts, myotubes and adult skeletal muscle fibers. Data from our laboratory showed that GAP43 is localized between calcium release units (CRUs and mitochondria in mammalian skeletal muscle suggesting that, also in skeletal muscle, this protein can be a key player in calcium/calmodulin homeostasis. However, the previous studies could not clearly distinguish between a mitochondrion- or a triad-related positioning of GAP43. To solve this question, the expression and localization of GAP43 was studied in skeletal muscle of Xenopus and Zebrafish known to have triads located at the level of the Z-lines and mitochondria not closely associated with them. Western blotting and immunostaining experiments revealed the expression of GAP43 also in skeletal muscle of lower vertebrates (like amphibians and fishes, and that the protein is localized closely to the triad junction. Once more, these results and GAP43 structural features, support an involvement of the protein in the dynamic intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, a common conserved role among the different species.

  16. BOR-syndrome-associated Eya1 mutations lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation of Eya1 protein.

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    Amna Musharraf

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human EYA1 gene have been associated with several human diseases including branchio-oto (BO and branchio-oto-renal (BOR syndrome, as well as congenital cataracts and ocular anterior segment anomalies. BOR patients suffer from severe malformations of the ears, branchial arches and kidneys. The phenotype of Eya1-heterozygous mice resembles the symptoms of human patients suffering from BOR syndrome. The Eya1 gene encodes a multifunctional protein that acts as a protein tyrosine phosphatase and a transcriptional coactivator. It has been shown that Eya1 interacts with Six transcription factors, which are also required for nuclear translocation of the Eya1 protein. We investigated the effects of seven disease-causing Eya1 missense mutations on Eya1 protein function, in particular cellular localization, ability to interact with Six proteins, and protein stability. We show here that the BOR-associated Eya1 missense mutations S454P, L472R, and L550P lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation of the Eya1 protein in mammalian cells. Moreover, Six proteins lead to a significant stabilization of Eya1, which is caused by Six-mediated protection from proteasomal degradation. In case of the mutant L550P, loss of interaction with Six proteins leads to rapid protein degradation. Our observations suggest that protein destabilization constitutes a novel disease causing mechanism for Eya1.

  17. Genome Defense Mechanisms in Neurospora and Associated Specialized Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Tamuli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurospora crassa, the filamentous fungus possesses widest array of genome defense mechanisms known to any eukaryotic organism, including a process called repeat-induced point mutation (RIP. RIP is a genome defense mechanism that hypermutates repetitive DNA sequences; analogous to genomic imprinting in mammals. As an impact of RIP, Neurospora possesses many fewer genes in multigene families than expected. A DNA methyltransferase homologue, RID was shown to be essential for RIP. Recently, a variant catalytic subunit of translesion DNA polymerase zeta (Pol zeta has been found to be essential for dominant RIP suppressor phenotype. Meiotic silencing and quelling are two other genome defense mechanisms in Neurospora, and proteins required for these two processes have been identified through genetic screens.

  18. Presence of proteolipid protein in coelacanth brain myelin demonstrates tetrapod affinities and questions a chondrichthyan association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waehneldt, T V; Malotka, J

    1989-06-01

    The protein and glycoprotein compositions of CNS myelin from the living coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An unglycosylated component of 25 kilodaltons showed substantially stronger immunoblot reactivity with antibodies against mammalian proteolipid protein (PLP) than lungfish glycosylated PLP. DM-20 (intermediate protein) was not detectable in either fish. The presence of unglycosylated PLP in CNS myelin of the actinistian coelacanth contradicts an association with cartilaginous fishes but supports tetrapod affinities closer than those of lungfish.

  19. Scrapie-associated prion protein accumulates in astrocytes during scrapie infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Diedrich, J F; Bendheim, P E; Kim, Y. S.; Carp, R. I.; Haase, A T

    1991-01-01

    In the course of scrapie, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy caused by an unconventional agent, a normal cellular protein is converted to an abnormal form that copurifies with infectivity and aggregates to form deposits of amyloid. We have used immunocytochemistry and methods that enhance detection of amyloidogenic proteins to investigate the types of cells in the central nervous system which are involved in the formation of the abnormal scrapie-associated protein. We show that this pr...

  20. WW domain binding protein-2, an E6-associated protein interacting protein, acts as a coactivator of estrogen and progesterone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhananjayan, Sarath C; Ramamoorthy, Sivapriya; Khan, Obaid Y; Ismail, Ayesha; Sun, Jun; Slingerland, Joyce; O'Malley, Bert W; Nawaz, Zafar

    2006-10-01

    WW domain binding protein-2 (WBP-2) was cloned as an E6-associated protein interacting protein, and its role in steroid hormone receptors functions was investigated. We show that WBP-2 specifically enhanced the transactivation functions of progesterone receptor (PR) and estrogen receptor (ER), whereas it did not have any significant effect on the androgen receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, or the activation functions of p53 and VP-16. Depletion of endogenous WBP-2 with small interfering RNAs indicated that WBP-2 was required for the proper functioning of PR and ER. We also demonstrated that WBP-2 contains an intrinsic activation domain. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate the hormone-dependent recruitment of WBP-2 onto an estrogen-responsive promoter. Mutational analysis suggests that one of three polyproline (PY) motifs of WBP-2 is essential for its coactivation and intrinsic activation functions. We show that WBP-2 and E6-associated protein each enhance PR function, and their effect on PR action are additive when coexpressed, suggesting a common signaling pathway. In this study, we also demonstrate that the WBP-2 binding protein, Yes kinase-associated protein (YAP) enhances PR transactivation, but YAP's coactivation function is absolutely dependent on WBP-2. Taken together, our data establish the role of WBP-2 and YAP as coactivators for ER and PR transactivation pathways.

  1. Brain transcriptome-wide screen for HIV-1 Nef protein interaction partners reveals various membrane-associated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen C Kammula

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Nef protein contributes essentially to the pathology of AIDS by a variety of protein-protein-interactions within the host cell. The versatile functionality of Nef is partially attributed to different conformational states and posttranslational modifications, such as myristoylation. Up to now, many interaction partners of Nef have been identified using classical yeast two-hybrid screens. Such screens rely on transcriptional activation of reporter genes in the nucleus to detect interactions. Thus, the identification of Nef interaction partners that are integral membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins or other proteins that do not translocate into the nucleus is hampered. In the present study, a split-ubiquitin based yeast two-hybrid screen was used to identify novel membrane-localized interaction partners of Nef. More than 80% of the hereby identified interaction partners of Nef are transmembrane proteins. The identified hits are GPM6B, GPM6A, BAP31, TSPAN7, CYB5B, CD320/TCblR, VSIG4, PMEPA1, OCIAD1, ITGB1, CHN1, PH4, CLDN10, HSPA9, APR-3, PEBP1 and B3GNT, which are involved in diverse cellular processes like signaling, apoptosis, neurogenesis, cell adhesion and protein trafficking or quality control. For a subfraction of the hereby identified proteins we present data supporting their direct interaction with HIV-1 Nef. We discuss the results with respect to many phenotypes observed in HIV infected cells and patients. The identified Nef interaction partners may help to further elucidate the molecular basis of HIV-related diseases.

  2. Brain transcriptome-wide screen for HIV-1 Nef protein interaction partners reveals various membrane-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammula, Ellen C; Mötter, Jessica; Gorgels, Alexandra; Jonas, Esther; Hoffmann, Silke; Willbold, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 Nef protein contributes essentially to the pathology of AIDS by a variety of protein-protein-interactions within the host cell. The versatile functionality of Nef is partially attributed to different conformational states and posttranslational modifications, such as myristoylation. Up to now, many interaction partners of Nef have been identified using classical yeast two-hybrid screens. Such screens rely on transcriptional activation of reporter genes in the nucleus to detect interactions. Thus, the identification of Nef interaction partners that are integral membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins or other proteins that do not translocate into the nucleus is hampered. In the present study, a split-ubiquitin based yeast two-hybrid screen was used to identify novel membrane-localized interaction partners of Nef. More than 80% of the hereby identified interaction partners of Nef are transmembrane proteins. The identified hits are GPM6B, GPM6A, BAP31, TSPAN7, CYB5B, CD320/TCblR, VSIG4, PMEPA1, OCIAD1, ITGB1, CHN1, PH4, CLDN10, HSPA9, APR-3, PEBP1 and B3GNT, which are involved in diverse cellular processes like signaling, apoptosis, neurogenesis, cell adhesion and protein trafficking or quality control. For a subfraction of the hereby identified proteins we present data supporting their direct interaction with HIV-1 Nef. We discuss the results with respect to many phenotypes observed in HIV infected cells and patients. The identified Nef interaction partners may help to further elucidate the molecular basis of HIV-related diseases.

  3. Surface-associated proteins of Staphylococcus aureus: their possible roles in virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Foster (Timothy); D. McDevitt

    1994-01-01

    textabstractA class of proteins that are associated with the cell surface of Gram-positive bacteria has been recognised. Common structural features which are implicated in the proper secretion and attachment of these proteins to the cell surface occur in the C-termini. N-terminal domains interact wi

  4. The Arabidopsis kinase-associated protein phosphatase controls internalization of the somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, K.; Russinova, E.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Willemse, J.; Vries, de S.C.

    2002-01-01

    The AtSERK1 protein is a plasma membrane-located LRR receptor-like serine threonine kinase that is transiently expressed during plant embryogenesis. Our results show that AtSERK1 interacts with the kinase-associated protein phosphatase (KAPP) in vitro. The kinase interaction (KI) domain of KAPP does

  5. Surface-associated proteins of Staphylococcus aureus: their possible roles in virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Foster (Timothy); D. McDevitt

    1994-01-01

    textabstractA class of proteins that are associated with the cell surface of Gram-positive bacteria has been recognised. Common structural features which are implicated in the proper secretion and attachment of these proteins to the cell surface occur in the C-termini. N-terminal domains interact

  6. The Role of Decorated SDS Micelles in Sub-CMC Protein Denaturation and Association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kell; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De; Larsen, K.L.;

    2009-01-01

    . Our data provide key structural insights into decorated micelle complexes with proteins, revealing a remarkable diversity in the different conformations they can stabilize. The data highlight that a minimum decorated micelle size, which may be a key driving force for intermolecular protein association...

  7. The surface-associated proteins of wheat starch granules: suitability of wheat starch for celiac patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat starch is used to make baked products for celiac patients in several European countries, but is avoided in the US because of uncertainty about the amounts of associated grain storage (gluten) proteins. People with celiac disease (CD) must avoid wheat, rye and barley proteins and products that...

  8. CHARACTER OF TUMOR ASSOCIATED PROTEIN RECOGNIZED BY MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY AGAINST YUNNAN GEJIU LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To identify and characterize lung cancer associated protein N35 and attempt to learn the prospective possibility of the clinical application of the protein N35. Methods: Immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, differential centrifigation and subcellular assay, immunohistochemistry, N-glycanase digestion, mitotic cell immunoflourescence and multiple methods of affinity chromatography have been used with the monoclonal antibody N-35 to detect the distribution of the protein N35 among the various cancer cell lines and normal human tissue, the relationship between the protein N35 and glycoprotein, the location of the subcellular structure and chromosomal domain of the protein N35,the most effective way of purification of tumor associated protein N35. Results: The protein N35 is a glycoprotein, distributes to the human lung cancer cell line GLC-82, human cervical cancer cell line Hela, human hepatic cancer cell line HepG-2 and human breast cancer cell line PMC with different relative molecular mass(Mr), but no expression of the protein ingredient in normal human fresh tissue; concentrates at the nuclei significantly ,much more than at the mitochondrail and membrane, locates at the centriole of the chromosomal domain. Conclusions: The lung cancer associated protein N35 might be expressed only by the cancer cells and related with the proliferation of cancer cells as a role of tumor cell growth regulator.

  9. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1 ×, DE3 ×, ME3 ×, NEL3 ×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P = 0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P = 0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P = 0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st

  10. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-15

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1×, DE3×, ME3×, NEL3×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P=0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P=0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P=0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P=0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P=0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P=0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P=0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P=0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P=0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st and 2nd amide groups (P0

  11. Purification of infectious human herpesvirus 6A virions and association of host cell proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garoff Henrik

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses that are incorporating host cell proteins might trigger autoimmune diseases. It is therefore of interest to identify possible host proteins associated with viruses, especially for enveloped viruses that have been suggested to play a role in autoimmune diseases, like human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A in multiple sclerosis (MS. Results We have established a method for rapid and morphology preserving purification of HHV-6A virions, which in combination with parallel analyses with background control material released from mock-infected cells facilitates qualitative and quantitative investigations of the protein content of HHV-6A virions. In our iodixanol gradient purified preparation, we detected high levels of viral DNA by real-time PCR and viral proteins by metabolic labelling, silver staining and western blots. In contrast, the background level of cellular contamination was low in the purified samples as demonstrated by the silver staining and metabolic labelling analyses. Western blot analyses showed that the cellular complement protein CD46, the receptor for HHV-6A, is associated with the purified and infectious virions. Also, the cellular proteins clathrin, ezrin and Tsg101 are associated with intact HHV-6A virions. Conclusion Cellular proteins are associated with HHV-6A virions. The relevance of the association in disease and especially in autoimmunity will be further investigated.

  12. A PII-Like Protein Regulated by Bicarbonate: Structural and Biochemical Studies of the Carboxysome-Associated CPII Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Nicole M; Eden, Kevin D; Ngo, Joanna; Rosinski, Justin S; Sawaya, Michael R; Cascio, Duilio; Collazo, Michael; Hoveida, Hamidreza; Hubbell, Wayne L; Yeates, Todd O

    2016-10-09

    Autotrophic bacteria rely on various mechanisms to increase intracellular concentrations of inorganic forms of carbon (i.e., bicarbonate and CO2) in order to improve the efficiency with which they can be converted to organic forms. Transmembrane bicarbonate transporters and carboxysomes play key roles in accumulating bicarbonate and CO2, but other regulatory elements of carbon concentration mechanisms in bacteria are less understood. In this study, after analyzing the genomic regions around α-type carboxysome operons, we characterize a protein that is conserved across these operons but has not been previously studied. On the basis of a series of apo- and ligand-bound crystal structures and supporting biochemical data, we show that this protein, which we refer to as the carboxysome-associated PII protein (CPII), represents a new and distinct subfamily within the broad superfamily of previously studied PII regulatory proteins, which are generally involved in regulating nitrogen metabolism in bacteria. CPII undergoes dramatic conformational changes in response to ADP binding, and the affinity for nucleotide binding is strongly enhanced by the presence of bicarbonate. CPII therefore appears to be a unique type of PII protein that senses bicarbonate availability, consistent with its apparent genomic association with the carboxysome and its constituents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nexrutine inhibits survival and induces G1 cell cycle arrest, which is associated with apoptosis or autophagy depending on the breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guang; Lanza-Jacoby, Susan; Wang, Chenguang

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers that are estrogen receptor (ER) negative or are ER negative with ErbB2/HER-2 overexpression have a poor prognosis, which emphasizes the importance of developing compounds for preventing breast cancer. Nexrutine, an herbal extract from the plant Phellodendron amurense, has been used for centuries in Asian medicine to treat inflammation, gastroenteritis, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. In this study we investigated the anticancer effects of Nexrutine on ER negative breast cancer cell lines that are positive or negative for HER-2. Nexrutine decreased the activities of 2 potential targets of breast cancer, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and peroxisome proliferators activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). The antiinflammatory effects of Nexrutine were evident with decreased prostaglandin (PG)E2 production, protein expression of microsomal PGE2 synthase (mPGES), and PPARγ. Nexrutine decreased cell survival and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest in SkBr3 and MDA-MB 231 cells, which were associated with reduced protein expression of Cyclin D1 and cdk2 along with increased protein expression of p21 and p27. The growth-inhibitory effect of Nexrutine was associated with apoptosis in SkBr3 cells and autophagy in MDA-MB231 cells. Based on these findings, we propose that Nexrutine may provide a novel approach for protection against breast cancer.

  14. A model of protein association based on their hydrophobic and electric interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Mozo-Villarías

    Full Text Available The propensity of many proteins to oligomerize and associate to form complex structures from their constituent monomers, is analyzed in terms of their hydrophobic (H, and electric pseudo-dipole (D moment vectors. In both cases these vectors are defined as the product of the distance between their positive and negative centroids, times the total hydrophobicity or total positive charge of the protein. Changes in the magnitudes and directions of H and D are studied as monomers associate to form larger complexes. We use these descriptors to study similarities and differences in two groups of associations: a open associations such as polymers with an undefined number of monomers (i.e. actin polymerization, amyloid and HIV capsid assemblies; b closed symmetrical associations of finite size, like spherical virus capsids and protein cages. The tendency of the hydrophobic moments of the monomers in an association is to align in parallel arrangements following a pattern similar to those of phospholipids in a membrane. Conversely, electric dipole moments of monomers tend to align in antiparallel associations. The final conformation of a given assembly is a fine-tuned combination of these forces, limited by steric constraints. This determines whether the association will be open (indetermined number of monomers or closed (fixed number of monomers. Any kinetic, binding or molecular peculiarities that characterize a protein assembly, comply with the vector rules laid down in this paper. These findings are also independent of protein size and shape.

  15. Proteomic profiling of lipid droplet-associated proteins in primary adipocytes of normal and obese mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yubo Ding; Yibo Wu; Rong Zeng; Kan Liao

    2012-01-01

    Lipid droplets in adipocytes serve as the principal longterm energy storage depot of animals.There is increasing recognition that lipid droplets are not merely a static neutral lipid storage site,but in fact dynamic and multifunctional organelles.Structurally,lipid droplet consists of a neutral lipid core surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer and proteins embedded in or bound to the phospholipid layer.Proteins on the surface of lipid droplets are crucial to droplet structure and dynamics.To understand the lipid droplet-associated proteome of primary adipocyte with a large central lipid droplet,lipid droplets of white adipose tissue from C57BL/6 mice were isolated.And the proteins were extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.A total of 193 proteins including 73 previously unreported proteins were identified.Furthermore,the isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT) was used to compare the difference of lipid droplet-associated proteomes between the normal lean and the high-fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice.Of 23proteins quantified by ICAT analysis,3 proteins were upregulated and 4 proteins were down-regulated in the lipid droplets of adipose tissue from the obese mice.Importantly,two structural proteins of lipid droplets,perilipin A and vimentin,were greatly reduced in the lipid droplets of the adipose tissue from the obese mice,implicating reduced protein machinery for lipid droplet stability.

  16. Melanoma MAPK pathway proteins and associated tumour suppressors: p16 is an independent prognostic biomarker by tissue microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lade-Keller, Johanne; Guldberg, Per; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Melanoma MAPK pathway proteins and associated tumour suppressors: p16 is an independent prognostic biomarker by tissue microarrays......Melanoma MAPK pathway proteins and associated tumour suppressors: p16 is an independent prognostic biomarker by tissue microarrays...

  17. The Association between Total Protein and Vegetable Protein Intake and Low Muscle Mass among the Community-Dwelling Elderly Population in Northern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ru-Yi; Yang, Kuen-Cheh; Chang, Hao-Hsiang; Lee, Long-Teng; Lu, Chia-Wen; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2016-06-17

    Sarcopenia, highly linked with fall, frailty, and disease burden, is an emerging problem in aging society. Higher protein intake has been suggested to maintain nitrogen balance. Our objective was to investigate whether pre-sarcopenia status was associated with lower protein intake. A total of 327 community-dwelling elderly people were recruited for a cross-sectional study. We adopted the multivariate nutrient density model to identify associations between low muscle mass and dietary protein intake. The general linear regression models were applied to estimate skeletal muscle mass index across the quartiles of total protein and vegetable protein density. Participants with diets in the lowest quartile of total protein density (protein density (protein density (p = 0.023) and vegetable protein density (p = 0.025). Increasing daily intakes of total protein and vegetable protein densities appears to confer protection against pre-sarcopenia status.

  18. Synthesis and secretion of proteins by perifused caput epididymal tubules, and association of secreted proteins with spermatozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinefelter, G.R.; Hamilton, D.W.

    1985-11-01

    We have used perifusion organ culture of proximal and distal caput epididymal tubules of the rat to study the secretion of proteins by epididymal epithelium and uptake of the luminal radioactive proteins by sperm. The amount of incorporation of L-(35S)methionine into luminal fluid proteins was time dependent and completely inhibited by cycloheximide. The association of labeled proteins with cultured sperm was also dependent on time and continuous, with sperm still acquiring labeled luminal proteins after protein synthesis was arrested. A Mr = 46,000 molecule was found to be heavily labeled in luminal fluid and sperm extracts. Fluorograms of all L-(35S)methionine extracts immunoprecipitated using an antiepididymal alpha-lactalbumin antibody (Klinefelter and Hamilton, 1984) showed labeling of an Mr = 18,000 molecule and, in addition, the Mr = 46,000 molecule, but immunostaining was specific only for the Mr = 18,000 molecule and the heavy chain of the immunoglobulin. We suggest that the Mr = 46,000 molecule may be galactosyltransferase. Galactose oxidase-NaB(3H)4 labeling of the cultured caput sperm cell surface revealed a Mr = 23,000 molecule that was able to be immunoprecipitated with antiepididymal alpha-lactalbumin antibody. Our data suggest that this cell surface molecule is similar to one component of the fluid epididymal alpha-lactalbumin-like complex and, in addition, show that glycosylation of the sperm surface can occur in the caput epididymidis.

  19. A review on protein-protein interaction network of APE1/Ref-1 and its associated biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, S; Dhiman, M; Tell, G; Mantha, A K

    2015-04-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a classic example of functionally variable protein. Besides its well-known role in (i) DNA repair of oxidative base damage, APE1 also plays a critical role in (ii) redox regulation of transcription factors controlling gene expression for cell survival pathways, for which it is also known as redox effector factor 1 (Ref-1), and recent evidences advocates for (iii) coordinated control of other non-canonical protein-protein interaction(s) responsible for significant biological functions in mammalian cells. The diverse functions of APE1 can be ascribed to its ability to interact with different protein partners, owing to the attainment of unfolded domains during evolution. Association of dysregulation of APE1 with various human pathologies, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases and neurodegeneration, is attributable to its multifunctional nature, and this makes APE1 a potential therapeutic target. This review covers the important aspects of APE1 in terms of its significant protein-protein interaction(s), and this knowledge is required to understand the onset and development of human pathologies and to design or improve the strategies to target such interactions for treatment and management of various human diseases.

  20. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  1. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom G Richardson

    Full Text Available It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit.Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1% together in three different ways 1 variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2 variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3 all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families. A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT.We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed.We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals.

  2. Identification of membrane-associated proteins from Campylobacter jejuni strains using complementary proteomics technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordwell, Stuart J; Len, Alice C L; Touma, Rachel G; Scott, Nichollas E; Falconer, Linda; Jones, David; Connolly, Angela; Crossett, Ben; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2008-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of food- and water-borne illness world-wide. The membrane-associated proteome of a recent C. jejuni gastrointestinal isolate (JHH1) was generated by sodium carbonate precipitation and ultracentrifugation followed by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF MS as well as 2-DLC (strong cation exchange followed by RP chromatography) of trypsin digests coupled to MS/MS (2-DLC/MS/MS). 2-DE/MS identified 77 proteins, 44 of which were predicted membrane proteins, while 2-DLC/MS/MS identified 432 proteins, of which 206 were predicted to be membrane associated. A total of 453 unique proteins (27.4% of the C. jejuni theoretical proteome), including 187 bona fide membrane proteins were identified in this study. Membrane proteins were also compared between C. jejuni JHH1 and ATCC 700297 to identify factors potentially associated with increased gastrointestinal virulence. We identified 28 proteins that were significantly (>two-fold) more abundant in, or unique to, JHH1, including eight proteins involved in chemotaxis signal transduction and flagellar motility, the amino acid-binding surface antigens CjaA and CjaC, and four outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of unknown function (Cj0129c, Cj1031, Cj1279c, and Cj1721c). Immunoblotting using convalescent patient sera generated post-gastrointestinal infection revealed 13 (JHH1) and 12 (ATCC 700297) immunoreactive proteins. These included flagellin (FlaA) and CadF as well as Omp18, Omp50, Cj1721c, PEB1A, PEB2, and PEB4A. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of membrane-associated proteins from C. jejuni.

  3. Association of elongation factor 1 alpha and ribosomal protein L3 with the proline-rich region of yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein CAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, C; Shinkai, M; Kariya, K; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Hu, C D; Masuda, T; Kataoka, T

    1997-03-17

    CAP is a multifunctional protein; the N-terminal region binds adenylyl cyclase and controls its response to Ras while the C-terminal region is involved in cytoskeletal regulation. In between the two regions, CAP possesses two proline-rich segments, P1 and P2, resembling a consensus sequence for binding SH3 domains. We have identified two yeast proteins with molecular sizes of 48 and 46 kDa associated specifically with P2. Determination of partial protein sequences demonstrated that the 48-kDa and 46-kDa proteins correspond to EF1 alpha and rL3, respectively, neither of which contains any SH3-domain-like sequence. Deletion of P2 from CAP resulted in loss of the activity to bind the two proteins either in vivo or in vitro. Yeast cells whose chromosomal CAP was replaced by the P2-deletion mutant displayed an abnormal phenotype represented by dissociated localizations of CAP and F-actin, which were colocalized in wild-type cells. These results suggest that these associations may have functional significance.

  4. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of a plant protein related to human B-cell receptor-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabekova, Anastasia K; Pankratenko, Anna V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Lazareva, Ekaterina A; Owens, Robert A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Morozov, Sergey Y

    2017-01-01

    Human B-cell receptor-associated protein BAP31 (HsBAP31) is the endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein involved in protein sorting and transport as well as pro-apoptotic signaling. Plant orthologs of HsBAP31 termed 'plant BAP-like proteins' (PBL proteins) have thus far remained unstudied. Recently, the PBL protein from Nicotiana tabacum (NtPBL) was identified as an interactor of Nt-4/1, a plant protein known to interact with plant virus movement proteins and affect the long-distance transport of potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) via the phloem. Here, we have compared the sequences of PBL proteins and studied the biochemical properties of NtPBL. Analysis of a number of fully sequenced plant genomes revealed that PBL-encoding genes represent a small multigene family with up to six members per genome. Two conserved motifs were identified in the C-terminal region of PBL proteins. The NtPBL C-terminal hydrophilic region (NtPBL-C) was expressed in bacterial cells, purified, and used for analysis of its RNA binding properties in vitro. In gel shift experiments, NtPBL-C was found to bind several tested RNAs, showing the most efficient binding to microRNA precursors (pre-miRNA) and less efficient interaction with PSTVd. Mutational analysis suggested that NtPBL-C has a composite RNA-binding site, with two conserved lysine residues in the most C-terminal protein region being involved in binding of pre-miRNA but not PSTVd RNA. Virus-mediated transient expression of NtPBL-C in plants resulted in stunting and leaf malformation, developmental abnormalities similar to those described previously for blockage of miRNA biogenesis/function. We hypothesize that the NtPBL protein represents a previously undiscovered component of the miRNA pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of disease-associated protein expression using quantitative proteomics—fibulin-5 is expressed in association with hepatic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracht, Thilo; Schweinsberg, Vincent; Trippler, Martin; Kohl, Michael; Ahrens, Maike; Padden, Juliet; Naboulsi, Wael; Barkovits, Katalin; Megger, Dominik A; Eisenacher, Martin; Borchers, Christoph H; Schlaak, Jörg F; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius; Weber, Frank; Baba, Hideo A; Meyer, Helmut E; Sitek, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis are major health problems worldwide. Until now, highly invasive biopsy remains the diagnostic gold standard despite many disadvantages. To develop noninvasive diagnostic assays for the assessment of liver fibrosis, it is urgently necessary to identify molecules that are robustly expressed in association with the disease. We analyzed biopsied tissue samples from 95 patients with HBV/HCV-associated hepatic fibrosis using three different quantification methods. We performed a label-free proteomics discovery study to identify novel disease-associated proteins using a subset of the cohort (n = 27). Subsequently, gene expression data from all available clinical samples were analyzed (n = 77). Finally, we performed a targeted proteomics approach, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), to verify the disease-associated expression in samples independent from the discovery approach (n = 68). We identified fibulin-5 (FBLN5) as a novel protein expressed in relation to hepatic fibrosis. Furthermore, we confirmed the altered expression of microfibril-associated glycoprotein 4 (MFAP4), lumican (LUM), and collagen alpha-1(XIV) chain (COL14A1) in association to hepatic fibrosis. To our knowledge, no tissue-based quantitative proteomics study for hepatic fibrosis has been performed using a cohort of comparable size. By this means, we add substantial evidence for the disease-related expression of the proteins examined in this study.

  6. Identification of genetic loci associated with crude protein and mineral concentrations in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) using association mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Congjun; Wu, Xinming; Chen, Min; Wang, Yunqi; Liu, Xiqiang; Gong, Pan; Xu, Qingfang; Wang, Xuemin; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Zan

    2017-06-06

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is one of the most important legume forage species in China and many other countries of the world. It provides a quality source of proteins and minerals to animals. Genetic underpinnings for these important traits, however, are elusive. An alfalfa (M. sativa) association mapping study for six traits, namely crude protein (CP), rumen undegraded protein (RUP), and four mineral elements (Ca, K, Mg and P), was conducted in three consecutive years using a large collection encompassing 336 genotypes genotyped with 85 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. All the traits were significantly influenced by genotype, environment, and genotype × environment interaction. Eight-five significant associations (P alfalfa quality. The markers could be used in assisting selection for the individual traits in breeding populations for developing new alfalfa cultivars.

  7. Prediction and dissection of widely-varying association rate constants of actin-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Pang

    Full Text Available Actin is an abundant protein that constitutes a main component of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Its polymerization and depolymerization are regulated by a variety of actin-binding proteins. Their functions range from nucleation of actin polymerization to sequestering G-actin in 1∶1 complexes. The kinetics of forming these complexes, with rate constants varying at least three orders of magnitude, is critical to the distinct regulatory functions. Previously we have developed a transient-complex theory for computing protein association mechanisms and association rate constants. The transient complex refers to an intermediate in which the two associating proteins have near-native separation and relative orientation but have yet to form short-range specific interactions of the native complex. The association rate constant is predicted as k(a = k(a0 e(-ΔG(el*/k(BT, where k(a0 is the basal rate constant for reaching the transient complex by free diffusion, and the Boltzmann factor captures the bias of long-range electrostatic interactions. Here we applied the transient-complex theory to study the association kinetics of seven actin-binding proteins with G-actin. These proteins exhibit three classes of association mechanisms, due to their different molecular shapes and flexibility. The 1000-fold k(a variations among them can mostly be attributed to disparate electrostatic contributions. The basal rate constants also showed variations, resulting from the different shapes and sizes of the interfaces formed by the seven actin-binding proteins with G-actin. This study demonstrates the various ways that actin-binding proteins use physical properties to tune their association mechanisms and rate constants to suit distinct regulatory functions.

  8. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in human ovarian follicles and its association with intrafollicular hormone levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtkjær, Jane Alrø; Jeppesen, Janni Vikkelsø; Wissing, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate follicular fluid (FF) levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) in relation to levels of intrafollicular hormones. Furthermore, immunostaining of human follicles of varying diameters was studied for PAPP-A, antimüllerian hormone (AMH), and aromatase, and the biological ...

  9. Genetic variation in heat shock protein 70 is associated with septic shock: narrowing the association to a specific haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, C; Cheong, K Y; Pham, K; Waterer, G W; Temple, S E L

    2008-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) plays a major role in immune responses. Polymorphisms within the gene have been associated with development of septic shock. This study refines the region of the HSP70 gene associated with development of septic shock and confirms its functionality. Subjects (n = 31) were grouped into one of three haplotypes based on their HSPA1B-179C>T and HSPA1B1267A>G genotypes. Mononuclear cells from these subjects were stimulated with heat-killed bacteria (10(7 )colony-forming units/mL Escherichia coli or Streptococcus pneumoniae) for 8 and 21 h. HSP70 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA and protein levels were measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and ELISA, respectively. The HSPA1B-179*C:1267*A haplotype was associated with significantly lower levels of HSPA1B mRNA and protein and higher production of TNF mRNA and protein compared to the other haplotypes. Induction of HSP70 was TNF independent. These results suggest that the HSPA1B-179C>T:1267A>G haplotype is functional and may explain the association of the HSP70 gene with development of septic shock.

  10. Surface-associated proteins of Staphylococcus aureus: their possible roles in virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Timothy; McDevitt, D

    1994-01-01

    textabstractA class of proteins that are associated with the cell surface of Gram-positive bacteria has been recognised. Common structural features which are implicated in the proper secretion and attachment of these proteins to the cell surface occur in the C-termini. N-terminal domains interact with the host by binding to soluble host proteins, to matrix proteins or to host cells. They probably have important roles in pathogenicity by allowing bacteria to avoid host defences and by acting a...

  11. RABL6A, a novel RAB-like protein, controls centrosome amplification and chromosome instability in primary fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Zhang

    Full Text Available RABL6A (RAB-like 6 isoform A is a novel protein that was originally identified based on its association with the Alternative Reading Frame (ARF tumor suppressor. ARF acts through multiple p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to prevent cancer. How RABL6A functions, to what extent it depends on ARF and p53 activity, and its importance in normal cell biology are entirely unknown. We examined the biological consequences of RABL6A silencing in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs that express or lack ARF, p53 or both proteins. We found that RABL6A depletion caused centrosome amplification, aneuploidy and multinucleation in MEFs regardless of ARF and p53 status. The centrosome amplification in RABL6A depleted p53-/- MEFs resulted from centrosome reduplication via Cdk2-mediated hyperphosphorylation of nucleophosmin (NPM at threonine-199. Thus, RABL6A prevents centrosome amplification through an ARF/p53-independent mechanism that restricts NPM-T199 phosphorylation. These findings demonstrate an essential role for RABL6A in centrosome regulation and maintenance of chromosome stability in non-transformed cells, key processes that ensure genomic integrity and prevent tumorigenesis.

  12. The Parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1/Park7 prevents glycation damage in human keratinocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advedissian, Tamara; Deshayes, Frédérique; Poirier, Françoise; Viguier, Mireille; Richarme, Gilbert

    2016-04-22

    Reducing sugars and dicarbonyls form covalent adducts with proteins through a nonenzymatic process known as glycation, which inactivates proteins, is increased in diabetic patients and is associated with diabetic complications, including retinopathy, cataracts, nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiomyopathy and skin defects. We recently characterized DJ-1/Park7 as a protein deglycase that repairs proteins from glycation by glyoxal and methylglyoxal, two major glycating agents which are responsible for up to 65% of glycation events. In this study, we investigated the ability of DJ-1 to prevent protein glycation in keratinocytes. Glycation of collagen and keratinocyte proteins was tested by measuring ultraviolet absorption and fluorescence emission. Protein glycation in HaCaT keratinocytes was investigated by immunodetection with anti-advanced glycation endproduct antibodies, after DJ-1 depletion or overexpression. In vitro, DJ-1 prevented glycation of collagen and keratinocyte protein extracts. In cell culture, DJ-1 depletion by small interfering RNAs resulted in a 3-fold increase in protein glycation levels. Moreover, protein glycation levels were decreased several-fold in cells overexpressing DJ-1 after addition of the Nrf2 inducer sulforaphane or after transfection with a DJ-1 plasmid. Thus, the DJ-1 deglycase plays a major role in preventing protein glycation in eukaryotic cells and might be important for preventing skin glycation.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Plant Tolerance to Heat Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bingru Huang; Chenping Xu

    2008-01-01

    Heat stress is a major abiotic stress limiting plant growth and productivity in many areas of the world. Understanding mechanisms of plant adaptation to heat stress would facilitate the development of heat-tolerant cultivars for improving productivity in warm climatic regions. Protein metabolism involving protein synthesis and degradation is one of the most sensitive processes to heat stress. Changes in the level and expression pattern of some proteins may play an important role in plant adaptation to heat stress. The identification of stress-responsive proteins and pathways has been facilitated by an increasing number of tools and resources, including two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and the rapidly expanding nucleotide and amino acid sequence databases. Heat stress may induce or enhance protein expression or cause protein degradation. The induction of heat-responsive proteins, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs), plays a key role in plant tolerance to heat stress. Protein degradation involving various proteases is also important in regulating plant responses to heat stress. This review provides an overview of recent research on proteomic profiling for the identification of heat-responsive proteins associated with heat tolerance, heat induction and characteristics of HSPs, and protein degradation in relation to plant responses to heat stress.

  14. The Role of Lectin-Carbohydrate Interactions in the Regulation of ER-Associated Protein Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Słomińska-Wojewódzka

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Proteins entering the secretory pathway are translocated across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane in an unfolded form. In the ER they are restricted to a quality control system that ensures correct folding or eventual degradation of improperly folded polypeptides. Mannose trimming of N-glycans on newly synthesized proteins plays an important role in the recognition and sorting of terminally misfolded glycoproteins for ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD. In this process misfolded proteins are retrotranslocated into the cytosol, polyubiquitinated, and eventually degraded by the proteasome. The mechanism by which misfolded glycoproteins are recognized and recruited to the degradation machinery has been extensively studied during last decade. In this review, we focus on ER degradation-enhancing α-mannosidase-like protein (EDEM family proteins that seem to play a key role in the discrimination between proteins undergoing a folding process and terminally misfolded proteins directed for degradation. We describe interactions of EDEM proteins with other components of the ERAD machinery, as well as with various protein substrates. Carbohydrate-dependent interactions together with N-glycan-independent interactions seem to regulate the complex process of protein recognition and direction for proteosomal degradation.

  15. Identification of a new class of lipid droplet-associated proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Patrick J; James, Christopher N; Gidda, Satinder K; Kilaru, Aruna; Dyer, John M; Mullen, Robert T; Ohlrogge, John B; Chapman, Kent D

    2013-08-01

    Lipid droplets in plants (also known as oil bodies, lipid bodies, or oleosomes) are well characterized in seeds, and oleosins, the major proteins associated with their surface, were shown to be important for stabilizing lipid droplets during seed desiccation and rehydration. However, lipid droplets occur in essentially all plant cell types, many of which may not require oleosin-mediated stabilization. The proteins associated with the surface of nonseed lipid droplets, which are likely to influence the formation, stability, and turnover of this compartment, remain to be elucidated. Here, we have combined lipidomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies of avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp to identify two new lipid droplet-associated proteins, which we named LDAP1 and LDAP2. These proteins are highly similar to each other and also to the small rubber particle proteins that accumulate in rubber-producing plants. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog to LDAP1 and LDAP2, At3g05500, was localized to the surface of lipid droplets after transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells that were induced to accumulate triacylglycerols. We propose that small rubber particle protein-like proteins are involved in the general process of binding and perhaps the stabilization of lipid-rich particles in the cytosol of plant cells and that the avocado and Arabidopsis protein members reveal a new aspect of the cellular machinery that is involved in the packaging of triacylglycerols in plant tissues.

  16. Function of plasma membrane microdomain-associated proteins during legume nodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhenzhen; Libault, Marc

    2017-08-17

    Plasma membrane microdomains are plasma membrane sub-compartments enriched in sphingolipids and sterols, and composed by a specific set of proteins. They are involved in recognizing signal molecules, transducing these signals, and controlling endocytosis and exocytosis processes. In a recent study, applying biochemical and microscopic methods, we characterized the soybean GmFWL1 protein, a major regulator of soybean nodulation, as a new membrane microdomain-associated protein. Interestingly, upon rhizobia inoculation of the soybean root system, GmFWL1 and one of its interacting partners, GmFLOT2/4, both translocate to the root hair cell tip, the primary site of interaction and infection between soybean and Rhizobium. The role of GmFWL1 as a plasma membrane microdomain-associated protein is also supported by immunoprecipitation assays performed on soybean nodules, which revealed 178 GmFWL1 protein partners including a large number of microdomain-associated proteins such as GmFLOT2/4. In this addendum, we provide additional information about the identity of the soybean proteins repetitively identified as GmFWL1 protein partners. Their function is discussed especially in regard to plant-microbe interactions and microbial symbiosis. This addendum will provide new insights in the role of plasma membrane microdomains in regulating legume nodulation.

  17. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  18. Dietary protein intake is associated with lean body mass in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirsdottir, Olof G; Arnarson, Atli; Ramel, Alfons; Jonsson, Palmi V; Thorsdottir, Inga

    2013-08-01

    Lean body mass (LBM) is important to maintain physical function during aging. We hypothesized that dietary protein intake and leisure-time physical activity are associated with LBM in community-dwelling older adults. To test the hypothesis, participants (n = 237; age, 65-92 years) did 3-day weighed food records and reported physical activity. Body composition was assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Protein intake was 0.98 ± 0.28 and 0.95 ± 0.29 g/kg body weight in male and female participants, respectively. Protein intake (in grams per kilogram of body weight) was associated with LBM (in kilograms); that is, the differences in LBM were 2.3 kg (P protein intake, respectively. Only a minor part of this association was explained by increased energy intake, which follows an increased protein intake. Our study shows that dietary protein intake was positively associated with LBM in older adults with a mean protein intake higher than the current recommended daily allowance of 0.8 g/kg per day. Leisure-time physical activity, predominantly consisting of endurance type exercises, was not related to LBM in this group.

  19. TIMP-1 increases expression and phosphorylation of proteins associated with drug resistance in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hekmat, Omid; Munk, Stephanie; Fogh, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) is a protein with a potential biological role in drug resistance. To elucidate the unknown molecular mechanisms underlying the association between high TIMP-1 levels and increased chemotherapy resistance, we employed SILAC-based quantitative mass...... may explain the resistance phenotype to topoisomerase inhibitors that was observed in cells with high TIMP-1 levels. Pathway analysis showed an enrichment of proteins from functional categories such as apoptosis, cell cycle, DNA repair, transcription factors, drug targets and proteins associated...... with drug resistance or sensitivity and drug transportation. The NetworKIN algorithm predicted the protein kinases CK2a, CDK1, PLK1 and ATM as likely candidates involved in the hyper-phosphorylation of the topoisomerases. Up-regulation of protein and/or phosphorylation levels of topoisomerases in TIMP-1...

  20. Two Rab proteins, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2) and secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs), are present on immunoisolated parietal cell tubulovesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, B C; Goldenring, J R

    1997-01-01

    The tubulovesicles of gastric parietal cells sequester H+/K+-ATPase molecules within resting parietal cells. Stimulation of parietal cell secretion elicits delivery of intracellular H+/K+-ATPase to the apically oriented secretory canaliculus. Previous investigations have suggested that this process requires the regulated fusion of intracellular tubulovesicles with the canalicular target membrane. We have sought to investigate the presence of critical putative regulators of vesicle fusion on immunoisolated gastric parietal cell tubulovesicles. Highly purified tubulovesicles were prepared by gradient fractionation and immunoisolation on magnetic beads coated with monoclonal antibodies against the alpha subunit of H+/K+-ATPase. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of Rab11, Rab25, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2) and secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) on immunoisolated vesicles. The same cohort of proteins was recovered on vesicles immunoisolated with monoclonal antibodies against SCAMPs and VAMP-2. In contrast, whereas immunoreactivities for syntaxin 1A/1B and synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP-25) were present in gradient-isolated vesicles, none of the immunoreactivity was associated with immunoisolated vesicles. The observation of VAMP-2 and two Rab proteins on immunoisolated H+/K+-ATPase-containing tubulovesicles supports the role for tubulovesicles in a regulated vesicle fusion process. In addition, the presence of SCAMPs along with Rab11 and Rab25 implicates the tubulovesicles as a critical apical recycling vesicle population. PMID:9230141

  1. Heavy metal-associated isoprenylated plant protein (HIPP): characterization of a family of proteins exclusive to plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu-Neto, João Braga; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia C; de Oliveira, Luiz Felipe Valter; Zanettini, Maria Helena Bodanese; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia

    2013-04-01

    Metallochaperones are key proteins for the safe transport of metallic ions inside the cell. HIPPs (heavy metal-associated isoprenylated plant proteins) are metallochaperones that contain a metal binding domain (HMA) and a C-terminal isoprenylation motif. In this study, we provide evidence that proteins of this family are found only in vascular plants and may be separated into five distinct clusters. HIPPs may be involved in (a) heavy metal homeostasis and detoxification mechanisms, especially those involved in cadmium tolerance, (b) transcriptional responses to cold and drought, and (c) plant-pathogen interactions. In particular, our results show that the rice (Oryza sativa) HIPP OsHIPP41 gene is highly expressed in response to cold and drought stresses, and its product is localized in the cytosol and the nucleus. The results suggest that HIPPs play an important role in the development of vascular plants and in plant responses to environmental changes.

  2. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins influences subunit association and translation of poly (U) in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulík, Karel; Bobek, Jan; Ziková, Alice; Smětáková, Magdalena; Bezoušková, Silvie

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of phosphorylated proteins in ribosomes of Streptomyces coelicolor was investigated. Little is known about which biological functions these posttranslational modifications might fulfil. A protein kinase associated with ribosomes phosphorylated six ribosomal proteins of the small subunit (S3, S4, S12, S13, S14 and S18) and seven ribosomal proteins of the large subunit (L2, L3, L7/L12, L16, L17, L23 and L27). The ribosomal proteins were phosphorylated mainly on the Ser/Thr residues. Phosphorylation of the ribosomal proteins influences ribosomal subunits association. Ribosomes with phosphorylated proteins were used to examine poly (U) translation activity. Phosphorylation induced about 50% decrease in polyphenylalanine synthesis. After preincubation of ribosomes with alkaline phosphatase the activity of ribosomes was greatly restored. Small differences were observed between phosphorylated and unphosphorylated ribosomes in the kinetic parameters of the binding of Phe-tRNA to the A-site of poly (U) programmed ribosomes, suggesting that the initial binding of Phe-tRNA is not significantly affected by phosphorylation. On contrary, the rate of peptidyl transferase was about two-fold lower than that in unphosphorylated ribosomes. The data presented demonstrate that phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins affects critical steps of protein synthesis.

  3. Lactobacillus casei BL23 Produces Microvesicles Carrying Proteins That Have Been Associated with Its Probiotic Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paula Domínguez Rubio

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Archaea, bacteria, and eukarya secrete membrane microvesicles (MVs as a mechanism for intercellular communication. We report the isolation and characterization of MVs from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei BL23. MVs were characterized using analytical high performance techniques, DLS, AFM and TEM. Similar to what has been described for other Gram-positive bacteria, MVs were on the nanometric size range (30–50 nm. MVs carried cytoplasmic components such as DNA, RNA and proteins. Using a proteomic approach (LC-MS, we identified a total of 103 proteins; 13 exclusively present in the MVs. The MVs content included cell envelope associated and secretory proteins, heat and cold shock proteins, several metabolic enzymes, proteases, structural components of the ribosome, membrane transporters, cell wall-associated hydrolases and phage related proteins. In particular, we identified proteins described as mediators of Lactobacillus’ probiotic effects such as p40, p75 and the product of LCABL_31160, annotated as an adhesion protein. The presence of these proteins suggests a role for the MVs in the bacteria-gastrointestinal cells interface. The expression and further encapsulation of proteins into MVs of GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe bacteria could represent a scientific novelty, with applications in food, nutraceuticals and clinical therapies.

  4. Local network topology in human protein interaction data predicts functional association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    Full Text Available The use of high-throughput techniques to generate large volumes of protein-protein interaction (PPI data has increased the need for methods that systematically and automatically suggest functional relationships among proteins. In a yeast PPI network, previous work has shown that the local connection topology, particularly for two proteins sharing an unusually large number of neighbors, can predict functional association. In this study we improved the prediction scheme by developing a new algorithm and applied it on a human PPI network to make a genome-wide functional inference. We used the new algorithm to measure and reduce the influence of hub proteins on detecting function-associated protein pairs. We used the annotations of the Gene Ontology (GO and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG as benchmarks to compare and evaluate the function relevance. The application of our algorithms to human PPI data yielded 4,233 significant functional associations among 1,754 proteins. Further functional comparisons between them allowed us to assign 466 KEGG pathway annotations to 274 proteins and 123 GO annotations to 114 proteins with estimated false discovery rates of <21% for KEGG and <30% for GO. We clustered 1,729 proteins by their functional associations and made functional inferences from detailed analysis on one subcluster highly enriched in the TGF-beta signaling pathway (P<10(-50. Analysis of another four subclusters also suggested potential new players in six signaling pathways worthy of further experimental investigations. Our study gives clear insight into the common neighbor-based prediction scheme and provides a reliable method for large-scale functional annotation in this post-genomic era.

  5. Protein-energy malnutrition alters hippocampal plasticity-associated protein expression following global ischemia in the gerbil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser-Loose, Erin J; Verge, Valerie M K; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2010-11-01

    Previously it has been demonstrated that protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) impairs habituation in the open field test following global ischemia. The present study examined the hypothesis that PEM exerts some of its deleterious effects on functional outcome by altering the post-ischemic expression of the plasticity-associated genes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB), and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Male, Mongolian gerbils (11-12 wk) were randomized to either control diet (12.5% protein) or PEM (2% protein) for 4 wk, and then underwent 5 min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion or sham surgery. Tympanic temperature was maintained at 36.5 ± 0.5°C during surgery. Brains collected at 1, 3 and 7 d post-surgery were processed by in-situ hybridization or immunofluorescence. BDNF and trkB mRNA expression was increased in hippocampal CA1 neurons after ischemia at all time points and was not significantly influenced by diet. However, increased trkB protein expression after ischemia was exacerbated by PEM at 7 d in the CA1 region. Post-ischemic GAP-43 protein increased at 3 and 7 d in the CA1 region, and PEM intensified this response and extended it to the CA3 and hilar regions. PEM exerted these effects without exacerbating CA1 neuron loss caused by global ischemia. The findings suggest that PEM increases the stress response and/or hyper-excitability in the hippocampus after global ischemia. Nutritional care appears to have robust effects on plasticity mechanisms important to recovery after brain ischemia.

  6. Identification of host proteins associated with HIV-1 preintegration complexes isolated from infected CD4+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Graham, Robert Lj; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Wu, Li

    2010-08-11

    An integrated HIV-1 genomic DNA leads to an infected cell becoming either an active or a latent virus-producing cell. Upon appropriate activation, a latently infected cell can result in production of progeny viruses that spread the infection to uninfected cells. The host proteins influence several steps of HIV-1 infection including formation of the preintegration complex (PIC), a key nucleoprotein intermediate essential for integration of reverse transcribed viral DNA into the chromosome. Much effort has gone into the identification of host proteins contributing to the assembly of functional PICs. Experimental approaches included the use of yeast two-hybrid system, co-immunoprecipitation, affinity tagged HIV-1 viral proteins and in vitro reconstitution of salt-stripped PIC activity. Several host proteins identified using these approaches have been shown to affect HIV-1 replication in cells and influence catalytic activities of recombinant IN in vitro. However, the comprehensive identification and characterization of host proteins associated with HIV-1 PICs of infected cells have been hindered in part by the technical limitation in acquiring sufficient amount of catalytically active PICs. To efficiently identify additional host factors associated with PICs in infected cells, we have developed the following novel approach. The catalytically active PICs from HIV-1-infected CD4+ cells were isolated using biotinylated target DNA, and the proteins selectively co-purifying with PICs have been analyzed by mass spectrometry. This technology enabled us to reveal at least 19 host proteins that are associated with HIV-1 PICs, of which 18 proteins have not been described previously with respect to HIV-1 integration. Physiological functions of the identified proteins range from chromatin organization to protein transport. A detailed characterization of these host proteins could provide new insights into the mechanism of HIV-1 integration and uncover new antiviral targets to

  7. Telomerase and telomere-associated proteins: structural insights into mechanism and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Karen A; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2012-01-11

    Recent advances in our structural understanding of telomerase and telomere-associated proteins have contributed significantly to elucidating the molecular mechanisms of telomere maintenance. The structures of telomerase TERT domains have provided valuable insights into how experimentally identified conserved motifs contribute to the telomerase reverse transcriptase reaction. Additionally, structures of telomere-associated proteins in a variety of organisms have revealed that, across evolution, telomere-maintenance mechanisms employ common structural elements. For example, the single-stranded 3' overhang of telomeric DNA is specifically and tightly bound by an OB-fold in nearly all species, including ciliates (TEBP and Pot1a), fission yeast (SpPot1), budding yeast (Cdc13), and humans (hPOT1). Structures of the yeast Cdc13, Stn1, and Ten1 proteins demonstrated that telomere maintenance is regulated by a complex that bears significant similarity to the RPA heterotrimer. Similarly, proteins that specifically bind double-stranded telomeric DNA in divergent species use homeodomains to execute their functions (human TRF1 and TRF2 and budding yeast ScRap1). Likewise, the conserved protein Rap1, which is found in budding yeast, fission yeast, and humans, contains a structural motif that is known to be critical for protein-protein interaction. In addition to revealing the common underlying themes of telomere maintenance, structures have also elucidated the specific mechanisms by which many of these proteins function, including identifying a telomere-specific domain in Stn1 and how the human TRF proteins avoid heterodimerization. In this review, we summarize the high-resolution structures of telomerase and telomere-associated proteins and discuss the emergent common structural themes among these proteins. We also address how these high-resolution structures complement biochemical and cellular studies to enhance our understanding of telomere maintenance and function.

  8. Longitudinal changes in C-reactive protein, proform of eosinophil major basic protein, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A during weight changes in obese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Gamborg, Michael; Bøjsøe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity is associated with several complications, including cardiovascular comorbidity. Several biomarkers, such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), proform of eosinophil major basic protein (Pro-MBP) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), have equally...... been linked to increased cardiovascular susceptibility. This study investigates these biomarkers during weight loss and regain in obese children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A longitudinal study during a 12-week weight loss program with a 28 months follow-up was conducted. Anthropometrics and plasma......), and 2.70 (girls) were included. Ninety children completed the weight loss program and 68 children entered the follow-up program. Pro-MBP and PAPP-A, but not hs-CRP, exhibited individual-specific levels (tracking) during weight loss and regain. The PAPP-A/Pro-MBP correlation was strong, whereas the hs...

  9. A preliminary screening study on the associated proteins in human psoriasis vulgaris by serum proteomics technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhankui Liu; Shengshun Tan; Chunshui Yu; Jinghua Fan; Zhuanli Bai; Junjie Li

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the optimum screening conditions of associated proteins in human psoriasis vulgaris by serum proteomics technique, and to screen the different expression proteins related with psoriasis vulgaris. Methods:Serum samples of peripheral blood were collected from newly diagnosed psoriasis vulgaris patients in the clinic, and 20 matched healthy persons.Serum albumin IgG was removed by filtering with ProteoExtract Albumin/IgG. After comparative proteomics analysis the different protein spots were identified using 2-DE and MS. Results :Electrophoresis figures with high resolution and reproducibility were obtained. Three different expression proteins were found only in the serum from psoriasis vulgaris patients,while nine other different proteins expressing from healthy volunteers. Conclusion:The protein expression was different in the serum between the psoriasis vulgaris patients and healthy volunteers. It was hoped that we could find the biomarkers related to psoriasis vulgaris by using proteomics.

  10. Shark myelin basic protein: amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and self-association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, T J; Atkins, A R; Warren, J A; Auton, W P; Smith, R

    1990-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) from the Whaler shark (Carcharhinus obscurus) has been purified from acid extracts of a chloroform/methanol pellet from whole brains. The amino acid sequence of the majority of the protein has been determined and compared with the sequences of other MBPs. The shark protein has only 44% homology with the bovine protein, but, in common with other MBPs, it has basic residues distributed throughout the sequence and no extensive segments that are predicted to have an ordered secondary structure in solution. Shark MBP lacks the triproline sequence previously postulated to form a hairpin bend in the molecule. The region containing the putative consensus sequence for encephalitogenicity in the guinea pig contains several substitutions, thus accounting for the lack of activity of the shark protein. Studies of the secondary structure and self-association have shown that shark MBP possesses solution properties similar to those of the bovine protein, despite the extensive differences in primary structure.

  11. Differential expression in Phanerochaete chrysosporium of membrane- associated proteins relevant to lignin degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semarjit Shary; Alexander N. Kapich; Ellen A. Panisko; Jon K. Magnuson; Daniel Cullen; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2008-01-01

    Fungal lignin-degrading systems likely include membrane-associated proteins that participate in diverse processes such as uptake and oxidation of lignin fragments, production of ligninolytic secondary metabolites, and defense of the mycelium against ligninolytic oxidants. Little is known about the nature or regulation of these membrane-associated components. We grew...

  12. High-sensitive C-reactive protein is associated with reduced lung function in young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F; Mikkelsen, D; Hancox, R J;

    2009-01-01

    Systemic inflammation has been associated with reduced lung function. However, data on the interrelationships between lung function and inflammation are sparse, and it is not clear if low-grade inflammation leads to reduced lung function. Associations between high-sensitive C-reactive protein (CR...

  13. Variations in C-reactive protein during a single haemodialysis session do not associate with mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Meuwese; N. Halbesma; P. Stenvinkel; F.W. Dekker; H. Molanaei; A.R. Qureshi; P. Barany; O. Heimburger; B. Lindholm; R.T. Krediet; E.W. Boeschoten; J.J. Carrero

    2010-01-01

    Background. An increase in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels during a single haemodialysis (HD) session has been associated with mortality. These associations, however, are difficult to understand from the current understanding of CRP metabolism. Methods. In 190 Swedish haemodialysis (HD) patients fro

  14. An analysis of gene/protein associations at PubMed scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyysalo Sampo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Event extraction following the GENIA Event corpus and BioNLP shared task models has been a considerable focus of recent work in biomedical information extraction. This work includes efforts applying event extraction methods to the entire PubMed literature database, far beyond the narrow subdomains of biomedicine for which annotated resources for extraction method development are available. Results In the present study, our aim is to estimate the coverage of all statements of gene/protein associations in PubMed that existing resources for event extraction can provide. We base our analysis on a recently released corpus automatically annotated for gene/protein entities and syntactic analyses covering the entire PubMed, and use named entity co-occurrence, shortest dependency paths and an unlexicalized classifier to identify likely statements of gene/protein associations. A set of high-frequency/high-likelihood association statements are then manually analyzed with reference to the GENIA ontology. Conclusions We present a first estimate of the overall coverage of gene/protein associations provided by existing resources for event extraction. Our results suggest that for event-type associations this coverage may be over 90%. We also identify several biologically significant associations of genes and proteins that are not addressed by these resources, suggesting directions for further extension of extraction coverage.

  15. Mechanism of oligomerisation of cyclase-associated protein from Dictyostelium discoideum in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Adlina Mohd; Jaenicke, Elmar; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Hofmann, Andreas

    2006-10-06

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a highly conserved modular protein implicated in the regulation of actin filament dynamics and a variety of developmental and morphological processes. The protein exists as a high molecular weight complex in cell extracts and purified protein possesses a high tendency to aggregate, a major obstacle for crystallisation. Using a mutagenesis approach, we show that two structural features underlie the mechanism of oligomerisation in Dictyostelium discoideum CAP. Positively charged clusters on the surface of the N-terminal helix-barrel domain are involved in inter-molecular interactions with the N or C-terminal domains. Abolishing these interactions mainly renders dimers due to a domain swap feature in the extreme C-terminal region of the protein that was previously described. Based on earlier studies with yeast CAP, we also generated constructs with mutations in the extreme N-terminal region of Dictyostelium CAP that did not show significantly altered oligomerisation behaviour. Constructs with mutations in the earlier identified protein-protein interaction interface on the N-terminal domain of CAP could not be expressed as soluble protein. Assessment of the soluble proteins indicates that the mutations did not affect their overall fold. Further studies point to the correlation between stability of full-length CAP with its multimerisation behaviour, where oligomer formation leads to a more stable protein.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Rice Plasma Membrane-associated Proteins in Response to Chitooligosaccharide Elicitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Chen; Qun Li; Zuhua He

    2007-01-01

    Chitooligomers or chitooligosaccharides (COS) are elicitors that bind to the plasma membrane (PM) and elicit various defense responses. However, the PM-bound proteins involved in elicitor-mediated plant defense responses still remain widely unknown. In order to get more information about PM proteins involved in rice defense responses, we conducted PM proteomic analysis of the rice suspension cells elicited by COS. A total of 14 up- or down-regulated protein spots were observed on 2-D gels of PM fractions at 12 h and 24 h after COS incubation. Of them, eight protein spots were successfully identified by MS (mass spectrography) and predicted to be associated to the PM and function in plant defense, including a putative PKN/PRK1 protein kinase, a putative pyruvate kinase isozyme G, a putative zinc finger protein, a putative MAR-binding protein MFP1, and a putative calcium-dependent protein kinase. Interestingly, a COS-induced pM5-like protein was identified for the first time in plants, which is a trans-membrane nodal modulator in transforming growth factor-β(TGFβ) signaling in vertebrates. We also identified two members of a rice polyprotein family, which were up-regulated by COS. Our study would provide a starting point for functionality of PM proteins in the rice basal defense.

  17. Association of Animal and Plant Protein Intake With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingyang; Fung, Teresa T; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter C; Longo, Valter D; Chan, Andrew T; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-10-01

    Defining what represents a macronutritionally balanced diet remains an open question and a high priority in nutrition research. Although the amount of protein may have specific effects, from a broader dietary perspective, the choice of protein sources will inevitably influence other components of diet and may be a critical determinant for the health outcome. To examine the associations of animal and plant protein intake with the risk for mortality. This prospective cohort study of US health care professionals included 131 342 participants from the Nurses' Health Study (1980 to end of follow-up on June 1, 2012) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986 to end of follow-up on January 31, 2012). Animal and plant protein intake was assessed by regularly updated validated food frequency questionnaires. Data were analyzed from June 20, 2014, to January 18, 2016. Hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Of the 131 342 participants, 85 013 were women (64.7%) and 46 329 were men (35.3%) (mean [SD] age, 49 [9] years). The median protein intake, as assessed by percentage of energy, was 14% for animal protein (5th-95th percentile, 9%-22%) and 4% for plant protein (5th-95th percentile, 2%-6%). After adjusting for major lifestyle and dietary risk factors, animal protein intake was not associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 1.02 per 10% energy increment; 95% CI, 0.98-1.05; P for trend = .33) but was associated with higher cardiovascular mortality (HR, 1.08 per 10% energy increment; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16; P for trend = .04). Plant protein was associated with lower all-cause mortality (HR, 0.90 per 3% energy increment; 95% CI, 0.86-0.95; P for trend based on smoking, heavy alcohol intake, overweight or obesity, and physical inactivity, but not evident among those without any of these risk factors. Replacing animal protein of various origins with plant protein was associated with lower mortality. In particular, the HRs for all

  18. The membrane-associated adaptor protein DOK5 is upregulated in systemic sclerosis and associated with IGFBP-5-induced fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekata Yasuoka

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is characterized by excessive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs due to fibroblast proliferation and excessive production of extracellular matrix (ECM. We have shown that insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-5 plays an important role in the development of fibrosis in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. We identified a membrane-associated adaptor protein, downstream of tyrosine kinase/docking protein (DOK5, as an IGFBP-5-regulated target gene using gene expression profiling of primary fibroblasts expressing IGFBP-5. DOK5 is a tyrosine kinase substrate associated with intracellular signaling. Our objective was to determine the role of DOK5 in the pathogenesis of SSc and specifically in IGFBP-5-induced fibrosis. DOK5 mRNA and protein levels were increased in vitro by endogenous and exogenous IGFBP-5 in primary human fibroblasts. DOK5 upregulation required activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling cascade. Further, IGFBP-5 triggered nuclear translocation of DOK5. DOK5 protein levels were also increased in vivo in mouse skin and lung by IGFBP-5. To determine the effect of DOK5 on fibrosis, DOK5 was expressed ex vivo in human skin in organ culture. Expression of DOK5 in human skin resulted in a significant increase in dermal thickness. Lastly, levels of DOK5 were compared in primary fibroblasts and lung tissues of patients with SSc and healthy donors. Both DOK5 mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in fibroblasts and skin tissues of patients with SSc compared with those of healthy controls, as well as in lung tissues of SSc patients. Our findings suggest that IGFBP-5 induces its pro-fibrotic effects, at least in part, via DOK5. Furthermore, IGFBP-5 and DOK5 are both increased in SSc fibroblasts and tissues and may thus be acting in concert to promote fibrosis.

  19. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Soo Hyun [School of Life Sciences, Steitz Center for Structural Biology, and Department of Chemistry, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, ChangJu, E-mail: cchun1130@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Young Jun, E-mail: imyoungjun@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  20. Deletion of the Vaccinia Virus I2 Protein Interrupts Virion Morphogenesis, Leading to Retention of the Scaffold Protein and Mislocalization of Membrane-Associated Entry Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Seong-In; Weisberg, Andrea; Moss, Bernard

    2017-08-01

    The I2L open reading frame of vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes a conserved 72-amino-acid protein with a putative C-terminal transmembrane domain. Previous studies with a tetracycline-inducible mutant demonstrated that I2-deficient virions are defective in cell entry. The purpose of the present study was to determine the step of replication or entry that is affected by loss of the I2 protein. Fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that I2 colocalized with a major membrane protein of immature and mature virions. We generated a cell line that constitutively expressed I2 and allowed construction of the VACV I2L deletion mutant vΔI2. As anticipated, vΔI2 was unable to replicate in cells that did not express I2. Unexpectedly, morphogenesis was interrupted at a stage after immature virion formation, resulting in the accumulation of dense spherical particles instead of brick-shaped mature virions with well-defined core structures. The abnormal particles retained the D13 scaffold protein of immature virions, were severely deficient in the transmembrane proteins that comprise the entry fusion complex (EFC), and had increased amounts of unprocessed membrane and core proteins. Total lysates of cells infected with vΔI2 also had diminished EFC proteins due to instability attributed to their hydrophobicity and failure to be inserted into viral membranes. A similar instability of EFC proteins had previously been found with unrelated mutants blocked earlier in morphogenesis that also accumulated viral membranes retaining the D13 scaffold. We concluded that I2 is required for virion morphogenesis, release of the D13 scaffold, and the association of EFC proteins with viral membranes.IMPORTANCE Poxviruses comprise a large family that infect vertebrates and invertebrates, cause disease in both in humans and in wild and domesticated animals, and are being engineered as vectors for vaccines and cancer therapy. In addition, investigations of poxviruses have provided insights into many

  1. Evolutionary conservation of mammalian sperm proteins associates with overall, not tyrosine, phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Julia; Ramljak, Sanja; Asif, Abdul R; Schaffrath, Michael; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2013-12-06

    We investigated possible associations between sequence evolution of mammalian sperm proteins and their phosphorylation status in humans. As a reference, spermatozoa from three normozoospermic men were analyzed combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. We identified 99 sperm proteins (thereof 42 newly described) and determined the phosphorylation status for most of them. Sequence evolution was studied across six mammalian species using nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS) and amino acid distances. Site-specific purifying selection was assessed employing average ratios of evolutionary rates at phosphorylated versus nonphosphorylated amino acids (α). According to our data, mammalian sperm proteins do not show statistically significant sequence conservation difference, no matter if the human ortholog is a phosphoprotein with or without tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation. In contrast, overall phosphorylation of human sperm proteins, i.e., phosphorylation at serine (S), threonine (T), and/or Y residues, associates with above-average conservation of sequences. Complementary investigations suggest that numerous protein-protein interactants constrain sequence evolution of sperm phosphoproteins. Although our findings reject a special relevance of Y phosphorylation for sperm functioning, they still indicate that overall phosphorylation substantially contributes to proper functioning of sperm proteins. Hence, phosphorylated sperm proteins might be considered as prime candidates for diagnosis and treatment of reduced male fertility.

  2. Proneural proteins Achaete and Scute associate with nuclear actin to promote formation of external sensory organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun-Ling; Chen, Yu-Ju; Chang, Yi-Jie; Yeh, Hsiao-Fong; Huang, Yi-Chun; Pi, Haiwei

    2014-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proneural proteins promote neurogenesis through transcriptional regulation. Although much is known about the tissue-specific regulation of proneural gene expression, how proneural proteins interact with transcriptional machinery to activate downstream target genes is less clear. Drosophila proneural proteins Achaete (Ac) and Scute (Sc) induce external sensory organ formation by activating neural precursor gene expression. Through co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric analyses, we found that nuclear but not cytoplasmic actin associated with the Ac and Sc proteins in Drosophila S2 cells. Daughterless (Da), the common heterodimeric partner of Drosophila bHLH proteins, was observed to associate with nuclear actin through proneural proteins. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that the binding specificity between actin and Ac or Sc was conserved in yeast nuclei without the presence of additional Drosophila factors. We further show that actin is required in external sensory organ formation. Reduction in actin gene activity impaired proneural-protein-dependent expression of the neural precursor genes, as well as formation of neural precursors. Furthermore, increased nuclear actin levels, obtained by expression of nucleus-localized actin, elevated Ac-Da-dependent gene transcription as well as Ac-mediated external sensory organ formation. Taken together, our in vivo and in vitro observations suggest a novel link for actin in proneural-protein-mediated transcriptional activation and neural precursor differentiation.

  3. Predicting Cell Association of Surface-Modified Nanoparticles Using Protein Corona Structure - Activity Relationships (PCSAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Padmaja; Fernandez, Alberto; Giralt, Francesc; Rallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are likely to interact in real-case application scenarios with mixtures of proteins and biomolecules that will absorb onto their surface forming the so-called protein corona. Information related to the composition of the protein corona and net cell association was collected from literature for a library of surface-modified gold and silver nanoparticles. For each protein in the corona, sequence information was extracted and used to calculate physicochemical properties and statistical descriptors. Data cleaning and preprocessing techniques including statistical analysis and feature selection methods were applied to remove highly correlated, redundant and non-significant features. A weighting technique was applied to construct specific signatures that represent the corona composition for each nanoparticle. Using this basic set of protein descriptors, a new Protein Corona Structure-Activity Relationship (PCSAR) that relates net cell association with the physicochemical descriptors of the proteins that form the corona was developed and validated. The features that resulted from the feature selection were in line with already published literature, and the computational model constructed on these features had a good accuracy (R(2)LOO=0.76 and R(2)LMO(25%)=0.72) and stability, with the advantage that the fingerprints based on physicochemical descriptors were independent of the specific proteins that form the corona.

  4. Fucoidan improves bioactivity and vasculogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells in murine hind limb ischemia associated with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hee; Ryu, Jung Min; Han, Yong-Seok; Zia, Mohammad Farid; Kwon, Hyog Young; Noh, Hyunjin; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Sang Hun

    2016-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease. Although mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of ischemic diseases associated with CKD, the associated pathophysiological conditions lead to low survival and proliferation of transplanted MSCs. To address these limitations, we investigated the effects of fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide, on the bioactivity of adipose tissue-derived MSCs and the potential of fucoidan-treated MSCs to improve neovascularization in ischemic tissues of CKD mice. Treatment of MSCs with fucoidan increased their proliferative potential and the expression of cell cycle-associated proteins, such as cyclin E, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 2, cyclin D1, and CDK4, via focal adhesion kinase and the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase-Akt axis. Moreover, fucoidan enhanced the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs through the ERK-IDO-1 signal cascade. Fucoidan was found to augment the proliferation, incorporation, and endothelial differentiation of transplanted MSCs at ischemic sites in CKD mice hind limbs. In addition, transplantation of fucoidan-treated MSCs enhanced the ratio of blood flow and limb salvage in CKD mice with hind limb ischemia. To our knowledge, our findings are the first to reveal that fucoidan enhances the bioactivity of MSCs and improves their neovascularization in ischemic injured tissues of CKD. In conclusion, fucoidan-treated MSCs may provide an important pathway toward therapeutic neovascularization in patients with CKD.

  5. Association mapping of seed oil and protein content in Sesamum indicum L. using SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Miao, Hongmei; Wei, Libin; Zhang, Tide; Han, Xiuhua; Zhang, Haiyang

    2014-01-01

    Sesame is an important oil crop for the high oil content and quality. The seed oil and protein contents are two important traits in sesame. To identify the molecular markers associated with the seed oil and protein contents in sesame, we systematically performed the association mapping among 369 worldwide germplasm accessions under 5 environments using 112 polymorphic SSR markers. The general linear model (GLM) was applied with the criteria of logP ≥ 3.0 and high stability under all 5 environments. Among the 369 sesame accessions, the oil content ranged from 27.89%-58.73% and the protein content ranged from 16.72%-27.79%. A significant negative correlation of the oil content with the protein content was found in the population. A total of 19 markers for oil content were detected with a R2 value range from 4% to 29%; 24 markers for protein content were detected with a R2 value range from 3% to 29%, of which 19 markers were associated with both traits. Moreover, partial markers were confirmed using mixed linear model (MLM) method, which suggested that the oil and protein contents are controlled mostly by major genes. Allele effect analysis showed that the allele associated with high oil content was always associated with low protein content, and vice versa. Of the 19 markers associated with oil content, 17 presented near the locations of the plant lipid pathway genes and 2 were located just next to a fatty acid elongation gene and a gene encoding Stearoyl-ACP Desaturase, respectively. The findings provided a valuable foundation for oil synthesis gene identification and molecular marker assistant selection (MAS) breeding in sesame.

  6. Association among Fibrinolytic Proteins, Metabolic Syndrome Components, Insulin Secretion, and Resistance in Schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Shuen Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and its soluble receptors (suPAR and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 in metabolic syndrome (MetS components, insulin secretion, and resistance in schoolchildren. We enrolled 387 children, aged 10.3 ± 1.5 years, in Taipei. Anthropometry, fibrinolytic proteins, MetS components, insulin secretion, and resistance were measured. Subjects were divided into normal, overweight, and obese groups. Finally, the relationship between fibrinolytic proteins and metabolic syndrome in boys and girls was analyzed. In boys, PAI-1 was positively associated with body mass index (BMI percentile, hypertriglyceride, insulin secretion, and resistance. In girls, PAI-1 was positively associated with obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and insulin secretion. In girls, uPA was positively associated with insulin secretion. suPAR was positively associated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in both boys and girls, and with BMI percentile and body fat in girls. The obese boys had higher suPAR and PAI-1 levels than the normal group. The obese girls had higher uPA, suPAR, and PAI-1 than the normal group. Boys and girls with MetS had higher PAI-1. Fibrinolytic proteins, especially PAI-1, are associated with MetS components and insulin secretion in children. Fibrinolytic proteins changes were more likely to occur in girls than in boys.

  7. The ribosomal biogenesis protein Utp21 interacts with Hsp90 and has differing requirements for Hsp90-associated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria R Tenge

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone Hsp90 buffers the effects of genetic variation by assisting the stabilization and folding of multiple clients critical for cell signaling and growth. We identified an interaction of Hsp90 and associated proteins with the essential nucleolar protein, Utp21, part of a large complex required for biogenesis of the small ribosomal subunit. The utp21-S602F mutation, which causes minor defects in otherwise wild-type yeast, exhibited severe or lethal growth defects when combined with mutations in Hsp90 or co-chaperones. WT Utp21 and Utp21-S602F exhibited similar interactions with Hsp90, and steady-state levels of WT Utp21 were reduced upon Hsp90 mutation or inhibition. Mutations in the human homolog of UTP21, WDR36, have been associated with adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Three different mutant forms of Utp21 analogous to glaucoma-associated WDR36 mutations exhibit reduced levels in yeast cells expressing mutations in Hsp90 or associated chaperones, suggesting that Hsp90 and co-chaperones buffer the effects of those mutations.

  8. Protein-Carbohydrate Interaction between Sperm and the Egg-Coating Envelope and Its Regulation by Dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis Zona Pellucida Protein-Associated Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Naofumi

    2015-05-22

    Protein-carbohydrate interaction regulates multiple important processes during fertilization, an essential biological event where individual gametes undergo intercellular recognition to fuse and generate a zygote. In the mammalian female reproductive tract, sperm temporarily adhere to the oviductal epithelium via the complementary interaction between carbohydrate-binding proteins on the sperm membrane and carbohydrates on the oviductal cells. After detachment from the oviductal epithelium at the appropriate time point following ovulation, sperm migrate and occasionally bind to the extracellular matrix, called the zona pellucida (ZP), which surrounds the egg, thereafter undergoing the exocytotic acrosomal reaction to penetrate the envelope and to reach the egg plasma membrane. This sperm-ZP interaction also involves the direct interaction between sperm carbohydrate-binding proteins and carbohydrates within the ZP, most of which have been conserved across divergent species from mammals to amphibians and echinoderms. This review focuses on the carbohydrate-mediated interaction of sperm with the female reproductive tract, mainly the interaction between sperm and the ZP, and introduces the fertilization-suppressive action of dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis ZP protein-associated protein. The action of dicalcin correlates significantly with a dicalcin-dependent change in the lectin-staining pattern within the ZP, suggesting a unique role of dicalcin as an inherent protein that is capable of regulating the affinity between the lectin and oligosaccharides attached on its target glycoprotein.

  9. Protein-Carbohydrate Interaction between Sperm and the Egg-Coating Envelope and Its Regulation by Dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis Zona Pellucida Protein-Associated Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naofumi Miwa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-carbohydrate interaction regulates multiple important processes during fertilization, an essential biological event where individual gametes undergo intercellular recognition to fuse and generate a zygote. In the mammalian female reproductive tract, sperm temporarily adhere to the oviductal epithelium via the complementary interaction between carbohydrate-binding proteins on the sperm membrane and carbohydrates on the oviductal cells. After detachment from the oviductal epithelium at the appropriate time point following ovulation, sperm migrate and occasionally bind to the extracellular matrix, called the zona pellucida (ZP, which surrounds the egg, thereafter undergoing the exocytotic acrosomal reaction to penetrate the envelope and to reach the egg plasma membrane. This sperm-ZP interaction also involves the direct interaction between sperm carbohydrate-binding proteins and carbohydrates within the ZP, most of which have been conserved across divergent species from mammals to amphibians and echinoderms. This review focuses on the carbohydrate-mediated interaction of sperm with the female reproductive tract, mainly the interaction between sperm and the ZP, and introduces the fertilization-suppressive action of dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis ZP protein-associated protein. The action of dicalcin correlates significantly with a dicalcin-dependent change in the lectin-staining pattern within the ZP, suggesting a unique role of dicalcin as an inherent protein that is capable of regulating the affinity between the lectin and oligosaccharides attached on its target glycoprotein.

  10. Identification of potential molecular associations between chikungunya virus non-structural protein 2 and human host proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, J; Gulati, S; Rajasekharan, S; Gupta, A; Chaudhary, V; Gupta, S

    2017-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) non-structural protein 2 (nsP2) is considered to be the master regulator of viral RNA replication and host responses generated during viral infection. This protein has two main functional domains: an N-terminal domain which exhibits NTPase, RNA triphosphatase and helicase activities and a C-terminal protease domain. Understanding how CHIKV nsP2 interacts with its host proteins is essential for elucidating all the required processes for viral replication and pathogenesis along with the identification of potential targets for antiviral therapy. In current study yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening of a human fetal brain cDNA library was performed using nsP2 protein as bait. The analysis identified seven host proteins (CCDC130, CPNE6, POLR2C, MAPK9, EIF4A2, EEF1A1 and EIF3I) as putative interactors of CHIKV nsP2 which were selected for further analysis based on their roles in host cellular machinery. The gene ontology analysis indicates that these proteins are mainly involved in apoptosis, transcription and translational mechanism of host cell. Domain mapping of nsP2 revealed that these associations are not random connections but instead they have functional significance. Further studies to identify the amino acid residues and their chemical interactions that may help in opening new possibilities for preventing these interactions, thus reducing chances of chikungunya infection were performed. This study expands the understanding of CHIKV-host interactions and is important for rational approaches of discovering new antiviral agents.

  11. Protein phosphorylation associated with epipodophyllotoxin-induced apoptosis of lymphoid cells: role of a serine/threonine protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, X; Mody, N S; Hingley, S T; Coffman, F D; Cohen, S; Fresa, K L

    1998-11-01

    We have previously shown that apoptosis induced in thymocytes by dexamethasone or teniposide (VM-26) could be inhibited by 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7) and sangivamycin, both relatively specific inhibitors for protein kinase C, but not by N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA1004), a more specific inhibitor for cAMP-dependent protein kinases. Apoptosis in this model system was not blocked by EGTA and no increase in cytosolic Ca2+ was observed during apoptosis induced by either dexamethasone or VM-26, suggesting that this kinase was Ca2+-independent. In the present study, we demonstrate that addition of 10 microM sangivamycin to thymocyte cultures up to 2 h after addition of either inducer resulted in virtually complete inhibition of apoptosis. Addition of 10 microM sangivamycin at 3 or 4 h after addition of inducer resulted in partial inhibition of apoptosis. Computerized image analysis of two-dimensional PAGE analyses of whole-cell lysates demonstrated that treatment of mouse thymocytes with VM-26 resulted in a limited number of de novo phosphorylation events within 1 h of treatment. The most prominent phosphorylation events associated with VM-26-induced apoptosis were that two intracellular protein species (Protein 1: m.w. = 22.9 kDa, pI, 5.11; and Protein 2: m.w. = 22.9 kDa, pI, 4.98). Similar phosphorylation events were seen in cells treated with dexamethasone. Finally, Western blot analysis suggests that de novo protein phosphorylation induced by VM-26 is on serine/threonine residues. These results provide further evidence that the mechanism of VM-26-induced apoptosis of murine thymocytes involves the action of one or more serine/threonine kinases. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  12. Wool Keratin-Associated Protein Genes in Sheep-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hua; Zhou, Huitong; Forrest, Rachel H J; Li, Shaobin; Wang, Jiqing; Dyer, Jolon M; Luo, Yuzhu; Hickford, Jon G H

    2016-05-28

    The importance of sheep's wool in making textiles has inspired extensive research into its structure and the underlying genetics since the 1960s. Wool keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are a key structural component of the wool fibre. The characterisation of the genes encoding these proteins has progressed rapidly with advances in the nucleotide and protein sequencing. This review describes our knowledge of ovine KAPs, their categorisation into families, polymorphism in the proteins and genes, the clustering and chromosomal location of the genes, some characteristics of gene expression and some potential effects of the KAPs on wool traits. The extent and nature of genetic variation in wool KAP genes and its association with fibre characteristics, provides an opportunity for the development of gene-markers for selective breeding of sheep to produce better wool with properties highly matched to specific end-uses.

  13. Wool Keratin-Associated Protein Genes in Sheep—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hua; Zhou, Huitong; Forrest, Rachel H. J.; Li, Shaobin; Wang, Jiqing; Dyer, Jolon M.; Luo, Yuzhu; Hickford, Jon G. H.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of sheep’s wool in making textiles has inspired extensive research into its structure and the underlying genetics since the 1960s. Wool keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are a key structural component of the wool fibre. The characterisation of the genes encoding these proteins has progressed rapidly with advances in the nucleotide and protein sequencing. This review describes our knowledge of ovine KAPs, their categorisation into families, polymorphism in the proteins and genes, the clustering and chromosomal location of the genes, some characteristics of gene expression and some potential effects of the KAPs on wool traits. The extent and nature of genetic variation in wool KAP genes and its association with fibre characteristics, provides an opportunity for the development of gene-markers for selective breeding of sheep to produce better wool with properties highly matched to specific end-uses. PMID:27240405

  14. The Peptide Network between Tetanus Toxin and Human Proteins Associated with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo Lucchese

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequence matching analyses show that Clostridium tetani neurotoxin shares numerous pentapeptides (68, including multiple occurrences with 42 human proteins that, when altered, have been associated with epilepsy. Such a peptide sharing is higher than expected, nonstochastic, and involves tetanus toxin-derived epitopes that have been validated as immunopositive in the human host. Of note, an unexpected high level of peptide matching is found in mitogen-activated protein kinase 10 (MK10, a protein selectively expressed in hippocampal areas. On the whole, the data indicate a potential for cross-reactivity between the neurotoxin and specific epilepsy-associated proteins and may help evaluate the potential risk for epilepsy following immune responses induced by tetanus infection. Moreover, this study may contribute to clarifying the etiopathogenesis of the different types of epilepsy.

  15. Adverse Effects Associated with Protein Intake above the Recommended Dietary Allowance for Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delimaris, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Background. While high-protein consumption-above the current recommended dietary allowance for adults (RDA: 0.8 g protein/kg body weight/day)-is increasing in popularity, there is a lack of data on its potential adverse effects. Objective. To determine the potential disease risks due to high protein/high meat intake obtained from diet and/or nutritional supplements in humans. Design. Review. Subjects. Healthy adult male and female subjects. Method. In order to identify relevant studies, the electronic databases, Medline and Google Scholar, were searched using the terms:"high protein diet," "protein overconsumption," "protein overuse," and "high meat diet." Papers not in English were excluded. Further studies were identified by citations in retrieved papers. Results. 32 studies (21 experimental human studies and 11 reviews) were identified. The adverse effects associated with long-term high protein/high meat intake in humans were (a) disorders of bone and calcium homeostasis, (b) disorders of renal function, (c) increased cancer risk, (d) disorders of liver function, and (e) precipitated progression of coronary artery disease. Conclusions. The findings of the present study suggest that there is currently no reasonable scientific basis in the literature to recommend protein consumption above the current RDA (high protein diet) for healthy adults due to its potential disease risks. Further research needs to be carried out in this area, including large randomized controlled trials.

  16. Postranslational modifications significantly alter the binding-folding pathways of proteins associating with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoian, Garegin

    2012-02-01

    Many important regulators of gene activity are natively disordered, but fully or partially order when they bind to their targets on DNA. Interestingly, the ensembles of disordered states for such free proteins are not structurally featureless, but can qualitatively differ from protein to protein. In particular, in random coil like states the chains are swollen, making relatively few contacts, while in molten globule like states a significant collapse occurs, with ensuing high density of intra-protein interactions. Furthermore, since many DNA binding proteins are positively charged polyelectrolytes, the electrostatic self-repulsion also influences the degree of collapse of the chain and its conformational preferences in the free state and upon binding to DNA. In our work, we have found that the nature of the natively disordered ensemble significantly affects the way the protein folds upon binding to DNA. In particular, we showed that posttranslational modifications of amino acid residues, such as lysine acetylation, can alter the degree of collapse and conformational preferences for a free protein, and also profoundly impact the binding affinity and pathways for the protein DNA association. These trends will be discussed in the context of DNA interacting with various histone tails and the p53 protein.

  17. Proteomic analysis of cell surface-associated proteins from probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Madsen, Søren M; Glenting, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to identify surface-associated proteins from the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. Proteins were extracted from the cell surface using a mild wash in phosphate buffer and analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel...... of probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The results provide the basis for future studies on the molecular mechanisms of probiotics....

  18. Protein markers associated with fertility restoration in japonica rice (Oryza sativaL.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@As genetic markers, seed storage proteins have characters of high level of polymorphism, less environmental influence, and simple genetic control. In this study, Kinmaze (CK), Liuqianxin A, Liuqianxin B, Liuqianxin R, 77302-1, Ninghui3-2, C57, Chinsurah Boro Ⅱ, TN1, IR8, IR2A, and F1 and F2 of Liuqianxin A/77302-1 were used to detect protein markers associated with fertility restoration in japonica rice.

  19. Fas-associated factor 1 interacts with protein kinase CK2 in vivo upon apoptosis induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    2001-01-01

    We show here that in several different cell lines protein kinase CK2 and Fas-associated factor 1 (FAF1) exist together in a complex which is stable to high monovalent salt concentration. The CK2/FAF1 complex formation is significantly increased after induction of apoptosis with various DNA damaging...... the view that protein kinase CK2 plays an important role in certain steps of apoptosis....

  20. Human telomerase and Cajal body ribonucleoproteins share a unique specificity of Sm protein association

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dragony; Collins, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Cajal bodies are nuclear structures that host RNA modification and assembly reactions. Some RNAs transit Cajal bodies, while others must concentrate in Cajal bodies to function. Here we report that at least a subfraction of human telomerase RNA and individual resident Cajal body RNAs is associated with Sm proteins. Surprisingly, of seven Sm proteins assembled into a heteroheptameric ring, only a subset copurifies telomerase and Cajal body ribonucleoproteins. We show that a Cajal body RNA loca...

  1. Severe malaria is associated with parasite binding to endothelial protein C receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Louise; Lavstsen, Thomas; Berger, Sanne S;

    2013-01-01

    . falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family and receptors on the endothelial lining. Severe childhood malaria is associated with expression of specific PfEMP1 subtypes containing domain cassettes (DCs) 8 and 13 (ref. 3), but the endothelial receptor for parasites expressing these proteins...... was unknown. Here we identify endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), which mediates the cytoprotective effects of activated protein C, as the endothelial receptor for DC8 and DC13 PfEMP1. We show that EPCR binding is mediated through the amino-terminal cysteine-rich interdomain region (CIDRα1) of DC8...... and group A PfEMP1 subfamilies, and that CIDRα1 interferes with protein C binding to EPCR. This PfEMP1 adhesive property links P. falciparum cytoadhesion to a host receptor involved in anticoagulation and endothelial cytoprotective pathways, and has implications for understanding malaria pathology...

  2. Electrostatic interaction between oxysterol-binding protein and VAMP-associated protein A revealed by NMR and mutagenesis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-04-23

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-A(MSP)) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBP(F)) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-A(MSP), OSBP(F), and the complex. Our results show that OSBP(F) is disordered in the free state, and VAP-A(MSP) and OSBP(F) form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain.

  3. Electrostatic Interaction between Oxysterol-binding Protein and VAMP-associated Protein A Revealed by NMR and Mutagenesis Studies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-AMSP) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBPF) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-AMSP, OSBPF, and the complex. Our results show that OSBPF is disordered in the free state, and VAP-AMSP and OSBPF form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain. PMID:20178991

  4. Isolation and Analysis of Keratins and Keratin-Associated Proteins from Hair and Wool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Plowman, Jeffrey E; Harland, Duane P

    2016-01-01

    The presence of highly cross-linked protein networks in hair and wool makes them very difficult substrates for protein extraction, a prerequisite for further protein analysis and characterization. It is therefore imperative that these cross-links formed by disulfide bridges are first disrupted for the efficient extraction of proteins. Chaotropes such as urea are commonly used as efficient extractants. However, a combination of urea and thiourea not only improves recovery of proteins but also results in improved resolution of the keratins in 2DE gels. Reductants also play an important role in protein dissolution. Dithiothreitol effectively removes keratinous material from the cortex, whereas phosphines, like Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, remove material from the exocuticle. The relative extractability of the keratins and keratin-associated proteins is also dependent on the concentration of chaotropes, reductants, and pH, thus providing a means to preferentially extract these proteins. Ionic liquids such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM(+)[Cl](-)) are known to solubilize wool by disrupting noncovalent interactions, specifically intermolecular hydrogen bonds. BMIM(+)[Cl](-) proved to be an effective extractant of wool proteins and complementary in nature to chaotropes such as urea and thiourea for identifying unique peptides of wool proteins using mass spectrometry (MS). Successful identification of proteins resolved by one- or two-dimensional electrophoresis and MS is highly dependent on the optimal recovery of its protease-digested peptides with an efficient removal of interfering substances. The detergent sodium deoxycholate used in conjunction with Empore™ disks improved identification of proteins by mass spectrometry leading to higher percentage sequence coverage, identification of unique peptides and higher score.

  5. Protein-like fully reversible tetramerisation and super-association of an aminocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolajski, Melanie; Adams, Gary G.; Gillis, Richard B.; Besong, David Tabot; Rowe, Arthur J.; Heinze, Thomas; Harding, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Unusual protein-like, partially reversible associative behaviour has recently been observed in solutions of the water soluble carbohydrates known as 6-deoxy-6-(ω-aminoalkyl)aminocelluloses, which produce controllable self-assembling films for enzyme immobilisation and other biotechnological applications. Now, for the first time, we have found a fully reversible self-association (tetramerisation) within this family of polysaccharides. Remarkably these carbohydrate tetramers are then seen to associate further in a regular way into supra-molecular complexes. Fully reversible oligomerisation has been hitherto completely unknown for carbohydrates and instead resembles in some respects the assembly of polypeptides and proteins like haemoglobin and its sickle cell mutation. Our traditional perceptions as to what might be considered ``protein-like'' and what might be considered as ``carbohydrate-like'' behaviour may need to be rendered more flexible, at least as far as interaction phenomena are concerned.

  6. Stimulation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in vitro RNA Synthesis by Microtubule-Associated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Virginia M.; Harmon, Shirley A.; Summers, Donald F.

    1986-08-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins purified from bovine brains stimulated the in vitro transcription and replication reactions of vesicular stomatitis virus. The products of these reactions were intact messenger or genome-sized RNA species. A preparation from HeLa cells containing tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins also stimulated vesicular stomatitis virus transcription in vitro. This observation is in accord with previous studies, which suggested that a host cell factor was involved with the function of the vesicular stomatitis virus RNA polymerase, and others that indicated that several animal viruses displayed an association with host cell cytoskeletal elements during their replication cycles. We show evidence in this report of a host cell protein that seems to have a functional role in interacting with the virion polymerase.

  7. Comparison of human CAP and CAP2, homologs of the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, G; Swiston, J; Young, D

    1994-06-01

    We previously reported the identification of human CAP, a protein that is related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins. The two yeast CAP proteins have similar functions: the N-terminal domains are required for the normal function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains result in morphological and nutritional defects that are unrelated to the cAMP pathways. We have amplified and cloned cDNAs from a human glioblastoma library that encode a second CAP-related protein, CAP2. The human CAP and CAP2 proteins are 64% identical. Expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. cerevisiae cap- strains suppresses phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP, but does not restore hyper-activation of adenylyl cyclase by RAS2val19. Similarly, expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. pombe cap- strains suppresses the morphological and temperature-sensitive phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP in this yeast. In addition, expression of human CAP, but not CAP2, suppresses the propensity to sporulate due to deletion of the N-terminal domain of CAP in S. pombe. This latter observation suggests that human CAP restores normal adenylyl cyclase activity in S. pombe cap- cells. Thus, functional properties of both N-terminal and C-terminal domains are conserved between the human and S. pombe CAP proteins.

  8. Human telomerase and Cajal body ribonucleoproteins share a unique specificity of Sm protein association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dragony; Collins, Kathleen

    2006-03-01

    Cajal bodies are nuclear structures that host RNA modification and assembly reactions. Some RNAs transit Cajal bodies, while others must concentrate in Cajal bodies to function. Here we report that at least a subfraction of human telomerase RNA and individual resident Cajal body RNAs is associated with Sm proteins. Surprisingly, of seven Sm proteins assembled into a heteroheptameric ring, only a subset copurifies telomerase and Cajal body ribonucleoproteins. We show that a Cajal body RNA localization motif determines this specificity. These discoveries expand the cellular repertoire of Sm protein assemblies and their involvement in ribonucleoprotein localization and function.

  9. Interaction with the Yes-associated protein (YAP) allows TEAD1 to positively regulate NAIP expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landin Malt, André; Georges, Adrien; Silber, Joël; Zider, Alain; Flagiello, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Although the expression of the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene is considered involved in apoptosis suppression as well as in inflammatory response, the molecular basis of the NAIP gene expression is poorly understood. Here we show that the TEA domain protein 1 (TEAD1) is able to positively activate the transcription of NAIP. We further demonstrate that this regulation is mediated by the presence of the endogenous Yes associated protein (YAP) cofactor, and requires the interaction with YAP. We finally identified an intronic region of the NAIP gene responding to TEAD1/YAP activity, suggesting that regulation of NAIP by TEAD1/YAP is at the transcriptional level.

  10. Differential localization of HPV16 E6 splice products with E6-associated protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponglikitmongkol Mathurose

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV is the etiological agent associated with the majority of anogenital cancers. The primary HPV oncogenes, E6 and E7, undergo a complex splicing program resulting in protein products whose purpose is not fully understood. Previous mouse studies have confirmed the existence of a translated product corresponding to the E6*I splice product. In terms of function, the translated E6*I protein has been shown to bind to E6 protein and to E6 associated protein (E6AP. E6*I has an inhibitory effect on E6-mediated p53 degradation in E6 expressing cells. In order to analyze the relationship between E6*I and full-length E6 in relation to localization, we created a series of green fluorescent protein (GFP fusion products. The localization of these proteins with reference to E6AP in vivo remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the cellular distribution of different forms of E6 with reference to E6AP. E6 and E6*I proteins, expressed from a wild type E6 gene cassette, were dispersed in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Whereas, the E6 splice donor mutant (E6MT was primarily localized to the nucleus. E6*I protein and E6AP were found to co-localize mainly to the cytoplasm, whereas the co-localization of full-length E6 protein and E6AP, if at all, was found mainly at the perinuclear region. These results suggest a functional relationship between the E6*I and full-length E6 protein which correlates with their localization and likely is important in regulation of the E6-E6AP complex.

  11. Dynamics of putative raft-associated proteins at the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, Anne K; Nichols, Benjamin J; Remmert, Catha L; Hendrix, Glenn M; Kumar, Mukesh; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2004-06-07

    Lipid rafts are conceptualized as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipid that serve as platforms for protein segregation and signaling. The properties of these domains in vivo are unclear. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to test if raft association affects a protein's ability to laterally diffuse large distances across the cell surface. The diffusion coefficients (D) of several types of putative raft and nonraft proteins were systematically measured under steady-state conditions and in response to raft perturbations. Raft proteins diffused freely over large distances (> 4 microm), exhibiting Ds that varied 10-fold. This finding indicates that raft proteins do not undergo long-range diffusion as part of discrete, stable raft domains. Perturbations reported to affect lipid rafts in model membrane systems or by biochemical fractionation (cholesterol depletion, decreased temperature, and cholesterol loading) had similar effects on the diffusional mobility of raft and nonraft proteins. Thus, raft association is not the dominant factor in determining long-range protein mobility at the cell surface.

  12. The Evolutionary History of MAPL (Mitochondria-Associated Protein Ligase) and Other Eukaryotic BAM/GIDE Domain Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, Jeremy G; Moore, Blake P

    2015-01-01

    MAPL (mitochondria-associated protein ligase, also called MULAN/GIDE/MUL1) is a multifunctional mitochondrial outer membrane protein found in human cells that contains a unique BAM (beside a membrane) domain and a C-terminal RING-finger domain. MAPL has been implicated in several processes that occur in animal cells such as NF-kB activation, innate immunity and antiviral signaling, suppression of PINK1/parkin defects, mitophagy in skeletal muscle, and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Previous studies demonstrated that the BAM domain is present in diverse organisms in which most of these processes do not occur, including plants, archaea, and bacteria. Thus the conserved function of MAPL and its BAM domain remains an open question. In order to gain insight into its conserved function, we investigated the evolutionary origins of MAPL by searching for homologues in predicted proteomes of diverse eukaryotes. We show that MAPL proteins with a conserved BAM-RING architecture are present in most animals, protists closely related to animals, a single species of fungus, and several multicellular plants and related green algae. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic MAPL proteins originate from a common ancestor and not from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We also determined that two independent duplications of MAPL occurred, one at the base of multicellular plants and another at the base of vertebrates. Although no other eukaryote genome examined contained a verifiable MAPL orthologue, BAM domain-containing proteins were identified in the protists Bigelowiella natans and Ectocarpus siliculosis. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that these proteins are more closely related to prokaryotic BAM proteins and therefore likely arose from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We conclude that MAPL proteins with BAM-RING architectures have been present in the holozoan and viridiplantae lineages since their very beginnings. Our work paves

  13. The Evolutionary History of MAPL (Mitochondria-Associated Protein Ligase and Other Eukaryotic BAM/GIDE Domain Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy G Wideman

    Full Text Available MAPL (mitochondria-associated protein ligase, also called MULAN/GIDE/MUL1 is a multifunctional mitochondrial outer membrane protein found in human cells that contains a unique BAM (beside a membrane domain and a C-terminal RING-finger domain. MAPL has been implicated in several processes that occur in animal cells such as NF-kB activation, innate immunity and antiviral signaling, suppression of PINK1/parkin defects, mitophagy in skeletal muscle, and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Previous studies demonstrated that the BAM domain is present in diverse organisms in which most of these processes do not occur, including plants, archaea, and bacteria. Thus the conserved function of MAPL and its BAM domain remains an open question. In order to gain insight into its conserved function, we investigated the evolutionary origins of MAPL by searching for homologues in predicted proteomes of diverse eukaryotes. We show that MAPL proteins with a conserved BAM-RING architecture are present in most animals, protists closely related to animals, a single species of fungus, and several multicellular plants and related green algae. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic MAPL proteins originate from a common ancestor and not from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We also determined that two independent duplications of MAPL occurred, one at the base of multicellular plants and another at the base of vertebrates. Although no other eukaryote genome examined contained a verifiable MAPL orthologue, BAM domain-containing proteins were identified in the protists Bigelowiella natans and Ectocarpus siliculosis. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that these proteins are more closely related to prokaryotic BAM proteins and therefore likely arose from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We conclude that MAPL proteins with BAM-RING architectures have been present in the holozoan and viridiplantae lineages since their very beginnings

  14. Association of polyalanine and polyglutamine coiled coils mediates expansion disease-related protein aggregation and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Corà, Davide; Cesano, Federico; Monje, Francisco J; Montarolo, Pier Giorgio; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2014-07-01

    The expansion of homopolymeric glutamine (polyQ) or alanine (polyA) repeats in certain proteins owing to genetic mutations induces protein aggregation and toxicity, causing at least 18 human diseases. PolyQ and polyA repeats can also associate in the same proteins, but the general extent of their association in proteomes is unknown. Furthermore, the structural mechanisms by which their expansion causes disease are not well understood, and these repeats are generally thought to misfold upon expansion into aggregation-prone β-sheet structures like amyloids. However, recent evidence indicates a critical role for coiled-coil (CC) structures in triggering aggregation and toxicity of polyQ-expanded proteins, raising the possibility that polyA repeats may as well form these structures, by themselves or in association with polyQ. We found through bioinformatics screenings that polyA, polyQ and polyQA repeats have a phylogenetically graded association in human and non-human proteomes and associate/overlap with CC domains. Circular dichroism and cross-linking experiments revealed that polyA repeats can form--alone or with polyQ and polyQA--CC structures that increase in stability with polyA length, forming higher-order multimers and polymers in vitro. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we studied the relevance of polyA CCs to the in vivo aggregation and toxicity of RUNX2--a polyQ/polyA protein associated with cleidocranial dysplasia upon polyA expansion--and found that the stability of its polyQ/polyA CC controls its aggregation, localization and toxicity. These findings indicate that, like polyQ, polyA repeats form CC structures that can trigger protein aggregation and toxicity upon expansion in human genetic diseases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Endobrevin, a Novel Synaptobrevin/VAMP-Like Protein Preferentially Associated with the Early Endosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Siew Heng; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Yue; Subramaniam, V. Nathan; Griffiths, Gareth; Hong, Wanjin

    1998-01-01

    Synaptobrevins/vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) together with syntaxins and a synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) are the main components of a protein complex involved in the docking and/or fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic membrane. We report here the molecular, biochemical, and cell biological characterization of a novel member of the synaptobrevin/VAMP family. The amino acid sequence of endobrevin has 32, 33, and 31% identity to those of synaptobrevin/VAMP-1, synaptobrevin/VAMP-2, and cellubrevin, respectively. Membrane fractionation studies demonstrate that endobrevin is enriched in membrane fractions that are also enriched in the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy establishes that endobrevin is primarily associated with the perinuclear vesicular structures of the early endocytic compartment. The preferential association of endobrevin with the early endosome was further established by electron microscopy (EM) immunogold labeling. In vitro binding assays show that endobrevin interacts with immobilized recombinant α-SNAP fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Our results highlight the general importance of members of the synaptobrevin/VAMP protein family in membrane traffic and provide new avenues for future functional and mechanistic studies of this protein as well as the endocytotic pathway. PMID:9614193

  16. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittingham, Jean L; Blagova, Elena V; Finn, Ciaran E; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Turkenburg, Johan P; Leech, Andrew P; Walton, Paul H; Murzin, Alexey G; Meijer, Wim G; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2014-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-D-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins.

  17. Ancient association between cation leak channels and Mid1 proteins is conserved in fungi and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo eGhezzi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal resting potential can tune the excitability of neural networks, affecting downstream behavior. Sodium leak channels (NALCN play a key role in rhythmic behaviors by helping set, or subtly changing neuronal resting potential. The full complexity of these newly described channels is just beginning to be appreciated, however. NALCN channels can associate with numerous subunits in different tissues and can be activated by several different peptides and second messengers. We recently showed that NALCN channels are closely related to fungal calcium channels, which they functionally resemble. Here, we use this relationship to predict a family of NALCN-associated proteins in animals on the basis of homology with the yeast protein Mid1, the subunit of the yeast calcium channel. These proteins all share a cysteine-rich region that is necessary for Mid1 function in yeast. We validate this predicted association by showing that the Mid1 homolog in Drosophila, encoded by the CG33988 gene, is coordinately expressed with NALCN, and that knockdown of either protein creates identical phenotypes in several behaviors associated with NALCN function. The relationship between Mid1 and leak channels has therefore persisted over a billion years of evolution, despite drastic changes to both proteins and the organisms in which they exist.

  18. Affinity Association Between Polynucleotide, Glycoprotein, or Sulfated Polysaccharides and Disease-Associated Prion Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Tsukui

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteinase-K resistant prion protein (PrPres has the property to aggregate in TSE-injured animal tissues. We have developed a test method to discriminate scrapie-infected and mock-infected hamsters by detecting the PrPres in plasma. It seemed that aggregation of the PrPres with some heterogeneous molecule(s enabled successful detection by this method. In order to investigate which molecule became the partner in the PrPres aggregates; we examined some molecules that could presumably have this ability. As a result, we found synthetic Poly-A RNA, especially in its denatured form, to be the most effective entity although glycoprotein, sulfated polysaccharide showed less effectiveness. DNA in the denatured form also has a high affinity, although in the presence of protein the effectiveness unsuccessful. On the basis of this result, it is possible that the PrPres aggregate in scrapie-infected hamster plasma is composed of PrPres and RNA.

  19. Specific T-cell recognition of the merozoite proteins rhoptry-associated protein 1 and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Hviid, L; Theander, T G;

    1993-01-01

    The merozoite proteins merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) and rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP-1) and synthetic peptides containing sequences of MSP-1, RAP-1, and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1, induced in vitro proliferative responses of lymphocytes collected from Ghanaian blood donors living...

  20. A protein diet score, including plant and animal protein, investigating the association with HbA1c and eGFR - the PREVIEW project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Grith; Sluik, Diewertje; Ritz, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Higher-protein diets have been advocated for body-weight regulation for the past few decades. However, the potential health risks of these diets are still uncertain. We aimed to develop a protein score based on the quantity and source of protein, and to examine the association of the score...

  1. Symmetry-mismatch reconstruction of genomes and associated proteins within icosahedral viruses using cryo-EM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowu Li; Hongrong Liu; Lingpeng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Although near-atomic resolutions have been routinely achieved for structural determination of many icosahedral viral capsids,structures of genomes and associated proteins within the capsids are still less characterized because the genome information is overlapped by the highly symmetric capsid information in the virus particle images.We recently developed a software package for symmetry-mismatch structural reconstruction and determined the structures of the genome and RNA polymerases within an icosahedral virus for the first time.Here,we describe the protocol used for this structural determination,which may facilitate structural biologists in investigating the structures of viral genome and associated proteins.

  2. Plakophilin-associated RNA-binding proteins in prostate cancer and their implications in tumor progression and metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Cheng; Stroebel, Philipp; Marx, Alexander; Hofmann, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Both plakophilins (PKP) 1 and 3 play a role in the progression of prostate cancer. The RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) GAP-SH3-binding protein (G3BP), fragile-X-related protein 1 (FXR1), poly(A)-binding protein, cytoplasmic 1 (PABPC1), and up-frameshift factor 1 (UPF1) are associated with PKP3. All thes

  3. Topology of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Cellular and Viral Proteins Determined with Split-GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Seong-In; Maruri-Avidal, Liliana; Moss, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    The split green fluorescent protein (GFP) system was adapted for investigation of the topology of ER-associated proteins. A 215-amino acid fragment of GFP (S1-10) was expressed in the cytoplasm as a free protein or fused to the N-terminus of calnexin and in the ER as an intraluminal protein or fused to the C-terminus of calnexin. A 16-amino acid fragment of GFP (S11) was fused to the N- or C-terminus of the target protein. Fluorescence occurred when both GFP fragments were in the same intracellular compartment. After validation with the cellular proteins PDI and tapasin, we investigated two vaccinia virus proteins (L2 and A30.5) of unknown topology that localize to the ER and are required for assembly of the viral membrane. Our results indicated that the N- and C-termini of L2 faced the cytoplasmic and luminal sides of the ER, respectively. In contrast both the N- and C-termini of A30.5 faced the cytoplasm. The system offers advantages for quickly determining the topology of intracellular proteins: the S11 tag is similar in length to commonly used epitope tags; multiple options are available for detecting fluorescence in live or fixed cells; transfection protocols are adaptable to numerous expression systems and can enable high throughput applications.

  4. Proteins associated with cork formation in Quercus suber L. stem tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Cândido P P; Martins, Isabel; Francisco, Rita; Sergeant, Kjell; Pinheiro, Carla; Campos, Alexandre; Renaut, Jenny; Fevereiro, Pedro

    2011-08-12

    Cork (phellem) formation in Quercus suber stem was studied by proteomic analysis of young shoots of increasing age (Y0, Y1 and Y4) and recently-formed phellem (Y8Ph) and xylem (Y8X) from an 8-year-old branch. In this study 99 proteins were identified, 45 excised from Y8X and 54 from Y8Ph. These ones, specifically associated with phellem, are of "carbohydrate metabolism" (28%), "defence" (22%), "protein folding, stability and degradation" (19%), "regulation/signalling" (11%), "secondary metabolism" (9%), "energy metabolism" (6%), and "membrane transport" (2%). The identification in phellem of galactosidases, xylosidases, apiose/xylose synthase, laccases and diphenol oxidases suggests intense cell wall reorganization, possibly with participation of hemicellulose/pectin biosynthesis and phenol oxidation. The identification of proteasome subunits, heat shock proteins, cyclophylin, subtilisin-like proteases, 14-3-3 proteins, Rab2 protein and enzymes interacting with nucleosides/nucleic acids gives additional evidence for cellular reorganization, involving cellular secretion, protein turnover regulation and active control processes. The high involvement in phellem of defence proteins (thioredoxin-dependent peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, SGT1 protein, cystatin, and chitinases) suggests a strong need for cell protection from the intense stressful events occurring in active phellem, namely, desiccation, pests/disease protection, detoxification and cell death. Identically, highly enhanced defence functions were previously reported for potato periderm formation.

  5. Tight junction-associated MARVEL proteins marveld3, tricellulin, and occludin have distinct but overlapping functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, David R; Marchiando, Amanda M; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Le; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Wang, Yingmin; Long, Manyuan; Turner, Jerrold R

    2010-04-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that occludin and tricellulin are important for tight junction barrier function, but in vivo data suggest that loss of these proteins can be overcome. The presence of a heretofore unknown, yet related, protein could explain these observations. Here, we report marvelD3, a novel tight junction protein that, like occludin and tricellulin, contains a conserved four-transmembrane MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction; analysis of RNA and protein tissue distribution; immunofluorescent and electron microscopic examination of subcellular localization; characterization of intracellular trafficking, protein interactions, dynamic behavior, and siRNA knockdown effects; and description of remodeling after in vivo immune activation show that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin have distinct but overlapping functions at the tight junction. Although marvelD3 is able to partially compensate for occludin or tricellulin loss, it cannot fully restore function. We conclude that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin define the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein family. The data further suggest that these proteins are best considered as a group with both redundant and unique contributions to epithelial function and tight junction regulation.

  6. Estrogen effects on actin cytoskeletal and endocytic proteins associated with tubulobulbar complex disruption in rat testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Rahul D; Kumar, Anita V; Sonawane, Shobha; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, Nafisa H

    2013-10-01

    Tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs), evaginations of mature spermatids, penetrate into the surrounding Sertoli cell cytoplasm of testis seminiferous epithelium during rat spermatogenesis. These structures prepare mature spermatids for their release into the seminiferous tubular lumen via a process called spermiation. Based on their functions of transient attachment and endocytosis, many actin-regulatory and endocytic proteins are associated with TBCs. Previously, exogenous 17β-estradiol administration to adult male rats showed spermiation failure that was attributed to TBC disruption. To determine the molecular basis of estrogen-induced TBC disruption, we examined the expressions and localizations of actin-regulatory proteins, endocytic proteins, Rho-GTPases, and phosphorylation in TBCs during sperm release. Results demonstrated absence of neural Wiscott Aldrich syndrome protein, cortactin, adaptor-related protein complex 2 sigma-1 subunit, dynamin 2, cell division control protein 42, and phosphocortactin in the concavity of spermatid head where TBCs are present without change in their protein expression levels. Absence of these proteins could have led to collapse of the TBC structure which is involved in its formation and function.

  7. Salivary Proteins Associated with Periodontitis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara B. Taiyeb-Ali

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the salivary proteins that are associated with periodontitis in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Volunteers for the study were patients from the Diabetic Unit, University of Malaya Medical Centre, whose periodontal status was determined. The diabetic volunteers were divided into two groups, i.e., patients with periodontitis and those who were periodontally healthy. Saliva samples were collected and treated with 10% TCA/acetone/20 mM DTT to precipitate the proteins, which were then separated using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel images were scanned using the GS-800TM Calibrated Densitometer. The protein spots were analyzed and expressed in percentage volumes. The percentage volume of each protein spot was subjected to Mann-Whitney statistical analysis using SPSS software and false discovery rate correction. When the expression of the salivary proteins was compared between the T2DM patients with periodontitis with those who were periodontally healthy, seven proteins, including polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, plastin-2, actin related protein 3, leukocyte elastase inhibitor, carbonic anhydrases 6, immunoglobulin J and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, were found to be differentially expressed (p < 0.01304. This implies that the proteins may have the potential to be used as biomarkers for the prediction of T2DM patients who may be prone to periodontitis.

  8. Nuclear matrix associated protein PML: an arsenic trioxide apoptosis therapeutic target protein in HepG2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于鼎; 王子慧; 朱立元; 邱殷庆

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-induced apoptosis and the effects on cell nuclear matrix related protein promyelocytic leukaemia (PML). Methods HepG2 cells were cultured in MEM medium and treated with 0.5, 2, 5 and 10 μmol/L As2O3 for either 24 h or 96 h at each concentration. In situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) labeling (TUNEL) and DNA ladders were used to detect apoptosis. Confocal microscopy and Western blotting were used to observe the expression of PML. Results The growth rates of HepG2 cells were slower in the As2O3 treated than the untreated control group. DNA ladder and TUNEL positive apoptotic cells could be detected in As2O3 treated groups. The expression of PML decreased in HepG2 cells with 2 μmol/L As2O3 treatment. Confocal images demonstrated that the expression of PML protein in HepG2 cell nuclei decreased after treatment with 2 μmol/L As2O3, and micropunctates characteristic of PML protein in HepG2 cell nuclei disappeared after treatment with 5 μmol/L As2O3.Conclusions Our results show that arsenic trioxide can significantly inhibit the growth of HepG2 cells in vitro. As2O3 induces apoptosis in HepG2 tumor cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. As2O3 may degrade the PML protein in HepG2 cell nuclei. The decreased expression of PML in As2O3 treated tumor cells is most likely to be caused by apoptosis. Nuclear matrix associated protein PML could be the target of As2O3 therapy.

  9. Regulation of starch accumulation by granule-associated plant 14-3-3 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehnke, P C; Chung, H J; Wu, K; Ferl, R J

    2001-01-16

    In higher plants the production of starch is orchestrated by chloroplast-localized biosynthetic enzymes, namely starch synthases, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and starch branching and debranching enzymes. Diurnal regulation of these enzymes, as well as starch-degrading enzymes, influences both the levels and composition of starch, and is dependent in some instances upon phosphorylation-linked regulation. The phosphoserine/threonine-binding 14-3-3 proteins participate in environmentally responsive phosphorylation-related regulatory functions in plants, and as such are potentially involved in starch regulation. We report here that reduction of the epsilon subgroup of Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins by antisense technology resulted in a 2- to 4-fold increase in leaf starch accumulation. Dark-governed starch breakdown was unaffected in these "antisense plants," indicating an unaltered starch-degradation pathway and suggesting a role for 14-3-3 proteins in regulation of starch synthesis. Absorption spectra and gelatinization properties indicate that the starch from the antisense plants has an altered branched glucan composition. Biochemical characterization of protease-treated starch granules from both Arabidopsis leaves and maize endosperm showed that 14-3-3 proteins are internal intrinsic granule proteins. These data suggest a direct role for 14-3-3 proteins in starch accumulation. The starch synthase III family is a possible target for 14-3-3 protein regulation because, uniquely among plastid-localized starch metabolic enzymes, all members of the family contain the conserved 14-3-3 protein phosphoserine/threonine-binding consensus motif. This possibility is strengthened by immunocapture using antibodies to DU1, a maize starch synthase III family member, and direct interaction with biotinylated 14-3-3 protein, both of which demonstrated an association between 14-3-3 proteins and DU1 or DU1-like proteins.

  10. The surface-associated protein of Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakinc, Türkan; Woznowski, Magdalena; Ebsen, Michael; Gatermann, Sören G

    2005-10-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus surface-associated protein (Ssp) was the first surface protein described for this organism. Ssp-positive strains display a fuzzy layer of surface-associated material in electron micrographs, whereas Ssp-negative strains appear to be smooth. The physiologic function of Ssp, however, has remained elusive. To clone the associated gene, we determined the N-terminal sequence, as well as an internal amino acid sequence, of the purified protein. We derived two degenerate primers from these peptide sequences, which we used to identify the ssp gene from genomic DNA of S. saprophyticus 7108. The gene was cloned by PCR techniques and was found to be homologous to genes encoding staphylococcal lipases. In keeping with this finding, strains 7108 and 9325, which are Ssp positive, showed lipase activity on tributyrylglycerol agar plates, whereas the Ssp-negative strain CCM883 did not. Association of enzyme activity with the cloned DNA was proven by introducing the gene into Staphylococcus carnosus TM300. When wild-type strain 7108 and an isogenic mutant were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, strain 7108 exhibited the fuzzy surface layer, whereas the mutant appeared to be smooth. Lipase activity and the surface appendages could be restored by reintroduction of the cloned gene into the mutant. Experiments using immobilized collagen type I did not provide evidence for the involvement of Ssp in adherence to this matrix protein. Our experiments thus provided evidence that Ssp is a surface-associated lipase of S. saprophyticus.

  11. Overexpressed HDAC4 is associated with poor survival and promotes tumor progression in esophageal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Shi-Juan; Wang, Meng-He; Zhang, Mei-Yin; Zheng, X.F. Steven; Wang, Hui-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) mediate histone deacetylation, leading to transcriptional repression, which is involved in many diseases, including age-related tissue degeneration, heart failure and cancer. In this study, we were aimed to investigate the expression, clinical significance and biological function of HDAC4 in esophageal carcinoma (EC). We found that HDAC4 mRNA and protein are overexpressed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues and cell lines. HDAC4 overexpression is associated with higher tumor grade, advanced clinical stage and poor survival. Mechanistically, HDAC4 promotes proliferation and G1/S cell cycle progression in EC cells by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21 and p27 and up-regulating CDK2/4 and CDK-dependent Rb phosphorylation. HDAC4 also enhances ESCC cell migration. Furthermore, HDAC4 positively regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by increasing the expression of Vimentin and decreasing the expression of E-Cadherin/α-Catenin. Together, our study shows that HDAC4 overexpression is important for the oncogenesis of EC, which may serve as a useful prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for this malignancy. PMID:27295551

  12. Literature mining of protein-residue associations with graph rules learned through distant supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar KE

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We propose a method for automatic extraction of protein-specific residue mentions from the biomedical literature. The method searches text for mentions of amino acids at specific sequence positions and attempts to correctly associate each mention with a protein also named in the text. The methods presented in this work will enable improved protein functional site extraction from articles, ultimately supporting protein function prediction. Our method made use of linguistic patterns for identifying the amino acid residue mentions in text. Further, we applied an automated graph-based method to learn syntactic patterns corresponding to protein-residue pairs mentioned in the text. We finally present an approach to automated construction of relevant training and test data using the distant supervision model. Results The performance of the method was assessed by extracting protein-residue relations from a new automatically generated test set of sentences containing high confidence examples found using distant supervision. It achieved a F-measure of 0.84 on automatically created silver corpus and 0.79 on a manually annotated gold data set for this task, outperforming previous methods. Conclusions The primary contributions of this work are to (1 demonstrate the effectiveness of distant supervision for automatic creation of training data for protein-residue relation extraction, substantially reducing the effort and time involved in manual annotation of a data set and (2 show that the graph-based relation extraction approach we used generalizes well to the problem of protein-residue association extraction. This work paves the way towards effective extraction of protein functional residues from the literature.

  13. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Murzin, Alexey G. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Meijer, Wim G. [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Wilkinson, Anthony J., E-mail: tony.wilkinson@york.ac.uk [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    VapD is one of a set of highly homologous virulence-associated proteins from the multi-host pathogen Rhodococcus equi. The crystal structure reveals an eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel fold and a glycine rich ‘bald’ surface. Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins.

  14. Early Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein A Concentrations are Associated with Third Trimester Insulin Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petry, Clive J; Ong, Ken K; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2017-01-01

    -A concentrations are related to the subsequent risk of GDM and gestational hypertension. Patients, Design and Setting: We measured serum PAPP-A concentrations around week 15 of pregnancy and related these to indices derived from week 28 oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and blood pressures across pregnancy...... in the Cambridge Baby Growth Study cohort. Results: Increased PAPP-A concentrations were associated with reduced GDM risk (odds ratio 0.623 (0.453, 0.856), P=3.5 x 10-3, n=777) and reduced mean arterial blood pressures (β=-0.202- -0.177, P=1.7-6.9 x 10-3, n=347-355). They were also negatively associated with week...

  15. Kebab: kinetochore and EB1 associated basic protein that dynamically changes its localisation during Drosophila mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, Ana M; Dzhindzhev, Nikola S; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Microtubule plus ends are dynamic ends that interact with other cellular structures. Microtubule plus end tracking proteins are considered to play important roles in the regulation of microtubule plus ends. Recent studies revealed that EB1 is the central regulator for microtubule plus end tracking proteins by recruiting them to microtubule plus ends through direct interaction. Here we report the identification of a novel Drosophila protein, which we call Kebab (kinetochore and EB1 associated basic protein), through in vitro expression screening for EB1-interacting proteins. Kebab fused to GFP shows a novel pattern of dynamic localisation in mitosis. It localises to kinetochores weakly in metaphase and accumulates progressively during anaphase. In telophase, it associates with microtubules in central-spindle and centrosomal regions. The localisation to kinetochores depends on microtubules. The protein has a domain most similar to the atypical CH domain of Ndc80, and a coiled-coil domain. The interaction with EB1 is mediated by two SxIP motifs but is not required for the localisation. Depletion of Kebab in cultured cells by RNA interference did not show obvious defects in mitotic progression or microtubule organisation. Generation of mutants lacking the kebab gene indicated that Kebab is dispensable for viability and fertility.

  16. DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A associates with viral proteins and impacts HSV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowles, Daniell L; Tsai, Yuan-Chin; Greco, Todd M; Lin, Aaron E; Li, Minghao; Yeh, Justin; Cristea, Ileana M

    2015-06-01

    Viral infections can alter the cellular epigenetic landscape, through modulation of either DNA methylation profiles or chromatin remodeling enzymes and histone modifications. These changes can act to promote viral replication or host defense. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a prominent human pathogen, which relies on interactions with host factors for efficient replication and spread. Nevertheless, the knowledge regarding its modulation of epigenetic factors remains limited. Here, we used fluorescently-labeled viruses in conjunction with immunoaffinity purification and MS to study virus-virus and virus-host protein interactions during HSV-1 infection in primary human fibroblasts. We identified interactions among viral capsid and tegument proteins, detecting phosphorylation of the capsid protein VP26 at sites within its UL37-binding domain, and an acetylation within the major capsid protein VP5. Interestingly, we found a nuclear association between viral capsid proteins and the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), which we confirmed by reciprocal isolations and microscopy. We show that drug-induced inhibition of DNA methyltransferase activity, as well as siRNA- and shRNA-mediated DNMT3A knockdowns trigger reductions in virus titers. Altogether, our results highlight a functional association of viral proteins with the mammalian DNA methyltransferase machinery, pointing to DNMT3A as a host factor required for effective HSV-1 infection.

  17. Thioredoxin interacting protein and its association with clinical outcome in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline M. Woolston

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall prognosis for operable gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma remains poor and therefore neoadjuvant chemotherapy has become the standard of care, in addition to radical surgery. Certain anticancer agents (e.g. anthracyclines and cisplatin generate damaging reactive oxygen species as by-products of their mechanism of action. Drug effectiveness can therefore depend upon the presence of cellular redox buffering systems that are often deregulated in cancer. The expression of the redox protein, thioredoxin interacting protein, was assessed in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Thioredoxin interacting protein expression was assessed using conventional immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray of 140 adenocarcinoma patients treated by primary surgery alone and 88 operable cases treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In the primary surgery cases, high thioredoxin interacting protein expression associated with a lack of lymph node involvement (p=0.005, no perineural invasion (p=0.030 and well/moderate tumour differentiation (p=0.033. In the neoadjuvant tumours, high thioredoxin interacting protein expression was an independent marker for improved disease specific survival (p=0.002 especially in cases with anthracycline-based regimes (p=0.008. This study highlights the potential of thioredoxin interacting protein as a biomarker for response in neoadjuvant treated gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma and may represent a useful therapeutic target due to its association with tumour progression.

  18. Kebab: kinetochore and EB1 associated basic protein that dynamically changes its localisation during Drosophila mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Meireles

    Full Text Available Microtubule plus ends are dynamic ends that interact with other cellular structures. Microtubule plus end tracking proteins are considered to play important roles in the regulation of microtubule plus ends. Recent studies revealed that EB1 is the central regulator for microtubule plus end tracking proteins by recruiting them to microtubule plus ends through direct interaction. Here we report the identification of a novel Drosophila protein, which we call Kebab (kinetochore and EB1 associated basic protein, through in vitro expression screening for EB1-interacting proteins. Kebab fused to GFP shows a novel pattern of dynamic localisation in mitosis. It localises to kinetochores weakly in metaphase and accumulates progressively during anaphase. In telophase, it associates with microtubules in central-spindle and centrosomal regions. The localisation to kinetochores depends on microtubules. The protein has a domain most similar to the atypical CH domain of Ndc80, and a coiled-coil domain. The interaction with EB1 is mediated by two SxIP motifs but is not required for the localisation. Depletion of Kebab in cultured cells by RNA interference did not show obvious defects in mitotic progression or microtubule organisation. Generation of mutants lacking the kebab gene indicated that Kebab is dispensable for viability and fertility.

  19. Thioredoxin interacting protein and its association with clinical outcome in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolston, Caroline M; Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Soomro, Irshad N; Lobo, Dileep N; Reece-Smith, Alexander M; Parsons, Simon L; Martin, Stewart G

    2013-01-01

    The overall prognosis for operable gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma remains poor and therefore neoadjuvant chemotherapy has become the standard of care, in addition to radical surgery. Certain anticancer agents (e.g. anthracyclines and cisplatin) generate damaging reactive oxygen species as by-products of their mechanism of action. Drug effectiveness can therefore depend upon the presence of cellular redox buffering systems that are often deregulated in cancer. The expression of the redox protein, thioredoxin interacting protein, was assessed in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Thioredoxin interacting protein expression was assessed using conventional immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray of 140 adenocarcinoma patients treated by primary surgery alone and 88 operable cases treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In the primary surgery cases, high thioredoxin interacting protein expression associated with a lack of lymph node involvement (p=0.005), no perineural invasion (p=0.030) and well/moderate tumour differentiation (p=0.033). In the neoadjuvant tumours, high thioredoxin interacting protein expression was an independent marker for improved disease specific survival (p=0.002) especially in cases with anthracycline-based regimes (p=0.008). This study highlights the potential of thioredoxin interacting protein as a biomarker for response in neoadjuvant treated gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma and may represent a useful therapeutic target due to its association with tumour progression.

  20. The spliceosome-associated protein Mfap1 binds to VCP in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Sandra; Ohm, Henrike; Zipfel, Jaqueline; Rumpf, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression contributes to many developmental transitions. Previously, we found that the AAA chaperone Valosin-Containing Protein (VCP) regulates ecdysone-dependent dendrite pruning of Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization (c4da) neurons via an effect on RNA metabolism. In a search for RNA binding proteins associated with VCP, we identified the spliceosome-associated protein Mfap1, a component of the tri-snRNP complex. Mfap1 is a nucleolar protein in neurons and its levels are regulated by VCP. Mfap1 binds to VCP and TDP-43, a disease-associated RNA-binding protein. via distinct regions in its N- and C-terminal halfs. Similar to vcp mutations, Mfap1 overexpression causes c4da neuron dendrite pruning defects and mislocalization of TDP-43 in these cells, but genetic analyses show that Mfap1 is not a crucial VCP target during dendrite pruning. Finally, rescue experiments with a lethal mfap1 mutant show that the VCP binding region is not essential for Mfap1 function, but may act to increase its stability or activity.

  1. Identification of a human homologue of the vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-associated protein of 33 kDa (VAP-33): a broadly expressed protein that binds to VAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, M L; Klip, A; Trimble, W S

    1998-01-01

    We report the identification of a human homologue of the vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-associated protein (hVAP-33) that has been implicated in neuronal exocytosis in Aplysia californica. This hVAP-33 shared 50% amino acid identity with the A. californica form and had similar length, structural organization and VAMP-binding abilities. However, in contrast with the neuron-specific expression seen in A. californica, hVAP-33 was broadly expressed, suggesting possible roles in vesicle fusion in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. PMID:9657962

  2. RNA-binding domain in the nucleocapsid protein of gill-associated nidovirus of penaeid shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chumporn Soowannayan

    Full Text Available Gill-associated virus (GAV infects Penaeus monodon shrimp and is the type species okavirus in the Roniviridae, the only invertebrate nidoviruses known currently. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs using His(6-tagged full-length and truncated proteins were employed to examine the nucleic acid binding properties of the GAV nucleocapsid (N protein in vitro. The EMSAs showed full-length N protein to bind to all synthetic single-stranded (ssRNAs tested independent of their sequence. The ssRNAs included (+ and (- sense regions of the GAV genome as well as a (+ sense region of the M RNA segment of Mourilyan virus, a crustacean bunya-like virus. GAV N protein also bound to double-stranded (dsRNAs prepared to GAV ORF1b gene regions and to bacteriophage M13 genomic ssDNA. EMSAs using the five N protein constructs with variable-length N-terminal and/or C-terminal truncations localized the RNA binding domain to a 50 amino acid (aa N-terminal sequence spanning Met(11 to Arg(60. Similarly to other RNA binding proteins, the first 16 aa portion of this sequence was proline/arginine rich. To examine this domain in more detail, the 18 aa peptide (M(11PVRRPLPPQPPRNARLI(29 encompassing this sequence was synthesized and found to bind nucleic acids similarly to the full-length N protein in EMSAs. The data indicate a fundamental role for the GAV N protein proline/arginine-rich domain in nucleating genomic ssRNA to form nucleocapsids. Moreover, as the synthetic peptide formed higher-order complexes in the presence of RNA, the domain might also play some role in protein/protein interactions stabilizing the helical structure of GAV nucleocapsids.

  3. Yes-associated protein and p53-binding protein-2 interact through their WW and SH3 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espanel, X; Sudol, M

    2001-04-27

    To understand the role of the Yes-associated protein (YAP), binding partners of its WW1 domain were isolated by a yeast two-hybrid screen. One of the interacting proteins was identified as p53-binding protein-2 (p53BP-2). YAP and p53BP-2 interacted in vitro and in vivo using their WW1 and SH3 domains, respectively. The YAP WW1 domain bound to the YPPPPY motif of p53BP-2, whereas the p53BP-2 SH3 domain interacted with the VPMRLR sequence of YAP, which is different from other known SH3 domain-binding motifs. By mutagenesis, we showed that this unusual SH3 domain interaction was due to the presence of three consecutive tryptophans located within the betaC strand of the SH3 domain. A point mutation within this triplet, W976R, restored the binding selectivity to the general consensus sequence for SH3 domains, the PXXP motif. A constitutively active form of c-Yes was observed to decrease the binding affinity between YAP and p53BP-2 using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase/enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas the overexpression of c-Yes did not modify this interaction. Since overexpression of an activated form of c-Yes resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of p53BP-2, we propose that the p53BP-2 phosphorylation, possibly in the WW1 domain-binding motif, might negatively regulate the YAP.p53BP-2 complex.

  4. Phase transition of spindle-associated protein regulate spindle apparatus assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Shusheng; Huang, Yuejia; He, Xiaonan; Cui, Honggang; Zhu, Xueliang; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-09-24

    Spindle assembly required during mitosis depends on microtubule polymerization. We demonstrate that the evolutionarily conserved low-complexity protein, BuGZ, undergoes phase transition or coacervation to promote assembly of both spindles and their associated components. BuGZ forms temperature-dependent liquid droplets alone or on microtubules in physiological buffers. Coacervation in vitro or in spindle and spindle matrix depends on hydrophobic residues in BuGZ. BuGZ coacervation and its binding to microtubules and tubulin are required to promote assembly of spindle and spindle matrix in Xenopus egg extract and in mammalian cells. Since several previously identified spindle-associated components also contain low-complexity regions, we propose that coacervating proteins may be a hallmark of proteins that comprise a spindle matrix that functions to promote assembly of spindles by concentrating its building blocks.

  5. Topology association analysis in weighted protein interaction network for gene prioritization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shunyao; Shao, Fengjing; Zhang, Qi; Ji, Jun; Xu, Shaojie; Sun, Rencheng; Sun, Gengxin; Du, Xiangjun; Sui, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Although lots of algorithms for disease gene prediction have been proposed, the weights of edges are rarely taken into account. In this paper, the strengths of topology associations between disease and essential genes are analyzed in weighted protein interaction network. Empirical analysis demonstrates that compared to other genes, disease genes are weakly connected with essential genes in protein interaction network. Based on this finding, a novel global distance measurement for gene prioritization with weighted protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. Positive and negative flow is allocated to disease and essential genes, respectively. Additionally network propagation model is extended for weighted network. Experimental results on 110 diseases verify the effectiveness and potential of the proposed measurement. Moreover, weak links play more important role than strong links for gene prioritization, which is meaningful to deeply understand protein interaction network.

  6. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPARgamma as an exosome-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looze, Christopher; Yui, David; Leung, Lester; Ingham, Matthew; Kaler, Maryann; Yao, Xianglan; Wu, Wells W; Shen, Rong-Fong; Daniels, Mathew P; Levine, Stewart J

    2009-01-16

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPARgamma as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  7. Role of Cbl-associated protein/ponsin in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Tikkanen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cbl-associated protein/ponsin (CAP is an adaptor protein that contains a so-called Sorbin homology (SoHo domain and three Src homology 3 (SH3 domains which are engaged in diverse protein-protein interactions. CAP has been shown to function in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion and to be involved in the differentiation of muscle cells and adipocytes. In addition, it participates in signaling pathways through several receptor tyrosine kinases such as insulin and neurotrophin receptors. In the last couple of years, several studies have shed light on the details of these processes and identified novel interaction partners of CAP. In this review, we summarize these recent findings and provide an overview on the function of CAP especially in cell adhesion and membrane receptor signaling.

  8. [Dynamic model of protein behavior in water. Possible mechanism of association and dissociation of specific complexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiaiviariainen, A I

    1979-01-01

    The proposed mechanism of association and dissociation of specific protein complex with ligands is based on the assumption that thermal fluctuations in the non-polar cavities of protein are interrelated due to the co-operative properties of macromolecules. The non-polar cavities, representing the active centres and clefts in the globule jump from the "open" state to the "closed" one with a certain amount of water being removed to the external medium. It is assumed that the association of ligand with the active centre is accompanied by stabilization of the chest state and destibilization of the open one, dissociation being a reverse process. A rapid change in the state of the active centre under the influence of ligand induces a slow relaxation process resulting in similar alterations in the state of the auxiliary non-polar cavities of protein. As a result, the binding constant of ligand increases, while the free energy of protein decreases. Expressions have been obtained which relate the rate constants of association, dissociation and the binding constant to the rate-constant of the nonpolar cavities transitions from the closed state to the open one, and vice versa. They gave a possibility for a qualitative interpretation of the effect of some specific and non-specific agents upon the stability of immunoglobulins, on the influence of salts upon the association and dissociation of antibody-antigene complexes and on the increase in the constant of binding between antibodies and haptens in the course of prolonged immunisation.

  9. Characterization of spontaneous air space enlargement in mice lacking microfibrillar-associated protein 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anne Trommelholt; Wulf-Johansson, Helle; Hvidsten, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) is localized to elastic fibers in blood vessels and the interalveolar septa of the lungs and is further present in bronchoalveolar lavage. Mfap4 has been previously suggested to be involved in elastogenesis in the lung. We tested this prediction and aim...

  10. Purification of Pregnancy-associated Plasma Protein-A and Preparation of Its Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Bin-yan; LI; Zi-ying; YUAN; Zhi-gang; ZHANG; Xue-feng; LIU; Yi-bing

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A(PAPP-A)is isolated from the plasma of pregnant women.It is producted by the syntrophoblast tissue of the placenta and decidual cells.PAPP-A belongs to macromolecular glycoprotein.As a sensitive serum marker,the decreased PAPP-A levels during the first

  11. The interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of the folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Schou, Christian; Babol, Linnea N.

    2011-01-01

    The folate binding protein (FBP) regulates homeostasis and intracellular trafficking of folic acid, a vitamin of decisive importance in cell division and growth. We analyzed whether interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of FBP plays a significant role in the physiology...

  12. Changes in chromatin-associated proteins of virus-infected tobacco leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telgen, van H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Symptoms of viral infections in plants often resemble disturbances in growth and development. Therefore, symptoms appear to result from an interference of the virus with the regulation of growth and development of the host plant. Particularly the non-histone chromatin- associated proteins are consid

  13. METHODS OF DETECTING PREGNANCY-ASSOCIATED PLASMA PROTEIN-A2 (PAPP-A2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides pregnancy associated plasma protein A2 (PAPP-A2), its nucleotide and amino acid sequences, antisense molecules to the nucleotide sequences which encode PAPP-A2, expression vectors for the production of purified PAPP-A2, antibodies capable of binding specifically...

  14. PREGNANCY-ASSOCIATED PLASMA PROTEIN-A2 (PAPP-A2) POLYNUCLEOTIDES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides pregnancy associated plasma protein A2 (PAPP-A2), its nucleotide and amino acid sequences antisense molecules to the nucleotide sequences which encode PAPP-A2, expression vectors for the production of purified PAPP-A2, antibodies capable of binding specifically...

  15. Associations of red meat, fat, and protein intake with distal colorectal cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christina Dawn; Satia, Jessie A; Adair, Linda S; Stevens, June; Galanko, Joseph; Keku, Temitope O; Sandler, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Studies have suggested that red and processed meat consumption elevate the risk of colon cancer; however, the relationship between red meat, as well as fat and protein, and distal colorectal cancer (CRC) specifically is not clear. We determined the risk of distal CRC associated with red and processed meat, fat, and protein intakes in Whites and African Americans. There were 945 cases (720 White, 225 African American) of distal CRC and 959 controls (800 White, 159 African American). We assessed dietary intake in the previous 12 mo. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to obtain odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). There was no association between total, saturated, or monounsaturated fat and distal CRC risk. In African Americans, the OR of distal CRC for the highest category of polyunsaturated fat intake was 0.28 (95% CI = 0.08-0.96). The percent of energy from protein was associated with a 47% risk reduction in Whites (Q4 OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.37-0.77). Red meat consumption in Whites was associated with a marginally significant risk reduction (Q4 OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.43-1.00). Our results do not support the hypotheses that fat, protein, and red meat increase the risk of distal CRC.

  16. Structural Insight into Epitopes in the Pregnancy-Associated Malaria Protein VAR2CSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P; Nielsen, MA; Resende, M

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites binding specifically to chondroitin sulfate A in the placenta. This sequestration of parasites is a major cause of low birth weight in infants and anemia in the mothers. VAR2CSA, a polymorphic multi-domain protein...

  17. Expression of multidrug resistance-associated proteins predicts prognosis in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, SLA; de Bont, ESJM; Boezen, M; vander Kolk, DM; Daenen, SMJG; Faber, KN; Kamps, WA; de Vries, EGE; Vellenga, E

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated with a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs, which can be transported by six multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP). These MRPs have strongly overlapping functional activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the exp

  18. Human FK506 binding protein 65 is associated with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Sanne Harder; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2005-01-01

    this gene hFKBP10 together with its encoded protein hFKBP65 as a novel marker associated with colorectal cancer. Analysis of 31 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 14 normal colorectal mucosa by RealTime PCR for hFKBP10 showed a significant up-regulation in tumors, when compared with normal mucosa...

  19. The characteristics of urine protein excretion in diabetic foot disease and the association with infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宏

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the characteristics of urine protein excretion in patients with diabetic foot and to analyze the changes associated with severity of infection. Methods We analyzed the profiles of 174 consecutive patients with diabetic foot,including physiological and biochemical indices and

  20. Identification of a putative protein-profile associating with tamoxifen therapy-resistance in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Umar (Arzu); J.W.M. Martens (John); J.A. Foekens (John); L. Paša-Tolić (Ljiljana); H. Kang; A.M. Timmermans (Mieke); M.P. Look (Maxime); M.E. Meijer van Gelder (Marion); N. Jaitly (Navdeep); M.A. den Bakker (Michael)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTamoxifen-resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical parameters can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that associate with tamoxifen-resistance is a first step towards

  1. Changes in chromatin-associated proteins of virus-infected tobacco leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telgen, van H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Symptoms of viral infections in plants often resemble disturbances in growth and development. Therefore, symptoms appear to result from an interference of the virus with the regulation of growth and development of the host plant. Particularly the non-histone chromatin- associated proteins

  2. Protein and fat mobilization and associations with serum beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Drift, S. G. A.; Houweling, M.; Schonewille, J. T.; Tielens, A. G. M.; Jorritsma, R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain information on variation between dairy cows in muscle and fat tissue mobilization around parturition and to study the association between protein and fat mobilization and serum beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentrations (hyperketonemia) in this period. Thirt

  3. METHODS OF DETECTING PREGNANCY-ASSOCIATED PLASMA PROTEIN-A2 (PAPP-A2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides pregnancy associated plasma protein A2 (PAPP-A2), its nucleotide and amino acid sequences, antisense molecules to the nucleotide sequences which encode PAPP-A2, expression vectors for the production of purified PAPP-A2, antibodies capable of binding specifically...

  4. Association of triclosan to casein proteins through solvent-mediated high-pressure homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, A; Dunlap, J; Harte, F

    2009-03-01

    The association of triclosan (TCS), a widely used hydrophobic compound, to the bovine casein micelle is investigated in this study. The use of high-pressure homogenization (HPH) at 0, 100, 200, and 300 MPa was introduced as a method for the dissociation of casein micelles in a skim milk/ethanol solution (1: 1, v/v) in the presence of TCS at 20, 80, and 160 mg/L where ethanol evaporation served as the final step for TCS association to caseins. The majority of TCS (over 80%) was associated with the caseins regardless of initial TCS concentration or applied pressure. TCS association to caseins was enhanced by 30% with continued pressurization to 300 MPa. Micellar dissociation and reassociation was found to be an irreversible process as evidenced by microscopy images. Pressurization to 300 MPa resulted in the formation of an integrated protein network of casein proteins and noncovalently linked whey proteins where the solubility of TCS was enhanced up to 40 times its reported water solubility at the highest initial TCS level of 160 mg/L. Reformed micelles exhibited Newtonian flow behavior at all pressure levels. This study provides evidence for the solubility enhancing quality of TCS through the solvent-mediated pressure/shear-induced dissociation of casein proteins.

  5. Association of ERCC1 protein expression to platinum resistance in epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Steffensen, Karina; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Jakobsen, Anders

    was to investigate if immunohistochemical expression of ERCC1 protein was associated with resistance to standard combination carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy in newly diagnosed ovarian cancer patients. Methods: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 101 patients with newly diagnosed ovarian...

  6. G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1), a potential biomarker in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuszynski, George P; Rothman, Vicki L; Zheng, Xiaoyi; Gutu, Mohammed; Zhang, Xinmin; Chang, Frank

    2011-10-01

    An innovative "2-D high performance liquid electrophoresis" (2-D HPLE) technology was used to identify serum biomarkers associated with the early stage of breast cancer in addition to other more advanced stages. 2-D HPLE is a newly developed electrophoretic technology that separates 100s of serum albumin complexes on a polyvinyl membrane based on their surface charges. Association of cancer proteins or their fragments (biomarkers) with pre-existing albumin complexes in the blood of cancer patients results in altered mobility on the membrane. Using 2-D HPLE we identified that a specific fragment of G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1) was present in the sera of patients with early stage disease but absent in sera of normal patients. GASP-1 has been shown to modulate lysosomal sorting and functional down-regulation of a variety of G-protein coupled receptors in neuronal cells. However, no reports have linked GASP-1 to breast cancer pathogenesis. GASP-1 was detected in tumor extracts of 7 cases of Stage 2 and Stage 3 breast cancers, but not in adjacent normal tissue as revealed by western blot analysis using an antibody developed against a GASP-1 peptide identified by our 2-D HPLE technology. Using this antibody, we immunohistochemically detected over-expression of GASP-1 in all of 107 cases of archived ductal breast carcinoma tumor samples, while normal adjacent breast tissue from 12 cases of ductal carcinoma showed little or no staining. Additionally, all 10 cases of metastatic breast carcinoma present in lymph nodes were positive. Strong positive GASP-1 staining was observed in all tumor tissue including ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma. Additionally, we observed a wide spectrum of enhanced staining of premalignant ductal epithelial cells present in benign ducts and those found in atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH). These studies identify GASP-1 as a potential new serum and tumor biomarker for breast cancer

  7. Selecting Targets for Tumor Imaging: An Overview of Cancer-Associated Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Martin C.; de Geus, Susanna W.L.; Prevoo, Hendrica A.J.M.; Hawinkels, Lukas J.A.C.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Sier, Cornelis F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor targeting is a booming business: The global therapeutic monoclonal antibody market accounted for more than $78 billion in 2012 and is expanding exponentially. Tumors can be targeted with an extensive arsenal of monoclonal antibodies, ligand proteins, peptides, RNAs, and small molecules. In addition to therapeutic targeting, some of these compounds can also be applied for tumor visualization before or during surgery, after conjugation with radionuclides and/or near-infrared fluorescent dyes. The majority of these tumor-targeting compounds are directed against cell membrane-bound proteins. Various categories of targetable membrane-bound proteins, such as anchoring proteins, receptors, enzymes, and transporter proteins, exist. The functions and biological characteristics of these proteins determine their location and distribution on the cell membrane, making them more, or less, accessible, and therefore, it is important to understand these features. In this review, we evaluate the characteristics of cancer-associated membrane proteins and discuss their overall usability for cancer targeting, especially focusing on imaging applications.

  8. Identification of Dynamic Changes in Proteins Associated with the Cellular Cytoskeleton after Exposure to Okadaic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Roepstorff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of cells to the diarrhetic shellfish poison, okadaic acid, leads to a dramatic reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture and loss of cell-cell contact. When cells are exposed to high concentrations of okadaic acid (100–500 nM, the morphological rearrangement is followed by apoptotic cell death. Okadaic acid inhibits the broad acting Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which results in hyperphosphorylation of a large number of proteins. Some of these hyperphosphorylated proteins are most likely key players in the reorganization of the cell morphology induced by okadaic acid. We wanted to identify these phosphoproteins and searched for them in the cellular lipid rafts, which have been found to contain proteins that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion. By using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture cells treated with okadaic acid (400 nM could be combined with control cells before the isolation of lipid rafts. Protein phosphorylation events and translocations induced by okadaic acid were identified by mass spectrometry. Okadaic acid was shown to regulate the phosphorylation status and location of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton, microtubules and cell adhesion structures. A large number of these okadaic acid-regulated proteins have previously also been shown to be similarly regulated prior to cell proliferation and migration. Our results suggest that okadaic acid activates general cell signaling pathways that induce breakdown of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment.

  9. The delicate balance between secreted protein folding and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation in human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Christopher J; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    Protein folding is a complex, error-prone process that often results in an irreparable protein by-product. These by-products can be recognized by cellular quality control machineries and targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation. The folding of proteins in the secretory pathway adds another layer to the protein folding "problem," as the endoplasmic reticulum maintains a unique chemical environment within the cell. In fact, a growing number of diseases are attributed to defects in secretory protein folding, and many of these by-products are targeted for a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Since its discovery, research on the mechanisms underlying the ERAD pathway has provided new insights into how ERAD contributes to human health during both normal and diseases states. Links between ERAD and disease are evidenced from the loss of protein function as a result of degradation, chronic cellular stress when ERAD fails to keep up with misfolded protein production, and the ability of some pathogens to coopt the ERAD pathway. The growing number of ERAD substrates has also illuminated the differences in the machineries used to recognize and degrade a vast array of potential clients for this pathway. Despite all that is known about ERAD, many questions remain, and new paradigms will likely emerge. Clearly, the key to successful disease treatment lies within defining the molecular details of the ERAD pathway and in understanding how this conserved pathway selects and degrades an innumerable cast of substrates.

  10. Protein Network Signatures Associated with Exogenous Biofuels Treatments in Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Guangsheng; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiangxin; Qiao, Jianjun; Zhang, Weiwen

    2014-01-01

    Although recognized as a promising microbial cell factory for producing biofuels, current productivity in cyanobacterial systems is low. To make the processes economically feasible, one of the hurdles, which need to be overcome is the low tolerance of hosts to toxic biofuels. Meanwhile, little information is available regarding the cellular responses to biofuels stress in cyanobacteria, which makes it challenging for tolerance engineering. Using large proteomic datasets of Synechocystis under various biofuels stress and environmental perturbation, a protein co-expression network was first constructed and then combined with the experimentally determined protein-protein interaction network. Proteins with statistically higher topological overlap in the integrated network were identified as common responsive proteins to both biofuels stress and environmental perturbations. In addition, a weighted gene co-expression network analysis was performed to distinguish unique responses to biofuels from those to environmental perturbations and to uncover metabolic modules and proteins uniquely associated with biofuels stress. The results showed that biofuel-specific proteins and modules were enriched in several functional categories, including photosynthesis, carbon fixation, and amino acid metabolism, which may represent potential key signatures for biofuels stress responses in Synechocystis. Network-based analysis allowed determination of the responses specifically related to biofuels stress, and the results constituted an important knowledge foundation for tolerance engineering against biofuels in Synechocystis.

  11. Concentration-Induced Association in a Protein System Caused by a Highly Directional Patch Attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weimin; Persson, Björn A; Lund, Mikael; Bergenholtz, Johan; Zackrisson Oskolkova, Malin

    2016-09-01

    Self-association of the protein lactoferrin is studied in solution using small-angle X-ray scattering techniques. Effective static structure factors have been shown to exhibit either a monotonic or a nonmonotonic dependence on protein concentration in the small wavevector limit, depending on salt concentration. The behavior correlates with a nonmonotonic dependence of the second virial coefficient on salt concentration, such that a maximum appears in the structure factor at a low protein concentration when the second virial coefficient is negative and close to a minimum. The results are interpreted in terms of an integral equation theory with explicit dimers, formulated by Wertheim, which provides a consistent framework able to explain the behavior in terms of a monomer-dimer equilibrium that appears because of a highly directional patch attraction. Short attraction ranges preclude trimer formation, which explains why the protein system behaves as if it were subject to a concentration-dependent isotropic protein-protein attraction. Superimposing an isotropic interaction, comprising screened Coulomb repulsion and van der Waals attraction, on the patch attraction allows for a semiquantitative modeling of the complete transition pathway from monomers in the dilute limit to monomer-dimer systems at somewhat higher protein concentrations.

  12. Angiogenesis-associated crosstalk between collagens, CXC chemokines, and thrombospondin domain-containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Corban G; Bader, Joel S; Popel, Aleksander S

    2011-08-01

    Excessive vascularization is a hallmark of many diseases including cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetic nephropathy, pathologic obesity, age-related macular degeneration, and asthma. Compounds that inhibit angiogenesis represent potential therapeutics for many diseases. Karagiannis and Popel [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 105(37):13775-13780, 2008] used a bioinformatics approach to identify more than 100 peptides with sequence homology to known angiogenesis inhibitors. The peptides could be grouped into families by the conserved domain of the proteins they were derived from. The families included type IV collagen fibrils, CXC chemokine ligands, and type I thrombospondin domain-containing proteins. The relationships between these families have received relatively little attention. To investigate these relationships, we approached the problem by placing the families of proteins in the context of the human interactome including >120,000 physical interactions among proteins, genes, and transcripts. We built on a graph theoretic approach to identify proteins that may represent conduits of crosstalk between protein families. We validated these findings by statistical analysis and analysis of a time series gene expression data set taken during angiogenesis. We identified six proteins at the center of the angiogenesis-associated network including three syndecans, MMP9, CD44, and versican. These findings shed light on the complex signaling networks that govern angiogenesis phenomena.

  13. Salivary proteins associated with periodontitis in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hang Haw; Rahim, Zubaidah H A; Jessie, Kala; Hashim, Onn H; Taiyeb-Ali, Tara B

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the salivary proteins that are associated with periodontitis in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Volunteers for the study were patients from the Diabetic Unit, University of Malaya Medical Centre, whose periodontal status was determined. The diabetic volunteers were divided into two groups, i.e., patients with periodontitis and those who were periodontally healthy. Saliva samples were collected and treated with 10% TCA/acetone/20 mM DTT to precipitate the proteins, which were then separated using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel images were scanned using the GS-800(TM) Calibrated Densitometer. The protein spots were analyzed and expressed in percentage volumes. The percentage volume of each protein spot was subjected to Mann-Whitney statistical analysis using SPSS software and false discovery rate correction. When the expression of the salivary proteins was compared between the T2DM patients with periodontitis with those who were periodontally healthy, seven proteins, including polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, plastin-2, actin related protein 3, leukocyte elastase inhibitor, carbonic anhydrases 6, immunoglobulin J and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, were found to be differentially expressed (p periodontitis.

  14. High intakes of protein and processed meat associate with increased incidence of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Gullberg, Bo; Hellstrand, Sophie; Hindy, George; Wirfält, Elisabet; Orho-Melander, Marju

    2013-03-28

    Diets high in protein have shown positive effects on short-term weight reduction and glycaemic control. However, the understanding of how dietary macronutrient composition relates to long-term risk of type 2 diabetes is limited. The aim of the present study was to examine intakes of macronutrients, fibre and protein sources in relation to incident type 2 diabetes. In total, 27 140 individuals, aged 45-74 years, from the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort, were included. Dietary data were collected with a modified diet history method, including registration of cooked meals. During 12 years of follow-up, 1709 incident type 2 diabetes cases were identified. High protein intake was associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio (HR) 1.27 for highest compared with lowest quintile; 95 % CI 1.08, 1.49; P for trend = 0.01). When protein consumption increased by 5 % of energy at the expense of carbohydrates (HR 1.20; 95 % CI 1.09, 1.33) or fat (HR 1.21; 95 % CI 1.09, 1.33), increased diabetes risk was observed. Intakes in the highest quintiles of processed meat (HR 1.16; 95 % CI 1.00, 1.36; P for trend = 0.01) and eggs (HR 1.21; 95 % CI 1.04, 1.41; P for trend = 0.02) were associated with increased risk. Intake of fibre-rich bread and cereals was inversely associated with type 2 diabetes (HR 0.84; 95 % CI 0.73, 0.98; P for trend = 0.004). In conclusion, results from the present large population-based prospective study indicate that high protein intake is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Replacing protein with carbohydrates may be favourable, especially if fibre-rich breads and cereals are chosen as carbohydrate sources.

  15. Rapamycin-binding FKBP25 associates with diverse proteins that form large intracellular entities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galat, Andrzej, E-mail: galat@dsvidf.cea.fr; Thai, Robert

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The hFKBP25 interacts with diverse components of macromolecular entities. • We show that the endogenous human FKBP25 is bound to polyribosomes. • The endogenous hFKBP25 co-immunoprecipitated with nucleosomal proteins. • FKBP25 could induce conformational switch in macromolecular complexes. - Abstract: In this paper, we show some evidence that a member of the FK506-binding proteins, FKBP25 is associated to diverse components that are part of several different intracellular large-molecular mass entities. The FKBP25 is a high-affinity rapamycin-binding immunophilin, which has nuclear translocation signals present in its PPIase domain but it was detected both in the cytoplasm compartment and in the nuclear proteome. Analyses of antiFKBP25-immunoprecipitated proteins have revealed that the endogenous FKBP25 is associated to the core histones of the nucleosome, and with several proteins forming spliceosomal complexes and ribosomal subunits. Using polyclonal antiFKBP25 we have detected FKBP25 associated with polyribosomes. Added RNAs or 0.5 M NaCl release FKBP25 that was associated with the polyribosomes indicating that the immunophilin has an intrinsic capacity to form complexes with polyribonucleotides via its charged surface patches. Rapamycin or FK506 treatments of the polyribosomes isolated from porcine brain, HeLa and K568 cells caused a residual release of the endogenous FKBP25, which suggests that the immunophilin also binds to some proteins via its PPIase cavity. Our proteomics study indicates that the nuclear pool of the FKBP25 targets various nuclear proteins that are crucial for packaging of DNA, chromatin remodeling and pre-mRNA splicing whereas the cytosolic pool of this immunophilin is bound to some components of the ribosome.

  16. Differential association of protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welting, Tim J M; Kikkert, Bastiaan J; van Venrooij, Walther J; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2006-07-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in nucleolar and mitochondrial RNA processing events. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein particle, which is structurally related to RNase P, an endoribonuclease involved in pre-tRNA processing. Most of the protein components of RNase MRP have been reported to be associated with RNase P as well. In this study we determined the association of these protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P particles by glycerol gradient sedimentation and coimmunoprecipitation. In agreement with previous studies, RNase MRP sedimented at 12S and 60-80S. In contrast, only a single major peak was observed for RNase P at 12S. The analysis of individual protein subunits revealed that hPop4 (also known as Rpp29), Rpp21, Rpp20, and Rpp25 only sedimented in 12S fractions, whereas hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 were also found in 60-80S fractions. In agreement with their cosedimentation with RNase P RNA in the 12S peak, coimmunoprecipitation with VSV-epitope-tagged protein subunits revealed that hPop4, Rpp21, and in addition Rpp14 preferentially associate with RNase P. These data show that hPop4, Rpp21, and Rpp14 may not be associated with RNase MRP. Furthermore, Rpp20 and Rpp25 appear to be associated with only a subset of RNase MRP particles, in contrast to hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 (and possibly also hPop5), which are probably associated with all RNase MRP complexes. Our data are consistent with a transient association of Rpp20 and Rpp25 with RNase MRP, which may be inversely correlated to its involvement in pre-rRNA processing.

  17. Downregulation of the microtubule associated protein tau impairs process outgrowth and myelin basic protein mRNA transport in oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiberlich, Veronika; Bauer, Nina G; Schwarz, Lisa; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Goldbaum, Olaf; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelin forming cells of the CNS, are characterized by their numerous membranous extensions, which enwrap neuronal axons and form myelin sheaths. During differentiation oligodendrocytes pass different morphological stages, downregulate the expression of the proteoglycan NG2, and acquire major myelin specific proteins, such as myelin basic proteins (MBP) and proteolipid protein. MBP mRNA is transported in RNA granules along the microtubules (MTs) to the periphery and translated locally. MTs participate in the elaboration and stabilization of the myelin forming extensions and are essential for cellular sorting processes. Their dynamic properties are regulated by microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). The MAP tau is present in oligodendrocytes and involved in the regulation and stabilization of the MT network. To further elucidate the functional significance of tau in oligodendrocytes, we have downregulated tau by siRNA technology and studied the effects on cell differentiation and neuron-glia contact formation. The data show that tau knockdown impairs process outgrowth and leads to a decrease in MBP expression. Furthermore, MBP mRNA transport to distant cellular extensions is impaired and cells remain in the NG2 stage. In myelinating cocultures with dorsal root ganglion neurons, oligodendrocyte precursor cells after tau miR RNA lentiviral knockdown develop into NG2 positive cells with very long and thin processes, contacting axons loosely, but fail to form internodes. This demonstrates that tau is important for MBP mRNA transport and involved in process formation. The disturbance of the balance of tau leads to abnormalities in oligodendrocyte differentiation, neuron-glia contact formation and the early myelination process.

  18. Meckel-Gruber syndrome protein MKS3 is required for endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation of surfactant protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Bridges, James P; Na, Cheng-Lun; Xu, Yan; Weaver, Timothy E

    2009-11-27

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the SFTPC gene are associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a progressive lethal interstitial lung disease. Mutations that cause misfolding of the encoded proprotein surfactant protein C (SP-C) trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation, a pathway that segregates terminally misfolded substrate for retrotranslocation to the cytosol and degradation by proteasome. Microarray screens for genes involved in SP-C ER-associated degradation identified MKS3/TMEM67, a locus previously linked to the ciliopathy Meckel-Gruber syndrome. In this study, MKS3 was identified as a membrane glycoprotein predominantly localized to the ER. Expression of MKS3 was up-regulated by genetic or pharmacological inducers of ER stress. The ER lumenal domain of MKS3 interacted with a complex that included mutant SP-C and associated chaperones, whereas the region predicted to encode the transmembrane domains of MKS3 interacted with cytosolic p97. Deletion of the transmembrane and cytosolic domains abrogated interaction of MKS3 with p97 and resulted in accumulation of mutant SP-C proprotein; knockdown of MKS3 also inhibited degradation of mutant SP-C. These results support a model in which MKS3 links the ER lumenal quality control machinery with the cytosolic degradation apparatus.

  19. Meckel-Gruber Syndrome Protein MKS3 Is Required for Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation of Surfactant Protein C*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Bridges, James P.; Na, Cheng-Lun; Xu, Yan; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the SFTPC gene are associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a progressive lethal interstitial lung disease. Mutations that cause misfolding of the encoded proprotein surfactant protein C (SP-C) trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation, a pathway that segregates terminally misfolded substrate for retrotranslocation to the cytosol and degradation by proteasome. Microarray screens for genes involved in SP-C ER-associated degradation identified MKS3/TMEM67, a locus previously linked to the ciliopathy Meckel-Gruber syndrome. In this study, MKS3 was identified as a membrane glycoprotein predominantly localized to the ER. Expression of MKS3 was up-regulated by genetic or pharmacological inducers of ER stress. The ER lumenal domain of MKS3 interacted with a complex that included mutant SP-C and associated chaperones, whereas the region predicted to encode the transmembrane domains of MKS3 interacted with cytosolic p97. Deletion of the transmembrane and cytosolic domains abrogated interaction of MKS3 with p97 and resulted in accumulation of mutant SP-C proprotein; knockdown of MKS3 also inhibited degradation of mutant SP-C. These results support a model in which MKS3 links the ER lumenal quality control machinery with the cytosolic degradation apparatus. PMID:19815549

  20. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  1. Dietary protein intake is associated with better physical function and muscle strength among elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isanejad, Masoud; Mursu, Jaakko; Sirola, Joonas; Kröger, Heikki; Rikkonen, Toni; Tuppurainen, Marjo; Erkkilä, Arja T

    2016-04-14

    Dietary protein intake might be beneficial to physical function (PF) in the elderly. We examined the cross-sectional and prospective associations of protein intake of g/kg body weight (BW), fat mass (FM) and lean mass (LM) with PF in 554 women aged 65·3-71·6 years belonging to the Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Fracture Prevention Study. Participants filled a questionnaire on lifestyle factors and 3-d food record in 2002. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and PF measures were performed at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. Sarcopaenia was defined using European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People criteria. At the baseline, women with higher protein intake (≥ 1·2 g/kg BW) had better performance in hand-grip strength/body mass (GS/BM) (P=0·001), knee extension/BM (P=0·003), one-leg stance (P=0·047), chair rise (P=0·043), squat (P=0·019), squat to the ground (P=0·001), faster walking speed for 10 m (P=0·005) and higher short physical performance battery score (P=0·004) compared with those with moderate and lower intakes (0·81-1·19 and ≤ 0·8 g/kg BW, respectively). In follow-up results, higher protein intake was associated with less decline in GS/BM, one-leg stance and tandem walk for 6 m over 3 years. Overall, results were no longer significant after controlling for FM. Associations were detected between protein intake and PF in non-sarcopaenic women but not in sarcopaenic women, except for change of GS (P=0·037). Further, FM but not LM was negatively associated with PF measures (Pprotein intake and lower FM might be positively associated with PF in elderly women.

  2. Characterization of the ectodomain of the envelope protein of dengue virus type 4: expression, membrane association, secretion and particle formation in the absence of precursor membrane protein.

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    Szu-Chia Hsieh

    Full Text Available The envelope (E of dengue virus (DENV is the major target of neutralizing antibodies and vaccine development. After biosynthesis E protein forms a heterodimer with precursor membrane (prM protein. Recent reports of infection enhancement by anti-prM monoclonal antibodies (mAbs suggest anti-prM responses could be potentially harmful. Previously, we studied a series of C-terminal truncation constructs expressing DENV type 4 prM/E or E proteins and found the ectodomain of E protein alone could be recognized by all 12 mAbs tested, suggesting E protein ectodomain as a potential subunit immunogen without inducing anti-prM response. The characteristics of DENV E protein ectodomain in the absence of prM protein remains largely unknown.In this study, we investigated the expression, membrane association, glycosylation pattern, secretion and particle formation of E protein ectodomain of DENV4 in the presence or absence of prM protein. E protein ectodomain associated with membrane in or beyond trans-Golgi and contained primarily complex glycans, whereas full-length E protein associated with ER membrane and contained high mannose glycans. In the absence of prM protein, E protein ectodomain can secrete as well as form particles of approximately 49 nm in diameter, as revealed by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation with or without detergent and electron microscopy. Mutational analysis revealed that the secretion of E protein ectodomain was affected by N-linked glycosylation and could be restored by treatment with ammonia chloride.Considering the enhancement of DENV infectivity by anti-prM antibodies, our findings provide new insights into the expression and secretion of E protein ectodomain in the absence of prM protein and contribute to future subunit vaccine design.

  3. Identification of a putative protein profile associated with tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, Annemieke M; Look, Maxime P; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E; den Bakker, Michael A; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W M; Luider, Theo M; Foekens, John A; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2009-06-01

    Tamoxifen resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that are associated with tamoxifen resistance is a first step toward better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer using nano-LC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on approximately 5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to approximately 550 ng of protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n = 24 and n = 27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag reference databases. A total of 17,263 unique peptides were identified that corresponded to 2,556 non-redundant proteins identified with > or = 2 peptides. 1,713 overlapping proteins between the two data sets were used for further analysis. Comparative proteome analysis revealed 100 putatively differentially abundant proteins between tamoxifen-sensitive and tamoxifen-resistant tumors. The presence and relative abundance for 47 differentially abundant proteins were verified by targeted nano-LC-MS/MS in a selection of unpooled, non-microdissected discovery set tumor tissue extracts. ENPP1, EIF3E, and GNB4 were significantly associated with progression-free survival upon tamoxifen treatment for recurrent disease. Differential abundance of our top discriminating protein, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, was validated by tissue microarray in an independent patient cohort (n = 156). Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer levels were

  4. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation.

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    Eugénie Ansseau

    Full Text Available Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain. Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs. Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs

  5. A genome-wide association study identifies protein quantitative trait loci (pQTLs.

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    David Melzer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence that human genetic variation influences gene expression. Genome-wide studies have revealed that mRNA levels are associated with genetic variation in or close to the gene coding for those mRNA transcripts - cis effects, and elsewhere in the genome - trans effects. The role of genetic variation in determining protein levels has not been systematically assessed. Using a genome-wide association approach we show that common genetic variation influences levels of clinically relevant proteins in human serum and plasma. We evaluated the role of 496,032 polymorphisms on levels of 42 proteins measured in 1200 fasting individuals from the population based InCHIANTI study. Proteins included insulin, several interleukins, adipokines, chemokines, and liver function markers that are implicated in many common diseases including metabolic, inflammatory, and infectious conditions. We identified eight Cis effects, including variants in or near the IL6R (p = 1.8x10(-57, CCL4L1 (p = 3.9x10(-21, IL18 (p = 6.8x10(-13, LPA (p = 4.4x10(-10, GGT1 (p = 1.5x10(-7, SHBG (p = 3.1x10(-7, CRP (p = 6.4x10(-6 and IL1RN (p = 7.3x10(-6 genes, all associated with their respective protein products with effect sizes ranging from 0.19 to 0.69 standard deviations per allele. Mechanisms implicated include altered rates of cleavage of bound to unbound soluble receptor (IL6R, altered secretion rates of different sized proteins (LPA, variation in gene copy number (CCL4L1 and altered transcription (GGT1. We identified one novel trans effect that was an association between ABO blood group and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha levels (p = 6.8x10(-40, but this finding was not present when TNF-alpha was measured using a different assay , or in a second study, suggesting an assay-specific association. Our results show that protein levels share some of the features of the genetics of gene expression. These include the presence of strong genetic effects in cis

  6. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

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    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  7. Elevated C-reactive protein levels in schizophrenia inpatients is associated with aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, R; Lobel, T; Krivoy, A; Shlosberg, D; Weizman, A; Katz, N

    2016-01-01

    An association between inflammation and behavioral domains of mental disorders is of growing interest. Recent studies reported an association between aggression and inflammation. In this study, we investigated the association between aggressive behavior and inflammatory markers in schizophrenia inpatients. Adult schizophrenia inpatients without affective symptoms (n=213) were retrospectively identified and categorized according to their C-reactive protein measurement at admission as either elevated (CRP>1 mg/dL; n=57) or normal (CRPinflammation including leukocyte count and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (r=0.387, Pinflammation) of a specific behavioral endophenotype (aggression) in schizophrenia inpatients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Physical interaction with Yes-associated protein enhances p73 transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, S; Munarriz, E; Rossi, M; Castagnoli, L; Shaul, Y; Sacchi, A; Oren, M; Sudol, M; Cesareni, G; Blandino, G

    2001-05-04

    Specific protein-protein interactions are involved in a large number of cellular processes and are mainly mediated by structurally and functionally defined domains. Here we report that the nuclear phosphoprotein p73 can engage in a physical association with the Yes-associated protein (YAP). This association occurs under physiological conditions as shown by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation of complexes from lysates of P19 cells. The WW domain of YAP and the PPPPY motif of p73 are directly involved in the association. Furthermore, as required for ligands to group I WW domains, the terminal tyrosine (Y) of the PPPPY motif of p73 was shown to be essential for the association with YAP. Unlike p73alpha, p73beta, and p63alpha, which bind to YAP, the endogenous as well as exogenously expressed wild-type p53 (wt-p53) and the p73gamma isoform do not interact with YAP. Indeed, we documented that YAP interacts only with those members of the p53 family that have a well conserved PPXY motif, a target sequence for WW domains. Overexpression of YAP causes an increase of p73alpha transcriptional activity. Differential interaction of YAP with members of the p53 family may provide a molecular explanation for their functional divergence in signaling.

  9. Expression of metastasis-associated protein 3 in human brain glioma related to tumor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shouqin; Hui, Guangyan; Hou, Fanggao; Shi, Hua; Zhou, Guoqing; Yan, Han; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jinfeng

    2015-10-01

    Glioma represents a disparate group of tumors characterized by high invasion ability, and therefore it is of clinical significance to identify molecular markers and therapeutic targets for better clinical management. Previously, metastasis-associated protein family (MTA) is considered to promote tumor cell invasion and metastasis of human malignancies. Recently, the newly identified MTA3 has been shown to play conflicting roles in human malignancies, while the expression pattern and potential clinical significance of MTA3 in human glioma have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we investigated the protein expression of MTA3 by immunohistochemistry assay and analyzed its association with glioma prognosis in 186 cases of patients. Results showed that MTA3 expression was decreased in glioma compared with that in normal brain (P human glioma and negatively associated with prognosis of patients, suggesting that MTA3 may play a tumor suppressor role in glioma.

  10. Amphotropic murine leukaemia virus envelope protein is associated with cholesterol-rich microdomains

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    Pedersen Lene

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol-rich microdomains like lipid rafts were recently identified as regions within the plasma membrane, which play an important role in the assembly and budding of different viruses, e.g., measles virus and human immunodeficiency virus. For these viruses association of newly synthesized viral proteins with lipid rafts has been shown. Results Here we provide evidence for the association of the envelope protein (Env of the 4070A isolate of amphotropic murine leukaemia virus (A-MLV with lipid rafts. Using density gradient centrifugation and immunocytochemical analyses, we show that Env co-localizes with cholesterol, ganglioside GM1 and caveolin-1 in these specific regions of the plasma membrane. Conclusions These results show that a large amount of A-MLV Env is associated with lipid rafts and suggest that cholesterol-rich microdomains are used as portals for the exit of A-MLV.

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Heat Shock Protein 70 Genes are Positively Associated with Human Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvraa, Steen; Bross, Peter Gerd;

    2010-01-01

    with longevity. The involvement of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in cellular maintenance and repair mechanisms, including its role as an anti-inflammatory protein, makes it a suitable candidate for studying such associations. We have studied the association of three single nucleotide polymorphisms, HSPA1A (-110A...... the opportunity to perform survival analysis on these subjects. Haplotype relative risk, and genotype relative risk were calculated to measure the effects of haplotypes and genotypes on human survival in a sex-specific manner. A significant association of HSPA1A-AA (RR=3.864; p=0.016) and HSPA1B-AA (RR=2.764; p=0...... observations from heat shock response (HSR) study where we had shown that after heat stimulation, mononuclear cells from the carriers of genotype HSPA1L-TT had better HSR than cells with the HSPA1L-CC genotype....

  12. Characterizing the Escherichia coli O157:H7 proteome including protein associations with higher order assemblies.

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    Rembert Pieper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The recent outbreak of severe infections with Shiga toxin (Stx producing Escherichia coli (STEC serotype O104:H4 highlights the need to understand horizontal gene transfer among E. coli strains, identify novel virulence factors and elucidate their pathogenesis. Quantitative shotgun proteomics can contribute to such objectives, allowing insights into the part of the genome translated into proteins and the connectivity of biochemical pathways and higher order assemblies of proteins at the subcellular level. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined protein profiles in cell lysate fractions of STEC strain 86-24 (serotype O157:H7, following growth in cell culture or bacterial isolation from intestines of infected piglets, in the context of functionally and structurally characterized biochemical pathways of E. coli. Protein solubilization in the presence of Triton X-100, EDTA and high salt was followed by size exclusion chromatography into the approximate M(r ranges greater than 280 kDa, 280-80 kDa and 80-10 kDa. Peptide mixtures resulting from these and the insoluble fraction were analyzed by quantitative 2D-LC-nESI-MS/MS. Of the 2521 proteins identified at a 1% false discovery rate, representing 47% of all predicted E. coli O157:H7 gene products, the majority of integral membrane proteins were enriched in the high M(r fraction. Hundreds of proteins were enriched in a M(r range higher than that predicted for a monomer supporting their participation in protein complexes. The insoluble STEC fraction revealed enrichment of aggregation-prone proteins, including many that are part of large structure/function entities such as the ribosome, cytoskeleton and O-antigen biosynthesis cluster. SIGNIFICANCE: Nearly all E. coli O157:H7 proteins encoded by prophage regions were expressed at low abundance levels or not detected. Comparative quantitative analyses of proteins from distinct cell lysate fractions allowed us to associate uncharacterized

  13. The selective biotin tagging and thermolysin proteolysis of chloroplast outer envelope proteins reveals information on protein topology and association into complexes

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    Hélène eHardré

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of chloroplast function requires the precise localization of proteins in each of its sub-compartments. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry has allowed the inventory of proteins in thylakoid, stroma and envelope fractions. Concerning membrane association, proteins can be either integral or peripheral or even soluble proteins bound transiently to a membrane complex. We sought a method providing information at the surface of the outer envelope membrane (OEM, based on specific tagging with biotin or proteolysis using thermolysin, a non-membrane permeable protease. To evaluate this method, envelope, thylakoid and stroma proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and analyzed by immunostaining and mass spectrometry. A short selection of proteins associated to the chloroplast envelope fraction was checked after superficial treatments of intact chloroplasts. We showed that this method could allow the characterization of OEM embedded proteins facing the cytosol, as well as peripheral and soluble proteins associated via tight or lose interactions. Some stromal proteins were associated with biotinylated spots and analyzes are still needed to determine whether polypeptides were tagged prior import or if they co-migrated with OEM proteins. This method also suggests that some proteins associated with the inner envelope membrane (IEM might need the integrity of a trans-envelope (IEM-OEM protein complex (e.g. division ring-forming components or at least an intact OEM partner. Following this evaluation, proteomic analyzes should be refined and the putative role of inter-membrane space components stabilizing trans-envelope complexes demonstrated. For future comprehensive studies, perspectives include the dynamic analyses of OEM proteins and IEM-OEM complexes in various physiological contexts and using virtually any other purified membrane organelle.

  14. Association of dopamine D(3) receptors with actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Chuanyu; Weingarten, Paul; Bunzow, James R; Grandy, David K; Zhou, Qun Yong

    2002-03-01

    Proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors have been identified as regulators of receptor localization and signaling. In our previous studies, a cytoskeletal protein, actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280), was found to associate with the third cytoplasmic loop of dopamine D(2) receptors. In this study, we demonstrate that ABP-280 also interacts with dopamine D(3) receptors, but not with D(4) receptors. Similar to the dopamine D(2) receptor, the D(3)/ABP-280 association is of signaling importance. In human melanoma M2 cells lacking ABP-280, D(3) receptors were unable to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) production significantly. D(4) receptors, however, exhibited a similar degree of inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in ABP-280-deficient M2 cells and ABP-280-replent M2 subclones (A7 cells). Further experiments revealed that the D(3)/ABP-280 interaction was critically dependent upon a 36 amino acid carboxyl domain of the D(3) receptor third loop, which is conserved in the D(2) receptor but not in the D(4) receptor. Our results demonstrate a subtype-specific regulation of dopamine D(2)-family receptor signaling by the cytoskeletal protein ABP-280.

  15. Cyclase-associated proteins: CAPacity for linking signal transduction and actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubberstey, Andrew V; Mottillo, Emilio P

    2002-04-01

    Many extracellular signals elicit changes in the actin cytoskeleton, which are mediated through an array of signaling proteins and pathways. One family of proteins that plays a role in regulating actin remodeling in response to cellular signals are the cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs). CAPs are highly conserved monomeric actin binding proteins present in a wide range of organisms including yeast, fly, plants, and mammals. The original CAP was isolated as a component of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex that serves as an effector of Ras during nutritional signaling. CAPs are multifunctional molecules that contain domains involved in actin binding, adenylyl cyclase association in yeast, SH3 binding, and oligomerization. Genetic studies in yeast have implicated CAPs in vesicle trafficking and endocytosis. CAPs play a developmental role in multicellular organisms, and studies of Drosophila have illuminated the importance of the actin cytoskeleton during eye development and in establishing oocyte polarity. This review will highlight the critical structural and functional domains of CAPs, describe recent studies that have implied important roles for these proteins in linking cell signaling with actin polymerization, and highlight their roles in vesicle trafficking and development.

  16. The role of myristoylation in the membrane association of the Lassa virus matrix protein Z

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    Eichler Robert

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Z protein is the matrix protein of arenaviruses and has been identified as the main driving force for budding. Both LCMV and Lassa virus Z proteins bud from cells in the absence of other viral proteins as enveloped virus-like particles. Z accumulates near the inner surface of the plasma membrane where budding takes place. Furthermore, biochemical data have shown that Z is strongly membrane associated. The primary sequence of Z lacks a typical transmembrane domain and until now it is not understood by which mechanism Z is able to interact with cellular membranes. In this report, we analyzed the role of N-terminal myristoylation for the membrane binding of Lassa virus Z. We show that disruption of the N-terminal myristoylation signal by substituting the N-terminal glycine with alanine (Z-G2A mutant resulted in a significant reduction of Z protein association with cellular membranes. Furthermore, removal of the myristoylation site resulted in a relocalization of Z from a punctuate distribution to a more diffuse cellular distribution pattern. Finally, treatment of Lassa virus-infected cells with various myristoylation inhibitors drastically reduced efficient Lassa virus replication. Our data indicate that myristoylation of Z is critical for its binding ability to lipid membranes and thus, for effective virus budding.

  17. Evaluation of protein intake and physical activity associated with sarcopenia in the elderly

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    Gloria Gabriela Peña-Ordóñez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the association between protein intake and physical activity with sarcopenia of the elderly. Older people are a vulnerable group and are easily reflected in their nutritional status, most do not cover their nutritional requirements and are physically inactive. A protein intake <1.2 g/kg/day and a low level of physical activity (<3.5 MET are factors associated with sarcopenia. Material and Methods: Observational, analytical, prospective, case-control study. Sampling was done for convenience in patients over 60 years of service outpatient Medical Center Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Toluca, Mexico. Questionnaires were used to determine protein intake and physical activity, and diagnostic tests for Sarcopenia (percentage of muscle mass, strength and speed Manual operation. 115 subjects were enrolled but 110 (55 cases and 55 controls were included. Results: The odds ratio (OR of the variables was obtained, finding that for every gram of total protein intake of 3% reduces the risk of sarcopenia and per unit of percent fat increases the risk by 20%. No statistically significant difference was found in physical activity, there is homogeneity between cases and controls regarding MET consumed. Conclusions: Protein intake is a protective factor against sarcopenia and excessive accumulation of fat is a risk factor for this disorder. It is important to further investigate the relationship between the two in older adults.

  18. The Association Between Peritoneal Charge Barrier Dysfunction and Protein Lost During Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

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    Guo-Qing Yu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The main purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of peritoneal charge barrier dysfunction on hypoalbuminemia during CAPD. Methods: We measured the association of dialysis dose, peritoneal equilibration test (PET results (ratio of dialysate and plasma creatinine, and peritoneal charge barrier index (ratio of pancreatic and salivary α-amylase clearance on protein loss in 33 patients on maintenance CAPD. All patients were from a single institution and were diagnosed with chronic nephritis (n = 18 cases, diabetic nephropathy (n = 8, hypertension (n = 5, and hepatitis B virus-associated glomerulonephritis (n = 2. Results: The mean (± SD dialysate protein loss was 4.04 g (± 1.97 per day. Protein loss was positively correlated with dialysis dose (r = 0.438, p = 0.01 but was not significantly correlated with PET results. The mean (± SD peritoneal charge barrier index was 6.12 (± 21.20 and was inversely correlated with protein loss into the peritoneal dialysate (r = -0.532, p Conclusions: Taken together, our study of CAPD patients indicates that protein loss into the peritoneal dialysate increases with peritoneal dialysis dose and with disruption of the peritoneal charge barrier.

  19. The small GTP-binding protein rab4 is associated with early endosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Sluijs, P.; Hull, M.; Mellman, I. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)); Zahraoui, A.; Tavitian, A. (INSERM U 248, Paris (France)); Goud, B. (Unite de Genetique Somatique, Paris (France))

    1991-07-15

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the rab family have been implicated as playing important roles in controlling membrane traffic on the biosynthetic and endocytic pathways. The authors demonstrate that a distinct rab protein, rab4p, is associated with the population of early endosomes involved in transferrin-receptor recycling. An antibody to human rab4p was found to detect a doublet of {approx} 24-kDa proteins on immunoblots from various cell types. Seventy-five percent of these proteins were tightly membrane bound and could be released only by detergent treatment. Upon isolation of early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes, by free-flow electrophoresis and Percoll density-gradient centrifugation, most (70%) of the rab4p was found to cofractionate with early endosomes and endocytic vesicles containing {sup 125}-labeled transferrin. The rab proteins previously localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi apparatus were not found in these fractions. They also localized rab4p to tansferrin-receptor-containing early endosomes by immunofluorescence after expression of rab4p cDNA. The association of rab4p with early endosomes and other vesicles involved in the intracellular tansport of transferrin receptor suggests that rab4p may play a role in regulating the pathway of receptor recycling.

  20. Animal Models of Congenital Cardiomyopathies Associated With Mutations in Z-Line Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac Z-line at the boundary between sarcomeres is a multiprotein complex connecting the contractile apparatus with the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The Z-line is important for efficient force generation and transmission as well as the maintenance of structural stability and integrity. Furthermore, it is a nodal point for intracellular signaling, in particular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. Mutations in various genes encoding Z-line proteins have been associated with different cardiomyopathies, including dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction, and mutations even within the same gene can cause widely different pathologies. Animal models have contributed to a great advancement in the understanding of the physiological function of Z-line proteins and the pathways leading from mutations in Z-line proteins to cardiomyopathy, although genotype-phenotype prediction remains a great challenge. This review presents an overview of the currently available animal models for Z-line and Z-line associated proteins involved in human cardiomyopathies with special emphasis on knock-in and transgenic mouse models recapitulating the clinical phenotypes of human cardiomyopathy patients carrying mutations in Z-line proteins. Pros and cons of mouse models will be discussed and a future outlook will be given. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 38-52, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The Tobacco mosaic virus Movement Protein Associates with but Does Not Integrate into Biological Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, Ana; Martínez-Gil, Luis; Tamborero, Silvia; Pallás, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plant positive-strand RNA viruses require association with plant cell endomembranes for viral translation and replication, as well as for intra- and intercellular movement of the viral progeny. The membrane association and RNA binding of the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) are vital for orchestrating the macromolecular network required for virus movement. A previously proposed topological model suggests that TMV MP is an integral membrane protein with two putative α-helical transmembrane (TM) segments. Here we tested this model using an experimental system that measured the efficiency with which natural polypeptide segments were inserted into the ER membrane under conditions approximating the in vivo situation, as well as in planta. Our results demonstrated that the two hydrophobic regions (HRs) of TMV MP do not span biological membranes. We further found that mutations to alter the hydrophobicity of the first HR modified membrane association and precluded virus movement. We propose a topological model in which the TMV MP HRs intimately associate with the cellular membranes, allowing maximum exposure of the hydrophilic domains of the MP to the cytoplasmic cellular components. IMPORTANCE To facilitate plant viral infection and spread, viruses encode one or more movement proteins (MPs) that interact with ER membranes. The present work investigated the membrane association of the 30K MP of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and the results challenge the previous topological model, which predicted that the TMV MP behaves as an integral membrane protein. The current data provide greatly needed clarification of the topological model and provide substantial evidence that TMV MP is membrane associated only at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane and that neither of its domains is integrated into the membrane or translocated into the lumen. Understanding the topology of MPs in the ER is vital for understanding the role of the ER in plant virus transport

  2. Expression of CAF-Related Proteins Is Associated with Histologic Grade of Breast Phyllodes Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Min Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of cancer-associated fibroblast- (CAF- related proteins and the implications in breast phyllodes tumor (PT. Methods. Tissue microarrays of 194 PT cases (151 benign PT, 27 borderline PT, and 16 malignant PT were constructed. We performed immunohistochemical staining for CAF-related proteins (podoplanin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, FAPα, S100A4, PDGFR α/β, and NG2 and analyzed the results according to clinicopathologic parameters. Results. Expression of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ in the stromal component increased with increasing histologic grade of PT (p=0.003 and p=0.034, resp.. Among clinicopathologic parameters, only expression of FAPα in stroma was associated with distant metastasis (p=0.002. In univariate analysis, stromal expression of PDGFRα was associated with shorter overall survival (p=0.002. In Cox multivariate analysis, stromal overgrowth and PDGFRα stromal positivity were associated with shorter overall survival (p=0.006 and p=0.050, resp.. Furthermore, expression of PDGFRβ in stroma was associated with shorter overall survival in patients with malignant PT (p=0.041. Conclusion. Stromal expression of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ increased with increasing histologic grade of PT. In addition, PDGFR stromal positivity was associated with shorter overall survival. These results suggest that CAFs are associated with breast PT progression.

  3. Expression of CAF-Related Proteins Is Associated with Histologic Grade of Breast Phyllodes Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Yu Kyung; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of cancer-associated fibroblast- (CAF-) related proteins and the implications in breast phyllodes tumor (PT). Methods. Tissue microarrays of 194 PT cases (151 benign PT, 27 borderline PT, and 16 malignant PT) were constructed. We performed immunohistochemical staining for CAF-related proteins (podoplanin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, FAPα, S100A4, PDGFR α/β, and NG2) and analyzed the results according to clinicopathologic parameters. Results. Expression of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ in the stromal component increased with increasing histologic grade of PT (p = 0.003 and p = 0.034, resp.). Among clinicopathologic parameters, only expression of FAPα in stroma was associated with distant metastasis (p = 0.002). In univariate analysis, stromal expression of PDGFRα was associated with shorter overall survival (p = 0.002). In Cox multivariate analysis, stromal overgrowth and PDGFRα stromal positivity were associated with shorter overall survival (p = 0.006 and p = 0.050, resp.). Furthermore, expression of PDGFRβ in stroma was associated with shorter overall survival in patients with malignant PT (p = 0.041). Conclusion. Stromal expression of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ increased with increasing histologic grade of PT. In addition, PDGFR stromal positivity was associated with shorter overall survival. These results suggest that CAFs are associated with breast PT progression.

  4. Are C-Reactive Protein Associated Genetic Variants Associated with Serum Levels and Retinal Markers of Microvascular Pathology in Asian Populations from Singapore?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Dorajoo (Rajkumar); R. Li (Rui); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); J. Liu (Jinhua); P. Froguel (Philippe); J.J. Lee (Jessica); X. Sim (Xueling); R.T.H. Ong (Rick Twee-Hee); W.-T. Tay; C. Peng (Cheng); T.L. Young (Terri); A.I.F. Blakemore (Alexandra); C.-Y. Cheng; T. Aung (Tin); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); R.J. Klein (Robert); D.S. Siscovick (David); R.A. Jensen (Richard); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); T.Y. Wong (Tien); E.S. Tai (Shyong); C.K. Heng (Chew-Kiat); Y. Friedlander (Yechiel)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction:C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are associated with cardiovascular disease and systemic inflammation. We assessed whether CRP-associated loci were associated with serum CRP and retinal markers of microvascular disease, in Asian populations.Methods:Genome-wide association ana

  5. Phosphorylation of anchoring protein by calmodulin protein kinase associated to the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit fast-twitch muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, E; Sacchetto, R; Margreth, A

    2000-12-09

    Regulatory phosphorylation of phospholamban and of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase SERCA2a isoform by endogenous CaM-K II in slow-twitch skeletal and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is well documented, but much less is known of the exact functional role of CaM K II in fast-twitch muscle SR. Recently, it was shown that RNA splicing of brain-specific alpha CaM K II, gives rise to a truncated protein (alpha KAP), consisting mainly of the association domain, serving to anchor CaM K II to SR membrane in rat skeletal muscle [Bayer, K.-U., et al. (1998) EMBO J. 19, 5598-5605]. In the present study, we searched for the presence of alpha KAP in sucrose-density purified SR membrane fractions from representative fast-twitch and slow-twitch limb muscles, both of the rabbit and the rat, using immunoblot techniques and antibody directed against the association domain of alpha CaM K II. Putative alpha KAP was immunodetected as a 23-kDa electrophoretic component on SDS-PAGE of the isolated SR from fast-twitch but not from slow-twitch muscle, and was further identified as a specific substrate of endogenous CaM K II, in the rabbit. Immunodetected, (32)P-labeled, non-calmodulin binding protein, behaved as a single 23-kDa protein species under several electrophoretic conditions. The 23-kDa protein, with defined properties, was isolated as a complex with 60-kDa delta CaM K II isoform, by sucrose-density sedimentation analysis. Moreover, we show here that putative alphaKAP, in spite of its inability to bind CaM in ligand blot overlay, co-eluted with delta CaM K II from CaM-affinity columns. That raises the question of whether CaM K II-mediated phosphorylation of alpha KAP and triadin together might be involved in a molecular signaling pathway important for SR Ca(2+)-release in fast-twitch muscle SR.

  6. Development of a Novel Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Binding Assay to Study the Association of Plakins with Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Bertrand; Begré, Nadja; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Borradori, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are fundamental for most biological processes, such as the formation of cellular structures and enzymatic complexes or in signaling pathways. The identification and characterization of protein-protein interactions are therefore essential for understanding the mechanisms and regulation of biological systems. The organization and dynamics of the cytoskeleton, as well as its anchorage to specific sites in the plasma membrane and organelles, are regulated by the plakins. These structurally related proteins anchor different cytoskeletal networks to each other and/or to other cellular structures. The association of several plakins with intermediate filaments (IFs) is critical for maintenance of the cytoarchitecture. Pathogenic mutations in the genes encoding different plakins can lead to dramatic manifestations, occurring principally in the skin, striated muscle, and/or nervous system, due to cytoskeletal disorganization resulting in abnormal cell fragility. Nevertheless, it is still unclear how plakins bind to IFs, although some general rules are slowly emerging. We here describe in detail a recently developed protein-protein fluorescence binding assay, based on the production of recombinant proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and their use as fluid-phase fluorescent ligands on immobilized IF proteins. Using this method, we have been able to assess the ability of C-terminal regions of GFP-tagged plakin proteins to bind to distinct IF proteins and IF domains. This simple and sensitive technique, which is expected to facilitate further studies in this area, can also be potentially employed for any kind of protein-protein interaction studies.

  7. Non-microtubular localizations of microtubule-associated protein 6 (MAP6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Gory-Fauré

    Full Text Available MAP6 proteins (MAP6s, which include MAP6-N (also called Stable Tubule Only Polypeptide, or STOP and MAP6d1 (MAP6 domain-containing protein 1, also called STOP-Like protein 21 kD, or SL21, bind to and stabilize microtubules. MAP6 deletion in mice severely alters integrated brain functions and is associated with synaptic defects, suggesting that MAP6s may also have alternative cellular roles. MAP6s reportedly associate with the Golgi apparatus through palmitoylation of their N-terminal domain, and specific isoforms have been shown to bind actin. Here, we use heterologous systems to investigate several biochemical properties of MAP6 proteins. We demonstrate that the three N-terminal cysteines of MAP6d1 are palmitoylated by a subset of DHHC-type palmitoylating enzymes. Analysis of the subcellular localization of palmitoylated MAP6d1, including electron microscopic analysis, reveals possible localization to the Golgi and the plasma membrane but no association with the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, we observed localization of MAP6d1 to mitochondria, which requires the N-terminus of the protein but does not require palmitoylation. We show that endogenous MAP6d1 localized at mitochondria in mature mice neurons as well as at the outer membrane and in the intermembrane space of purified mouse mitochondria. Last, we found that MAP6d1 can multimerize via a microtubule-binding module. Interestingly, most of these properties of MAP6d1 are shared by MAP6-N. Together, these results describe several properties of MAP6 proteins, including their intercellular localization and multimerization activity, which may be relevant to neuronal differentiation and synaptic functions.

  8. Differential expression of apoptosis related proteins and nitric oxide synthases in Epstein Barr associated gastric carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria D Begnami; Andre L Montagnini; Andre L Vettore; Sueli Nonogaki; Mariana Brait; Alex Y Simoes-Sato; Andrea Q A Seixas; Fernando A Soares

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence of Epstein Barr virus associated gastric carcinoma (GC) in Brazil and compare the expressions of apoptosis related proteins and nitric oxide synthases between EBV positive and negative gastric carcinoma.METHODS: In situ hybridization of EBV-encoded small RNA-1 (EBER-1) and PCR was performed to identify the presence of EBV in GCs. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify expressions of bcl-2, bcl-xl, bak,bax, p53, NOS-1, NOS-2, and NOS-3 proteins in 25 EBV positive GCs and in 103 EBV negative GCS.RESULTS: 12% of the cases of GC (25/208) showed EBER-1 and EBNA-1 expression. The cases were preferentially of diffuse type with intense lymphoid infiltrate in the stroma. EBV associated GCs showed higher expression of bcl-2 protein and lower expression of bak protein than in EBV negative GCs. Indeed,expressions of NOS-1 and NOS-3 were frequently observed in EBV associated GCs.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that EBV infection may protect tumor cells from apoptosis, giving them the capacity for permanent cell cycling and proliferation.In addition, EBV positive GCs show high expression of constitutive NOS that could influence tumor progression and aggressiveness.

  9. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalinski, Eva; Bange, Gert; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard, E-mail: irmi.sinning@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, INF 328, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-09-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1 from Homo sapiens is provided. ErbB-3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1) is a member of the family of proliferation-associated 2G4 proteins (PA2G4s) and plays a role in cellular growth and differentiation. Ligand-induced activation of the transmembrane receptor ErbB3 leads to dissociation of Ebp1 from the receptor in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The non-associated protein is involved in transcriptional and translational regulation in the cell. Here, the overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Ebp1 from Homo sapiens are reported. Initially observed crystals were improved by serial seeding to single crystals suitable for data collection. The optimized crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å.

  10. Proteomic analysis of cytosolic proteins associated with petite mutations in Candida glabrata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.V. Loureiro y Penha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of superficial or deep-seated infections due to Candida glabrata has increased markedly, probably because of the low intrinsic susceptibility of this microorganism to azole antifungals and its relatively high propensity to acquire azole resistance. To determine changes in the C. glabrata proteome associated with petite mutations, cytosolic extracts from an azole-resistant petite mutant of C. glabrata induced by exposure to ethidium bromide, and from its azole-susceptible parent isolate were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteins of interest were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting or sequence tagging using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Tryptic peptides from a total of 160 Coomassie-positive spots were analyzed for each strain. Sixty-five different proteins were identified in the cytosolic extracts of the parent strain and 58 in the petite mutant. Among the proteins identified, 10 were higher in the mutant strain, whereas 23 were lower compared to the parent strain. The results revealed a significant decrease in the enzymes associated with the metabolic rate of mutant cells such as aconitase, transaldolase, and pyruvate kinase, and changes in the levels of specific heat shock proteins. Moreover, transketolase, aconitase and catalase activity measurements decreased significantly in the ethidium bromide-induced petite mutant. These data may be useful for designing experiments to obtain a better understanding of the nuclear response to impairment of mitochondrial function associated with this mutation in C. glabrata.

  11. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins in vesicle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Aimee K; Liew, Jean; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Whiteley, Marvin

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that package and deliver proteins, small molecules, and DNA to prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The molecular details of OMV biogenesis have not been fully elucidated, but peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins that tether the outer membrane to the underlying peptidoglycan have been shown to be critical for OMV formation in multiple Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, we demonstrate that the peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins OprF and OprI, but not OprL, impact production of OMVs by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, OprF does not appear to be important for tethering the outer membrane to peptidoglycan but instead impacts OMV formation through modulation of the levels of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a quorum signal previously shown by our laboratory to be critical for OMV formation. Thus, the mechanism by which OprF impacts OMV formation is distinct from that for other peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins, including OprI.

  12. A human-specific de novo protein-coding gene associated with human brain functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand whether any human-specific new genes may be associated with human brain functions, we computationally screened the genetic vulnerable factors identified through Genome-Wide Association Studies and linkage analyses of nicotine addiction and found one human-specific de novo protein-coding gene, FLJ33706 (alternative gene symbol C20orf203. Cross-species analysis revealed interesting evolutionary paths of how this gene had originated from noncoding DNA sequences: insertion of repeat elements especially Alu contributed to the formation of the first coding exon and six standard splice junctions on the branch leading to humans and chimpanzees, and two subsequent substitutions in the human lineage escaped two stop codons and created an open reading frame of 194 amino acids. We experimentally verified FLJ33706's mRNA and protein expression in the brain. Real-Time PCR in multiple tissues demonstrated that FLJ33706 was most abundantly expressed in brain. Human polymorphism data suggested that FLJ33706 encodes a protein under purifying selection. A specifically designed antibody detected its protein expression across human cortex, cerebellum and midbrain. Immunohistochemistry study in normal human brain cortex revealed the localization of FLJ33706 protein in neurons. Elevated expressions of FLJ33706 were detected in Alzheimer's brain samples, suggesting the role of this novel gene in human-specific pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. FLJ33706 provided the strongest evidence so far that human-specific de novo genes can have protein-coding potential and differential protein expression, and be involved in human brain functions.

  13. A human-specific de novo protein-coding gene associated with human brain functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand whether any human-specific new genes may be associated with human brain functions, we computationally screened the genetic vulnerable factors identified through Genome-Wide Association Studies and linkage analyses of nicotine addiction and found one human-specific de novo protein-coding gene, FLJ33706 (alternative gene symbol C20orf203. Cross-species analysis revealed interesting evolutionary paths of how this gene had originated from noncoding DNA sequences: insertion of repeat elements especially Alu contributed to the formation of the first coding exon and six standard splice junctions on the branch leading to humans and chimpanzees, and two subsequent substitutions in the human lineage escaped two stop codons and created an open reading frame of 194 amino acids. We experimentally verified FLJ33706's mRNA and protein expression in the brain. Real-Time PCR in multiple tissues demonstrated that FLJ33706 was most abundantly expressed in brain. Human polymorphism data suggested that FLJ33706 encodes a protein under purifying selection. A specifically designed antibody detected its protein expression across human cortex, cerebellum and midbrain. Immunohistochemistry study in normal human brain cortex revealed the localization of FLJ33706 protein in neurons. Elevated expressions of FLJ33706 were detected in Alzheimer's brain samples, suggesting the role of this novel gene in human-specific pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. FLJ33706 provided the strongest evidence so far that human-specific de novo genes can have protein-coding potential and differential protein expression, and be involved in human brain functions.

  14. Association of brominated proteins and changes in protein expression in the rat kidney with subcarcinogenic to carcinogenic doses of bromate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolisetty, Narendrababu [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Bull, Richard J. [MoBull Consulting, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Muralidhara, Srinivasa; Costyn, Leah J. [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Delker, Don A. [School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Guo, Zhongxian [Water Quality Office, Public Utilities Board, 608576 (Singapore); Cotruvo, Joseph A. [Joseph Cotruvo and Associates, LLC, Washington, DC 20016 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Cummings, Brian S., E-mail: bsc@rx.uga.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The water disinfection byproduct bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup −}) produces cytotoxic and carcinogenic effects in rat kidneys. Our previous studies demonstrated that BrO{sub 3}{sup −} caused sex-dependent differences in renal gene and protein expression in rats and the elimination of brominated organic carbon in their urine. The present study examined changes in renal cell apoptosis and protein expression in male and female F344 rats treated with BrO{sub 3}{sup −} and associated these changes with accumulation of 3-bromotyrosine (3-BT)-modified proteins. Rats were treated with 0, 11.5, 46 and 308 mg/L BrO{sub 3}{sup −} in drinking water for 28 days and renal sections were prepared and examined for apoptosis (TUNEL-staining), 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxoG), 3-BT, osteopontin, Kim-1, clusterin, and p-21 expression. TUNEL-staining in renal proximal tubules increased in a dose-related manner beginning at 11.5 mg BrO{sub 3}{sup −}/L in female rats and 46 mg/L in males. Increased 8-oxoG staining was observed at doses as low as 46 mg/L. Osteopontin expression also increased in a dose-related manner after treatment with 46 mg/L, in males only. In contrast, Kim-1 expression increased in a dose-related manner in both sexes, although to a greater extent in females at the highest dose. Clusterin and p21 expression also increased in a dose-related manner in both sexes. The expression of 3-BT-modified proteins only increased in male rats, following a pattern previously reported for accumulation of α-2{sub u}-globulin. Increases in apoptosis in renal proximal tubules of male and female rats at the lowest doses suggest a common mode of action for renal carcinogenesis for the two sexes that is independent of α-2{sub u}-globulin nephropathy. - Highlights: • Bromate induced nephrotoxicity in both male and female rats by similar mechanisms. • Apoptosis was seen in both male and female rats at the lowest doses tested. • Bromate-induced apoptosis correlated to 8-oxo

  15. Measurement of Binding Force between Microtubule-Associated Protein and Microtubule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chun-Hua; GUO Hong-Lian; QU E; LI Zhao-Lin; YUAN Ming; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are important proteins in cells. They can regulate the organization,dynamics and function of microtubules. We measure the binding force between microtubule and a new plant MAP, i.e. AtMAP65-1, by dual-optical tweezers. The force is obtained to be 14.6±3.5 pN from the data statistics and analysis. This force measurement is helpful to understand the function and mechanism of MAPs from the mechanical point of view and lays the groundwork for future measurements of the mechanical properties of other biological macro-molecules.

  16. Republished: Importance of carcinoma-associated fibroblast-derived proteins in clinical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcz, Gabor; Sipos, Ferenc; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnar, Bela; Yagi, Yukako

    2015-05-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) as prominent cell type of the tumour microenvironment has complex interaction with both the cancer cells and other non-neoplastic surrounding cells. The CAF-derived regulators and extracellular matrix proteins can support cancer progression by providing a protective microenvironment for the cancer cells via reduction of chemotherapy sensitivity. On the other hand, these proteins may act as powerful prognostic markers as well as potential targets of anticancer therapy. In this review, we summarise the clinical importance of the major CAF-derived signals influencing tumour behaviour and determining the outcome of chemotherapy.

  17. Importance of carcinoma-associated fibroblast-derived proteins in clinical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcz, Gabor; Sipos, Ferenc; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnar, Bela; Yagi, Yukako

    2014-12-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) as prominent cell type of the tumour microenvironment has complex interaction with both the cancer cells and other non-neoplastic surrounding cells. The CAF-derived regulators and extracellular matrix proteins can support cancer progression by providing a protective microenvironment for the cancer cells via reduction of chemotherapy sensitivity. On the other hand, these proteins may act as powerful prognostic markers as well as potential targets of anticancer therapy. In this review, we summarise the clinical importance of the major CAF-derived signals influencing tumour behaviour and determining the outcome of chemotherapy.

  18. Microfluidic screening and whole-genome sequencing identifies mutations associated with improved protein secretion by yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Mingtao; Bai, Yunpeng; Sjostrom, Staffan L.

    2015-01-01

    interest in improving its protein secretion capacity. Due to the complexity of the secretory machinery in eukaryotic cells, it is difficult to apply rational engineering for construction of improved strains. Here we used high-throughput microfluidics for the screening of yeast libraries, generated by UV...... to construct efficient cell factories for protein secretion. The combined use of microfluidics screening and whole-genome sequencing to map the mutations associated with the improved phenotype can easily be adapted for other products and cell types to identify novel engineering targets, and this approach could...

  19. Radioiodination of advenovirus-associated virus external structural proteins. [/sup 125/I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubeck, M.D.; Johnson, F.B.

    1977-12-01

    The three structural polypeptides of adenovirus-associated virus type 3 (AAV-3) were examined to determine their orientation in the viral capsid. Sepharose-bound lactoperoxidase was used to label both dense-band and major-band AAV-3 virions. All three capsid proteins (VP1, VP2, and VP3) were found to be radioiodinated by solid-state lactoperoxidase in both dense-band and major-band virus particles. These findings indicate that the three polypeptides possess sequences that are externally oriented in the virion and that, therefore, no one of the three polypeptides can be considered an exclusively internally core protein.

  20. Molecular Cloning, and Characterization of an Adenylyl Cyclase-Associated Protein from Gossypium arboreum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng; ZHAO Guo-hong; JIA Yin-hua; DU Xiong-ming

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clone CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) gene from Gossypium arboreum L. and develop a platform for expressing and purifying CAP protein, which is a base for the construction and function researches of CAP. In this work, a CAP homolog from cotton (DPL971) ovule was identified and cloned. And the cDNA sequence consisted of an open reading frame of 1416 nucleotides encoding a protein of 471 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 50.6 kDa. To gain insight on the CAP role in cotton fiber development, the cloned CAP cDNA was expressed. A significant higher yield pure protein was obtained with the chromatographic method. Further experiments showed that the purified protein can bind with the actin in vitro indicating that the recombinant cotton CAP is functional. The procedure described here produced high yield pure protein through one chromatographic step, suitable for further structure-function studies.

  1. Z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution of cytosolic and membrane-associated protein populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth M; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D

    2015-07-01

    This study introduces a technique that characterizes the spatial distribution of peripheral membrane proteins that associate reversibly with the plasma membrane. An axial scan through the cell generates a z-scan intensity profile of a fluorescently labeled peripheral membrane protein. This profile is analytically separated into membrane and cytoplasmic components by accounting for both the cell geometry and the point spread function. We experimentally validated the technique and characterized both the resolvability and stability of z-scan measurements. Furthermore, using the cellular brightness of green fluorescent protein, we were able to convert the fluorescence intensities into concentrations at the membrane and in the cytoplasm. We applied the technique to study the translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C delta 1 labeled with green fluorescent protein on ionomycin treatment. Analysis of the z-scan fluorescence profiles revealed protein-specific cell height changes and allowed for comparison between the observed fluorescence changes and predictions based on the cellular surface area-to-volume ratio. The quantitative capability of z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution offers opportunities for investigating peripheral membrane proteins in the living cell that were previously not accessible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel Immunity Proteins Associated with Colicin M-like Bacteriocins Exhibit Promiscuous Protection in Pseudomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghequire, Maarten G. K.; Kemland, Lieselore; De Mot, René

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriocins related to colicin M, acting via cleavage of the cell wall precursor lipid II, have been characterized in γ- and β-proteobacteria. Depending on the species, immunity is provided by either an inner membrane-anchored periplasmic <