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Sample records for cd8 chemokine receptors

  1. CD8 chemokine receptors in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smyth, L J C; Starkey, C; Gordon, F S;

    2008-01-01

    Increased lung CD8 cells and their expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 have been previously reported in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Alterations of CD8-CCR3 and -CCR4 expression and their ligands in COPD patients have not been fully investigated. The objective......, smokers and healthy non-smokers (HNS). CCL5 and CCL11 levels were measured in BAL, and from the supernatants of lung resection explant cultures. CD8-CCR3 and -CCR5 expression (means) were increased in COPD patients (22% and 46% respectively) and smokers (20% and 45%) compared with HNS (3% and 22%); P ....05 for all comparisons. CD3CXCR3 expression was raised in smokers and COPD while CD8CXCR3 and CD3 and CD8 CCR4 expression was similar between groups. CD8CCR5 expression correlated to smoking pack years (r = 0.42, P = 0.01). COPD explants released more CCL5 compared with smokers (P = 0.02), while...

  2. The effect of aging and caloric restriction on murine CD8+ T cell chemokine receptor gene expression

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    Mo RuRan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism explaining the increased disease susceptibility in aging is not well understood. CD8+ T cells are crucial in anti-viral and anti-tumor responses. Although the chemokine system plays a critical role in CD8+ T cell function, very little is known about the relationship between aging and the T cell chemokine system. Results In this study we have examined the effect of aging on murine CD8+ T cell chemokine receptor gene expression. Freshly isolated splenic CD8+ T cells from old C57BL/6 mice were found to have higher CCR1, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5 and CXCR5, and lower CCR7 gene expression compared to their younger cohort. Anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation elicited a similar robust chemokine receptor response from young and old CD8+ T cells. Western blot analyses confirmed elevated protein level of CCR4 and CCR5 in aged CD8+ T cells. Increases in T cell CCR1 and CCR5 expression also correlate to increased in vitro chemotaxis response to macrophage-inflammatory protein-1 α(MIP-1α. Finally, caloric restriction selectively prevents the loss of CD8+ T cell CCR7 gene expression in aging to the level that is seen in young CD8+ T cells. Conclusion These findings are consistent with the notion that aging exists in a state of low grade pro-inflammatory environment. In addition, our results provide a potential mechanism for the reported aging-associated impaired T cell lymphoid homing and allograft response, and reduced survival in sepsis.

  3. Functional analysis of the CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) on virus-specific CD8+ T cells following coronavirus infection of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracranial infection of C57BL/6 mice with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) results in an acute encephalomyelitis followed by a demyelinating disease similar in pathology to the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS). T cells participate in both defense and disease progression following MHV infection. Expression of chemokine receptors on activated T cells is important in allowing these cells to traffic into and accumulate within the central nervous system (CNS) of MHV-infected mice. The present study evaluated the contributions of CCR5 to the activation and trafficking of virus-specific CD8+ T cells into the MHV-infected CNS mice. Comparable numbers of virus-specific CD8+ T cells derived from immunized CCR5+/+ or CCR5-/- mice were present within the CNS of MHV-infected RAG1-/- mice following adoptive transfer, indicating that CCR5 is not required for trafficking of these cells into the CNS. RAG1-/- recipients of CCR5-/--derived CD8+ T cells exhibited a modest, yet significant (P ≤ 0.05), reduction in viral burden within the brain which correlated with increased CTL activity and IFN-γ expression. Histological analysis of RAG1-/- recipients of either CCR5+/+or CCR5-/--derived CD8+ T cells revealed only focal areas of demyelination with no significant differences in white matter destruction. These data indicate that CCR5 signaling on CD8+ T cells modulates antiviral activities but is not essential for entry into the CNS

  4. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Multiple Sclerosis

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    Wenjing Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease with classical traits of demyelination, axonal damage, and neurodegeneration. The migration of autoimmune T cells and macrophages from blood to central nervous system as well as the destruction of blood brain barrier are thought to be the major processes in the development of this disease. Chemokines, which are small peptide mediators, can attract pathogenic cells to the sites of inflammation. Each helper T cell subset expresses different chemokine receptors so as to exert their different functions in the pathogenesis of MS. Recently published results have shown that the levels of some chemokines and chemokine receptors are increased in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients. This review describes the advanced researches on the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of MS and discusses the potential therapy of this disease targeting the chemokine network.

  5. Chemokine Receptors and Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinquan Tan; Gang Zhou

    2005-01-01

    A complex process including both the innate and acquired immune responses results in allograft rejection. Some chemokine receptors and their ligands play essential roles not only for leukocyte migration into the graft but also in facilitating dendritic and T cell trafficking between lymph nodes and the transplant in the early and late stage of the allogeneic response. This review focuses on the impact of these chemoattractant proteins on transplant outcome and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for antirejection therapy based on targeting of chemokine receptors and/or their ligands. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  6. Generalized Lévy walks and the role of chemokines in migration of effector CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tajie H; Banigan, Edward J; Christian, David A; Konradt, Christoph; Tait Wojno, Elia D; Norose, Kazumi; Wilson, Emma H; John, Beena; Weninger, Wolfgang; Luster, Andrew D; Liu, Andrea J; Hunter, Christopher A

    2012-06-28

    Chemokines have a central role in regulating processes essential to the immune function of T cells, such as their migration within lymphoid tissues and targeting of pathogens in sites of inflammation. Here we track T cells using multi-photon microscopy to demonstrate that the chemokine CXCL10 enhances the ability of CD8+ T cells to control the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii in the brains of chronically infected mice. This chemokine boosts T-cell function in two different ways: it maintains the effector T-cell population in the brain and speeds up the average migration speed without changing the nature of the walk statistics. Notably, these statistics are not Brownian; rather, CD8+ T-cell motility in the brain is well described by a generalized Lévy walk. According to our model, this unexpected feature enables T cells to find rare targets with more than an order of magnitude more efficiency than Brownian random walkers. Thus, CD8+ T-cell behaviour is similar to Lévy strategies reported in organisms ranging from mussels to marine predators and monkeys, and CXCL10 aids T cells in shortening the average time taken to find rare targets.

  7. Chemokine receptors in cancer metastasis and cancer cell-derived chemokines in host immune response.

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    Koizumi, Keiichi; Hojo, Shozo; Akashi, Takuya; Yasumoto, Kazuo; Saiki, Ikuo

    2007-11-01

    The chemotactic cytokines called chemokines are a superfamily of small secreted cytokines that were initially characterized through their ability to prompt the migration of leukocytes. Attention has been focused on the chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells because cancer cell migration and metastasis show similarities to leukocyte trafficking. CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) was first investigated as a chemokine receptor that is associated with lung metastasis of breast cancers. Recently, CXCR4 was reported to be a key molecule in the formation of peritoneal carcinomatosis in gastric cancer. In the present review, we highlight current knowledge about the role of CXCR4 in cancer metastases. In contrast to chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells, little is known about the roles of cancer cell-derived chemokines. Cancer tissue consists of both cancer cells and various stromal cells, and leukocytes that infiltrate into cancer are of particular importance in cancer progression. Although colorectal cancer invasion is regulated by the chemokine CCL9-induced infiltration of immature myeloid cells into cancer, high-level expression of cancer cell-derived chemokine CXCL16 increases infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells into cancer tissues, and correlates with a good prognosis. We discuss the conflicting biological effects of cancer cell-derived chemokines on cancer progression, using CCL9 and CXCL16 as examples. PMID:17894551

  8. Identification of a human CD8+ regulatory T cell subset that mediates suppression through the chemokine CC chemokine ligand 4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, S.A.; Meijgaarden, K.E. van; Savage, N.D.; Boer, T. de; Triebel, F.; Wal, A. van der; Heer, E. de; Klein, M.R.; Geluk, A.; Ottenhoff, T.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) comprise multiple subsets and are important in controlling immunity and inflammation. However, the induction and mode of action of the various distinct Treg subsets remain ill defined, particularly in humans. Here, we describe a human CD8+ lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-

  9. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

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    Steve Bird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specially zebrafish (Danio rerio, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly.

  10. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

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    Xiaofeng Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN.

  11. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaofeng; Pirapakaran, Tharshikha; Luo, Xin M

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  12. Effect of ranitidine on soluble interleukin 2 receptors and CD8 molecules in surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Mynster, T; Jensen, S;

    1994-01-01

    transfusion were similar in the two groups. Serum concentrations of soluble IL-2 receptor and CD8 were measured before operation (day 0) and in the morning of postoperative days 1, 3 and 9 using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. In patients treated with ranitidine, the serum level of soluble......The effect of perioperative immunomodulation with the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on postoperative changes in soluble interleukin (IL) 2 receptor and soluble CD8 levels was assessed in 24 patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery. Eleven patients were randomized to receive...... developed postoperative infectious complications. No significant differences were shown in soluble CD8 concentration during the postoperative period. The postoperative change in soluble IL-2 receptor level may reflect lymphocyte activation status; ranitidine appears to promote activation of mainly CD4...

  13. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly......The human chemokine system comprises 19 seven-transmembrane helix (7TM) receptors and 45 endogenous chemokines that often interact with each other in a promiscuous manner. Due to the chemokine system's primary function in leukocyte migration, it has a central role in immune homeostasis...... and surveillance. Chemokines are a group of 8-12 kDa large peptides with a secondary structure consisting of a flexible N-terminus and a core-domain usually stabilized by two conserved disulfide bridges. They mainly interact with the extracellular domains of their cognate 7TM receptors. Affinityand activity...

  14. Atypical chemokine receptors in cancer: friends or foes?

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    Massara, Matteo; Bonavita, Ornella; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2016-06-01

    The chemokine system is a fundamental component of cancer-related inflammation involved in all stages of cancer development. It controls not only leukocyte infiltration in primary tumors but also angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation, and migration to metastatic sites. Atypical chemokine receptors are a new, emerging class of regulators of the chemokine system. They control chemokine bioavailability by scavenging, transporting, or storing chemokines. They can also regulate the activity of canonical chemokine receptors with which they share the ligands by forming heterodimers or by modulating their expression levels or signaling activity. Here, we summarize recent results about the role of these receptors (atypical chemokine receptor 1/Duffy antigen receptor for chemokine, atypical chemokine receptor 2/D6, atypical chemokine receptor 3/CXC-chemokine receptor 7, and atypical chemokine receptor 4/CC-chemokine receptor-like 1) on the tumorigenesis process, indicating that their effects are strictly dependent on the cell type on which they are expressed and on their coexpression with other chemokine receptors. Indeed, atypical chemokine receptors inhibit tumor growth and progression through their activity as negative regulators of chemokine bioavailability, whereas, on the contrary, they can promote tumorigenesis when they regulate the signaling of other chemokine receptors, such as CXC-chemokine receptor 4. Thus, atypical chemokine receptors are key components of the regulatory network of inflammation and immunity in cancer and may have a major effect on anti-inflammatory and immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26908826

  15. Chemokines

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    Richard Horuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a family of polypeptides that direct the migration of leukocytestoward a site of infection. They play a major role in autoimmune disease and chemokine receptors have recently been found to mediate HIV-1 fusion. In this short review we examine the role of chemokines in host defence and in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases. We conclude by discussing various therapeutic approaches that target chemokine receptors and that could be beneficial in disease.

  16. Requirements for Peptide-induced T Cell Receptor Downregulation on Naive CD8+ T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Zeling; Kishimoto, Hidehiro; Brunmark, Anders; Jackson, Michael R.; Peterson, Per A.; Sprent, Jonathan

    1997-01-01

    The requirements for inducing downregulation of α/β T cell receptor (TCR) molecules on naive major histocompatibility complex class I–restricted T cells was investigated with 2C TCR transgenic mice and defined peptides as antigen. Confirming previous results, activation of 2C T cells in response to specific peptides required CD8 expression on the responder cells and was heavily dependent upon costimulation provided by either B7-1 or ICAM-1 on antigen-presenting cells (APC). These stringent re...

  17. Epstein-Barr virus receptor expression on human CD8+ (cytotoxic/suppressor) T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageau, G; Stocco, R; Kasparian, S; Menezes, J

    1990-02-01

    In 1977 we showed that cells of a human lymphocytic leukaemia-derived T line (Molt-4) have receptors for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). More recently, EBV-positive human T cell lymphomas have been recognized and human T cell lines containing the EBV genome have been established in vitro. To understand better the interaction of EBV with T cells, we decided to determine first whether human peripheral blood T lymphocytes express receptors for EBV. Using flow cytometry we examined the binding of both lymphocyte-transforming (B95-8) and non-transforming (P3HR-1) strains of EBV to T lymphocyte subpopulations, using a double labelling technique with T cell-specific phycoerythrinated monoclonal antibodies (Leu 2a) and fluoresceinated viral preparation. Our results suggest that, in general, about 50% of the CD8+ (or suppressor/cytotoxic) T cell subpopulation from both EBV-seropositive and -seronegative individuals can bind EBV. EBV receptor expression on these T cells was about 10 and 51 times less than that on Molt-4 and Raji (an EBV receptor-positive B cell line) cells, respectively. The specificity of this binding was demonstrated by the inhibition of attachment of viral preparations preincubated with a monoclonal antibody directed against the viral ligand (gp240/350), and by preincubating these target T cells with unlabelled virus. We were unable to detect EBV-induced antigens in infected T cells, suggesting that, as in Molt-4 cells, virus internalization may not occur in fresh T cells and/or that the virus receptor may not be completely functional. We were also unable to detect C3d (or CR2) receptors on these T cells, or to inhibit virus attachment by treating the targets with an anti-CR2 monoclonal antibody (OKB7), suggesting that the EBV receptor on CD8+ peripheral blood lymphocytes is different from that on B cells. PMID:2155291

  18. Effect of ranitidine on soluble interleukin 2 receptors and CD8 molecules in surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Mynster, T; Jensen, S;

    1994-01-01

    The effect of perioperative immunomodulation with the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on postoperative changes in soluble interleukin (IL) 2 receptor and soluble CD8 levels was assessed in 24 patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery. Eleven patients were randomized to receive...... intravenous ranitidine 100 mg twice daily for 4 days from skin incision, followed by oral ranitidine 150 mg twice daily for a further 5 days; 13 control patients received no ranitidine. Routine blood analysis, clinical data, duration of surgery, anaesthesia, antibiotic prophylaxis and perioperative blood...... IL-2 receptor increased from day 0 to day 9 (P < 0.01); in control patients it decreased from day 0 to day 1, did not change significantly by day 3 and increased by day 9. The change from day 0 to day 1 was significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.01). Five of the 13 control patients...

  19. Regulation of inflammatory chemokine receptors on blood T cells associated to the circulating versus liver chemokines in dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; Marinho, Cíntia Ferreira; Povoa, Tiago Fajardo; de Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; de Souza, Luiza Assed; Barbosa, Luiza Damian Ribeiro; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Alves, Ada M B; Ávila, Carlos André Lins; de Souza, Luiz José; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; Damasco, Paulo Vieira; Paes, Marciano Viana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chemokines/chemokines receptors on T cells in natural DENV infection. Patients from DENV-2 and -3- outbreaks were studied prospectively during the acute or convalescent phases. Expression of chemokine receptor and activation markers on lymphocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometry analysis, plasma chemokine ligands concentrations were measured by ELISA and quantification of CCL5/RANTES(+) cells in liver tissues from fatal dengue cases was performed by immunochemistry. In the acute DENV-infection, T-helper/T-cytotoxic type-1 cell (Th1/Tc1)-related CCR5 is significantly higher expressed on both CD4 and CD8 T cells. The Th1-related CXCR3 is up-regulated among CD4 T cells and Tc2-related CCR4 is up-regulated among CD8 T cells. In the convalescent phase, all chemokine receptor or chemokine ligand expression tends to reestablish control healthy levels. Increased CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1β but decreased CCL5/RANTES levels were observed in DENV-patients during acute infection. Moreover, we showed an increased CD107a expression on CCR5 or CXCR3-expressing T cells and higher expression of CD29, CD44(HIGH) and CD127(LOW) markers on CCR4-expressing CD8 T cells in DENV-patients when compared to controls. Finally, liver from dengue fatal patients showed increased number of cells expressing CCL5/RANTES in three out of four cases compared to three death from a non-dengue patient. In conclusion, both Th1-related CCR5 and CXCR3 among CD4 T cells have a potential ability to exert cytotoxicity function. Moreover, Tc1-related CCR5 and Tc2-related CCR4 among CD8 T cells have a potential ability to exert effector function and migration based on cell markers evaluated. The CCR5 expression would be promoting an enhanced T cell recruitment into liver, a hypothesis that is corroborated by the CCL5/RANTES increase detected in hepatic tissue from dengue fatal cases. The balance between protective and pathogenic immune response mediated by

  20. Regulation of inflammatory chemokine receptors on blood T cells associated to the circulating versus liver chemokines in dengue fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Maria de-Oliveira-Pinto

    Full Text Available Little is known about the role of chemokines/chemokines receptors on T cells in natural DENV infection. Patients from DENV-2 and -3- outbreaks were studied prospectively during the acute or convalescent phases. Expression of chemokine receptor and activation markers on lymphocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometry analysis, plasma chemokine ligands concentrations were measured by ELISA and quantification of CCL5/RANTES(+ cells in liver tissues from fatal dengue cases was performed by immunochemistry. In the acute DENV-infection, T-helper/T-cytotoxic type-1 cell (Th1/Tc1-related CCR5 is significantly higher expressed on both CD4 and CD8 T cells. The Th1-related CXCR3 is up-regulated among CD4 T cells and Tc2-related CCR4 is up-regulated among CD8 T cells. In the convalescent phase, all chemokine receptor or chemokine ligand expression tends to reestablish control healthy levels. Increased CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1β but decreased CCL5/RANTES levels were observed in DENV-patients during acute infection. Moreover, we showed an increased CD107a expression on CCR5 or CXCR3-expressing T cells and higher expression of CD29, CD44(HIGH and CD127(LOW markers on CCR4-expressing CD8 T cells in DENV-patients when compared to controls. Finally, liver from dengue fatal patients showed increased number of cells expressing CCL5/RANTES in three out of four cases compared to three death from a non-dengue patient. In conclusion, both Th1-related CCR5 and CXCR3 among CD4 T cells have a potential ability to exert cytotoxicity function. Moreover, Tc1-related CCR5 and Tc2-related CCR4 among CD8 T cells have a potential ability to exert effector function and migration based on cell markers evaluated. The CCR5 expression would be promoting an enhanced T cell recruitment into liver, a hypothesis that is corroborated by the CCL5/RANTES increase detected in hepatic tissue from dengue fatal cases. The balance between protective and pathogenic immune response

  1. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE.

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    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 1% of CD4(+) T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4(+) T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6(+) and CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8(+) T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4(+) T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6(+) cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  2. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

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    Jyothi Thyagabhavan Mony

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS. The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS. The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4+ T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells. Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4+ T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 7.7% of CD4+ T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8+ T cells. CD8+ T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4+ T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6+ and CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8+ T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4+ T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6+ cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  3. Chapter 8. Activation mechanisms of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to the large family of 7-transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are targeted and activated by a variety of different ligands, indicating that activation is a result of similar molecular mechanisms but not necessarily similar modes of ligand bin...

  4. Reduced interleukin-4 receptor α expression on CD8+ T cells correlates with higher quality anti-viral immunity.

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    Danushka K Wijesundara

    Full Text Available With the hope of understanding how interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13 modulated quality of anti-viral CD8(+ T cells, we evaluated the expression of receptors for these cytokines following a range of viral infections (e.g. pox viruses and influenza virus. Results clearly indicated that unlike other IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunits, IL-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα was significantly down-regulated on anti-viral CD8(+ T cells in a cognate antigen dependent manner. The infection of gene knockout mice and wild-type (WT mice with vaccinia virus (VV or VV expressing IL-4 confirmed that IL-4, IL-13 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6 were required to increase IL-4Rα expression on CD8(+ T cells, but not interferon (IFN-γ. STAT6 dependent elevation of IL-4Rα expression on CD8(+ T cells was a feature of poor quality anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity as measured by the production of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α in response to VV antigen stimulation in vitro. We propose that down-regulation of IL-4Rα, but not the other IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunits, is a mechanism by which CD8(+ T cells reduce responsiveness to IL-4 and IL-13. This can improve the quality of anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity. Our findings have important implications in understanding anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity and designing effective vaccines against chronic viral infections.

  5. Selective suppression of chemokine receptor CXCR3 expression by interferon-beta1a in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Sellebjerg, F

    2002-01-01

    We studied the expression of chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR3 on CD4 and CD8 positive T cells, and on CD14 positive monocytes in blood from 10 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) at initiation of interferon (IFN)-beta treatment, after 1 month and after 3...

  6. Chemokines and their receptors in central nervous system disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, K; de Jong, EK; van Weering, HRJ; Boddeke, HWGM

    2006-01-01

    Almost a decade ago, it was discovered that the human deficiency virus (HIV) makes use of chemokine receptors to infect blood cells. This appreciation of the clinical relevance of specific chemokine receptors has initiated a considerable boost in the field of chemokine research. It is clear today th

  7. CD8+ T Cell Response to Gammaherpesvirus Infection Mediates Inflammation and Fibrosis in Interferon Gamma Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigid M O'Flaherty

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, one of the most severe interstitial lung diseases, is a progressive fibrotic disorder of unknown etiology. However, there is growing appreciation for the role of viral infection in disease induction and/or progression. A small animal model of multi-organ fibrosis, which involves murine gammaherpesvirus (MHV68 infection of interferon gamma receptor deficient (IFNγR-/- mice, has been utilized to model the association of gammaherpesvirus infections and lung fibrosis. Notably, several MHV68 mutants which fail to induce fibrosis have been identified. Our current study aimed to better define the role of the unique MHV68 gene, M1, in development of pulmonary fibrosis. We have previously shown that the M1 gene encodes a secreted protein which possesses superantigen-like function to drive the expansion and activation of Vβ4+ CD8+ T cells. Here we show that M1-dependent fibrosis is correlated with heightened levels of inflammation in the lung. We observe an M1-dependent cellular infiltrate of innate immune cells with most striking differences at 28 days-post infection. Furthermore, in the absence of M1 protein expression we observed reduced CD8+ T cells and MHV68 epitope specific CD8+ T cells to the lungs-despite equivalent levels of viral replication between M1 null and wild type MHV68. Notably, backcrossing the IFNγR-/- onto the Balb/c background, which has previously been shown to exhibit weak MHV68-driven Vβ4+ CD8+ T cell expansion, eliminated MHV68-induced fibrosis-further implicating the activated Vβ4+ CD8+ T cell population in the induction of fibrosis. We further addressed the role that CD8+ T cells play in the induction of fibrosis by depleting CD8+ T cells, which protected the mice from fibrotic disease. Taken together these findings are consistent with the hypothesized role of Vβ4+ CD8+ T cells as mediators of fibrotic disease in IFNγR-/- mice.

  8. Pouncing on the chemokine receptor Chimera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascolini, M

    1997-08-01

    Scientists are seeking to unravel the mystery of chemokine receptors in an attempt to develop treatments for HIV infection; however, receptor experts are realizing that the picture is more complicated than they first imagined. Scientists want to know, among other things, what parts of each coreceptor are essential for viral fusion with target cells, what makes macrophage-tropic viruses switch their preference to T-lymphocytes, why HIV goes after chemokine receptors in the first place, and how fusion and entry occur. Other issues discussed include whether blocking coreceptors for HIV will actually curb this disease, virus turnover in monkey studies showing that SIV may go through the cycle as many as 100 times per day, and studies showing that the first days of infection may predict the course of disease. Final comments concern the use of ritonavir plus indinavir in treatment combinations for children with HIV and the latest progress toward vaccine development. Understanding these and other puzzles might help scientists to develop drugs to block receptors active in HIV infection and perhaps curb HIV. More than 14 biotechnology and pharmaceutical firms are working to design coreceptor blockers, despite the opinions of several leading researchers that the drugs are not terribly promising. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID), notes that a famous attempt to block HIV's primary receptor failed, and David Ho, the man who demonstrated why CD4 would not work as therapy, is similarly cautious. According to Ho, drug makers will have no trouble developing compounds that keep HIV off chemokine receptors, such as CCR5 or CXCR4, but whether those compounds will slow disease progression is another question. PMID:11364629

  9. Inhibitory receptor expression depends more dominantly on differentiation and activation than exhaustion of human CD8 T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine eLegat

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Under conditions of chronic antigen stimulation, such as persistent viral infection and cancer, CD8 T cells may diminish effector function, which has been termed exhaustion. Expression of inhibitory Receptors (iRs is often regarded as a hallmark of exhaustion. Here we studied the expression of eight different iRs by CD8 T cells of healthy humans, including CTLA-4, PD1, TIM3, LAG3, 2B4, BTLA, CD160 and KLRG-1. We show that many iRs are expressed upon activation, and with progressive differentiation to effector cells, even in absence of long-term (chronic antigenic stimulation. In particular, we evaluated the direct relationship between iR expression and functionality in CD8 T cells by using anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 stimulation to stimulate all cells and differentiation subsets. We observed a striking upregulation of certain iRs following the cytokine production wave, in agreement with the notion that iRs function as a negative feedback mechanism. Intriguingly, we found no major impairment of cytokine production in cells positive for a broad array of iRs, as previously shown for PD1 in healthy donors. Rather, the expression of the various iRs strongly correlated with T cell differentiation or activation states, or both. Furthermore, we analyzed CD8 T cells from lymph nodes (LNs of melanoma patients. Interestingly, we found altered iR expression and lower cytokine production by T cells from metastatic LNs, but also from non-metastatic LNs, likely due to mechanisms which are not related to exhaustion. Together, our data shows that expression of iRs per se does not mark dysfunctional cells, but is rather tightly linked to activation and differentiation. This study highlights the importance of considering the status of activation and differentiation for the study and the clinical monitoring of CD8 T cells.

  10. Cloning analysis of HBV-specific CD8 T cell receptor gene in patients with acute hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning DING

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the molecular mechanism of T cell receptor(TCR in CD8 T cell-mediated immune response to HBV in patients with acute hepatitis B(AHB.Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMCs were collected from HLA-A2-positive AHB patients.To determine HBsAg183-191 and HBsAg335-343-specific CD8 T cell frequencies,the PBMCs were stained by fluorescence-labeled anti-CD3,anti-CD8 and pentamers,and analyzed by flow cytometry.PBMCs from 6 patients were stimulated with epitopic peptide HBsAg335-343 in vitro for 3 to 4 weeks.HBV-specific CD8 T cells were isolated by magnetic activated cell sorting followed by flow florescence activated cell sorting.The mRNA of sorted cells was extracted after expanding by IL-2,anti-CD3 and anti-CD8.The full-length gene fragments of variable region of TCR α and β chains were gained by 5’-RACE,and then cloned and sequenced(≥50 clones for single chain of each sample.The gene families of TCR α and β chains were identified and the sequence characters of CDR3 were compared.Results Analysis of more than 600 cloned gene sequences of TCR α and β chains showed that the proliferated HBV-specific CD8 T cells from 6 AHB patients presented a predominant expression in TCR α and chains,with 2-4 α chain families and 1-4 chain families in each case.The α2,α14,α15,β3,β13 and 23 families were detected in more than one case.The chain genes were all 13 for all tested clones in one case.For the same α chain or-chain family,CDR3 sequences tended to be identical in one case but different among cases.Conclusions HBV-specific CD8 T cells with antigenic peptide-induced proliferation present predominance in the usage of TCR α and β chains.This property might be one of the important molecular factors influencing anti-HBV immunity.

  11. T-cell receptor Vβ repertoire of CD8+ T-lymphocyte subpopulations in cutaneous leishmaniasis patients from the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Raquel; Cunha, Clarissa Ferreira; Pimentel, Maria Inês; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Schubach, Armando Oliveira; de Mendonça, Sérgio Coutinho Furtado; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bertho, Alvaro Luiz

    2015-01-01

    In human cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), the immune response is mainly mediated by T-cells. The role of CD8+ T-lymphocytes, which are related to healing or deleterious functions, in affecting clinical outcome is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate T-cell receptor diversity in late-differentiated effector (LDE) and memory CD8+ T-cell subsets in order to create a profile of specific clones engaged in deleterious or protective CL immune responses. Healthy subjects, patients with active disease (PAD) and clinically cured patients were enrolled in the study. Total CD8+ T-lymphocytes showed a disturbance in the expression of the Vβ2, Vβ9, Vβ13.2, Vβ18 and Vβ23 families. The analyses of CD8+T-lymphocyte subsets showed high frequencies of LDE CD8+T-lymphocytes expressing Vβ12 and Vβ22 in PAD, as well as effector-memory CD8+ T-cells expressing Vβ22. We also observed low frequencies of effector and central-memory CD8+ T-cells expressing Vβ2 in PAD, which correlated with a greater lesion size. Particular Vβ expansions point to CD8+ T-cell clones that are selected during CL immune responses, suggesting that CD8+ T-lymphocytes expressing Vβ12 or Vβ22 are involved in a LDE response and that Vβ2 contractions in memory CD8+T-cells are associated with larger lesions. PMID:26107186

  12. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in mucosal homeostasis at the intestinal epithelial barrier in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Noah P Zimmerman; Vongsa, Rebecca A.; Wendt, Michael K; Michael B Dwinell

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines, a large family of small chemoattractive cytokines, and their receptors play an integral role in the regulation of the immune response and homeostasis. The ability of chemokines to attract specific populations of immune cells sets them apart from other chemoattractants. Chemokines produced within the gastrointestinal mucosa, are critical players in directing the balance between physiological and pathophysiological inflammation in health, inflammatory bowel disease and the progressi...

  13. Biased and g protein-independent signaling of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie;

    2014-01-01

    not be absolute, i.e., full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro......-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of "classic" redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where...... a single chemokine may bind to several receptors - in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confers a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles...

  14. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in mucosal homeostasis at the intestinal epithelial barrier in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Noah P; Vongsa, Rebecca A; Wendt, Michael K; Dwinell, Michael B

    2008-07-01

    Chemokines, a large family of small chemoattractive cytokines, and their receptors play an integral role in the regulation of the immune response and homeostasis. The ability of chemokines to attract specific populations of immune cells sets them apart from other chemoattractants. Chemokines produced within the gastrointestinal mucosa are critical players in directing the balance between physiological and pathophysiological inflammation in health, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and the progression to colon cancer. In addition to the well-characterized role of chemokines in directed trafficking of immune cells to the gut mucosa, the expression of chemokine receptors on the cells of the epithelium makes them active participants in the chemokine signaling network. Recent findings demonstrate an important role for chemokines and chemokine receptors in epithelial barrier repair and maintenance as well as an intricate involvement in limiting metastasis of colonic carcinoma. Increased recognition of the association between barrier defects and inflammation and the subsequent progression to cancer in IBD thus implicates chemokines as key regulators of mucosal homeostasis and disease pathogenesis. PMID:18452220

  15. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, D; Han, Yong-Chang; Rani, M R;

    2000-01-01

    This article focuses on the production of chemokines by resident glial cells of the nervous system. We describe studies in two distinct categories of inflammation within the nervous system: immune-mediated inflammation as seen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or multiple sclerosis...

  16. Genomic organization, annotation, and ligand-receptor inferences of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptor genes based on comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in host defense, organogenesis, hematopoiesis, and neuronal communication. Forty-two chemokines and 19 cognate receptors have been found in the human genome. Prior to this report, only 11 chicken chemokines and 7 receptors had been reported. The objectives of this study were to systematically identify chicken chemokines and their cognate receptor genes in the chicken genome and to annotate these genes and ligand-receptor binding by a comparative genomics approach. Results Twenty-three chemokine and 14 chemokine receptor genes were identified in the chicken genome. All of the chicken chemokines contained a conserved CC, CXC, CX3C, or XC motif, whereas all the chemokine receptors had seven conserved transmembrane helices, four extracellular domains with a conserved cysteine, and a conserved DRYLAIV sequence in the second intracellular domain. The number of coding exons in these genes and the syntenies are highly conserved between human, mouse, and chicken although the amino acid sequence homologies are generally low between mammalian and chicken chemokines. Chicken genes were named with the systematic nomenclature used in humans and mice based on phylogeny, synteny, and sequence homology. Conclusion The independent nomenclature of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptors suggests that the chicken may have ligand-receptor pairings similar to mammals. All identified chicken chemokines and their cognate receptors were identified in the chicken genome except CCR9, whose ligand was not identified in this study. The organization of these genes suggests that there were a substantial number of these genes present before divergence between aves and mammals and more gene duplications of CC, CXC, CCR, and CXCR subfamilies in mammals than in aves after the divergence.

  17. Chemokine receptor expression on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talvani, Andre; Rocha, Manoel O C; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2004-01-15

    We evaluated the expression of chemokine receptors (CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4) on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) and noninfected individuals. Only CCR5 and CXCR4 expression was different on the surface of the subsets (CD4, CD8, and CD14) evaluated. Patients with mild CCC had elevated leukocyte expression of CCR5, compared with noninfected individuals or those with severe disease. CXCR4 expression was lower on leukocytes from patients with severe CCC. The differential expression of both receptors on leukocytes of patients with CCC was consistent and clearly correlated with the degree of heart function such that the lower the heart function, the lower the expression of either CCR5 or CXCR4. These results highlight the possible participation of the chemokine system in early forms of chagasic cardiomyopathy and the relevance of heart failure-induced remodeling in modifying immune parameters in infected individuals.

  18. Cigarette Smoke Disturbs the Survival of CD8+ Tc/Tregs Partially through Muscarinic Receptors-Dependent Mechanisms in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells (Cytotoxic T cells, Tc are known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of smoking related airway inflammation including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, how cigarette smoke directly impacts systematic CD8+ T cell and regulatory T cell (Treg subsets, especially by modulating muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (MRs, has yet to be well elucidated.Circulating CD8+ Tc/Tregs in healthy nonsmokers (n = 15, healthy smokers (n = 15 and COPD patients (n = 18 were evaluated by flow cytometry after incubating with anti-CD3, anti-CD8, anti-CD25, anti-Foxp3 antibodies. Peripheral blood T cells (PBT cells from healthy nonsmokers were cultured in the presence of cigarette smoke extract (CSE alone or combined with MRs agonist/antagonist for 5 days. Proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry using Ki-67/Annexin-V antibodies to measure the effects of CSE on the survival of CD8+ Tc/Tregs.While COPD patients have elevated circulating percentage of CD8+ T cells, healthy smokers have higher frequency of CD8+ Tregs. Elevated percentages of CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with declined FEV1 in COPD. CSE promoted the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of CD8+ T cells, while facilitated both the proliferation and apoptosis of CD8+ Tregs. Notably, the effects of CSE on CD8+ Tc/Tregs can be mostly simulated or attenuated by muscarine and atropine, the MR agonist and antagonist, respectively. However, neither muscarine nor atropine influenced the apoptosis of CD8+ Tregs.The results imply that cigarette smoking likely facilitates a proinflammatory state in smokers, which is partially mediated by MR dysfunction. The MR antagonist may be a beneficial drug candidate for cigarette smoke-induced chronic airway inflammation.

  19. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, T B; Wittenhagen, P;

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta).......To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta)....

  20. Efficient T-cell surveillance of the CNS requires expression of the CXC chemokine receptor 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Nansen, Anneline; Moos, Torben;

    2004-01-01

    T-cells play an important role in controlling viral infections inside the CNS. To study the role of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 in the migration and positioning of virus-specific effector T-cells within the brain, CXCR3-deficient mice were infected intracerebrally with lymphocytic choriomeningitis......-cell-mediated immunopathology. Quantitative analysis of the cellular infiltrate in CSF of infected mice revealed modest, if any, decrease in the number of mononuclear cells recruited to the meninges in the absence of CXCR3. However, immunohistological analysis disclosed a striking impairment of CD8+ T-cells from CXCR3......-deficient mice to migrate from the meninges into the outer layers of the brain parenchyma despite similar localization of virus-infected target cells. Reconstitution of CXCR3-deficient mice with wild-type CD8+ T-cells completely restored susceptibility to LCMV-induced meningitis. Thus, taken together, our...

  1. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Their Manifold Roles in Homeostasis and Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingying Le; Ye Zhou; Pablo Iribarren; Ji Ming Wang

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of small proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors on target cells and were originally discovered as mediators of directional migration of immune cells to sites of inflammation and injury. In recent years, it has become clear that the function of chemokines extends well beyond the role in leukocyte chemotaxis. They participate in organ development, angiogenesis/angiostasis, leukocyte trafficking and homing, tumorigenesis and metastasis, as well as in immune responses to microbial infection. Therefore,chemokines and their receptors are important targets for modulation of host responses in pathophysiological conditions and for therapeutic intervention of human diseases.

  2. Emerging Concepts and Approaches for Chemokine-Receptor Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Salanga, Catherina L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Hamel, Damon J.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Chemokine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) most noted for their role in cell migration. However, inappropriate utilization or regulation of these receptors is implicated in many inflammatory diseases, cancer and HIV, making them important drug targets. Areas covered in this review Allostery, oligomerization, and ligand bias are presented as they pertain to chemokine receptors and their associated pathologies. Specific examples of each are described from the recent literature and their implications are discussed in terms of drug discovery efforts targeting chemokine receptors. What the reader will gain Insight into the expanding view of the multitude of pharmacological variables that need to be considered or that may be exploited in chemokine receptor drug discovery. Take home message Since 2007, two drugs targeting chemokine receptors have been approved by the FDA, Maraviroc for preventing HIV infection and Mozobil™ for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization. While these successes permit optimism for chemokine receptors as drug targets, only recently has the complexity of this system begun to be appreciated. The concepts of allosteric inhibitors, biased ligands and functional selectivity raise the possibility that drugs with precisely-defined properties can be developed. Other complexities such as receptor oligomerization and tissue-specific functional states of receptors also offer opportunities for increased target and response specificity, although it will be more challenging to translate these ideas into approved therapeutics compared to traditional approaches. PMID:21132095

  3. The role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in eosinophil activation during inflammatory allergic reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.H.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are important chemotactic cytokines that play a fundamental role in the trafficking of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. They are also potent cell-activating factors, inducing cytokine and histamine release and free radical production, a fact that makes them particularly important in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. The action of chemokines is regulated at the level of agonist production and processing as well as at the level of receptor expression and coupling. Therefore, an analysis of the ligands must necessarily consider receptors. Eosinophils are target cells involved in the allergic inflammatory response since they are able to release a wide variety of mediators including CC and CXC chemokines and express their receptors. These mediators could damage the airway epithelial cells and might be important to stimulate other cells inducing an amplification of the allergic response. This review focuses on recently emerging data pertaining to the importance of chemokines and chemokine receptors in promoting eosinophil activation and migration during the allergic inflammatory process. The analysis of the function of eosinophils and their chemokine receptors during allergic inflammation might be a good approach to understanding the determinants of asthma severity and to developing novel therapies.

  4. Chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in the lesions of patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilka Luisa Diaz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL presents distinct active clinical forms with different grades of severity, known as localised (LCL, intermediate (ICL and diffuse (DCL cutaneous leishmaniasis. LCL and DCL are associated with a polarised T-helper (Th1 and Th2 immune response, respectively, whereas ICL, or chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis, is associated with an exacerbated immune response and a mixed cytokine expression profile. Chemokines and chemokine receptors are involved in cellular migration and are critical in the inflammatory response. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of the chemokines CXCL10, CCL4, CCL8, CCL11 and CXCL8 and the chemokine receptors CCR3, CXCR3, CCR5 and CCR7 in the lesions of patients with different clinical forms of ACL using immunohistochemistry. LCL patients exhibited a high density of CXCL10+, CCL4+ and CCL8+ cells, indicating an important role for these chemokines in the local Th1 immune response and the migration of CXCR3+ cells. LCL patients showed a higher density of CCR7+ cells than ICL or DCL patients, suggesting major dendritic cell (DC migration to lymph nodes. Furthermore, DCL was associated with low expression levels of Th1-associated chemokines and CCL11+ epidermal DCs, which contribute to the recruitment of CCR3+ cells. Our findings also suggest an important role for epidermal cells in the induction of skin immune responses through the production of chemokines, such as CXCL10, by keratinocytes.

  5. GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β chain (CD131 expression as a biomarker of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maric Dragan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon Ag-activation cytotoxic T cells (CTLs produce IFN-γ GM-CSF and TNF-α, which deliver simultaneously pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory signals to the surrounding microenvironment. Whether this secretion affects in an autocrine loop the CTLs themselves is unknown. Methods Here, we compared the transcriptional profile of Ag-activated, Flu-specific CTL stimulated with the FLU M1:58-66 peptide to that of convivial CTLs expanded in vitro in the same culture. PBMCs from 6 HLA-A*0201 expressing donors were expanded for 7 days in culture following Flu M1:58-66 stimulation in the presence of 300 IU/ml of interleukin-2 and than sorted by high speed sorting to high purity CD8+ expressing T cells gated according to FluM1:58-66 tetrameric human leukocyte antigen complexes expression. Results Ag-activated CTLs displayed higher levels of IFN-γ, GM-CSF (CSF2 and GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β- chain (CD131 but lacked completely expression of IFN-γ receptor-II and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. This observation suggested that Ag-activated CTLs in preparation for the release of IFN-γ and GM-CSF shield themselves from the potentially apoptotic effects of the former entrusting their survival to GM-SCF. In vitro phenotyping confirmed the selective surface expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs and their increased proliferation upon exogenous administration of GM-CSF. Conclusion The selective responsiveness of Ag-activated CTLs to GM-CSF may provide an alternative explanation to the usefulness of this chemokine as an adjuvant for T cell aimed vaccines. Moreover, the selective expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs proposes CD131 as a novel biomarker of Ag-dependent CTL activation.

  6. Biased and G protein-independent signaling of chemokine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eSteen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor, different receptors (with the same ligand or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand-receptor pair. Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e. full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of classic redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confer a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor- or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the

  7. Genetic variants in the chemokines and chemokine receptors in Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Oscar; Martín, Javier; González, Clara Isabel

    2012-08-01

    Clinical symptoms of Chagas' disease occur in 30% of the individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and are characterised by heart inflammation and dysfunction. Chemokines and chemokine receptors control the migration of leukocytes during the inflammatory process and are involved in the modulation of Th1 or Th2 responses. To determine their influence, we investigated the possible role of CCL5/RANTES and CXCL8/IL8 chemokines, and CCR2 and CCR5 chemokines receptors cluster gene polymorphisms with the development of chagasic cardiomyopathy. Our study included 260 Chagas seropositive individuals (asymptomatic, n=130; cardiomyopathic, n=130) from an endemic area of Colombia. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. We found statistically significant differences in the distribution of the CCR5 human haplogroup (HH)-A (p=0.027; OR=3.78, 95% CI=1.04-13.72). Moreover, we found that the CCR5-2733 G and CCR5-2554 T alleles are associated, respectively, with a reduced risk of susceptibility and severity to develop chagasic cardiomyopathy. No other associations were found to be significant for the other polymorphisms analysed in the CCR5, CCR2, CCL5/RANTES and CXCL8/IL8 genes. Our data suggest that the analysed chemokines and chemokine receptor genetic variants have a weak but important association with the development of chagasic cardiomyopathy in the population under study.

  8. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E;

    2014-01-01

    ) clonotypes within individual HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations was also apparent, independent of clonal dominance hierarchies. Positive correlations were detected between PD-1 expression and plasma viral load, which were reinforced by stratification for epitope sequence stability and dictated...... by effector memory CD8+ T cells. CONCLUSION: Collectively, these data suggest that PD-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells tracks antigen load at the level of epitope specificity and TCR clonotype usage. These findings are important because they provide evidence that PD-1 expression levels......OBJECTIVES: Although CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the control of HIV-1 infection,their antiviral efficacy can be limited by antigenic variation and immune exhaustion.The latter phenomenon is characterized by the upregulation of multiple inhibitory receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1...

  9. Antigen and transforming growth factor beta receptors contribute to long term functional and phenotypic heterogeneity of memory CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghong eHu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen-specific CD8 T cells provide a mechanism for selectively eliminating host cells that are harboring intracellular pathogens. The pathogens are killed when lytic molecules are injected into the cytoplasm of the infected cells and begin an apoptotic cascade. Activated CD8 T cells also release large quantities of proinflammatory cytokines that stimulate other immune cells in the local vicinity. As the alveoli are extraordinarily sensitive to cytokine induced damage, multiple layers of immune regulation limit the activities of immune cells that enter the lungs. These mechanisms include receptor-mediated signaling pathways in CD8 T cells that respond to peptide antigens and transforming growth factor-beta. Both pathways influence the functional and phenotypic properties of long-lived CD8 T cells populations in peripheral and lymphoid tissues.

  10. Chemokines and their receptors in Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vorst, Emiel P C; Döring, Yvonne; Weber, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the medium- and large-sized arteries, is the main underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) most often leading to a myocardial infarction or stroke. However, atherosclerosis can also develop without this clinical manifestation. The pathophysiology of atherosclerosis is very complex and consists of many cells and molecules interacting with each other. Over the last years, chemokines (small 8-12 kDa cytokines with chemotactic properties) have been identified as key players in atherogenesis. However, this remains a very active and dynamic field of research. Here, we will give an overview of the current knowledge about the involvement of chemokines in all phases of atherosclerotic lesion development. Furthermore, we will focus on two chemokines that recently have been associated with atherogenesis, CXCL12, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Both chemokines play a crucial role in leukocyte recruitment and arrest, a critical step in atherosclerosis development. MIF has shown to be a more pro-inflammatory and thus pro-atherogenic chemokine, instead CXCL12 seems to have a more protective function. However, results about this protective role are still quite debatable. Future research will further elucidate the precise role of these chemokines in atherosclerosis and determine the potential of chemokine-based therapies. PMID:26175090

  11. Characterization of a novel single-chain bispecific antibody for retargeting of T cells to tumor cells via the TCR co-receptor CD8.

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    Irene Michalk

    Full Text Available There is currently growing interest in retargeting of effector T cells to tumor cells via bispecific antibodies (bsAbs. Usually, bsAbs are directed on the one hand to the CD3 complex of T cells and on the other hand to a molecule expressed on the surface of the target cell. A bsAb-mediated cross-linkage via CD3 leads to an activation of CD8+ T cells and consequently to killing of the target cells. In parallel, CD4+ T cells including TH1, TH2, TH17 cells and even regulatory T cells (Tregs will be activated as well. Cytokines produced by CD4+ T cells can contribute to severe side effects e. g. life-threatening cytokine storms and, thinking of the immunosupressive function of Tregs, can even be counterproductive. Therefore, we asked whether or not it is feasible to limit retargeting to CD8+ T cells e. g. via targeting of the co-receptor CD8 instead of CD3. In order to test for proof of concept, a novel bsAb with specificity for CD8 and a tumor-associated surface antigen was constructed. Interestingly, we found that pre-activated (but not freshly isolated CD8+ T cells can be retargeted via CD8-engaging bsAbs leading to an efficient lysis of target cells.

  12. CXCR3 expression defines a novel subset of innate CD8+ T cells that enhance immunity against bacterial infection and cancer upon stimulation with IL-15

    OpenAIRE

    Oghumu, Steve; Terrazas, Cesar A.; Varikuti, Sanjay; Kimble, Jennifer; Vadia, Stephen; Yu, Lianbo; Seveau, Stephanie; Abhay R Satoskar

    2014-01-01

    Innate CD8+ T cells are a heterogeneous population with developmental pathways distinct from conventional CD8+ T cells. However, their biology, classification, and functions remain incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the existence of a novel population of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3)-positive innate CD8+ T cells. Here, we investigated the functional properties of this subset and identified effector molecules and pathways which mediate their function. Adoptive trans...

  13. Enhanced Chemokine Receptor Expression on Leukocytes of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Goldeck

    Full Text Available Although primarily a neurological complaint, systemic inflammation is present in Alzheimer's Disease, with higher than normal levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the periphery as well as the brain. A gradient of these factors may enhance recruitment of activated immune cells into the brain via chemotaxis. Here, we investigated the phenotypes of circulating immune cells in AD patients with multi-colour flow cytometry to determine whether their expression of chemokine receptors is consistent with this hypothesis. In this study, we confirmed our previously reported data on the shift of early- to late-differentiated CD4+ T-cells in AD patients. The percentage of cells expressing CD25, a marker of acute T-cell activation, was higher in patients than in age-matched controls, and percentages of CCR6+ cells were elevated. This chemokine receptor is primarily expressed on pro-inflammatory memory cells and Th17 cells. The proportion of cells expressing CCR4 (expressed on Th2 cells and CCR5 (Th1 cells and dendritic cells was also greater in patients, and was more pronounced on CD4+ than CD8+ T-cells. These findings allow a more detailed insight into the systemic immune status of patients with Alzheimer's disease and suggest possible novel targets for immune therapy.

  14. 4-1BB Signaling Enhances Primary and Secondary Population Expansion of CD8+ T Cells by Maximizing Autocrine IL-2/IL-2 Receptor Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho S Oh

    Full Text Available 4-1BB (CD137, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF, is primarily expressed on activated T cells and is known to enhance proliferation of T cells, prevent activation-induced cell death, and promote memory formation of CD8+ T cells. In particular, it is well acknowledged that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells rather than CD4+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we found that 4-1BB triggering markedly increased IL-2Rα (CD25 and IL-2 expressions of CD8+ T cells but minimally for CD4+ T cells. Proliferation of CD8+ T cells was moderately enhanced by direct 4-1BB triggering in the absence of signaling through IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions, but further promoted in the presence of IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions. Among the TNFRSF members including OX40, GITR, CD30, and CD27, 4-1BB was superior in the ability to induce IL-2Rα expression on CD8+ T cells. When the primary and secondary expansions of CD8+ T cells in vivo were examined by adoptively transferring OVA-specific CD8+ T cells along with the treatment with agonistic anti-4-1BB and/or antagonistic anti-CD25 F(ab'2 mAb, 4-1BB triggering enhanced both primary and secondary expansion of CD8+ T cells in vivo, and the 4-1BB effects were moderately suppressed in primary expansion while completely abolished in secondary expansion of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by blocking IL-2Rα. These results suggest that 4-1BB-mediated increases of IL-2Rα and IL-2 prolong the effects of transient TCR- and 4-1BB-mediated signaling in CD8+ T cells, and that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells through the amplification of autocrine IL-2/IL-2R signaling loop.

  15. 4-1BB Signaling Enhances Primary and Secondary Population Expansion of CD8+ T Cells by Maximizing Autocrine IL-2/IL-2 Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ho S; Choi, Beom K; Kim, Young H; Lee, Don G; Hwang, Sunhee; Lee, Myoung J; Park, Sang H; Bae, Yong-Soo; Kwon, Byoung S

    2015-01-01

    4-1BB (CD137), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), is primarily expressed on activated T cells and is known to enhance proliferation of T cells, prevent activation-induced cell death, and promote memory formation of CD8+ T cells. In particular, it is well acknowledged that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells rather than CD4+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we found that 4-1BB triggering markedly increased IL-2Rα (CD25) and IL-2 expressions of CD8+ T cells but minimally for CD4+ T cells. Proliferation of CD8+ T cells was moderately enhanced by direct 4-1BB triggering in the absence of signaling through IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions, but further promoted in the presence of IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions. Among the TNFRSF members including OX40, GITR, CD30, and CD27, 4-1BB was superior in the ability to induce IL-2Rα expression on CD8+ T cells. When the primary and secondary expansions of CD8+ T cells in vivo were examined by adoptively transferring OVA-specific CD8+ T cells along with the treatment with agonistic anti-4-1BB and/or antagonistic anti-CD25 F(ab')2 mAb, 4-1BB triggering enhanced both primary and secondary expansion of CD8+ T cells in vivo, and the 4-1BB effects were moderately suppressed in primary expansion while completely abolished in secondary expansion of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by blocking IL-2Rα. These results suggest that 4-1BB-mediated increases of IL-2Rα and IL-2 prolong the effects of transient TCR- and 4-1BB-mediated signaling in CD8+ T cells, and that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells through the amplification of autocrine IL-2/IL-2R signaling loop. PMID:25962156

  16. Distinct chemokine receptor and cytokine expression profile in secondary progressive MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Sellebjerg, F

    2001-01-01

    Chemokines, small chemotactic cytokines, have been implicated in active relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). However, the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors has not been specifically studied in secondary progressive MS (SPMS)....

  17. The atypical chemokine receptor D6 contributes to the development of experimental colitis1

    OpenAIRE

    Bordon, Yvonne; Hansell, Chris A H; Sester, David P; Clarke, Mairi; Mowat, Allan McI; Nibbs, Robert J B

    2009-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory CC chemokines control leukocyte recruitment and function during inflammation by engaging chemokine receptors expressed on circulating leukocytes. The D6 chemokine receptor can bind several of these chemokines but appears unable to couple to signal transduction pathways or direct cell migration. Instead, D6 has been proposed to act as a chemokine scavenger, removing pro-inflammatory chemokines to dampen leukocyte responses. In this report, we have examined the role of D6 in th...

  18. Type 1 chemokine receptor expression in Chagas' disease correlates with morbidity in cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Juliana A S; Bahia-Oliveira, Lilian M G; Rocha, Manoel Otávio C; Busek, Solange C U; Teixeira, Mauro M; Silva, João Santana; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2005-12-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors (CKRs) control the migration of leukocytes during the inflammatory process and are important immunological markers of type 1 (CCR5 and CXCR3) and type 2 (CCR3 and CCR4) responses. The coexpression of CKRs (CCR2, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR3, and CXCR4) and intracellular cytokines (interleukin-10 [IL-10], IL-4, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha], and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma]) on T CD4+ and CD8+ peripheral cells from individuals with indeterminate (IND) or cardiac (CARD) clinical forms of Chagas' disease after in vitro stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens, were evaluated in this study. The percentage of T CD4+ and CD8+ cells coexpressing CCR5 and IFN-gamma, CXCR3 and IFN-gamma, and CXCR3 and TNF-alpha were higher in CARD than in IND individuals; on the other hand, the percentage of T CD4+ or CD8+ cells coexpressing CCR3 and IL-10 or coexpressing CCR3 and IL-4 were lower in CARD individuals than in IND individuals. In addition, a significant positive correlation between the expression of CCR5 or CXCR3 and IFN-gamma was observed in CARD individuals contrasting with a significant positive correlation between the expression of CCR3 and IL-4 and of CCR3 and IL-10 in IND patients. These results reinforce the hypothesis that a T. cruzi-exacerbated specific type 1 immune response developed by CARD chagasic patients is associated with the development of heart pathology.

  19. A highly restricted T-cell receptor dominates the CD8+ T-cell response to parvovirus B19 infection in HLA-A*2402-positive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprowicz, V; Jeffery, K; Broliden, K;

    2006-01-01

    Six of seven HLA-A*2402-positive individuals with acute parvovirus B19 infections made vigorous CD8-positive cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses to the viral epitope FYTPLADQF. All responders showed highly focused T-cell receptor (TCR) usage, using almost exclusively BV5.1. The BV5.1 TCR dominated...

  20. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors as Novel Therapeutic Targets in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Inhibitory Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicinal Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Chen; Joost J. Oppenheim; O.M.Zack Howard

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines belong to a large family of inflammatory cytokines responsible for migration and accumulation of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence indicated a crucial role for chemokines and chemokine receptors in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a chronic autoimmune disease in which the synovial tissue is heavily infiltrated by leukocytes. Chemokines play an important role in the infiltration, localization, retention of infiltrating leukocytes and generation of ectopic germinal centers in the inflamed synovium. Recent evidence also suggests that identification of inhibitors directly targeting chemokines or their receptors may provide a novel therapeutic strategy in RA. Traditional Chinese medicinals (TCMs) have a long history in the treatment of inflammatory joint disease. The basis for the clinical benefits of TCM remains largely unclear. Our studies have led to the identification of numerous novel chemokine/chemokine receptor inhibitors present in anti-inflammatory TCMs. All of these inhibitors were previously reported by other researchers to have anti-arthritic effect, which may be attributable, at least in part, to their inhibitory effect on chemokine and/or chemokine receptor. Therefore, identification of agents capable of targeting chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions has suggested a mechanism of action for several TCM components and provided a means of identifying additional anti-RA TCM. Thus, this approach may lead to the discovery of new inhibitors of chemokines or chemokine receptors that can be used to treat diseases associated with inappropriately overactive chemokine mediated inflammatory reactions. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):336-342.

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Targeted Rectification of Impaired CD8⁺ T Cell Functions in Experimental Leishmania donovani Infection Reinstates Host Protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamdas Bandyopadhyay

    Full Text Available Leishmania donovani, a protozoan parasite, causes the disease visceral leishmanisis (VL, characterized by inappropriate CD8+ T-cell activation. Therefore, we examined whether the Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2 ligand Ara-LAM, a cell wall glycolipid from non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis, would restore CD8+ T-cell function during VL. We observed that by efficient upregulation of TLR2 signaling-mediated NF-κB translocation and MAPK signaling in CD8+ T-cells (CD25+CD28+IL-12R+IFN-γR+, Ara-LAM triggered signaling resulted in the activation of T-bet, which in turn, induced transcription favourable histone modification at the IFN-γ, perforin, granzyme-B promoter regions in CD8+ T-cells. Thus, we conclude that Ara-LAM induced efficient activation of effector CD8+ T-cells by upregulating the expression of IFN-γ, perforin and granzyme-B in an NF-κB and MAPK induced T-bet dependent manner in VL.

  2. CD3 Ligation on Immature Thymocytes Generates Antagonist-like Signals Appropriate for CD8 Lineage Commitment, Independently of  T Cell Receptor Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert Basson, M.; Bommhardt, Ursula; Cole, Michael S.; Tso, J. Yun; Zamoyska, Rose

    1998-01-01

    The signals that direct differentiation of T cells to the CD4 or CD8 lineages in the thymus remain poorly understood. Although it has been relatively easy to direct differentiation of CD4 single positive (CD4+) cells using combinations of antibodies and pharmacological agents that mimic receptor engagements, equivalent stimuli do not induce efficient maturation of CD8+ cells. Here we report that, irrespective of the MHC-restriction specificity of the TCR, differentiation of mature CD8+ thymocytes can be induced by ligation of CD3 polypeptides on immature thymocytes with a F(ab′)2 reagent (CD3fos-F(ab′)2). The tyrosine phosphorylation patterns stimulated by CD3fos-F(ab′)2 have been shown to resemble those delivered to mature T cells by antagonist peptides, which are known to direct positive selection of CD8+ cells, and we can show that this reagent exhibits potent antagonistic-like activity for primary T cell responses. Our results suggest a distinction in the signals that specify lineage commitment in the thymus. We present a model of thymocyte differentiation that proposes that the relative balance of signals delivered by TCR engagement and by p56lck activation is responsible for directing commitment to the CD8 or CD4 lineages. PMID:9547336

  3. Autoreactive effector/memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells infiltrating grafted and endogenous islets in diabetic NOD mice exhibit similar T cell receptor usage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Diz

    Full Text Available Islet transplantation provides a "cure" for type 1 diabetes but is limited in part by recurrent autoimmunity mediated by β cell-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. Insight into the T cell receptor (TCR repertoire of effector T cells driving recurrent autoimmunity would aid the development of immunotherapies to prevent islet graft rejection. Accordingly, we used a multi-parameter flow cytometry strategy to assess the TCR variable β (Vβ chain repertoires of T cell subsets involved in autoimmune-mediated rejection of islet grafts in diabetic NOD mouse recipients. Naïve CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells exhibited a diverse TCR repertoire, which was similar in all tissues examined in NOD recipients including the pancreas and islet grafts. On the other hand, the effector/memory CD8(+ T cell repertoire in the islet graft was dominated by one to four TCR Vβ chains, and specific TCR Vβ chain usage varied from recipient to recipient. Similarly, islet graft- infiltrating effector/memory CD4(+ T cells expressed a limited number of prevalent TCR Vβ chains, although generally TCR repertoire diversity was increased compared to effector/memory CD8(+ T cells. Strikingly, the majority of NOD recipients showed an increase in TCR Vβ12-bearing effector/memory CD4(+ T cells in the islet graft, most of which were proliferating, indicating clonal expansion. Importantly, TCR Vβ usage by effector/memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells infiltrating the islet graft exhibited greater similarity to the repertoire found in the pancreas as opposed to the draining renal lymph node, pancreatic lymph node, or spleen. Together these results demonstrate that effector/memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells mediating autoimmune rejection of islet grafts are characterized by restricted TCR Vβ chain usage, and are similar to T cells that drive destruction of the endogenous islets.

  4. Chemokine Receptor 7 Knockout Attenuates Atherosclerotic Plaque Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtefeld, Maren; Grothusen, Christina; Gagalick, Andreas; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Schuett, Harald; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Pabst, Oliver; Grote, Karsten; Drexler, Helmut; Foerster, Reinhold; Schieffer, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Background-Atherosclerosis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Both innate immunity and adaptive immunity contribute to atherogenesis, but the mode of interaction is poorly understood. Chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) is critically involved in the

  5. ANTI-APOPTOTIC EFFECT OF CD95 RECEPTOR IN NA VE CD8+ T-LYMPHOCYTES IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Filatova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute infectious mononucleosis is a widespread viral disease, which most often manifests in childhood. The development of acute infectious mononucleosis is accompanied by the change of the CD4+/CD8+ T-lymphocytes ratio and the increase of the virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes number. One of the T-lymphocytes number regulation mechanisms is the modulation of their progenitor cells apoptosis. The death receptor CD95 takes part in the regulation of T-lymphocytes apoptosis, including naïve T-cells. We studied the effect of CD95 receptor activation on apoptosis of naïve CD4+ and naïve cytotoxic CD8+ T-lymphocytes in healthy children and children with acute infectious mononucleosis. In this study children with acute infectious mononucleosis at the age of 9 to 16 years were included. For comparison healthy children of the same age with no clinical and laboratory signs of the disease were used. Naïve CD4+ and naïve cytotoxic CD8+ T-lymphocytes were isolated by negative magnetic immunoseparation. The analysis of naïve T-cells apoptosis and the CD95 receptor surface expression density was performed by using the flow cytometry analysis. The analysis of T-cells was performed in three variants: freshly isolated naïve CD4+ T-lymphocytes and naïve cytotoxic CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and also cells after 24 hours of the cultivation with anti-CD95 monoclonal antibodies or without them. In healthy children both CD95– and CD95+ naïve CD4+ T-lymphocytes underwent apoptosis. In children with acute infectious mononucleosis CD95– naïve CD4+ T-lymphocytes lost their susceptibility to apoptosis induction. In healthy children and children with acute infectious mononucleosis CD95– naïve cytotoxic CD8+ T-lymphocytes were resistant to apoptosis in contrast to CD95+ naïve CD4+ T-lymphocytes. In healthy children CD95 receptor did not induce apoptosis of isolated naïve CD4+ T-lymphocytes and naïve cytotoxic CD8+ T-lymphocytes. In children with acute

  6. CD8+ T Cell Immunodominance in Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Infection Is Modified in the Presence of Toll-Like Receptor Agonists ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Sarah; Basta, Sameh

    2011-01-01

    Currently, we have limited understanding of how Toll-like receptor (TLR) engagement by microbial products influences the immune response during a concurrent virus infection. In this study, we established that dual TLR2 plus TLR3 (designated TLR2+3) stimulation alters the immunodominance hierarchies of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) epitopes by reducing NP396-specific CD8+ T cell responses and shifting it to a subdominant position. The shift in immunodominance occurred due to a redu...

  7. Discovery of indole inhibitors of chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Bhaumik A; Baber, Christian; Chan, Audrey; Chamberlain, Brian; Chandonnet, Haoqun; Goss, Jennifer; Hopper, Timothy; Lippa, Blaise; Poutsiaka, Katherine; Romero, Jan; Stucka, Sabrina; Varoglu, Mustafa; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Xin

    2016-07-15

    Irritable bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are serious chronic diseases affecting millions of patients worldwide. Studies of human chemokine biology has suggested C-C chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) may be a key mediator of pro-inflammatory signaling. Discovery of agents that inhibit CCR9 may lead to new therapies for CD and UC patients. Herein we describe the evolution of a high content screening hit (1) into potent inhibitors of CCR9, such as azaindole 12. PMID:27256913

  8. Differential expression of chemokines, chemokine receptors and proteinases by foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Usman A; Hashimi, Saeed M; Khan, Shershah; Quan, Jingjing; Bakr, Mahmoud M; Forwood, Mark R; Morrison, Nigel M

    2014-07-01

    Osteoclasts and foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) are both derived from the fusion of macropahges. These cells are seen in close proximity during foreign body reactions, therefore it was assumed that they might interact with each other. The aim was to identify important genes that are expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs which can be used to understand peri-implantitis and predict the relationship of these cells during foreign body reactions. Bone marrow macrophages (BMM) were treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) to produce osteoclasts. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to identify the genes that were expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs compared to macrophage controls. TRAP staining was used to visualise the cells while gelatine zymography and western blots were used for protein expression. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), matrix metallo proteinase 9 (MMP9), nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1), cathepsin K (CTSK) and RANK were significantly lower in FBGCs compared to osteoclasts. Inflammation specific chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP1 also called CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP1α), MIP1β and MIP1γ, and their receptors CCR1, CCR3 and CCR5, were highly expressed by FBGCs. FBGCs were negative for osteoclast specific markers (RANK, NFATc1, CTSK). FBGCs expressed chemokines such as CCL2, 3, 5 and 9 while osteoclasts expressed the receptors for these chemokines i.e. CCR1, 2 and 3. Our findings show that osteoclast specific genes are not expressed by FBGCs and that FBGCs interact with osteoclasts during foreign body reaction through chemokines.

  9. T cells and gene regulation: the switching on and turning up of genes after T cell receptor stimulation in CD8 T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Conley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Signaling downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR is directly regulated by the dose and affinity of peptide antigen. The strength of TCR signaling drives a multitude of T cell functions from development to differentiation. CD8 T cells differentiate into a diverse pool of effector and memory cells after activation, a process that is critical for pathogen clearance and is highly regulated by TCR signal strength. T cells rapidly alter their gene expression upon activation. Multiple signaling pathways downstream of the TCR activate transcription factors, which are critical for this process. The dynamics between proximal TCR signaling, transcription factor activation, and CD8 T cell function are discussed here. We propose that Inducible T cell kinase (ITK acts as a rheostat for gene expression. This unique regulation of TCR signaling by ITK provides a possible signaling mechanism for the promotion of a diverse T cell repertoire in response to pathogen.

  10. T Cells and Gene Regulation: The Switching On and Turning Up of Genes after T Cell Receptor Stimulation in CD8 T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, James M.; Gallagher, Michael P.; Berg, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Signaling downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) is directly regulated by the dose and affinity of peptide antigen. The strength of TCR signaling drives a multitude of T cell functions from development to differentiation. CD8 T cells differentiate into a diverse pool of effector and memory cells after activation, a process that is critical for pathogen clearance and is highly regulated by TCR signal strength. T cells rapidly alter their gene expression upon activation. Multiple signaling pathways downstream of the TCR activate transcription factors, which are critical for this process. The dynamics between proximal TCR signaling, transcription factor activation and CD8 T cell function are discussed here. We propose that inducible T cell kinase (ITK) acts as a rheostat for gene expression. This unique regulation of TCR signaling by ITK provides a possible signaling mechanism for the promotion of a diverse T cell repertoire in response to pathogen. PMID:26973653

  11. Virally encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors in the role of viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Lüttichau, Hans R; Schwartz, Thue W;

    2003-01-01

    Large DNA viruses such as pox- and in particular herpesviruses are notorious in their ability to evade the immune system and to be maintained in the general population. Based on the accumulated knowledge reviewed in this study it is evident that important mechanisms of these actions are the acqui......Large DNA viruses such as pox- and in particular herpesviruses are notorious in their ability to evade the immune system and to be maintained in the general population. Based on the accumulated knowledge reviewed in this study it is evident that important mechanisms of these actions...... are the acquisition and modification of host-encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors. The described viral molecules leave nothing to chance and have thoroughly and efficiently corrupted the host immune system. Through this process viruses have identified key molecules in antiviral responses by their inhibition...... for antiviral therapies have been provided by UL33, UL78 and in particular ORF74 and the chances are that many more will follow. In HHV8 vMIP-2 and the chemokine-binding proteins potent anti-inflammatory agents have been provided. These have already had their potential demonstrated in animal models and may...

  12. Involvement of chemokine receptors in breast cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Anja; Homey, Bernhard; Soto, Hortensia; Ge, Nianfeng; Catron, Daniel; Buchanan, Matthew E.; McClanahan, Terri; Murphy, Erin; Yuan, Wei; Wagner, Stephan N.; Barrera, Jose Luis; Mohar, Alejandro; Verástegui, Emma; Zlotnik, Albert

    2001-03-01

    Breast cancer is characterized by a distinct metastatic pattern involving the regional lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and liver. Tumour cell migration and metastasis share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Here we report that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 are highly expressed in human breast cancer cells, malignant breast tumours and metastases. Their respective ligands CXCL12/SDF-1α and CCL21/6Ckine exhibit peak levels of expression in organs representing the first destinations of breast cancer metastasis. In breast cancer cells, signalling through CXCR4 or CCR7 mediates actin polymerization and pseudopodia formation, and subsequently induces chemotactic and invasive responses. In vivo, neutralizing the interactions of CXCL12/CXCR4 significantly impairs metastasis of breast cancer cells to regional lymph nodes and lung. Malignant melanoma, which has a similar metastatic pattern as breast cancer but also a high incidence of skin metastases, shows high expression levels of CCR10 in addition to CXCR4 and CCR7. Our findings indicate that chemokines and their receptors have a critical role in determining the metastatic destination of tumour cells.

  13. Cell-autonomous role of TGFβ and IL-2 receptors in CD4+ and CD8+ inducible regulatory T-cell generation during GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamukai, Norifumi; Satake, Atsushi; Schmidt, Amanda M; Lamborn, Ian T; Ojha, Priti; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Kambayashi, Taku

    2012-06-01

    FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress GVHD while preserving graft-versus-tumor effects, making them an attractive target for GVHD therapy. The donor-derived Treg pool can potentially be derived from the expansion of preexisting natural Tregs (nTregs) or from de novo generation of inducible Tregs (iTregs) from donor Tconvs in the transplantation recipient. Using an MHC-mismatched model of acute GVHD, in the present study we found that the Treg pool was comprised equally of donor-derived nTregs and iTregs. Experiments using various combinations of T cells from wild-type and FoxP3-deficient mice suggested that both preexisting donor nTregs and the generation of iTregs in the recipient mice contribute to protection against GVHD. Surprisingly, CD8(+)FoxP3(+) T cells represented approximately 70% of the iTreg pool. These CD8(+)FoxP3(+) T cells shared phenotypic markers with their CD4(+) counterparts and displayed suppressive activity, suggesting that they were bona fide iTregs. Both CD4(+) and CD8(+) Tregs appeared to be protective against GVHD-induced lethality and required IL-2 and TGFβ receptor expression for their generation. These data illustrate the complex makeup of the donor-derived FoxP3(+) Treg pool in allogeneic recipients and their potential role in protection against GVHD.

  14. The emerging role of CXC chemokines and their receptors in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2012-05-01

    Chemokines and their receptors have a multifaceted role in tumor biology and are implicated in nearly all aspects of cancer growth, survival and dissemination. Modulation of the interaction between chemokines and their cell surface receptor is, therefore, a promising area for the development of new cancer medicines. In this review, we look at the compelling evidence that is emerging to support targeting CXC chemokines, also known as family α chemokines, as novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22571611

  15. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors as Novel Therapeutic Targets in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Inhibitory Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicinal Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XinChen; JoostJ.Oppenheim; O.M.ZackHoward

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines belong to a large family of inflammatory cytokines responsible for migration and accumulation of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence indicated a crucial role for chemokines and chemokine receptors in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a chronic autoimmune disease in which the synovial tissue is heavily infiltrated by leukocytes. Chemokines play an important role in the infiltration, localization, retention of infiltrating leukocytes and generation of ectopic germinal centers in the inflamed synovium. Recent evidence also suggests that identification of inhibitors directly targeting chemokines or their receptors may provide a novel therapeutic strategy in RA. Traditional Chinese medicinals (TCMs) have a long history in the treatment of inflammatory joint disease. The basis forthe clinical benefits of TCM remains largely unclear. Our studies have led to the identification of numerousnovel chemokine/chemokine receptor inhibitors present in anti,inflammatory TCMs. All of these inhibitors were previously reported by other researchers to have anti-arthritic effect, which may be attributable, at leastin part, to their inhibitory effect on chemokine and/or chemokine receptor. Therefore, identification of agents capable of targeting chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions has suggested a mechanism of action for several TCM components and provided a means of identifying additional anti-RA TCM. Thus, this approach may lead to the discovery of new inhibitors of chemokines or chemokine receptors that can be used to treat diseases associated with inappropriately overactive chemokine mediated inflammatory reactions. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):336-342.

  16. IFN-gamma-receptor signaling ameliorates transplant vasculopathy through attenuation of CD8+ T-cell-mediated injury of vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolinger, Beatrice; Engeler, Daniel; Krebs, Philippe; Miller, Simone; Firner, Sonja; Hoffmann, Matthias; Palmer, Douglas C; Restifo, Nicholas P; Tian, Yinghua; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2010-03-01

    Occlusive transplant vasculopathy (TV) is the major cause for chronic graft rejection. Since endothelial cells (EC) are the first graft cells encountered by activated host lymphocytes, it is important to delineate the molecular mechanisms that coordinate the interaction of EC with activated T cells. Here, the interaction of CD8(+) T cells with Ag-presenting EC in vivo was examined using a transgenic heart transplantation model with beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) expression exclusively in EC (Tie2-LacZ hearts). We found that priming with beta-gal peptide-loaded DC failed to generate a strong systemic IFN-gamma response, but elicited pronounced TV in both IFN-gamma receptor (IFNGR)-competent, and ifngr(-/-) Tie2-LacZ hearts. In contrast, stimulation of EC-specific CD8(+) T cells with beta-gal-recombinant mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV-LacZ) in recipients of ifngr(+/+) Tie2-LacZ hearts did not precipitate significant TV. However, MCMV-LacZ infection of recipients of ifngr(-/-) Tie2-LacZ hearts led to massive activation of beta-gal-specific CD8 T cells, and led to development of fulminant TV. Further analyses revealed that the strong systemic IFN-gamma "storm" associated with MCMV infection induced upregulation of programmed death-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) on EC, and subsequent attenuation of programmed death-1 (PD-1)-expressing EC-specific CD8(+) T cells. Thus, IFNGR signaling in ECs activates a potent peripheral negative feedback circuit that protects vascularized grafts from occlusive TV. PMID:20049875

  17. Study on the Expression of Killer Ig-like Receptors 3DL1 in the Peripheral Blood CD8 +T Lymphocytes from Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B%慢性乙型肝炎患者外周血CD8+T细胞的KIR3DL1表达的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈颖; 常珊碧; 金文君

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the expression of killer Ig-like receptors 3DL1 ( KIR3DL1) on the peripheral blood CD8 + T lymphocytes in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Methods KIR3DL1 expression on the peripheral blood CD8 * T lymphocytes was detected by flow cytometry in the patients with chronic hepatitis B and normal controls. Results KIR3DL1 expression on the peripheral blood CD8 + T lymphocytes in patients with chronic hepatitis B are significantly higher than that of controls. Conclusion The expression of killer Ig-like receptors 3DL1 on the peripheral blood CD8 + T lymphocytes increased significantly in patients with chronic hepatitis B.%目的:检测慢性乙型肝炎患者外周血CD8+T细胞的KIR3DL1表达情况.方法::采用流式细胞术检测慢性乙型肝炎患者外周血CD8+T细胞的KIR3DL1分子表达,并与正常对照组比较.结果:慢性乙型肝炎患者外周血CD8 +T细胞的KIR3DL1分子表达明显高于对照组.结论:慢性乙型肝炎患者CD8+T细胞的KIR3DL1表达显著增加.

  18. Dual GPCR and GAG mimicry by the M3 chemokine decoy receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M.; Fremont, Daved H. (WU-MED)

    2008-09-23

    Viruses have evolved a myriad of evasion strategies focused on undermining chemokine-mediated immune surveillance, exemplified by the mouse {gamma}-herpesvirus 68 M3 decoy receptor. Crystal structures of M3 in complex with C chemokine ligand 1/lymphotactin and CC chemokine ligand 2/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 reveal that invariant chemokine features associated with G protein-coupled receptor binding are primarily recognized by the decoy C-terminal domain, whereas the N-terminal domain (NTD) reconfigures to engage divergent basic residue clusters on the surface of chemokines. Favorable electrostatic forces dramatically enhance the association kinetics of chemokine binding by M3, with a primary role ascribed to acidic NTD regions that effectively mimic glycosaminoglycan interactions. Thus, M3 employs two distinct mechanisms of chemical imitation to potently sequester chemokines, thereby inhibiting chemokine receptor binding events as well as the formation of chemotactic gradients necessary for directed leukocyte trafficking.

  19. Inflammatory disease protective R381Q IL23 receptor polymorphism results in decreased primary CD4+ and CD8+ human T-cell functional responses

    OpenAIRE

    Sarin, Ritu; Wu, Xingxin; Abraham, Clara

    2011-01-01

    The SNP (c.1142G > A;p.R381Q) in the IL-23 receptor (IL23R) confers protection from multiple inflammatory diseases, representing one of the most significant human genetic polymorphisms in autoimmunity. We, therefore, sought to define the functional consequences of this clinically significant variant. We find that CD4+CD45RO+ and CD8+ T cells from healthy R381Q IL23R carriers show decreased IL-23–dependent IL-17 and IL-22 production relative to WT IL23R individuals. This was associated with a ...

  20. Polymorphisms in chemokine and chemokine receptor genes and the development of coal workers' pneumoconiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadif, R.; Mintz, M.; Rivas-Fuentes, S.; Jedlicka, A.; Lavergne, E.; Rodero, M.; Kauffmann, F.; Combadiere, C.; Kleeberger, S.R. [INSERM, Villejuif (France)

    2006-02-07

    Chemokines and their receptors are key regulators of inflammation and may participate in the lung fibrotic process. Associations of polymorphisms in CCL5 (G-403A) and its receptor CCR5 {Delta}32), CCL2 (A-2578G) and CCR2 (V641), and CX3CR1 V2491 and T280M with coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) were investigated in 209 miners examined in 1990, 1994 and 1999. Coal dust exposure was assessed by job history and ambient measures. The main health outcome was lung computed tomography (CT) score in 1990. Internal coherence was assessed by studying CT score in 1994, 4-year change in CT score, and CWP prevalence in 1999. CCR5 {Delta}32 carriers had significantly higher CT score in 1990 and 1994 (2.15 vs. 1.28, p = 0.01; 3.04 vs. 1.80, p = 0.04). The CX3CR1 1249 allele was significantly associated with lower 1990 CT score and lower progression in 4-year change in CT score in CCR5{Delta}32 carriers only (p for interaction = 0.03 and 0.02). CX3CR1 V2491 was associated with lower 1999 CWP prevalence (16.7%, 13.2%, 0.0% for VV, VI and II); the effect was most evident in miners with high dust exposure (31.6%, 21.7%, 0.0%). Our findings indicate that chemokine receptors CCR5 and CX3CR1 may be involved in the development of pneumoconiosis.

  1. Diverging mechanisms of activation of chemokine receptors revealed by novel chemokine agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Sarmiento

    Full Text Available CXCL8/interleukin-8 is a pro-inflammatory chemokine that triggers pleiotropic responses, including inflammation, angiogenesis, wound healing and tumorigenesis. We engineered the first selective CXCR1 agonists on the basis of residue substitutions in the conserved ELR triad and CXC motif of CXCL8. Our data reveal that the molecular mechanisms of activation of CXCR1 and CXCR2 are distinct: the N-loop of CXCL8 is the major determinant for CXCR1 activation, whereas the N-terminus of CXCL8 (ELR and CXC is essential for CXCR2 activation. We also found that activation of CXCR1 cross-desensitized CXCR2 responses in human neutrophils co-expressing both receptors, indicating that these novel CXCR1 agonists represent a new class of anti-inflammatory agents. Further, these selective CXCR1 agonists will aid at elucidating the functional significance of CXCR1 in vivo under pathophysiological conditions.

  2. Cytokines, Chemokines, and Chemokine Receptors Quantitative Expressions in Patients with Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Rezaeifard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors regulate the proliferation and survival of tumor cells, angiogenesis, and metastasis to other organs. This network of ligands and receptors has been used in molecular targeting of cancer. Methods: We compared the mRNA expression of CXCR3, CXCL-10, CXCR4, CXCL-12, IL-4, and IL-10 in tissues of benign and malignant ovarian tumors by qRT-PCR method and evaluated serum IL-10 and CA-125 content of these patients by ELISA during one year. Results: Our result showed a trend toward a higher expression of CXCR4 in malignant ovarian tissues compared with the benign ovarian cysts (P>0.05. However, SDF-1, IP-10, IL-4, CXCR3, and IL-10 had a lower trend in mRNA expression in malignant ovarian tissues compared to the benign cyst tissues. Except for IL-4 (P=0.01 and SDF-1 (P=0.02, the data for other factors were not statistically significant. A trend toward higher concentration of IL-10 was observed in the serum of ovarian cancer patients compared to those with benign cysts; however, the difference was not significant. CA-125 concentration in the serum of ovarian cancer patients was higher than that of benign cyst patients (P=0.05. Conclusion: According to results obtained, we hypothesize that the lower expression of SDF-1 in malignant tissues may have an important role in ovarian tumor growth. However, this hypothesis requires more investigation. Higher levels of CA125 and IL-10 in the serum of patients might indicate that the combination of these biomarkers could be used for distinguishing patients with ovarian cancer from those with benign cysts.

  3. 转化生长因子β受体在口腔扁平苔藓CD8+T细胞中的表达%Expression of TGF-β receptors in CD8+T cells of oral lichen planus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷蕾; 于淼; 高新宇; 周序珑; 詹丽华

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究转化生长因子β受体(transforming growth factor-β receptor,TGF-βR)在口腔扁平苔藓(oral lichen planus,OLP)组织中CD8+T细胞中的表达,探讨TGF-βR在OLP发病中的作用.方法 采用免疫组化双标记法检测28例OLP组织中CD8+T细胞TGF-βR Ⅰ和TGF-βR Ⅱ蛋白的表达.以10例临床正常口腔黏膜(normal oral mucosa,NOM)为对照组.结果 OLP组织中CD8+及TGF-βR Ⅰ、CD8+及TGF-βR Ⅱ双标记细胞的阳性率分别为(8.82±9.98)%、(1.11±2.94)%.NOM组织中双标记细胞均为零.OLP组CD8+T细胞中TGF-βRⅡ表达与NOM组相比差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),TGF-βR Ⅰ与NOM组相比表达增强.结论 提示OLP组织CD8+T细胞存在TGF-β信号传导异常.这可能是CD8+T细胞缺乏有效抑制、致使OLP慢性炎性反应长期持续的因素之一.

  4. Study of structure function correlation of chemokine receptor CXCR4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hong; Stephen C PEIPER; ZHU Xi-hua

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlation between structure domains and functions of chemokine receptor CXCR4. Methods: After the establishment of wild type chemokine receptor CXCR4 and CXCR2 expressing cell lines, 5 CXCR4/CXCR2 chimeras, 2 CXCR4 mutants were stably expressed on CHO cell line.Binding activities of all variants with the ligand, recombinant human SDF-1β, signal transduction ability after stimulation and their function as coreceptor for HIV-1 were studied with ligand-binding assay, Cytosensor/microphysiometry and cell-cell reporter gene fusion assay. Results: Among all 7 changed CXCR4 receptors, 3 chimeras (2444a, 4442, 4122), and 1 mutant (CXCR4-Tr) bond with SDF-1β in varying degrees, of which only 2444a totally and CXCR4-Tr partially maintain signaling. All changed receptors except for 4222 could act as coreceptors for HIV-1(LAI) in varying degrees. Conclusion: Several structure domains of CXCR4 are involved in the binding with SDF-1β, among which, N-terminal extracellular domain has high affinity of binding with SDF-1β, and the 3rd extracellular loop contributes to the binding, too. Although the C-terminal intracellular domain has no association with the maintenance of the overall structure of the receptor and ligand binding capability, the signaling is decreased when this domain is truncated. For CXCR4 signaling, not only is the conserved motif DRY box needed, but also the characterized conformation of the whole molecule must be formed when activation is required. There are some overlaps between SDF-1β binding domains and coreceptor function domains in molecular structure of CXCR4.

  5. Allosteric and orthosteric sites in CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), a chimeric receptor approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Steen, Anne; Jensen, Pia C;

    2011-01-01

    molecules often act more deeply in an allosteric mode. However, opposed to the well described molecular interaction of allosteric modulators in class C 7-transmembrane helix (7TM) receptors, the interaction in class A, to which the chemokine receptors belong, is more sparsely described. Using the CCR5...... chemokine receptor as a model system, we studied the molecular interaction and conformational interchange required for proper action of various orthosteric chemokines and allosteric small molecules, including the well known CCR5 antagonists TAK-779, SCH-C, and aplaviroc, and four novel CCR5 ago......-allosteric molecules. A chimera was successfully constructed between CCR5 and the closely related CCR2 by transferring all extracellular regions of CCR2 to CCR5, i.e. a Trojan horse that resembles CCR2 extracellularly but signals through a CCR5 transmembrane unit. The chimera bound CCR2 (CCL2 and CCL7), but not CCR5...

  6. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    Large DNA viruses, in particular herpes- and poxviruses, have evolved proteins that serve as mimics or decoys for endogenous proteins in the host. The chemokines and their receptors serve key functions in both innate and adaptive immunity through control of leukocyte trafficking, and have...... to their closest endogenous homologs, are interactions with a wider range of chemokines, which can act as agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists, and the exploitation of many signal transduction pathways. High constitutive activity is another key property of some--but not all--of these receptors. The chemokine...... receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein coupled 7TM receptors that per se are excellent drug targets. At present, non-peptide antagonists have been developed against many chemokine receptors. The potentials of the virus-encoded chemokine receptors as drug targets--ie. as novel antiviral strategies...

  7. Tumorigenesis induced by the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor requires ligand modulation of high constitutive activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, P J; Rosenkilde, M M; Manfra, D;

    2001-01-01

    ORF74 (or KSHV-vGPCR) is a highly constitutively active G protein-coupled receptor encoded by HHV8 that is regulated both positively and negatively by endogenous chemokines. When expressed in transgenic mice, this chemokine receptor induces an angioproliferative disease closely resembling Kaposi...

  8. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines mediates chemokine endocytosis through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Zhao

    Full Text Available The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC shows high affinity binding to multiple inflammatory CC and CXC chemokines and is expressed by erythrocytes and endothelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial DARC facilitates chemokine transcytosis to promote neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanism of chemokine endocytosis by DARC remains unclear.We investigated the role of several endocytic pathways in DARC-mediated ligand internalization. Here we report that, although DARC co-localizes with caveolin-1 in endothelial cells, caveolin-1 is dispensable for DARC-mediated (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis as knockdown of caveolin-1 failed to inhibit ligand internalization. (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis by DARC was also independent of clathrin and flotillin-1 but required cholesterol and was, in part, inhibited by silencing Dynamin II expression.(125I-CXCL1 endocytosis was inhibited by amiloride, cytochalasin D, and the PKC inhibitor Gö6976 whereas Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF enhanced ligand internalization through DARC. The majority of DARC-ligand interactions occurred on the endothelial surface, with DARC identified along plasma membrane extensions with the appearance of ruffles, supporting the concept that DARC provides a high affinity scaffolding function for surface retention of chemokines on endothelial cells.These results show DARC-mediated chemokine endocytosis occurs through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells and caveolin-1 is dispensable for CXCL1 internalization.

  9. Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in thedevelopment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine system consists of four differentsubclasses with over 50 chemokines and 19 receptors.Their functions in the immune system have beenwell elucidated and research during the last decadesunveils their new roles in hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC). The chemokines and their receptors in themicroenvironment influence the development of HCC by several aspects including: inflammation, effects onimmune cells, angiogenesis, and direct effects on HCCcells. Regarding these aspects, pre-clinical research bytargeting the chemokine system has yielded promisingdata, and these findings bring us new clues in thechemokine-based therapies for HCC.

  10. Expression of specific chemokines and chemokine receptors in the central nervous system of multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Tani, M; Jensen, J;

    1999-01-01

    Chemokines direct tissue invasion by specific leukocyte populations. Thus, chemokines may play a role in multiple sclerosis (MS), an idiopathic disorder in which the central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory reaction is largely restricted to mononuclear phagocytes and T cells. We asked whether...

  11. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...... analyzed in 109 patients with relapsing-remitting MS treated with IFN-beta who were followed clinically for 1 year. Cellular CCR5 expression was measured by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Patients with MS had a higher percentage of CCR5-positive monocytes than healthy controls. Increased monocyte expression...... of CCR5 correlated weakly with an increased short-term relapse risk but there was no relationship between CCR5 Delta32 allele and CCR5 promoter polymorphism genotypes and relapse risk. CONCLUSIONS: The results do not support a major role of CCR5 in the pathogenesis of relapses in MS patients treated...

  12. Immunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with a defined ratio of CD8+ and CD4+ CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Berger, Carolina; Hudecek, Michael; Pender, Barbara; Robinson, Emily; Hawkins, Reed; Chaney, Colette; Cherian, Sindhu; Chen, Xueyan; Soma, Lorinda; Wood, Brent; Li, Daniel; Heimfeld, Shelly; Riddell, Stanley R; Maloney, David G

    2016-09-01

    CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells have antitumor activity in B cell malignancies, but factors that affect toxicity and efficacy have been difficult to define because of differences in lymphodepletion and heterogeneity of CAR-T cells administered to individual patients. We conducted a clinical trial in which CD19 CAR-T cells were manufactured from defined T cell subsets and administered in a 1:1 CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio of CAR-T cells to 32 adults with relapsed and/or refractory B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after cyclophosphamide (Cy)-based lymphodepletion chemotherapy with or without fludarabine (Flu). Patients who received Cy/Flu lymphodepletion had increased CAR-T cell expansion and persistence, and higher response rates [50% complete remission (CR), 72% overall response rate (ORR)] than patients who received Cy-based lymphodepletion without Flu (8% CR, 50% ORR). The CR rate in patients treated with Cy/Flu at the maximally tolerated dose was 64% (82% ORR; n = 11). Cy/Flu minimized the effects of an immune response to the murine single-chain variable fragment component of the CAR, which limited CAR-T cell expansion and clinical efficacy in patients who received Cy-based lymphodepletion without Flu. Severe cytokine release syndrome (sCRS) and grade ≥3 neurotoxicity were observed in 13 and 28% of all patients, respectively. Serum biomarkers, one day after CAR-T cell infusion, correlated with subsequent sCRS and neurotoxicity. Immunotherapy with CD19 CAR-T cells in a defined CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio allowed identification of correlative factors for CAR-T cell expansion, persistence, and toxicity, and facilitated optimization of lymphodepletion that improved disease response and overall and progression-free survival. PMID:27605551

  13. Identification of prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor as a tumor antigen recognized by CD8(+ T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Matsueda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among elderly men in the US, and immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising strategy to treat patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Efforts to identify novel prostate specific tumor antigens will facilitate the development of effective cancer vaccines against prostate cancer. Prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor (PSGR is a novel antigen that has been shown to be specifically over-expressed in human prostate cancer tissues. In this study, we describe the identification of PSGR-derived peptide epitopes recognized by CD8(+ T cells in an HLA-A2 dependent manner. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-one PSGR-derived peptides were predicted by an immuno-informatics approach based on the HLA-A2 binding motif. These peptides were examined for their ability to induce peptide-specific T cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained from either HLA-A2(+ healthy donors or HLA-A2(+ prostate cancer patients. The recognition of HLA-A2 positive and PSGR expressing LNCaP cells was also tested. Among the 21 PSGR-derived peptides, three peptides, PSGR3, PSGR4 and PSGR14 frequently induced peptide-specific T cell responses in PBMCs from both healthy donors and prostate cancer patients. Importantly, these peptide-specific T cells recognized and killed LNCaP prostate cancer cells in an HLA class I-restricted manner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified three novel HLA-A2-restricted PSGR-derived peptides recognized by CD8(+ T cells, which, in turn, recognize HLA-A2(+ and PSGR(+ tumor cells. The PSGR-derived peptides identified may be used as diagnostic markers as well as immune targets for development of anticancer vaccines.

  14. [Chemokine Receptor-5 and Graft-versus-Host Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Liu, Wei; Ren, Han-Yun

    2015-06-01

    Chemokine receptor-5 (CCR5) belongs to a G-protein coupled receptors superfamily. It is mainly expressed on a wide variety of immune cells. CCR5 can bind with its specific ligands, which plays very important roles in inflammatory cell growth, differentiation, activation, adhesion and migration. CCR5 was identified as a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) to infect CD4+ T cells. In addition, CCR5 not only participates in the pathogenic mechanisms of many inflammation disease such as AIDS, auto-immune disease, and atherosclerosis, but also plays important roles in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Recent studies using murine models have demonstrated the critical role of CCR5 and its ligands which direct T-cell infiltration and recruitment into target tissues during acute GVHD. CCR5 has become the focus of intense interest and discussion, and this review will attempt to describe what is understood about the structure and function, internalization, signal transduction of CCR5, in order to investigate the relationship between CCR5 and acute GVHD. PMID:26117055

  15. Impaired virus control and severe CD8+ T-cell-mediated immunopathology in chimeric mice deficient in gamma interferon receptor expression on both parenchymal and hematopoietic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Pernille; Bartholdy, Christina; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard;

    2005-01-01

    Bone marrow chimeras were used to determine the cellular target(s) for the antiviral activity of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). By transfusing such mice with high numbers of naive virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, a system was created in which the majority of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells would be...

  16. Genetic characterization of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 gene in lagomorphs: comparison between the families Ochotonidae and Leporidae

    OpenAIRE

    Abrantes, J; esteves, pj; carmo, cr; Muller, A.; Thompson, G.; LOO, W

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines receptors are transmembrane proteins that bind chemokines. Chemokines and their receptors are known to play a crucial role in the immune system and in pathogen entry. There is evidence that myxoma virus, the causative agent of myxomatosis, can use the chemokine receptor CXCR4 to infect cells. This virus causes a benign disease in its natural host, Sylvilagus, but in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) it causes a highly fatal and infectious disease known as myxomatosis. We ...

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray structural studies of a high-affinity CD8αα co-receptor to pMHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, David K. [Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Rizkallah, Pierre J., E-mail: p.j.rizkallah@dl.ac.uk [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Sami, Malkit; Lissin, Nikolai M.; Gao, Feng [Avidex Ltd, 57c Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4RX (United Kingdom); Bell, John I. [Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Boulter, Jonathan M. [Medical Biochemistry and Immunology, Henry Wellcome Building, University of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN,Wales (United Kingdom); Glick, Meir [Novartis Pharmaceuticals, One Health Plaza, East Hanover, NJ 07936 (United States); Vuidepot, Anne-Lise; Jakobsen, Bent K., E-mail: p.j.rizkallah@dl.ac.uk [Avidex Ltd, 57c Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4RX (United Kingdom); Gao, George F. [Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    A high-affinity mutant CD8 (haCD8) has been developed with the aim of developing a therapeutic immunosuppressor. In order to fully understand the nature of the haCD8 interaction, this protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The class I CD8 positive T-cell response is involved in a number of conditions in which artificial down-regulation and control would be therapeutically beneficial. Such conditions include a number of autoimmune diseases and graft rejection in transplant patients. Although the CD8 T-cell response is dominated by the TCR–pMHC interaction, activation of T cells is in most cases also dependent on a number of associated signalling molecules. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of one such molecule (CD8) to act as an antagonist to T-cell activation if added in soluble form. Therefore, a high-affinity mutant CD8 (haCD8) has been developed with the aim of developing a therapeutic immunosuppressor. In order to fully understand the nature of the haCD8 interaction, this protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Single haCD8 crystals were cryocooled and used for data collection. These crystals belonged to space group P6{sub 4}22 (assumed by similarity to the wild type), with unit-cell parameters a = 101.08, c = 56.54 Å. V{sub M} calculations indicated one molecule per asymmetric unit. A 2 Å data set was collected and the structure is currently being determined using molecular replacement.

  18. Targeting the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligand CXCL10 in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2004-01-01

    focuses on the present data regarding CXCL10 (previously known as IP-10) and CXRC3 in multiple sclerosis, since consistent data has suggested that this chemokine/chemokine receptor pair has a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment into the central nervous system (CNS) in multiple sclerosis....

  19. Antibody-targeted NY-ESO-1 to mannose receptor or DEC-205 in vitro elicits dual human CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses with broad antigen specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takemasa; Matsuzaki, Junko; Kelly, Marcus P; Ramakrishna, Venky; Vitale, Laura; He, Li-Zhen; Keler, Tibor; Odunsi, Kunle; Old, Lloyd J; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha

    2011-01-15

    Immunization of cancer patients with vaccines containing full-length tumor Ags aims to elicit specific Abs and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Vaccination with protein Ags, however, often elicits only CD4(+) T cell responses without inducing Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells, as exogenous protein is primarily presented to CD4(+) T cells. Recent data revealed that Ab-mediated targeting of protein Ags to cell surface receptors on dendritic cells could enhance the induction of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. We investigated in this study if these observations were applicable to NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis Ag widely used in clinical cancer vaccine trials. We generated two novel targeting proteins consisting of the full-length NY-ESO-1 fused to the C terminus of two human mAbs against the human mannose receptor and DEC-205, both internalizing molecules expressed on APC. These targeting proteins were evaluated for their ability to activate NY-ESO-1-specific human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in vitro. Both targeted NY-ESO-1 proteins rapidly bound to their respective targets on APC. Whereas nontargeted and Ab-targeted NY-ESO-1 proteins similarly activated CD4(+) T cells, cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells was only efficiently induced by targeted NY-ESO-1. In addition, both mannose receptor and DEC-205 targeting elicited specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from PBLs of cancer patients. Receptor-specific delivery of NY-ESO-1 to APC appears to be a promising vaccination strategy to efficiently generate integrated and broad Ag-specific immune responses against NY-ESO-1 in cancer patients.

  20. Opposing effects of CXCR3 and CCR5 deficiency on CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the central nervous system of virus-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lemos, Carina; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Nansen, Anneline;

    2005-01-01

    T cells play a key role in the control of viral infection in the CNS but may also contribute to immune-mediated cell damage. To study the redundancy of the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 in regulating virus-induced CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the brain, CXCR3/CCR5 double-deficient mice...... and therefore protect mice against the otherwise fatal CD8+ T cell-mediated immune attack. Contrary to expectations, the accumulation of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid was only slightly delayed compared with mice with normal expression of both receptors. Even more surprising, CXCR3/CCR5 double......-deficient mice were more susceptible to intracerebral infection than CXCR3-deficient mice. Analysis of effector T cell generation revealed an accelerated antiviral CD8+ T cell response in CXCR3/CCR5 double-deficient mice. Furthermore, while the accumulation of CD8+ T cells in the neural parenchyma...

  1. Accumulation of cytolytic CD8{sup +} T cells in B16-melanoma and proliferation of mature T cells in TIS21-knockout mice after T cell receptor stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Min Sook [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Min-Yeong [Department of Microbiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, The Graduate School, Ajou University (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Daeho [Department of Microbiology, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Gangneung, Gangwon-do 210-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Allen E. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kye Yong [Department of Pathology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun [Department of Microbiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, In Kyoung [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    In vivo and in vitro effects of TIS21 gene on the mature T cell activation and antitumor activities were explored by employing MO5 melanoma orthograft and splenocytes isolated from the TIS21-knockout (KO) mice. Proliferation and survival of mature T cells were significantly increased in the KO than the wild type (WT) cells, indicating that TIS21 inhibits the rate of mature T cell proliferation and its survival. In MO5 melanoma orthograft model, the KO mice recruited much more CD8{sup +} T cells into the tumors at around day 14 after tumor cell injection along with reduced tumor volumes compared with the WT. The increased frequency of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in splenocytes of the KO mice compared with the WT may account for antitumor-immunity of TIS21 gene in the melanoma orthograft. In contrast, reduced frequencies of CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in the splenocytes of KO mice may affect the loss of CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in the orthograft at around day 19. These results indicate that TIS21 exhibits antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in mature T cells, and differentially affects the frequencies of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells and CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells, thus transiently regulating in vivo anti-tumor immunity. - Highlights: • Constitutive expression of TIS21 in splenocytes and upregulation by TCR stimulation. • Proliferation of mature T-cells in spleen of TIS21KO mice after TCR stimulation. • Inhibition of cell death in mature T-cells of TIS21KO mice compared with the wild type. • Inhibition of melanoma growth in TIS21KO mice and CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in tumor. • Reduction of CD 107{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells, but increased granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in TIS21KO mice.

  2. Characterisation of SNP haplotype structure in chemokine and chemokine receptor genes using CEPH pedigrees and statistical estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Vanessa J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chemokine signals and their cell-surface receptors are important modulators of HIV-1 disease and cancer. To aid future case/control association studies, aim to further characterise the haplotype structure of variation in chemokine and chemokine receptor genes. To perform haplotype analysis in a population-based association study, haplotypes must be determined by estimation, in the absence of family information or laboratory methods to establish phase. Here, test the accuracy of estimates of haplotype frequency and linkage disequilibrium by comparing estimated haplotypes generated with the expectation maximisation (EM algorithm to haplotypes determined from Centre d'Etude Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH pedigree data. To do this, they have characterised haplotypes comprising alleles at 11 biallelic loci in four chemokine receptor genes (CCR3, CCR2, CCR5 and CCRL2, which span 150 kb on chromosome 3p21, and haplotyes of nine biallelic loci in six chemokine genes [MCP-1(CCL2, Eotaxin(CCL11, RANTES(CCL5, MPIF-1(CCL23, PARC(CCL18 and MIP-1α(CCL3 ] on chromosome 17q11-12. Forty multi-generation CEPH families, totalling 489 individuals, were genotyped by the TaqMan 5'-nuclease assay. Phased haplotypes and haplotypes estimated from unphased genotypes were compared in 103 grandparents who were assumed to have mated at random. For the 3p21 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data, haplotypes determined by pedigree analysis and haplotypes generated by the EM algorithm were nearly identical. Linkage disequilibrium, measured by the D' statistic, was nearly maximal across the 150 kb region, with complete disequilibrium maintained at the extremes between CCR3-Y17Y and CCRL2-1243V. D'-values calculated from estimated haplotypes on 3p21 had high concordance with pairwise comparisons between pedigree-phased chromosomes. Conversely, there was less agreement between analyses of haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium using estimated haplotypes when

  3. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (Whitehead); (MIT)

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  4. CC-chemokine receptors: a potential therapeutic target for Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, A P M P; Silva, A A; Santos, P V A; Pinto, L M O; Gazinelli, R T; Teixeira, M M; Lannes-Vieira, J

    2005-03-01

    The comprehension of the pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis is crucial to delineate new therapeutic strategies aiming to ameliorate the inflammation that leads to heart dysfunction, without hampering parasite control. The augmented expression of CCL5/RANTES and CCL3/MIP-1alpha, and their receptor CCR5, in the heart of T. cruzi-infected mice suggests a role for CC-chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis of T. cruzi-elicited myocarditis. Herein, we discuss our recent results using a CC-chemokine receptor inhibitor (Met-RANTES), showing the participation of CC-chemokines in T. cruzi infection and unraveling CC-chemokine receptors as an attractive therapeutic target for further evaluation in Chagas disease.

  5. CC-chemokine receptors: a potential therapeutic target for Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    APMP Marino

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of the pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis is crucial to delineate new therapeutic strategies aiming to ameliorate the inflammation that leads to heart dysfunction, without hampering parasite control. The augmented expression of CCL5/RANTES and CCL3/MIP-1alpha, and their receptor CCR5, in the heart of T. cruzi-infected mice suggests a role for CC-chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis of T. cruzi-elicited myocarditis. Herein, we discuss our recent results using a CC-chemokine receptor inhibitor (Met-RANTES, showing the participation of CC-chemokines in T. cruzi infection and unraveling CC-chemokine receptors as an attractive therapeutic target for further evaluation in Chagas disease.

  6. Unexpected positive control of NFκB and miR-155 by DGKα and ζ ensures effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jialong; Zhang, Ping; Krishna, Sruti; Wang, Jinli; Lin, Xingguang; Huang, Hongxiang; Xie, Danli; Gorentla, Balachandra; Huang, Rick; Gao, Jimin; Li, Qi-Jing; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Signals from the T-cell receptor (TCR) and γ-chain cytokine receptors play crucial roles in initiating activation and effector/memory differentiation of CD8 T-cells. We report here that simultaneous deletion of both diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) α and ζ (DKO) severely impaired expansion of CD8 effector T cells and formation of memory CD8 T-cells after Listeria monocytogenes infection. Moreover, ablation of both DGKα and ζ in preformed memory CD8 T-cells triggered death and impaired homeostatic proliferation of these cells. DKO CD8 T-cells were impaired in priming due to decreased expression of chemokine receptors and migration to the draining lymph nodes. Moreover, DKO CD8 T-cells were unexpectedly defective in NFκB-mediated miR-155 transcript, leading to excessive SOCS1 expression and impaired γ-chain cytokine signaling. Our data identified a DGK-NFκB-miR-155-SOCS1 axis that bridges TCR and γ-chain cytokine signaling for robust CD8 T-cell primary and memory responses to bacterial infection. PMID:27014906

  7. Modulation in selectivity and allosteric properties of small-molecule ligands for CC-chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel; Engel-Andreasen, Jens;

    2012-01-01

    Among 18 human chemokine receptors, CCR1, CCR4, CCR5, and CCR8 were activated by metal ion Zn(II) or Cu(II) in complex with 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline with similar potencies (EC(50) from 3.9 to 172 μM). Besides being agonists, they acted as selective allosteric enhancers of CCL3...... exploration of chemokine receptors as possible targets for therapeutic intervention....

  8. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  9. Extracellular Disulfide Bridges Serve Different Purposes in Two Homologous Chemokine Receptors, CCR1 and CCR5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rummel, Pia Cwarzko; Thiele, Stefanie; Hansen, Laerke Smidt;

    2013-01-01

    chemokine receptors, high affinity CCL3 chemokine binding was maintained in the absence of either bridge. In CCR5, the closest homolog to CCR1, a completely different dependency was observed as neither chemokine activation nor binding was retained in the absence of either bridge. In contrast, both bridges...... where dispensable for small-molecule activation. This indicates that CCR5 activity is independent of extracellular regions, whereas in CCR1, preserved folding of ECL2 is necessary for activation. These results indicate that conserved structural features in a receptor subgroup, does not necessarily...

  10. Erythrocyte Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC):diagnostic and therapeutic implications in atherosclerotic Cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stavros APOSTOLAKIS; Georgios K CHALIKIAS; Dimitrios N TZIAKAS; Stavros KONSTANTINIDES

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease.The last three decades efforts have been made to elucidate the biochemical pathways that are implicated in the process of atherogenesis and plaque development.Chemokines are crucial mediators in every step of this process.Additionally.cellular components of the peripheral blood have been proved important mediators in the formation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions.However,until recently data were mostly focusing on leukocytes and platelets.Erythrocytes were considered unreceptive bystanders and limited data supported their importance in the progression and destabilization of the atherosclerotic plaque.Recently erythrocytes, through their Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines(DARC),have been proposed as appealing regulators of chemokine-induced pathways.Dissimilar to every other chemokine receptor DARC possesses high affinity for severalligands from both CC and CXC chemokine sub-families.Moreover,DARC is not coupled to a G-protein or any other intracellular signalling system;thus it is incapable of generating second messages.The exact biochemical role of erythrocyte DARC remains to be determined.It is however challenging the fact that DARC is a regulator of almost every CC and CXC chemokine ligand and therefore DARC antagonism could efiectively block the complex pre-inflammatory chemokine network.In the present review we intent to provid recent evidence supporting the role of erythrocytes in atherosclerosis focusing on the erythrocyte-chemokine interaction through the Duffy antigen system.

  11. Interleukin-21-dependent modulation of T cell antigen receptor reactivity towards low affinity peptide ligands in autoreactive CD8(+) T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbala, Diwakar; Orkhis, Sakina; Kandhi, Rajani; Ramanathan, Sheela; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2016-09-01

    IL-21 promotes autoimmune type-1 diabetes (T1D) in NOD mice by facilitating CD4(+) T cell help to CD8(+) T cells. IL-21 also enables autoreactive CD8(+) T cells to respond to weak TCR ligands and induce T1D. Here, we assessed whether IL-21 is essential for T1D induction in a mouse model where the disease can occur independently of CD4 help. In this model, which expresses lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) glycoprotein (GP) antigen under the rat insulin promoter (RIP-GP), LCMV infection activates CD8(+) T cells reactive to the GP-derived GP33 peptide that attack pancreatic islets and cause T1D. We show that IL-21 deficiency in RIP-GP mice did not impair T1D induction by LCMV expressing the wildtype GP33 peptide. Surprisingly, LCMV-L6F, expressing a weak peptide mimic of GP33, induced T1D more efficiently in Il21(-/-)RIP-GP mice than in controls. However, LCMV-C4Y expressing a very weak peptide mimic of GP33 did not induce T1D in Il21(-/-) mice, but T cells from the infected mice caused disease in lymphopenic RIP-GP mice upon adoptive transfer. Using Nur77(GFP) reporter mice, we show that CD8(+) T cells from Il21(-/-) mice expressing the GP33-specific transgenic P14 TCR showed increased reactivity towards low affinity TCR ligands. Collectively, our findings show that IL-21 is not always required for T1D induction by autoreactive CD8(+) T cells, and suggest that IL-21 may play an important role in regulating CD8(+) T cell reactivity towards low affinity TCR ligands. PMID:27300756

  12. Chagas' disease and Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokine (DARC: a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AP Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Duffy gene (FY codifies the transmembrane glycoprotein Duffy (gp-Fy of 35 to 43 kDa which is moderately immunogenic. This glycoprotein is polymorphic, and constitutes the antigens of the Duffy histo-blood system which were designated receptors for chemokines and denominated DARC (Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokine. This receptor has an important role in the regulation of chemokine levels in the circulation, as it binds and adsorbs them on the surface of red cells as a reservoir. It plays a "sink" role, which can contribute to homeostasis by removing inflammatory chemokines from circulation as well as maintaining them in plasmatic levels. Chronic Chagas' cardiopathy (CCC is the most frequent form of the disease. It is an inflammatory disease, in which infiltrated inflammatory cells play an important role in the development and progress of the infection. High chemokine levels in the plasma have been associated with the disease severity in patients with heart failure. In this context, the profile of DARC expression could play an important function as a receptor for chemokines in Chagas' disease, in patients with CCC, as it can modulate damage from this inflammatory disease.

  13. CD8αα expression marks terminally differentiated human CD8+ T cells expanded in chronic viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Jane Walker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The T cell co-receptor CD8αβ enhances T cell sensitivity to antigen, however studies indicate CD8αα has the converse effect and acts as a co-repressor. Using a combination of Thymic Leukaemia antigen (TL tetramer, which directly binds CD8αα, anti-CD161 and anti-Vα7.2 antibodies we have been able for the first time to clearly define CD8αα expression on human CD8 T cells subsets. In healthy controls CD8αα is most highly expressed by CD161 bright (CD161++ mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT cells, with CD8αα expression highly restricted to the TCR Vα7.2+ cells of this subset. We also identified CD8αα-expressing populations within the CD161 mid (CD161+ and negative (CD161- non-MAIT CD8 T cell subsets and show TL-tetramer binding to correlate with expression of CD8β at low levels in the context of maintained CD8α expression (CD8α+CD8βlow. In addition, we found CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations to be significantly expanded in the peripheral blood of HIV-1 and hepatitis B (mean of 47% and 40% of CD161- T cells respectively infected individuals. Such CD8αα expressing T cells are an effector-memory population (CD45RA-, CCR7-, CD62L- that express markers of activation and maturation (HLA-DR+, CD28-, CD27-, CD57+ and are functionally distinct, expressing greater levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ on stimulation and perforin at rest than their CD8α+CD8βhigh counterparts. Antigen-specific T cells in HLA-B*4201+HIV-1 infected patients are found within both the CD161-CD8α+CD8βhigh and CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations. Overall we have clearly defined CD8αα expressing human T cell subsets using the TL-tetramer, and have demonstrated CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations, highly expanded in disease settings, to co-express CD8αβ and CD8αα. Co-expression of CD8αα on CD8αβ T cells may impact on their overall function in-vivo and contribute to the distinctive phenotype of highly differentiated populations in HBV and HIV-1 infection.

  14. Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, chemokine receptor CXCR4 cDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemokine receptor CXCR4, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, binds selectively CXCL12. This protein plays many important roles in immunological as well as pathophysiological functions. In this communication, we identified and characterized the channel catfish CXCR4 transcript....

  15. Expression of CC Chemokine Ligand 20 and CC Chemokine Receptor 6 mRNA in Patients with Psoriasis Vulgaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴艳; 李家文

    2004-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore the possible role of CC chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) and its receptor CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, the expression levels of mRNA of them in psoriatic lesions were investigated. The skin biopsies were collected from skin lesions in 35 cases of psoriasis vulgaris and 18 normal controls. RT-PCR was used to semi-quantitatively analyze the mRNA expression of CCL20 and CCR6 in the psoriatic lesions and the normal skin tissues.The results showed that the mRNA of CCL20 and CCR6 was present in every specimen. The expression levels of CCL20 mRNA in skin lesions were 1. 1397±0. 0521, which were greatly higher than those in normal controls (0.8681±0.0308) (P<0. 001). The expression levels of CCR6 mRNA in skin lesions were 1.1103±0.0538, significantly higher than in the controls (0.9131±0.0433, P<0. 001). These findings indicate that up-regulated expression of CCL20 and CCR6 mRNA might be related to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  16. Dynamic T-lymphocyte chemokine receptor expression induced by interferon-beta therapy in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, M; Sorensen, P S; Khademi, M;

    2006-01-01

    as these influence central nervous system (CNS) transmigration and inflammation. At 'steady state' (>/=1 day after the most recent IFN-beta injection), IFN-beta treatment increased CD4(+) T-cell surface expression of CC chemokine receptor (CCR)4, CCR5 and CCR7 after 3 months of treatment, whereas that of CXC...... and immunoregulatory genes. In conclusion, IFN-beta treatment caused 'steady-state' increases of several chemokine receptors relevant for CD4(+) T-lymphocyte trafficking and function, possibly facilitating lymphocyte migration into the CNS. An important therapeutic effect of IFN-beta treatment may be the normalization...... of a decreased Th2-related CD4(+) T-cell CCR4 expression in MS patients. Surface chemokine receptor expression and CXCL10 varied according to the timing of blood sampling in relation to the most recent IFN-beta injection. Thus, it is imperative to distinguish acute effects of IFN-beta from steady-state effects....

  17. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili [Scripps; (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UCSD)

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  18. The role of CC chemokine receptor 5 in antiviral immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andreasen, Susanne Ørding;

    2002-01-01

    that the virus-induced clonal expansion of antigen-specific T cells was augmented in CCR5(-/-) mice especially with regard to the CD4(+) subset. Despite absence of CCR5, intracerebral infection invariably resulted in lethal T cell-mediated meningitis, and quantitative and qualitative analysis of the inflammatory...... influence of CCR5 was found, not even when viral peptide was used as local trigger instead of live virus. Finally, long-term CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune surveillance was efficiently sustained in CCR5(-/-) mice. Taken together, these results indicate that expression of CCR5 is not critical for T cell...

  19. Chemokine receptor expression on B cells and effect of interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Roed, Hanne; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the B-cell expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR5 and CCR5 in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients in relapse of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in neurological controls. Chemokine receptor expression was also studied in interferon-beta-treated patients...... with relapsing-remitting or secondary progressive MS. We observed significantly higher expression of CXCR3 on B cells in the CSF in active MS than in controls. Patients with active MS also had higher B-cell expression of CCR5 in blood. No major differences between RRMS and SPMS patients were detected...

  20. Evidence favoring the involvement of CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 5 in T-lymphocyte accumulation in optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Ransohoff, R M; Jensen, J;

    2003-01-01

    To define the relationships between levels of chemokine receptor (CCR)5+ T-cells in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of optic neuritis (ON) and control patients (CON).......To define the relationships between levels of chemokine receptor (CCR)5+ T-cells in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of optic neuritis (ON) and control patients (CON)....

  1. Molecular determinants of receptor binding and signaling by the CX3C chemokine fractalkine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizoue, L S; Sullivan, S K; King, D S;

    2001-01-01

    Fractalkine/CX3CL1 is a membrane-tethered chemokine that functions as a chemoattractant and adhesion protein by interacting with the receptor CX3CR1. To understand the molecular basis for the interaction, an extensive mutagenesis study of fractalkine's chemokine domain was undertaken. The results...... reveal a cluster of basic residues (Lys-8, Lys-15, Lys-37, Arg-45, and Arg-48) and one aromatic (Phe-50) that are critical for binding and/or signaling. The mutant R48A could bind but not induce chemotaxis, demonstrating that Arg-48 is a signaling trigger. This result also shows that signaling residues......, but not all, pathways required for migration. Fractalkine also binds the human cytomegalovirus receptor US28, and analysis of the mutants indicates that US28 recognizes many of the same epitopes of fractalkine as CX3CR1. Comparison of the binding surfaces of fractalkine and the CC chemokine MCP-1 reveals...

  2. Dasatinib inhibits proliferation and activation of CD8+ T-lymphocytes by down-regulation of the T-cell receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Fei, Fei

    2007-01-01

    The novel Src/Abl inhibitor dasatinib (BMS-354825) is a promising therapeutic agent with imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutations in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, little is known about its effects on T-cell function, especially for patients undergoing allogeneic transplantation for leukemia. Here, we demonstrate that dasatinib at a concentration of 5 nM to 250 nM inhibits the proliferation and activation of CD8+ T-lymp...

  3. Targeted suppression of autoreactive CD8+ T-cell activation using blocking anti-CD8 antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Mathew; Pearson, James A.; Gras, Stephanie; van den Berg, Hugo A.; Lissina, Anya; Llewellyn-Lacey, Sian; Willis, Mark D.; Dockree, Tamsin; McLaren, James E.; Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; Gostick, Emma; Robertson, Neil P.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Burrows, Scott R.; Price, David A.; Wong, F. Susan; Peakman, Mark; Skowera, Ania; Wooldridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T-cells play a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes. However, drugs that target the entire CD8+ T-cell population are not desirable because the associated lack of specificity can lead to unwanted consequences, most notably an enhanced susceptibility to infection. Here, we show that autoreactive CD8+ T-cells are highly dependent on CD8 for ligand-induced activation via the T-cell receptor (TCR). In contrast, pathogen-specific CD8+ T-cells are relatively CD8-independent. These generic differences relate to an intrinsic dichotomy that segregates self-derived and exogenous antigen-specific TCRs according to the monomeric interaction affinity with cognate peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I (pMHCI). As a consequence, “blocking” anti-CD8 antibodies can suppress autoreactive CD8+ T-cell activation in a relatively selective manner. These findings provide a rational basis for the development and in vivo assessment of novel therapeutic strategies that preferentially target disease-relevant autoimmune responses within the CD8+ T-cell compartment. PMID:27748447

  4. The atypical chemokine receptor D6 contributes to the development of experimental colitis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordon, Yvonne; Hansell, Chris A. H.; Sester, David P; Clarke, Mairi; Mowat, Allan McI.; Nibbs, Robert J. B.

    2009-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory CC chemokines control leukocyte recruitment and function during inflammation by engaging chemokine receptors expressed on circulating leukocytes. The D6 chemokine receptor can bind several of these chemokines but appears unable to couple to signal transduction pathways or direct cell migration. Instead, D6 has been proposed to act as a chemokine scavenger, removing pro-inflammatory chemokines to dampen leukocyte responses. In this report, we have examined the role of D6 in the colon using the dextran sodium sulphate-induced model of colitis. We show that D6 is expressed in the resting colon, predominantly by stromal cells and B cells, and is up-regulated during colitis. Unexpectedly, D6-deficient mice showed reduced susceptibility to colitis and had less pronounced clinical symptoms associated with this model. D6 deletion had no impact on the level of pro-inflammatory CC chemokines released from cultured colon explants, or on the balance of leukocyte subsets recruited to the inflamed colon. However, late in colitis, inflamed D6-deficient colons showed enhanced production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IFNγ and IL-17A, and there was a marked increase in IL-17A-secreting γδ T cells in the lamina propria. Moreover, antibody-mediated neutralisation of IL-17A worsened the clinical symptoms of colitis at these later stages of the response in D6-deficient, but not wild-type, mice. Thus, D6 can contribute to the development of colitis by regulating IL-17A secretion by γδ T cells in the inflamed colon. PMID:19342683

  5. Emerging importance of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligands in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altara, Raffaele; Manca, Marco; Brandão, Rita D; Zeidan, Asad; Booz, George W; Zouein, Fouad A

    2016-04-01

    The CXC chemokines, CXCL4, -9, -10, -11, CXCL4L1, and the CC chemokine CCL21, activate CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3), a cell-surface G protein-coupled receptor expressed mainly by Th1 cells, cytotoxic T (Tc) cells and NK cells that have a key role in immunity and inflammation. However, CXCR3 is also expressed by vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and appears to be important in controlling physiological vascular function. In the last decade, evidence from pre-clinical and clinical studies has revealed the participation of CXCR3 and its ligands in multiple cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) of different aetiologies including atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as in heart transplant rejection and transplant coronary artery disease (CAD). CXCR3 ligands have also proven to be valid biomarkers for the development of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, suggesting an underlining pathophysiological relation between levels of these chemokines and the development of adverse cardiac remodelling. The observation that several of the above-mentioned chemokines exert biological actions independent of CXCR3 provides both opportunities and challenges for developing effective drug strategies. In this review, we provide evidence to support our contention that CXCR3 and its ligands actively participate in the development and progression of CVDs, and may additionally have utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:26888559

  6. Targeting cytokine/chemokine receptors : a challenge for molecular nuclear medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, A; Chianelli, M; Bei, R; Oyen, W; Modesti, A

    2003-01-01

    Radiolabelled cytokines and chemokines are a group of radiopharmaceuticals that, by highlighting in vivo the binding to specific high-affinity receptors expressed on selected cell populations, allow the molecular and functional characterisation of immune-mediated processes Recently, several authors

  7. Bicyclams, selective antagonists of the human chemokine receptor CXCR4, potently inhibit feline immunodeficiency virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H.F.; Clercq, E. de; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Balzarini, J.; Bridger, G.J.; Henson, G.; Schols, D.

    1999-01-01

    Bicyclams are low-molecular-weight anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents that have been shown to act as potent and selective CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that bicyclams are potent inhibitors of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication when evalua

  8. Design, synthesis, and functionalization of dimeric peptides targeting chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demmer, O.; Dijkgraaf, I.; Schumacher, U.; Marinelli, L.; Cosconati, S.; Gourni, E.; Wester, H.J.; Kessler, H.

    2011-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a critical regulator of inflammation and immune surveillance, and it is specifically implicated in cancer metastasis and HIV-1 infection. On the basis of the observation that several of the known antagonists remarkably share a C(2) symmetry element, we constructed sym

  9. Staphylococcus aureus Targets the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) to Lyse Erythrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, András N.; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Badiou, Cédric; Cochet, Sylvie; Boguslawski, Kristina M.; Yoong, Pauline; Day, Christopher J.; Gosselaar-de Haas, Carla J C; van Kessel, Kok P M; Vandenesch, François; Jennings, Michael P.; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Colin, Yves; Van Strijp, Jos A G; Henry, Thomas; Torres, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    In order for Staphylococcus aureus to thrive inside the mammalian host, the bacterium has to overcome iron scarcity. S. aureus is thought to produce toxins that lyse erythrocytes, releasing hemoglobin, the most abundant iron source in mammals. Here we identify the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokin

  10. Bioenergetic Insufficiencies Due to Metabolic Alterations Regulated by the Inhibitory Receptor PD-1 Are an Early Driver of CD8(+) T Cell Exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengsch, Bertram; Johnson, Andy L; Kurachi, Makoto; Odorizzi, Pamela M; Pauken, Kristen E; Attanasio, John; Stelekati, Erietta; McLane, Laura M; Paley, Michael A; Delgoffe, Greg M; Wherry, E John

    2016-08-16

    Dynamic reprogramming of metabolism is essential for T cell effector function and memory formation. However, the regulation of metabolism in exhausted CD8(+) T (Tex) cells is poorly understood. We found that during the first week of chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, before severe dysfunction develops, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells were already unable to match the bioenergetics of effector T cells generated during acute infection. Suppression of T cell bioenergetics involved restricted glucose uptake and use, despite persisting mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and upregulation of many anabolic pathways. PD-1 regulated early glycolytic and mitochondrial alterations and repressed transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α. Improving bioenergetics by overexpression of PGC-1α enhanced function in developing Tex cells. Therapeutic reinvigoration by anti-PD-L1 reprogrammed metabolism in a subset of Tex cells. These data highlight a key metabolic control event early in exhaustion and suggest that manipulating glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism might enhance checkpoint blockade outcomes. PMID:27496729

  11. Contrasting Effects of Natural Selection on Human and Chimpanzee CC Chemokine Receptor 5

    OpenAIRE

    Wooding, Stephen ; Stone, Anne C. ; Dunn, Diane M. ; Mummidi, Srinivas ; Jorde, Lynn B. ; Weiss, Robert K. ; Ahuja, Sunil ; Bamshad, Michael J. 

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolved via cross-species transmission of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVcpz) from chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Chimpanzees, like humans, are susceptible to infection by HIV-1. However, unlike humans, infected chimpanzees seldom develop immunodeficiency when infected with SIVcpz or HIV-1. SIVcpz and most strains of HIV-1 require the cell-surface receptor CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) to infect specific leukocyte subsets, and, subsequent to inf...

  12. Efficient targeting of protein antigen to the dendritic cell receptor DEC-205 in the steady state leads to antigen presentation on major histocompatibility complex class I products and peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Steinman, Ralph M

    2002-12-16

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal alphaDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c- cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When alphaDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4-48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of alphaDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4-7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with alphaDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic alphaCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon gamma, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation.

  13. Efficient Targeting of Protein Antigen to the Dendritic Cell Receptor DEC-205 in the Steady State Leads to Antigen Presentation on Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Products and Peripheral CD8+ T Cell Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2002-01-01

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal αDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c− cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When αDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4–48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of αDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4–7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with αDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic αCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon γ, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation. PMID:12486105

  14. Re: Chemokines in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fehmi Narter

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that regulate the trafficking and positioning of cells by activating the seven-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled chemokine receptors (GPCR) or non G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane spanning receptors called atypical chemokine receptors (ACKR). Chemokines are basic proteins that also bind to glycosaminoglycans which play important roles in their biology. Chemokines are divided into four subfamilies based on the position of the first two N-termina...

  15. The chemokine receptor CXCR6 contributes to recruitment of bone marrow-derived fibroblast precursors in renal fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Yunfeng; Yan, Jingyin; Jin, Xiaogao; Entman, Mark L.; Wang, Yanlin

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived fibroblasts in circulation are of hematopoietic origin, proliferate, differentiate into myofibroblasts, and express the chemokine receptor CXCR6. Since chemokines mediate the trafficking of circulating cells to sites of injury, we studied the role of CXCR6 in mouse models of renal injury. Significantly fewer bone marrow-derived fibroblasts accumulated in the kidney of CXCR6 knockout mice in response to injury, expressed less profibrotic chemokines and cytokines, displayed ...

  16. Signal transmission through the CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) transmembrane helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wescott, Melanie P; Kufareva, Irina; Paes, Cheryl; Goodman, Jason R; Thaker, Yana; Puffer, Bridget A; Berdougo, Eli; Rucker, Joseph B; Handel, Tracy M; Doranz, Benjamin J

    2016-08-30

    The atomic-level mechanisms by which G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular ligand binding events through their transmembrane helices to activate intracellular G proteins remain unclear. Using a comprehensive library of mutations covering all 352 residues of the GPCR CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), we identified 41 amino acids that are required for signaling induced by the chemokine ligand CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor 1). CXCR4 variants with each of these mutations do not signal properly but remain folded, based on receptor surface trafficking, reactivity to conformationally sensitive monoclonal antibodies, and ligand binding. When visualized on the structure of CXCR4, the majority of these residues form a continuous intramolecular signaling chain through the transmembrane helices; this chain connects chemokine binding residues on the extracellular side of CXCR4 to G protein-coupling residues on its intracellular side. Integrated into a cohesive model of signal transmission, these CXCR4 residues cluster into five functional groups that mediate (i) chemokine engagement, (ii) signal initiation, (iii) signal propagation, (iv) microswitch activation, and (v) G protein coupling. Propagation of the signal passes through a "hydrophobic bridge" on helix VI that coordinates with nearly every known GPCR signaling motif. Our results agree with known conserved mechanisms of GPCR activation and significantly expand on understanding the structural principles of CXCR4 signaling. PMID:27543332

  17. Analysis of Arrestin Recruitment to Chemokine Receptors by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneterre, J; Montpas, N; Boularan, C; Galés, C; Heveker, N

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors recruit the multifunctional scaffolding protein beta arrestin in response to binding of their chemokine ligands. Given that arrestin recruitment represents a signaling axis that is in part independent from G-protein signaling, it has become a hallmark of G protein-coupled receptor functional selectivity. Therefore, quantification of arrestin recruitment has become a requirement for the delineation of chemokine and drug candidate activity along different signaling axes. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) techniques provide methodology for such quantification that can reveal differences between nonredundant chemokines binding the same receptor, and that can be upscaled for high-throughput testing. We here provide protocols for the careful setup of BRET-based arrestin recruitment assays, and examples for the application of such systems in dose-response or time-course experiments. Suggestions are given for troubleshooting, optimizing test systems, and the interpretation of results obtained with BRET-based assays, which indeed yield an intricate blend of quantitative and qualitative information.

  18. Dengue virus requires the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 for replication and infection development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Rafael E; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Queiroz, Ana Luiza; Cisalpino, Daniel; Marques, Pedro E; Pacca, Carolina C; Fagundes, Caio T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Nogueira, Maurício L; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2015-08-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people worldwide yearly. Currently, there is no vaccine or specific treatment available. Further investigation on dengue pathogenesis is required to better understand the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. The chemokine system has been implicated in dengue pathogenesis, although the specific role of chemokines and their receptors remains elusive. Here we describe the role of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 in Dengue virus (DENV-2) infection. In vitro experiments showed that CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication in human and mouse macrophages. DENV-2 infection induces the expression of CCR5 ligands. Incubation with an antagonist prevents CCR5 activation and reduces DENV-2 positive-stranded (+) RNA inside macrophages. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of DENV-2 infection we found that CCR5(-/-) mice were resistant to lethal infection, presenting at least 100-fold reduction of viral load in target organs and significant reduction in disease severity. This phenotype was reproduced in wild-type mice treated with CCR5-blocking compounds. Therefore, CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication and disease development. Targeting CCR5 might represent a therapeutic strategy for dengue fever. These data bring new insights on the association between viral infections and the chemokine receptor CCR5.

  19. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gompels Ursula A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Methods Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. Results U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4

  20. CXCR3 expression defines a novel subset of innate CD8+ T cells that enhance immunity against bacterial infection and cancer upon stimulation with IL-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghumu, Steve; Terrazas, Cesar A; Varikuti, Sanjay; Kimble, Jennifer; Vadia, Stephen; Yu, Lianbo; Seveau, Stephanie; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2015-03-01

    Innate CD8(+) T cells are a heterogeneous population with developmental pathways distinct from conventional CD8(+) T cells. However, their biology, classification, and functions remain incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the existence of a novel population of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3)-positive innate CD8(+) T cells. Here, we investigated the functional properties of this subset and identified effector molecules and pathways which mediate their function. Adoptive transfer of IL-15 activated CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells conferred increased protection against Listeria monocytogenes infection in susceptible IFN-γ(-/-) mice compared with similarly activated CXCR3(-) subset. This was associated with enhanced proliferation and IFN-γ production in CXCR3(+) cells. Further, CXCR3(+) innate cells showed enhanced cytotoxicity against a tumor cell line in vitro. In depth analysis of the CXCR3(+) subset showed increased gene expression of Ccl5, Klrc1, CtsW, GP49a, IL-2Rβ, Atp5e, and Ly6c but reduced IFN-γR2 and Art2b. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed an up-regulation of genes associated with T-cell activation, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and translational initiation in CXCR3(+) populations. Our results demonstrate that CXCR3 expression in innate CD8(+) T cells defines a subset with enhanced cytotoxic potential and protective antibacterial immune functions. Immunotherapeutic approaches against infectious disease and cancer could utilize CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T-cell populations as novel clinical intervention strategies. PMID:25466888

  1. Detection and Tracking of NY-ESO-1-Specific CD8+ T Cells by High-Throughput T Cell Receptor β (TCRB Gene Rearrangements Sequencing in a Peptide-Vaccinated Patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manami Miyai

    Full Text Available Comprehensive immunological evaluation is crucial for monitoring patients undergoing antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. The identification and quantification of T cell responses is most important for the further development of such therapies. Using well-characterized clinical samples from a high responder patient (TK-f01 in an NY-ESO-1f peptide vaccine study, we performed high-throughput T cell receptor β-chain (TCRB gene next generation sequencing (NGS to monitor the frequency of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells. We compared these results with those of conventional immunological assays, such as IFN-γ capture, tetramer binding and limiting dilution clonality assays. We sequenced human TCRB complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3 rearrangements of two NY-ESO-1f-specific CD8+ T cell clones, 6-8L and 2F6, as well as PBMCs over the course of peptide vaccination. Clone 6-8L possessed the TCRB CDR3 gene TCRBV11-03*01 and BJ02-01*01 with amino acid sequence CASSLRGNEQFF, whereas 2F6 possessed TCRBV05-08*01 and BJ02-04*01 (CASSLVGTNIQYF. Using these two sequences as models, we evaluated the frequency of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells in PBMCs ex vivo. The 6-8L CDR3 sequence was the second most frequent in PBMC and was present at high frequency (0.7133% even prior to vaccination, and sustained over the course of vaccination. Despite a marked expansion of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells detected from the first through 6th vaccination by tetramer staining and IFN-γ capture assays, as evaluated by CDR3 sequencing the frequency did not increase with increasing rounds of peptide vaccination. By clonal analysis using 12 day in vitro stimulation, the frequency of B*52:01-restricted NY-ESO-1f peptide-specific CD8+ T cells in PBMCs was estimated as only 0.0023%, far below the 0.7133% by NGS sequencing. Thus, assays requiring in vitro stimulation might be underestimating the frequency of clones with lower proliferation potential. High-throughput TCRB

  2. Detection and Tracking of NY-ESO-1-Specific CD8+ T Cells by High-Throughput T Cell Receptor β (TCRB) Gene Rearrangements Sequencing in a Peptide-Vaccinated Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyai, Manami; Eikawa, Shingo; Hosoi, Akihiro; Iino, Tamaki; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Isobe, Midori; Uenaka, Akiko; Udono, Heiichiro; Nakajima, Jun; Nakayama, Eiichi; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive immunological evaluation is crucial for monitoring patients undergoing antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. The identification and quantification of T cell responses is most important for the further development of such therapies. Using well-characterized clinical samples from a high responder patient (TK-f01) in an NY-ESO-1f peptide vaccine study, we performed high-throughput T cell receptor β-chain (TCRB) gene next generation sequencing (NGS) to monitor the frequency of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells. We compared these results with those of conventional immunological assays, such as IFN-γ capture, tetramer binding and limiting dilution clonality assays. We sequenced human TCRB complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) rearrangements of two NY-ESO-1f-specific CD8+ T cell clones, 6-8L and 2F6, as well as PBMCs over the course of peptide vaccination. Clone 6-8L possessed the TCRB CDR3 gene TCRBV11-03*01 and BJ02-01*01 with amino acid sequence CASSLRGNEQFF, whereas 2F6 possessed TCRBV05-08*01 and BJ02-04*01 (CASSLVGTNIQYF). Using these two sequences as models, we evaluated the frequency of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells in PBMCs ex vivo. The 6-8L CDR3 sequence was the second most frequent in PBMC and was present at high frequency (0.7133%) even prior to vaccination, and sustained over the course of vaccination. Despite a marked expansion of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells detected from the first through 6th vaccination by tetramer staining and IFN-γ capture assays, as evaluated by CDR3 sequencing the frequency did not increase with increasing rounds of peptide vaccination. By clonal analysis using 12 day in vitro stimulation, the frequency of B*52:01-restricted NY-ESO-1f peptide-specific CD8+ T cells in PBMCs was estimated as only 0.0023%, far below the 0.7133% by NGS sequencing. Thus, assays requiring in vitro stimulation might be underestimating the frequency of clones with lower proliferation potential. High-throughput TCRB sequencing using NGS

  3. Involvement and prognosis value of CD8(+) T cells in giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Maxime; Ly, Kim Heang; Tournier, Benjamin; Janikashvili, Nona; Trad, Malika; Ciudad, Marion; Gautheron, Alexandrine; Devilliers, Hervé; Quipourt, Valérie; Maurier, François; Meaux-Ruault, Nadine; Magy-Bertrand, Nadine; Manckoundia, Patrick; Ornetti, Paul; Maillefert, Jean-Francis; Besancenot, Jean-François; Ferrand, Christophe; Mesturoux, Laura; Labrousse, François; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Saas, Philippe; Martin, Laurent; Audia, Sylvain; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    CD8(+) T cells participate in the pathogenesis of some vasculitides. However, little is known about their role in Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA). This study was conducted to investigate CD8(+) T cell involvement in the pathogenesis of GCA. Analyses were performed at diagnosis and after 3 months of glucocorticoid treatment in 34 GCA patients and 26 age-matched healthy volunteers. Percentages of CD8(+) T-cell subsets, spectratype analysis of the TCR Vβ families of CD8(+) T cells, levels of cytokines and chemokines and immunohistochemistry of temporal artery biopsies (TAB) were assessed. Among total CD8(+) T cells, percentages of circulating cytotoxic CD8 T lymphocytes (CTL, CD3(+)CD8(+)perforin(+)granzymeB(+)), Tc17 (CD3(+)CD8(+)IL-17(+)), CD63(+)CD8(+) T cells and levels of soluble granzymes A and B were higher in patients than in controls, whereas the percentage of Tc1 cells (CD3(+)CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)) was similar. Moreover, CD8(+) T cells displayed a restricted TCR repertoire in GCA patients. Percentages of circulating CTL, Tc17 and soluble levels of granzymes A and B decreased after treatment. CXCR3 expression on CD8(+) T cells and its serum ligands (CXCL9, -10, -11) were higher in patients. Analyses of TAB revealed high expression of CXCL9 and -10 associated with infiltration by CXCR3(+)CD8(+) T cells expressing granzyme B and TiA1. The intensity of the CD8 T-cell infiltrate in TAB was predictive of the severity of the disease. This study demonstrates the implication and the prognostic value of CD8(+) T-cells in GCA and suggests that CD8(+) T-cells are recruited within the vascular wall through an interaction between CXCR3 and its ligands. PMID:27236507

  4. Low Intraprostatic DHT Promotes the Infiltration of CD8+ T Cells in BPH Tissues via Modulation of CCL5 Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies suggested thatandrogen might be associated with infiltrating T cells in prostate of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH patients, but detail of T-cell subset and mechanism still remained unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that intraprostatic 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT exerts effects on T cells recruitment by BPH epithelial cells. Prostate tissues from 64 cases of BPH patients after transurethral resection of prostate (TURP were divided into 2 groups: (1 no medication history; (2 administration of 5α-reductase type II inhibitor-finasteride 5 mg daily for at least 6 months before surgery. Group 2 presented significantly higher CD8+ T cells infiltration than group 1, but no changes in CD4+ T cells (immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. In vitro study more CD8+ T cell migrated to the prostate tissue lysates from group 2 and BPH-1 cells in low DHT condition. Transcription of chemokine (C-C motif Ligand 5 (CCL5 mRNA in BPH-1 cells and chemokine (C-C motif receptor 5 (CCR5 mRNA in CD8+ T cells were upregulated in low DHT condition (q-PCR. CCL5 expression was also identified to be higher in group 2 prostate tissues by IHC. This study suggested that intraprostatic DHT may participate in regulating inflammatory response which was induced by human prostatic epithelial cell, via modulating CCL5 secretion.

  5. The siRNA cocktail targeting interleukin 10 receptor and transforming growth factor-β receptor on dendritic cells potentiates tumour antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Y-H; Hong, S-O; Kim, J H; Noh, K H; Song, K-H; Lee, Y-H; Jeon, J-H; Kim, D-W; Seo, J H; Kim, T W

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are promising therapeutic agents in the field of cancer immunotherapy due to their intrinsic immune-priming capacity. The potency of DCs, however, is readily attenuated immediately after their administration in patients as tumours and various immune cells, including DCs, produce various immunosuppressive factors such as interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β that hamper the function of DCs. In this study, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to silence the expression of endogenous molecules in DCs, which can sense immunosuppressive factors. Among the siRNAs targeting various immunosuppressive molecules, we observed that DCs transfected with siRNA targeting IL-10 receptor alpha (siIL-10RA) initiated the strongest antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses. The potency of siIL-10RA was enhanced further by combining it with siRNA targeting TGF-β receptor (siTGF-βR), which was the next best option during the screening of this study, or the previously selected immunoadjuvant siRNA targeting phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) or Bcl-2-like protein 11 (BIM). In the midst of sorting out the siRNA cocktails, the cocktail of siIL-10RA and siTGF-βR generated the strongest antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell immunity. Concordantly, the knock-down of both IL-10RA and TGF-βR in DCs induced the strongest anti-tumour effects in the TC-1 P0 tumour model, a cervical cancer model expressing the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 E7 antigen, and even in the immune-resistant TC-1 (P3) tumour model that secretes more IL-10 and TGF-β than the parental tumour cells (TC-1 P0). These results provide the groundwork for future clinical development of the siRNA cocktail-mediated strategy by co-targeting immunosuppressive molecules to enhance the potency of DC-based vaccines. PMID:25753156

  6. CXC Chemokine Receptor 3 Alternative Splice Variants Selectively Activate Different Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchiche, Yamina A; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2016-10-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) C-X-C chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) is a potential drug target that mediates signaling involved in cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases. The CXCR3 primary transcript has three potential alternative splice variants and cell-type specific expression results in receptor variants that are believed to have different functional characteristics. However, the molecular pharmacology of ligand binding to CXCR3 alternative splice variants and their downstream signaling pathways remain poorly explored. To better understand the role of the functional consequences of alternative splicing of CXCR3, we measured signaling in response to four different chemokine ligands (CXCL4, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11) with agonist activity at CXCR3. Both CXCL10 and CXCL11 activated splice variant CXCR3A. Whereas CXCL10 displayed full agonistic activity for Gαi activation and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and partial agonist activity for β-arrestin recruitment, CXCL9 triggered only modest ERK1/2 phosphorylation. CXCL11 induced CXCR3B-mediated β-arrestin recruitment and little ERK phosphorylation. CXCR3Alt signaling was limited to modest ligand-induced receptor internalization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to chemokines CXCL11, CXCL10, and CXCL9. These results show that CXCR3 splice variants activate different signaling pathways and that CXCR3 variant function is not redundant, suggesting a mechanism for tissue specific biased agonism. Our data show an additional layer of complexity for chemokine receptor signaling that might be exploited to target specific CXCR3 splice variants. PMID:27512119

  7. Association of haemolytic uraemic syndrome with dysregulation of chemokine receptor expression in circulating monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Maria Victoria; Ruggieri, Matias; Panek, Analia Cecilia; Mejias, Maria Pilar; Fernandez-Brando, Romina Jimena; Abrey-Recalde, Maria Jimena; Exeni, Andrea; Barilari, Catalina; Exeni, Ramon; Palermo, Marina Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is the major complication of Escherichia coli gastrointestinal infections that are Shiga toxin (Stx) producing. Monocytes contribute to HUS evolution by producing cytokines that sensitize endothelial cells to Stx action and migration to the injured kidney. As CC chemokine receptors (CCRs) are involved in monocyte recruitment to injured tissue, we analysed the contribution of these receptors to the pathogenesis of HUS. We analysed CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 expression in peripheral monocytes from HUS patients during the acute period, with healthy children as controls. We observed an increased expression of CCRs per cell in monocytes from HUS patients, accompanied by an increase in the absolute number of monocytes CCR1+, CCR2+ and CCR5+. It is interesting that prospective analysis confirmed that CCR1 expression positively correlated with HUS severity. The evaluation of chemokine levels in plasma showed that regulated on activation of normal T-cell-expressed and -secreted (RANTES) protein was reduced in plasma from patients with severe HUS, and this decrease correlated with thrombocytopenia. Finally, the expression of the higher CCRs was accompanied by a loss of functionality which could be due to a mechanism for desensitization to compensate for altered receptor expression. The increase in CCR expression correlates with HUS severity, suggesting that the dysregulation of these receptors might contribute to an increased risk of renal damage. Activated monocytes could be recruited by chemokines and then receptors could be dysregulated. The dysregulation of CCRs and their ligands observed during the acute period suggests that a chemokine pathway would participate in HUS development.

  8. T cell receptor (TCR-transgenic CD8 lymphocytes rendered insensitive to transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling mediate superior tumor regression in an animal model of adoptive cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quatromoni Jon G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor antigen-reactive T cells must enter into an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, continue to produce cytokine and deliver apoptotic death signals to affect tumor regression. Many tumors produce transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ, which inhibits T cell activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity. In a murine model of adoptive cell therapy, we demonstrate that transgenic Pmel-1 CD8 T cells, rendered insensitive to TGFβ by transduction with a TGFβ dominant negative receptor II (DN, were more effective in mediating regression of established B16 melanoma. Smaller numbers of DN Pmel-1 T cells effectively mediated tumor regression and retained the ability to produce interferon-γ in the tumor microenvironment. These results support efforts to incorporate this DN receptor in clinical trials of adoptive cell therapy for cancer.

  9. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Wehler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P=.039, tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005, and low hemoglobin (P = .039. In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma.

  10. The chemokine receptor CCR5 Δ32 allele in natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Søndergaard, Helle B; Koch-Henriksen, N;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The chemokine receptor CCR5 may be important for the recruitment of pathogenic T cells to the CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS). We hypothesized that this chemokine receptor might still be important for T-cell migration during treatment with anti-very late antigen (VLA)-4 antibody. We...... therefore analysed whether natalizumab-treated MS patients carrying the CCR5 Δ32 deletion allele, which results in reduced expression of CCR5 on the cell surface, had lower disease activity. METHODS: CCR5 Δ32 was analysed in 212 natalizumab-treated MS patients. RESULTS: CCR5 Δ32 status had no significant...... impact on the frequency of relapses 1 year prior to natalizumab treatment or during the first 48 weeks of treatment. The multiple sclerosis severity score (MSSS) was significantly lower at baseline in patients carrying CCR5 Δ32 (P = 0.031). CONCLUSIONS: CCR5 Δ32 is not associated with lower disease...

  11. Antagonism of chemokine receptor CXCR3 inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis to lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Pradelli, Emmanuelle; Karimdjee-Soilihi, Babou; Michiels, Jean-François; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Millet, Marie-Ange; Vandenbos, Fanny; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Collins, Tassie L.; Johnson, Michael G.; Medina, Julio C.; Kleinerman, Eugenie S; Schmid-Alliana, Annie; Schmid-Antomarchi, Heidy

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis continues to be the leading cause of mortality for patients with cancer. Several years ago, it became clear that chemokines and their receptors could control the tumor progress. CXCR3 has now been identified in many cancers including osteosarcoma and CXCR3 ligands were expressed by lungs that are the primary sites to which this tumor metastasize. This study tested the hypothesis that disruption of the CXCR3/CXCR3 ligands complexes could lead to a decrease in lungs metastasis. The e...

  12. Reduced locomotor activity and exploratory behavior in CC chemokine receptor 4 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrée, Oliver; Klassen, Irene; Förster, Irmgard; Arolt, Volker; Scheu, Stefanie; Alferink, Judith

    2016-11-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are key regulators of immune cell trafficking and activation. Recent findings suggest that they may also play pathophysiological roles in psychiatric diseases like depression and anxiety disorders. The CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) and its two ligands, CCL17 and CCL22, are functionally involved in neuroinflammation as well as anti-infectious and autoimmune responses. However, their influence on behavior remains unknown. Here we characterized the functional role of the CCR4-CCL17 chemokine-receptor axis in the modulation of anxiety-related behavior, locomotor activity, and object exploration and recognition. Additionally, we investigated social exploration of CCR4 and CCL17 knockout mice and wild type (WT) controls. CCR4 knockout (CCR4(-/-)) mice exhibited fewer anxiety-related behaviors in the elevated plus-maze, diminished locomotor activity, exploratory behavior, and social exploration, while their recognition memory was not affected. In contrast, CCL17 deficient mice did not show an altered behavior compared to WT mice regarding locomotor activity, anxiety-related behavior, social exploration, and object recognition memory. In the dark-light and object recognition tests, CCL17(-/-) mice even covered longer distances than WT mice. These data demonstrate a mechanistic or developmental role of CCR4 in the regulation of locomotor and exploratory behaviors, whereas the ligand CCL17 appears not to be involved in the behaviors measured here. Thus, either CCL17 and the alternative ligand CCL22 may be redundant, or CCL22 is the main activator of CCR4 in these processes. Taken together, these findings contribute to the growing evidence regarding the involvement of chemokines and their receptors in the regulation of behavior. PMID:27469058

  13. Critical roles of chemokine receptor CCR5 in regulating glioblastoma proliferation and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lanfu; Wang, Yuan; Xue, Yafei; Lv, Wenhai; Zhang, Yufu; He, Shiming

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent malignant primary brain tumor in adults and exhibits a spectrum of aberrantly aggressive phenotype. Tumor cell proliferation and invasion are critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Recent studies have shown that the chemokine CCL5 and its receptor CCR5 play important roles in tumor invasion and metastasis. Nonetheless, the roles of the CCR5 in GBM still remain unclear. The present study provides the evidence that the chemokine receptor CCR5 is highly expressed and associated with poor prognosis in human GBM. Mechanistically, CCL5-CCR5 mediates activation of Akt, and subsequently induces proliferation and invasive responses in U87 and U251 cells. Moreover, down-regulation of CCR5 significantly inhibited the growth of glioma in U87 tumor xenograft mouse model. Finally, high CCR5 expression in GBM is correlated with increased p-Akt expression in patient samples. Together, these findings suggest that the CCR5 is a critical molecular event associated with gliomagenesis.

  14. Selective loss of chemokine receptor expression on leukocytes after cell isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Nieto

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors are distinctively exposed on cells to characterize their migration pattern. However, little is known about factors that may regulate their expression. To determine the optimal conditions for an accurate analysis of chemokine receptors, we compared the expression of CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CXCR3 and CXCR4 on different leukocyte subsets using whole blood (WB plus erythrocyte lysis and density gradient isolation (Ficoll. Most WB monocytes were CCR2+ (93.5 ± 2.9% whereas 32.8 ± 6.0% of monocytes from Ficoll-PBMC expressed CCR2 (p<0.001. Significant reductions of CCR6 and CXCR3 on monocytes were also observed after Ficoll isolation (WB: 46.4 ± 7.5% and 57.1 ± 5.5%; Ficoll: 29.5 ± 2.2% and 5.4 ± 4.3% respectively (p<0.01. Although comparable percentages of WB and Ficoll-PBMC monocytes expressed CCR4, CCR5 and CXCR4, Ficoll isolation significantly reduced the levels of CXCR4 (WB: MFI 5 ± 0.4 and Ficoll: MFI 3.3 ± 0.1 (p<0.05. Similarly to monocytes, CCR2, CXCR3 and CXCR4 were also reduced on lymphocytes. In addition, Ficoll isolation significantly reduced the percentage of CCR4 positive lymphocytes (WB: 90.2 ± 4.5% and Ficoll: 55 ± 4.1% (p<0.01. The loss of expression of chemokine receptors after isolation of monocytes was not dependent on either the anticoagulant or the density gradient method. It was irreversible and could not be restored by LPS activation or in vitro macrophage differentiation. Experiments tagged with anti-CCR2 antibodies prior to density gradient isolation demonstrated that Ficoll internalized chemokine receptors. The method for cell isolation may alter not only the expression of certain chemokine receptors but also the respective functional migration assay. The final choice to analyze their expression should therefore depend on the receptor to be measured.

  15. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domains of the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines: characterization of antibody and chemokine binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournamille, Christophe; Filipe, Anne; Wasniowska, Kazimiera; Gane, Pierre; Lisowska, Elwira; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2003-09-01

    The Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC), a seven-transmembrane glycoprotein carrying the Duffy (Fy) blood group, acts as a widely expressed promiscuous chemokine receptor. In a structure-function study, we analysed the binding of chemokines and anti-Fy monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to K562 cells expressing 39 mutant forms of DARC with alanine substitutions spread out on the four extracellular domains (ECDs). Using synthetic peptides, we defined previously the Fy6 epitope (22-FEDVW-26), and we characterized the Fya epitope as the linear sequence 41-YGANLE-46. In agreement with these results, mutations of F22-E23, V25 and Y41, G42, N44, L45 on ECD1 abolished the binding of anti-Fy6 and anti-Fya mAbs to K562 cells respectively, Anti-Fy3 binding was abolished by D58-D59 (ECD1), R124 (ECD2), D263 and D283 (ECD4) substitutions. Mutations of C51 (ECD1), C129 (ECD2), C195 (ECD3) and C276 (ECD4 severely reduced anti-Fy3 and CXC-chemokine ligand 8 (CXCL-8) binding. CXCL-8 binding was also abrogated by mutations of F22-E23, P50 (ECD1) and D263, R267, D283 (ECD4). These results defined the Fya epitope and suggested that (1) two disulphide bridges are involved in the creation of an active chemokine binding pocket; (2) a limited number of amino acids in ECDs 1-4 participate in CXCL-8 binding; and (3) Fy3 is a conformation-dependent epitope involving all ECDs. We also showed that N-glycosylation of DARC occurred on N16SS and did not influence antibody and chemokine binding. PMID:12956774

  16. The Role of chemokine receptor CXCR4 in breast cancer metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Debarati; Zhao, Jihe

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide. Breast cancer-related mortality is associated with the development of metastatic potential of primary tumor lesions. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 has been found to be a prognostic marker in various types of cancer, including breast cancer. Recent advances in the field of cancer biology has pointed to the critical role that CXCR4 receptor and its ligand CXCL12 play in the metastasis of various types of cancer, inclu...

  17. Two selective novel triterpene glycosides from sea cucumber, Telenata ananas: Inhibitors of chemokine receptor-5

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hegde, V.R.; Chan, T.-M.; Pu, H.; Gullo, V.P.; Patel, M.G.; Das, P.; Wagner, N.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Naik, C.G.

    . Kitagawa, I.; Kobayashi, M.; Kyogoku, Y. Chem. Pharm. Bull. 1982, 30, 2045. 12. A screening assay utilizing a membrane-binding assay was developed to identify antagonists of the ligand RANTES binding to the CCR5 receptor. Cell membranes were prepared from... CHO cells (BioSignal Inc.) transduced to express the human CCR5 chemokine receptor. These membrane prepara- tions were incubated with 125 I-RANTESin the presence or absenceofcompoundforonehourat25 C14 C.Compounds were serially diluted over a range of 0...

  18. Identification and Profiling of Novel α1A-Adrenoceptor-CXC Chemokine Receptor 2 Heteromer*

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa, Sanam; Heng B See; Seeber, Ruth M.; Armstrong, Stephen P.; White, Carl W; Ventura, Sabatino; Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Pfleger, Kevin D.G.

    2012-01-01

    We have provided the first evidence for specific heteromerization between the α1A-adrenoceptor (α1AAR) and CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) in live cells. α1AAR and CXCR2 are both expressed in areas such as the stromal smooth muscle layer of the prostate. By utilizing the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromer identification technology on the live cell-based bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay platform, our studies in human embryonic kidney 293 cells have identified no...

  19. Disulfide Trapping for Modeling and Structure Determination of Receptor:Chemokine Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zheng, Yi; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent breakthrough advances in GPCR crystallography, structure determination of protein-protein complexes involving chemokine receptors and their endogenous chemokine ligands remains challenging. Here we describe disulfide trapping, a methodology for generating irreversible covalent binary protein complexes from unbound protein partners by introducing two cysteine residues, one per interaction partner, at selected positions within their interaction interface. Disulfide trapping can serve at least two distinct purposes: (i) stabilization of the complex to assist structural studies, and/or (ii) determination of pairwise residue proximities to guide molecular modeling. Methods for characterization of disulfide-trapped complexes are described and evaluated in terms of throughput, sensitivity, and specificity towards the most energetically favorable cross-links. Due to abundance of native disulfide bonds at receptor:chemokine interfaces, disulfide trapping of their complexes can be associated with intramolecular disulfide shuffling and result in misfolding of the component proteins; because of this, evidence from several experiments is typically needed to firmly establish a positive disulfide crosslink. An optimal pipeline that maximizes throughput and minimizes time and costs by early triage of unsuccessful candidate constructs is proposed. PMID:26921956

  20. Application of chemokine receptor antagonist with stents reduces local inflammation and suppresses cancer growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ai-Wu; Jiang, Ting-Hui; Sun, Xian-Jun; Peng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Severe pain and obstructive jaundice resulting from invasive cholangiocarcinoma or pancreatic carcinoma can be alleviated by implantation of biliary and duodenal stents. However, stents may cause local inflammation to have an adverse effect on the patients' condition and survival. So far, no efficient approaches have been applied to prevent the occurrence of stents-related inflammation. Here, we reported significantly higher levels of serum stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) in the patients that developed stents-associated inflammation. A higher number of inflammatory cells have been detected in the cancer close to stent in the patients with high serum SDF-1. Since chemokine plays a pivotal role in the development of inflammation, we implanted an Alzet osmotic pump with the stents to gradually release AMD3100, a specific inhibitor binding of SDF-1 and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), at the site of stents in mice that had developed pancreatic cancer. We found that AMD3100 significantly reduced local inflammation and significantly inhibited cancer cell growth, resulting in improved survival of the mice that bore cancer. Moreover, the suppression of cancer growth may be conducted through modulation of CyclinD1, p21, and p27 in the cancer cells. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of chemokine signaling at the site of stents may substantially improve survival through suppression of stent-related inflammation and tumor growth.

  1. Assessment of Apoptosis Level of Naive CD8+ T-lymphocytes in Children with Acute Infectious Mononucleosis in CD95 and DR3 Receptors Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.N. Filatova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to estimate the relation of CD95 and DR3 receptors activation with apoptosis level of naive cytotoxic Т-lymphocytes (nCТL in children with acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM. Materials and Methods. The test materials were peripheral blood samples of healthy children and children with AIM. nCTL were isolated by negative immunomagnetic separation. Specific activation of CD95 and DR3 receptors was performed using monoclonal antibodies. An apoptosis level and expression of receptors were studied by flow cytometry. Results. The percentage of cell apoptosis decreased in children with AIM in freshly isolated nCTL, as well as in CD95 receptor activation compared to healthy children. nCTL apoptosis in healthy children regardless of culture conditions was accompanied by the reduced quantity of CD95+DR3– cells and CD95 expression density on their surface. In children with AIM the decrease of these indices required CD95 activation. Compared to healthy children, the percentage of CD95+DR3+ cells in children with AIM decreased in CD95 activation. In CD95 receptor activation in healthy children and children with AIM, the content of CD95+DR3+ cells correlated directly with an apoptosis level. DR3 receptor activation was accompanied neither by nCTL apoptosis level change nor the changed content of DR3+ cells in both healthy children and children with AIM. Conclusion. nCTL are less sensitive to apoptosis in children with AIM compared to healthy children. DR3 receptor activation results in no change of nCTL apoptosis level both in healthy children and children with AIM. CD95 activation in patients with AIM is accompanied by increased resistance of CD95+DR3– cells to apoptosis and the susceptibility to apoptosis of CD95+DR3+ cells. The evaluation of nCTL susceptibility to CD95-induced apoptosis in AIM can serve as a subtest to assess the state of a cell component of immune system.

  2. CXCL10 is the key ligand for CXCR3 on CD8+ effector T cells involved in immune surveillance of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-infected central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; de Lemos, Carina; Moos, Torben;

    2006-01-01

    IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10/CXCL10 is a chemokine associated with type 1 T cell responses, regulating the migration of activated T cells through binding to the CXCR3 receptor. Expression of both CXCL10 and CXCR3 are observed during immunopathological diseases of the CNS, and this receptor....../ligand pair is thought to play a central role in regulating T cell-mediated inflammation in this organ site. In this report, we investigated the role of CXCL10 in regulating CD8(+) T cell-mediated inflammation in the virus-infected brain. This was done through analysis of CXCL10-deficient mice infected...... intracerebrally with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, which in normal immunocompetent mice induces a fatal CD8(+) T cell-mediated meningoencephalitis. We found that a normal antiviral CD8(+) T cell response was generated in CXCL10-deficient mice, and that lack of CXCL10 had no influence on the accumulation...

  3. Retinoid X receptor alpha controls innate inflammatory responses through the up-regulation of chemokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Vanessa; Alameda, Daniel; Rico, Daniel; Mota, Rubén; Gonzalo, Pilar; Cedenilla, Marta; Fischer, Thierry; Boscá, Lisardo; Glass, Christopher K; Arroyo, Alicia G; Ricote, Mercedes

    2010-06-01

    The retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha) plays a central role in the regulation of many intracellular receptor signaling pathways and can mediate ligand-dependent transcription by forming homodimers or heterodimers with other nuclear receptors. Although several members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily have emerged as important regulators of macrophage gene expression, the existence in vivo of an RXR signaling pathway in macrophages has not been established. Here, we provide evidence that RXRalpha regulates the transcription of the chemokines Ccl6 and Ccl9 in macrophages independently of heterodimeric partners. Mice lacking RXRalpha in myeloid cells exhibit reduced levels of CCL6 and CCL9, impaired recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation, and lower susceptibility to sepsis. These studies demonstrate that macrophage RXRalpha plays key roles in the regulation of innate immunity and represents a potential target for immunotherapy of sepsis.

  4. A Role for the Chemokine Receptor CCR6 in Mammalian Sperm Motility and Chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Campo, Pedro; Buffone, Mariano G.; Benencia, Fabian; Conejo-García, José R.; Rinaudo, Paolo F.; Gerton, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Although recent evidence indicates that several chemokines and defensins, well-known as inflammatory mediators, are expressed in the male and female reproductive tracts, the location and functional significance of chemokine networks in sperm physiology and sperm reproductive tract interactions are poorly understood. To address this deficiency in our knowledge, we examined the expression and function in sperm of CCR6, a receptor common to several chemoattractant peptides, and screened several reproductive tract fluids for the presence of specific ligands. CCR6 protein is present in mouse and human sperm and mainly localized in the sperm tail with other minor patterns in sperm from mice (neck and acrosomal region) and men (neck and midpiece regions). As expected from the protein immunoblotting and immunofluorescence results, mouse Ccr6 mRNA is expressed in the testis. Furthermore, the Defb29 mRNA encoding the CCR6 ligand, β-defensin DEFB29, is expressed at high levels in the epididymis. As determined by protein chip analysis, several chemokines (including some that act through CCR6, such as CCL20/MIP-3α (formerly Macrophage Inflammatory Protein 3α) and protein hormones were present in human follicular fluid, endometrial secretions, and seminal plasma. In functional chemotaxis assays, capacitated human sperm exhibited a directional movement towards CCL20, and displayed modifications in motility parameters. Our data indicate that chemokine ligand/receptor interactions in the male and female genital tracts promote sperm motility and chemotaxis under non-inflammatory conditions. Therefore, some of the physiological reactions mediated by CCR6 ligands in male reproduction extend beyond a pro-inflammatory response and might find application in clinical reproduction and/or contraception. PMID:23765988

  5. Down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5 by activation of chemotactic formyl peptide receptor in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, W; Li, B; Wetzel, M A; Rogers, T J; Henderson, E E; Su, S B; Gong, W; Le, Y; Sargeant, R; Dimitrov, D S; Oppenheim, J J; Wang, J M

    2000-10-15

    Interactions between cell surface receptors are important regulatory elements in the complex host responses to infections. In this study, it is shown that a classic chemotactic factor, the bacterial chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenyl-alanine (fMLF), rapidly induced a protein-kinase-C-mediated serine phosphorylation and down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5, which serves as a major human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coreceptor. The fMLF binding to its receptor, formyl peptide receptor (FPR), resulted in significant attenuation of cell responses to CCR5 ligands and in inhibition of HIV-1-envelope-glycoprotein-mediated fusion and infection of cells expressing CD4, CCR5, and FPR. The finding that the expression and function of CCR5 can be regulated by peptides that use an unrelated receptor may provide a novel approach to the design of anti-inflamatory and antiretroviral agents. (Blood. 2000;96:2887-2894)

  6. Pleural mesothelial cells promote expansion of IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells in tuberculous pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Zhou, Q; Yang, W B; Xiong, X Z; Du, R H; Zhang, J C

    2013-05-01

    IL-17-producing CD8(+) T lymphocytes (Tc17 cells) have recently been detected in many cancers and autoimmune diseases. However, the possible implication of Tc17 cells in tuberculous pleural effusion remains unclarified. In this study, distribution and phenotypic features of Tc17 cells in both tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) and peripheral blood from patients with tuberculosis were determined. The effects of proinflammatory cytokines and local accessory cells (pleural mesothelial cells) on Tc17 cell expansion were also explored. We found that TPE contained more Tc17 cells than the blood. Compared with IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells, Tc17 cells displayed higher expression of chemokine receptors (CCRs) and lower expression of cytotoxic molecules. In particularly, Tc17 cells in TPE exhibited high expression levels of CCR6, which could migrate in response to CCL20. Furthermore, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23, or their various combinations could promote Tc17 cell expansion from CD8(+) T cells, whereas the proliferative response of Tc17 cells to above cytokines was lower than that of Th17 cells. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) were able to stimulate Tc17 cell expansion via cell contact in an IL-1β/IL-6/IL-23 independent fashion. Thus this study demonstrates that Tc17 cells marks a subset of non-cytotoxic, CCR6(+) CD8(+) T lymphocytes with low proliferative capacity. The overrepresentation of Tc17 cells in TPE may be due to Tc17 cell expansion stimulated by pleural proinflammatory cytokines and to recruitment of Tc17 cells from peripheral blood. Additionally, PMCs may promote the production of IL-17 by CD8(+) T cells at sites of TPE via cell-cell interactions. PMID:23299924

  7. Cord blood Vα24-Vβ11 natural killer T cells display a Th2-chemokine receptor profile and cytokine responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Harner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fetal immune system is characterized by a Th2 bias but it is unclear how the Th2 predominance is established. Natural killer T (NKT cells are a rare subset of T cells with immune regulatory functions and are already activated in utero. To test the hypothesis that NKT cells are part of the regulatory network that sets the fetal Th2 predominance, percentages of Vα24(+Vβ11(+ NKT cells expressing Th1/Th2-related chemokine receptors (CKR were assessed in cord blood. Furthermore, IL-4 and IFN-γ secreting NKT cells were quantified within the single CKR(+ subsets. RESULTS: Cord blood NKT cells expressed the Th2-related CCR4 and CCR8 at significantly higher frequencies compared to peripheral blood NKT cells from adults, while CXCR3(+ and CCR5(+ cord blood NKT cells (Th1-related were present at lower percentages. Within CD4(negCD8(neg (DN NKT cells, the frequency of IL-4 producing NKT cells was significantly higher in cord blood, while frequencies of IFN-γ secreting DN NKT cells tended to be lower. A further subanalysis showed that the higher percentage of IL-4 secreting DN NKT cells was restricted to CCR3(+, CCR4(+, CCR5(+, CCR6(+, CCR7(+, CCR8(+ and CXCR4(+ DN subsets in cord blood. This resulted in significantly decreased IFN-γ /IL-4 ratios of CCR3(+, CCR6(+ and CCR8(+ cord blood DN NKT cells. Sequencing of VA24AJ18 T cell receptor (TCR transcripts in sorted cord blood Vα24Vβ11 cells confirmed the invariant TCR alpha-chain ruling out the possibility that these cells represent an unusual subset of conventional T cells. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the heterogeneity of cord blood NKT cells, we observed a clear Th2-bias at the phenotypic and functional level which was mainly found in the DN subset. Therefore, we speculate that NKT cells are important for the initiation and control of the fetal Th2 environment which is needed to maintain tolerance towards self-antigens as well as non-inherited maternal antigens.

  8. Systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated tumoricidal effects by intratumoral treatment of oncolytic herpes simplex virus with the agonistic monoclonal antibody for murine glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikiya Ishihara

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy combined with immunomodulators is a novel noninvasive strategy for cancer treatment. In this study, we examined the tumoricidal effects of oncolytic HF10, a naturally occurring mutant of herpes simplex virus type-1, combined with an agonistic DTA-1 monoclonal antibody specific for the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor. Two murine tumor models were used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacies of HF10 virotherapy combined with DTA-1. The kinetics and immunological mechanisms of DTA-1 in HF10 infection were examined using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Intratumoral administration of HF10 in combination with DTA-1 at a low dose resulted in a more vigorous attenuation of growth of the untreated contralateral as well as the treated tumors than treatment with either HF10 or DTA-1 alone. An accumulation of CD8(+ T cells, including tumor- and herpes simplex virus type-1-specific populations, and a decrease in the number of CD4(+ Foxp3(+ T regulatory cells were seen in both HF10- and DTA-1-treated tumors. Studies using Fc-digested DTA-1 and Fcγ receptor knockout mice demonstrated the direct participation of DTA-1 in regulatory T cell depletion by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity primarily via macrophages. These results indicated the potential therapeutic efficacy of a glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-specific monoclonal antibody in oncolytic virotherapy at local tumor sites.

  9. Analysis of Chemokines and Receptors Expression Profile in the Myelin Mutant Taiep Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Soto-Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taiep rat has a failure in myelination and remyelination processes leading to a state of hypomyelination throughout its life. Chemokines, which are known to play a role in inflammation, are also involved in the remyelination process. We aimed to demonstrate that remyelination-stimulating factors are altered in the brainstem of 1- and 6-month-old taiep rats. We used a Rat RT2 Profiler PCR Array to assess mRNA expression of 84 genes coding for cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors. We also evaluated protein levels of CCL2, CCR1, CCR2, CCL5, CCR5, CCR8, CXCL1, CXCR2, CXCR4, FGF2, and VEGFA by ELISA. Sprague-Dawley rats were used as a control. PCR Array procedure showed that proinflammatory cytokines were not upregulated in the taiep rat. In contrast, some mRNA levels of beta and alpha chemokines were upregulated in 1-month-old rats, but CXCR4 was downregulated at their 6 months of age. ELISA results showed that CXCL1, CCL2, CCR2, CCR5, CCR8, and CXCR4 protein levels were decreased in brainstem at the age of 6 months. These results suggest the presence of a chronic neuroinflammation process with deficiency of remyelination-stimulating factors (CXCL1, CXCR2, and CXCR4, which might account for the demyelination in the taiep rat.

  10. Cloning of Encoding Sequences for Chemokine Receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 from a Chinese Lymphocyte cDNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ It has been known recently that cofactors, which belong to the family of seven-transmembrane GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors, are necessary for the entry of HIV-1 into CD4+cells. The CXC chemokine receptor 4(CXCR4) was first found to act as the coreceptor for the infection of T cell line-tropic HIV-1 strains to T helper cells in 1996. Keeping in step with this find the CC chemokine receptor 5(CCR5)was also identified as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic virus. Both of the coreceptors could be used in basic research and application design for AIDS.

  11. Metal complexes of pyridine-fused macrocyclic polyamines targeting the chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamal, Sunil; D'huys, Thomas; Rowley, William F; Vermeire, Kurt; Aquaro, Stefano; Frost, Brian J; Schols, Dominique; Bell, Thomas W

    2015-11-14

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 acts as a key cell surface receptor in HIV infections, multiple forms of cancer, and various other pathologies, such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Macrocyclic polyamines and their metal complexes are known to exert anti-HIV activity, many acting as HIV entry inhibitors by specifically binding to CXCR4. Three series of pyridopentaazacylopentadecanes, in which the pyridine ring is fused to zero, one, or two saturated six-membered rings, were synthesized by manganese(ii)-templated Schiff-base cyclization of triethylenetetramine with various dicarbonyl compounds. By evaluating these macrocyclic polyamines and their complexes with Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and Zn(2+), we have discovered novel CXCR4-binding compounds. The MnCl2 complex of a new pentaazacyclopentadecane with one fused carbocyclic ring (11) was found to have the greatest potency as an antagonist of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 (IC50: 0.014 μM), as evidenced by inhibiting binding of CXCL12 to PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells). Consequently, this compound inhibits replication of the CXCR4-using (X4) HIV-1 strain NL4-3 in the TZM-bl cell line with an IC50 value of 0.52 μM and low cytotoxicity (CC50: >100 μM). In addition, 18 other compounds were evaluated for their interaction with CXCR4 via their ability to interfere with ligand chemokine binding and HIV entry and infection. Of these, the metal complexes of the two more hydrophobic series with one or two fused carbocyclic rings exhibited the greatest potency. The Zn(2+) complex 21 was among the most potent, showing that redox activity of the metal center is not associated with CXCR4 antagonist activity. PMID:26338723

  12. Expressions of chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 in salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓刚; 吕春堂; 周中华

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine expressions of chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 in primary focus and lymphogenous metastasis of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) with lung metastasis. Methods: Using immunohistochemical hypersensitivity catalyzed signal amplification (CSA), expressions of chemokine receptor CXCR4 and ligand CXCL12 were detected in tissue specimens from 20 cases of primary cancer focus and lymphogenous metastasis of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma, of which 7 cases were associated with lung metastasis and 3 with lympogenons metastasis. Twenty cases of tongue carcinoma (including 10 cases with lymphogenous metastasis) and 15 cases of mucoepidermoid carcinoma (including 5 cases with lymphogenous metastasis) were used as the malignant control group; and salivary mixed tumor ( n =10), tongue leukoceratosis ( n = 10) and cervical lymph node reactive hyperplasia ( n = 10) were used as the benign control group. Results: Expression of CXCR4 in the tissues and lymph metastases of oral and maxillofacial salivary ACC, mucoepidermoid carcinoma and tongue carcinoma was significantly higher than that of the benign control group ( P < 0.05); expression of CXCR4 in the primary focus of ACC was significantly higher than that of the malignant control group; and expression of CXCR4 in the ACC with lung metastasis was 87.1% (6/7), significantly higher than that without lung metastasis( P <0.01 ). There was evident positive expression of CXCL12 in endotheliocytes of microvessels within cancer and paracancer tissues and significantly high expression of CXCL12 in lymphogenous metastasis( P < 0.05). Conclusion: Chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 may be associated with local invasion and lymphogenous metastasis of oral and maxillofacial cancer, especially with lung metastasis of salivary ACC.

  13. CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor Mediates Prostate Tumor Cell Adhesion through α5 and β3 Integrins

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    Tobias Engl

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to prostate cancer metastasis are not understood completely. Although there is evidence that the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR 4 and its ligand CXCL12 may regulate tumor dissemination, their role in prostate cancer is controversial. We examined CXCR4 expression and functionality, and explored CXCL12-triggered adhesion of prostate tumor cells to human endothelium or to extracellular matrix proteins laminin, collagen, and fibronectin. Although little CXCR4 was expressed on LNCaP and DU-145 prostate tumor cells, CXCR4 was still active, enabling the cells to migrate toward a CXCL12 gradient. CXCL12 induced elevated adhesion to the endothelial cell monolayer and to immobilized fibronectin, laminin, and collagen. Anti-CXCR4 antibodies or CXCR4 knock out significantly impaired CXCL 12-triggered tumor cell binding. The effects observed did not depend on CXCR4 surface expression level. Rather, CXCR4-mediated adhesion was established by α5 and β3 integrin subunits and took place in the presence of reduced p38 and p38 phosphorylation. These data show that chemoattractive mechanisms are involved in adhesion processes of prostate cancer cells, and that binding of CXCL12 to its receptor leads to enhanced expression of α5 and β3. The findings provide a link between chemokine receptor expression and integrin-triggered tumor dissemination.

  14. Chemokine receptor CCR8 is required for lipopolysaccharide-triggered cytokine production in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

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    Tomoyuki Oshio

    Full Text Available Chemokine (C-C motif receptor 8 (CCR8, the chemokine receptor for chemokine (C-C motif ligand 1 (CCL1, is expressed in T-helper type-2 lymphocytes and peritoneal macrophages (PMφ and is involved in various pathological conditions, including peritoneal adhesions. However, the role of CCR8 in inflammatory responses is not fully elucidated. To investigate the function of CCR8 in macrophages, we compared cytokine secretion from mouse PMφ or bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMφ stimulated with various Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands in CCR8 deficient (CCR8-/- and wild-type (WT mice. We found that CCR8-/- PMφ demonstrated attenuated secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6, and IL-10 when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. In particular, LPS-induced IL-10 production absolutely required CCR8. CCR8-dependent cytokine secretion was characteristic of PMφ but not BMMφ. To further investigate this result, we selected the small molecule compound R243 from a library of compounds with CCR8-antagonistic effects on CCL1-induced Ca2+ flux and CCL1-driven PMφ aggregation. Similar to CCR8-/- PMφ, R243 attenuated secretion of TNF-α, IL-6, and most strikingly IL-10 from WT PMφ, but not BMMφ. CCR8-/- PMφ and R243-treated WT PMφ both showed suppressed c-jun N-terminal kinase activity and nuclear factor-κB signaling after LPS treatment when compared with WT PMφ. A c-Jun signaling pathway inhibitor also produced an inhibitory effect on LPS-induced cytokine secretion that was similar to that of CCR8 deficiency or R243 treatment. As seen in CCR8-/- mice, administration of R243 attenuated peritoneal adhesions in vivo. R243 also prevented hapten-induced colitis. These results are indicative of cross talk between signaling pathways downstream of CCR8 and TLR-4 that induces cytokine production by PMφ. Through use of CCR8-/- mice and the new CCR8 inhibitor, R243, we identified a novel macrophage innate immune response pathway that

  15. Similar activation of signal transduction pathways by the herpesvirus-encoded chemokine receptors US28 and ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLean, Katherine A; Holst, Peter J; Martini, Lene;

    2004-01-01

    The virally encoded chemokine receptors US28 from human cytomegalovirus and ORF74 from human herpesvirus 8 are both constitutively active. We show that both receptors constitutively activate the transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and cAMP response element binding pro...

  16. GluVII:06--a highly conserved and selective anchor point for non-peptide ligands in chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Schwartz, Thue W

    2006-01-01

    to be crucially important for the binding and action of a number of non-peptide ligands in for example the CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 receptors. It is proposed that in chemokine receptors in general GluVII:06 serves as a selective anchor point for the centrally located, positively charged nitrogen of the small molecule...

  17. Chemokine Ligand 5 (CCL5 and chemokine receptor (CCR5 genetic variants and prostate cancer risk among men of African Descent: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidd LaCreis R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokine and chemokine receptors play an essential role in tumorigenesis. Although chemokine-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are associated with various cancers, their impact on prostate cancer (PCA among men of African descent is unknown. Consequently, this study evaluated 43 chemokine-associated SNPs in relation to PCA risk. We hypothesized inheritance of variant chemokine-associated alleles may lead to alterations in PCA susceptibility, presumably due to variations in antitumor immune responses. Methods Sequence variants were evaluated in germ-line DNA samples from 814 African-American and Jamaican men (279 PCA cases and 535 controls using Illumina’s Goldengate genotyping system. Results Inheritance of CCL5 rs2107538 (AA, GA+AA and rs3817655 (AA, AG, AG+AA genotypes were linked with a 34-48% reduction in PCA risk. Additionally, the recessive and dominant models for CCR5 rs1799988 and CCR7 rs3136685 were associated with a 1.52-1.73 fold increase in PCA risk. Upon stratification, only CCL5 rs3817655 and CCR7 rs3136685 remained significant for the Jamaican and U.S. subgroups, respectively. Conclusions In summary, CCL5 (rs2107538, rs3817655 and CCR5 (rs1799988 sequence variants significantly modified PCA susceptibility among men of African descent, even after adjusting for age and multiple comparisons. Our findings are only suggestive and require further evaluation and validation in relation to prostate cancer risk and ultimately disease progression, biochemical/disease recurrence and mortality in larger high-risk subgroups. Such efforts will help to identify genetic markers capable of explaining disproportionately high prostate cancer incidence, mortality, and morbidity rates among men of African descent.

  18. Stoichiometry and geometry of the CXC chemokine receptor 4 complex with CXC ligand 12: Molecular modeling and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Stephens, Bryan S.; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zhao, Chunxia; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Abagyan, Ruben; Handel, Tracy M.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors regulate cell migration during development, immune system function, and in inflammatory diseases, making them important therapeutic targets. Nevertheless, the structural basis of receptor:chemokine interaction is poorly understood. Adding to the complexity of the problem is the persistently dimeric behavior of receptors observed in cell-based studies, which in combination with structural and mutagenesis data, suggest several possibilities for receptor:chemokine complex stoichiometry. In this study, a combination of computational, functional, and biophysical approaches was used to elucidate the stoichiometry and geometry of the interaction between the CXC-type chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand CXCL12. First, relevance and feasibility of a 2:1 stoichiometry hypothesis was probed using functional complementation experiments with multiple pairs of complementary nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. Next, the importance of dimers of WT CXCR4 was explored using the strategy of dimer dilution, where WT receptor dimerization is disrupted by increasing expression of nonfunctional CXCR4 mutants. The results of these experiments were supportive of a 1:1 stoichiometry, although the latter could not simultaneously reconcile existing structural and mutagenesis data. To resolve the contradiction, cysteine trapping experiments were used to derive residue proximity constraints that enabled construction of a validated 1:1 receptor:chemokine model, consistent with the paradigmatic two-site hypothesis of receptor activation. The observation of a 1:1 stoichiometry is in line with accumulating evidence supporting monomers as minimal functional units of G protein-coupled receptors, and suggests transmission of conformational changes across the dimer interface as the most probable mechanism of altered signaling by receptor heterodimers. PMID:25468967

  19. Cloning and functional characterization of the rabbit C-C chemokine receptor 2

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    Hamdouchi Chafiq

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CC-family chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 is implicated in the trafficking of blood-borne monocytes to sites of inflammation and is implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and atherosclerosis. The major challenge in the development of small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists is the lack of cross-species activity to the receptor in the preclinical species. Rabbit models have been widely used to study the role of various inflammatory molecules in the development of inflammatory processes. Therefore, in this study, we report the cloning and characterization of rabbit CCR2. Data regarding the activity of the CCR2 antagonist will provide valuable tools to perform toxicology and efficacy studies in the rabbit model. Results Sequence alignment indicated that rabbit CCR2 shares 80 % identity to human CCR2b. Tissue distribution indicated that rabbit CCR2 is abundantly expressed in spleen and lung. Recombinant rabbit CCR2 expressed as stable transfectants in U-937 cells binds radiolabeled 125I-mouse JE (murine MCP-1 with a calculated Kd of 0.1 nM. In competition binding assays, binding of radiolabeled mouse JE to rabbit CCR2 is differentially competed by human MCP-1, -2, -3 and -4, but not by RANTES, MIP-1α or MIP-1β. U-937/rabbit CCR2 stable transfectants undergo chemotaxis in response to both human MCP-1 and mouse JE with potencies comparable to those reported for human CCR2b. Finally, TAK-779, a dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist effectively inhibits the binding of 125I-mouse JE (IC50 = 2.3 nM to rabbit CCR2 and effectively blocks CCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Conclusion In this study, we report the cloning of rabbit CCR2 and demonstrate that this receptor is a functional chemotactic receptor for MCP-1.

  20. Expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 on lymphocytes of leprosy patients

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    V.A. Mendonça

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae, which induces chronic granulomatous infection of the skin and peripheral nerves. The disease ranges from the tuberculoid to the lepromatous forms, depending on the cellular immune response of the host. Chemokines are thought to be involved in the immunopathogenesis of leprosy, but few studies have investigated the expression of chemokine receptors on leukocytes of leprosy patients. In the present study, we evaluated 21 leprosy patients (M/F: 16/5 with a new diagnosis from the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic of the University Hospital, Federal University of Minas Gerais. The control group was composed of 20 healthy members (M/F: 15/5 of the community recruited by means of announcements. The expression of CCR2, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4 was investigated by flow cytometry on the surface of peripheral blood lymphocytes. There was a decrease in percentage of CD3+CXCR4+ and CD4+CXCR4+ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of leprosy patients (median [range], 17.6 [2.7-41.9] and 65.3 [3.9-91.9], respectively compared to the control group (median [range], 43.0 [3.7-61.3] and 77.2 [43.6-93.5], respectively. The percentage of CD4+CXCR4+ was significantly lower in patients with the tuberculoid form (median [range], 45.7 [0.0-83.1] of the disease, but not in lepromatous patients (median [range], 81.5 [44.9-91.9]. The CXCR4 chemokine receptor may play a role in leprosy immunopathogenesis, probably directing cell migration to tissue lesions in tuberculoid leprosy patients.

  1. Genetic characterization of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 gene in lagomorphs: comparison between the families Ochotonidae and Leporidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, J; Esteves, P J; Carmo, C R; Müller, A; Thompson, G; van der Loo, W

    2008-04-01

    Chemokines receptors are transmembrane proteins that bind chemokines. Chemokines and their receptors are known to play a crucial role in the immune system and in pathogen entry. There is evidence that myxoma virus, the causative agent of myxomatosis, can use the chemokine receptor CXCR4 to infect cells. This virus causes a benign disease in its natural host, Sylvilagus, but in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) it causes a highly fatal and infectious disease known as myxomatosis. We have characterized the chemokine receptor CXCR4 gene in five genera of the order Lagomorpha, Ochotona (Ochotonidae), and Oryctolagus, Lepus, Bunolagus and Sylvilagus (Leporidae). In lagomorphs, the CXCR4 is highly conserved, with most of the protein diversity found at surface regions. Five amino acid replacements were observed, two in the intracellular loops, one in the transmembrane domain and two in the extracellular loops. Oryctolagus features unique amino acid changes at the intracellular domains, putting this genus apart of all other lagomorphs. Furthermore, in the 37 European rabbits analysed, which included healthy rabbits and rabbits with clinical symptoms of myxomatosis, 14 nucleotide substitutions were obtained but no amino acid differences were observed. PMID:18205827

  2. CC Chemokine Receptor 5: The Interface of Host Immunity and Cancer

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    Carlos Eduardo Coral de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors are embedded in a stromal microenvironment consisting of immune cells, such as macrophages and lymphocytes, as well as nonimmune cells, such as endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Chemokines are a type of small secreted chemotactic cytokine and together with their receptors play key roles in the immune defense. Critically, they regulate cancer cellular migration and also contribute to their proliferation and survival. The CCR5 chemokine receptor is involved in leucocytes chemotaxis to sites of inflammation and plays an important role in the macrophages, T cells, and monocytes recruitment. Additionally, CCR5 may have an indirect effect on cancer progression by controlling the antitumor immune response, since it has been demonstrated that its expression could promote tumor growth and contribute to tumor metastasis, in different types of malignant tumors. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that a CCR5 antagonist may inhibit tumor growth, consisting of a possible therapeutic target. In this context, the present review focuses on the establishment of CCR5 within the interface of host immunity, tumor microenvironment, and its potential as a targeting to immunotherapy.

  3. Abrogation of CC chemokine receptor 9 ameliorates ventricular remodeling in mice after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yijie; Liu, Tao; Chen, Yuting; Tang, Yanhong; Wang, Teng; Hu, Dan; Huang, Congxin

    2016-01-01

    CC chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9), which is a unique receptor for CC chemokine ligand (CCL25), is mainly expressed on lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes/macrophages. CCR9 mediates the chemotaxis of inflammatory cells and participates in the pathological progression of inflammatory diseases. However, the role of CCR9 in the pathological process of myocardial infarction (MI) remains unexplored; inflammation plays a key role in this process. Here, we used CCR9 knockout mice to determine the functional significance of CCR9 in regulating post-MI cardiac remodeling and its underlying mechanism. MI was induced by surgical ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in CCR9 knockout mice and their CCR9+/+ littermates. Our results showed that the CCR9 expression levels were up-regulated in the hearts of the MI mice. Abrogation of CCR9 improved the post-MI survival rate and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and decreased the infarct size. In addition, the CCR9 knockout mice exhibited attenuated inflammation, apoptosis, structural and electrical remodeling compared with the CCR9+/+ MI mice. Mechanistically, CCR9 mainly regulated the pathological response by interfering with the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. In conclusion, the data reveal that CCR9 serves as a novel modulator of pathological progression following MI through NF-κB and MAPK signaling.

  4. Humoral Immune Pressure Selects for HIV-1 CXC-chemokine Receptor 4-using Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nina; Gonzalez, Oscar A; Registre, Ludy; Becerril, Carlos; Etemad, Behzad; Lu, Hong; Wu, Xueling; Lockman, Shahin; Essex, Myron; Moyo, Sikhulile; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Sagar, Manish

    2016-06-01

    Although both C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)- and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)-using HIV-1 strains cause AIDS, the emergence of CXCR4-utilizing variants is associated with an accelerated decline in CD4+ T cells. It remains uncertain if CXCR4-using viruses hasten disease or if these variants only emerge after profound immunological damage. We show that exclusively CXCR4- as compared to cocirculating CCR5-utilizing variants are less sensitive to neutralization by both contemporaneous autologous plasma and plasma pools from individuals that harbor only CCR5-using HIV-1. The CXCR4-utilizing variants, however, do not have a global antigenic change because they remain equivalently susceptible to antibodies that do not target coreceptor binding domains. Studies with envelope V3 loop directed antibodies and chimeric envelopes suggest that the neutralization susceptibility differences are potentially influenced by the V3 loop. In vitro passage of a neutralization sensitive CCR5-using virus in the presence of autologous plasma and activated CD4+ T cells led to the emergence of a CXCR4-utilizing virus in 1 of 3 cases. These results suggest that in some but not necessarily all HIV-1 infected individuals humoral immune pressure against the autologous virus selects for CXCR4-using variants, which potentially accelerates disease progression. Our observations have implications for using antibodies for HIV-1 immune therapy. PMID:27428434

  5. Humoral Immune Pressure Selects for HIV-1 CXC-chemokine Receptor 4-using Variants

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    Nina Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although both C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5- and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4-using HIV-1 strains cause AIDS, the emergence of CXCR4-utilizing variants is associated with an accelerated decline in CD4+ T cells. It remains uncertain if CXCR4-using viruses hasten disease or if these variants only emerge after profound immunological damage. We show that exclusively CXCR4- as compared to cocirculating CCR5-utilizing variants are less sensitive to neutralization by both contemporaneous autologous plasma and plasma pools from individuals that harbor only CCR5-using HIV-1. The CXCR4-utilizing variants, however, do not have a global antigenic change because they remain equivalently susceptible to antibodies that do not target coreceptor binding domains. Studies with envelope V3 loop directed antibodies and chimeric envelopes suggest that the neutralization susceptibility differences are potentially influenced by the V3 loop. In vitro passage of a neutralization sensitive CCR5-using virus in the presence of autologous plasma and activated CD4+ T cells led to the emergence of a CXCR4-utilizing virus in 1 of 3 cases. These results suggest that in some but not necessarily all HIV-1 infected individuals humoral immune pressure against the autologous virus selects for CXCR4-using variants, which potentially accelerates disease progression. Our observations have implications for using antibodies for HIV-1 immune therapy.

  6. Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 Is a Novel Marker for the Progression of Cutaneous Malignant Melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CXCR4/CXCL12 pathway has recently been reported to be involved in stimulating the metastasis of many different neoplasms, in which CXCR4 activates various phenomena such as chemotaxis, invasion, angiogenesis and proliferation. The purpose of this study was to analyze a possible association between the expression of chemokine receptors CXCR4, CCR6 and CCR7 with the clinicopathological features of cutaneous malignant melanoma, and to assess the usefulness of these chemokine receptors for diagnosis and prognosis. In our study, a percentage of immunoexpression of both CXCR4 and its ligands CXCL12 was associated with high clinical risk. In contrast, the patients with a low immunoexpression of CXCR4 and CXCL12 had low clinical risk. CCR6 and CCR7 immunoexpressions were also correlated with some clinical parameters, but seemed no more useful than CXCR4. These data suggest that the assessment of CXCR4 immunoexpression is a novel tool for predicting tumor aggressiveness in malignant melanomas, and in particular, a high immunoexpression percentage of CXCR4 and CXCL12 might be a sign of a poor prognosis

  7. Re: Chemokines in Cancer

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    Fehmi Narter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that regulate the trafficking and positioning of cells by activating the seven-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled chemokine receptors (GPCR or non G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane spanning receptors called atypical chemokine receptors (ACKR. Chemokines are basic proteins that also bind to glycosaminoglycans which play important roles in their biology. Chemokines are divided into four subfamilies based on the position of the first two N-terminal cysteine residues, including the CC, CXC, CX3C and XC subfamilies. Nearly 50 chemokines and 20 signaling chemokine receptors and 4 AKCRs have been identified. Dysregulated expression of chemokines and their corresponding receptors is implicated in many diseases, such as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and cancer. Chemokines are essential coordinators of cellular migration and cell-cell interactions and, therefore, have great impact on tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, tumor-associated host cells and cancer cells release an array of different chemokines, resulting in the recruitment and activation of different cell types that mediate the balance between antitumor and pro-tumor responses. In addition to their primary role as chemoattractants, chemokines are also involved in other tumor-related processes, including tumor cell growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Therefore, further studies of the distinctions between the pro-tumor and antitumor activities of chemokines are warranted in order to develop more effective therapies against cancer.

  8. Programming CD8+ T cells for effective immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hinrichs, Christian S.; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2006-01-01

    The differentiation state of CD8+ T cells has emerged as a crucial determinant of their ability to respond to tumor and infection. Signals from T-cell receptors, co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine receptors direct the differentiation process. These signals ‘program’ sustained and heritable gene expression patterns that govern progressive differentiation and lineage commitment. The epigenetic mechanisms by which T cells are programmed are just beginning to be elucidated. Understanding the m...

  9. Fulminant lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced inflammation of the CNS involves a cytokine-chemokine-cytokine-chemokine cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Simonsen, Stine; Fenger, Christina;

    2009-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of immunocompetent mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) normally results in fatal CD8+ T cell mediated meningoencephalitis. However, in CXCL10-deficient mice, the virus-induced CD8+ T cell accumulation in the neural parenchyma is impaired, and only 30......-50% of the mice succumb to the infection. Similar results are obtained in mice deficient in the matching chemokine receptor, CXCR3. Together, these findings point to a key role for CXCL10 in regulating the severity of the LCMV-induced inflammatory process. For this reason, we now address the mechanisms regulating...... the expression of CXCL10 in the CNS of LCMV-infected mice. Using mice deficient in type I IFN receptor, type II IFN receptor, or type II IFN, as well as bone marrow chimeras expressing CXCL10 only in resident cells or only in bone marrow-derived cells, we analyzed the up-stream regulation as well as the cellular...

  10. Differential gene expression during capillary morphogenesis in a microcarrier-based three-dimensional in vitro model of angiogenesis with focus on chemokines and chemokine receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Tai Sun; Min-Yue Zhang; Chang Shu; Qiang Li; Xiao-Gui Yan; Ni Cheng; Yu-Dong Qiu; Yi-Tao Ding

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To globally compare the gene expression profiles during the capillary morphogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) in an in vitro angiogenesis system with affymetrix oligonucleotide array.METHODS: A microcarrier-based in vitro angiogenesis system was developed, in which ECs migrated into the matrix,proliferated, and formed capillary sprouts. The sprouts elongated, branched and formed networks. The total RNA samples from the HMVECs at the selected time points (0.5,24, and 72 h) during the capillary morphogenesis were used for microarray analyses, and the data were processed with the softwares provided by the manufacturers. The expression patterns of some genes were validated and confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The regulated genes were grouped based on their molecular functions and expression patterns, and among them the expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors was specially examined and their functional implications were analyzed.RESULTS: A total of 1 961 genes were up- or downregulated two-folds or above, and among them, 468 genes were up- or down-regulated three-folds or above. The regulated genes could be grouped into categories based on their molecular functions, and were also clustered into six groups based on their patterns of expression. As for chemokines and chemokine receptors, CXCL1/GRO-α,CXCL2/GRO-β, CXCLS/ENA-78, CXCL6/GCP2, IL-8/CXCL8,CXCL12/SDF-1, CXCL9/Mig, CXC11/ITAC, CX3CL1/fractalkine,CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3, CCLS/RANTES, CCL7, CCL15, CCL21,CCL23, CCL28, and CCR1, CCR9, CXCR4 were identified.Moreover, these genes demonstrated different changing patterns during the capillary morphogenesis, which implied that they might have different roles in the sequential process. Among the chemokines identified, CCL2/MCP-1,CCL5/RANTES and CX3CL1 were specially up-regulated at the 24-h time point when the sprouting characterized the morphological change. It was thus suggested that they might exert crucial roles at the early stage

  11. Estrogen, SNP-Dependent Chemokine Expression and Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Bongartz, Tim; Liu, Mohan; Kalari, Krishna R; Goss, Paul E; Shepherd, Lois E; Goetz, Matthew P; Kubo, Michiaki; Ingle, James N; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported, on the basis of a genome-wide association study for aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms, that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near the T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1A (TCL1A) gene were associated with aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal pain and with estradiol (E2)-induced TCL1A expression. Furthermore, variation in TCL1A expression influenced the downstream expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cytokine receptors. Specifically, the top hit genome-wide association study SNP, rs11849538, created a functional estrogen response element (ERE) that displayed estrogen receptor (ER) binding and increased E2 induction of TCL1A expression only for the variant SNP genotype. In the present study, we pursued mechanisms underlying the E2-SNP-dependent regulation of TCL1A expression and, in parallel, our subsequent observations that SNPs at a distance from EREs can regulate ERα binding and that ER antagonists can reverse phenotypes associated with those SNPs. Specifically, we performed a series of functional genomic studies using a large panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines with dense genomic data that demonstrated that TCL1A SNPs at a distance from EREs can modulate ERα binding and expression of TCL1A as well as the expression of downstream immune mediators. Furthermore, 4-hydroxytamoxifen or fulvestrant could reverse these SNP-genotype effects. Similar results were found for SNPs in the IL17A cytokine and CCR6 chemokine receptor genes. These observations greatly expand our previous results and support the existence of a novel molecular mechanism that contributes to the complex interplay between estrogens and immune systems. They also raise the possibility of the pharmacological manipulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in a SNP genotype-dependent fashion. PMID:26866883

  12. Intravaginal TLR agonists increase local vaccine-specific CD8 T cells and human papillomavirus-associated genital-tumor regression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos-Pereira, S; Decrausaz, L; Derré, L; Bobst, M; Romero, P; Schiller, J T; Jichlinski, P; Nardelli-Haefliger, D

    2013-03-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV)-related cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Despite active development, HPV E6/E7 oncogene-specific therapeutic vaccines have had limited clinical efficacy to date. Here, we report that intravaginal (IVAG) instillation of CpG-ODN (TLR9 agonist) or poly-(I:C) (TLR3 agonist) after subcutaneous E7 vaccination increased ~fivefold the number of vaccine-specific interferon-γ-secreting CD8 T cells in the genital mucosa (GM) of mice, without affecting the E7-specific systemic response. The IVAG treatment locally increased both E7-specific and total CD8 T cells, but not CD4 T cells. This previously unreported selective recruitment of CD8 T cells from the periphery by IVAG CpG-ODN or poly-(I:C) was mediated by TLR9 and TLR3/melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 signaling pathways, respectively. For CpG, this recruitment was associated with a higher proportion of GM-localized CD8 T cells expressing both CCR5 and CXCR3 chemokine receptors and E-selectin ligands. Most interestingly, IVAG CpG-ODN following vaccination led to complete regression of large genital HPV tumors in 75% of mice, instead of 20% with vaccination alone. These findings suggest that mucosal application of immunostimulatory molecules might substantially increase the effectiveness of parenterally administered vaccines.

  13. Breast cancer lung metastasis requires expression of chemokine receptor CCR4 and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Baatar, Dolgor; Bodogai, Monica; Hakim, Fran; Gress, Ronald; Anderson, Robin L; Deng, Jie; Xu, Mai; Briest, Susanne; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-07-15

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. More needs to be learned about mechanisms that control this process. In particular, the role of chemokine receptors in metastasis remains controversial. Here, using a highly metastatic breast cancer (4T1) model, we show that lung metastasis is a feature of only a proportion of the tumor cells that express CCR4. Moreover, the primary tumor growing in mammary pads activates remotely the expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 in the lungs. These chemokines acting through CCR4 attract both tumor and immune cells. However, CCR4-mediated chemotaxis was not sufficient to produce metastasis, as tumor cells in the lung were efficiently eliminated by natural killer (NK) cells. Lung metastasis required CCR4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which directly killed NK cells using beta-galactoside-binding protein. Thus, strategies that abrogate any part of this process should improve the outcome through activation of effector cells and prevention of tumor cell migration. We confirm this prediction by killing CCR4(+) cells through delivery of TARC-fused toxins or depleting Tregs and preventing lung metastasis. PMID:19567680

  14. The Role of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 in the Biologic Behavior of Human Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger H. Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of sarcoma remains poorly understood. However, recent studies have begun to uncover some of the molecular pathways involved in sarcomagenesis. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 has been implicated in sarcoma development and has been found to be a prognostic marker for poor clinical outcome. There is growing evidence that overexpression of CXCR4 plays a significant role in development of metastatic disease, especially in directing tumor cells towards the preferential sites of metastases in sarcoma, lung and bone. Although further investigation is necessary to validate these pathways, there is potential for clinical application, particularly in the use of pharmacologic inhibitors of CXCR4 as means of preventing sarcoma metastasis.

  15. Chemokine receptor CXCR3 in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus): cloning, characterization and its responses to lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yadong; Zhou, Shuhong; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiuli; Liu, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3, a member of the G protein-coupled receptors superfamily, regulates the responses of many immune responses. In this experiment, we cloned and characterized the cDNA of CXCR3 in Scophthalmus maximus (turbot). A 5'-UTR of 216-bp, a 259-bp 3'-UTR with a poly (A) tail and a 1089-bp CDS encoding 362 amino acids form the cDNA of CXCR3, which is 1564-bp long. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that turbot CXCR3 shared a high similarity with other CXCR3s and shared more similarity with CXCR5 than the other subfamilies of chemokines. The CXCR3 protein in turbot showed the highest similarity with the CXCR3b from rainbow trout (44.5%), which indicated that this CXCR3 gene/protein may be a CXCR3b isoform. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that CXCR3 transcripts were constitutively expressed in all the tissues of the non-injected turbot used in this study, with the highest expression occurring in blood. Several immune-related tissues of fish, such as the spleen, head kidney, liver and blood, tissues, which were abundant of lymphocyte, were investigated in this study. CXCR3 gene was expressed at the highest level in blood than the other tested tissues. The injection experiment suggested that the CXCR3 expression level after LPS injection was significantly up-regulated in all immune-related tissues in turbot. These results improve our understanding of the functions of CXCR3 in the turbot immune response. PMID:26585996

  16. Classification of distinct subtypes of peripheral T-cell lymphoma unspecified, identified by chemokine and chemokine receptor expression: Analysis of prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Koichi; Karube, Kennosuke; Kawano, Riko; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Suzumiya, Junji; Kikuchii, Masahiro

    2004-09-01

    WHO classification for malignant lymphoma was recently proposed. However, PTCL is heterogeneous. Chemokines and its receptors are closely associated with the T-cell subtypes. To clarify the T-cell subtype in PTCL, we conducted DNA chips of chemokine, its receptor (R) and cytokines. Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AILD, n=4), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, n=4), adult T-cell leukemia lymphoma (ATLL, n=7), NK-cell lymphoma (NKL, n=2) and PTCL, unspecified (PTCL-U, n=6) were analyzed using DNA chips. In addition, immunological stainings were performed in 280 cases. In DNA chip, AILD, ALCL, NKL and ATLL showed a tendency for respective clusters, otherwise, PTCL-U clustered with AILD, ALCL and ATLL. From the gene expression profiling, CCR4, CCR3, MIG, CXCR3 and BLC were selected for immunohistochemistry. ATLL (n=48) expressed CCR4. ALCL (n=26) expressed CCR3, NKL (n=20) expressed MIG, and AILD (n=29) expressed CXCR3 and/or BLC. From the expression patterns, PTCL-U (n=134) were classified into three groups; CCR4 type (CCR4(+), n=42), CCR3 type (CCR3(+), n=31) and CXCR3 type (CXCR3(+) BLC(+/-), n=54). The prognosis was poor for ATLL, intermediate for AILD and favorable for ALCL (P=0.0014). Among PTCL-U, CCR4 type, CXCR3 type and CCR3 type had prognoses equivalent to ATLL, AILD and ALCL, respectively (P<0.0001).

  17. CD8αα innate-type lymphocytes in the intestinal epithelium mediate mucosal immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Kaer, Luc Van; Scott Algood, Holly M.; Singh, Kshipra; Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Greer, Michael J.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Matta, Pranathi; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune responses are critical for mucosal immunity. Here we describe an innate lymphocyte population, iCD8α cells, characterized by expression of CD8α homodimers. iCD8α cells exhibit innate functional characteristics such as the capacity to engulf and kill bacteria. Development of iCD8α cells depends on expression of interleukin-2 receptor γ chain (IL-2Rγc), IL-15, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ib protein H2-T3, also known as the thymus leukemia antigen or TL. Wh...

  18. Bridged cyclams as imaging agents for chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over-expression of chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is present in a majority of cancers, has been linked to an aggressive phenotype, and may indicate the metastatic potential of primary tumor. Several CXCR4 targeted therapeutics are in clinical trials and the development of the corresponding imaging agents is an area of active interest. Previously, 64Cu-labeled imaging agents for CXCR4 have provided clear images of CXCR4-bearing tissues in relevant experimental models but demonstrated fast washout from tissues harboring receptor. Addition of stabilizing bridges is known to provide more robust chelator-Cu(II) complexes. In addition, bridged cyclam-based CXCR4 binding agents demonstrated increased receptor residence times relative to existing agents. Based on that knowledge we synthesized several bridged cyclam analogs of AMD3465, a monocyclam-based CXCR4 imaging agent, to increase the retention time of the tracer bound to the receptor to allow for protracted imaging and improved target-to-non-target ratios. Specific accumulation of two radiolabeled, cross-bridged analogs ([64Cu] RAD1-24 and [64Cu]RAD1-52) was observed in U87-stb-CXCR4 tumors in both PET/CT imaging and biodistribution studies. At 90 min post-injection of radiotracer, tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-blood ratios reached 106.05 ± 17.19 and 28.08 ± 4.78, respectively, for cross-bridged pyrimidine analog [64Cu]RAD1-52. Receptor blockade performed in vivo denoted target binding specificity. The biodistribution and PET/CT imaging studies with the radiolabeled bridged cyclams demonstrated longer tumor retention and comparable uptake to [64Cu]AMD3465, though [64Cu]AMD3465 demonstrated superior overall pharmacokinetics

  19. Intranasal Vaccination Affords Localization and Persistence of Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Lymphocytes in the Female Reproductive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailbala Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunization strategies generating large numbers of antigen-specific T cells in the female reproductive tract (FRT can provide barrier protection against sexually-transmitted pathogens, such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and human papillomaviruses (HPV. The kinetics and mechanisms of regulation of vaccine-induced adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses in FRT are less well defined. We present here evidence for intranasal delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA along with alpha-galactosylceramide adjuvant as a protein vaccine to induce significantly higher levels of antigen-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cells in the FRT, relative to other systemic and mucosal tissues. Antibody blocking of the CXCR3 receptor significantly reduced antigen-specific CD8+ T cells subsequent to intranasal delivery of the protein vaccine suggesting an important role for the CXCR3 chemokine-receptor signaling for T cell trafficking. Further, intranasal vaccination with an adenoviral vector expressing OVA or HIV-1 envelope was as effective as intramuscular vaccination for generating OVA- or ENV-specific immunity in the FRT. These results support the application of the needle-free intranasal route as a practical approach to delivering protein as well as DNA/virus vector-based vaccines for efficient induction of effector and memory T cell immunity in the FRT.

  20. Functional interaction between angiotensin II receptor type 1 and chemokine (C-C Motif) receptor 2 with implications for chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Akli Ayoub; Yuan Zhang; Kelly, Robyn S.; Heng B See; Johnstone, Elizabeth K.M.; McCall, Elizabeth A.; Williams, James H; Kelly, Darren J.; Pfleger, Kevin D.G.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding functional interactions between G protein-coupled receptors is of great physiological and pathophysiological importance. Heteromerization provides one important potential mechanism for such interaction between different signalling pathways via macromolecular complex formation. Previous studies suggested a functional interplay between angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) and Chemokine (C-C motif) Receptor 2 (CCR2). However the molecular mechanisms are not understood. We investiga...

  1. Pathway-selective suppression of chemokine receptor signaling in B cells by LPS through downregulation of PLC-β2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Aiko-Konno; Liao, Fang; Zhang, Hongwei H; Hedrick, Michael N; Singh, Satya P; Wu, Dianqing; Farber, Joshua M

    2010-11-01

    Lymphocyte activation leads to changes in chemokine receptor expression. There are limited data, however, on how lymphocyte activators can alter chemokine signaling by affecting downstream pathways. We hypothesized that B cell-activating agents might alter chemokine responses by affecting downstream signal transducers, and that such effects might differ depending on the activator. We found that activating mouse B cells using either anti-IgM or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the surface expression of CCR6 and CCR7 with large increases in chemotaxis to their cognate ligands. By contrast, while anti-IgM also led to enhanced calcium responses, LPS-treated cells showed only small changes in calcium signaling as compared with cells that were freshly isolated. Of particular interest, we found that LPS caused a reduction in the level of B-cell phospholipase C (PLC)-β2 mRNA and protein. Data obtained using PLC-β2(-/-) mice showed that the β2 isoform mediates close to one-half the chemokine-induced calcium signal in resting and anti-IgM-activated B cells, and we found that calcium signals in the LPS-treated cells were boosted by increasing the level of PLC-β2 using transfection, consistent with a functional effect of downregulating PLC-β2. Together, our results show activator-specific effects on responses through B-cell chemokine receptors that are mediated by quantitative changes in a downstream signal-transducing protein, revealing an activity for LPS as a downregulator of PLC-β2, and a novel mechanism for controlling chemokine-induced signals in lymphocytes.

  2. Chemokines, lymphocytes, and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farber J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are members of a family of more than 30 human cytokines whose best-described activities are as chemotactic factors for leukocytes and that are presumed to be important in leukocyte recruitment and trafficking. While many chemokines can act on lymphocytes, the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology are poorly understood. The recent discoveries that chemokines can suppress infection by HIV-1 and that chemokine receptors serve, along with CD4, as obligate co-receptors for HIV-1 entry have lent urgency to studies on the relationships between chemokines and lymphocytes. My laboratory has characterized Mig and Crg-2/IP-10, chemokines that are induced by IFN-g and that specifically target lymphocytes, particularly activated T cells. We have demonstrated that the genes for these chemokines are widely expressed during experimental infections in mice with protozoan and viral pathogens, but that the patterns of mig and crg-2 expression differed, suggesting non-redundant roles in vivo. Our related studies to identify new chemokine receptors from activated lymphocytes resulted in the cloning of STRL22 and STRL33. We and others have shown that STRL22 is a receptor for the CC chemokine MIP-3a, and STRL22 has been re-named CCR6. Although STRL33 remains an orphan receptor, we have shown that it can function as a co-receptor for HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, and that it is active with a broader range of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins than the major co-receptors described to date. The ability of STRL33 to function with a wide variety of envelope glycoproteins may become particularly important if therapies are instituted to block other specific co-receptors. We presume that investigations into the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology will provide information important for understanding the pathogenesis of AIDS and for manipulating immune and inflammatory responses for clinical benefit

  3. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for Imaging of Chemokine Receptor 4 Expression in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Constantin; Lückerath, Katharina; Kleinlein, Irene; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Linsenmann, Thomas; Kessler, Almuth F; Rudelius, Martina; Kropf, Saskia; Buck, Andreas K; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Löhr, Mario; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) has been reported to be overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM) and to be associated with poor survival. This study investigated the feasibility of non-invasive CXCR4-directed imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine receptor ligand (68)Ga-Pentixafor. 15 patients with clinical suspicion on primary or recurrent glioblastoma (13 primary, 2 recurrent tumors) underwent (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for assessment of CXCR4 expression prior to surgery. O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET/CT images were available in 11/15 cases and were compared visually and semi-quantitatively (SUVmax, SUVmean). Tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated for both PET probes. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were also compared to histological CXCR4 expression on neuronavigated surgical samples. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was visually positive in 13/15 cases with SUVmean and SUVmax of 3.0±1.5 and 3.9±2.0 respectively. Respective values for (18)F-FET were 4.4±2.0 (SUVmean) and 5.3±2.3 (SUVmax). TBR for SUVmean and SUVmax were higher for (68)Ga-Pentixafor than for (18)F-FET (SUVmean 154.0±90.7 vs. 4.1±1.3; SUVmax 70.3±44.0 and 3.8±1.2, p<0.01), respectively. Histological analysis confirmed CXCR4 expression in tumor areas with high (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake; regions of the same tumor without apparent (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake showed no or low receptor expression. In this pilot study, (68)Ga-Pentixafor retention has been observed in the vast majority of glioblastoma lesions and served as readout for non-invasive determination of CXCR4 expression. Given the paramount importance of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis in tumor biology, (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT might prove a useful tool for sensitive, non-invasive in-vivo quantification of CXCR4 as well as selection of patients who might benefit from CXCR4-directed therapy. PMID:26909116

  4. T-cells in the cerebrospinal fluid express a similar repertoire of inflammatory chemokine receptors in the absence or presence of CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivisäkk, P; Trebst, C; Liu, Z;

    2002-01-01

    It is believed that chemokines and their receptors are involved in trafficking of T-cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the current study was to define the expression on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) T-cells of six chemokine receptors associated with trafficking to sites...... is not sufficient for the trafficking of CD3+T-cells to the CSF. We hypothesize that CXCR3 is the principal inflammatory chemokine receptor involved in intrathecal accumulation of T-cells in MS. Through interactions with its ligands, CXCR3 is proposed to mediate retention of T-cells in the inflamed CNS....

  5. Relation of circulating concentrations of chemokine receptor CCR5 ligands to C-peptide, proinsulin and HbA1c and disease progression in type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfleger, C; Kaas, A; Hansen, L; Alizadeh, B; Hougaard, P; Holl, R; Kolb, H; Roep, B O; Mortensen, H B; Schloot, N C

    2008-01-01

    Th1 related chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 and Th2 related CCL4 as ligands of the receptor CCR5 contribute to disease development in animal models of type 1 diabetes. In humans, no data are available addressing the role of these chemokines regarding disease progression and remission. We investigated longi

  6. CD8+ T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8+ T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8+ splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8+ splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8+ splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  7. CD8(+) T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8(+) T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8(+) splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8(+) splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8(+) splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  8. Role of chemokine receptor CXCR2 expression in mammary tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan C Nannuru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemokines and their receptors have long been known to regulate metastasis in various cancers. Previous studies have shown that CXCR2 expression is upregulated in malignant breast cancer tissues but not in benign ductal epithelial samples. The functional role of CXCR2 in the metastatic phenotype of breast cancer still remains unclear. We hypothesize that the chemokine receptor, CXCR2, mediates tumor cell invasion and migration and promotes metastasis in breast cancer. The objective of this study is to investigate the potential role of CXCR2 in the metastatic phenotype of mouse mammary tumor cells. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the functional role of CXCR2 in breast cancer by stably downregulating the expression of CXCR2 in metastatic mammary tumor cell lines Cl66 and 4T1, using short hairpin RNA (shRNA. The effects of CXCR2 downregulation on tumor growth, invasion and metastatic potential were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results: We demonstrated knock down of CXCR2 in Cl66 and 4T1 cells (Cl66-shCXCR2 and 4T1-shCXCR2 cells by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR at the transcriptional level and by immunohistochemistry at the protein level. We did not observe a significant difference in in vitro cell proliferation between vector control and CXCR2 knock-down Cl66 or 4T1 cells. Next, we examined the invasive potential of Cl66-shCXCR2 cells by in vitro Matrigel invasion assay. We observed a significantly lower number (52 ± 5 of Cl66-shCXCR2 cells invading through Matrigel compared to control cells (Cl66-control (182 ± 3 (P < 0.05. We analyzed the in vivo metastatic potential of Cl66-shCXCR2 using a spontaneous metastasis model by orthotopically implanting cells into the mammary fat pad of female BALB/c mice. Animals were sacrificed 12 weeks post tumor implantation and tissue samples were analyzed for metastatic nodules. CXCR2 downregulation significantly inhibited tumor cell metastasis. All the mice (n = 10

  9. Accumulation of low-avidity anti-melanocortin receptor 1 (anti-MC1R) CD8(+) T cells in the lesional skin of a patient with melanoma-related depigmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Wankowicz-Kalinska; R.B. Mailliard; K. Olson; F. Graham; H. Edington; J.M. Kirkwood; S. Martinek; P.K. Das; W.J. Storkus

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous or therapy-induced depigmentation in patients with melanoma has long been considered a favourable prognostic indicator. In this report, we isolated T cells infiltrating the depigmented skin of an HLA-A2+/ DR4+ patient with melanoma, and detected a very high frequency of CD8+ T cells spec

  10. Receptor expression and responsiveness of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a human cytomegalovirus encoded CC chemokine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zheng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects the majority of the world's population. After long period of time co-evolving with human being, this pathogen has developed several strategies to evade host immune surveillance. One of the major trick is encoding homologous to those of the host organism or stealing host cellular genes that have significant functions in immune system. To date, we have found several viral immune analogous which include G protein coupled receptor, class I major histocompatibility complex and chemokine. Chemokine is a small group of molecules which is defined by the presence of four cysteines in highly conserved region. The four kinds of chemokines (C, CC, CXC, and CX3C are classified based on the arrangement of 1 or 2 N-terminal cysteine residues. UL128 protein is one of the analogous that encoded by human cytomegalovirus that has similar amino acid sequences to the human CC chemokine. It has been proved to be one of the essential particles that involved in human cytomegalovirus entry into epithelial/endothelial cells as well as macrophages. It is also the target of potent neutralizing antibodies in human cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals. We had demonstrated the chemotactic trait of UL128 protein in our previous study. Recombinant UL128 in vitrohas the ability to attract monocytes to the infection region and enhances peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. However, the way that this viral encoded chemokine interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the detailed mechanism that involving the virus entry into host cells keeps unknown. Here we performed in vitroinvestigation into the effects of UL128 protein on peripheral blood mononuclear cell's activation and receptor binding, which may help us further understand the immunomodulatory function of UL128 protein as well as human cytomegalovirus diffusion mechanism.

  11. Reversed binding of a small molecule ligand in homologous chemokine receptors - differential role of extracellular loop 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P C; Thiele, S; Steen, A;

    2012-01-01

    The majority of small molecule compounds targeting chemokine receptors share a similar pharmacophore with a centrally located aliphatic positive charge and flanking aromatic moieties. Here we describe a novel piperidine-based compound with structural similarity to previously described CCR8-specif...... agonists, but containing a unique phenyl-tetrazol moiety which, in addition to activity at CCR8 was also active at CCR1....

  12. Universal expression and dual function of the atypical chemokine receptor D6 on innate-like B cells in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hansell, Chris A H; Schiering, Chris; Kinstrie, Ross; Ford, Laura; Bordon, Yvonne; McInnes, Iain B; Goodyear, Carl S.; Nibbs, Robert J B

    2011-01-01

    Mouse innate-like B cells are a heterogeneous collection of multifunctional cells that control infection, play housekeeping roles, contribute to adaptive immunity, and suppress inflammation. We show that, amongst leukocytes, chemokine internalisation by the D6 receptor is a unique and universal feature of all known innate-like B cell populations and, to our knowledge, the most effective unifying marker of these cells. Moreover, we identify novel D6active B1 cell subsets, including those we te...

  13. Tumor infiltration by chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7)+ T-lymphocytes is a favorable prognostic factor in metastatic colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Correale, Pierpaolo; Rotundo, Maria Saveria; Botta, Cirino; del Vecchio, Maria Teresa; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro

    2012-01-01

    The immune interactions occurring within the tumor microenvironment have a critical role in determining the outcome of colorectal cancer patients. We carried-out an immunohistochemical analysis of tumor infiltrating T-lymphocytes expressing chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) in a series of colorectal cancer patients enrolled in a prospective clinical trial. We demonstrated that a high tumor infiltration score of this lymphocyte subset is predictive of longer progression free survival and overall sur...

  14. Human C-C chemokine receptor 3 monoclonal antibody inhibits pulmonary inflammation in allergic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai WANG; Hua-hao SHEN; Wen LI; Hua-qiong HUANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the effect of C-C chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) blockade on pulmonary inflammation and mucus production in allergic mice. Methods:We used the synthetic peptide of the CCR3 NH2-terminal as the immunizing antigen and generated murine monoclonal antibody against the human CCR3. In addition,the generated antibody was administered to mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. The inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage,cytokine levels,pulmonary histopathology,and mucus secretion were examined. Results:The Western blotting analysis indicated that the generated antibody bound to CCR3 specifically. The allergic mice treated with the antihuman CCR3 antibody exhibited a significant reduction of pulmonary inflammation accompanied with the alteration of cytokine. Conclusion:The antibody we generated was specific to CCR3. The inhibition of airway inflammation and mucus overproduction by the antibody suggested that the blockade of CCR3 is an appealing therapeutical target for asthma. The present research may provide an experimental basis for the further study of this agent.

  15. Chemokine receptor Ccr1 drives neutrophil-mediated kidney immunopathology and mortality in invasive candidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail S Lionakis

    Full Text Available Invasive candidiasis is the 4(th leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in the US with mortality that exceeds 40% despite administration of antifungal therapy; neutropenia is a major risk factor for poor outcome after invasive candidiasis. In a fatal mouse model of invasive candidiasis that mimics human bloodstream-derived invasive candidiasis, the most highly infected organ is the kidney and neutrophils are the major cellular mediators of host defense; however, factors regulating neutrophil recruitment have not been previously defined. Here we show that mice lacking chemokine receptor Ccr1, which is widely expressed on leukocytes, had selectively impaired accumulation of neutrophils in the kidney limited to the late phase of the time course of the model; surprisingly, this was associated with improved renal function and survival without affecting tissue fungal burden. Consistent with this, neutrophils from wild-type mice in blood and kidney switched from Ccr1(lo to Ccr1(high at late time-points post-infection, when Ccr1 ligands were produced at high levels in the kidney and were chemotactic for kidney neutrophils ex vivo. Further, when a 1∶1 mixture of Ccr1(+/+ and Ccr1(-/- donor neutrophils was adoptively transferred intravenously into Candida-infected Ccr1(+/+ recipient mice, neutrophil trafficking into the kidney was significantly skewed toward Ccr1(+/+ cells. Thus, neutrophil Ccr1 amplifies late renal immunopathology and increases mortality in invasive candidiasis by mediating excessive recruitment of neutrophils from the blood to the target organ.

  16. Chemokine receptor Ccr1 drives neutrophil-mediated kidney immunopathology and mortality in invasive candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionakis, Michail S; Fischer, Brett G; Lim, Jean K; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Wan, Wuzhou; Richard Lee, Chyi-Chia; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Scheinberg, Phillip; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the 4(th) leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in the US with mortality that exceeds 40% despite administration of antifungal therapy; neutropenia is a major risk factor for poor outcome after invasive candidiasis. In a fatal mouse model of invasive candidiasis that mimics human bloodstream-derived invasive candidiasis, the most highly infected organ is the kidney and neutrophils are the major cellular mediators of host defense; however, factors regulating neutrophil recruitment have not been previously defined. Here we show that mice lacking chemokine receptor Ccr1, which is widely expressed on leukocytes, had selectively impaired accumulation of neutrophils in the kidney limited to the late phase of the time course of the model; surprisingly, this was associated with improved renal function and survival without affecting tissue fungal burden. Consistent with this, neutrophils from wild-type mice in blood and kidney switched from Ccr1(lo) to Ccr1(high) at late time-points post-infection, when Ccr1 ligands were produced at high levels in the kidney and were chemotactic for kidney neutrophils ex vivo. Further, when a 1∶1 mixture of Ccr1(+/+) and Ccr1(-/-) donor neutrophils was adoptively transferred intravenously into Candida-infected Ccr1(+/+) recipient mice, neutrophil trafficking into the kidney was significantly skewed toward Ccr1(+/+) cells. Thus, neutrophil Ccr1 amplifies late renal immunopathology and increases mortality in invasive candidiasis by mediating excessive recruitment of neutrophils from the blood to the target organ.

  17. The Mechanism of Chemokine Receptor 9 Internalization Triggered by Interleukin 2 and Interleukin 4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoling Tong; Lijun Zhang; Li Zhang; Meng Hu; Jun Leng; Beibei Yu; Beibei Zhou; Yi Hu; Qiuping Zhang

    2009-01-01

    In previous study, we found that the chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) was highly expressed on CD4+ T cells from patients with T-cell lineage acute lymphocytic leukemia (T-ALL) and mediated leukemia cell infiltration and metastasis. Combined use of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-4 promoted the internalization of CCR9 and therefore attenuated leukemia cell infiltration and metastasis. In this study, we preliminarily investigated the mechanism of internalization of CCR9 on MOLT4 cell model (a human leukemia T-cell line, naturally expresses CCR9) and found that IL-2 upregulated the cell surface expression of IL-4Rα (CD124) greatly, whereas IL-4 had no significant influence on α (CD25) and β subunits (CD122) of IL-2R. Moreover, specific inhibitors, such as staurosporine, H89 and heparin, inhibited internalization of CCR9, which indicated a role of protein kinase C (PKC) and G protein-coupled kinase 2 (GRK2), respectively. Furthermore, GRK2 was upregulated and translocated to cell membrane in IL-2 and IL-4 treated cells which indicated that PKC could be a prerequisite for GRK2 activity.Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2009;6(3):181-189.

  18. Human Cytomegalovirus Encoded Homologs of Cytokines, Chemokines and their Receptors: Roles in Immunomodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. McSharry

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, the largest human herpesvirus, infects a majority of the world’s population. Like all herpesviruses, following primary productive infection, HCMV establishes a life-long latent infection, from which it can reactivate years later to produce new, infectious virus. Despite the presence of a massive and sustained anti-HCMV immune response, productively infected individuals can shed virus for extended periods of time, and once latent infection is established, it is never cleared from the host. It has been proposed that HCMV must therefore encode functions which help to evade immune mediated clearance during productive virus replication and latency. Molecular mimicry is a strategy used by many viruses to subvert and regulate anti-viral immunity and HCMV has hijacked/developed a range of functions that imitate host encoded immunomodulatory proteins. This review will focus on the HCMV encoded homologs of cellular cytokines/chemokines and their receptors, with an emphasis on how these virus encoded homologs may facilitate viral evasion of immune clearance.

  19. Antagonism of chemokine receptor CXCR3 inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis to lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradelli, Emmanuelle; Karimdjee-Soilihi, Babou; Michiels, Jean-François; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Millet, Marie-Ange; Vandenbos, Fanny; Sullivan, Timothy J; Collins, Tassie L; Johnson, Michael G; Medina, Julio C; Kleinerman, Eugenie S; Schmid-Alliana, Annie; Schmid-Antomarchi, Heidy

    2009-12-01

    Metastasis continues to be the leading cause of mortality for patients with cancer. Several years ago, it became clear that chemokines and their receptors could control the tumor progress. CXCR3 has now been identified in many cancers including osteosarcoma and CXCR3 ligands were expressed by lungs that are the primary sites to which this tumor metastasize. This study tested the hypothesis that disruption of the CXCR3/CXCR3 ligands complexes could lead to a decrease in lungs metastasis. The experimental design involved the use of the CXCR3 antagonist, AMG487 and 2 murine models of osteosarcoma lung metastases. After tail vein injection of osteosarcoma cells, mice that were systematically treated with AMG487 according to preventive or curative protocols had a significant reduction in metastatic disease. Treatment of osteosarcoma cells in vitro with AMG487 led to decreased migration, decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity, decreased proliferation/survival and increased caspase-independent death. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that CXCR3 and their ligands intervene in the initial dissemination of the osteosarcoma cells to the lungs and stimulate the growth and expansion of the metastatic foci in later stages. Moreover, these studies indicate that targeting CXCR3 may specifically inhibit tumor metastasis without adversely affecting antitumoral host response. PMID:19544560

  20. Chemokine Receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, Differentially Regulate Exosome Release in Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Takanori; Freeman, Christopher M; Schuster, Rebecca M; Japtok, Lukasz; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J; Gulbins, Erich; Lentsch, Alex B

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles released by different cell types, including hepatocytes, that play important roles in intercellular communication. We have previously demonstrated that hepatocyte-derived exosomes contain the synthetic machinery to form sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in target hepatocytes resulting in proliferation and liver regeneration after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We also demonstrated that the chemokine receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, regulate liver recovery and regeneration after I/R injury. In the current study, we sought to determine if the regulatory effects of CXCR1 and CXCR2 on liver recovery and regeneration might occur via altered release of hepatocyte exosomes. We found that hepatocyte release of exosomes was dependent upon CXCR1 and CXCR2. CXCR1-deficient hepatocytes produced fewer exosomes, whereas CXCR2-deficient hepatocytes produced more exosomes compared to their wild-type controls. In CXCR2-deficient hepatocytes, there was increased activity of neutral sphingomyelinase (Nsm) and intracellular ceramide. CXCR1-deficient hepatocytes had no alterations in Nsm activity or ceramide production. Interestingly, exosomes from CXCR1-deficient hepatocytes had no effect on hepatocyte proliferation, due to a lack of neutral ceramidase and sphingosine kinase. The data demonstrate that CXCR1 and CXCR2 regulate hepatocyte exosome release. The mechanism utilized by CXCR1 remains elusive, but CXCR2 appears to modulate Nsm activity and resultant production of ceramide to control exosome release. CXCR1 is required for packaging of enzymes into exosomes that mediate their hepatocyte proliferative effect. PMID:27551720

  1. A meta-analysis for C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 as a prognostic marker and potential drug target in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Fei Hu, Lin Miao, Yu Zhao, Yuan-Yuan Xiao, Qing XuDepartment of Medical Oncology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University, School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Chemokines (CKs), small proinflammatory chemoattractant cytokines that bind to specific G-protein coupled seven-span transmembrane receptors, are major regulators of cell trafficking and adhesion. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) has gained tremendous attention over th...

  2. C-C chemokine receptor-7 mediated endocytosis of antibody cargoes into intact cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eCharest-Morin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7 is a G protein coupled receptor that has a role in leukocyte homing, but that is also expressed in aggressive tumor cells. Preclinical research supports that CCR7 is a valid target in oncology. In view of the increasing availability of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that carry cytotoxic cargoes, we studied the feasibility of forcing intact cells to internalize known monoclonal antibodies by exploiting the cycle of endocytosis and recycling triggered by the CCR7 agonist CCL19. Firstly, an anti-CCR7 antibody (CD197; clone 150503 labeled surface recombinant CCR7 expressed in intact HEK 293a cells and the fluorescent antibody was internalized following CCL19 treatment. Secondly, a recombinant myc-tagged CCL19 construction was exploited along the anti-myc monoclonal antibody 4A6. The myc-tagged ligand was produced as a conditioned medium of transfected HEK 293a cells that contained the equivalent of 430 ng/ml of immunoreactive CCL19 (average value, ELISA determination. CCL19-myc, but not authentic CCL19, carried the fluorophore-labeled antibody 4A6 into other recipient cells that expressed recombinant CCR7 (microscopy, cytofluorometry. The immune complexes were apparent in endosomal structures, colocalized well with the small GTPase Rab5 and progressed toward Rab7-positive endosomes. A dominant negative form of Rab5 (GDP-locked inhibited this endocytosis. Further, endosomes in CCL19-myc- or CCL19-stimulated cells were positive for β-arrestin2, but rarely for β-arrestin1. Following treatment with CCL19-myc and the 4A6 antibody, the melanoma cell line A375 that expresses endogenous CCR7 was specifically stained using a secondary peroxidase-conjugated antibody. Agonist-stimulated CCR7 can transport antibody-based cargoes, with possible therapeutic applications in oncology.

  3. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist promotes M1 microglia biased cytokines and chemokines following human traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Carpenter, Keri Lh; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) has demonstrated efficacy in a wide range of animal models of neuronal injury. We have previously published a randomised controlled study of IL1ra in human severe TBI, with concomitant microdialysis and plasma sampling of 42 cytokines and chemokines. In this study, we have used partial least squares discriminant analysis to model the effects of drug administration and time following injury on the cytokine milieu within the injured brain. We demonstrate that treatment with rhIL1ra causes a brain-specific modification of the cytokine and chemokine response to injury, particularly in samples from the first 48 h following injury. The magnitude of this response is dependent on the concentration of IL1ra achieved in the brain extracellular space. Chemokines related to recruitment of macrophages from the plasma compartment (MCP-1) and biasing towards a M1 microglial phenotype (GM-CSF, IL1) are increased in patient samples in the rhIL1ra-treated patients. In control patients, cytokines and chemokines biased to a M2 microglia phenotype (IL4, IL10, MDC) are relatively increased. This pattern of response suggests that a simple classification of IL1ra as an 'anti-inflammatory' cytokine may not be appropriate and highlights the importance of the microglial response to injury. PMID:26661249

  4. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells expressing both chemotactic cytokines IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and their receptors,and their selective migration to these chemokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To characterize the mRNA expression of CXC chemokine IL-8, CC chemokine monocyte chemothractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and regulated on activation,normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and a newly defined DC chemokine DC- CK1 as well as the expression of IL-8 receptor, MCP-1 receptor and RANTES receptor in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MoDCs).The migratory responsiveness of MoDC to IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES was alsso studied. Methods In vitro generated MoDCs were obtained by differentiating monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for 5 days. The time course of RNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and migratoly ability was assessed by a micromultiwell chemotaxis chamber assay. Results IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and their corres ponding receptors were consistently expressed in MoDCs. DC-CK-1 expression was detectable efter 48 hours of differentiation. MoDC selectively migrated in response to MCP-1 and RANTES but not to IL-8 though transcripts of IL-8 receptor were present. Conclusion Because the capacity of dendritic cells to initiate immune responses depends on their specialized migratory and tissue homing properties, the expression of chemokines and their receptors along with the migratory responsiveness to chemokines of MoDC in our study suggests a potential role of chemokines in the interaction between dendritic cells and T cells and the induction of immune responses.

  5. Doxycycline and Benznidazole Reduce the Profile of Th1, Th2, and Th17 Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Cardiac Tissue from Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Dogs

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    Guilherme de Paula Costa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines (CKs and chemokine receptors (CKR promote leukocyte recruitment into cardiac tissue infected by the Trypanosoma cruzi. This study investigated the long-term treatment with subantimicrobial doses of doxycycline (Dox in association, or not, with benznidazole (Bz on the expression of CK and CKR in cardiac tissue. Thirty mongrel dogs were infected, or not, with the Berenice-78 strain of T. cruzi and grouped according their treatments: (i two months after infection, Dox (50 mg/kg 2x/day for 12 months; (ii nine months after infection, Bz (3,5 mg/kg 2x/day for 60 days; (iii Dox + Bz; and (iv vehicle. After 14 months of infection, hearts were excised and processed for qPCR analysis of Th1 (CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL11, Th2 (CCL1, CCL17, CCL24, and CCL26, Th17 (CCL20 CKs, Th1 (CCR5, CCR6, and CXCR3, and Th2/Th17 (CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8 CKR, as well as IL-17. T. cruzi infection increases CCL1, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CCL17, CXCL10, and CCR5 expression in the heart. Dox, Bz, or Dox + Bz treatments cause a reversal of CK and CKR and reduce the expression of CCL20, IL-17, CCR6, and CXCR3. Our data reveal an immune modulatory effect of Dox with Bz, during the chronic phase of infection suggesting a promising therapy for cardiac protection.

  6. CXCL12 chemokine and its receptors as major players in the interactions between immune and nervous systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice eGuyon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine CXCL12/SDF1a has first been described in the immune system where it functions include chemotaxis for lymphocytes and macrophages, migration of hematopoietic cells from fetal liver to bone marrow and the formation of large blood vessels. Among other chemokines, CXCL12 has recently attracted much attention in the brain as it has been shown that it can be produced not only by glial cells but also by neurons. In addition, its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, which are belonging to the G-protein coupled receptors family, are abundantly expressed in diverse brain area, CXCR4 being a major co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 entry. This chemokine system has been shown to play important roles in brain plasticity processes occurring during development but also in the physiology of the brain in normal and pathological conditions. For example, in neurons, CXCR4 stimulation has been shown regulate the synaptic release of glutamate and GABA. It can also act post-synaptically by activating a G-protein Inward Rectifier K+ (GIRK, a voltage-gated K channel Kv2.1 associated to neuronal survival, and by increasing high voltage activated (HVA Ca2+ currents. In addition, it has been recently evidenced that there are several crosstalks between the CXCL12/CXCR4-7 system and other neurotransmitter systems in the brain (such as GABA, glutamate, opioids ans cannabinoids. Overall, this chemokine system could be one of the key players of the neuro-immune interface that participates in shaping the brain in response to changes in the environment.

  7. Structural Basis of the CD8[alpha beta]/MHC Class I Interaction: Focused Recognition Orients CD8[beta] to a T Cell Proximal Position[superscript 1,2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rui; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H.; (NIH)

    2009-09-18

    In the immune system, B cells, dendritic cells, NK cells, and T lymphocytes all respond to signals received via ligand binding to receptors and coreceptors. Although the specificity of T cell recognition is determined by the interaction of T cell receptors with MHC/peptide complexes, the development of T cells in the thymus and their sensitivity to Ag are also dependent on coreceptor molecules CD8 (for MHC class I (MHCI)) and CD4 (for MHCII). The CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer is a potent coreceptor for T cell activation, but efforts to understand its function fully have been hampered by ignorance of the structural details of its interactions with MHCI. In this study we describe the structure of CD8{alpha}{beta} in complex with the murine MHCI molecule H-2D{sup d} at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The focus of the CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction is the acidic loop (residues 222-228) of the {alpha}3 domain of H-2D{sup d}. The {beta} subunit occupies a T cell membrane proximal position, defining the relative positions of the CD8{alpha} and CD8{beta} subunits. Unlike the CD8{alpha}{alpha} homodimer, CD8{alpha}{beta} does not contact the MHCI {alpha}{sub 2}- or {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin domains. Movements of the CD8{alpha} CDR2 and CD8{beta} CDR1 and CDR2 loops as well as the flexibility of the H-2D{sup d} CD loop facilitate the monovalent interaction. The structure resolves inconclusive data on the topology of the CD8{alpha}{beta}/MHCI interaction, indicates that CD8{beta} is crucial in orienting the CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer, provides a framework for understanding the mechanistic role of CD8{alpha}{beta} in lymphoid cell signaling, and offers a tangible context for design of structurally altered coreceptors for tumor and viral immunotherapy.

  8. CD8+ T cells from a novel T cell receptor transgenic mouse induce liver-stage immunity that can be boosted by blood-stage infection in rodent malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Shong Lau

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To follow the fate of CD8+ T cells responsive to Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA infection, we generated an MHC I-restricted TCR transgenic mouse line against this pathogen. T cells from this line, termed PbT-I T cells, were able to respond to blood-stage infection by PbA and two other rodent malaria species, P. yoelii XNL and P. chabaudi AS. These PbT-I T cells were also able to respond to sporozoites and to protect mice from liver-stage infection. Examination of the requirements for priming after intravenous administration of irradiated sporozoites, an effective vaccination approach, showed that the spleen rather than the liver was the main site of priming and that responses depended on CD8α+ dendritic cells. Importantly, sequential exposure to irradiated sporozoites followed two days later by blood-stage infection led to augmented PbT-I T cell expansion. These findings indicate that PbT-I T cells are a highly versatile tool for studying multiple stages and species of rodent malaria and suggest that cross-stage reactive CD8+ T cells may be utilized in liver-stage vaccine design to enable boosting by blood-stage infections.

  9. CXCL9 contributes to antimicrobial protection of the gut during citrobacter rodentium infection independent of chemokine-receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Reid-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines have been shown to be effective bactericidal molecules against a variety of bacteria and fungi in vitro. These direct antimicrobial effects are independent of their chemotactic activities involving immunological receptors. However, the direct biological role that these proteins may play in host defense, particularly against intestinal pathogens, is poorly understood. Here, we show that CXCL9, an ELR- chemokine, exhibits direct antimicrobial activity against Citrobacter rodentium, an attaching/effacing pathogen that infects the gut mucosa. Inhibition of this antimicrobial activity in vivo using anti-CXCL9 antibodies increases host susceptibility to C. rodentium infection with pronounced bacterial penetration into crypts, increased bacterial load, and worsened tissue pathology. Using Rag1(-/- mice and CXCR3(-/- mice, we demonstrate that the role for CXCL9 in protecting the gut mucosa is independent of an adaptive response or its immunological receptor, CXCR3. Finally, we provide evidence that phagocytes function in tandem with NK cells for robust CXCL9 responses to C. rodentium. These findings identify a novel role for the immune cell-derived CXCL9 chemokine in directing a protective antimicrobial response in the intestinal mucosa.

  10. CXCL9 contributes to antimicrobial protection of the gut during citrobacter rodentium infection independent of chemokine-receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Yu, Sarah A; Tuinema, Brian R; Small, Cherrie N; Xing, Lydia; Coombes, Brian K

    2015-02-01

    Chemokines have been shown to be effective bactericidal molecules against a variety of bacteria and fungi in vitro. These direct antimicrobial effects are independent of their chemotactic activities involving immunological receptors. However, the direct biological role that these proteins may play in host defense, particularly against intestinal pathogens, is poorly understood. Here, we show that CXCL9, an ELR- chemokine, exhibits direct antimicrobial activity against Citrobacter rodentium, an attaching/effacing pathogen that infects the gut mucosa. Inhibition of this antimicrobial activity in vivo using anti-CXCL9 antibodies increases host susceptibility to C. rodentium infection with pronounced bacterial penetration into crypts, increased bacterial load, and worsened tissue pathology. Using Rag1(-/-) mice and CXCR3(-/-) mice, we demonstrate that the role for CXCL9 in protecting the gut mucosa is independent of an adaptive response or its immunological receptor, CXCR3. Finally, we provide evidence that phagocytes function in tandem with NK cells for robust CXCL9 responses to C. rodentium. These findings identify a novel role for the immune cell-derived CXCL9 chemokine in directing a protective antimicrobial response in the intestinal mucosa.

  11. Universal expression and dual function of the atypical chemokine receptor D6 on innate-like B cells in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, Chris A. H.; Schiering, Chris; Kinstrie, Ross; Ford, Laura; Bordon, Yvonne; McInnes, Iain B.; Goodyear, Carl S.; Nibbs, Robert J. B.

    2011-01-01

    Mouse innate-like B cells are a heterogeneous collection of multifunctional cells that control infection, play housekeeping roles, contribute to adaptive immunity, and suppress inflammation. We show that, amongst leukocytes, chemokine internalisation by the D6 receptor is a unique and universal feature of all known innate-like B cell populations and, to our knowledge, the most effective unifying marker of these cells. Moreover, we identify novel D6active B1 cell subsets, including those we term B1d, which lack CD5 and CD11b but exhibit typical B1 cell properties, including spontaneous ex vivo production of IgM, interleukin-10, and anti-phosphorylcholine antibody. The unprecedented opportunity to examine D6 on primary cells has allowed us to clarify its ligand specificity and show that, consistent with a scavenging role, D6 internalises chemokines but cannot induce Ca2+ fluxes or chemotaxis. Unexpectedly, however, D6 can also suppress the function of CXCR5, a critical chemokine receptor in innate-like B cell biology. This is associated with a reduction in B1 cells and circulating class-switched anti-phosphorylcholine antibody in D6-deficient mice. Thus, we identify a unifying marker of innate-like B cells; describe novel B1 cell subsets; reveal a dual role for D6; and provide the first evidence of defects in resting D6-deficient mice. PMID:21450903

  12. CXC CHEMOKINE RECEPTOR 3 MODULATES BLEOMYCIN-INDUCED PULMONARY INJURY VIA INVOLVING INFLAMMATORY PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-ming Gao; Bao Lu; Zi-jian Guo

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of CXC chemokine receptor 3(CXCR3 ) in bleomycin-induced lung injury by using CXCR3 gene deficient mice.Methods Sex-, age-, and weight-matched C57BL/6 CXCR3 gene knockout mice and C57BL/6 wide type mice were challenged by injection of bleomycin via trachea. Lung tissue was stained with HE method. Airway resistance was measured. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed using phosphate buffered saline twice, cell number and differentials were counted by Diff-Qnick staining. Interleukin(IL)-4, IL-5, IL-12p40, and interfon-γ in BAL fluid and lung homogenate were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Unpaired t test was explored to compare the difference between two groups.Results On day 7 after bleomycin injection via trachea, CXCR3 knockout mice were protected from bleomycininduced lung injury as evidenced by fewer accumulation of inflammatory cells in the airway and lung interstitium compared with their wild type littermates ( P<0.05 ). Airway resistance was also lower in CXCR3 knockout mice compared with wild type mice (P<0.01 ). Significantly lower level of inflammatory cytokines release, including the altered production of IL-4 and IL-5 both in BAL fluid and lung tissue was seen in CXCR3 knockout mice than in wild type mice (both P<0.05).Conclusion CXCR3 signaling promotes inflammatory cells recruiting and initiates inflammatory cytokines cascade following endotracheal bleomycin administration, indicating that CXCR3 might be a therapeutic target for pulmonary injury.

  13. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 strongly promotes neuroblastoma primary tumour and metastatic growth, but not invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Meier

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB is a heterogeneous, and particularly malignant childhood neoplasm in its higher stages, with a propensity to form metastasis in selected organs, in particular liver and bone marrow, and for which there is still no efficient treatment available beyond surgery. Recent evidence indicates that the CXCR4/CXCL12 chemokine/receptor axis may be involved in promoting NB invasion and metastasis. In this study, we explored the potential role of CXCR4 in the malignant behaviour of NB, using a combination of in vitro functional analyses and in vivo growth and metastasis assessment in an orthotopic NB mouse model. We show here that CXCR4 overexpression in non-metastatic CXCR4-negative NB cells IGR-NB8 and in moderately metastatic, CXCR4 expressing NB cells IGR-N91, strongly increased tumour growth of primary tumours and liver metastases, without altering the frequency or the pattern of metastasis. Moreover shRNA-mediated knock-down experiments confirmed our observations by showing that silencing CXCR4 in NB cells impairs in vitro and almost abrogates in vivo growth. High levels of CXCL12 were detected in the mouse adrenal gland (the primary tumour site, and in the liver suggesting a paracrine effect of host-derived CXCL12 on NB growth. In conclusion, this study reveals a yet unreported NB-specific predominant growth and survival-promoting role of CXCR4, which warrants a critical reconsideration of the role of CXCR4 in the malignant behaviour of NB and other cancers.

  14. CHEMOKINE RECEPTORS AT DISTINCT DIFFERENTIATION STAGES OF T-HELPERS FROM PERIPHERAL BLOOD

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    I. V. Kudryavtsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression of chemokine receptors (CCR4, CCR6, CXCR3 and CXCR5 on T-helper (Th cells at various levels of differentiation in a group of healthy volunteers (n = 52 was assessed on the basis of CD45RA and CD62L expression, using the eight-color flow cytometry. It was found that the “naive” T helper cells (N with CD45RA+CD62L+ phenotype express CXCR3 (4.94±0.39%, and CXCR5 (3.63±0.25%. About 50% of central memory T helpers (CD45RA–CD62L+, CM were CXCR3 positive, and 43.72±1.27% of CM cells expressed CCR6, whereas CXCR5 and CCR4 levels were about 30%. Furthermore, CXCR3 was expressed by 76.76±0.75% of the CD3+CD4+CD45RA–CD62L– (EM population, and similar values were obtained for CCR6, while the relative abundance of CXCR5+ cells decreased to 13.68±0.50%, and CCR4 levels did not change and accounted for 33.26±1.13% positive cells. Likewise, co-expression of the chemokine receptors was studied for the abovementioned subpopulations of T helper cells. Among the CXCR5– Th, Th1 cells were identified as CXCR3+CCR6–CCR4– (this subset also contained Th9, and CXCR3+CCR6+CCR4– subsets, referred to as Th1/Th17. Th2 were detected on the basis of CCR4 expression in absence of all other chemokine receptors. In addition to the mentioned Th1/Th17 populations, Th 17 cells were found in the subsets of Th17 CXCR3–CCR6+CCR4– and CXCR3–CR6+CCR4+. The latter also contained a Th22 population. Follicular Th cell populations (CXCR5+ consisted of, at least, six different subsets: CXCR3–CCR6–CCR4– (Tfh/Tfh2, CXCR3–CCR6–CCR4+ (Tfh2, CXCR3-CCR6+CCR4–(Tfh17, CXCR3–CCR6+CCR4+ (Tfh17, CXCR3+CCR6–CCR4– (Tfh1 and CXCR3+CCR6+CCR4–(Tfh1/Tfh17. The cells with Th1/Th9 and Th1/Th17 phenotypes dominated among CM (about 13%, whereas their relative abundance within EM increased to 22.37±1.69% and 31.69±1.52%, respectively. The amounts of Th2 were 8.15±0.46% within CM, and only 1.72±0.15% for EM population. For the cells

  15. The GHS-R Blocker D-[Lys3] GHRP-6 Serves as CCR5 Chemokine Receptor Antagonist

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    Kalpesh Patel, Vishwa Deep Dixit, Jun Ho Lee, Jie Wan Kim, Eric M. Schaffer, Dzung Nguyen, Dennis D. Taub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available [D-Lys3]-Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-6 (DLS is widely utilized in vivo and in vitro as a selective ghrelin receptor (GHS-R antagonist. This antagonist is one of the most common antagonists utilized in vivo to block GHS-R function and activity. Here, we found that DLS also has the ability to modestly block chemokine function and ligand binding to the chemokine receptor CCR5. The DLS effects on RANTES binding and Erk signaling as well as calcium mobilization appears to be much stronger than its effects on MIP-1α and MIP-1β. CCR5 have been shown to act as major co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the CD4 positive host cells. To this end, we also found that DLS blocks M-tropic HIV-1 propagation in activated human PBMCs. These data demonstrate that DLS may not be a highly selective GHS-R1a inhibitor and may also effects on other G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family members. Moreover, DLS may have some potential clinical applications in blocking HIV infectivity and CCR5-mediated migration and function in various inflammatory disease states.

  16. Memory CD8+ T Cells: Orchestrators and Key Players of Innate Immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvau, Grégoire; Goriely, Stanislas

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decades, the dichotomy between innate and adaptive immune responses has largely dominated our understanding of immunology. Upon primary encounter with microbial pathogens, differentiation of adaptive immune cells into functional effectors usually takes several days or even longer, making them contribute to host protection only late during primary infection. However, once generated, antigen-experienced T lymphocytes can persist in the organism and constitute a pool of memory cells that mediate fast and effective protection to a recall infection with the same microbial pathogen. Herein, we challenge this classical paradigm by highlighting the "innate nature" of memory CD8+ T cells. First, within the thymus or in the periphery, naïve CD8+ T cells may acquire phenotypic and functional characteristics of memory CD8+ T cells independently of challenge with foreign antigens. Second, both the "unconventional" and the "conventional" memory cells can rapidly express protective effector functions in response to sets of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines signals, independent of cognate antigen triggering. Third, memory CD8+ T cells can act by orchestrating the recruitment, activation, and licensing of innate cells, leading to broad antimicrobial states. Thus, collectively, memory CD8+ T cells may represent important actors of innate immune defenses.

  17. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G;

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpes virus 8 is considered the etiological agent of KS, a highly vascularized neoplasm that is the most common tumor affecting HIV/AIDS patients. The KS-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 open reading frame 74 encodes a constitutively...... active G protein-coupled receptor known as vGPCR that binds CXC chemokines with high affinity. In this study, we show that conditional transgenic expression of vGPCR by cells of endothelial origin triggers an angiogenic program in vivo, leading to development of an angioproliferative disease...

  18. Chemokines: structure, receptors and functions. A new target for inflammation and asthma therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. A. van Acker

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Five to 10% of the human population have a disorder of the respiratory tract called ‘asthma’. It has been known as a potentially dangerous disease for over 2000 years, as it was already described by Hippocrates and recognized as a disease entity by Egyptian and Hebrew physicians. At the beginning of this decade, there has been a fundamental change in asthma management. The emphasis has shifted from symptom relief with bronchodilator therapies (e.g. β2-agonists to a much earlier introduction of anti-inflammatory treatment (e.g. corticosteroids. Asthma is now recognized to be a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, involving various inflammatory cells and their mediators. Although asthma has been the subject of many investigations, the exact role of the different inflammatory cells has not been elucidated completely. Many suggestions have been made and several cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, such as the eosinophils, the mast cells, the basophils and the lymphocytes. To date, however, the relative importance of these cells is not completely understood. The cell type predominantly found in the asthmatic lung is the eosinophil and the recruitment of these eosinophils can be seen as a characteristic of asthma. In recent years much attention is given to the role of the newly identified chemokines in asthma pathology. Chemokines are structurally and functionally related 8–10 kDa peptides that are the products of distinct genes clustered on human chromosomes 4 and 17 and can be found at sites of inflammation. They form a superfamily of proinflammatory mediators that promote the recruitment of various kinds of leukocytes and lymphocytes. The chemokine superfamily can be divided into three subgroups based on overall sequence homology. Although the chemokines have highly conserved amino acid sequences, each of the chemokines binds to and induces the chemotaxis of particular classes of white blood cells. Certain

  19. Sequence analysis, characterization and mRNA distribution of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque, 1818) chemokine (C-X-C Motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) cDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemokine receptor CXCR4, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, binds selectively CXCL12. This protein plays many important roles in immunological as well as pathophysiological functions. In this study, we identified and characterized the channel catfish CXCR4 transcript. The fu...

  20. Gating function of isoleucine-116 in TM-3 (position III:16/3.40) for the activity state of the CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, A; Sparre-Ulrich, A H; Thiele, Stefanie;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A conserved amino acid within a protein family indicates a significance of the residue. In the centre of transmembrane helix (TM)-5, position V:13/5.47, an aromatic amino acid is conserved among class A 7TM receptors. However, in 37% of chemokine receptors - a subgroup of 7...

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of spirocyclic antagonists of CCR2 (chemokine CC receptor subtype 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunz, Ann Kathrin; Zweemer, Annelien J M; Weiss, Christina; Schepmann, Dirk; Junker, Anna; Heitman, Laura H; Koch, Michael; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2015-07-15

    Activation of chemokine CC receptors subtype 2 (CCR2) plays an important role in chronic inflammatory processes such as atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. A diverse set of spirocyclic butanamides 4 (N-benzyl-4-(3,4-dihydrospiro[[2]benzopyran-1,4'-piperidin]-1'-yl)butanamides) was prepared by different combination of spirocyclic piperidines 8 (3,4-dihydrospiro[[2]benzopyran-1,4'-piperidines]) and γ-halobutanamides 11. A key step in the synthesis of spirocyclic piperidines 8 was an Oxa-Pictet-Spengler reaction of β-phenylethanols 5 with piperidone acetal 6. The substituted γ-hydroxybutanamides 11c-e were prepared by hydroxyethylation of methyl acetates 13 with ethylene sulfate giving the γ-lactones 14c and 14e. Aminolysis of the γ-lactones 14c and 14e with benzylamines provided the γ-hydroxybutanamides 15c-e, which were converted into the bromides 11c-e by an Appel reaction using polymer-bound PPh3. In radioligand binding assays the spirocyclic butanamides 4 did not displace the iodinated radioligand (125)I-CCL2 from the human CCR2. However, in the Ca(2+)-flux assay using human CCR2 strong antagonistic activity of butanamides 4 was detected. Analysis of the IC50-values led to clear relationships between the structure and the inhibition of the Ca(2+)-flux. 4g (4-(3,4-dihydrospiro[[2]benzopyran-1,4'-piperidin]-1'-yl)-N-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethylbenzyl)]-2-(4-fluorophenyl)butanamide) and 4o (N-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-2-cyclopropyl-4-(3,4-dihydrospiro[[2]benzopyran-1,4'-piperidin]-1'-yl)butanamide) represent the most potent CCR2 antagonists with IC50-values of 89 and 17nM, respectively. Micromolar activities were found in the β-arrestin recruitment assay with murine CCR2, but the structure-activity-relationships detected in the Ca(2+)-flux assay were confirmed. PMID:25766632

  2. Development of operational models of receptor activation including constitutive receptor activity and their use to determine the efficacy of the chemokine CCL17 at the CC chemokine receptor CCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, R J; Hall, D A

    2012-07-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The operational model provides a key conceptual framework for the analysis of pharmacological data. However, this model does not include constitutive receptor activity, a frequent phenomenon in modern pharmacology, particularly in recombinant systems. Here, we developed extensions of the operational model which include constitutive activity and applied them to effects of agonists at the chemokine receptor CCR4. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of agonists of CCR4 on [(35) S]GTPγS binding to recombinant cell membranes and on the filamentous (F-) actin content of human CD4(+) CCR4(+) T cells were determined. The basal [(35) S]GTPγS binding was changed by varying the GDP concentration whilst the basal F-actin contents of the higher expressing T cell populations were elevated, suggesting constitutive activity of CCR4. Both sets of data were analysed using the mathematical models. RESULTS The affinity of CCL17 (also known as TARC) derived from analysis of the T cell data (pK(a) = 9.61 ± 0.17) was consistent with radioligand binding experiments (9.50 ± 0.11) while that from the [(35) S]GTPγS binding experiments was lower (8.27 ± 0.09). Its intrinsic efficacy differed between the two systems (110 in T cells vs. 11). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The presence of constitutive receptor activity allows the absolute intrinsic efficacy of agonists to be determined without a contribution from the signal transduction system. Intrinsic efficacy estimated in this way is consistent with Furchgott's definition of this property. CCL17 may have a higher intrinsic efficacy at CCR4 in human T cells than that expressed recombinantly in CHO cells.

  3. Inhibition of chemokine (C-C motif receptor 7 sialylation suppresses CCL19-stimulated proliferation, invasion and anti-anoikis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Lin Su

    Full Text Available Chemokine (C-C motif receptor 7 (CCR7 is involved in lymph-node homing of naive and regulatory T cells and lymphatic metastasis of cancer cells. Sialic acids comprise a group of monosaccharide units that are added to the terminal position of the oligosaccharide chain of glycoproteins by sialyation. Recent studies suggest that aberrant sialylation of receptor proteins contributes to proliferation, motility, and drug resistance of cancer cells. In this study, we addressed whether CCR7 is a sialylated receptor protein and tried to elucidate the effect of sialylation in the regulation of signal transduction and biological function of CCR7. Our results demonstrated that α-2, 3-sialyltransferase which catalyze sialylation reaction in vivo was overexpressed in breast tumor tissues and cell lines. Lectin blot analysis clearly demonstrated that CCR7 receptor was sialyated in breast cancer cells. Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 19 (CCL19, the cognate ligand for CCR7, induced the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and AKT signaling and increased the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and proliferation of breast cancer cells. When cells were pre-treated with a sialyltransferase inhibitor AL10 or sialidase, CCL19-induced cell growth was significantly suppressed. CCL19 also increased invasion and prevented anoikis by up-regulating pro-survival proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Inhibition of sialylation by AL10 totally abolished these effects. Finally, we showed that AL10 inhibited tumorigenicity of breast cancer in experimental animals. Taken together, we demonstrate for the first time that CCR7 receptor is a sialylated protein and sialylation is important for the paracrine stimulation by its endogenous ligand CCL19. In addition, inhibition of aberrant sialylation of CCR7 suppresses proliferation and invasion and triggers anoikis in breast cancer cells. Targeting of sialylation enzymes may be a novel strategy for breast cancer treatment.

  4. Tissue signatures influence the activation of intrahepatic CD8+ T cells against malaria sporozoites

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    Alexandre eMorrot

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium sporozoites and liver stages express antigens that are targeted to the MHC-Class I antigen-processing pathway. After the introduction of Plasmodium sporozoites by Anopheles mosquitoes, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in skin-draining lymph nodes are the first cells to cross-present parasite antigens and elicit specific CD8+ T cells. One of these antigens is the immunodominant circumsporozoite protein (CSP. The CD8+ T cell-mediated protective immune response against CSP is dependent on the interleukin loop involving IL-4 receptor expression on CD8+ cells and IL-4 secretion by CD4+ T cell helpers. In a few days, these CD8+ T cells re-circulate to secondary lymphoid organs and the liver. In the liver, the hepatic sinusoids are enriched with cells, such as dendritic, sinusoidal endothelial and Kupffer cells, that are able to cross-present MHC class I antigens to intrahepatic CD8+ T cells. Specific CD8+ T cells actively find infected hepatocytes and target intra-cellular parasites through mechanisms that are both Interferon-g-dependent and -independent. Immunity is mediated by CD8+ T effector or effector-memory cells and, when present in high numbers, these cells can provide sterilizing immunity. Human vaccination trials with recombinant formulations or attenuated sporozoites have yet to achieve the high numbers of specific effector T cells that are required for sterilizing immunity. In spite of the limited number of specific CD8+ T cells, attenuated sporozoites provided multiple times by the endovenous route provided a high degree of protective immunity. These observations highlight that CD8+ T cells may be useful for improving antibody-mediated protective immunity to pre-erythrocytic stages of malaria parasites.

  5. The effect of combined polymorphisms in chemokines and chemokine receptors on the clinical course of HIV-1 infection in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdimara Corrêa Vieira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in genes that encode chemokines or their receptors can modulate susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and disease progression. The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of polymorphisms CCR5-Δ32, CCR2-64I, CCR5-59029A and SDF1-3'A and their role in the course of HIV infection in a Southern Brazilian population. Clinical data were obtained from 249 patients for an average period of 6.4 years and genotypes were determined by standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Survival analyses were conducted for three outcomes: CD4+ T-cell counts below 200 cells/µL, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS or death. The frequency of the polymorphisms CCR5-Δ32, CCR2-64I, CCR5-59029A and SDF1-3'A were 0.024, 0.113, 0.487 and 0.207, respectively. CCR5-Δ32 was associated with a reduction in the risk for CD4+ T-cell depletion and with an increased risk for death after AIDS diagnosis. CCR2-64I was associated with a reduction in the risk for developing AIDS. SDF1-3'A was also associated with decreased risk for AIDS, but its effect was only evident when CCR2-64I was present as well. These results highlight the possibility of using these markers as indicators for the prognosis of disease progression and provide evidence for the importance of analysing the effects of gene polymorphisms in a combined fashion.

  6. Activation and Recruitment of Regulatory T Cells via Chemokine Receptor Activation in Trichinella spiralis-Infected Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong-Bin; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-04-01

    As most infections by the helminth parasite elicit the recruitment of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T (Treg) cells, many scientists have suggested that these cells could be used for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammation and associated diseases. In order to investigate the distribution and alteration of activated Treg cells, we compared the expression levels of Treg cell activation markers in the ileum and gastrocnemius tissues 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. The number of Treg cells was monitored using GFP-coded Foxp3 transgenic mice. In mice at 1 week after Trichinella spiralis infection, the number of activated Treg cells was higher than in the control group. In mice at 2 weeks after infection, there was a significant increase in the number of cells expressing Foxp3 and CTLA-4 when compared to the control group and mice at 1 week after infection. At 4 weeks after infection, T. spiralis was easily identifiable in nurse cells in mouse muscles. In the intestine, the expression of Gzmb and Klrg1 decreased over time and that of Capg remained unchanged for the first and second week, then decreased in the 4th week. However, in the muscles, the expression of most chemokine genes was increased due to T. spiralis infection, in particular the expression levels of Gzmb, OX40, and CTLA-4 increased until week 4. In addition, increased gene expression of all chemokine receptors in muscle, CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR9, and CCR10, was observed up until the 4th week. In conclusion, various chemokine receptors showed increased expressions combined with recruitment of Treg cells in the muscle tissue. PMID:27180574

  7. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppresses proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines induced by Toll-like receptor 9 agonists in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sushovita Mukherjee, Mohammad Adnan Siddiqui, Shubham Dayal, Yasmine Zakaria Ayoub, Krishnamurthy Malathi Department of Biological Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA Abstract: Chronic inflammation of the prostate contributes to the increased risk of prostate cancer. Microbial pathogens in the prostate cause inflammation that leads to prostatitis and proliferative inflammatory atrophy frequently associated with the development of prostate cancer. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides and DNA mediate immune responses by engaging Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 and 9, respectively. Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG-ODN mimic bacterial DNA and signal through TLR9 to initiate innate immune responses. Here, we show that stimulation of DU145, PC3, or LnCap prostate cancer cells by the TLR9 agonists, CpG-ODN, induces mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-8, CXCL1, IP-10, CCL5, and TGFβ. In addition, activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 and -2 and cell migration increased on CpG-ODN treatment. Induction of cytokines and chemokines was mediated by NF-ΚB activation and translocation to the nucleus. Treatment with epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, the major constituent of green tea, prior to CpG-ODN stimulation, inhibits cytokine and chemokine gene induction, activity of MMP-9 and -2, and cell migration. EGCG treatment sequesters the p65 subunit of transcription factor NF-ΚB in the cytoplasm and inhibits transcriptional activity of the NF-ΚB-driven promoter in response to CpG-ODN. Our results suggest that the ability of the TLR9 agonists, CpG-ODN, to induce cytokines, chemokines, and MMP activity, as well as suppression by EGCG are independent of the androgen receptor and p53 status of the cells. EGCG may provide protective effects against inflammation in the prostate and benefit prostate cancer treatment. Keywords: CpG-ODN, EGCG, inflammation, NF-ΚB

  8. Intranasal Vaccination Affords Localization and Persistence of Antigen-Specific CD8⁺ T Lymphocytes in the Female Reproductive Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailbala; Schluns, Kimberly S; Yang, Guojun; Anthony, Scott M; Barry, Michael A; Sastry, K Jagannadha

    2016-03-17

    Immunization strategies generating large numbers of antigen-specific T cells in the female reproductive tract (FRT) can provide barrier protection against sexually-transmitted pathogens, such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human papillomaviruses (HPV). The kinetics and mechanisms of regulation of vaccine-induced adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses in FRT are less well defined. We present here evidence for intranasal delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) along with alpha-galactosylceramide adjuvant as a protein vaccine to induce significantly higher levels of antigen-specific effector and memory CD8⁺ T cells in the FRT, relative to other systemic and mucosal tissues. Antibody blocking of the CXCR3 receptor significantly reduced antigen-specific CD8⁺ T cells subsequent to intranasal delivery of the protein vaccine suggesting an important role for the CXCR3 chemokine-receptor signaling for T cell trafficking. Further, intranasal vaccination with an adenoviral vector expressing OVA or HIV-1 envelope was as effective as intramuscular vaccination for generating OVA- or ENV-specific immunity in the FRT. These results support the application of the needle-free intranasal route as a practical approach to delivering protein as well as DNA/virus vector-based vaccines for efficient induction of effector and memory T cell immunity in the FRT.

  9. Unaltered levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in the absence of the B cell homing chemokine receptor CXCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensminger, Stephan M; Abele-Ohl, Silke; Ohl, Lars; Spriewald, Bernd M; Ramsperger-Gleixner, Martina; Weyand, Michael; Förster, Reinhold

    2009-03-01

    Chemokine receptors and their ligands are crucial for lymphocyte trafficking under both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. The chemokine receptor CXCR5 controls B cell migration and the organization of B cell follicles. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of CXCR5 on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Fully MHC mismatched BALB/c (H2(d)) donor aortas were transplanted into C57BL/6-CXCR5(-/-) (H2(b)), C57BL/6-CXCR5(+/-) (H2(b)) or C57BL/6-CXCR5(+/+) (H2(b)) recipients. Grafts were analysed by morphometry and immunofluorescence and intra-graft cytokine mRNA production was analysed by RT-PCR. Transplant arteriosclerosis was evident in CXCR5+/+ and CXCR5+/- mice and only mildly reduced in CXCR5-/- recipients indicating that absence of CXCR5 had no substantial effect on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Analysis of the cellular infiltrate of aortic grafts implanted in CXCR5-/- recipients revealed no differences in the number of T-cells, macrophages and B cells as compared to controls. Intra-graft cytokine production showed no significant changes in Th1 (IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines as well as in TGF-beta and iNOS production. These data suggest that lack of CXCR5 expression by recipient T- and B-cells has little effect on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis.

  10. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Expressions of Adhesion Molecules and Chemokine Receptors on T Cells in a Murine Model of Acute Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Migration of T cells into the colon plays a major role in the pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease. This study investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln supplementation on chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules expressed by T cells in mice with dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS- induced colitis. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a standard diet or a Gln diet replacing 25% of the total nitrogen. After being fed the diets for 5 days, half of the mice from both groups were given 1.5% DSS in drinking water to induce colitis. Mice were killed after 5 days of DSS exposure. Results. DSS colitis resulted in higher expression levels of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- (PSGL- 1, leukocyte function-associated antigen- (LFA- 1, and C-C chemokine receptor type 9 (CCR9 by T helper (Th and cytotoxic T (Tc cells, and mRNA levels of endothelial adhesion molecules in colons were upregulated. Gln supplementation decreased expressions of PSGL-1, LFA-1, and CCR9 by Th cells. Colonic gene expressions of endothelial adhesion molecules were also lower in Gln-colitis mice. Histological finding showed that colon infiltrating Th cells were less in the DSS group with Gln administration. Conclusions. Gln supplementation may ameliorate the inflammation of colitis possibly via suppression of T cell migration.

  11. Relationship of Genetic Polymorphisms of the Chemokine, CCL5, and Its Receptor, CCR5, with Coronary Artery Disease in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Hsin Ting

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine receptor CCR5 polymorphism, which confers resistance to HIV infection, has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the association of the chemokine, CCL5, and its receptor, CCR5, polymorphism and coronary artery disease (CAD in the Taiwanese has not been studied. In this study, 483 subjects who received elective coronary angiography were recruited from Chung Shan Medical University Hospital. CCL5-403 and CCR5-59029 were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. We found that CCL5-403 with TT genotype frequencies was significantly associated with the risk of CAD group (odds ratio = 3.063 and p=0.012. Moreover, the frequencies of CCR5-59029 with GG or GA genotype were higher than AA genotype in acute coronary syndrome individuals (odds ratio = 1.853, CI = 1.176–2.921, p=0.008. In conclusion, we found that CCL5-403 polymorphism may increase genetic susceptibility of CAD. CCL5-403 or CCR5-59029 single nucleotide polymorphism may include genotype score and it may predict cardiovascular event.

  12. Berberine suppresses migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through down-regulation of chemokine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Naghmeh Ahmadiankia; Hamid Kalalian Moghaddam; Mohammad Amir Mishan; Ahmad Reza Bahrami; Hojjat Naderi-Meshkin; Hamid Reza Bidkhori; Maryam Moghaddam; Seyed Jamal Aldin Mirfeyzi

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Berberine is one of the main alkaloids and it has been proven to have different pharmacological effects including inhibition of cell cycle and progression of apoptosis in various cancerous cells; however, its effects on cancer metastasis are not well known. Cancer cells obtain the ability to change their chemokine system and convert into metastatic cells. In this study, we examined the effect of berberine on breast cancer cell migration and its probable interaction with the chem...

  13. Cutting edge: membrane lymphotoxin regulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated intestinal allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z; Wang, J; Meng, L; Wu, Q; Kim, O; Hart, J; He, G; Zhou, P; Thistlethwaite, J R; Alegre, M L; Fu, Y X; Newell, K A

    2001-11-01

    Blocking the CD28/B7 and/or CD154/CD40 costimulatory pathways promotes long-term allograft survival in many transplant models where CD4(+) T cells are necessary for rejection. When CD8(+) T cells are sufficient to mediate rejection, these approaches fail, resulting in costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. To address this problem we examined the role of lymphotoxin-related molecules in CD8(+) T cell-mediated rejection of murine intestinal allografts. Targeting membrane lymphotoxin by means of a fusion protein, mAb, or genetic mutation inhibited rejection of intestinal allografts by CD8(+) T cells. This effect was associated with decreased monokine induced by IFN-gamma (Mig) and secondary lymphoid chemokine (SLC) gene expression within allografts and spleens respectively. Blocking membrane lymphotoxin did not inhibit rejection mediated by CD4(+) T cells. Combining disruption of membrane lymphotoxin and treatment with CTLA4-Ig inhibited rejection in wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that membrane lymphotoxin is an important regulatory molecule for CD8(+) T cells mediating rejection and suggest a strategy to avoid costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. PMID:11673481

  14. CD8+ T cells in inflammatory demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Hanne A; Millward, Jason M; Owens, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    We review the contribution made by CD8+ T cells to inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and discuss their role in the animal model Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that the inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17...... are differentially regulated in CNS-infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in EAE, and that CD8+ T cells regulate disease. In MS, CD8+ T cells appear to play a role in promotion of disease, so cytokine regulation is likely different in CD8+ T cells in MS and EAE...

  15. Neonatal CD8+ T-cell differentiation is dependent on interleukin-12.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarron, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Neonatal CD8(+) T-cell activation is significantly impaired compared with that in adults. Recent studies have demonstrated that interleukin (IL)-12 is necessary as a third signal, in addition to antigen and co-stimulation, to authorize the differentiation of naive CD8(+) T cells. We examined whether human neonatal CD8(+) T cells, which possess an exclusively naive T-cell phenotype, required a third signal to authorize a productive T-cell response. IL-12 enhanced activated naive CD8(+) T-cell survival, expansion, CD25 expression, and IL-2 production. Activated CD8(+) T cells produced interferon-gamma and intracellular granzyme B and were cytotoxic only in the presence of IL-12. Sustained IL-12 signaling for 72 hours was required for optimal interferon-gamma production. IL-12, in concert with T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation, sustained late-stage (48-72 hours) intracellular phosphorylation and particularly total protein levels of the proximal TCR components, Lck, and CD3xi. The requirement for a third signal for productive human neonatal CD8(+) T-cell differentiation may have implications for neonatal vaccination strategies.

  16. Molecular Programming of Tumor-Infiltrating CD8+ T Cells and IL15 Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doedens, Andrew L; Rubinstein, Mark P; Gross, Emilie T; Best, J Adam; Craig, David H; Baker, Megan K; Cole, David J; Bui, Jack D; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2016-09-01

    Despite clinical potential and recent advances, durable immunotherapeutic ablation of solid tumors is not routinely achieved. IL15 expands natural killer cell (NK), natural killer T cell (NKT) and CD8(+) T-cell numbers and engages the cytotoxic program, and thus is under evaluation for potentiation of cancer immunotherapy. We found that short-term therapy with IL15 bound to soluble IL15 receptor α-Fc (IL15cx; a form of IL15 with increased half-life and activity) was ineffective in the treatment of autochthonous PyMT murine mammary tumors, despite abundant CD8(+) T-cell infiltration. Probing of this poor responsiveness revealed that IL15cx only weakly activated intratumoral CD8(+) T cells, even though cells in the lung and spleen were activated and dramatically expanded. Tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells exhibited cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic resistance to IL15. Our data showed that in the case of persistent viral or tumor antigen, single-agent systemic IL15cx treatment primarily expanded antigen-irrelevant or extratumoral CD8(+) T cells. We identified exhaustion, tissue-resident memory, and tumor-specific molecules expressed in tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells, which may allow therapeutic targeting or programming of specific subsets to evade loss of function and cytokine resistance, and, in turn, increase the efficacy of IL2/15 adjuvant cytokine therapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(9); 799-811. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Differential remodeling of a T-cell transcriptome following CD8-versus CD3-induced signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S Hussain I Abidi; Tao Dong; Mai T Vuong; Vattipally B Sreenu; Sarah L Rowland-Jones; Edward J Evans; Simon J Davis

    2008-01-01

    CD8 engagement with class I major histocompatibility antigens greatly enhances T-cell activation,but it is not clear how this is achieved.We address the question of whether or not the antibody-mediated ligation of CD8 alone induces transcriptional remodeling in a T-cell clone,using serial analysis of gene expression.Even though it fails to induce overt phenotypic changes,we find that CD8 ligation profoundly alters transcription in the T-cell clone,at a scale comparable to that induced by antibody-mediated ligation of CD3.The character of the resulting changes is distinct,however,with the net effect ofCD8 ligation being substantially inhibitory.We speculate that ligating CD8 induces weak,T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated inhibitory signals reminiscent of the effects of TCR antagonists.Our results imply that CD8 ligation alone is incapable of activating the T-cell clone because it fails to fully induce NFAT-dependent transcription.

  18. Characterization and functional analyses of a novel chicken CD8α variant X1 (CD8α1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, A D; Ban, J; Park, B; Hong, Y H; Lillehoj, H S

    2016-07-01

    We provide the first description of cloning and of structural and functional analysis of a novel variant in the chicken cluster of differentiation 8 alpha (CD8a) family, termed the CD8α X1 (CD8α1) gene. Multiple alignments of CD8α1 with known CD8α and CD8β sequences of other species revealed relatively low conservation of AA residues involved in the specific and unique structural domains among CD8α genes. For example, cysteine residues that are involved in disulfide bonding to form the V domain are conserved. In contrast, the O-linked glycosylation sites (XPXX motif) are not found in the chicken CD8α1 sequence, and the A β strand and complementarity-determining region 1 and 2 sequences are poorly conserved between chicken CD8α1 and avian CD8α. Furthermore, the alignment showed that the transmembrane regions show relatively high sequence similarity, whereas the cytoplasmic regions show relatively low similarity, indicating poor conservation. Moreover, the motif (CXCP) that is thought to be responsible for binding the p56 lymphocyte cell kinase subunit (p56) is missing in the CD8α1 sequence. The chicken CD8α1 genomic structure is similar to that of chicken CD8α, but their protein structures differ. Phylogenetic analysis showed that chicken CD8α1 grouped with known avian CD8α sequences but was somewhat distantly related to the CD8α molecules of other species. Moreover, we analyzed the signal transduction and cytokine response to CD8α1 treatment to determine the specific biological functions of chicken CD8α1 in immune cells. The results showed that chicken CD8α1 is a key regulator of the expression of genes that are associated and cooperate with transcription factors in the major histocompatibility complex class I and II promoter regions and activates Janus kinase (JAK) 1/2, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), and suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1 signaling-related genes. Immune cells that express functional CD8α1 induce

  19. The Influence of Immunization Route, Tissue Microenvironment, and Cytokine Cell Milieu on HIV-Specific CD8+ T Cells Measured Using Fluidigm Dynamic Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Shubhanshi; Ranasinghe, Charani

    2015-01-01

    Thirty different genes including cytokines, chemokines, granzymes, perforin and specifically integrins were evaluated in Peyer's patch-KdGag197–205-specific CD8+ T cells (pools of 100 cells) using Fluidigm 48.48 Dynamic arrays following three different prime-boost immunization strategies. Data revealed that the route of prime or the booster immunization differentially influenced the integrin expression profile on gut KdGag197–205-specific CD8+ T cells. Specifically, elevated numbers of integr...

  20. CCR2+ and CCR5+ CD8+ T cells increase during viral infection and migrate to sites of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, A; Marker, O; Bartholdy, C;

    2000-01-01

    expression was dominated by CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5. However, despite a stronger initial chemokine signal in VSV-infected mice, only LCMV-induced T cell-dependent inflammation was found to be associated with substantially increased expression of CCR genes. Virus-activated CD8+ T cells were found to express CCR2...... and CCR5, whereas activated monocytes/macrophages expressed CCR1 in addition to CCR2 and CCR5. Together, these CCR profiles readily account for the CCR profile prominent during CD8+-dependent CNS inflammation....

  1. CD4+/CD8+ double-positive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana H; Jung, Ji-Won; Steptoe, Raymond J;

    2015-01-01

    CD4(+)/CD8(+) DP thymocytes are a well-described T cell developmental stage within the thymus. However, once differentiated, the CD4(+) lineage or the CD8(+) lineage is generally considered to be fixed. Nevertheless, mature CD4(+)/CD8(+) DP T cells have been described in the blood and peripheral...... cells, CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell populations, outside of the thymus, have recently been described to express concurrently ThPOK and Runx3. Considerable heterogeneity exists within the CD4(+)/CD8(+) DP T cell pool, and the function of CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell populations remains controversial, with conflicting...... reports describing cytotoxic or suppressive roles for these cells. In this review, we describe how transcriptional regulation, lineage of origin, heterogeneity of CD4 and CD8 expression, age, species, and specific disease settings influence the functionality of this rarely studied T cell population....

  2. Elevated monocyte chemotactic proteins 1, 2, and 3 in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis are associated with chemokine receptor suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfield, Tracey L; John, Nejimol; Malur, Anagha; Barna, Barbara P; Culver, Daniel A; Kavuru, Mani S; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare autoimmune lung disease characterized by abnormal surfactant accumulation within alveolar macrophages, and circulating auto-antibodies against granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) resulting in functional GM-CSF deficiency. Monocyte/macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is elevated in PAP, suggesting association with the pathophysiology. Because PAP has been associated with inflammatory pulmonary changes, we hypothesized that other MCP family chemokines would be present and that Chemokine Chemotaxis Receptor 2 (CCR2) would be elevated on PAP mononuclear cells. Here we show for the first time that MCP-2 and MCP-3, like MCP-1, are highly elevated in PAP. We also confirm that PAP alveolar macrophages and not epithelial cells produce MCP-1, and that MCP-1 from PAP lung has functional chemoattractant activity. Surprisingly, CCR2 expression is diminished in PAP lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages compared to controls. Further, MCP-1 from PAP lung suppresses CCR2 expression in vitro, suggesting that in PAP, MCP-1 participates in an autocrine regulatory network in vivo. PMID:15596412

  3. Investigation of Chemokine Receptor CCR2V64Il Gene Polymorphism and Migraine without Aura in the Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Zandifar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Migraine is a multifactorial common neurovascular disease with a polygenic inheritance. Inflammation plays an important part in migraine pathophysiology. C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 is an important chemokine for monocyte aggregation and transendothelial monocyte migration. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of migraine with CCR2V64Il polymorphism in the Iranian population. Methods. We assessed 103 patients with newly diagnosed migraine and 100 healthy subjects. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from peripheral blood and genotypes of CCR2V64Il gene polymorphism were determined. For measuring the severity of headache, every patient filled out the MIGSEV questionnaire. Results. There were no significant differences in the distribution of both 64Il allele and heterozygote (GA genotype of CCR2 gene polymorphism (P=0.396; OR=0.92, 95% CI = 0.50–1.67 and P=0.388; OR=0.91, 95% CI = 0.47–1.73, resp. between case and control groups. There was no significant difference of alleles frequency between three grades of MIGSEV (P=0.922. Conclusions. In conclusion our results revealed no association between CCR2V64Il polymorphism and susceptibility to migraine and also headache severity in the Iranian population.

  4. The role of CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)12-CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)4 signalling in the migration of neural stem cells towards a brain tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, A. A. E.; Biber, K.; Lukovac, S.; Balasubramaniyan, V.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Mooij, J. J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: It has been shown that neural stem cells (NSCs) migrate towards areas of brain injury or brain tumours and that NSCs have the capacity to track infiltrating tumour cells. The possible mechanism behind the migratory behaviour of NSCs is not yet completely understood. As chemokines are involved

  5. A closed-tube assay for genotyping of the 32-bp deletion polymorphism in the chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Werge, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a closed-tube assay for determination of the chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) 32-bp deletion allele, which protects against infections with HIV and modulates susceptibility to a variety of inflammatory diseases. This assay utilizes dissociation analysis of amplified products...

  6. An IFN-gamma-IL-18 signaling loop accelerates memory CD8+ T cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Iwai

    Full Text Available Rapid proliferation is one of the important features of memory CD8(+ T cells, ensuring rapid clearance of reinfection. Although several cytokines such as IL-15 and IL-7 regulate relatively slow homeostatic proliferation of memory T cells during the maintenance phase, it is unknown how memory T cells can proliferate more quickly than naïve T cells upon antigen stimulation. To examine antigen-specific CD8(+ T cell proliferation in recall responses in vivo, we targeted a model antigen, ovalbumin(OVA, to DEC-205(+ dendritic cells (DCs with a CD40 maturation stimulus. This led to the induction of functional memory CD8(+ T cells, which showed rapid proliferation and multiple cytokine production (IFN-gamma, IL-2, TNF-alpha during the secondary challenge to DC-targeted antigen. Upon antigen-presentation, IL-18, an IFN-gamma-inducing factor, accumulated at the DC:T cell synapse. Surprisingly, IFN-gamma receptors were required to augment IL-18 production from DCs. Mice genetically deficient for IL-18 or IFN-gamma-receptor 1 also showed delayed expansion of memory CD8(+ T cells in vivo. These results indicate that a positive regulatory loop involving IFN-gamma and IL-18 signaling contributes to the accelerated memory CD8(+ T cell proliferation during a recall response to antigen presented by DCs.

  7. T cells respond to heat shock protein 60 via TLR2: activation of adhesion and inhibition of chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Franitza, Susanne; Cohen, Irun R; Lider, Ofer

    2003-08-01

    Soluble 60 kDa heat shock protein (HSP60) activates macrophages via TLR4. We now report that soluble HSP60 activates T cells via the innate receptor TLR2. HSP60 activated T cell adhesion to fibronectin to a degree similar to other activators: IL-2, SDF-1alpha, and RANTES. T cell type and state of activation was important; nonactivated CD45RA+ and IL-2-activated CD45RO+ T cells responded optimally (1 h) at low concentrations (0.1-1 ng/ml), but nonactivated CD45RO+ T cells required higher concentrations (approximately 1 microg/ml) of HSP60. T cell HSP60 signaling was inhibited specifically by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to TLR2 but not by a mAb to TLR4. Indeed, T cells from mice with mutated TLR4 could still respond to HSP60, whereas Chinese hamster T cells with mutated TLR2 did not respond. The human T cell response to soluble HSP60 depended on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase C signaling and involved the phosphorylation of Pyk-2. Soluble HSP60 also inhibited actin polymerization and T cell chemotaxis through extracellular matrix-like gels toward the chemokines SDF-1alpha (CXCL12) or ELC (CCL19). Exposure to HSP60 for longer times (18 h) down-regulated chemokine receptor expression: CXCR4 and CCR7. These results suggest that soluble HSP60, through TLR2-dependent interactions, can regulate T cell behavior in inflammation. PMID:12824285

  8. Update on D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA): a viral entry inhibitor that blocks CCR5 chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Michael R; Polianova, Maria; Yang, Quan-en; Leoung, Gifford S; Ruscetti, Francis W; Pert, Candace B

    2003-01-01

    Peptide T, named for its high threonine content (ASTTTNYT), was derived by a database search which assumed that a relevant receptor binding epitope within env (gp120) would have sequence homology to a known signaling peptide. Binding of radiolabeled gp120 to brain membranes was displaced by peptide T and three octapeptide analogs (including "DAPTA", Dala1-peptide T-amide, the protease-resistant analog now in Phase II clinical trials) with the same potency that these four octapeptides blocked infectivity of an early passage patient isolate. This 1986 report was controversial due to a number of laboratories' failure to find peptide T antiviral effects; we now know that peptide T is a potent HIV entry inhibitor selectively targeting CCR5 receptors with minimal effects on the X4 tropic lab adapted virus exclusively in use at that time. Early clinical trials, which demonstrated lack of toxicity and focused on neurological and neurocognitive benefits, are reviewed and data from a small ongoing Phase II trial--the first to assess peptide T's antiviral effects--are presented. Studies using infectivity, receptor binding, chemotaxis, and blockade of gp120-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, discussed and presented here. Peptide T and analogs of its core pentapeptide, present near the V2 stem of numerous gp120 isolates, are potent ligands for CCR5. Clinical data showing peptide T's immunomodulation of plasma cytokine levels and increases in the percentage of IFNgamma secreting CD8+ T cells in patients with HIV disease are presented and suggests additional therapeutic mechanisms via regulation of specific immunity.

  9. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols. PMID:27447484

  10. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Deiser

    Full Text Available The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7 is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+ host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7 therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols.

  11. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols.

  12. Features that shape CD8+ T-cell responses to viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia de Almeida Fontaine Costa, A.I.

    2014-01-01

    CD8+ T cells, via their specific T-cell receptor (TCR), target infected cells when recognizing pathogen-derived peptides (epitopes) bound to class I major histocompatibility complex molecules (MHCI, or HLA-class I in humans). HLA-B is the most polymorphic of the classical HLA-I molecules. HLA-B-rest

  13. The herpesvirus 8-encoded chemokine vMIP-II, but not the poxvirus-encoded chemokine MC148, inhibits the CCR10 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, H R; Lewis, I C; Gerstoft, J;

    2001-01-01

    chemokines are expressed in the skin we suspected MC148 to block CCR10. However, in calcium mobilization assays we found MC148 unable to block CCR10 in micromolar concentrations in contrast to vMIP-II. (125)I-MC148 was only able to bind to CCR8, but not to CCR10, CCR11, CXCR6 / BONZO, APJ, DARC or the orphan...

  14. Fractalkine receptor chemokine (CX3CR1 influences on cervical and lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Soo Oh

    2015-01-01

    of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in the disc degeneration and to compare between cervical and lumbar HNP. Materials and Methods: The mRNA concentrations of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 chemokine were analyzed in the surgically obtained disc specimens from C-HNP (n = 13 and L-HNP (n = 13 by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The localization of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 chemokine in the disc of C-HNP and L-HNP patients was determined using immunohistochemical study. Blood samples from patients with C-HNP and L-HNP patients were stained for CX3CR1 with flow cytometric analysis. Results: The CX3CL1 positive cell ratio in the discs was observed in both groups by immunohistochemical study. CX3CR1 was strongly expressed on endothelial cells in C-spine disc, but sparely expressed in L-spine disc. There was greater CX3CR1 mRNA expression in C-HNP patients than in L-HNP patients as quantified by reversal transcription-PCR (P = 0.010. CX3CR1 positive cell frequencies and CX3CR1 expression levels were increased in CD4 (+ T-cells and natural killer (NK cells from patients with C-HNP (P = 0.210 and P = 0.040. Conclusions: This study identified that increases in CX3CL1 and CX3CR1-expressing cells are significantly related to pathomechanism of HNP for the first time. Especially, CD4 (+ T-cells and NK cells expressing CX3CR1 may play an important role in developing C-HNP.

  15. CD8+ T cells in Leishmania infections: friends or foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eStager

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Host protection against several intracellular pathogens requires the induction of CD8+ T cell responses. CD8+ T cells are potent effector cells that can produce high amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines and kill infected target cells efficiently. However, a protective role for CD8+ T cells during Leishmania infections is still controversial and largely depends on the infection model. In this review, we discuss the role of CD8+ T cells during various types Leishmania infections, following vaccination, and as potential immunotherapeutic targets.

  16. Consensus nomenclature for CD8+ T cell phenotypes in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetoh, Lionel; Smyth, Mark J.; Drake, Charles G.; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Apte, Ron N.; Ayyoub, Maha; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bonneville, Marc; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Esteban; Chen, Lieping; Colombo, Mario P.; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Coukos, Georges; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Dranoff, Glenn; Frazer, Ian H.; Fridman, Wolf-Hervé; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kaufman, Howard L.; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John; Knuth, Alexander; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Marincola, Francesco; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Odun, Kunle; Overwijk, Willem W.; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Parmiani, Giorgio; Ribas, Antoni; Romero, Pedro; Schreiber, Robert D.; Schuler, Gerold; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Tartour, Eric; Valmori, Danila; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van der Bruggen, Pierre; van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Wang, Ena; Zou, Weiping; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Anderson, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas preclinical investigations and clinical studies have established that CD8+ T cells can profoundly affect cancer progression, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Challenging the prevalent view that the beneficial effect of CD8+ T cells in cancer is solely attributable to their cytotoxic activity, several reports have indicated that the ability of CD8+ T cells to promote tumor regression is dependent on their cytokine secretion profile and their ability to self-renew. Evidence has also shown that the tumor microenvironment can disarm CD8+ T cell immunity, leading to the emergence of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells. The existence of different types of CD8+ T cells in cancer calls for a more precise definition of the CD8+ T cell immune phenotypes in cancer and the abandonment of the generic terms “pro-tumor” and “antitumor.” Based on recent studies investigating the functions of CD8+ T cells in cancer, we here propose some guidelines to precisely define the functional states of CD8+ T cells in cancer. PMID:26137416

  17. Clonal expansions of CD8+ T cells with IL-10 secreting capacity occur during chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C Cyktor

    Full Text Available The exact role of CD8(+ T cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection has been heavily debated, yet it is generally accepted that CD8(+ T cells contribute to protection against Mtb. In this study, however, we show that the Mtb-susceptible CBA/J mouse strain accumulates large numbers of CD8(+ T cells in the lung as infection progresses, and that these cells display a dysfunctional and immunosuppressive phenotype (PD-1(+, Tim-3(+, CD122(+. CD8(+ T cell expansions from the lungs of Mtb-infected CBA/J mice were also capable of secreting the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10, although in vivo CD8(+ T cell depletion did not significantly alter Mtb burden. Further analysis revealed that pulmonary CD8(+ T cells from Mtb-infected CBA/J mice were clonally expanded, preferentially expressing T cell receptor (TcR Vβ chain 8 (8.2, 8.3 or Vβ 14. Although Vβ8(+ CD8(+ T cells were responsible for the majority of IL-10 production, in vivo depletion of Vβ8(+ did not significantly change the outcome of Mtb infection, which we hypothesize was a consequence of their dual IL-10/IFN-γ secreting profiles. Our data demonstrate that IL-10-secreting CD8(+ T cells can arise during chronic Mtb infection, although the significance of this T cell population in tuberculosis pathogenesis remains unclear.

  18. Non-hematopoietic cells in lymph nodes drive memory CD8 T cell inflation during murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Torti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available During human and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection an exceptionally large virus-specific CD8 T cell pool is maintained in the periphery lifelong. This anomalous response is only seen for specific subsets of MCMV-specific CD8 T cells which are referred to as 'inflationary T cells'. How memory CD8 T cell inflation is induced and maintained is unclear, though their activated phenotype strongly suggests an involvement of persistent antigen encounter during MCMV latency. To dissect the cellular and molecular requirements for memory CD8 T cell inflation, we have generated a transgenic mouse expressing an MHC class I-restricted T cell receptor specific for an immunodominant inflationary epitope of MCMV. Through a series of adoptive transfer experiments we found that memory inflation was completely dependent on antigen presentation by non-hematopoietic cells, which are also the predominant site of MCMV latency. In particular, non-hematopoietic cells selectively induced robust proliferation of inflationary CD8 T cells in lymph nodes, where a majority of the inflationary CD8 T cells exhibit a central-memory phenotype, but not in peripheral tissues, where terminally differentiated inflationary T cells accumulate. These results indicate that continuous restimulation of central memory CD8 T cells in the lymph nodes by infected non-hematopoietic cells ensures the maintenance of a functional effector CD8 T pool in the periphery, providing protection against viral reactivation events.

  19. Functional interaction between angiotensin II receptor type 1 and chemokine (C-C motif receptor 2 with implications for chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli Ayoub

    Full Text Available Understanding functional interactions between G protein-coupled receptors is of great physiological and pathophysiological importance. Heteromerization provides one important potential mechanism for such interaction between different signalling pathways via macromolecular complex formation. Previous studies suggested a functional interplay between angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1 and Chemokine (C-C motif Receptor 2 (CCR2. However the molecular mechanisms are not understood. We investigated AT1-CCR2 functional interaction in vitro using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer in HEK293 cells and in vivo using subtotal-nephrectomized rats as a well-established model for chronic kidney disease. Our data revealed functional heteromers of these receptors resulting in CCR2-Gαi1 coupling being sensitive to AT1 activation, as well as apparent enhanced β-arrestin2 recruitment with agonist co-stimulation that is synergistically reversed by combined antagonist treatment. Moreover, we present in vivo findings where combined treatment with AT1- and CCR2-selective inhibitors was synergistically beneficial in terms of decreasing proteinuria, reducing podocyte loss and preventing renal injury independent of blood pressure in the subtotal-nephrectomized rat model. Our findings further support a role for G protein-coupled receptor functional heteromerization in pathophysiology and provide insights into previous observations indicating the importance of AT1-CCR2 functional interaction in inflammation, renal and hypertensive disorders.

  20. Chemokine CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 in the medullary dorsal horn are involved in trigeminal neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhi-Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain in the trigeminal system is frequently observed in clinic, but the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In addition, the function of immune cells and related chemicals in the mechanism of pain has been recognized, whereas few studies have addressed the potential role of chemokines in the trigeminal system in chronic pain. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2-chemokine C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2 signaling in the trigeminal nucleus is involved in the maintenance of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Methods The inferior alveolar nerve and mental nerve transection (IAMNT was used to induce trigeminal neuropathic pain. The expression of ATF3, CCL2, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and CCR2 were detected by immunofluorescence histochemical staining and western blot. The cellular localization of CCL2 and CCR2 were examined by immunofluorescence double staining. The effect of a selective CCR2 antagonist, RS504393 on pain hypersensitivity was checked by behavioral testing. Results IAMNT induced persistent (>21 days heat hyperalgesia of the orofacial region and ATF3 expression in the mandibular division of the trigeminal ganglion. Meanwhile, CCL2 expression was increased in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH from 3 days to 21 days after IAMNT. The induced CCL2 was colocalized with astroglial marker GFAP, but not with neuronal marker NeuN or microglial marker OX-42. Astrocytes activation was also found in the MDH and it started at 3 days, peaked at 10 days and maintained at 21 days after IAMNT. In addition, CCR2 was upregulated by IAMNT in the ipsilateral medulla and lasted for more than 21 days. CCR2 was mainly colocalized with NeuN and few cells were colocalized with GFAP. Finally, intracisternal injection of CCR2 antagonist, RS504393 (1, 10 μg significantly attenuated IAMNT-induced heat hyperalgesia. Conclusion The data suggest that CCL2-CCR

  1. Thymic Nurse Cells Support CD4-CD8+ Thymocytes to Differentiate into CD4+CD8+ Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aidong Li; Xueli Liu; Baochun Duan; Jie Ma

    2005-01-01

    Thymic nurse cells (TNCs) represent a unique microenvironment in the thymus for T cell maturation. In order to investigate the role of thymic nurse cells during T cell differentiation, a TNC clone, RWTE-1, which formed a typical complex with fetal thymocytes in vitro was established from normal Wistar rat. Hanging drop culture method was applied to reveal the interaction between TNCs and thymocytes. Our result revealed that eighty percent of immature CD4-CD8+ cells differentiated into CD4+CD8+ cells after a 12-hour hanging drop culture with RWTE-1. However, in a 12-hour culture of immature CD4-CD8+ cells with or without RWTE-1 supernatant, only 30% of the cells differentiated into CD4+CD8+ cells spontaneously. This observation led to the conclusion that RWTE-1 cell has the capacity to facilitate immature CD4-CD8+ thymocytes to differentiate into CD4+CD8+ T cells by direct interaction.

  2. Thymoproteasomes produce unique peptide motifs for positive selection of CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Takada, Kensuke; Ohte, Yuki; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Keiji; Takahama, Yousuke; Murata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Positive selection in the thymus provides low-affinity T-cell receptor (TCR) engagement to support the development of potentially useful self-major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I)-restricted T cells. Optimal positive selection of CD8(+) T cells requires cortical thymic epithelial cells that express β5t-containing thymoproteasomes (tCPs). However, how tCPs govern positive selection is unclear. Here we show that the tCPs produce unique cleavage motifs in digested peptides and in MHC-I-associated peptides. Interestingly, MHC-I-associated peptides carrying these tCP-dependent motifs are enriched with low-affinity TCR ligands that efficiently induce the positive selection of functionally competent CD8(+) T cells in antigen-specific TCR-transgenic models. These results suggest that tCPs contribute to the positive selection of CD8(+) T cells by preferentially producing low-affinity TCR ligand peptides.

  3. T-cell Receptor Excision Circles (TREC) in CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell Subpopulations in Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis Show Major Differences in the Emission of Recent Thymic Emigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Helle; Deleuran, Mette; Vestergaard, Christian;

    2008-01-01

    We used T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC) to evaluate thymic function in adult patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. We observed that men, but not women, with atopic dermatitis had a significantly faster decline in TREC content with increasing age compared with healthy men. In cont......-cells, this indicates that atopic dermatitis patients can have compensatory emissions of thymic emigrants, whereas psoriatic patients do not, thus supporting different thymic function in these two diseases....

  4. Peripheral tolerance through clonal deletion of mature CD4-CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlow, D A; Teh, S J; van Oers, N S; Miller, R G; Teh, H S

    1992-05-01

    Transgenic mice bearing the alpha beta transgenes encoding a defined T cell receptor specific for the male (H-Y) antigen presented by the H-2Db class I MHC molecule were used to study mechanisms of peripheral tolerance. Female transgenic mice produce large numbers of functionally homogeneous CD8+ male antigen-reactive T cells in the thymus that subsequently accumulate in the peripheral lymphoid organs. We have used three experimental approaches to show that male reactive CD8+ T cells can be eliminated from peripheral lymphoid organs after exposure to male antigen. (i) In female transgenic mice that were neonatally tolerized with male spleen cells, male reactive CD8+ T cells continued to be produced in large numbers in the thymus but were virtually absent in the lymph nodes. (ii) Injection of thymocytes from female transgenic mice into female mice neonatally tolerized with the male antigen, or into normal male mice, led to the specific elimination of male-reactive CD8+ T cells in the lymph nodes. (iii) Four days after male lymphoid cells were injected intravenously into female transgenic mice, male antigen-reactive CD8+ T cells recovered from the lymph nodes of recipient mice were highly apoptotic when compared to CD4+ (non-male reactive) T cells. These data indicate that tolerance to extrathymic antigen can be achieved through elimination of mature T cells in the peripheral lymphoid organs.

  5. Bystander activation of CD8+ T lymphocytes during experimental mycobacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Brad; Germano, Susie; Steele, Pauline; Turner, Steven; Fazekas de St Groth, Barbara; Cheers, Christina

    2004-12-01

    Infection of C57BL/6 mice with Mycobacterium avium leads to the activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-producing T cells, although the CD8+ cells play no role in protection against infection. Using transfer of different lines of transgenic T cells with T-cell receptors (TCRs) which recognize irrelevant antigens, we show here that transferred CD8+ T cells from two of the three lines were activated to the same degree as the host cells, suggesting that the majority of the IFN-gamma-producing CD8+ T cells of the host represented bystander activation. The third line, specific for the male HY antigen, showed no activation. Activation required the participation of the CD28 coreceptor on T cells and was unaffected by the removal of CD44(hi) (memory phenotype) T cells. The transferred CD8+ T cells proliferated in vivo, although this was not essential for IFN-gamma production. Taken together, these data are highly reminiscent of homeostatic proliferation of TCR transgenic T cells upon transfer to lymphopenic hosts, and suggest low-affinity stimulation through the TCR, possibly by self peptides. The findings are discussed in relation to homeostatic proliferation and their significance in the possible induction of autoimmune disease.

  6. HTLV-1 specific CD8+ T cell function augmented by blockade of 2B4/CD48 interaction in HTLV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibueze Chioma Ezinne

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cell response is important in the response to viral infections; this response though is regulated by inhibitory receptors. Expression of inhibitory receptors has been positively correlated with CD8+ T cell exhaustion; the consequent effect of simultaneous blockade of these inhibitory receptors on CD8+ T cell response in viral infections have been studied, however, the role of individual blockade of receptor-ligand pair is unclear. 2B4/CD48 interaction is involved in CD8+T cell regulation, its signal transducer SAP (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM-associated protein is required for stimulatory function of 2B4/CD244 on lymphocytes hence, we analyzed 2B4/CD244 (natural killer cell receptor and SAP (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule(SLAM-associated protein on total CD8+ and HTLV-1 specific CD8+T cells in HTLV-1 infection and the effect of blockade of interaction with ligand CD48 on HTLV-1 specific CD8+ T cell function. We observed a high expression of 2B4/CD244 on CD8+ T cells relative to uninfected and further upregulation on HTLV-1 specific CD8+ T cells. 2B4+ CD8+ T cells exhibited more of an effector and terminally differentiated memory phenotype. Blockade of 2B4/CD48 interaction resulted in improvement in function via perforin expression and degranulation as measured by CD107a surface mobilization on HTLV-1 specific CD8+ T cells. In the light of these findings, we thus propose an inhibitory role for 2B4/CD48 interaction on CD8+T cell function.

  7. Cloning of two chemokine receptor homologs (CXC-R4 and CC-R7) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G D; Zou, J; Charlemagne, J; Partula, S; Cunningham, C; Secombes, C J

    1999-05-01

    Two rainbow trout chemokine receptors have been sequenced, with homology to CXC-R4 and CC-R7 molecules. The CXC-R4 sequence consisted of 1681 nucleotides, which translated into a mature protein of 357 amino acids, with 80.7% similarity to human CXC-R4. The CC-R7 sequence consisted of 2287 nucleotides, which translated into a 368-amino acid mature protein with 64.5% similarity to human CC-R7. Both sequences contained seven hydrophobic regions, representing the seven transmembrane domains (TM) typical of G-protein-coupled receptors. Extracellular cysteines, transmembrane prolines, and the DRY motif immediately following TM3 were conserved. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed a tight clustering of trout CXC-R4 with CXC-R3-5 genes. Trout CC-R7 clustered with CC-R6-7 and CXC-R1-2. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated a wide tissue distribution of CXC-R4 and CC-R7 message in trout, being present in head-kidney leukocytes, blood, gill, brain, spleen, and liver. PMID:10331499

  8. Met receptor tyrosine kinase signaling induces secretion of the angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8/CXCL8 in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen S Hill

    Full Text Available At diagnosis, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients present with advanced disease when curative resection is no longer feasible and current therapeutic treatments are largely ineffective. An improved understanding of molecular targets for effective intervention of pancreatic cancer is thus urgent. The Met receptor tyrosine kinase is one candidate implicated in pancreatic cancer. Notably, Met is over expressed in up to 80% of invasive pancreatic cancers but not in normal ductal cells correlating with poor overall patient survival and increased recurrence rates following surgical resection. However the functional role of Met signaling in pancreatic cancer remains poorly understood. Here we used RNA interference to directly examine the pathobiological importance of increased Met signaling for pancreatic cancer. We show that Met knockdown in pancreatic tumor cells results in decreased cell survival, cell invasion, and migration on collagen I in vitro. Using an orthotopic model for pancreatic cancer, we provide in vivo evidence that Met knockdown reduced tumor burden correlating with decreased cell survival and tumor angiogenesis, with minimal effect on cell growth. Notably, we report that Met signaling regulates the secretion of the pro-angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8/CXCL8. Our data showing that the interleukin-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 are not expressed on pancreatic tumor cells, suggests a paracrine mechanism by which Met signaling regulates interleukin-8 secretion to remodel the tumor microenvironment, a novel finding that could have important clinical implications for improving the effectiveness of treatments for pancreatic cancer.

  9. Exploring a model of human chemokine receptor CCR2 in presence of TAK779: A membrane based molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balupuri, Anand; Sobhia, M. Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and a crucial target for various inflammation-driven diseases. In the present study, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were performed on a CCR2 homology model. This work includes the comparative MD simulations of uncomplexed and ‘antagonist-complexed’ CCR2 models. These simulations yield insights into the binding mechanism of antagonist TAK779 and improve the understanding of various structural changes induced by the ligand in the CCR2 protein. Here, one 20 ns MD simulation was carried out on the uncomplexed CCR2 model in lipid bilayer to explore the effects of lipid membrane on the protein. Another 20 ns MD simulation was performed under the similar conditions on the docked CCR2-TAK779 complex. An alteration in the position and orientation of the ligand in binding site was observed after the simulation. Examination of protein-ligand complex suggested that TAK779 produced a greater structural change on the TM-III, TM-IV, TM-V and TM-VI than TM-I, TM-II and TM-VII. Interaction networks involving the conserved residues of uncomplexed and ‘antagonist-complexed’ CCR2 models were also examined. The major difference was observed to be the role of conserved residues of the DRY motif of TM-III and the NPxxY motif of TM-VII of CCR2.

  10. Chemokine receptor CCR5 antagonist maraviroc: medicinal chemistry and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoyan G; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes acquired immumodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the worst global pandemic. The virus infects human CD4 T cells and macrophages, and causes CD4 depletion. HIV enters target cells through the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 and the chemokine coreceptor, CXCR4 or CCR5. In particular, the CCR5-utilizing viruses predominate in the blood during the disease course. CCR5 is expressed on the surface of various immune cells including macrophages, monocytes, microglia, dendric cells, and active memory CD4 T cells. In the human population, the CCR5 genomic mutation, CCR5Δ32, is associated with relative resistance to HIV. These findings paved the way for the discovery and development of CCR5 inhibitors to block HIV transmission and replication. Maraviroc, discovered as a CCR5 antagonist, is the only CCR5 inhibitor that has been approved by both US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for treating HIV/AIDS patients. In this review, we summarize the medicinal chemistry and clinical studies of Maraviroc.

  11. Inhibition of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain by Targeting a Mu Opioid Receptor/Chemokine Receptor5 Heteromer (MOR-CCR5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgün, Eyup; Javed, Muhammad I; Lunzer, Mary M; Powers, Michael D; Sham, Yuk Y; Watanabe, Yoshikazu; Portoghese, Philip S

    2015-11-12

    Chemokine release promotes cross-talk between opioid and chemokine receptors that in part leads to reduced efficacy of morphine in the treatment of chronic pain. On the basis of the possibility that a MOR-CCR5 heteromer is involved in such cross-talk, we have synthesized bivalent ligands (MCC series) that contain mu opioid agonist and CCR5 antagonist pharmacophores linked through homologous spacers (14-24 atoms). When tested on lipopolysaccharide-inflamed mice, a member of the series (MCC22; 3e) with a 22-atom spacer exhibited profound antinociception (i.t. ED50 = 0.0146 pmol/mouse) that was 2000× greater than morphine. Moreover, MCC22 was ~3500× more potent than a mixture of mu agonist and CCR5 antagonist monovalent ligands. These data strongly suggest that MCC22 acts by bridging the protomers of a MOR-CCR5 heteromer having a TM5,6 interface. Molecular simulation studies are consistent with such bridging. This study supports the MOR-CCR5 heteromer as a novel target for the treatment of chronic pain.

  12. Role of CD8+ regulatory T cells in organ transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyan Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8 + T cells are regulatory T cells (Tregs that suppress both alloimmunity and autoimmunity in many animal models. This class of regulatory cells includes the CD8 + CD28 - , CD8 + CD103 + , CD8 + FoxP3 + and CD8 + CD122 + subsets. The mechanisms of action of these regulatory cells are not fully understood; however, the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-4, IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β as well as the direct killing of target cells via Fas L/Fas and the perforin/granzyme B pathways have been demonstrated in various models. Further studies are necessary to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the suppressive effects of Tregs and to provide experimental support for potential clinical trials. We recently observed that CD8 + CD122 + Tregs more potently suppressed allograft rejection compared to their CD4 + CD25 + counterparts, supporting the hypothesis that CD8 + Tregs may represent a new and promising Treg family that can be targeted to prevent allograft rejection in the clinic. In this review, we summarize the progress in the field during the past 7-10 years and discuss CD8 + Treg phenotypes, mechanisms of action, and their potential clinical applications; particularly in composite tissue transplants in burn and trauma patients.

  13. A beginner's guide to chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2012-05-01

    This review provides an overview of chemokines and their receptors, with an emphasis on general features and nomenclature along with a short summary of their properties and functions. It is intended as an introduction to the subject and a reference point for those wishing to learn key facts about chemokines and their role in biology. PMID:22571610

  14. Enhanced Chemokine Receptor Recycling and Impaired S1P1 Expression Promote Leukemic Cell Infiltration of Lymph Nodes in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrussi, Laura; Capitani, Nagaja; Martini, Veronica; Pizzi, Marco; Trimarco, Valentina; Frezzato, Federica; Marino, Filippo; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Trentin, Livio; Baldari, Cosima T

    2015-10-01

    Lymphocyte trafficking is orchestrated by chemokine and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors that enable homing and egress from secondary lymphoid organs (SLO). These receptors undergo rapid internalization and plasma membrane recycling to calibrate cellular responses to local chemoattractants. Circulating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells display an abnormal increase in the surface levels of the homing receptors CCR7 and CXCR4 concomitant with low S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) expression. In this study, we investigated the role of receptor recycling on CXCR4/CCR7 surface levels in CLL cells and addressed the impact of quantitative alterations of these receptors and S1P1 on the ability of leukemic cells to accumulate in SLOs. We show that recycling accounts, to a major extent, for the high levels of surface CXCR4/CCR7 on CLL cells. In addition, increased expression of these receptors, together with S1P1 deficiency, is detectable not only in circulating leukemic cells, but also in SLOs of CLL patients with lymphoadenopathy. We further provide evidence that ibrutinib, a Btk inhibitor that promotes mobilization of leukemic cells from SLOs, normalizes the imbalance between CXCR4/CCR7 and S1P1. Taken together, our results highlight the relevance of chemokine and S1P receptor recycling in CLL pathogenesis and clinical outcome.

  15. Delayed functional expression of neuronal chemokine receptors following focal nerve demyelination in the rat: a mechanism for the development of chronic sensitization of peripheral nociceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monahan Patrick E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal and clinical studies have revealed that focal peripheral nerve axon demyelination is accompanied by nociceptive pain behavior. C-C and C-X-C chemokines and their receptors have been strongly implicated in demyelinating polyneuropathies and persistent pain syndromes. Herein, we studied the degree to which chronic nociceptive pain behavior is correlated with the neuronal expression of chemokines and their receptors following unilateral lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC-induced focal demyelination of the sciatic nerve in rats. Results Focal nerve demyelination increased behavioral reflex responsiveness to mechanical stimuli between postoperative day (POD 3 and POD28 in both the hindpaw ipsilateral and contralateral to the nerve injury. This behavior was accompanied by a bilateral increase in the numbers of primary sensory neurons expressing the chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4 by POD14, with no change in the pattern of CXCR3 expression. Significant increases in the numbers of neurons expressing the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2, Regulated on Activation, Normal T Expressed and Secreted (RANTES/CCL5 and interferon γ-inducing protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10 were also evident following nerve injury, although neuronal expression pattern of stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF1/CXCL12 did not change. Functional studies demonstrated that acutely dissociated sensory neurons derived from LPC-injured animals responded with increased [Ca2+]i following exposure to MCP-1, IP-10, SDF1 and RANTES on POD 14 and 28, but these responses were largely absent by POD35. On days 14 and 28, rats received either saline or a CCR2 receptor antagonist isomer (CCR2 RA-[R] or its inactive enantiomer (CCR2 RA-[S] by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection. CCR2 RA-[R] treatment of nerve-injured rats produced stereospecific bilateral reversal of tactile hyperalgesia. Conclusion These results suggest that the presence of chemokine

  16. Abnormal distribution of CD8 subpopulation in B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia identified by flow cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terstappen, L.W.M.M.; Grooth, de B.G.; Berkel, van W.; Napel, ten C.H.H.

    1988-01-01

    We studied the occurrence of T-cell subpopulations for patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The CD8+ population was divided into CD8+ suppressor (CD8a+) and CD8+ cytotoxic (CD8b+) lymphocytes using difference in orthogonal light scattering. Average CD4+/CD8+ratios determined for all p

  17. Induction of Specific CD8+ T Cells against Intracellular Bacteria by CD8+ T-Cell-Oriented Immunization Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshi Nagata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For protection against intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes, the cellular arm of adaptive immunity is necessary. A variety of immunization methods have been evaluated and are reported to induce specific CD8+ T cells against intracellular bacterial infection. Modified BCG vaccines have been examined to enhance CD8+ T-cell responses. Naked DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce CD8+ T cells. In addition to this strategy, live attenuated intracellular bacteria such as Shigella, Salmonella, and Listeria have been utilized as carriers of DNA vaccines in animal models. Vaccination with dendritic cells pulsed with antigenic peptides or the cells introduced antigen genes by virus vectors such as retroviruses is also a powerful strategy. Furthermore, vaccination with recombinant lentivirus has been attempted to induce specific CD8+ T cells. Combinations of these strategies (prime-boost immunization have been studied for the efficient induction of intracellular bacteria-specific CD8+ T cells.

  18. Role of the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR4 in the pathogenesis of experimental dengue infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Guabiraba

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is a public health problem in many tropical countries. Recent clinical data have shown an association between levels of different chemokines in plasma and severity of dengue. We evaluated the role of CC chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR4 in an experimental model of DENV-2 infection in mice. Infection of mice induced evident clinical disease and tissue damage, including thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration, lymphopenia, increased levels of transaminases and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and lethality in WT mice. Importantly, infected WT mice presented increased levels of chemokines CCL2/JE, CCL3/MIP-1α and CCL5/RANTES in spleen and liver. CCR1⁻/⁻ mice had a mild phenotype with disease presentation and lethality similar to those of WT mice. In CCR2⁻/⁻ mice, lethality, liver damage, levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ, and leukocyte activation were attenuated. However, thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration and systemic TNF-α levels were similar to infected WT mice. Infection enhanced levels of CCL17/TARC, a CCR4 ligand. In CCR4⁻/⁻ mice, lethality, tissue injury and systemic inflammation were markedly decreased. Despite differences in disease presentation in CCR-deficient mice, there was no significant difference in viral load. In conclusion, activation of chemokine receptors has discrete roles in the pathogenesis of dengue infection. These studies suggest that the chemokine storm that follows severe primary dengue infection associates mostly to development of disease rather than protection.

  19. Pharmacological inhibition of the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 attenuates disease in a chronic-relapsing rat model for multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ridderstad Wollberg, Anna; Ericsson-Dahlstrand, Anders; Juréus, Anders; Ekerot, Petra; Simon, Sylvia; Nilsson, Maria; Wiklund, Stig-Johan; Berg, Anna-Lena; Ferm, Mats; Sunnemark, Dan; Johansson, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and degenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) causing paralysis. The most effective treatments for MS aim to block infiltration of inflammatory cells to the brain. However, severe side effects related to the broad-acting specificity of these treatments exist. AZD8797, a unique inhibitor of the chemokine receptor CX3CR1, provides inhibition of subpopulations of peripheral leukocytes with potential for a beneficial effect: side ef...

  20. CD8+ Tregs in Lupus, Autoimmunity, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Ravi K; Skaggs, Brian J; Cava, Antonio La; Hahn, Bevra H.; Singh, Ram Pyare

    2010-01-01

    While CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells (Tregs) have garnered much attention for their role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, recent findings have shown that subsets of CD8+ T cells (CD8+ Tregs) display immunoregulatory functions as well. Both CD4+ Tregs and CD8+ Tregs appear impaired in number and/or function in several autoimmune diseases and in experimental animal models of autoimmunity, suggesting the possibility of immunotherapeutic targeting of these cells for improved management of autoimmune conditions. Our group has developed a strategy to induce CD8+ Tregs in autoimmune mice through the use of a tolerogenic self-peptide, and new information has been gained on the phenotype, function and role of induced CD8+ Tregs in autoimmunity. Here we present an overview of the role and mechanisms of action of CD8+ Tregs in autoimmunity, with a special focus on lupus. We also discuss the potential role of CD8+ Tregs in other diseases, including chronic infection and cancer. PMID:20385256

  1. Effects of pharmacological and genetic disruption of CXCR4 chemokine receptor function in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Shubhchintan; Cho, Byung S; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Sivina, Mariela; Koehrer, Stefan; Müschen, Markus; Peled, Amnon; Davis, Richard E; Konopleva, Marina; Burger, Jan A

    2016-08-01

    B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) cells express high levels of CXCR4 chemokine receptors for homing and retention within the marrow microenvironment. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) secrete CXCL12, the ligand for CXCR4, and protect B-ALL cells from cytotoxic drugs. Therefore, the therapeutic use of CXCR4 antagonists has been proposed to disrupt cross talk between B-ALL cells and the protective stroma. Because CXCR4 antagonists can have activating agonistic function, we compared the genetic and pharmacological deletion of CXCR4 in B-ALL cells, using CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing and CXCR4 antagonists that are in clinical use (plerixafor, BKT140). Both genetic and pharmacological CXCR4 inhibition significantly reduced B-ALL cell migration to CXCL12 gradients and beneath BMSC, and restored drug sensitivity to dexamethasone, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. NOD/SCID/IL-2rγnull mice injected with CXCR4 gene-deleted B-ALL cells had significant delay in disease progression and superior survival when compared to control mice injected with CXCR4 wild-type B-ALL cells. These findings indicate that anti-leukaemia activity of CXCR4 antagonists is primarily due to CXCR4 inhibition, rather than agonistic activity, and corroborate that CXCR4 is an important target to overcome stroma-mediated drug resistance in B-ALL. PMID:27071778

  2. Coincident expression of the chemokine receptors CCR6 and CCR7 by pathologic Langerhans cells in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Mark D; Pinkus, Jack L; Fournier, Marcia V; Alexander, Sarah W; Tam, Carmen; Loda, Massimo; Sallan, Stephen E; Nichols, Kim E; Carpentieri, David F; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Rollins, Barrett J

    2003-04-01

    It has been suggested that a switch in chemokine receptor expression underlies Langerhans cell migration from skin to lymphoid tissue. Activated cells are thought to down-regulate CCR6, whose ligand macrophage inflammatory protein-3 alpha (MIP-3 alpha)/CCL20 is expressed in skin, and up-regulate CCR7, whose ligands are in lymphoid tissues. In Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), pathologic Langerhans cells (LCs) accumulate in several tissues, including skin, bone, and lymphoid organs. We have examined 24 LCH cases and find that pathologic LCs expressed CCR6 and CCR7 coincidentally in all cases. Furthermore, MIP-3 alpha/CCL20 is expressed by keratinocytes in involved skin and by macrophages and osteoblasts in involved bone. Expression of CCR6 by pathologic LCs may contribute to their accumulation in nonlymphoid organs such as skin and bone, whereas CCR7 expression may direct them to lymphoid tissue. Histiocytes in Rosai-Dorfman disease and hemophagocytic syndrome also coexpressed CCR6 and CCR7, suggesting that this may be a general attribute of abnormal histiocytes.

  3. Possible Association Between the Chemokine Receptor Gene CCR5-Delta32 Mutation and Hepatitis C Virus Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouka Saad Eldin Abdel-Wahab, **Mohamed Foda, *Magda Abdel

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: CCR5-Delta32, a 32-base pair deletion of the CC chemokine receptor (CCR5 gene, is associated with slowed human immunodeficiency virus disease progression in heterozygotes and protection against infection in homozygotes between carriers and non-carriers of each genetic variant. The present study investigated the frequency and clinical consequence of the CCR%-Delta32 mutation in Egyptian HCV infected patients. Genomic DNA samples from 150 patients with chronic HCV infection were screened by PCR for the presence of the CCR5-Delta32 polymorphism. One hundred blood donors were used as control population. Results: The frequency of CCR5-Delta32 heterozygosity was 0.67% in chronic hepatitis C virus and 0% in controls. The CCR5-Delta32 allele was not associated with any of the clinical parameters of hepatitis C virus infection. Conclusion: In this study, the frequency of CCR5-Delta32 homozygosity in patients with hepatitis C was similar to controls.

  4. Selective chemokine receptor usage by central nervous system myeloid cells in CCR2-red fluorescent protein knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Saederup

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocyte subpopulations distinguished by differential expression of chemokine receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 are difficult to track in vivo, partly due to lack of CCR2 reagents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We created CCR2-red fluorescent protein (RFP knock-in mice and crossed them with CX3CR1-GFP mice to investigate monocyte subset trafficking. In mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, CCR2 was critical for efficient intrathecal accumulation and localization of Ly6C(hi/CCR2(hi monocytes. Surprisingly, neutrophils, not Ly6C(lo monocytes, largely replaced Ly6C(hi cells in the central nervous system of these mice. CCR2-RFP expression allowed the first unequivocal distinction between infiltrating monocytes/macrophages from resident microglia. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results refine the concept of monocyte subsets, provide mechanistic insight about monocyte entry into the central nervous system, and present a novel model for imaging and quantifying inflammatory myeloid populations.

  5. An Ultra-High Fluorescence Enhancement and High Throughput Assay for Revealing Expression and Internalization of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hua; Wang, Xiaojuan; Cheng, Tiantian; Xia, Yongqing; Lao, Jun; Ge, Baosheng; Ren, Hao; Khan, Naseer Ullah; Huang, Fang

    2016-04-18

    Revealing chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression, distribution, and internalization levels in different cancers helps to evaluate cancer progression or prognosis and to set personalized treatment strategy. We here describe a sensitive and high-throughput immunoassay for determining CXCR4 expression and distribution in cancer cells. The assay is accessible to a wide range of users in an ordinary lab only by dip-coating poly(styrene-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) spheres on the glass substrate. The self- assembled spheres form three-dimensional photonic colloidal crystals which enhance the fluorescence of CF647 and Alexa Fluor 647 by a factor of up to 1000. CXCR4 in cells is detected by using the sandwich immunoassay, where the primary antibody recognizes CXCR4 and the secondary antibody is labeled with CF647. With the newly established assay, we quantified the total expression of CXCR4, its distribution on the cell membrane and cytoplasm, and revealed their internalization level upon SDF-1α activation in various cancer cells, even for those with extremely low expression level. PMID:26879206

  6. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rhesus macaque CD8αα homodimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CD8α exodomain protein, a crucial immune-system factor in rhesus macaque (M. mulatta), one of the best animal models for vaccine design, was assembled and crystallized. The full structure data will contribute to future studies of immune responses in rhesus macaques. As a T-cell co-receptor, CD8 binds to MHC class I molecules and plays a pivotal role in the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. To date, structures of CD8 have been solved for two different mammals: human and mouse. The infection of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is the best animal model for studying HIV. In this study, the rhesus macaque CD8 (rCD8) αα homodimer was obtained and rCD8α exodomain protein crystals were successfully obtained for further structural analysis. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å. The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.52, b = 56.28, c = 82.40 Å. These data will facilitate further studies on the structural differences between these CD8 structures and the cellular immune responses of rhesus macaque

  7. Relationship between expression of chemokine receptors CCR3,CCR5 and CXCR3 on CD4+ T cells and spontaneous abortion in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Pei-juan; LIN Qi-de; BAO Shi-min; ZHAO Ai-min; ZHANG Yu; XIAO Shi-jin

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that local immune cells in the feto-maternal interface are recruited from peripheral blood, and that chemokines and their receptors play an initial and key role in this recruitment process. In this study, we aimed to determine whether spontaneous abortion is associated with the expression of chemokine receptors CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR3 on CD4+ T cells.Methods Peripheral blood, spleen, and thymus were collected from the spontaneous abortion mouse model CBA/J×DBN2 (SA group, n=14), the normal pregnant mouse model CBA/J×BALB/c (NP group, n=13), and normal non-pregnant CBA/J mice (NNP group, n=11). The number of chemokine receptors CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR3 expressed on CD4+ T cells was measured by double-label flow cytometry (FCM) method.Results In peripheral blood, the SA group had significantly lower CCR3 expression (P 0.05). In spleen, the SA group expressed significantly lower CCR3 expression (P 0.05). In thymus, the SA group had significantly lower CCR3 expression (P 0.05). Compared with the NNP group, the SA group had higher CCR3 expression (P 0.05) between the two groups.Conclusion The abnormal expression of CCR3, CCR5 and CXCR3 on CD4+ T cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of spontaneous abortion.

  8. Similar chemokine receptor profiles in lymphomas with central nervous system involvement - possible biomarkers for patient selection for central nervous system prophylaxis, a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemma, Siria A; Pasanen, Anna Kaisa; Haapasaari, Kirsi-Maria; Sippola, Antti; Sormunen, Raija; Soini, Ylermi; Jantunen, Esa; Koivunen, Petri; Salokorpi, Niina; Bloigu, Risto; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Kuittinen, Outi

    2016-05-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse occurs in around 5% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cases. No biomarkers to identify high-risk patients have been discovered. We evaluated the expression of lymphocyte-guiding chemokine receptors in systemic and CNS lymphomas. Immunohistochemical staining for CXCR4, CXCR5, CCR7, CXCL12, and CXCL13 was performed on 89 tissue samples, including cases of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), secondary CNS lymphoma (sCNSL), and systemic DLBCL. Also, 10 reactive lymph node samples were included. Immunoelectron microscopy was performed on two PCNSLs, one sCNSL, one systemic DLBCL, and one reactive lymph node samples, and staining was performed for CXCR4, CXCR5, CXCL12, and CXCL13. Chi-square test was used to determine correlations between clinical parameters, diagnostic groups, and chemokine receptor expression. Strong nuclear CXCR4 positivity correlated with systemic DLBCL, whereas strong cytoplasmic CXCR5 positivity correlated with CNS involvement (P = 0.003 and P = 0.039). Immunoelectron microscopy revealed a nuclear CXCR4 staining in reactive lymph node, compared with cytoplasmic and membranous localization seen in CNS lymphomas. We found that CNS lymphoma presented a chemokine receptor profile different from systemic disease. Our findings give new information on the CNS tropism of DLBCL and, if confirmed, may contribute to more effective targeting of CNS prophylaxis among patients with DLBCL.

  9. Specific Control of Immunity by Regulatory CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoleiTang; TrevorRFSmith

    2005-01-01

    T lymphocytes with dedicated suppressor function (Treg) play a crucial role in the homeostatic control of immunity in the periphery. Several Treg phenotypes have now been identified in the CD4 and CD8 T cell populations, suggesting their down-regulatory function in both human and animal models of autoimmunity, transplantation and tumor immunity. Here we will focus on the CD8 Treg population and their ability to specifically inhibit a pathogenic autoimmune response. This review will detail the current advances in the knowledge of CD8 Treg in the context of antigen specificity, phenotype, MHC restriction, mechanism of action, and priming. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):11-19.

  10. Chemokine receptors and their crucial role in human immunodeficiency virus infection: major breakthroughs in HIV research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, T B; Knudsen, T B; Eugen-Olsen, J

    1998-01-01

    Within the last three years, major progress in the understanding of acquired immune deficiency syndrome pathogenesis has been achieved. The discovery that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), in addition to the CD4 receptor, requires the presence of a coreceptor in order to infect cells has led...... to a series of breakthroughs in HIV research and knowledge. These include an increased understanding of viral entry, a connection of viral phenotype to specific coreceptor use, and an unequivocal linkage of a single human gene to host susceptibility. All in all these achievements provide a number of promising...

  11. 弥漫增生型狼疮肾炎患者趋化因子及其受体的表达%The study of chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭桂梅; 陈顺乐; 沈南; 戴岷; 倪旭鸣; 郑林

    2008-01-01

    目的 了解弥漫增生型狼疮肾炎(LN)患者趋化因子MCP-1、CCL19、CXCL9、CXCL10和趋化因子受体CCR2、CCR7、CXCR3的表达,探讨趋化因子及其受体在LN发病中的作用.方法 ①同步收集12例弥漫增生型LN患者肾组织和外周血,抽提总RNA并反转录为cDNA,以实时荧光定量聚合酶链反应(PCR)方法 检测趋化因子基因MCP-1、CCL19、CXCL9、CXCL10和趋化因子受体基因CCR2、CCR7、CXCR3的表达水平.②应用免疫荧光抗体标记、激光扫描共聚焦显微镜技术观察患者肾组织趋化因子MCP-1、CCL19、CXCL9和CXCL10的表达.结果 弥漫增生型LN患者趋化因子基因MCP-1、CCL19、CXCL9和CXCL10 mRNA在肾脏组织和外周血的表达呈同步增高趋势,4种趋化因子蛋白在肾小球的表达显著增高.趋化因子受体CCR2和CXCR3在LN患者外周血高表达.结论 趋化因子MCP-1、CCL19、CXCL9和CXCL10外周血表达水平可能做为评估狼疮患者肾脏病变的生物学标记.阻断趋化因子与其相应受体的结合将可能减轻患者的临床症状、改善预后.%Objective To explore the role of chemokines and ehemokine receptors in the etiopathog-enesis of diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (LN). Methods ① Total RNA from the kidney tissues and peripheral blood cells of 12 patients with diffuse proliferative LN and 10 normal controls were prepared simultaneously and reverse transcribed into complementary DNA. Sybr green dye based real-time quantitative PCR method was used to compare the expression levels (indicated as-AACt value) of MCP-1, CCL19,CXCLg, CXCL10 and CCR2, CCR7, CXCR3. ② Immunofluoresceee labeling and immunohistochemical staining technique were used to observe the distribution of chemokines MCP-1, CCL19, CXCL9 and CXCL10 in normal and patients kidney tissues. Results The 4 chemokines genes (MCP-1, CCL19, CXCL9 and CXCL10) were consistently highly expressed in kidney tissues and peripheral blood ceils of diffuse proliferative LN

  12. Generation and Regulation of CD8+ Regulatory T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linrong Lu; Harvey Cantor

    2008-01-01

    Research into the suppressive activity of CD4+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells (Treg) has defined a sublineage of CD4+ cells that contribute to self-tolerance and resistance to autoimmune disease. Much less attention has been given to the potential contribution of regulatory sublineages of CD8+ cells. Analysis of a small fraction of CD8+ cells that target autoreactive CD4+ cells through recognition of the MHC class Ib molecule Qa-1 in mouse and HLA-E in human has revitalized interest in CD8+ Treg. Here we summarize recent progress and future directions of research into the role of this CD8+ sublineage in resistance to autoimmune disease. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(6):401-406.

  13. Detection of CD4+ and CD8 + T-lymphocytes with the optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohring, John T.; Fan, Xudong

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated the use of the Opto-Fluidic ring resonator (OFRR) to achieve the label-free detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Lymphocytes. The OFRR sensing technology combines microfluidics and optical sensing in a small platform that achieves rapid detection. In this work, white blood cells were obtained from healthy blood and the concentration altered to reflect CD4 and CD8 concentrations of HIV infected individuals. The OFRR was modified to effectively capture these receptors located on T-Lymphocytes and obtain a sensing signal through interaction with an evanescent field. Results show isolation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Lymphocytes at medically significant levels. This work will lead to a device that can provide a CD4 and CD8 count to measure HIV progression in a low cost sensing setup.

  14. The role of CD8+ T cells during allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bueno V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation can be considered as replacement therapy for patients with end-stage organ failure. The percent of one-year allograft survival has increased due, among other factors, to a better understanding of the rejection process and new immunosuppressive drugs. Immunosuppressive therapy used in transplantation prevents activation and proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes, although not fully preventing chronic rejection. Recognition by recipient T cells of alloantigens expressed by donor tissues initiates immune destruction of allogeneic transplants. However, there is controversy concerning the relative contribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to allograft rejection. Some animal models indicate that there is an absolute requirement for CD4+ T cells in allogeneic rejection, whereas in others CD4-depleted mice reject certain types of allografts. Moreover, there is evidence that CD8+ T cells are more resistant to immunotherapy and tolerance induction protocols. An intense focal infiltration of mainly CD8+CTLA4+ T lymphocytes during kidney rejection has been described in patients. This suggests that CD8+ T cells could escape from immunosuppression and participate in the rejection process. Our group is primarily interested in the immune mechanisms involved in allograft rejection. Thus, we believe that a better understanding of the role of CD8+ T cells in allograft rejection could indicate new targets for immunotherapy in transplantation. Therefore, the objective of the present review was to focus on the role of the CD8+ T cell population in the rejection of allogeneic tissue.

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonists modulate Th1 and Th2 chemokine secretion in normal thyrocytes and Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, Alessandro, E-mail: a.antonelli@med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Silvia Martina, E-mail: sm.ferrari@int.med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Frascerra, Silvia, E-mail: lafrasce@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Corrado, Alda, E-mail: dala_res@hotmail.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Pupilli, Cinzia, E-mail: c.pupilli@dfc.unifi.it [Endocrinology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Careggi and University of Florence, Viale Morgagni 85, I-50134, Florence (Italy); Bernini, Giampaolo, E-mail: g.bernini@int.med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Benvenga, Salvatore, E-mail: s.benvenga@me.nettuno.it [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, University of Messina, Piazza Pugliatti 1, I-98122, Messina (Italy); Ferrannini, Ele, E-mail: eferrannini@med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Fallahi, Poupak, E-mail: poupak@int.med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Until now, no data are present about the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} activation on the prototype Th1 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10] (CXCL10) and Th2 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2] (CCL2) chemokines secretion in thyroid cells. The role of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} activation on CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion was tested in Graves' disease (GD) and control primary thyrocytes stimulated with interferon (IFN){gamma} and tumor necrosis factor (TNF){alpha}. IFN{gamma} stimulated both CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion in primary GD and control thyrocytes. TNF{alpha} alone stimulated CCL2 secretion, while had no effect on CXCL10. The combination of IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} had a synergistic effect both on CXCL10 and CCL2 chemokines in GD thyrocytes at levels comparable to those of controls. PPAR{alpha} activators inhibited the secretion of both chemokines (stimulated with IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha}) at a level higher (for CXCL10, about 60-72%) than PPAR{gamma} agonists (about 25-35%), which were confirmed to inhibit CXCL10, but not CCL2. Our data show that CCL2 is modulated by IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} in GD and normal thyrocytes. Furthermore we first show that PPAR{alpha} activators inhibit the secretion of CXCL10 and CCL2 in thyrocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} may be involved in the modulation of the immune response in the thyroid.

  16. The viral context instructs the redundancy of costimulatory pathways in driving CD8(+) T cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, Suzanne P M; Redeker, Anke; Franken, Kees L M C; Oduro, Jennifer D; Ossendorp, Ferry; Čičin-Šain, Luka; Melief, Cornelis J M; Aichele, Peter; Arens, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Signals delivered by costimulatory molecules are implicated in driving T cell expansion. The requirements for these signals, however, vary from dispensable to essential in different infections. We examined the underlying mechanisms of this differential T cell costimulation dependence and found that the viral context determined the dependence on CD28/B7-mediated costimulation for expansion of naive and memory CD8(+) T cells, indicating that the requirement for costimulatory signals is not imprinted. Notably, related to the high-level costimulatory molecule expression induced by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), CD28/B7-mediated costimulation was dispensable for accumulation of LCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells because of redundancy with the costimulatory pathways induced by TNF receptor family members (i.e., CD27, OX40, and 4-1BB). Type I IFN signaling in viral-specific CD8(+) T cells is slightly redundant with costimulatory signals. These results highlight that pathogen-specific conditions differentially and uniquely dictate the utilization of costimulatory pathways allowing shaping of effector and memory antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. PMID:26263500

  17. Cutting Edge: ACVRL1 Signaling Augments CD8α+ Dendritic Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rohit; Jaiswal, Hemant; Chauhan, Kuldeep Singh; Kaushik, Monika; Tailor, Prafullakumar

    2016-08-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a collection of different subtypes, each of which is characterized by specific surface markers, gene-expression patterns, and distinct functions. Members of the IFN regulatory factor family play critical roles in DC development and functions. Recently, Irf8 was shown to activate TGF-β signaling, which led to exacerbated neuroinflammation in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model. We analyzed the effect of Irf8 on TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein pathway-specific genes in DCs and identified Acvrl1, a type I TGF-β superfamily receptor, as a gene strongly induced by Irf8 expression. Among various DC subtypes, Acvrl1 is differentially expressed in CD8α(+) DCs. ACVRL1 signaling augmented Irf8-directed classical CD8α(+) DC development. Irf8 expression is essential for plasmacytoid DC and CD8α(+) DC development, and this study demonstrates that ACVRL1 signaling plays a pivotal role whereby it suppresses plasmacytoid DC development while enhancing that of CD8α(+) DCs, thus contributing to DC diversity development. PMID:27421479

  18. Involvement of M3 Cholinergic Receptor Signal Transduction Pathway in Regulation of the Expression of Chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1 Genes in Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海; 陈道达; 张景輝; 田原

    2004-01-01

    Whether M3 cholinergic receptor signal transduction pathway is involved in regulation of the activation of NF-κB and the expression of chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1genes in pancreatic acinar cells was investigated. Rat pancreatic acinar cells were isolated, cultured and treated with carbachol, atropine and PDTC in vitro. The MOB-1 and MCP-1 mRNA expression was detected by using RT-PCR. The activation of NF-κB was monitored by using electrophoretic mobility shift assay.The results showed that as compared with control group, M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (103mol/L, 104-4ol/L carbachol) could induce a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in the expression of MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA in pancreatic acinar cells. After treatment with 10 -3mol/L carbachol for 2 h, the expression of MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA was strongest. The activity of NF-κB in pancreatic acinar cells was significantly increased (P<0.01) after treated with M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (10-3 mol/L carbachol) in vitro for 30 min. Either M3 cholinergic receptor antagonist (10-5 mol/L atropine) or NF-κB inhibitor (10-2 mol/L PDTC) could obviously inhibit the activation of NF-κB and the chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA expression induced by carbachol (P <0.05). This inhibitory effect was significantly increased by atropine plus PDTC (P<0.01). The results of these studies indicated that M3 cholinergic receptor signal transduction pathway was likely involved in regulation of the expression of chemokine MOB-1 and MCP-1genes in pancreatic acinar cells in vitro through the activation of NF-κB.

  19. AMPKα1: A glucose sensor that controls CD8 T-cell memory

    OpenAIRE

    Finlay, David

    2013-01-01

    The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated by antigen receptor signals and energy stress in T cells. In many cell types, AMPK can maintain energy homeostasis and can enforce quiescence to limit energy demands. We consequently evaluated the importance of AMPK for controlling the transition of metabolically active effector CD8 T lymphocytes to the metabolically quiescent catabolic memory T cells during the contraction phase of the immune response. We show that AMPK...

  20. CCR9 Is Not Required for the Homing of Pro-inflammatory Effector T cells, but Is Crucial for Recruitment and Expansion of FoxP3+ CD8+ Tregs in the Small Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Casado, Cristina; Joeris, Thorsten; Holmkvist, Petra;

    Chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) is required for the homeostatic recruitment of T cells to the mucosa of the small intestine. Accordingly, CCR9 has been suggested as a potential target to inhibit the recruitment of proinflammatory effector T cells (Teff) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Since...... the contribution of CCR9 to the recruitment of Teff in inflammation is not entirely clear, we aimed to address this question using IFABPtOva mice. These mice express Ovalbumin (Ova) specifically in small intestinal epithelial cells, which allows triggering of acute inflammation following transfer of Ova......-specific CD8+ T cells (OT-I cells) and adjuvant treatment. Strikingly, intestinal inflammation in IFABP-tOva mice could also be triggered following transfer of CCR9-deficient OT-I cells, demonstrating that CCR9 is not required for homing of Teff cells. Interestingly, OTI cells transferred to IFABP-tOva mice...

  1. Relation of circulating concentrations of chemokine receptor CCR5 ligands to C-peptide, proinsulin and HbA1c and disease progression in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C.; Kaas, A.; Hansen, L.;

    2008-01-01

    Th1 related chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 and Th2 related CCL4 as ligands of the receptor CCR5 contribute to disease development in animal models of type 1 diabetes. In humans, no data are available addressing the role of these chemokines regarding disease progression and remission. We investigated...... longitudinally circulating concentrations of CCR5 ligands of 256 newly diagnosed patients with type 1 diabetes. CCR5 ligands were differentially associated with beta-cell function and clinical remission. CCL5 was decreased in remitters and positively associated with HbA1c suggestive of a Th1 associated...... of CCR5 by therapeutic agents such as maraviroc may provide a new therapeutic target to ameliorate disease progression in type 1 diabetes. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  2. Chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma patients increases the risk of bone metastases and poor survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ying

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chemokine and bone marrow-homing receptor CXCR4 is implicated in metastases of various cancers. This study was conducted to analyze the association of CXCR4 expression with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC bone metastasis and patient survival. Methods Tumor tissue from HCC patients with (n = 43 and without (n = 138 bone metastasis was subjected to immunohistochemical staining for CXCR4 using tissue microarrays. Immunoreactivity was evaluated semi-quantitatively. A receiver-operating characteristic-based approach and logistical regression analysis were used to determine the predictive value of clinicopathologic factors, including CXCR4 expression, in bone metastasis. Patient survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Results CXCR4 overexpression was detected in 34 of 43 (79.1% patients with bone metastases and in 57 of 138 (41.3% without bone metastases. CXCR4 expression correlated with (correlation coefficient: 0.551, P predictive of HCC bone metastases (AUC: 0.689; 95%CI: 0.601 – 0.776; P . CXCR4 staining intensity correlated with the bone metastasis-free survival (correlation coefficient: -0.359; P = 0.018. CXCR4 overexpression in primary tumors (n = 91 decreased overall median survival (18.0 months vs. 36.0 months, P 0.001. Multivariable analysis identified CXCR4 as a strong, independent risk factor for reduced disease-free survival (relative risk [RR]: 5.440; P = 0.023 and overall survival (RR: 7.082; P = 0.001. Conclusion CXCR4 expression in primary HCCs may be an independent risk factor for bone metastasis and may be associated with poor clinical outcome.

  3. Effect of chemokine receptor CXCR4 on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hales Charles A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CXCR4 is the receptor for chemokine CXCL12 and reportedly plays an important role in systemic vascular repair and remodeling, but the role of CXCR4 in development of pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling has not been fully understood. Methods In this study we investigated the role of CXCR4 in the development of pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling by using a CXCR4 inhibitor AMD3100 and by electroporation of CXCR4 shRNA into bone marrow cells and then transplantation of the bone marrow cells into rats. Results We found that the CXCR4 inhibitor significantly decreased chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling in rats and, most importantly, we found that the rats that were transplanted with the bone marrow cells electroporated with CXCR4 shRNA had significantly lower mean pulmonary pressure (mPAP, ratio of right ventricular weight to left ventricular plus septal weight (RV/(LV+S and wall thickness of pulmonary artery induced by chronic hypoxia as compared with control rats. Conclusions The hypothesis that CXCR4 is critical in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats has been demonstrated. The present study not only has shown an inhibitory effect caused by systemic inhibition of CXCR4 activity on pulmonary hypertension, but more importantly also has revealed that specific inhibition of the CXCR4 in bone marrow cells can reduce pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling via decreasing bone marrow derived cell recruitment to the lung in hypoxia. This study suggests a novel therapeutic approach for pulmonary hypertension by inhibiting bone marrow derived cell recruitment.

  4. Prognostic value of the expression of C-Chemokine Receptor 6 and 7 and their ligands in non-metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are major actors of leukocytes trafficking and some have been shown to play an important role in cancer metastasis. Chemokines CCL19, CCL20 and CCL21 and their receptors CCR6 and CCR7, were assessed as potential biomarkers of metastatic dissemination in primary breast cancer. Biomarker expression levels were evaluated using immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissue sections of breast cancer (n = 207). CCR6 was expressed by tumor cells in 35% of cases. CCR7 was expressed by spindle shaped stromal cells in 43% of cases but not by tumor cells in this series. CCL19 was the only chemokine found expressed in a significant number of breast cancers and was expressed by both tumor cells and dendritic cells (DC). CCR6, CCL19 and CCR7 expression correlated with histologic features of aggressive disease. CCR6 expression was associated with shorter relapse-free survival (RFS) in univariate and but not in multivariate analysis (p = 0.0316 and 0.055 respectively), and was not associated with shorter overall survival (OS). Expression of CCR7 was not significantly associated with shorter RFS or OS. The presence of CCL19-expressing DC was associated with shorter RFS in univariate and multivariate analysis (p = 0.042 and 0.020 respectively) but not with shorter OS. These results suggest a contribution of CCR6 expression on tumor cells and CCL19-expressing DC in breast cancer dissemination. In our series, unlike what was previously published, CCR7 was exclusively expressed on stromal cells and was not associated with survival

  5. Genome-wide association replicates the association of Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) polymorphisms with serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels in Hispanic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voruganti, V Saroja; Laston, Sandra; Haack, Karin; Mehta, Nitesh R; Smith, C Wayne; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low inflammatory state characterized by elevated levels of chemokines. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a member of the cysteine-cysteine (CC) chemokine family and is increased in obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify loci regulating serum MCP-1 in obese Hispanic children from the Viva La Familia Study. A genome-wide association (GWA) analysis was performed in 815 children, ages 4-19 years, using genotypes assayed with the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad v1.0 BeadChips. All analyses were performed in SOLAR using a linear regression-based test under an additive model of allelic effect, while accounting for the relatedness of family members via a kinship variance component. The strongest association for MCP-1 levels was found with a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs12075, resulting in an amino acid substitution (Asp42Gly) in the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) gene product (minor allele frequency=43.6%, p=1.3 × 10(-21)) on chromosome 1. Four other DARC SNPs were also significantly associated with MCP-1 levels (p<10(-16)-10(-6)). The Asp42Gly variant was associated with higher levels of MCP-1 and accounted for approximately 10% of its variability. In addition, MCP-1 levels were significantly associated with SNPs in chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) and caspase recruitment domain family, member 9 (CARD9). In summary, the association of the DARC Asp42Gly variant with MCP-1 levels replicates previous GWA results substantiating a potential role for DARC in the regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:23017229

  6. Mast-Cell-Derived TNF Amplifies CD8+ Dendritic Cell Functionality and CD8+ T Cell Priming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dudeck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are critical promoters of adaptive immunity in the contact hypersensitivity model, but the mechanism of allergen sensitization is poorly understood. Using Mcpt5-CreTNFFL/FL mice, we show here that the absence of TNF exclusively in mast cells impaired the expansion of CD8+ T cells upon sensitization and the T-cell-driven adaptive immune response to elicitation. T cells primed in the absence of mast cell TNF exhibited a diminished efficiency to transfer sensitization to naive recipients. Specifically, mast cell TNF promotes CD8+ dendritic cell (DC maturation and migration to draining lymph nodes. The peripherally released mast cell TNF further critically boosts the CD8+ T-cell-priming efficiency of CD8+ DCs, thereby linking mast cell effects on T cells to DC modulation. Collectively, our findings identify the distinct potential of mast cell TNF to amplify CD8+ DC functionality and CD8+ T-cell-dominated adaptive immunity, which may be of great importance for immunotherapy and vaccination approaches.

  7. Phenotypic and Functional Analysis of LCMV gp33-41-Specific CD8 T Cells Elicited by Multiple Peptide Immunization in Mice Revealed the Up-regulation of PD-1 Expression on Antigen Specific CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Liu; Lihui Xu; Yiqun Jiang; Jianfang Sun; Xianhui He

    2007-01-01

    The phenotype and function of antigen-specific CD8 T cells are closely associated with the efficacy of a therapeutic vaccination. Here we showed that multiple immunizations with LCMV gp33-41 peptide (KAV) in Freund's adjuvant could induce KAV-specific CD8 T cells with low expression of CD127 and CD62L molecules. The inhibitory receptor PD-1 was also expressed on a substantial part of KAV-specific CD8 T cells, and its expression level on KAV-specific CD8 T cells in spleen and lymph nodes was much higher when compared to those in peripheral blood. Furthermore, KAV-specific CD8 T cells could specifically kill KAV-pulsed target cells in vivo but the efficiency was low. These data suggest that prime-boost vaccination schedule with peptide in Freund's adjuvant can elicit antigen-specific CD8 T cells of effector-like phenotype with partial functional exhaustion, which may only provide short-term protection against the pathogen.

  8. A surface membrane protein of Entamoeba histolytica functions as a receptor for human chemokine IL-8: its role in the attraction of trophozoites to inflammation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Valencia, J Daniel; Pérez-Yépez, Eloy Andrés; Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge Tonatiuh; Franco, Elizabeth; Meza, Isaura

    2015-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites respond to the presence of IL-8, moving by chemotaxis towards the source of the chemokine. IL-8 binds to the trophozoite membrane and triggers a response that activates signaling pathways that in turn regulate actin/myosin cytoskeleton organisation to initiate migration towards the chemokine, suggesting the presence of a receptor for IL-8 in the parasite. Antibodies directed to the human IL-8 receptor (CXCR1) specifically recognised a 29 kDa protein in trophozoite membrane fractions. The same protein was immunoprecipitated by this antibody from total amebic extracts. Peptide analysis of the immunoprecipitated protein revealed a sequence with high homology to a previously identified amebic outer membrane peroxiredoxin and a motif within the third loop of human CXCR1, which is an important site for IL-8 binding and activation of signaling processes. Immunodetection assays demonstrated that the anti-human CXCR1 antibody binds to the 29 kDa protein in a different but close site to where IL-8 binds to the trophozoite surface membrane, suggesting that human and amebic receptors for this chemokine share common epitopes. In the context of the human intestinal environment, a receptor for IL-8 could be a great advantage for E. histolytica trophozoite survival, as they could reach an inflammatory milieu containing abundant nutrients. In addition, it has been suggested that the high content of accessible thiol groups of the protein and its peroxidase activity could provide protection in the oxygen rich milieu of colonic lesions, allowing trophozoite invasion of other tissues and escape from the host immune response.

  9. Apoptosis in human germinal centre B cells by means of CC chemokine receptor 3 expression induced by interleukin-2 and interleukin-4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiu-ping; XIE Luo-kun; ZHANG Li-jun; TAN Jin-quan

    2005-01-01

    Background CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), expressed on some inflammatory cells, is a member of the chemokine receptor family. Its ligand is eotaxin/CCL11. In this research, we studied the expression and function of CCR3 induced by interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) on human germinal centre (GC) B cells.Methods Cells isolated from human tonsils were stimulated with IL-2 or/and IL-4 followed by bonding with eotaxin/CCL11. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CCR3 on GC B cells and apoptosis of GC B cells. Real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot assays were used to analyse the CCR3 mRNA expressed in the GC B cells. Chemotaxis and adhesion assays were used to determine the effect of eotaxin/CCL11 ligand bonded to CCR3 on GC B cells.Results There was no CCR3 expression on human freshly isolated GC B cells. The combination IL-2 and IL-4 could upregulate CCR3 mRNA and protein expression on GC B cells. Eotaxin could not induce GC B cell chemotaxis and adhesion but triggered apoptosis of GC B cells.Conclusion IL-2 and IL-4 together induced expression of CCR3 on GC B cells, and the receptor acted as a death receptor.

  10. Immediate dysfunction of vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cells primed in the absence of CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Larocca, Rafael A.; Aid, Malika; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Borducchi, Erica N.; Yates, Kathleen B.; Abbink, Peter; Kirilova, Marinela; Ng’ang’a, David; Bramson, Jonathan; Haining, W. Nicholas; Barouch, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cell help is critical for optimal CD8+ T cell memory differentiation and maintenance in many experimental systems. Additionally, many reports have identified reduced primary CD8+ T cell responses in the absence of CD4+ T cell help, which often coincides with reduced antigen or pathogen clearance. Here we demonstrate that absence of CD4+ T cells at the time of adenovirus vector immunization of mice led to immediate impairments in early CD8+ T cell functionality and differentiation. Unhelped CD8+ T cells exhibited a reduced effector phenotype, decreased ex vivo cytotoxicity, and decreased capacity to produce cytokines. This dysfunctional state was imprinted within 3 days of immunization. Unhelped CD8+ T cells expressed elevated levels of inhibitory receptors and exhibited transcriptomic exhaustion and anergy profiles by gene set enrichment analysis. Dysfunctional, impaired effector differentiation also occurred following immunization of CD4+ T cell-deficient mice with a poxvirus vector. This study demonstrates that following priming with viral vectors, CD4+ T cell help is required to promote both the expansion and acquisition of effector functions by CD8+ T cells, which is accomplished by preventing immediate dysfunction. PMID:27448585

  11. T-bet and Eomes Are Differentially Linked to the Exhausted Phenotype of CD8+T Cells in HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggert, Marcus; Tauriainen, Johanna; Yamamoto, Takuya;

    2014-01-01

    CD8+ T cell exhaustion represents a major hallmark of chronic HIV infection. Two key transcription factors governing CD8+ T cell differentiation, T-bet and Eomesodermin (Eomes), have previously been shown in mice to differentially regulate T cell exhaustion in part through direct modulation of PD...... to an inverse expression balance between T-bet and Eomes, which is not reversed despite long-term viral control through ART. These results aid to explain the inability of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells to control the viral replication post-ART cessation.......CD8+ T cell exhaustion represents a major hallmark of chronic HIV infection. Two key transcription factors governing CD8+ T cell differentiation, T-bet and Eomesodermin (Eomes), have previously been shown in mice to differentially regulate T cell exhaustion in part through direct modulation of PD-1....... Here, we examined the relationship between these transcription factors and the expression of several inhibitory receptors (PD-1, CD160, and 2B4), functional characteristics and memory differentiation of CD8+ T cells in chronic and treated HIV infection. The expression of PD-1, CD160, and 2B4 on total...

  12. Blimp-1-mediated CD4 T cell exhaustion causes CD8 T cell dysfunction during chronic toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, SuJin; Cobb, Dustin A; Bhadra, Rajarshi; Youngblood, Ben; Khan, Imtiaz A

    2016-08-22

    CD8, but not CD4, T cells are considered critical for control of chronic toxoplasmosis. Although CD8 exhaustion has been previously reported in Toxoplasma encephalitis (TE)-susceptible model, our current work demonstrates that CD4 not only become exhausted during chronic toxoplasmosis but this dysfunction is more pronounced than CD8 T cells. Exhausted CD4 population expressed elevated levels of multiple inhibitory receptors concomitant with the reduced functionality and up-regulation of Blimp-1, a transcription factor. Our data demonstrates for the first time that Blimp-1 is a critical regulator for CD4 T cell exhaustion especially in the CD4 central memory cell subset. Using a tamoxifen-dependent conditional Blimp-1 knockout mixed bone marrow chimera as well as an adoptive transfer approach, we show that CD4 T cell-intrinsic deletion of Blimp-1 reversed CD8 T cell dysfunction and resulted in improved pathogen control. To the best of our knowledge, this is a novel finding, which demonstrates the role of Blimp-1 as a critical regulator of CD4 dysfunction and links it to the CD8 T cell dysfunctionality observed in infected mice. The critical role of CD4-intrinsic Blimp-1 expression in mediating CD4 and CD8 T cell exhaustion may provide a rational basis for designing novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27481131

  13. CD8α dendritic cells drive establishment of HSV-1 latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Mott

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that CD8 T cells play the key role to maintain HSV-1 latency in trigeminal ganglia of ocularly infected mice. Yet, comparably little is known about the role of innate immunity in establishment of viral latency. In the current study, we investigated whether CD8α DCs impact HSV-1 latency by examining latency in the trigeminal ganglia (TG of wild-type (WT C57BL/6 versus CD8α-/- (lack functional CD8 T cells and CD8α+ DCs, CD8β-/- (have functional CD8α+ T cells and CD8α+ DCs, and β2m-/- (lack functional CD8 T cells but have CD8α+ DCs mice as well as BXH2 (have functional CD8 T cells but lack CD8α+ DCs versus WT C3H (have functional CD8α T cells and CD8α+ DCs mice. We also determined whether the phenotype of CD8α-/- and BXH2 mice could be restored to that of WT mice by adoptive transfer of WT CD8+ T cells or bone marrow (BM derived CD8α+ DCs. Our results clearly demonstrate that CD8α DCs, rather than CD8 T cells, are responsible for enhanced viral latency and recurrences.

  14. CD8-positive mycosis fungoides masquerading as pyoderma gangrenosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitrayee Saha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycosis fungoides (MF, a primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, accounts for <1% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The diagnosis of classic MF is based on a constellation of typical clinical presentation, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and T-cell monoclonality detected by molecular studies. Rarely, atypical clinical presentation may occur. The typical immunohistochemical phenotype is, CD2 +ve, CD3 +ve, CD5 +ve, CD4 +ve, and CD8 − ve. Here, we report a rare case of CD8 +ve MF in a 43-year-male patient who was clinically diagnosed as pyoderma gangrenosum initially. The atypical presentation and rarity of such case have prompted this report.

  15. CD8-positive Mycosis Fungoides Masquerading as Pyoderma Gangrenosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Maitrayee; Jain, Bhawna Bhutoria; Chattopadhyay, Sarbani; Podder, Indrashis

    2016-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF), a primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, accounts for <1% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The diagnosis of classic MF is based on a constellation of typical clinical presentation, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and T-cell monoclonality detected by molecular studies. Rarely, atypical clinical presentation may occur. The typical immunohistochemical phenotype is, CD2 +ve, CD3 +ve, CD5 +ve, CD4 +ve, and CD8 - ve. Here, we report a rare case of CD8 +ve MF in a 43-year-male patient who was clinically diagnosed as pyoderma gangrenosum initially. The atypical presentation and rarity of such case have prompted this report.

  16. Expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor types 1/2 in patients with gastric carcinoma: Clinicopathological correlations and significance

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, JUN PU; HU, WAN MING; WANG, KUAN SONG; Yu, Jun; LUO, BAI HUA; Wu, Chang; CHEN, ZHI HONG; LUO, GENG QIU; LIU, YU WU; LIU, QIN LAI; Xiao, Yan; ZHOU, HAI YAN; YANG, XIAO JING; JIANG, HAI YING; LI, JING HE

    2012-01-01

    C-X-C chemokine receptor types 1/2 (CXCR1/2) may play multiple roles in the development and progression of a number of types of tumor. The abnormal expression of CXCR1/2 in various types of malignant tumors has been reported, but less is known with regard to gastric carcinoma. The present study was preliminarily conducted to elucidate the correlation between clinicopathological factors and the immunohistochemical expression of CXCR1/2 in patients with gastric carcinoma. The expression of CXCR...

  17. Triplex targeting of a native gene in permeabilized intact cells: covalent modification of the gene for the chemokine receptor CCR5.

    OpenAIRE

    Belousov, E S; Afonina, I A; Kutyavin, I V; Gall, A A; Reed, M W; Gamper, H B; Wydro, R M; Meyer, R. B.

    1998-01-01

    A 12 nucleotide oligodeoxyribopurine tract in the gene for the chemokine receptor CCR5 has been targeted and covalently modified in intact cells by a 12mer triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO) bearing a reactive group. A nitrogen mustard placed on the 5'-end of the purine motif TFO modified a guanine on the DNA target with high efficiency and selectivity. A new use of a guanine analog in these TFOs significantly enhanced triplex formation and efficiency of modification, as did the use of the...

  18. Multiscale Modeling of the Early CD8 T-Cell Immune Response in Lymph Nodes: An Integrative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiris A. Prokopiou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available CD8 T-cells are critical  in controlling infection by intracellular  pathogens. Upon encountering antigen presenting cells, T-cell receptor activation promotes the differentiation of naïve CD8 T-cells into strongly proliferating  activated and effector stages. We propose a 2D-multiscale computational model to study the maturation of CD8 T-cells in a lymph node controlled by their molecular profile. A novel molecular pathway is presented and converted into an ordinary differential  equation model, coupled with a cellular Potts model to describe cell-cell interactions. Key molecular  players such as activated IL2 receptor and Tbet levels  control the differentiation  from naïve into activated and effector stages, respectively,  while caspases and Fas-Fas ligand interactions control cell apoptosis.  Coupling  this molecular model to the cellular scale successfully  reproduces  qualitatively the evolution of total CD8 T-cell counts observed in mice lymph node, between Day 3 and 5.5 post-infection. Furthermore, this model allows us to make testable predictions  of the evolution of the different CD8 T-cell stages.

  19. Molecular aspects, genomic arrangement and immune responsive mRNA expression profiles of two CXC chemokine receptor homologs (CXCR1 and CXCR2) from rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Wan, Qiang; Revathy, Kasthuri Saranya; Whang, Ilson; Noh, Jae Koo; Kim, Seokryel; Park, Myoung-Ae; Lee, Jehee

    2014-09-01

    The CXCR1 and CXCR2 are the prototypical receptors and are the only known receptors for mammalian ELR+ (Glu-Leu-Arg) CXC chemokines, including CXCL8 (interleukin 8). These receptors transduce the ELR+ chemokine signals and operate the downstream signaling pathways in inflammation and innate immunity. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of CXCR1 and CXCR2 genes from rock bream fish (OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2) at the molecular level. The cDNA and genomic DNA sequences of the OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2 were identified from a transcriptome library and a custom-constructed BAC library, respectively. Both OfCXCR genes consisted of two exons, separated by an intron. The 5'-flanking regions of OfCXCR genes possessed multiple putative transcription factor binding sites related to immune response. The coding sequences of OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2 encoded putative peptides of 355 and 360 amino acids (aa), respectively. The deduced aa sequences of OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2 comprised of a G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) family 1 profile with a GPCR signature and a DRY motif. In addition, seven conserved transmembrane regions were predicted in both OfCXCRs. While our multiple alignment study revealed the functionally significant conserved elements of the OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2, phylogeny analyses further confirmed their position in teleost sub clade, in which they manifested an evolutionary relatedness with other fish counterparts. Based on comparative analyses, teleost CXC chemokine receptors appear to be distinct from their non-fish orthologs in terms of evolution (both CXCR1 and CXCR2) and genomic organization (CXCR2). Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) detected the transcripts of OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2 in eleven examined tissues, with higher levels in head kidney, kidney and spleen highlighting their crucial importance in immunity. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) with concanavalin A (Con A) resulted in modulation of OfCXCR2 transcription, but not

  20. Multi-scale modeling of the CD8 immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarroux, Loic; Michel, Philippe; Adimy, Mostafa; Crauste, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    During the primary CD8 T-Cell immune response to an intracellular pathogen, CD8 T-Cells undergo exponential proliferation and continuous differentiation, acquiring cytotoxic capabilities to address the infection and memorize the corresponding antigen. After cleaning the organism, the only CD8 T-Cells left are antigen-specific memory cells whose role is to respond stronger and faster in case they are presented this very same antigen again. That is how vaccines work: a small quantity of a weakened pathogen is introduced in the organism to trigger the primary response, generating corresponding memory cells in the process, giving the organism a way to defend himself in case it encounters the same pathogen again. To investigate this process, we propose a non linear, multi-scale mathematical model of the CD8 T-Cells immune response due to vaccination using a maturity structured partial differential equation. At the intracellular scale, the level of expression of key proteins is modeled by a delay differential equation system, which gives the speeds of maturation for each cell. The population of cells is modeled by a maturity structured equation whose speeds are given by the intracellular model. We focus here on building the model, as well as its asymptotic study. Finally, we display numerical simulations showing the model can reproduce the biological dynamics of the cell population for both the primary response and the secondary responses.

  1. Adoptive immunotherapy via CD4+ versus CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Phan-Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of cancer immunotherapy is to induce specific and durable antitumor immunity. Adoptive T cell therapy (ACT has garnered wide interest, particularly in regard to strategies to improve T cell efficacy in trials. There are many types of T cells (and subsets which can be selected for use in ACT. CD4+ T cells are critical for the regulation, activation and aid of host defense mechanisms and, importantly, for enhancing the function of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. To date, much research in cancer immunotherapy has focused on CD8+ T cells, in melanoma and other cancers. Both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells have been evaluated as ACT in mice and humans, and both are effective at eliciting antitumor responses. IL-17 producing CD4+ T cells are a new subset of CD4+ T cells to be evaluated in ACT models. This review discusses the benefits of adoptive immunotherapy mediated by CD8+ and CD4+ cells. It also discusses the various type of T cells, source of T cells, and ex vivo cytokine growth factors for augmenting clinical efficacy of ACT. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(4.000: 588-595

  2. Roles of Chemokines in Thymopoiesis: Redundancy and Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenxian Fu; Weifeng Chen

    2004-01-01

    Thymus is the primary lymphoid organ involved in the development of thymocytes. Maturation related events of thymocytes within thymus, especially the widely discussed directional migration of thymocytes, is regulated by chemokines via chemokine receptors mediated signaling pathway. Multiple types of chemokines and chemokine receptors, as components of the network-interaction within thymic microenvironment, are involved in the thymopoiesis. It appears that these chemokines are functionally redundant and such phenomenon may be explained not only by the promiscuous, non-one-to-one matching between ligands-receptors within CXC or CC chemokine subfamily, but also by the various spatio-temporal expression patterns within different cell types and developmental stages. The redundancy and regulation of thymus expressed chemokines and chemokine receptors during thymocyte development are herein discussed.

  3. Roles of Chemokines in Thymopoiesis: Redundancy and Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenxianFu; WeifengChen

    2004-01-01

    Thymus is the primary lymphoid organ involved in the development of thymocytes. Maturation related events of thymocytes within thymus, especially the widely discussed directional migration of thymocytes, is regulated by chemokines via chemokine receptors mediated signaling pathway. Multiple types of chemokines and chemokine receptors, as components of the network-interaction within thymic microenvironment, are involved in the thymopoiesis. It appears that these chemokines are functionally redundant and such phenomenon may be explained not only by the promiscuous, non-one-to-one matching between ligands-receptors within CXC or CC chemokine subfamily, but also by the various spatio-temporal expression patterns within different cell types and developmental stages. The redundancy and regulation of thymus expressed chemokines and chemokine receptors during thymocyte development are herein discussed. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  4. Chemokine Systems Link Obesity to Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuguhito Ota

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a state of chronic low-grade systemic inflammation. This chronic inflammation is deeply involved in insulin resistance, which is the underlying condition of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. A significant advance in our understanding of obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance has been recognition of the critical role of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs. Chemokines are small proteins that direct the trafficking of immune cells to sites of inflammation. In addition, chemokines activate the production and secretion of inflammatory cytokines through specific G protein-coupled receptors. ATM accumulation through C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 and its ligand monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is considered pivotal in the development of insulin resistance. However, chemokine systems appear to exhibit a high degree of functional redundancy. Currently, more than 50 chemokines and 18 chemokine receptors exhibiting various physiological and pathological properties have been discovered. Therefore, additional, unidentified chemokine/chemokine receptor pathways that may play significant roles in ATM recruitment and insulin sensitivity remain to be fully identified. This review focuses on some of the latest findings on chemokine systems linking obesity to inflammation and subsequent development of insulin resistance.

  5. The Role of Chemokines in Breast Cancer Pathology and Its Possible Use as Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Isabel Palacios-Arreola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are small proteins that primarily regulate the traffic of leukocytes under homeostatic conditions and during specific immune responses. The chemokine-chemokine receptor system comprises almost 50 chemokines and approximately 20 chemokine receptors; thus, there is no unique ligand for each receptor and the binding of different chemokines to the same receptor might have disparate effects. Complicating the system further, these effects depend on the cellular milieu. In cancer, although chemokines are associated primarily with the generation of a protumoral microenvironment and organ-directed metastasis, they also mediate other phenomena related to disease progression, such as angiogenesis and even chemoresistance. Therefore, the chemokine system is becoming a target in cancer therapeutics. We review the emerging data and correlations between chemokines/chemokine receptors and breast cancer, their implications in cancer progression, and possible therapeutic strategies that exploit the chemokine system.

  6. Different-Sized Gold Nanoparticle Activator/Antigen Increases Dendritic Cells Accumulation in Liver-Draining Lymph Nodes and CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Zhang, Yulong; Du, Juan; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Yong; Fu, Qiuxia; Zhang, Jingang; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhan, Linsheng

    2016-02-23

    The lack of efficient antigen and activator delivery systems, as well as the restricted migration of dendritic cells (DCs) to secondary lymph organs, dramatically limits DC-based adoptive immunotherapy. We selected two spherical gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based vehicles of optimal size for activator and antigen delivery. Their combination (termed the NanoAu-Cocktail) was associated with the dual targeting of CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) and an OVA peptide (OVAp) to DC subcellular compartments, inducing enhanced antigen cross-presentation, upregulated expression of costimulatory molecules and elevated secretion of T helper1 cytokines. We demonstrated that the intravenously transfused NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs showed dramatically improved in vivo homing ability to lymphoid tissues and were settled in T cell area. Especially, by tissue-distribution analysis, we found that more than 60% of lymphoid tissues-homing DCs accumulated in liver-draining lymph nodes (LLNs). The improved homing ability of NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs was associated with the high expression of chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) and rearrangement of the cytoskeletons. In addition, by antigen-specific tetramers detection, NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs were proved able to elicit strong antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, which provided enhanced protection from viral invasions. This study highlights the importance of codelivering antigen/adjuvant using different sized gold nanoparticles to improve DC homing and therapy. PMID:26771692

  7. Programming tumor-reactive effector memory CD8+ T cells in vitro obviates the requirement for in vivo vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Yu, Zhiya; Hwang, Leroy N.; Douglas C Palmer; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2009-01-01

    Naive and memory CD8+ T cells can undergo programmed activation and expansion in response to a short T-cell receptor stimulus, but the extent to which in vitro programming can qualitatively substitute for an in vivo antigen stimulation remains unknown. We show that self-/tumor-reactive effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM) programmed in vitro either with peptide-pulsed antigen-presenting cells or plate-bound anti-CD3/anti-CD28 embark on a highly stereotyped response of in vivo clonal expansion a...

  8. 4-1BB signaling breaks the tolerance of maternal CD8+ T cells that are reactive with alloantigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang H Kim

    Full Text Available 4-1BB (CD137, TNFRSF9, a member of the activation-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family, is a powerful T-cell costimulatory molecule. It generally enhances CD8(+ T responses and even breaks the tolerance of CD8(+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. In the present study we found that it was expressed in the placentas of pregnant mice and that its expression coincided with that of the immunesuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO. Therefore, we investigated whether 4-1BB signaling is involved in fetal rejection using agonistic anti-4-1BB mAb and 4-1BB-deficient mice. Treatment with agonistic anti-4-1BB mAb markedly increased the rate of rejection of allogeneic but not syngeneic fetuses, and this was primarily dependent on CD8(+ T cells. Complement component 3 (C3 seemed to be the effector molecule because 4-1BB triggering resulting in accumulation of C3 in the placenta, and this accumulation was also reversed by anti-CD8 mAb treatment. These findings demonstrate that 4-1BB triggering breaks the tolerance of CD8(+ T cells to alloantigens in the placenta. Moreover, triggering 4-1BB protected the pregnant mice from Listeria monocytogenes (LM infection, but led to rejection of semi-allogeneic fetuses. Therefore, given the cross-recognition of alloantigen by pathogen-reactive CD8(+ T cells, the true function of 4-1BB may be to reverse the hypo-responsiveness of pathogen-reactive CD8(+ T cells in the placenta in cases of infection, even if that risks losing the fetus.

  9. T Cell Help Amplifies Innate Signals in CD8+ DCs for Optimal CD8+ T Cell Priming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Greyer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DCs often require stimulation from CD4+ T cells to propagate CD8+ T cell responses, but precisely how T cell help optimizes the priming capacity of DCs and why this appears to differ between varying types of CD8+ T cell immunity remains unclear. We show that CD8+ T cell priming upon HSV-1 skin infection depended on DCs receiving stimulation from both IFN-α/β and CD4+ T cells to provide IL-15. This was not an additive effect but resulted from CD4+ T cells amplifying DC production of IL-15 in response to IFN-α/β. We also observed that increased innate stimulation reversed the helper dependence of CD8+ T cell priming and that the innate stimulus, rather than the CD4+ T cells themselves, determined how “help’” was integrated into the priming response by DCs. These findings identify T cell help as a flexible means to amplify varying suboptimal innate signals in DCs.

  10. TCR affinity for thymoproteasome-dependent positively selecting peptides conditions antigen responsiveness in CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Kensuke; Van Laethem, Francois; Xing, Yan; Akane, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji; Jameson, Stephen C; Singer, Alfred; Takahama, Yousuke

    2015-10-01

    In the thymus, low-affinity T cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement facilitates positive selection of a useful T cell repertoire. Here we report that TCR responsiveness of mature CD8(+) T cells is fine tuned by their affinity for positively selecting peptides in the thymus and that optimal TCR responsiveness requires positive selection on major histocompatibility complex class I-associated peptides produced by the thymoproteasome, which is specifically expressed in the thymic cortical epithelium. Thymoproteasome-independent positive selection of monoclonal CD8(+) T cells results in aberrant TCR responsiveness, homeostatic maintenance and immune responses to infection. These results demonstrate a novel aspect of positive selection, in which TCR affinity for positively selecting peptides produced by thymic epithelium determines the subsequent antigen responsiveness of mature CD8(+) T cells in the periphery.

  11. In vivo proliferation of naïve and memory influenza-specific CD8(+) T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flynn, K J; Riberdy, J M; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard;

    1999-01-01

    days. The greatly expanded population of CD8(+)NPP(+) memory T cells in the lymphoid tissue of secondarily challenged mice declines progressively in mean prevalence over the ensuing 100 days, despite the fact that at least some of these lymphocytes continue to cycle. The recall of cell......The virus-specific CD8(+) T cell response has been analyzed through the development, effector, and recovery phases of primary and secondary influenza pneumonia. Apparently, most, if not all, memory T cells expressing clonotypic receptors that bind a tetrameric complex of influenza nucleoprotein (NP......)(366-374) peptide+H-2D(b) (NPP) are induced to divide during the course of this localized respiratory infection. The replicative phase of the recall response ends about the time that virus can no longer be recovered from the lung, whereas some primary CD8(+)NPP(+) T cells may proliferate for a few more...

  12. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, C. Preston; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dietze, Kirsten K.; Werner, Tanja; Liu, Jia; Chen, Lieping; Lang, Karl S.; Palmer, Brent E.; Dittmer, Ulf; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL) efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV) or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells. PMID:26484769

  13. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilseyar Akhmetzyanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells.

  14. Molecular analysis of tumor-promoting CD8+ T cells in two-stage cutaneous chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Bernice Y; Roberts, Scott J; Silberzahn, Tobias; Filler, Renata B; Neustadter, Jason H; Galan, Anjela; Reddy, Swapna; Lin, William M; Ellis, Peter D; Langford, Cordelia F; Hayday, Adrian C; Girardi, Michael

    2010-06-01

    T-pro are tumor-infiltrating TCRalphabeta(+)CD8(+) cells of reduced cytotoxic potential that promote experimental two-stage chemical cutaneous carcinogenesis. Toward understanding their mechanism of action, this study uses whole-genome expression analysis to compare T-pro with systemic CD8(+) T cells from multiple groups of tumor-bearing mice. T-pro show an overt T helper 17-like profile (high retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-(ROR)gammat, IL-17A, IL-17F; low T-bet and eomesodermin), regulatory potential (high FoxP3, IL-10, Tim-3), and transcripts encoding epithelial growth factors (amphiregulin, Gro-1, Gro-2). Tricolor flow cytometry subsequently confirmed the presence of TCRbeta(+) CD8(+) IL-17(+) T cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Moreover, a time-course analysis of independent TIL isolates from papillomas versus carcinomas exposed a clear association of the "T-pro phenotype" with malignant progression. This molecular characterization of T-pro builds a foundation for elucidating the contributions of inflammation to cutaneous carcinogenesis, and may provide useful biomarkers for cancer immunotherapy in which the widely advocated use of tumor-specific CD8(+) cytolytic T cells should perhaps accommodate the cells' potential corruption toward the T-pro phenotype. The data are also likely germane to psoriasis, in which the epidermis may be infiltrated by CD8(+) IL-17-producing T cells.

  15. Therapeutic potential of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes in SLE☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puliaeva, I.; Puliaev, R.; Via, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence supports the idea that following a break in tolerance, CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) may be an important but unrecognized mechanism for limiting expansion of autoreactive B cells. Failure of this mechanism could allow persistence of CD4 T cell driven polyclonal B cell activation resulting in clinical lupus. Although CD8 CTL failure may occur early in disease, work in mice supports the concept that therapeutic CTL enhancement may be both practical and beneficial in lupus. Devising such therapy for humans will first require an understanding of the in vivo mechanisms critical in CTL expansion and down regulation, particularly in the lupus setting which may differ from CTL generation in other clinical settings (e.g. tumors, infections). PMID:18725326

  16. Localization and Expression of CCR3 and CCR5 by Interleukin-1ß in the RIN-5AH Insulin-Producing Model System: A Protective Mechanism Involving Down-Regulation of Chemokine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliadis S

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta has been considered to be an immune effector molecule in insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. As such, we examined its role on chemokine receptors which, when expressed in the pancreas, have also been associated with the development of type I autoimmune diabetes. DESIGN AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of membrane and cytoplasmic levels of CCR3 and CCR5 expression is assessed by immunofluorescence in control and interleukin-1beta-treated RIN-5AH cells. The cytoplasmic expression is also shown by confocal microscopy as assessed by the brightness of the cells whereas enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detects secreted CCR3 and CCR5 molecules by comparing optical density values as these derive from the control and the treated cells. Cell-fractionation experiments show the exact location of the intracellular pools of the chemokine receptors by using the rab7 monoclonal antibody as a guiding molecule. RESULTS: Interleukin-1beta down-regulates constitutively expressed surface CCR3 and CCR5 levels implying receptor internalization for re-utilization or destruction, secretion or both. Cytoplasmic immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy demonstrate cellular retention of chemokine receptors by interleukin-1beta which may be released in the absence of interleukin-1beta as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Finally, cell-fractionation shows the presence of both receptors in endosomes exhibiting an increasing density after interleukin-1beta treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Given the association of chemokine receptors with progression to diabetes, it appears that interleukin-1beta-induced down-regulation of CCR3 and CCR5 promotes a protective mechanism against cellular destruction. The major role of interleukin-1beta is to maintain these molecules within the endosomes. Thus, interleukin-1beta modulates the movement and the expression of constitutively expressed chemokine receptors

  17. Generalized Liver- and Blood-Derived CD8+ T-Cell Impairment in Response to Cytokines in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Burke Schinkel

    Full Text Available Generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and the contribution of liver-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells to the immunopathogenesis of this infection remain poorly understood. It is hypothesized that this impairment is partially due to reduced CD8+ T-cell activity in response to cytokines such as IL-7, particularly within the liver. To investigate this, the phenotype and cytokine responsiveness of blood- and liver-derived CD8+ T-cells from healthy controls and individuals with HCV infection were compared. In blood, IL-7 receptor α (CD127 expression on bulk CD8+ T-cells in HCV infection was no different than controls yet was lower on central memory T-cells, and there were fewer naïve cells. IL-7-induced signalling through phosphorylated STAT5 was lower in HCV infection than in controls, and differed between CD8+ T-cell subsets. Production of Bcl-2 following IL-7 stimulation was also lower in HCV infection and inversely related to the degree of liver fibrosis. In liver-derived CD8+ T-cells, STAT5 activation could not be increased with cytokine stimulation and basal Bcl-2 levels of liver-derived CD8+ T-cells were lower than blood-derived counterparts in HCV infection. Therefore, generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment in HCV infection is characterized, in part, by impaired IL-7-mediated signalling and survival, independent of CD127 expression. This impairment is more pronounced in the liver and may be associated with an increased potential for apoptosis. This generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment represents an important immune dysfunction in chronic HCV infection that may alter patient health.

  18. Distribution, characterization, and induction of CD8+ regulatory T cells and IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Li Jiang; Huang Zhou-Feng; Xiong Geng; Mo Hao-Yuan; Qiu Fang; Mai Hai-Qiang; Chen Qiu-Yan; He Jia; Chen Shu-peng; Zheng Li-Min; Qian Chao-Nan; Zeng Yi-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background CD8+ effector cells often have an antitumor function in patients with cancer. However, CD8+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tcregs) and interleukin (IL)-17-producing CD8+ T cells (Tc17 cells) also derive from the CD8+ T cell lineage. Their role in the antitumor response remains largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the distribution, characterization, and generation of CD8+ Tcregs and Tc17 cells in NPC patients. Methods Peripheral blood and tumor biopsy t...

  19. Polymorphisms of chemokine receptors and its ligand alleles influencing genetic suscepti-bity to HIV-1 infection in eight ethnic groups in Chinese mainland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Limited genetic information is available concerning the polymorphisms of HIV-1 resistant genes in indigenous Chinese populations. The aim of this study is to identify the allelic frequencies of the chemokine and chemokine receptor genes in the Chinese mainland. Genomic DNA samples extracted from whole blood of 2318 subjects were analyzed by using PCR or PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assays, and further confirmed by direct DNA sequencing. Higher frequencies of mutant CCR2-64I (19.15%-28.79%) and SDF1-3'A (19.10%-29.86%) alleles were found in subjects of 8 ethnic groups in the Chi-nese mainland. In contrast, the △32 mutation in CCR5 gene occurs at a very low frequency (0.0016, n=1287) in Han population. A relatively high frequency of CCR5- wt/D32 heterozygotes was observed in Uygurian and Mongolian populations. No △32 mutation allele was detected in Ti-betan and other 4 ethnic groups in Yunnan Province. There was no CCR5-m303 mutation in subjects of any ethnic group in the Chinese mainland. Our results suggest that the CCR5-△32 mutation is not a major resistant factor against HIV-1 infection and disease progression in Han, Tibetan and other ethnic groups in Yunnan Province. Whether higher frequen-cies of CCR2-64I and SDF1-3′A alleles constitute major genetic resistant factors or not remains to be clarified.

  20. The expression and mechanisms of interleukin-17 in CD8+ T cells of mice with cigarette smoke-induced emphysema%肺气肿小鼠肺组织CD8+ IL-17+T细胞变化及作用机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段敏超; 钟小宁; 黄颖; 何志义; 唐海娟

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the expression of Tc17 in a cigarette smoke-induced mice model of emphysema.To explore the probable mechanisms about how Tc17 cells to elevate in lungs of mice.Methods Forty male Balb/c mice were randomly divided into four groups,including control group ( 12 weeks,C12),control group (24 weeks,C24),smoke-exposure group (12 weeks,S12) and smoke-exposure group (24 weeks,S24 ),10 mice each group,Emphysema of mice was observed by HE pigmentation.Morphological changes were evaluated by mean linear intercepts (Lm) and destructive index (DI).The proportion of CD8+ IL-17 + Tc17,CD8+ IL-17 + CC chemokine receptor type 6 ( CCR6 ) + and 6CCR6 + Tc17 cells in lungs of mice was determined by flow cytometry.The mRNA expressions of retinoidrelated orphan nuclear receptor(RORγt) and IL-17 were evaluated by real-time PCR.The levels of IL-1 β,IL-6,IL-23,transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and CC chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) were tested by ELISA.Correlations among these indexes were analyzed.Results Lm and DI were significantly higher in S12 and S24 than in C12 and C24,S24 in particular (t value 4.378-15.188,all P < 0.05).The percentages of Tc17 in S12 and S24[(9.28 ± 1.12)%,( 13.13 ±3.56)%]was significantly increased as compared with that in C12 and C24[(2.40 ±0.60 )%,(2.64 ±0.96 )%],S24 in particular.The mRNA levels of RORγt and IL-17 in S12 and S24 were higher than in C12 and C24,S12 and S24 in particular.There was significant difference (all P <0.05 ).The frequency of Tc17 cells had a positive correlation with Lm and DI ( r value were 0.734 and 0.884 respectively,P < 0.01 ).The percentages of CD8+ IL-17 + CCR6 +T cells and CCR6 + Tc17 were significantly elevated in S12 and S24 compared to C12 and C24,S24 in particular (all P < 0.05 ).There was positive correlation between Tc17 cell ratio and CCL20 levels( r =0.899,P <0.01 ).The levels of IL-1 β,IL-6,IL-23 and TGFβ in S12 and S24 were significantly increased as compared with that in C12 and

  1. In silico analysis reveals sequential interactions and protein conformational changes during the binding of chemokine CXCL-8 to its receptor CXCR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Wen Liou

    Full Text Available Chemokine CXCL-8 plays a central role in human immune response by binding to and activate its cognate receptor CXCR1, a member of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family. The full-length structure of CXCR1 is modeled by combining the structures of previous NMR experiments with those from homology modeling. Molecular docking is performed to search favorable binding sites of monomeric and dimeric CXCL-8 with CXCR1 and a mutated form of it. The receptor-ligand complex is embedded into a lipid bilayer and used in multi ns molecular dynamics (MD simulations. A multi-steps binding mode is proposed: (i the N-loop of CXCL-8 initially binds to the N-terminal domain of receptor CXCR1 driven predominantly by electrostatic interactions; (ii hydrophobic interactions allow the N-terminal Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR motif of CXCL-8 to move closer to the extracellular loops of CXCR1; (iii electrostatic interactions finally dominate the interaction between the N-terminal ELR motif of CXCL-8 and the EC-loops of CXCR1. Mutation of CXCR1 abrogates this mode of binding. The detailed binding process may help to facilitate the discovery of agonists and antagonists for rational drug design.

  2. mRNA Expression of Chemokine Receptors on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Correlation with Clinical Features in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-mei Li; Zhi-qiang Chen; Xu Yao; Ai-zhen Yang; An-sheng Li; Dong-ming Liu; Juan-qin Gong

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expressions of chemokine receptors and interleukin (1L) receptors on the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and their correlations with clinical features as well as SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI).Methods The mRNA expressions of ehemokine receptors and IL receptors on PBMCs of 93 SLE patients and 30 healthy controls were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, including CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCRS, CCR6, CCR8, CXCR3, CXCRS, CX3CR1, XCR1, IL-4R, and IL-10R. The clinical features of SLE patients were recorded. The correlations of chemokine receptors and IL receptors mRNA expressions with clinical features as well as SLEDAI were assayed using linear regression analysis.Results The level of CCR5 mRNA in SLE patients (including active and inactive SLE) was signifi-cantly higher than that in healthy controls (P0.05). CX3CR1 mRNA expression significantly increased from healthy control to inactive SLE to active SLE in sequence. The others (except for CCR8, CXCR3, and IL-10R) in active SLE patients were significantly higher than those in both inactive SLE patients and healthy controls (all P<0.05). There were positive correlations between SLEDAI and CCR2 (r=0.424, t=4.313, P<0.001), CCR3 (r=0.518, t=5.410, P<0.001), CCR4 (r=0.376, t=3.851, P<0.001), CCR6 (r=0.457, t=4.513, P<0.001), CXCR5 (r=0.455, t=4.629, P<0.001), CX3CR1 (r=0.445, t=4.523, P<0.001), as well as XCR1 (r=0.540, t=5.445, P<0.001). And CCR5 mRNA expression level was positively correlated with IL-4R mRNA (r=0.313, t=2.353, P<0.05). The patients with myositis and cutaneous vasculitis simultaneously showed lower levels of CCR5 and CX3CR1, and CCR5 expression was negatively correlated with the scores of SLEDAI in SLE cases accompanied by photosensitivity (r=0.426, t=-2.155, P<0.05).Conclusion Increased expressions of CCR5 and CX3CR1 on PBMCs may be indicators in clinical survey for SLE.

  3. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals binding residues for the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The surface glycoprotein (SU, gp120 of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV must bind to a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4, to invade CD4+ cells. Plasmodium vivax uses the Duffy Binding Protein (DBP to bind the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and invade reticulocytes. Results Variable loop 3 (V3 of HIV-1 SU and domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax DBP share a sequence similarity. The site of amino acid sequence similarity was necessary, but not sufficient, for DARC binding and contained a consensus heparin binding site essential for DARC binding. Both HIV-1 and P. vivax can be blocked from binding to their chemokine receptors by the chemokine, RANTES and its analog AOP-RANTES. Site directed mutagenesis of the heparin binding motif in members of the DBP family, the P. knowlesi alpha, beta and gamma proteins abrogated their binding to erythrocytes. Positively charged residues within domain 1 are required for binding of P. vivax and P. knowlesi erythrocyte binding proteins. Conclusion A heparin binding site motif in members of the DBP family may form part of a conserved erythrocyte receptor binding pocket.

  4. Chemokine Signaling Specificity: Essential Role for the N-Terminal Domain of Chemokine Receptors†

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. Prado, Gregory; Suetomi, Katsutoshi; Shumate, David; Maxwell, Carrie; Ravindran, Aishwarya; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Navarro, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine IL-8 (CXCL8) binds to its cognate receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 to induce inflammatory responses, wound healing, tumorogenesis, and neuronal survival. Here we identify the N-loop residues in IL-8 (H18 and F21) and the receptor N-termini as the major structural determinants regulating the rate of receptor internalization, which in turn controlled the activation profile of ERK1/2, a central component of the receptor/ERK signaling pathway that dictates signal specificity. Our data further support the idea that the chemokine receptor core acts as a plastic scaffold. Thus, the diversity and intensity of inflammatory and noninflammatory responses mediated by chemokine receptors appear to be primarily determined by the initial interaction between the receptor N-terminus and the N-loop of chemokines. PMID:17630697

  5. CD8-dependent CTL require co-engagement of CD8 and the TCR for phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis, but CD8-independent CTL do not and can kill in the absence of phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knall, C; Smith, P A; Potter, T A

    1995-06-01

    Most instances of MHC class I recognition and target cell killing by CD8+ CTL require the involvement of CD8. The role of CD8 in these events may be both for adhesion of the CTL with the APC, as well as for signal transduction through the TCR. The precise mechanism by which CD8 mediates signal transduction remains enigmatic. Similarly, it is unclear whether only the CD8 molecules which bind to the same class I molecule as the TCR contribute to signaling in the T cell responding to antigen. We have investigated the requirement for co-engagement of CD8 and the TCR in the induction of the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) during the interaction of CTL and APC transfected with either wild-type or mutant (CD8 non-binding) class I molecules. Our results show that for conventional CD8-dependent killing co-engagement of both CD8 and the TCR is required to initiate PIP2 hydrolysis. This requirement for co-engagement, however, can be overcome by a high density of ligand, such as that provided by high concentrations of exogenous peptide. In such situations, the binding of CD8 to non-antigenic class I molecules can elicit PIP2 hydrolysis. Therefore, during interactions between CTL and APC, which generally occur at low concentrations of antigenic peptide, triggering of PIP2 hydrolysis requires TCR and CD8 co-engagement, and the binding of CD8 to non-antigenic class I molecules does not contribute significantly to signaling within the T cell.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of CCX282-B, an orally-administered blocker of chemokine receptor CCR9, for patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keshav, Satish; Vaňásek, Tomáš; Niv, Yaron;

    2013-01-01

    CCX282-B, also called vercirnon, is a specific, orally-administered chemokine receptor CCR9 antagonist that regulates migration and activation of inflammatory cells in the intestine. This randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CCX282-B in 436...... patients with Crohn's disease. Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) scores were 250-450 and C-reactive protein >7.5 mg/L at study entry. In addition to stable concomitant Crohn's medication (85% of subjects), subjects received placebo or CCX282-B (250 mg once daily, 250 mg twice daily, or 500 mg once...... this clinical trial led to initiation of Phase 3 clinical trials in Crohn's disease....

  7. Activation of the CXCR3 chemokine receptor through anchoring of a small molecule chelator ligand between TM-III, -IV, and -VI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Andersen, Michael B; Nygaard, Rie;

    2006-01-01

    between the extracellular ends of transmembrane (TM) III and TM-IV to anchor aromatic chelators at a location corresponding to the presumed binding pocket for adrenergic receptor agonists. In this construct, free metal ions had no agonistic effect in accordance with the optimal geometry of the metal ion...... site in molecular models built over the inactive form of rhodopsin. In contrast, the aromatic chelators bipyridine or phenanthrolene in complex with Zn(II) or Cu(II) acted as potent agonists displaying signaling efficacies similar to or even better than the endogenous chemokine agonists. Molecular...... modeling and molecular simulations combined with mutational analysis indicated that the metal ion site-anchored chelators act as agonists by establishing an aromatic-aromatic, second-site interaction with TyrVI:16 on the inner face of TM-VI. It is noteworthy that this interaction required...

  8. Common variants of chemokine receptor gene CXCR3 and its ligands CXCL10 and CXCL11 associated with vascular permeability of dengue infection in peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoh, B P; Umi-Shakina, H; Zuraihan, Z; Zaiharina, M Z; Rafidah-Hanim, S; Mahiran, M; Khairudin, N Y Nik; Benedict, L H Sim; Masliza, Z; Christopher, K C Lee; Sazaly, A B

    2015-06-01

    Dengue causes significantly more human disease than any other arboviruses. It causes a spectrum of illness, ranging from mild self-limited fever, to severe and fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever, as evidenced by vascular leakage and multifactorial hemostatic abnormalities. There is no specific treatment available till date. Evidence shows that chemokines CXCL10, CXCL11 and their receptor CXCR3 are involved in severity of dengue, but their genetic association with the susceptibility of vascular leakage during dengue infection has not been reported. We genotyped 14 common variants of these candidate genes in 176 patients infected with dengue. rs4859584 and rs8878 (CXCL10) were significantly associated with vascular permeability of dengue infection (Pdengue infection. PMID:25858769

  9. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H;

    2000-01-01

    expressed on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood stimulated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) but not on freshly isolated CD34(+) progenitors. Freshly isolated CD34(+) progenitors expressed low levels of CXCR3 messenger RNA, but this expression was highly up......-induced CD34(+) progenitor chemotaxis. These chemotactic attracted CD34(+) progenitors are colony-forming units-granulocyte-macrophage. gamma IP-10 and Mig also induced GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitor adhesion and aggregation by means of CXCR3, a finding confirmed by the observation that anti-CXCR3 m...... stimulated CXCR3 redistribution and cellular polarization in GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. These results indicate that CXCR3-gamma IP-10 and CXCR3-Mig receptor-ligand pairs, as well as the effects of GM-CSF on them, may be especially important in the cytokine/chemokine environment...

  10. A temporal role of type I interferon signaling in CD8+ T cell maturation during acute West Nile virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia K Pinto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A genetic absence of the common IFN-α/β signaling receptor (IFNAR in mice is associated with enhanced viral replication and altered adaptive immune responses. However, analysis of IFNAR(-/- mice is limited for studying the functions of type I IFN at discrete stages of viral infection. To define the temporal functions of type I IFN signaling in the context of infection by West Nile virus (WNV, we treated mice with MAR1-5A3, a neutralizing, non cell-depleting anti-IFNAR antibody. Inhibition of type I IFN signaling at or before day 2 after infection was associated with markedly enhanced viral burden, whereas treatment at day 4 had substantially less effect on WNV dissemination. While antibody treatment prior to infection resulted in massive expansion of virus-specific CD8(+ T cells, blockade of type I IFN signaling starting at day 4 induced dysfunctional CD8(+ T cells with depressed cytokine responses and expression of phenotypic markers suggesting exhaustion. Thus, only the later maturation phase of anti-WNV CD8(+ T cell development requires type I IFN signaling. WNV infection experiments in BATF3(-/- mice, which lack CD8-α dendritic cells and have impaired priming due to inefficient antigen cross-presentation, revealed a similar effect of blocking IFN signaling on CD8(+ T cell maturation. Collectively, our results suggest that cell non-autonomous type I IFN signaling shapes maturation of antiviral CD8(+ T cell response at a stage distinct from the initial priming event.

  11. The expression of CD8α discriminates distinct T cell subsets in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Fumio; Dijkstra, Johannes Martinus; Kotterba, Paul; Korytář, Tomáš; Kock, Holger; Köllner, Bernd; Jaureguiberry, Beltran; Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Fischer, Uwe

    2011-07-01

    CD8, belonging to the TCR complex, is the main marker molecule of CTLs. Although CD8 genes have been detected in many fish species, the analysis of teleost CD8+ cells has been limited because of the lack of antibodies. Using newly established mAbs against rainbow trout CD8α, we found high ratios of CD8α+ cells in trout thymus, gill and intestine, but relatively low abundance in pronephros, spleen and blood. Accordingly, tissue sections revealed many CD8α+ cells in thymus, numerous intra- and subepithelial CD8α+ cells in intestine and gill and few scattered CD8α+ cells in spleen and pronephros. In secondary lymphoid tissues, CD8α+ lymphocytes, which did not react with anti-thrombocyte or anti-IgM mAbs, expressed CD8α, CD8β and TCRα, while Ig and CD4 transcripts were found in CD8α⁻ lymphocytes. In contrast, considerable CD4 expression in CD8α+ thymocytes suggests the presence of double-positive early T cells. Highly expressed TCRγ, LAG3 and CTLA4 in CD8α+ lymphocytes imply that they constitute a heterogeneous population different from found in non-mucosal tissues. PHA stimulation resulted in an up-regulation of CTL effector genes (perforin, granulysin and IFN-γ) in CD8α+ pronephrocytes, while both Th1 (IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-4/13A) cytokines were up-regulated in CD8α⁻ pronephrocytes. Although the basic characteristics of CD8α+ lymphocytes seem similar in teleost and mammals, features such as the low proportion of teleost CD8α+ lymphocytes in blood and their high abundance in respiratory tissue reveal a unique dynamics and distribution. PMID:21352850

  12. Chemokine cooperativity is caused by competitive glycosaminoglycan binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaar, F.; Offenbeek, J. van; Lee, M. van der; Lith, L.H. van; Watts, A.O.; Rops, A.L.; Aguilar, D.C.; Ziarek, J.J.; Vlag, J. van der; Handel, T.M.; Volkman, B.F.; Proudfoot, A.E.; Vischer, H.F.; Zaman, G.J.; Smit, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines comprise a family of secreted proteins that activate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and thereby control the migration of leukocytes during inflammation or immune surveillance. The positional information required for such migratory behavior is governed by the binding of chemokines t

  13. HIV-1 Nef down-modulates C-C and C-X-C chemokine receptors via ubiquitin and ubiquitin-independent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha Chandrasekaran

    Full Text Available Human and Simian Immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV encode an accessory protein, Nef, which is a pathogenesis and virulence factor. Nef is a multivalent adapter that dysregulates the trafficking of many immune cell receptors, including chemokine receptors (CKRs. Physiological endocytic itinerary of agonist occupied CXCR4 involves ubiquitinylation of the phosphorylated receptor at three critical lysine residues and dynamin-dependent trafficking through the ESCRT pathway into lysosomes for degradation. Likewise, Nef induced CXCR4 degradation was critically dependent on the three lysines in the C-terminal -SSLKILSKGK- motif. Nef directly recruits the HECT domain E3 ligases AIP4 or NEDD4 to CXCR4 in the resting state. This mechanism was confirmed by ternary interactions of Nef, CXCR4 and AIP4 or NEDD4; by reversal of Nef effect by expression of catalytically inactive AIP4-C830A mutant; and siRNA knockdown of AIP4, NEDD4 or some ESCRT-0 adapters. However, ubiquitinylation dependent lysosomal degradation was not the only mechanism by which Nef downregulated CKRs. Agonist and Nef mediated CXCR2 (and CXCR1 degradation was ubiquitinylation independent. Nef also profoundly downregulated the naturally truncated CXCR4 associated with WHIM syndrome and engineered variants of CXCR4 that resist CXCL12 induced internalization via an ubiquitinylation independent mechanism.

  14. Adhesion- and Degranulation-Promoting Adapter Protein Promotes CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Resident Memory Formation and Function during an Acute Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, Jessica K; Beura, Lalit K; Burbach, Brandon J; Shimizu, Yoji

    2016-09-15

    During acute infections, naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells are activated and differentiate into effector T cells, most of which undergo contraction after pathogen clearance. A small population of CD8 T cells persists as memory to protect against future infections. We investigated the role of adhesion- and degranulation-promoting adapter protein (ADAP) in promoting CD8 T cell responses to a systemic infection. Naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells lacking ADAP exhibited a modest expansion defect early after Listeria monocytogenes or vesicular stomatitis virus infection but comparable cytolytic function at the peak of response. However, reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient CD8 T cells were present in the spleen after the peak of the response. ADAP deficiency resulted in a greater frequency of CD127(+) CD8 memory precursors in secondary lymphoid organs during the contraction phase. Reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient killer cell lectin-like receptor G1(-) CD8 resident memory T (TRM) cell precursors were present in a variety of nonlymphoid tissues at the peak of the immune response, and consequently the total numbers of ADAP-deficient TRM cells were reduced at memory time points. TRM cells that did form in the absence of ADAP were defective in effector molecule expression. ADAP-deficient TRM cells exhibited impaired effector function after Ag rechallenge, correlating with defects in their ability to form T cell-APC conjugates. However, ADAP-deficient TRM cells responded to TGF-β signals and recruited circulating memory CD8 T cells. Thus, ADAP regulates CD8 T cell differentiation events following acute pathogen challenge that are critical for the formation and selected functions of TRM cells in nonlymphoid tissues. PMID:27521337

  15. Localization of Distinct Peyer's Patch Dendritic Cell Subsets and Their Recruitment by Chemokines Macrophage Inflammatory Protein (Mip)-3α, Mip-3β, and Secondary Lymphoid Organ Chemokine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Akiko; Kelsall, Brian L.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the anatomical localization of three distinct dendritic cell (DC) subsets in the murine Peyer's patch (PP) and explore the role of chemokines in their recruitment. By two-color in situ immunofluorescence, CD11b+ myeloid DCs were determined to be present in the subepithelial dome (SED) region, whereas CD8α+ lymphoid DCs are present in the T cell–rich interfollicular region (IFR). DCs that lack expression of CD8α or CD11b (double negative) are present in both the SED and IFR. By in situ hybridization, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α mRNA was dramatically expressed only by the follicle-associated epithelium overlying the SED, while its receptor, CCR6, was concentrated in the SED. In contrast, CCR7 was expressed predominantly in the IFR. Consistent with these findings, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and in vitro chemotaxis assays using freshly isolated DCs revealed that CCR6 was functionally expressed only by DC subsets present in the SED, while all subsets expressed functional CCR7. Moreover, none of the splenic DC subsets migrated toward MIP-3α. These data support a distinct role for MIP-3α/CCR6 in recruitment of CD11b+ DCs toward the mucosal surfaces and for MIP-3β/CCR7 in attraction of CD8α+ DCs to the T cell regions. Finally, we demonstrated that all DC subsets expressed an immature phenotype when freshly isolated and maintained expression of subset markers upon maturation in vitro. In contrast, CCR7 expression by myeloid PP DCs was enhanced with maturation in vitro. In addition, this subset disappeared from the SED and appeared in the IFR after microbial stimulation in vivo, suggesting that immature myeloid SED DCs capture antigens and migrate to IFR to initiate T cell responses after mucosal microbial infections. PMID:10770804

  16. Adenoviral Vector Vaccination Induces a Conserved Program of CD8+ T Cell Memory Differentiation in Mouse and Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Bolinger

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Following exposure to vaccines, antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses develop as long-term memory pools. Vaccine strategies based on adenoviral vectors, e.g., those developed for HCV, are able to induce and sustain substantial CD8+ T cell populations. How such populations evolve following vaccination remains to be defined at a transcriptional level. We addressed the transcriptional regulation of divergent CD8+ T cell memory pools induced by an adenovector encoding a model antigen (beta-galactosidase. We observe transcriptional profiles that mimic those following infection with persistent pathogens, murine and human cytomegalovirus (CMV. Key transcriptional hallmarks include upregulation of homing receptors and anti-apoptotic pathways, driven by conserved networks of transcription factors, including T-bet. In humans, an adenovirus vaccine induced similar CMV-like phenotypes and transcription factor regulation. These data clarify the core features of CD8+ T cell memory following vaccination with adenovectors and indicate a conserved pathway for memory development shared with persistent herpesviruses.

  17. Efficacious early antiviral activity of HIV Gag- and Pol-specific HLA-B 2705-restricted CD8+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payne, Rebecca P; Kløverpris, Henrik; Sacha, Jonah B;

    2010-01-01

    The association between HLA-B 2705 and the immune control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has previously been linked to the targeting of the HLA-B 2705-restricted Gag epitope KRWIILGLNK (KK10) by CD8(+) T cells. In order to better define the mechanisms of the HLA-B 2705 immune...... control of HIV, we first characterized the CD8(+) T-cell responses of nine highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-naïve B 2705-positive subjects. Unexpectedly, we observed a strong response to an HLA-B 2705-restricted Pol epitope, KRKGGIGGY (KY9), in 8/9 subjects. The magnitude of the KY9 response...... recognition of HIV-1-infected cells, within 6 h of infection, by KK10- and KY9-specific CD8(+) T cells but not until 18 h postinfection by VL9-specific CD8(+) T cells. There was no association between antiviral efficacy and proliferative capacity, cytotoxicity, polyfunctionality, or T-cell receptor (TCR...

  18. 趋化因子复合受体在HIV-1感染中的作用%Effect of chemokine co-receptor on HIV-1 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙利; 黄长形; 白雪帆

    2008-01-01

    趋化因子复合受体与HIV-1感染关系密切.此文简要回顾了HIV-1复合受体以及它们在病毒膜融合和HIV-1发病机制中的作用,以期为将来研究趋化因子复合受体抗HIV-1感染提供理论依据.%The chemokine co-receptor has close relations to HIV-1 infection.Binding to CD4 typically is followed by binding to either the CCR5 or CXCR4 co-receptor,which is required for fusion to proceed.The development of chemokine co-receptor may provide new tools to address this important pathogenesis question about HIV-1 infection.

  19. CD8+ Cell Anti-HIV Activity Rapidly Increases Upon Discontinuation of Early Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Killian, M. Scott; Roop, Jeremy; Ng, Sharon; Frederick M Hecht; Levy, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    CD8+ lymphocytes can suppress HIV replication without killing the infected cells. This CD8+ cell noncytotoxic anti-HIV response (CNAR) is associated with a beneficial clinical course. In this longitudinal study of 16 participants in the Options Project at UCSF, we measured the ability of CD8+ lymphocytes to suppress HIV replication in CD4+ cells during primary HIV infection, early antiretroviral therapy, and after treatment. CD8+ lymphocytes from subjects with untreated primary HIV-1 in...

  20. Apigenin suppresses migration and invasion of transformed cells through down-regulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Kuang, Lisha; Hitron, John Andrew; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Budhraja, Amit [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Institute of Oral Biosciences and BK21 Program, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Pratheeshkumar, Poyil [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is known to cause various cancers. There are some potential relationships between cell malignant transformation and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expressions. Metastasis, one of the major characteristics of malignantly transformed cells, contributes to the high mortality of cells. CXCR4 and its natural chemokine ligand C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12) play a critical role in metastasis. Therefore, identification of nutritional factors which are able to inhibit CXCR4 is important for protection from environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis and for abolishing metastasis of malignantly transformed cells. The present study demonstrates that apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a natural dietary flavonoid, suppressed CXCR4 expression in arsenic-transformed Beas-2B cells (B-AsT) and several other types of transformed/cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitor had any effect in reducing the apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4, indicating that apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4 is not due to proteolytic degradation. The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to the inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Apigenin also abolished migration and invasion of transformed cells induced by CXCL12. In a xenograft mouse model, apigenin down-regulated CXCR4 expression and suppressed tumor growth. Taken together, our results show that apigenin is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression. This dietary flavonoid has the potential to suppress migration and invasion of transformed cells and prevent environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Apigenin has a potential in preventing environmental arsenic induced carcinogenesis. • Apigenin suppresses CXCR4 in malignant transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. • The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to inhibition of NF-κB activity.

  1. Polyplex-mediated inhibition of chemokine receptor CXCR4 and chromatin-remodeling enzyme NCOA3 impedes pancreatic cancer progression and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Kumar, Sushil; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Sajja, Balasrinivasa R; Xie, Ying; Hang, Yu; Jain, Maneesh; Li, Jing; Boska, Michael D; Batra, Surinder K; Oupický, David

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies due to intense desmoplasia, extreme hypoxia and inherent chemoresistance. Studies have implicated the expression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 and nuclear receptor co-activator-3 (NCOA3) in the development of desmoplasia and metastatic spread of PC. Using a series of polymeric CXCR4 antagonists (PCX), we optimized formulation of PCX/siNCOA3 polyplexes to simultaneously target CXCR4 and NCOA3 in PC. Cholesterol-modified PCX showed maximum CXCR4 antagonism, NCOA3 silencing and inhibition of PC cell migration in vitro. The optimized PCX/siNCOA3 polyplexes were used in evaluating antitumor and antimetastatic activity in orthotopic mouse model of metastatic PC. The polyplexes displayed significant inhibition of primary tumor growth, which was accompanied by a decrease in tumor necrosis and increased tumor perfusion. The polyplexes also showed significant antimetastatic effect and effective suppression of metastasis to distant organs. Overall, dual-function PCX/siNCOA3 polyplexes can effectively regulate tumor microenvironment to decrease progression and dissemination of PC. PMID:27267632

  2. Peptide pool immunization and CD8+ T cell reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne B; Harndahl, Mikkel N; Buus, Anette Stryhn;

    2013-01-01

    Mice were immunized twice with a pool of five peptides selected among twenty 8-9-mer peptides for their ability to form stable complexes at 37°C with recombinant H-2K(b) (half-lives 10-15h). Vaccine-induced immunity of splenic CD8(+) T cells was studied in a 24h IFNγ Elispot assay. Surprisingly......, IFNγ spot-formation was observed without addition of peptide to the assay culture at 3 weeks and 3 months after immunization. To clarify if IFNγ spot formation in the absence of peptide exposure ex vivo is caused by the peptide-pool per se, mice were immunized with single peptides. Three of the five...

  3. Self-assembling peptide for co-delivery of HIV-1 CD8+ T cells epitope and Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonists R848 to induce maturation of monocyte derived dendritic cell and augment polyfunctional cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Liu, Jun; Lu, Sheng; Igweze, Justice; Xu, Wen; Kuang, Da; Zealey, Chris; Liu, Daheng; Gregor, Alex; Bozorgzad, Ardalan; Zhang, Lei; Yue, Elizabeth; Mujib, Shariq; Ostrowski, Mario; Chen, P

    2016-08-28

    Peptide based vaccine that incorporates one or several highly conserved CD8+ T cells epitopes to induce potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is desirable for some infectious diseases, such as HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus-1), and cancers. However, the CD8+ T cells epitope is often weakly immunogenic, and thus requires a specific adjuvant or delivery system to enhance the efficiency. Here we investigated the use of self-assembling peptide EAK16-II based platform to achieve the co-delivery of CD8+ T cells epitope and TLR7/8 agonists (R848 or R837) for augmenting DCs maturation and HIV-1 specific CTL response. HIV-1 CTL epitope SL9 was conjugated with EAK16-II to obtain SL9-EAK16-II, which further spontaneously co-assembled with R848 or R837 in aqueous solution, forming co-assembled nanofibers. Fluorescence spectra and calorimetrical titration revealed the interaction between SL9-EAK16-II assemblies and R848 or R837 via hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction, with the binding affinity (dissociation constant Kd) of 0.62μM or 0.53μM, respectively. Ex vivo generated DCs from HIV-1+ patients pulsed with the SL9-EAK16-II/R848 nanofibers stimulated significantly more polyfunctional SL9 specific CTLs, compared to the DCs pulsed with SL9 alone or the mixture of SL9 and TLR agonist. Furthermore, the nanofibers elicited stronger SL9 specific CTL response in vaccinated mice. Our findings suggest the self-assembling peptide EAK16-II might be used as a new delivery system for peptide based vaccines. PMID:27297778

  4. Molecular mechanism of action of monocyclam versus bicyclam non-peptide antagonists in the CXCR4 chemokine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Gerlach, Lars-Ole; Hatse, Sigrid;

    2007-01-01

    ligand binding pocket of the CXCR4 receptor demonstrated that the single cyclam ring of AMD3465 binds in the pocket around AspIV:20 (Asp(171)), in analogy with AMD3100, whereas the N-pyridinylmethylene moiety mimics the other cyclam ring through interactions with the two acidic anchor-point residues in...... ensures the efficacious blocking of the receptor, in a similar manner can be replaced by chemical moieties allowing for, for example, oral bioavailability....

  5. Enhanced Th1/Th17 Functions of CD161+ CD8+ T Cells in Mucosal Tissues of Rhesus Macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namita Rout

    Full Text Available Expression of the C-type lectin-like receptor CD161 by human T cells is associated with type-17 responses, which play critical regulatory roles in immunity and inflammation at mucosal sites. However, the functions of CD161-expressing T cells in macaques, the pre-clinical model of several human diseases, remain unknown. This study examined the phenotypic and functional characteristics of CD161+ T cells in peripheral blood, mucosal tissues and lymph nodes of rhesus macaques. Majority of CD161-expressing T cells in peripheral blood and lung/intestinal mucosal tissues of rhesus macaques were found to be CD8+CD4- in phenotype. There was a significant enrichment of CD161+CD8+ T cells in the lungs and colonic mucosa (16.1%±6.6 and 16.8%±5.7 in comparison to peripheral blood (4.2%±1.2 and mesenteric lymph nodes (1.3%±0.8. Regardless of the tissue compartment, CD161+CD8+ T cells mainly comprised of γδ T cells and TCR Vα7.2+ MAIT cells (up to 80%, and displayed Th1 and Th17 cytokine responses to mitogen stimulation. Mucosal CD161+CD8+ T cells were characterized by very high expression of CD69, a recent activation marker that is preferentially expressed on tissue resident cells. Furthermore, lung and colonic mucosal CD161+CD8+ T cells showed enhanced IFN-γ, IL-17, and Perforin production in comparison to those in blood. Thus, macaque CD161+CD8+ T cells represent mucosal tissue-homing innate-like CD8+ T-cell populations with Th1/Th17 type cytokine and cytotoxic effector functions that can potentially enhance the recruitment of adaptive immune cells and control initial pathogen burden/dissemination in tissues. Analysis of their role in early immune responses to mucosal pathogens will be valuable in the design of vaccines and therapeutics.

  6. BTLA interaction with HVEM expressed on CD8(+ T cells promotes survival and memory generation in response to a bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos W Steinberg

    Full Text Available The B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA is an Ig super family member that binds to the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM, a TNF receptor super family (TNFRSF member. Engagement of BTLA by HVEM triggers inhibitory signals, although recent evidence indicates that BTLA also may act as an activating ligand for HVEM. In this study, we reveal a novel role for the BTLA-HVEM pathway in promoting the survival of activated CD8(+ T cells in the response to an oral microbial infection. Our data show that both BTLA- and HVEM-deficient mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes had significantly reduced numbers of primary effector and memory CD8(+ T cells, despite normal proliferation and expansion compared to controls. In addition, blockade of the BTLA-HVEM interaction early in the response led to significantly reduced numbers of antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells. HVEM expression on the CD8(+ T cells as well as BTLA expression on a cell type other than CD8(+ T lymphocytes, was required. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the function of the BTLA-HVEM pathway is not limited to inhibitory signaling in T lymphocytes, and instead, that BTLA can provide crucial, HVEM-dependent signals that promote survival of antigen activated CD8(+ T cell during bacterial infection.

  7. The role of CXC-chemokine receptor CXCR2 and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS-3) in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemokine receptor signaling pathways are implicated in the pathobiology of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the clinical relevance of CXCR2 receptor, mediating the effects of all angiogenic chemokines, remains unclear. SOCS (suppressor of cytokine signaling)-3 is a negative regulator of cytokine-driven responses, contributing to interferon-α resistance commonly used to treat advanced RCC with limited information regarding its expression in RCC. In this study, CXCR2 and SOCS-3 were immunohistochemically investigated in 118 RCC cases in relation to interleukin (IL)-6 and (IL)-8, their downstream transducer phosphorylated (p-)STAT-3, and VEGF expression, being further correlated with microvascular characteristics, clinicopathological features and survival. In 30 cases relationships with hypoxia-inducible factors, i.e. HIF-1a, p53 and NF-κΒ (p65/RelA) were also examined. Validation of immunohistochemistry and further investigation of downstream transducers, p-JAK2 and p-c-Jun were evaluated by Western immunoblotting in 5 cases. Both CXCR2 and IL-8 were expressed by the neoplastic cells their levels being interrelated. CXCR2 strongly correlated with the levels of HIF-1a, p53 and p65/RelA in the neoplastic cells. Although SOCS-3 was simultaneously expressed with p-STAT-3, its levels tended to show an inverse relationship with p-JAK-2 and p-c-Jun in Western blots and were positively correlated with HIF-1a, p53 and p65/p65/RelA expression. Neither CXCR2 nor SOCS-3 correlated with the extent of microvascular network. IL-8 and CXCR2 expression was associated with high grade, advanced stage and the presence/number of metastases but only CXCR2 adversely affected survival in univariate analysis. Elevated SOCS-3 expression was associated with progression, the presence/number of metastasis and shortened survival in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Our findings implicate SOCS-3 overexpression in RCC metastasis and biologic aggressiveness advocating its

  8. A role for CCR5(+)CD4 T cells in cutaneous psoriasis and for CD103(+) CCR4(+) CD8 Teff cells in the associated systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgambelluri, Francesco; Diani, Marco; Altomare, Andrea; Frigerio, Elena; Drago, Lorenzo; Granucci, Francesca; Banfi, Giuseppe; Altomare, Gianfranco; Reali, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Recent results have identified critical components of the T cell response involved in the initiation and amplification phases of psoriasis. However the link between T cell responses arising in the skin and the systemic inflammation associated with severe psoriasis is largely unknown. We hypothesized that specific subsets of memory T cells recirculating from the skin could play a role. We therefore dissected the circulating memory T cell compartment in patients by analyzing the TCM, TEM and Teff phenotype, the pattern of CCR4 and CCR5 chemokine receptor expression and the expression of the tissue homing molecule CD103. For each subset we calculated the correlation with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and with the extent of systemic inflammation measured as serum level of the prototypic short pentraxin, C reactive protein (CRP). Validation was performed by comparison with gene expression data in psoriatic plaques. We found that circulating CD103(+)CCR4(+)CCR5(+) and CCR4(+)CCR6(-) CD8(+) Teff cells, were highly correlated with CRP levels as well as with the validated index PASI, reflecting a link between skin involvement and systemic inflammation in patients with severe psoriasis. In addition we observed a contraction of circulating CCR5(+) T cells in psoriasis patients, with a highly significant inverse correlation between CCR5(+)CD4 T cells and the PASI score. Increased expression of CCR5 and CCL5 genes in psoriatic skin lesions was consistent with an accumulation of CCR5(+) cells in psoriatic plaques indicating a role for CCR5/CCL5 axis in disease pathogenesis.

  9. 愛滋病毒的輔助受體CCR5和CXCR4%The Role of Chemokine Receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 in HIV-1 Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周燁; 樂影穎; Pablo IRIBARREN; 龔望華; 張廈; 王吉民

    2004-01-01

    化學趨化因子介導白細胞遷移,淋巴器官生成、炎症、過敏、動脈粥樣硬化以及惡性腫瘤生長轉移等多種病理生理過程.這些因子結合位於細胞表面的島苷蛋白耦聯受體,從而促進細胞遊走並活化.近年來,化學趨化因子及其受體受到生物醫學界高度重視,原因之一是有些受體被人類免疫缺陷(愛滋)病毒利用作為侵襲細胞的關鍵性輔助受體.在這些受體中,CXCR4和CCR5分別被噬淋巴細胞病毒株或噬巨噬特異細胞病毒株所識別利用.為此,這些受體的配體由於能夠與病毒競爭受體結合位點,成為人體内天然的抗病毒蛋白.生物醫學界和製藥業也正在研究開發能特異地抑制這些受體的分子作為新一代抗人類免疫缺陷病毒的藥物.%Chemokines are key mediators of a variety of pathophysiological responses, including leukocyte trafficking, lymphoid tissue organogenesis, inflammation, allergy, atherosclerosis and malignancy.Chemokines bind and activate a group of G protein-coupled receptors, which, upon ligand binding, transmit a cascade of signaling events culminating in cell migration and activation. For the past few years, chemokines and their receptors have received particular attention due to the discoveries that some of the chemokine receptors are utilized by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as coreceptors for cellular entry. Although a number of chemokine and orphan receptors also exhibit coreceptor activity for different strains of HIV-1, CXCR4 and CCR5 are the two essential coreceptors for T-cell line tropic (X4) and macrophage tropic (R5) viruses, respectively.Consequently, chemokine ligands for CXCR4 or CCR5 are potent host-derived anti-HIV-1 agents based on their competitive receptor binding activity and down-regulation of the viral coreceptors. It is recognized that agents targeting HIV-1 coreceptors may have important therapeutic potential.

  10. Pathogen-induced proapoptotic phenotype and high CD95 (Fas expression accompany a suboptimal CD8+ T-cell response: reversal by adenoviral vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ronnie Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available MHC class Ia-restricted CD8(+ T cells are important mediators of the adaptive immune response against infections caused by intracellular microorganisms. Whereas antigen-specific effector CD8(+ T cells can clear infection caused by intracellular pathogens, in some circumstances, the immune response is suboptimal and the microorganisms survive, causing host death or chronic infection. Here, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms that could explain why CD8(+ T cell-mediated immunity during infection with the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is not optimal. For that purpose, we compared the CD8(+ T-cell mediated immune responses in mice infected with T. cruzi or vaccinated with a recombinant adenovirus expressing an immunodominant parasite antigen. Several functional and phenotypic characteristics of specific CD8(+ T cells overlapped. Among few exceptions was an accelerated expansion of the immune response in adenoviral vaccinated mice when compared to infected ones. Also, there was an upregulated expression of the apoptotic-signaling receptor CD95 on the surface of specific T cells from infected mice, which was not observed in the case of adenoviral-vaccinated mice. Most importantly, adenoviral vaccine provided at the time of infection significantly reduced the upregulation of CD95 expression and the proapoptotic phenotype of pathogen-specific CD8(+ cells expanded during infection. In parallel, infected adenovirus-vaccinated mice had a stronger CD8 T-cell mediated immune response and survived an otherwise lethal infection. We concluded that a suboptimal CD8(+ T-cell response is associated with an upregulation of CD95 expression and a proapoptotic phenotype. Both can be blocked by adenoviral vaccination.

  11. Tumor-infiltrating NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells are negatively regulated by LAG-3 and PD-1 in human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Gnjatic, Sacha; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Beck, Amy; Miller, Austin; Tsuji, Takemasa; Eppolito, Cheryl; Qian, Feng; Lele, Shashikant; Shrikant, Protul; Old, Lloyd J; Odunsi, Kunle

    2010-04-27

    NY-ESO-1 is a "cancer-testis" antigen frequently expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and is among the most immunogenic tumor antigens defined to date. In an effort to understand in vivo tolerance mechanisms, we assessed the phenotype and function of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8(+) T cells derived from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), and tumor-associated lymphocytes (TALs) of EOC patients with NY-ESO-1-expressing tumors, with or without humoral immunity to NY-ESO-1. Whereas NY-ESO-1-specific CD8(+) T cells were readily detectable ex vivo with tetramers in TILs and TALs of seropositive patients, they were only detectable in PBLs following in vitro stimulation. Compared with PBLs, tumor-derived NY-ESO-1-specific CD8(+) T cells demonstrated impaired effector function, preferential usage of dominant T-cell receptor, and enriched coexpression of inhibitory molecules LAG-3 and PD-1. Expression of LAG-3 and PD-1 on CD8(+) T cells was up-regulated by IL-10, IL-6 (cytokines found in tumor ascites), and tumor-derived antigen-presenting cells. Functionally, CD8(+)LAG-3(+)PD-1(+) T cells were more impaired in IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha production compared with LAG-3(+)PD-1(-) or LAG-3(-)PD-1(-) subsets. Dual blockade of LAG-3 and PD-1 during T-cell priming efficiently augmented proliferation and cytokine production by NY-ESO-1-specific CD8(+) T cells, indicating that antitumor function of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8(+) T cells could potentially be improved by therapeutic targeting of these inhibitory receptors.

  12. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression increases the disease-inducing potential of CD4+ CD25- T cells in adoptive transfer colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Gad, Monika; Thomsen, Allan Randrup;

    2006-01-01

    of enteroantigen specificity; we also tested the enteroantigen-specific proliferative ability of CD4CD25 T cells from CXCR3 mice in vitro and found that they respond even more strongly than wild-type cells. CONCLUSIONS: The present data indicate that CXCR3 plays an important role in controlling the migration......-inflammatory therapy in inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, we have investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 in the development of chronic colitis in a murine model. METHOD: Expression of CXCR3 on CD4 T cell from normal and colitic mice was assessed by flow cytometry. Development of colitis...... was followed after transfer of either normal or CXCR3CD4CD25T cell into immunodeficient host. In addition, the ability of regulatory T cell to function in vivo in the absence of CXCR3 was tested. RESULTS: We find CXCR3 to be expressed on 80% to 90% of CD4 T cells isolated from colitic mice compared with only 4...

  13. CX3 chemokine receptor 1 defciency leads to reduced dendritic complexity and delayed maturation of newborn neurons in the adult mouse hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that microglia impact the proliferation and differentiation of neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis via the fractalkine/CX3 chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1 signaling pathway. However, whether microglia can influence the maturation and dendritic growth of newborn neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the hippocampus was decreased, and the dendritic length and number of intersections in newborn neurons in the hippocampus were reduced in transgenic adult mice with CX3CR1 deficiency (CX3CR1GFP/GFP. Furthermore, after experimental seizures were induced with kainic acid in these CX3CR1-deficient mice, the expression of c-fos, a marker of neuronal activity, was reduced compared with wild-type mice. Collectively, the experimental findings indicate that the functional maturation of newborn neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice is delayed by CX3CR1 deficiency.

  14. Aspartate-Based CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor Binding of Cross-Bridged Tetraazamacrocyclic Copper(II) and Zinc(II) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maples, Randall D; Cain, Amy N; Burke, Benjamin P; Silversides, Jon D; Mewis, Ryan E; D'huys, Thomas; Schols, Dominique; Linder, Douglas P; Archibald, Stephen J; Hubin, Timothy J

    2016-08-26

    The CXCR4 chemokine receptor is implicated in a number of diseases including HIV infection and cancer development and metastasis. Previous studies have demonstrated that configurationally restricted bis-tetraazamacrocyclic metal complexes are high-affinity CXCR4 antagonists. Here, we present the synthesis of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) acetate complexes of six cross-bridged tetraazamacrocycles to mimic their coordination interaction with the aspartate side chains known to bind them to CXCR4. X-ray crystal structures for three new Cu(2+) acetate complexes and two new Zn(2+) acetate complexes demonstrate metal-ion-dependent differences in the mode of binding the acetate ligand concomitantly with the requisite cis-V-configured cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyle. Concurrent density functional theory molecular modelling studies produced an energetic rationale for the unexpected [Zn(OAc)(H2 O)](+) coordination motif present in all of the Zn(2+) cross-bridged tetraazamacrocycle crystal structures, which differs from the chelating acetate [Zn(OAc)](+) structures of known unbridged and side-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic Zn(2+) -containing CXCR4 antagonists. PMID:27458983

  15. CX3 chemokine receptor 1 deficiency leads to reduced dendritic complexity and delayed maturation of newborn neurons in the adult mouse hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xiao; Jun-mei Xu; Xing-hua Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that microglia impact the proliferation and differentiation of neu-rons during hippocampal neurogenesisvia the fractalkine/CX3 chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1) signaling pathway. However, whether microglia can influence the maturation and dendritic growth of newborn neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the hippocampus was decreased, and the dendritic length and number of intersections in newborn neurons in the hippocampus were reduced in transgenic adult mice with CX3CR1 deifciency (CX3CR1GFP/GFP). Furthermore, after experimental seizures were induced with kainic acid in these CX3CR1-deifcient mice, the expression of c-fos, a marker of neuronal activity, was reduced compared with wild-type mice. Collectively, the experimental ifndings indicate that the functional maturation of newborn neu-rons during hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice is delayed by CX3CR1 deifciency.

  16. Recruitment of exogenous mesenchymal stem cells in mandibular distraction osteogenesis by the stromal cell-derived factor-1/chemokine receptor-4 pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Wang, Lei; Du, Zhao-jie; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Ya-bo; Sui, Jian-fu; Liu, Yan-pu; Lei, De-lin

    2013-12-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is widely used in orthopaedic and craniofacial surgery. However, its exact mechanism is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to find out whether there is systemic recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to the neocallus in the distraction gap by the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis during osteogenesis. We examined the migration of MSC towards a gradient of SDF-1 in vitro. We also transplanted MSC labelled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) intravenously, with or without treatment with CXCR4-blocking antibody, into rats that had had unilateral mandibular distraction osteogenesis, and investigated the distribution of cells labelled with GFP in the soft callus after 24 h. We found that SDF-1 facilitated the migration potency of MSC both in vitro and in vivo, and this migration could be inhibited by AMD3100, an antagonist of CXCR4, and promoted by local infusion of exogenous SDF-1 into the distraction gap. This study provides a new insight into the molecular basis of how new bone is regenerated during distraction osteogenesis.

  17. C-C chemokine receptor 2 inhibitor ameliorates hepatic steatosis by improving ER stress and inflammation in a type 2 diabetic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Min Kim

    Full Text Available Hepatic steatosis is the accumulation of excess fat in the liver. Recently, hepatic steatosis has become more important because it occurs in the patients with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hyperlipidemia and is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and insulin resistance. C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 inhibitor has been reported to improve inflammation and glucose intolerance in diabetes, but its mechanisms remained unknown in hepatic steatosis. We examined whether CCR2 inhibitor improves ER stress-induced hepatic steatosis in type 2 diabetic mice. In this study, db/db and db/m (n = 9 mice were fed CCR2 inhibitor (2 mg/kg/day for 9 weeks. In diabetic mice, CCR2 inhibitor decreased plasma and hepatic triglycerides levels and improved insulin sensitivity. Moreover, CCR2 inhibitor treatment decreased ER stress markers (e.g., BiP, ATF4, CHOP, and XBP-1 and inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNFα, IL-6, and MCP-1 while increasing markers of mitochondrial biogenesis (e.g., PGC-1α, Tfam, and COX1 in the liver. We suggest that CCR2 inhibitor may ameliorate hepatic steatosis by reducing ER stress and inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Chemokine-Like Receptor 1 mRNA Weakly Correlates with Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis Score in Male but Not Female Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Maximilian; Meier, Elisabeth M.; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Eisinger, Kristina; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Pohl, Rebekka; Weiss, Thomas S.; Buechler, Christa

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1) ligands resolvin E1 and chemerin are known to modulate inflammatory response. The progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with inflammation. Here it was analyzed whether hepatic CMKLR1 expression is related to histological features of NASH. Therefore, CMKLR1 mRNA was quantified in liver tissue of 33 patients without NAFLD, 47 patients with borderline NASH and 38 patients with NASH. Hepatic CMKLR1 mRNA was not associated with gender and body mass index (BMI) in the controls and the whole study group. CMKLR1 expression was similar in controls and in patients with borderline NASH and NASH. In male patients weak positive correlations with inflammation, fibrosis and NASH score were identified. In females CMKLR1 was not associated with features of NAFLD. Liver CMKLR1 mRNA tended to be higher in type 2 diabetes patients of both genders and in hypercholesterolemic women. In summary, this study shows that hepatic CMKLR1 mRNA is weakly associated with features of NASH in male patients only. PMID:27548138

  19. Expression and Function of the Chemokine, CXCL13, and Its Receptor, CXCR5, in Aids-Associated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Widney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The homeostatic chemokine, CXCL13 (BLC, BCA-1, helps direct the recirculation of mature, resting B cells, which express its receptor, CXCR5. CXCL13/CXCR5 are expressed, and may play a role, in some non-AIDS-associated B cell tumors. Objective. To determine if CXCL13/CXCR5 are associated with AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (AIDS-NHL. Methods. Serum CXCL13 levels were measured by ELISA in 46 subjects who developed AIDS-NHL in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and in controls. The expression or function of CXCL13 and CXCR5 was examined on primary AIDS-NHL specimens or AIDS-NHL cell lines. Results. Serum CXCL13 levels were significantly elevated in the AIDS-NHL group compared to controls. All primary AIDS-NHL specimens showed CXCR5 expression and most also showed CXCL13 expression. AIDS-NHL cell lines expressed CXCR5 and showed chemotaxis towards CXCL13. Conclusions. CXCL13/CXCR5 are expressed in AIDS-NHL and could potentially be involved in its biology. CXCL13 may have potential as a biomarker for AIDS-NHL.

  20. Biased and constitutive signaling in the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 by manipulating the interface between transmembrane helices 6 and 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Thiele, Stefanie; Guo, Dong;

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium state of CCR5 is manipulated here toward either activation or inactivation by introduction of single amino acid substitutions in the transmembrane domains (TMs) 6 and 7. Insertion of a steric hindrance mutation in the center of TM7 (G286F in position VII:09/7.42) resulted in biased...... signaling. Thus, β-arrestin recruitment was eliminated, whereas constitutive activity was observed in Gαi-mediated signaling. Furthermore, the CCR5 antagonist aplaviroc was converted to a full agonist (a so-called efficacy switch). Computational modeling revealed that the position of the 7TM receptor......-conserved Trp in TM6 (Trp-248 in position VI:13/6.48, part of the CWXP motif) was influenced by the G286F mutation, causing Trp-248 to change orientation away from TM7. The essential role of Trp-248 in CCR5 activation was supported by complete inactivity of W248A-CCR5 despite maintaining chemokine binding...

  1. The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a marker of, but not essential for the development of human Th1 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Bregenholt, S; Eriksen, K W;

    1999-01-01

    The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has recently been described as a surface marker of human T cells producing type 1 (Th1) cytokines. Here we confirm that CCR5 is expressed on human Th1 but not on Th2 T-cell clones. Using intracellular cytokine staining, we show that alloantigen specific CD4+ T......-cell lines derived from a CCR5-deficient individual (delta32 allele homozygote) contain high numbers of both interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin (IL)-2 producing cells, low numbers of IL-10 producing cells and no IL4 or IL-5 producing cells when stimulated with phorbol ester and ionomycin in vitro....... These results were similar to those obtained from alloantigen specific CD4+ T-cell lines derived from CCR5 expressing individuals. An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed that the Th1 cytokine-positive cells from the CCR5-deficient individual were able to produce equal amounts of cytokines when...

  2. The Viral G Protein-Coupled Receptor ORF74 Hijacks β-Arrestins for Endocytic Trafficking in Response to Human Chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munnik, Sabrina M; Kooistra, Albert J; van Offenbeek, Jody; Nijmeijer, Saskia; de Graaf, Chris; Smit, Martine J; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected cells express the virally encoded G protein-coupled receptor ORF74. Although ORF74 is constitutively active, it binds human CXC chemokines that modulate this basal activity. ORF74-induced signaling has been demonstrated to underlie the development of the angioproliferative tumor Kaposi's sarcoma. Whereas G protein-dependent signaling of ORF74 has been the subject of several studies, the interaction of this viral GPCR with β-arrestins has hitherto not been investigated. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer experiments demonstrate that ORF74 recruits β-arrestins and subsequently internalizes in response to human CXCL1 and CXCL8, but not CXCL10. Internalized ORF74 traffics via early endosomes to recycling and late endosomes. Site-directed mutagenesis and homology modeling identified four serine and threonine residues at the distal end of the intracellular carboxyl-terminal of ORF74 that are required for β-arrestin recruitment and subsequent endocytic trafficking. Hijacking of the human endocytic trafficking machinery is a previously unrecognized action of ORF74.

  3. Avian Influenza Viruses, Inflammation, and CD8+ T Cell Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongfang; Loh, Liyen; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulate naturally in wild aquatic birds, infect domestic poultry, and are capable of causing sporadic bird-to-human transmissions. AIVs capable of infecting humans include a highly pathogenic AIV H5N1, first detected in humans in 1997, and a low pathogenic AIV H7N9, reported in humans in 2013. Both H5N1 and H7N9 cause severe influenza disease in humans, manifested by acute respiratory distress syndrome, multi-organ failure, and high mortality rates of 60% and 35%, respectively. Ongoing circulation of H5N1 and H7N9 viruses in wild birds and poultry, and their ability to infect humans emphasizes their epidemic and pandemic potential and poses a public health threat. It is, thus, imperative to understand the host immune responses to the AIVs so we can control severe influenza disease caused by H5N1 or H7N9 and rationally design new immunotherapies and vaccines. This review summarizes our current knowledge on AIV epidemiology, disease symptoms, inflammatory processes underlying the AIV infection in humans, and recent studies on universal pre-existing CD8+ T cell immunity to AIVs. Immune responses driving the host recovery from AIV infection in patients hospitalized with severe influenza disease are also discussed. PMID:26973644

  4. Origin of CD8+ Effector and Memory T Cell Subsets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Stemberger; Michael Neuenhahn; Veit R.Buchholz; Dirk H.Busch

    2007-01-01

    It is well accepted that CD8+ T cells play a pivotal role in providing protection against infection with intracellular pathogens and some tumors. In many cases protective immunity is maintained for long periods of time (immunological memory). Over the past years, it has become evident that in order to fulfill these multiple tasks,distinct subsets of effector and memory T cells have to be generated. Until today, however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of subset differentiation and the timing of lineage fate decisions. In this context, it is of special importance to determine at which level of clonal expansion functional and phenotypical heterogeneity is achieved. Different models for T cell subset diversification have been proposed; these differ mainly in the time point during priming and clonal expansion (prior, during, or beyond the first cell division) when differentiation programs are induced. Recently developed single-cell adoptive transfer technology has allowed us to demonstrate that individual precursor cell still bears the full plasticity to develop into a plethora different T cell subsets. This observation targets the shaping of T cell subset differentiation towards factors that are still operative beyond the first cell division. These findings have important implications for vaccine development, as the modulation of differentiation patterns towards distinct subsets could become a powerful strategy to enhance the efficacy and quality of vaccines.

  5. Regulation of CD8+ T cell responses to retinal antigen by local FoxP3+ regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W McPherson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available While pathogenic CD4 T cells are well known mediators of autoimmune uveoretinitis, CD8 T cells can also be uveitogenic. Since preliminary studies indicated that C57BL/6 mice were minimally susceptible to autoimmune uveoretinitis induction by CD8 T cells, the basis of the retinal disease resistance was sought. Mice that express β-galactosidase (βgal on a retina-specific promoter (arrβgal mice were backcrossed to mice expressing green fluorescent protein and diphtheria toxin receptor under control of the Foxp3 promoter (Foxp3-DTR/GFP mice, and to T cell receptor transgenic mice that produce βgal specific CD8 T cells (BG1 mice. These mice were used to explore the role of regulatory T cells in the resistance to retinal autoimmune disease. Experiments with T cells from double transgenic BG1 x Foxp3-DTR/GFP mice transferred into Foxp3-DTR/GFP x arrβgal mice confirmed that the retina was well protected from attempts to induce disease by adoptive transfer of activated BG1 T cells. The successful induction of retinal disease following unilateral intraocular administration of diphtheria toxin to deplete regulatory T cells showed that the protective activity was dependent on local, toxin-sensitive regulatory T cells; the opposite, untreated eye remained disease-free. Although there were very few Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the parenchyma of quiescent retina, and they did not accumulate in retina, their depletion by local toxin administration led to disease susceptibility. We propose that these regulatory T cells modulate the pathogenic activity of βgal-specific CD8 T cells in the retinas of arrβgal mice on a local basis, allowing immunoregulation to be responsive to local conditions.

  6. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Their Manifold Roles in Homeostasis and Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YingyingLe; YeZhou; PabloIribarren; JiMingWang

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of small proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors on target cells and were originally discovered as mediators of directional migration of immune cells to sites of inflammation and injury. In recent years, it has become clear that the function of chemokines extends well beyond the role in leukocyte chemotaxis. They participate in organ development, angiogenesis/angiostasis, leukocyte trafficking and homing, tumorigenesis and metastasis, as well as in immune responses to microbial infection. Therefore, chemokines and their receptors are important targets for modulation of host responses in pathophysiological conditions and for therapeutic intervention of human diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):95-104.

  7. Establishment and Characterization of a Cell Based Artificial Antigen-Presenting Cell for Expansion and Activation of CD8+ T Cells Ex Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijuan Gong; Mingchun Ji; Zhengfeng Cao; Liheng Wang; Yayun Qian; Maozhi Hu; Li Qian; Xingyuan Pan

    2008-01-01

    Atificial antigen-presenting cells are expected to stimulate the expansion and acquisition of optimal therapeutic features of T cells before infusion. Here CD32 that binds to a crystallizable fragment of IgG monoclonal antibody was genetically expressed on human K562 leukemia cells to provide a ligand for T-cell receptor. CD86 and 4-1BBL, which are ligands of CO. stimulating receptors of CD28 and 4-1BB. respectively, were also expressed on K562 cells. Then we accomplished the artificial antigen-presenting cells by coupling K32, CD86/4-IBBL cell with OKT3 monoclonal antibody against CD3.named K32/CD86/4-lBBL/OKT3 cells. These artificial modified cells had the abilities of inducing CD8+ T cell activation. promoting CD8+ T cell proliferation, division, and long-term growth, inhibiting CD8+ T cell apoptosis, and enhancing CD8+ T cell secretion of IFN-Y and perforin. Furthermore, antigen. secific cytotoxic T lymphocytes could be retained in the culture stimulated with K32/CD86/4-1BBL/OKT3 cells at least within 28 day This approach was robust, simple, reproducible and economical for expansion and activation of CD8+ T cells and may have important therapeutic implications for adoptive immunotherapy. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2007;5(1):47-53.

  8. Temporal Dynamics of CD8+ T Cell Effector Responses during Primary HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Korey R.; Makedonas, George; Buggert, Marcus; Eller, Michael A.; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Li, Chris K.; Eller, Leigh Anne; Rono, Kathleen; Maganga, Lucas; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Kibuuka, Hannah; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Slifka, Mark K.; Haynes, Barton F.; Bernard, Nicole F.; Robb, Merlin L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The loss of HIV-specific CD8+ T cell cytolytic function is a primary factor underlying progressive HIV infection, but whether HIV-specific CD8+ T cells initially possess cytolytic effector capacity, and when and why this may be lost during infection, is unclear. Here, we assessed CD8+ T cell functional evolution from primary to chronic HIV infection. We observed a profound expansion of perforin+ CD8+ T cells immediately following HIV infection that quickly waned after acute viremia resolution. Selective expression of the effector-associated transcription factors T-bet and eomesodermin in cytokine-producing HIV-specific CD8+ T cells differentiated HIV-specific from bulk memory CD8+ T cell effector expansion. As infection progressed expression of perforin was maintained in HIV-specific CD8+ T cells with high levels of T-bet, but not necessarily in the population of T-betLo HIV-specific CD8+ T cells that expand as infection progresses. Together, these data demonstrate that while HIV-specific CD8+ T cells in acute HIV infection initially possess cytolytic potential, progressive transcriptional dysregulation leads to the reduced CD8+ T cell perforin expression characteristic of chronic HIV infection. PMID:27486665

  9. Differential estrogen-regulation of CXCL12 chemokine receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, contributes to the growth effect of estrogens in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Boudot

    Full Text Available CXCR4 and CXCR7 are the two receptors for the chemokine CXCL12, a key mediator of the growth effect of estrogens (E2 in estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancers. In this study we examined E2-regulation of the CXCL12 axis components and their involvement in the growth of breast cancer cells. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were differentially regulated by E2 which enhanced the expression of both CXCL12 and CXCR4 but repressed the expression of CXCR7. Formaldehyde-associated isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE revealed that E2-mediated transcriptional regulation of these genes is linked to the control of the compaction state of chromatin at their promoters. This effect could be accomplished via several distal ER-binding sites in the regions surrounding these genes, all of which are located 20-250 kb from the transcription start site. Furthermore, individual down-regulation of CXCL12, CXCR4 or CXCR7 expression as well as the inhibition of their activity significantly decreases the rate of basal cell growth. In contrast, E2-induced cell growth was differentially affected. Unlike CXCR7, the inhibition of the expression or activity of either CXCL12 or CXCR4 significantly blunted the E2-mediated stimulation of cellular growth. Besides, CXCR7 over-expression increased the basal MCF-7 cell growth rate and decreased the growth effect of E2. These findings indicate that E2 regulation of the CXCL12 signaling axis is important for the E2-mediated growth effect of breast cancer cells. These data also provide support for distinct biological functions of CXCR4 and CXCR7 and suggest that targeting CXCR4 and/or CXCR7 would have distinct molecular effects on ER-positive breast tumors.

  10. Prenatal exposure to ethanol stimulates hypothalamic CCR2 chemokine receptor system: Possible relation to increased density of orexigenic peptide neurons and ethanol drinking in adolescent offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G-Q; Karatayev, O; Leibowitz, S F

    2015-12-01

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that maternal consumption of ethanol during pregnancy increases alcohol drinking in the offspring. Possible underlying mechanisms may involve orexigenic peptides, which are stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure and themselves promote drinking. Building on evidence that ethanol stimulates neuroimmune factors such as the chemokine CCL2 that in adult rats is shown to colocalize with the orexigenic peptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), the present study sought to investigate the possibility that CCL2 or its receptor CCR2 in LH is stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure, perhaps specifically within MCH neurons. Our paradigm of intraoral administration of ethanol to pregnant rats, at low-to-moderate doses (1 or 3g/kg/day) during peak hypothalamic neurogenesis, caused in adolescent male offspring twofold increase in drinking of and preference for ethanol and reinstatement of ethanol drinking in a two-bottle choice paradigm under an intermittent access schedule. This effect of prenatal ethanol exposure was associated with an increased expression of MCH and density of MCH(+) neurons in LH of preadolescent offspring. Whereas CCL2(+) cells at this age were low in density and unaffected by ethanol, CCR2(+) cells were dense in LH and increased by prenatal ethanol, with a large percentage (83-87%) identified as neurons and found to colocalize MCH. Prenatal ethanol also stimulated the genesis of CCR2(+) and MCH(+) neurons in the embryo, which co-labeled the proliferation marker, BrdU. Ethanol also increased the genesis and density of neurons that co-expressed CCR2 and MCH in LH, with triple-labeled CCR2(+)/MCH(+)/BrdU(+) neurons that were absent in control rats accounting for 35% of newly generated neurons in ethanol-exposed rats. With both the chemokine and MCH systems believed to promote ethanol consumption, this greater density of CCR2(+)/MCH(+) neurons in the LH of preadolescent rats suggests that

  11. CD8+ Treg cells suppress CD8+ T cell-responses by IL-10-dependent mechanism during H5N1 influenza virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Qiang; Wu, Bing; Xue, Jia; Fan, Xiaoxu; Feng, Congcong; Geng, Shuang; Wang, Ming; Wang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Although Treg-cell-mediated suppression during infection or autoimmunity has been described, functions of Treg cells during highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection remain poorly characterized. Here we found that in Foxp3-GFP transgenic mice, CD8+ Foxp3+ Treg cells, but not CD4+ Foxp3+ Treg cells, were remarkably induced during H5N1 infection. In addition to expressing CD25, the CD8+ Foxp3+ Treg cells showed a high level of GITR and produced IL-10. In an adoptive transfer model, CD8+...

  12. Rubratoxin-B-induced secretion of chemokine ligands of cysteine-cysteine motif chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and its dependence on heat shock protein 90 in HL60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying rubratoxin B toxicity, the effects of rubratoxin B on the secretion of CCR5 chemokines, CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5, in a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL60, were investigated. In addition, to examine whether the molecular chaperone 90-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) contributes to rubratoxin B toxicity, the effects of Hsp90-specific inhibitors, radicicol and geldanamycin, were investigated. Exposure to rubratoxin B for 24h induced secretion of each CCR5 chemokine, although the effect on CCL5 secretion was modest, and it enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, CXCL8, and CCL2. Concomitant treatment with radicicol abolished the rubratoxin-induced secretion of all cytokines investigated. Geldanamycin antagonized the rubratoxin B-induced effects on CCL3 and CCL5, but not CCL4; the effects of geldanamycin were less than that of radicicol. Taken together, the results suggest that rubratoxin B, with the contribution of Hsp90, induces secretion of CCR5 chemokines.

  13. Chemokine receptor expression in the human ectocervix: implications for infection by the human immunodeficiency virus-type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Grant R; Asin, Susana; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; Gonzalez, Jorge L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W; Howell, Alexandra L

    2004-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) is a sexually transmitted pathogen that can infect cells in the female reproductive tract (FRT). The mechanism of viral transmission within the FRT and the mode of viral spread to the periphery are not well understood. To characterize the frequency of potential targets of HIV infection within the FRT, we performed a systematic study of the expression of HIV receptors (CD4, galactosyl ceramide (GalCer)) and coreceptors (CXCR4 and CCR5) on epithelial cells and leucocytes from the ectocervix. The ectocervix is a likely first site of contact with HIV-1 following heterosexual transmission, and expression of these receptors is likely to correlate with susceptibility to viral infection. We obtained ectocervical tissue specimens from women undergoing hysterectomy, and compared expression of these receptors among patients who were classified as being in the proliferative or secretory phases of their menstrual cycle at the time of hysterectomy, as well as from postmenopausal tissues. Epithelial cells from tissues at early and mid-proliferative stages of the menstrual cycle express CD4, although by late proliferative and secretory phases, CD4 expression was absent or weak. In contrast, GalCer expression was uniform in all stages of the menstrual cycle. CXCR4 expression was not detected on ectocervical epithelial cells and positive staining was only evident on individual leucocytes. In contrast, CCR5 expression was detected on ectocervical epithelial cells from tissues at all stages of the menstrual cycle. Overall, our results suggest that HIV infection of cells in the ectocervix could most likely occur through GalCer and CCR5. These findings are important to define potential targets of HIV-1 infection within the FRT, and for the future design of approaches to reduce the susceptibility of women to infection by HIV-1. PMID:15554931

  14. Chemokine receptor expression in the human ectocervix: implications for infection by the human immunodeficiency virus-type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Grant R; Asin, Susana; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; Gonzalez, Jorge L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W; Howell, Alexandra L

    2004-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) is a sexually transmitted pathogen that can infect cells in the female reproductive tract (FRT). The mechanism of viral transmission within the FRT and the mode of viral spread to the periphery are not well understood. To characterize the frequency of potential targets of HIV infection within the FRT, we performed a systematic study of the expression of HIV receptors (CD4, galactosyl ceramide (GalCer)) and coreceptors (CXCR4 and CCR5) on epithelial cells and leucocytes from the ectocervix. The ectocervix is a likely first site of contact with HIV-1 following heterosexual transmission, and expression of these receptors is likely to correlate with susceptibility to viral infection. We obtained ectocervical tissue specimens from women undergoing hysterectomy, and compared expression of these receptors among patients who were classified as being in the proliferative or secretory phases of their menstrual cycle at the time of hysterectomy, as well as from postmenopausal tissues. Epithelial cells from tissues at early and mid-proliferative stages of the menstrual cycle express CD4, although by late proliferative and secretory phases, CD4 expression was absent or weak. In contrast, GalCer expression was uniform in all stages of the menstrual cycle. CXCR4 expression was not detected on ectocervical epithelial cells and positive staining was only evident on individual leucocytes. In contrast, CCR5 expression was detected on ectocervical epithelial cells from tissues at all stages of the menstrual cycle. Overall, our results suggest that HIV infection of cells in the ectocervix could most likely occur through GalCer and CCR5. These findings are important to define potential targets of HIV-1 infection within the FRT, and for the future design of approaches to reduce the susceptibility of women to infection by HIV-1.

  15. Human cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor US28 induces migration of cells on a CX3CL1-presenting surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Gertrud M; Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Selmeczi, David;

    2013-01-01

    endothelium. We observed that US28-expressing cells migrated more than CX3CR1-expressing cells when adhering to immobilized CX3CL1. US28-induced migration was G protein-signalling dependent and was blocked by the phospholipase Cβ inhibitor U73122 and the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM. In addition......, migration was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by competition from CCL2 and CCL5, whereas CCL3 had little effect. Instead of migrating, CX3CR1-expressing cells performed 'dancing-on-the-spot' movements, demonstrating that anchored CX3CL1 acts as a strong tether for these cells. At low receptor...

  16. Expression of Human CD4 and chemokine receptors in cotton rat cells confers permissiveness for productive HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broder Christopher C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current small animal models for studying HIV-1 infection are very limited, and this continues to be a major obstacle for studying HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis, as well as for the urgent development and evaluation of effective anti-HIV-1 therapies and vaccines. Previously, it was shown that HIV-1 can infect cotton rats as indicated by development of antibodies against all major proteins of the virus, the detection of viral cDNA in spleen and brain of challenged animals, the transmission of infectious virus, albeit with low efficiency, from animal to animal by blood, and an additional increase in the mortality in the infected groups. Results Using in vitro experiments, we now show that cotton rat cell lines engineered to express human receptor complexes for HIV-1 (hCD4 along with hCXCR4 or hCCR5 support virus entry, viral cDNA integration, and the production of infectious virus. Conclusion These results further suggest that the development of transgenic cotton rats expressing human HIV-1 receptors may prove to be useful small animal model for HIV infection.

  17. The neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone is critically involved in the development of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Loser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone is well known as a mediator of skin pigmentation. More recently, it has been shown that alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone also plays pivotal roles in energy homeostasis, sexual function, and inflammation or immunomodulation. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone exerts its antiinflammatory and immunomodulatory effects by binding to the melanocortin-1 receptor, and since T cells are important effectors during immune responses, we investigated the effects of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone on T cell function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: T cells were treated with alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, and subsequently, their phenotype and function was analyzed in a contact allergy as well as a melanoma model. Furthermore, the relevance of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-mediated signaling for the induction of cytotoxicity was assessed in CD8(+ T cells from melanoma patients with functional and nonfunctional melanocortin-1 receptors. Here we demonstrate that the melanocortin-1 receptor is expressed by murine as well as human CD8(+ T cells, and we furthermore show that alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone/melanocortin-1 receptor-mediated signaling is critical for the induction of cytotoxicity in human and murine CD8(+ T cells. Upon adoptive transfer, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-treated murine CD8(+ T cells significantly reduced contact allergy responses in recipient mice. Additionally, the presented data indicate that alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone via signaling through a functional melanocortin-1 receptor augmented antitumoral immunity by up-regulating the expression of cytotoxic genes and enhancing the cytolytic activity in tumor-specific CD8(+ T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these results point to an important role of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone in MHC class I-restricted cytotoxicity. Therefore, treatment of contact allergies or

  18. Glycan-modified liposomes boost CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses by targeting DC-SIGN on dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W.J. Unger; A.J. van Beelen; S.C. Bruijns; M. Joshi; C.M. Fehres; L. van Bloois; M.I. Verstege; M. Ambrosini; H. Kalay; K. Nazmi; J.G. Bolscher; E. Hooiberg; T.D. de Gruijl; G. Storm; Y. van Kooyk

    2012-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy requires potent tumor-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses, initiated by dendritic cells (DCs). Tumor antigens can be specifically targeted to DCs in vivo by exploiting their expression of C-type lectin receptors (CLR), which bind carbohydrate structures on antigens, resultin

  19. Peripheral canine CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive T cells - unique amongst others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Buttlar, Heiner; Bismarck, Doris; Alber, Gottfried

    2015-12-15

    T lymphocytes co-expressing CD4 and CD8 ("double-positive T cells") are commonly associated with a thymic developmental stage of T cells. Their first description in humans and pigs as extrathymic T cells with a memory phenotype almost 30 years ago came as a surprise. Meanwhile peripheral double-positive T cells have been described in a growing number of different species. In this review we highlight novel data from our very recent studies on canine peripheral double-positive T cells which point to unique features of double-positive T cells in the dog. In contrast to porcine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells forming a homogenous cellular population based on their expression of CD4 and CD8α, canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells can be divided into three different cellular subsets with distinct expression levels of CD4 and CD8α. Double-positive T cells expressing CD8β are present in humans and dogs but absent in swine. Moreover, canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells can not only develop from CD4(+) single-positive T cells but also from CD8(+) single-positive T cells. Together, this places canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells closer to their human than porcine counterparts since human double-positive T cells also appear to be heterogeneous in their CD4 and CD8α expression and have both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells as progenitor cells. However, CD4(+) single-positive T cells are the more potent progenitors for canine double-positive T cells, whereas CD8(+) single-positive T cells are more potent progenitors for human double-positive T cells. Canine double-positive T cells have an activated phenotype and may have as yet unrecognized roles in vivo in immunity to infection or in inflammatory diseases such as chronic infection, autoimmunity, allergy, or cancer.

  20. Control of mucosal virus infection by influenza nucleoprotein-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couch Robert B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC class I-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL are thought to play a major role in clearing virus and promoting recovery from influenza infection and disease. This has been demonstrated for clearance of influenza virus from the lungs of infected mice. However, human influenza infection is primarily a respiratory mucosal infection involving the nasopharynx and tracheobronchial tree. The role of CD8+ CTL directed toward the influenza nucleoprotein (NP in defense against influenza virus infection at the respiratory mucosa was evaluated in two separate adoptive transfer experiments. Methods Influenza nucleoprotein (NP-specific CD8+ CTL were generated from splenocytes obtained from Balb/c mice previously primed with influenza A/Taiwan/1/86 (H1N1 infection or with influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1-derived NP plasmid DNA vaccine followed by infection with A/Hong Kong/68 (H3N2 virus. After in vitro expansion by exposure to an influenza NP-vaccinia recombinant, highly purified CD8+ T cells exhibited significant lysis in vitro of P815 target cells infected with A/Hong Kong/68 (H3N2 virus while the CD8- fraction (CD4+ T cells, B cells and macrophages had no CTL activity. Purified CD8+ and CD8- T cells (1 × 107 were injected intravenously or interperitoneally into naive mice four hours prior to intranasal challenge with A/HK/68 (H3N2 virus. Results The adoptively transferred NP-vaccinia-induced CD8+ T cells caused significant reduction of virus titers in both the lungs and nasal passages when compared to CD8- cells. Neither CD8+ nor CD8- T cells from cultures stimulated with HIV gp120-vaccinia recombinant reduced virus titers. Conclusion The present data demonstrate that influenza NP-specific CD8+ CTL can play a direct role in clearance of influenza virus from the upper respiratory mucosal surfaces.

  1. Sustained CD8+ T-cell responses induced after acute parvovirus B19 infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norbeck, Oscar; Isa, Adiba; Pöhlmann, Christoph;

    2005-01-01

    Murine models have suggested that CD8+ T-cell responses peak early in acute viral infections and are not sustained, but no evidence for humans has been available. To address this, we longitudinally analyzed the CD8+ T-cell response to human parvovirus B19 in acutely infected individuals. We...... observed striking CD8+ T-cell responses, which were sustained or even increased over many months after the resolution of acute disease, indicating that CD8+ T cells may play a prominent role in the control of parvovirus B19 and other acute viral infections of humans, including potentially those generated...

  2. CD8+ T cells cause disability and axon loss in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Deb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CD8+ T cells directly mediate motor disability and axon injury in the demyelinated central nervous system. We have previously observed that genetic deletion of the CD8+ T cell effector molecule perforin leads to preservation of motor function and preservation of spinal axons in chronically demyelinated mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine if CD8+ T cells are necessary and sufficient to directly injure demyelinated axons, we adoptively transferred purified perforin-competent CD8+ spinal cord-infiltrating T cells into profoundly demyelinated but functionally preserved perforin-deficient host mice. Transfer of CD8+ spinal cord-infiltrating T cells rapidly and irreversibly impaired motor function, disrupted spinal cord motor conduction, and reduced the number of medium- and large-caliber spinal axons. Likewise, immunodepletion of CD8+ T cells from chronically demyelinated wildtype mice preserved motor function and limited axon loss without altering other disease parameters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In multiple sclerosis patients, CD8+ T cells outnumber CD4+ T cells in active lesions and the number of CD8+ T cells correlates with the extent of ongoing axon injury and functional disability. Our findings suggest that CD8+ T cells may directly injure demyelinated axons and are therefore a viable therapeutic target to protect axons and motor function in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  3. The closely related CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs) and lymphoid-resident CD8+ DCs differ in their inflammatory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Zhijun; Bedoui, Sammy; Brady, Jamie L; Walter, Anne; Chopin, Michael; Carrington, Emma M; Sutherland, Robyn M; Nutt, Stephen L; Zhang, Yuxia; Ko, Hyun-Ja; Wu, Li; Lew, Andrew M; Zhan, Yifan

    2014-01-01

    Migratory CD103+ and lymphoid-resident CD8+ dendritic cells (DCs) share many attributes, such as dependence on the same transcription factors, cross-presenting ability and expression of certain surface molecules, such that it has been proposed they belong to a common sub-lineage. The functional diversity of the two DC types is nevertheless incompletely understood. Here we reveal that upon skin infection with herpes simplex virus, migratory CD103+ DCs from draining lymph nodes were more potent at inducing Th17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells than CD8+ DCs. This superior capacity to drive Th17 responses was also evident in CD103+ DCs from uninfected mice. Their differential potency to induce Th17 differentiation was reflected by higher production of IL-1β and IL-6 by CD103+ DCs compared with CD8+ DCs upon stimulation. The two types of DCs from isolated lymph nodes also differ in expression of certain pattern recognition receptors. Furthermore, elevated levels of GM-CSF, typical of those found in inflammation, substantially increased the pool size of CD103+ DCs in lymph nodes and skin. We argue that varied levels of GM-CSF may explain the contrasting reports regarding the positive role of GM-CSF in regulating development of CD103+ DCs. Together, we find that these two developmentally closely-related DC subsets display functional differences and that GM-CSF has differential effect on the two types of DCs.

  4. The closely related CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs and lymphoid-resident CD8+ DCs differ in their inflammatory functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Jiao

    Full Text Available Migratory CD103+ and lymphoid-resident CD8+ dendritic cells (DCs share many attributes, such as dependence on the same transcription factors, cross-presenting ability and expression of certain surface molecules, such that it has been proposed they belong to a common sub-lineage. The functional diversity of the two DC types is nevertheless incompletely understood. Here we reveal that upon skin infection with herpes simplex virus, migratory CD103+ DCs from draining lymph nodes were more potent at inducing Th17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells than CD8+ DCs. This superior capacity to drive Th17 responses was also evident in CD103+ DCs from uninfected mice. Their differential potency to induce Th17 differentiation was reflected by higher production of IL-1β and IL-6 by CD103+ DCs compared with CD8+ DCs upon stimulation. The two types of DCs from isolated lymph nodes also differ in expression of certain pattern recognition receptors. Furthermore, elevated levels of GM-CSF, typical of those found in inflammation, substantially increased the pool size of CD103+ DCs in lymph nodes and skin. We argue that varied levels of GM-CSF may explain the contrasting reports regarding the positive role of GM-CSF in regulating development of CD103+ DCs. Together, we find that these two developmentally closely-related DC subsets display functional differences and that GM-CSF has differential effect on the two types of DCs.

  5. Proinsulin Expression Shapes the TCR Repertoire but Fails to Control the Development of Low-Avidity Insulin-Reactive CD8+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, James A; Thayer, Terri C; McLaren, James E; Ladell, Kristin; De Leenheer, Evy; Phillips, Amy; Davies, Joanne; Kakabadse, Dimitri; Miners, Kelly; Morgan, Peter; Wen, Li; Price, David A; Wong, F Susan

    2016-06-01

    NOD mice, a model strain for human type 1 diabetes, express proinsulin (PI) in the thymus. However, insulin-reactive T cells escape negative selection, and subsequent activation of the CD8(+) T-cell clonotype G9C8, which recognizes insulin B15-23 via an αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) incorporating TRAV8-1/TRAJ9 and TRBV19/TRBJ2-3 gene rearrangements, contributes to the development of diabetes. In this study, we used fixed TRAV8-1/TRAJ9 TCRα-chain transgenic mice to assess the impact of PI isoform expression on the insulin-reactive CD8(+) T-cell repertoire. The key findings were: 1) PI2 deficiency increases the frequency of insulin B15-23-reactive TRBV19(+)CD8(+) T cells and causes diabetes; 2) insulin B15-23-reactive TRBV19(+)CD8(+) T cells are more abundant in the pancreatic lymph nodes of mice lacking PI1 and/or PI2; 3) overexpression of PI2 decreases TRBV19 usage in the global CD8(+) T-cell compartment; 4) a biased repertoire of insulin-reactive CD8(+) T cells emerges in the periphery regardless of antigen exposure; and 5) low-avidity insulin-reactive CD8(+) T cells are less affected by antigen exposure in the thymus than in the periphery. These findings inform our understanding of the diabetogenic process and reveal new avenues for therapeutic exploitation in type 1 diabetes. PMID:26953160

  6. SLAP deficiency increases TCR avidity leading to altered repertoire and negative selection of cognate antigen-specific CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Samantha F; Peterson, Lisa K; Kedl, Ross M; Dragone, Leonard L

    2013-03-01

    How T cell receptor (TCR) avidity influences CD8(+) T cell development and repertoire selection is not yet fully understood. To fill this gap, we utilized Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP)-deficient mice as a tool to increase TCR avidity on double positive (DP) thymocytes. We generated SLAP(-/-) mice with the transgenic MHC class I-restricted TCR (OT-1) and SLAP(-/-) Vβ5 mice, expressing only the β-chain of the TCR OT-1 transgene, to examine the effects of increased TCR surface levels on CD8(+) T cell development and repertoire selection. In comparing SLAP(-/-) OT-1 and Vβ5 mice with wild-type controls, we performed compositional analysis and assessed thymocyte signaling by measuring CD5 levels. In addition, we performed tetramer and compositional staining to measure affinity for the cognate antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) peptide, presented by MHC. Furthermore, we quantified differences in α-chain repertoire in SLAP(-/-) Vβ5 mice. We have found that SLAP(-/-) OT-1 mice have fewer CD8(+) thymocytes but have increased CD5 expression. SLAP(-/-) OT-1 mice have fewer DP thymocytes expressing Vα2, signifying increased endogenous α-chain rearrangement, and more non-OVA-specific CD8(+) splenocytes upon tetramer staining. Our data demonstrate that SLAP(-/-) Vβ5 mice also have fewer OVA-specific cells and increased Vα2 usage in the peripheral Vβ5 CD8(+) T cells that were non-OVA-specific, demonstrating differences in α-chain repertoire. These studies provide direct evidence that increased TCR avidity in DP thymocytes enhances CD8(+) T cell negative selection deleting thymocytes with specificity for cognate antigen, an antigen the mature T cells may never encounter. Collectively, these studies provide new insights into how TCR avidity during CD8(+) T cell development influences repertoire selection.

  7. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of adenovirus type 5 vector-induced memory CD8 T cells: not as bad as their reputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Holst, Peter Johannes; Steengaard, Sanne Skovvang; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Bartholdy, Christina; Stryhn, Anette; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2013-06-01

    It has been reported that adenovirus (Ad)-primed CD8 T cells may display a distinct and partially exhausted phenotype. Given the practical implications of this claim, we decided to analyze in detail the quality of Ad-primed CD8 T cells by directly comparing these cells to CD8 T cells induced through infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We found that localized immunization with intermediate doses of Ad vector induces a moderate number of functional CD8 T cells which qualitatively match those found in LCMV-infected mice. The numbers of these cells may be efficiently increased by additional adenoviral boosting, and, importantly, the generated secondary memory cells cannot be qualitatively differentiated from those induced by primary infection with replicating virus. Quantitatively, DNA priming prior to Ad vaccination led to even higher numbers of memory cells. In this case, the vaccination led to the generation of a population of memory cells characterized by relatively low CD27 expression and high CD127 and killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G member 1 (KLRG1) expression. These memory CD8 T cells were capable of proliferating in response to viral challenge and protecting against infection with live virus. Furthermore, viral challenge was followed by sustained expansion of the memory CD8 T-cell population, and the generated memory cells did not appear to have been driven toward exhaustive differentiation. Based on these findings, we suggest that adenovirus-based prime-boost regimens (including Ad serotype 5 [Ad5] and Ad5-like vectors) represent an effective means to induce a substantially expanded, long-lived population of high-quality transgene-specific memory CD8 T cells.

  8. Genome-wide association replicates the association of Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) polymorphisms with serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels in Hispanic children

    OpenAIRE

    Voruganti, V. Saroja.; Laston, Sandra; Haack, Karin; Mehta, Nitesh R.; Smith, C. Wayne; Cole, Shelley A.; Butte, Nancy F.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low inflammatory state characterized by elevated levels of chemokines. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a member of the cysteine-cysteine (CC) chemokine family and is increased in obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify loci regulating serum MCP-1 in obese Hispanic children from the Viva La Familia Study. A genome-wide association (GWA) analysis was performed in 815 children, ages 4-19 years, using genotypes assayed with the Illumin...

  9. The Retinoic Acid Receptor-α mediates human T-cell activation and Th2 cytokine and chemokine production

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    Key Michael

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently demonstrated that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA and 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis RA promote IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 synthesis, while decreasing IFN-γ and TNF-α expression by activated human T cells and reduces the synthesis of IL-12p70 from accessory cells. Here, we have demonstrated that the observed effects using ATRA and 9-cis RA are shared with the clinically useful RAR ligand, 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA, and the retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α-selective agonist, AM580 but not with the RAR-β/γ ligand, 4-hydroxyphenylretinamide (4-HPR. Results The increase in type 2 cytokine production by these retinoids correlated with the expression of the T cell activation markers, CD69 and CD38. The RAR-α-selective agonist, AM580 recapitulated all of the T cell activation and type 2 cytokine-inducing effects of ATRA and 9-cis-RA, while the RAR-α-selective antagonist, RO 41–5253, inhibited these effects. Conclusion These results strongly support a role for RAR-α engagement in the regulation of genes and proteins involved with human T cell activation and type 2 cytokine production.

  10. Cutting edge: CXCR4 is critical for CD8+ memory T cell homeostatic self-renewal but not rechallenge self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Julie; Nish, Simone A; Lin, Wen-Hsuan W; Rothman, Nyanza J; Ding, Lei; Wherry, E John; Reiner, Steven L

    2014-08-01

    Central memory (CM) CD8(+) T cells "remember" prior encounters because they maintain themselves through cell division in the absence of ongoing challenge (homeostatic self-renewal), as well as reproduce the CM fate while manufacturing effector cells during secondary Ag encounters (rechallenge self-renewal). We tested the consequence of conditional deletion of the bone marrow homing receptor CXCR4 on antiviral T cell responses. CXCR4-deficient CD8(+) T cells have impaired memory cell maintenance due to defective homeostatic proliferation. Upon rechallenge, however, CXCR4-deficient T cells can re-expand and renew the CM pool while producing secondary effector cells. The critical bone marrow-derived signals essential for CD8(+) T cell homeostatic self-renewal appear to be dispensable to yield self-renewing, functionally asymmetric cell fates during rechallenge.

  11. Cyclophosphamide chemotherapy sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL-dependent CD8 T cell-mediated immune attack resulting in suppression of tumor growth.

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    Robbert G van der Most

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-cancer chemotherapy can be simultaneously lymphodepleting and immunostimulatory. Pre-clinical models clearly demonstrate that chemotherapy can synergize with immunotherapy, raising the question how the immune system can be mobilized to generate anti-tumor immune responses in the context of chemotherapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used a mouse model of malignant mesothelioma, AB1-HA, to investigate T cell-dependent tumor resolution after chemotherapy. Established AB1-HA tumors were cured by a single dose of cyclophosphamide in a CD8 T cell- and NK cell-dependent manner. This treatment was associated with an IFN-alpha/beta response and a profound negative impact on the anti-tumor and total CD8 T cell responses. Despite this negative effect, CD8 T cells were essential for curative responses. The important effector molecules used by the anti-tumor immune response included IFN-gamma and TRAIL. The importance of TRAIL was supported by experiments in nude mice where the lack of functional T cells could be compensated by agonistic anti-TRAIL-receptor (DR5 antibodies. CONCLUSION: The data support a model in which chemotherapy sensitizes tumor cells for T cell-, and possibly NK cell-, mediated apoptosis. A key role of tumor cell sensitization to immune attack is supported by the role of TRAIL in tumor resolution and explains the paradox of successful CD8 T cell-dependent anti-tumor responses in the absence of CD8 T cell expansion.

  12. Generation of clinical-grade CD19-specific CAR-modified CD8+ memory stem cells for the treatment of human B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Marianna; Hu, Jinhui; Sommariva, Michele; Gautam, Sanjivan; Fellowes, Vicki; Hocker, James D; Dougherty, Sean; Qin, Haiying; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Fry, Terry J; Gress, Ronald E; Kochenderfer, James N; Stroncek, David F; Ji, Yun; Gattinoni, Luca

    2016-07-28

    Long-lived, self-renewing, multipotent T memory stem cells (TSCM) can trigger profound and sustained tumor regression but their rareness poses a major hurdle to their clinical application. Presently, clinically compliant procedures to generate relevant numbers of this T-cell population are undefined. Here, we provide a strategy for deriving large numbers of clinical-grade tumor-redirected TSCM starting from naive precursors. CD8(+)CD62L(+)CD45RA(+) naive T cells enriched by streptamer-based serial-positive selection were activated by CD3/CD28 engagement in the presence of interleukin-7 (IL-7), IL-21, and the glycogen synthase-3β inhibitor TWS119, and genetically engineered to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CD19-CAR). These conditions enabled the generation of CD19-CAR-modified CD8(+) TSCM that were phenotypically, functionally, and transcriptomically equivalent to their naturally occurring counterpart. Compared with CD8(+) T cells generated with clinical protocols currently under investigation, CD19-CAR-modified CD8(+) TSCM exhibited enhanced metabolic fitness and mediated robust, long-lasting antitumor responses against systemic acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. This clinical-grade platform provides the basis for a phase 1 trial evaluating the activity of CD19-CAR-modified CD8(+) TSCM in patients with B-cell malignancies refractory to prior allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27226436

  13. Linfocitos T citotóxicos CD8+ en la leishmaniasis cutánea CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes in cutaneous leishmaniasis

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    Joselín Hernández-Ruiz

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Examinar la bibliografía relacionada con la participación de los linfocitos T CD8+ en la reacción inmunitaria a especies de Leishmania causantes de leishmaniasis cutánea. En esta enfermedad se ha resaltado la intervención de macrófagos, células dendríticas, NK y células T CD4+; sin embargo, es poco lo que se conoce de las células T CD8+. Los trabajos en modelos murinos señalan que la participación de las células CD8+ sucede a través de la producción de IFN-gamma, aunque su capacidad citotóxica puede desempeñar una función importante, como lo demuestran los hallazgos en seres humanos. La forma como se activan las células citotóxicas CD8+ es un enigma. Es posible que las células dendríticas realicen esa labor a través de mecanismos que incluyen transpresentación de antígenos. Comprender la contribución de este subtipo celular en la respuesta inmunitaria a Leishmania aportará novedosos conocimientos sobre la fisiopatogenia de la leishmaniasis, lo cual hará posible desarrollar nuevos enfoques terapéuticos para esta parasitosis.OBJECTIVE: Review of the literature on the role of CD8+ T cell in the immune response against Leishmania species that cause cutaneous leishmaniasis. The role of macrophages, dendritic cells, CD4 T cells and NK cells has been extensively analyzed in leishmaniasis, yet very little knowledge has been gained on CD8+ T cells in this disease. Murine models of leishmaniasis suggest that CD8+ T cells participate through IFNg production, yet their cytotoxic capacity may also play a crucial role, as has been found in human disease. It is an enigma what mechanisms underlie the CD8+ T cell activation. It is possible that dendritic cells activate CD8+ T cells through mechanisms that include antigen traspresentation. A better understanding of CD8+ T cells in the immune response against Leishmania will undoubtedly provide new insights into the physiopathogenesis of the disease that could lead to new

  14. CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) T Lymphocytes in Patients with Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żabińska, Marcelina; Krajewska, Magdalena; Kościelska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The results of studies on the CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells in SLE are inconsistent since several analyses describe CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) as either immunosuppressive or cytotoxic. The aim of this study is to inquire whether the quantitative changes of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) T lymphocytes subpopulation are related to the clinical status of patients with lupus nephritis. Evaluation of Foxp3 expression on CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells may shed some light on functional properties of these cells. 54 adult SLE patients and 19 sex and age matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. There were 15 patients in inactive (SLEDAI ≤ 5) and 39 in active (SLEDAI > 5) phase of disease. We determined absolute count of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) and CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-)Foxp3(+) subpopulations by flow cytometry. We observed a statistically significant increase in absolute count and percentage of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) in SLE patients compared to HC (p < 0.001). Moreover there was significant positive correlation between increasing absolute count of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells and disease activity measured by SLEDAI (rs = 0.281, p = 0.038). Active LN patients had increased absolute count of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells compared to HC. Positive correlation of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) number with disease activity, and lack of Foxp3 expression on these cells, suggests that CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) lymphocytes might be responsible for an increased proinflammatory response in the exacerbation of SLE. PMID:27446964

  15. Distribution, characterization, and induction of CD8+ regulatory T cells and IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

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    Li Jiang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD8+ effector cells often have an antitumor function in patients with cancer. However, CD8+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tcregs and interleukin (IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells (Tc17 cells also derive from the CD8+ T cell lineage. Their role in the antitumor response remains largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the distribution, characterization, and generation of CD8+ Tcregs and Tc17 cells in NPC patients. Methods Peripheral blood and tumor biopsy tissues from 21 newly diagnosed patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC were collected, along with peripheral blood from 21 healthy donors. The biological characteristics of Tcregs and Tc17 cells from blood and tumor tissues were examined by intracellular staining, tetramer staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analysis. The suppressive function of Tcregs was investigated using a proliferation assay that involved co-culture of sorted CD8+CD25+ T cells with naïve CD4+ T cells in vitro. Results We observed an increased prevalence of Tcregs and Tc17 cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs and different distribution among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in NPC patients. Cytokine profiles showed that the Tcregs expressed a high level of IL-10 and low level of transforming growth factor β, whereas Tc17 cells expressed a high level of tumor necrosis factor α. Interestingly, both subsets expressed a high level of interferon γ in TILs, and the Tcregs suppressed naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation by a cell contact-dependent mechanism in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrated the existence of Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein (LMP 1 and LMP2 antigen-specific Tcregs in NPC. Conclusions Our data provide new insights into the composition and function of CD8+ T-cell subsets in NPC, which may have an important influence on NPC immunotherapy.

  16. Why Do CD8+ T Cells become Indifferent to Tumors: A Dynamic Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Colin; Zhang, Ranran; Haley, Jeremy S; Liu, Xin; Loughran, Thomas; Schell, Todd D; Albert, Réka; Thakar, Juilee

    2011-01-01

    CD8+ T cells have the potential to influence the outcome of cancer pathogenesis, including complete tumor eradication or selection of malignant tumor escape variants. The Simian virus 40 large T-antigen (Tag) oncoprotein promotes tumor formation in Tag-transgenic mice and also provides multiple target determinants (sites) for responding CD8+ T cells in C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice. To understand the in vivo quantitative dynamics of CD8+ T cells after encountering Tag, we constructed a dynamic model from in vivo-generated data to simulate the interactions between Tag-expressing cells and CD8+ T cells in distinct scenarios including immunization of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and of Tag-transgenic mice that develop various tumors. In these scenarios the model successfully reproduces the dynamics of both the Tag-expressing cells and antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. The model predicts that the tolerance of the site-specific T cells is dependent on their apoptosis rates and that the net growth of CD8+ T cells is altered in transgenic mice. We experimentally validate both predictions. Our results indicate that site-specific CD8+ T cells have tissue-specific apoptosis rates affecting their tolerance to the tumor antigen. Moreover, the model highlights differences in apoptosis rates that contribute to compromised CD8+ T cell responses and tumor progression, knowledge of which is essential for development of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:21808621

  17. Heterogeneity in the differentiation and function of CD8⁺ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Visekruna, Alexander; Huber, Magdalena

    2014-12-01

    It is well established that CD8(+) T cells constitute an important branch of adaptive immunity contributing to clearance of intracellular pathogens and providing long-term protection. These functions are mostly fulfilled by the best characterized subpopulation of CD8(+) T cells, the cytotoxic T lymphocytes (also called Tc1 cells), owing to their ability to kill infected cells and to secrete cytokines such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. However, there is growing evidence for alternative CD8(+) T cell fates influencing CD4(+) T-cell-mediated responses in the context of allergy, autoimmunity and infections. Thus, like subpopulations of CD4(+) T cells, also CD8(+) T cells under particular conditions acquire the expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-13, IL-17 or suppressive activity and thereby influence immune responses. The process of CD8(+) T-cell differentiation is dictated by antigen strength, co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines. These environmental cues induce transcription factors further specifying CD8(+) T-cell decision into Tc1, Tc2, Tc9, Tc17 or CD8(+) T regulatory fate. Here, we discuss our current understanding about functional diversity of effector CD8(+) T cells and contribution of transcription factors to this process. PMID:24879097

  18. Identification of heme oxygenase-1-specific regulatory CD8+ T cells in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Sørensen, Rikke Baek; Brimnes, Marie K;

    2009-01-01

    the antigens they recognize. Here, we describe what we believe to be the first natural target for CD8+ Tregs. Naturally occurring HLA-A2-restricted CD8+ T cells specific for the antiinflammatory molecule heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were able to suppress cellular immune responses with outstanding efficacy...

  19. Why Do CD8 + T Cells Become Indifferent To Tumors: A Dynamic Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin eCampbell

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells have the potential to influence the outcome of cancer pathogenesis, including complete tumor eradication or selection of malignant tumor escape variants. The Simian virus 40 large T-antigen oncoprotein promotes tumor formation in T-antigen transgenic mice and also provides multiple target determinants (sites for responding CD8+ T cells in C57BL/6 (H-2b mice. To understand the in vivo quantitative dynamics of CD8+ T cells after encountering T-antigen, we constructed a dynamic model from in vivo-generated data to simulate the interactions between T-antigen expressing cells and CD8+ T cells in distinct scenarios including immunization of wild type C57BL/6 mice and of T-antigen transgenic mice that develop various tumors. In these scenarios the model successfully reproduces the dynamics of both the T-antigen-expressing cells and antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses. The model predicts that the tolerance of the site-specific T cells is dependent on their apoptosis rates and that the net growth of CD8+ T cells is altered in transgenic mice. We experimentally validate both predictions. Our results indicate that site-specific CD8+ T cells have tissue-specific apoptosis rates affecting their tolerance to the tumor antigen. Moreover, the model highlights differences in apoptosis rates that contribute to compromised CD8+ T cell responses and tumor progression, knowledge of which is essential for development of cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Transient Surface CCR5 Expression by Naive CD8+ T Cells within Inflamed Lymph Nodes Is Dependent on High Endothelial Venule Interaction and Augments Th Cell-Dependent Memory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, David; Su, Charles A; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Dorand, R Dixon; Myers, Jay; Liou, Rachel; Nthale, Joseph; Huang, Alex Y

    2016-05-01

    In inflamed lymph nodes, Ag-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells encounter Ag-bearing dendritic cells and, together, this complex enhances the release of CCL3 and CCL4, which facilitate additional interaction with naive CD8(+) T cells. Although blocking CCL3 and CCL4 has no effect on primary CD8(+) T cell responses, it dramatically impairs the development of memory CD8(+) T cells upon Ag rechallenge. Despite the absence of detectable surface CCR5 expression on circulating native CD8(+) T cells, these data imply that naive CD8(+) T cells are capable of expressing surface CCR5 prior to cognate Ag-induced TCR signaling in inflamed lymph nodes; however, the molecular mechanisms have not been characterized to date. In this study, we show that CCR5, the receptor for CCL3 and CCL4, can be transiently upregulated on a subset of naive CD8(+) T cells and that this upregulation is dependent on direct contact with the high endothelial venule in inflamed lymph node. Binding of CD62L and CD11a on T cells to their ligands CD34 and CD54 on the high endothelial venule can be enhanced during inflammation. This enhanced binding and subsequent signaling promote the translocation of CCR5 molecules from intracellular vesicles to the surface of the CD8(+) T cell. The upregulation of CCR5 on the surface of the CD8(+) T cells increases the number of contacts with Ag-bearing dendritic cells, which ultimately results in increased CD8(+) T cell response to Ag rechallenge.

  1. Tuberculosis-specific CD8 cells in HLA A*02-positive TB- and LTBI patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Brix, Liselotte; Wejse, Christian;

    Background: Understanding the CD8+ response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) may be a key to improved TB diagnostics and vaccine development. Aims and Objectives: To detect a CD8+ T-cell response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in active tuberculosis (TB) and latent TB (LTBI), in...... candidates, from which we constructed MHC multimers (Dextramers). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 7 TB-patients, 16 LTBI patients and 8 MTB-exposed, IGRA-negative, healthy subjects (HE), all HLA A*02 positive, were stained with the Dextramers and with anti-CD8 and anti-CD3, and analyzed on a...... flow cytometer. The MTB epitopes were analyzed in 5 pools (3-7 epitopes each). Positive responses included >0.001 % of CD8+, CD3+ cells, supported by inspection of flow cytometry plots. Results: MTB-specific CD8+ T-cells were detected more often in TB patients (57%) than in LTBI patients (41%) and in...

  2. CD152 (CTLA-4) regulates effector functions of CD8+ T lymphocytes by repressing Eomesodermin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Johannes K; Knieke, Karin; Kolar, Paula; Reiner, Steven L; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2009-03-01

    CD8(+) T lymphocytes are required for effective host defense against pathogens and also for mediating effector responses against uncontrolled proliferating self-tissues. In this study, we determine that individual CD8(+) T cells are tightly controlled in their effector functions by CD152 (CTLA-4). We demonstrate that signals induced by CD152 reduce the frequency of IFN-gamma and granzyme B expressing CD8(+) T cells independently of the transcription factors T-bet or cKrox by selectively inhibiting accumulation of Eomesodermin mRNA and protein. Ectopic expression of Eomesodermin reversed the CD152-mediated inhibition of effector molecule production. Additionally, enhanced cytotoxicity of individual CD8(+) T cells differentiated in the absence of CD152 signaling was determined in vivo. These novel insights extend our understanding of how immune responses of CD8(+) T cells are selectively modulated.

  3. Protective and Pathogenic Roles of CD8+ T Lymphocytes in Murine Orientia tsutsugamushi Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Matthias; Kolbaum, Julia; Lilla, Stefanie; Wozniak, David; Gharaibeh, Mohammad; Fleischer, Bernhard; Keller, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    T cells are known to contribute to immune protection against scrub typhus, a potentially fatal infection caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia (O.) tsutsugamushi. However, the contribution of CD8+ T cells to protection and pathogenesis during O. tsutsugamushi infection is still unknown. Using our recently developed BALB/c mouse model that is based on footpad inoculation of the human-pathogenic Karp strain, we show that activated CD8+ T cells infiltrate spleen and lung during the third week of infection. Depletion of CD8+ T cells with monoclonal antibodies resulted in uncontrolled pathogen growth and mortality. Adoptive transfer of CD8+ T cells from infected animals protected naïve BALB/c mice from lethal outcome of intraperitoneal challenge. In C57Bl/6 mice, the pulmonary lymphocyte compartment showed an increased percentage of CD8+ T cells for at least 135 days post O. tsutsugamushi infection. Depletion of CD8+ T cells at 84 days post infection caused reactivation of bacterial growth. In CD8+ T cell-deficient beta 2-microglobulin knockout mice, bacterial replication was uncontrolled, and all mice succumbed to the infection, despite higher serum IFN-γ levels and stronger macrophage responses in liver and lung. Moreover, we show that CD8+ T cells but not NKT cells were required for hepatocyte injury: elevated concentrations of serum alanine aminotransferase and infection-induced subcapsular necrotic liver lesions surrounded by macrophages were found in C57Bl/6 and CD1d-deficient mice, but not in beta 2-microglobulin knockout mice. In the lungs, peribronchial macrophage infiltrations also depended on CD8+ T cells. In summary, our results demonstrate that CD8+ T cells restrict growth of O. tsutsugamushi during acute and persistent infection, and are required to protect from lethal infections in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. However, they also elicit specific pathologic tissue lesions in liver and lung. PMID:27606708

  4. HDAC1 controls CD8+ T cell homeostasis and antiviral response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Tschismarov

    Full Text Available Reversible lysine acetylation plays an important role in the regulation of T cell responses. HDAC1 has been shown to control peripheral T helper cells, however the role of HDAC1 in CD8+ T cell function remains elusive. By using conditional gene targeting approaches, we show that LckCre-mediated deletion of HDAC1 led to reduced numbers of thymocytes as well as peripheral T cells, and to an increased fraction of CD8+CD4- cells within the CD3/TCRβlo population, indicating that HDAC1 is essential for the efficient progression of immature CD8+CD4- cells to the DP stage. Moreover, CD44hi effector CD8+ T cells were enhanced in mice with a T cell-specific deletion of HDAC1 under homeostatic conditions and HDAC1-deficient CD44hi CD8+ T cells produced more IFNγ upon ex vivo PMA/ionomycin stimulation in comparison to wild-type cells. Naïve (CD44l°CD62L+ HDAC1-null CD8+ T cells displayed a normal proliferative response, produced similar amounts of IL-2 and TNFα, slightly enhanced amounts of IFNγ, and their in vivo cytotoxicity was normal in the absence of HDAC1. However, T cell-specific loss of HDAC1 led to a reduced anti-viral CD8+ T cell response upon LCMV infection and impaired expansion of virus-specific CD8+ T cells. Taken together, our data indicate that HDAC1 is required for the efficient generation of thymocytes and peripheral T cells, for proper CD8+ T cell homeostasis and for an efficient in vivo expansion and activation of CD8+ T cells in response to LCMV infection.

  5. Circulating human CD4 and CD8 T cells do not have large intracellular pools of CCR5

    OpenAIRE

    Pilch-Cooper, Heather A.; Sieg, Scott F.; Hope, Thomas J.; Koons, Ann; Escola, Jean-Michel; Offord, Robin; Veazey, Ronald S.; Mosier, Donald E.; Clagett, Brian; Medvik, Kathy; Jadlowsky, Julie K; Chance, Mark R.; Kiselar, Janna G.; Hoxie, James A.; Collman, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    CC Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5) is an important mediator of chemotaxis and the primary coreceptor for HIV-1. A recent report by other researchers suggested that primary T cells harbor pools of intracellular CCR5. With the use of a series of complementary techniques to measure CCR5 expression (antibody labeling, Western blot, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction), we established that intracellular pools of CCR5 do not exist and that the results obtained by the other rese...

  6. Expression of chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 in folliculostellate (FS) cells of the rat anterior pituitary gland: the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis induces interconnection of FS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Ilmiawati, Cimi; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    The anterior pituitary gland is composed of five types of hormone-producing cells plus folliculostellate (FS) cells, which do not produce classical anterior pituitary hormones. FS cells are interconnected by cytoplasmic processes and encircle hormone-producing cells or aggregate homophilically. Using living-cell imaging of primary culture, we recently reported that some FS cells precisely extend their cytoplasmic processes toward other FS cells and form interconnections with them. These phenomena suggest the presence of a chemoattractant factor that facilitates the interconnection. In this study, we attempted to discover the factor that induces interconnection of FS cells and succeeded in identifying chemokine (CXC)-L12 and its receptor CXCR4 as potential candidate molecules. CXCL12 is a chemokine of the CXC subfamily. It exerts its effects via CXCR4, a G protein-coupled receptor. The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is a potent chemoattractant for many types of neural cells. First, we revealed that CXCL12 and CXCR4 are expressed by FS cells in rat anterior pituitary gland. Next, to clarify the function of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in FS cells, we observed living anterior pituitary cells in primary culture with specific CXCL12 inhibitor or CXCR4 antagonist and noted that extension of cytoplasmic processes and interconnection of FS cells were inhibited. Finally, we examined FS cell migration and invasion by using Matrigel matrix assays. CXCL12 treatment resulted in markedly increased FS cell migration and invasion. These data suggest that FS cells express chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 and that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis evokes interconnection of FS cells.

  7. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolton Michael J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120 and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM. Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC. A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans.

  8. 趋化因子及受体在银屑病发病机制中的研究进展%Chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis of psoriasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏金玉; 何焱玲

    2014-01-01

    银屑病的发病机制复杂,涉及到免疫、炎症等多个方面.趋化因子及其受体作为介导炎症及免疫反应的桥梁,参与自身免疫、感染、肿瘤和血管等多种疾病的病理过程.近年来,研究发现,银屑病患者存在多种趋化因子及其受体系统的异常表达,趋化因子及其受体通过一系列级联反应参与银屑病的发生发展.概述趋化因子及其受体在银屑病中的研究进展,以期在分子水平进一步探讨银屑病的发病机制.%The pathogenesis of psoriasis is complex,and involves multiple factors such as immunity and inflammation.As one of the mediators of inflammation and immune response,chemokines and their receptors participate in the pathological process of many diseases,such as autoimmune diseases,infection,tumor and vascular diseases.Recently,it has been revealed that many chemokines and their receptors are abnormally expressed in patients with psoriasis,which may be involved in the formation and development of psoriasis via a series of cascade reactions.This paper presents recent advances in the research about chemokines and their receptors in psoriasis,in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of psoriasis at the molecular level.

  9. Neuropilin-1 expression is induced on tolerant self-reactive CD8+ T cells but is dispensable for the tolerant phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie R Jackson

    Full Text Available Establishing peripheral CD8(+ T cell tolerance is vital to avoid immune mediated destruction of healthy self-tissues. However, it also poses a major impediment to tumor immunity since tumors are derived from self-tissue and often induce T cell tolerance and dysfunction. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that regulate T cell tolerance versus immunity has important implications for human health. Signals received from the tissue environment largely dictate whether responding T cells become activated or tolerant. For example, induced expression and subsequent ligation of negative regulatory receptors on the surface of self-reactive CD8(+ T cells are integral in the induction of tolerance. We utilized a murine model of T cell tolerance to more completely define the molecules involved in this process. We discovered that, in addition to other known regulatory receptors, tolerant self-reactive CD8(+ T cells distinctly expressed the surface receptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp1. Nrp1 was highly induced in response to self-antigen, but only modestly when the same antigen was encountered under immune conditions, suggesting a possible mechanistic link to T cell tolerance. We also observed a similar Nrp1 expression profile on human tumor infiltrating CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. Despite high expression on tolerant CD8(+ T cells, our studies revealed that Nrp1 had no detectable role in the tolerant phenotype. Specifically, Nrp1-deficient T cells displayed the same functional defects as wild-type self-reactive T cells, lacking in vivo cytolytic potential, IFNγ production, and antitumor responses. While reporting mostly negative data, our findings have therapeutic implications, as Nrp1 is now being targeted for human cancer therapy in clinical trials, but the precise molecular pathways and immune cells being engaged during treatment remain incompletely defined.

  10. Identification of biomarkers to measure HIV-specific mucosal and systemic CD8(+) T-cell immunity using single cell Fluidigm 48.48 Dynamic arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Shubhanshi; Neeman, Teresa; Jackson, Ronald J; Ranasinghe, Roshanka; Jack, Cameron; Ranasinghe, Charani

    2015-12-16

    Thirty genes composed of cytokines, chemokines, granzymes, perforin and integrins were evaluated in gut and splenic K(d)Gag197-205-specific single CD8(+) T cells using Fluidigm 48.48 Dynamic arrays, with the aim of identifying biomarkers to predict effective mucosal and systemic vaccine efficacy. The mRNA expression profiles were analyzed in three ways: (i) the "number" of K(d)Gag197-205-specific CD8(+) T cells expressing the biomarker, (ii) "level" of mRNA expression using principal component analysis (PCA) and (iii) poly-functionality in relation to RANTES expression. In total, 21 genes were found to be differentially expressed between the vaccine groups and the immune compartments tested. Overall, the PCA indicated that IL-13Rα2 or IL-4R antagonist adjuvanted vaccines that previously induced high-avidity mucosal/systemic CD8(+) T cells with better protective efficacy, the "level" of mRNA expression, specifically RANTES, MIP-1β, and integrin α4 in gut K(d)Gag197-205-specific single CD8(+) T cells, were significantly elevated compared to unadjuvanted vaccine. Furthermore, significantly elevated granzymes/perforin levels were detected in IL-13(-/-) mice given the unadjuvanted vaccine, indicating that the degree of IL-13 inhibition (total, transient or no inhibition) can considerably alter the level of T-cell activity/poly-functionality. When splenic- and gut-K(d)Gag197-205-specific CD8(+) T cells were compared, PC1 vs. PC2 scores revealed that not only RANTES, MIP-1β, and integrin α4 mRNA, but also perforin, granzymes A/B, and integrins β1 and β2 mRNA were elevated in spleen. Collectively, data suggest that RANTES, MIP-1β, perforin, and integrins α4, β1 and β7 mRNA in single HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells could be used as a measure of effective mucosal and systemic vaccine efficacy. PMID:26519547

  11. The Influence of Immunization Route, Tissue Microenvironment, and Cytokine Cell Milieu on HIV-Specific CD8+ T Cells Measured Using Fluidigm Dynamic Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Shubhanshi; Ranasinghe, Charani

    2015-01-01

    Thirty different genes including cytokines, chemokines, granzymes, perforin and specifically integrins were evaluated in Peyer's patch-KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells (pools of 100 cells) using Fluidigm 48.48 Dynamic arrays following three different prime-boost immunization strategies. Data revealed that the route of prime or the booster immunization differentially influenced the integrin expression profile on gut KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells. Specifically, elevated numbers of integrin αE and αD expressing gut KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells were detected following mucosal but not systemic priming. Also, αE/β7 and αD/β2 heterodimerization were more noticeable in an intranasal (i.n.)/i.n. vaccination setting compared to i.n./intramuscular (i.m) or i.m./i.m. vaccinations. Moreover, in all vaccine groups tested α4 appeared to heterodimerize more closely with β7 then β1. Also MIP-1β, RANTES, CCR5, perforin and integrin α4 bio-markers were significantly elevated in i.n./i.m. and i.m./i.m. immunization groups compared to purely mucosal i.n./i.n. delivery. Furthermore, when wild type (WT) BALB/c and IL-13 knockout (KO) mice were immunized using i.n./i.m. strategy, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, integrins α4, β1 and β7 mRNA expression levels were found to be significantly different, in mucosal verses systemic KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, the numbers of gut KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells expressing gut-homing markers α4β7 and CCR9 protein were also significantly elevated in IL-13 KO compared to WT control. Collectively, our findings further corroborate that the route of vaccine delivery, tissue microenvironment and IL-13 depleted cytokine milieu can significantly alter the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell gene expression profiles and in turn modulate their functional avidities as well as homing capabilities. PMID:25946028

  12. The Influence of Immunization Route, Tissue Microenvironment, and Cytokine Cell Milieu on HIV-Specific CD8+ T Cells Measured Using Fluidigm Dynamic Arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhanshi Trivedi

    Full Text Available Thirty different genes including cytokines, chemokines, granzymes, perforin and specifically integrins were evaluated in Peyer's patch-KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells (pools of 100 cells using Fluidigm 48.48 Dynamic arrays following three different prime-boost immunization strategies. Data revealed that the route of prime or the booster immunization differentially influenced the integrin expression profile on gut KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells. Specifically, elevated numbers of integrin αE and αD expressing gut KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells were detected following mucosal but not systemic priming. Also, αE/β7 and αD/β2 heterodimerization were more noticeable in an intranasal (i.n./i.n. vaccination setting compared to i.n./intramuscular (i.m or i.m./i.m. vaccinations. Moreover, in all vaccine groups tested α4 appeared to heterodimerize more closely with β7 then β1. Also MIP-1β, RANTES, CCR5, perforin and integrin α4 bio-markers were significantly elevated in i.n./i.m. and i.m./i.m. immunization groups compared to purely mucosal i.n./i.n. delivery. Furthermore, when wild type (WT BALB/c and IL-13 knockout (KO mice were immunized using i.n./i.m. strategy, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, integrins α4, β1 and β7 mRNA expression levels were found to be significantly different, in mucosal verses systemic KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, the numbers of gut KdGag197-205-specific CD8+ T cells expressing gut-homing markers α4β7 and CCR9 protein were also significantly elevated in IL-13 KO compared to WT control. Collectively, our findings further corroborate that the route of vaccine delivery, tissue microenvironment and IL-13 depleted cytokine milieu can significantly alter the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell gene expression profiles and in turn modulate their functional avidities as well as homing capabilities.

  13. Accelerated in vivo proliferation of memory phenotype CD4+ T-cells in human HIV-1 infection irrespective of viral chemokine co-receptor tropism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available CD4(+ T-cell loss is the hallmark of HIV-1 infection. CD4 counts fall more rapidly in advanced disease when CCR5-tropic viral strains tend to be replaced by X4-tropic viruses. We hypothesized: (i that the early dominance of CCR5-tropic viruses results from faster turnover rates of CCR5(+ cells, and (ii that X4-tropic strains exert greater pathogenicity by preferentially increasing turnover rates within the CXCR4(+ compartment. To test these hypotheses we measured in vivo turnover rates of CD4(+ T-cell subpopulations sorted by chemokine receptor expression, using in vivo deuterium-glucose labeling. Deuterium enrichment was modeled to derive in vivo proliferation (p and disappearance (d* rates which were related to viral tropism data. 13 healthy controls and 13 treatment-naive HIV-1-infected subjects (CD4 143-569 cells/ul participated. CCR5-expression defined a CD4(+ subpopulation of predominantly CD45R0(+ memory cells with accelerated in vivo proliferation (p = 2.50 vs 1.60%/d, CCR5(+ vs CCR5(-; healthy controls; P<0.01. Conversely, CXCR4 expression defined CD4(+ T-cells (predominantly CD45RA(+ naive cells with low turnover rates. The dominant effect of HIV infection was accelerated turnover of CCR5(+CD45R0(+CD4(+ memory T-cells (p = 5.16 vs 2.50%/d, HIV vs controls; P<0.05, naïve cells being relatively unaffected. Similar patterns were observed whether the dominant circulating HIV-1 strain was R5-tropic (n = 9 or X4-tropic (n = 4. Although numbers were small, X4-tropic viruses did not appear to specifically drive turnover of CXCR4-expressing cells (p = 0.54 vs 0.72 vs 0.44%/d in control, R5-tropic, and X4-tropic groups respectively. Our data are most consistent with models in which CD4(+ T-cell loss is primarily driven by non-specific immune activation.

  14. A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of CCX282-B, an orally-administered blocker of chemokine receptor CCR9, for patients with Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Keshav

    Full Text Available CCX282-B, also called vercirnon, is a specific, orally-administered chemokine receptor CCR9 antagonist that regulates migration and activation of inflammatory cells in the intestine. This randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CCX282-B in 436 patients with Crohn's disease. Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI scores were 250-450 and C-reactive protein >7.5 mg/L at study entry. In addition to stable concomitant Crohn's medication (85% of subjects, subjects received placebo or CCX282-B (250 mg once daily, 250 mg twice daily, or 500 mg once daily for 12 weeks. They then received 250 mg CCX282-B twice daily, open-label, through week 16. Subjects who had a clinical response (a ≥ 70 point drop in CDAI at week 16 were randomly assigned to groups given placebo or CCX282-B (250 mg, twice daily for 36 weeks. Primary endpoints were clinical response at Week 8 and sustained clinical response at Week 52. During the 12-week Induction period, the clinical response was highest in the group given 500 mg CCX282-B once daily. Response rates at week 8 were 49% in the placebo group, 52% in the group given CCX282-B 250 mg once daily (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12; p = .667 vs placebo, 48% in the group given CCX282-B 250 mg twice daily (OR = 0.95; p = .833, and 60% in the group given CCX282-B 500 mg once daily (OR = 1.53; p = .111. At week 12, response rates were 47%, 56% (OR = 1.44; p = .168, 49% (OR = 1.07; p = .792, and 61% (OR = 1.74; p = .039, respectively. At the end of the Maintenance period (week 52, 47% of subjects on CCX282-B were in remission, compared to 31% on placebo (OR = 2.01; p = .012; 46% showed sustained clinical responses, compared to 42% on placebo (OR = 1.14; p = .629. CCX282-B was well tolerated. Encouraging results from this clinical trial led to initiation of Phase 3 clinical trials in Crohn's disease.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00306215.

  15. Human MAIT and CD8αα cells develop from a pool of type-17 precommitted CD8+ T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Lucy J.; Kang, Yu-Hoi; Smith, Matthew O.; Tharmalingham, Hannah; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Fleming, Vicki M.; Sahgal, Natasha; Leslie, Alistair; Oo, Ye; Geremia, Alessandra; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hanekom, Willem A; Lauer, Georg M.; Lantz, Olivier; Adams, David H

    2012-01-01

    Human mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) CD8+ and Tc17 cells are important tissue-homing cell populations, characterized by high expression of CD161 (++) and type-17 differentiation, but their origins and relationships remain poorly defined. By transcriptional and functional analyses, we demonstrate that a pool of polyclonal, precommitted type-17 CD161++CD8αβ+ T cells exist in cord blood, from which a prominent MAIT cell (TCR Vα7.2+) population emerges post-natally. During this expansion, ...

  16. DOCK8 deficiency impairs CD8 T cell survival and function in humans and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Katrina L.; Chan, Stephanie S.-Y.; Ma, Cindy S.; Fung, Ivan; Mei, Yan; Yabas, Mehmet; Tan, Andy; Arkwright, Peter D.; Al Suwairi, Wafaa; Lugo Reyes, Saul Oswaldo; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco A.; de la Luz Garcia-Cruz, Maria; Smart, Joanne M.; Picard, Capucine; Okada, Satoshi; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Lambe, Teresa; Cornall, Richard J.; Russell, Sarah; Oliaro, Jane; Tangye, Stuart G.; Bertram, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    In humans, DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome is characterized by severe cutaneous viral infections. Thus, CD8 T cell function may be compromised in the absence of DOCK8. In this study, by analyzing mutant mice and humans, we demonstrate a critical, intrinsic role for DOCK8 in peripheral CD8 T cell survival and function. DOCK8 mutation selectively diminished the abundance of circulating naive CD8 T cells in both species, and in DOCK8-deficient humans, most CD8 T cells displayed an exhausted CD45RA+CCR7− phenotype. Analyses in mice revealed the CD8 T cell abnormalities to be cell autonomous and primarily postthymic. DOCK8 mutant naive CD8 T cells had a shorter lifespan and, upon encounter with antigen on dendritic cells, exhibited poor LFA-1 synaptic polarization and a delay in the first cell division. Although DOCK8 mutant T cells underwent near-normal primary clonal expansion after primary infection with recombinant influenza virus in vivo, they showed greatly reduced memory cell persistence and recall. These findings highlight a key role for DOCK8 in the survival and function of human and mouse CD8 T cells. PMID:22006977

  17. G0S2 modulates homeostatic proliferation of naïve CD8⁺ T cells and inhibits oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping-Hsien; Yamada, Takeshi; Park, Chun Shik; Shen, Ye; Puppi, Monica; Lacorazza, H Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Since its discovery, diverse functions have been attributed to the G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2), from lipid metabolism to control of cell proliferation. Our group showed for the first time that G0S2 promotes quiescence in hematopoietic stem cells by interacting with and retaining nucleolin around the nucleus. Herein, we report the role of G0S2 in the differentiation and function of CD8(+) T cells examined in mice with an embryonic deletion of the G0s2 gene. G0S2 expression in naïve CD8(+) T cells decreased immediately after T-cell receptor activation downstream of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, calcium/calmodulin, phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Surprisingly, G0S2-null naïve CD8(+) T cells displayed increased basal and spare respiratory capacity that was not associated with increased mitochondrial biogenesis but with increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase α. Naïve CD8(+) T cells showed increased proliferation in response to in vitro activation and in vivo lymphopenia; however, naïve CD8(+) T cells expressing the OT-1 transgene exhibited normal differentiation of naïve cells to effector and memory CD8(+) T cells upon infection with Listeria monocytogenes in a wild-type or a G0s2-null environment, with increased circulating levels of free fatty acids. Collectively, our results suggest that G0S2 inhibits energy production by oxidative phosphorylation to fine-tune proliferation in homeostatic conditions. PMID:25666096

  18. Age and CD161 expression contribute to inter-individual variation in interleukin-23 response in CD8+ memory human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Shen

    Full Text Available The interleukin-23 (IL-23 pathway plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic inflammatory disorders, however, inter-individual variability in IL-23-induced signal transduction in circulating human lymphocytes has not been well-defined. In this study, we observed marked, reproducible inter-individual differences in IL-23 responsiveness (measured by STAT3 phosphorylation in peripheral blood CD8+CD45RO+ memory T and CD3+CD56+ NKT cells. Age, but not gender, was a significant (Pearson's correlation coefficient, r = -0.37, p = 0.001 source of variability observed in CD8+CD45RO+ memory T cells, with IL-23 responsiveness gradually decreasing with increasing age. Relative to cells from individuals demonstrating low responsiveness to IL-23 stimulation, CD8+CD45RO+ memory T cells from individuals demonstrating high responsiveness to IL-23 stimulation showed increased gene expression for IL-23 receptor (IL-23R, RORC (RORγt and CD161 (KLRB1, whereas RORA (RORα and STAT3 expression were equivalent. Similar to CD4+ memory T cells, IL-23 responsiveness is confined to the CD161+ subset in CD8+CD45RO+ memory T cells, suggesting a similar CD161+ precursor as has been reported for CD4+ Th17 cells. We observed a very strong positive correlation between IL-23 responsiveness and the fraction of CD161+, CD8+CD45RO+ memory T cells (r = 0.80, p<0.001. Moreover, the fraction of CD161+, CD8+CD45RO+ memory T cells gradually decreases with aging (r = -0.34, p = 0.05. Our data define the inter-individual differences in IL-23 responsiveness in peripheral blood lymphocytes from the general population. Variable expression of CD161, IL-23R and RORC affects IL-23 responsiveness and contributes to the inter-individual susceptibility to IL-23-mediated defenses and inflammatory processes.

  19. CD8+ Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells Are Trapped in the Tumor-Dendritic Cell Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Boissonnas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy enhances the antitumor adaptive immune T cell response, but the immunosuppressive tumor environment often dominates, resulting in cancer relapse. Antigen-presenting cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and tumor dendritic cells (TuDCs are the main protagonists of tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL immuno-suppression. TAMs have been widely investigated and are associated with poor prognosis, but the immuno-suppressive activity of TuDCs is less well understood. We performed two-photon imaging of the tumor tissue to examine the spatiotemporal interactions between TILs and TuDCs after chemotherapy. In a strongly immuno-suppressive murine tumor model, cyclophosphamide-mediated chemotherapy transiently enhanced the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T cell receptor transgenic T cells (OTI but barely affected TuDC compartment within the tumor. Time lapse imaging of living tumor tissue showed that TuDCs are organized as a mesh with dynamic interconnections. Once infiltrated into the tumor parenchyma, OTI T cells make antigen-specific and long-lasting contacts with TuDCs. Extensive analysis of TIL infiltration on histologic section revealed that after chemotherapy the majority of OTI T cells interact with TuDCs and that infiltration is restricted to TuDC-rich areas. We propose that the TuDC network exerts antigen-dependent unproductive retention that trap T cells and limit their antitumor effectiveness.

  20. CD3+CD8+CD161high Tc17 cells are depleted in HIV-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Hartling, Hans Jakob; Thorsteinsson, Kristina;

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ Tc17 cells with pro-inflammatory properties have only recently been acknowledged, and Tc17 cells in HIV-infection are undescribed. CD3+CD8+CD161 Tc17 cells and the production of Interleukin-17 were examined in untreated and treated HIV-infected patients, HIV-HCV co-infected patients and...... healthy controls. Depletion of CD3+CD8+CD161 Tc17 cells and diminished production of Interleukin-17 in HIV-infected patients was found. The level of Tc17 cells was associated with the level of the CD4+ count in treated patients....

  1. CD3+CD8+CD161high Tc17 cells are depleted in HIV-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Hartling, Hans Jakob; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ullum, Henrik; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2013-02-20

    CD8 Tc17 cells with pro-inflammatory properties have only recently been acknowledged, and Tc17 cells in HIV-infection are not described. CD3CD8CD161 Tc17 cells and the production of interleukin (IL)-17 were examined in untreated and treated HIV-infected patients, HIV-hepatitis C virus co-infected patients, and healthy controls. Depletion of CD3CD8CD161 Tc17 cells and diminished production of IL-17 in HIV-infected patients were found. The level of Tc17 cells was associated with the CD4 cell count in treated patients. PMID:23135168

  2. IL-17A secretion by CD8+ T cells supports Th17-mediated autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Magdalena; Heink, Sylvia; Pagenstecher, Axel; Reinhard, Katharina; Ritter, Josephine; Visekruna, Alexander; Guralnik, Anna; Bollig, Nadine; Jeltsch, Katharina; Heinemann, Christina; Wittmann, Eva; Buch, Thorsten; da Costa, Olivia Prazeres; Brüstle, Anne; Brenner, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    IL-17–producing CD8+ T (Tc17) cells are detectible in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions; however, their contribution to the disease is unknown. To identify functions of Tc17 cells, we induced EAE, a murine model of MS, in mice lacking IFN regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). IRF4-deficient mice failed to generate Tc17 and Th17 cells and were resistant to EAE. After adoptive transfer of WT CD8+ T cells and subsequent immunization for EAE induction in these mice, the CD8+ T cells developed a Tc17 phenotyp...

  3. CD8+ Lymphocytes Can Control HIV Infection in vitro by Suppressing Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher M.; Moody, Dewey J.; Stites, Daniel P.; Levy, Jay A.

    1986-12-01

    Lymphocytes bearing the CD8 marker were shown to suppress replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The effect was dose-dependent and most apparent with autologous lymphocytes; it did not appear to be mediated by a cytotoxic response. This suppression of HIV replication could be demonstrated by the addition of CD8+ cells at the initiation of virus production as well as after several weeks of virus replication by cultured cells. The observations suggest a potential approach to therapy in which autologous CD8 lymphocytes could be administered to individuals to inhibit HIV replication and perhaps progression of disease.

  4. Memory CD8+ T cell differentiation in viral infection: A cell for all seasons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry Radziewicz; Luke Uebelhoer; Bertram Bengsch; Arash Grakoui

    2007-01-01

    Chronic viral infections such as hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are major global health problems affecting more than 500 million people worldwide. Virus-specific CD8+ T cells play an important role in the course and outcome of these viral infections and it is hypothesized that altered or impaired differentiation of virusspecific CD8+ T cells contributes to the development of persistence and/or disease progression. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms responsible for functional differentiation of CD8+ T cells is essential for the generation of successful therapies aiming to strengthen the adaptive component of the immune system.

  5. A Pathogenic Role for CD8+ T Cells in a Spontaneous Model of Demyelinating Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brisebois, Marcel; Zehntner, Simone P.; Estrada, José;

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic (Tg) mice that overexpress the costimulatory ligand B7.2/CD86 on microglia spontaneously develop a T cell-mediated demyelinating disease. Characterization of the inflammatory infiltrates in the nervous tissue revealed a predominance of CD8+ T cells, suggesting a prominent role of this T...... pathogenesis. Collectively, our data indicate that the spontaneous demyelinating disease in this animal model occurs as a consequence of an inflammatory response initiated through the activation of CNS-specific CD8+ T cells by Tg expression of B7.2 within the target organ. Thus, autoreactive CD8+ T cells can...

  6. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer. PMID:26062132

  7. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Valdivia-Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/ chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer.

  8. Direct presentation is sufficient for an efficient anti-viral CD8+ T cell response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Huan Xu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which direct- and cross-presentation (DP and CP contribute to the priming of CD8(+ T cell (T(CD8+ responses to viruses is unclear mainly because of the difficulty in separating the two processes. Hence, while CP in the absence of DP has been clearly demonstrated, induction of an anti-viral T(CD8+ response that excludes CP has never been purposely shown. Using vaccinia virus (VACV, which has been used as the vaccine to rid the world of smallpox and is proposed as a vector for many other vaccines, we show that DP is the main mechanism for the priming of an anti-viral T(CD8+ response. These findings provide important insights to our understanding of how one of the most effective anti-viral vaccines induces immunity and should contribute to the development of novel vaccines.

  9. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of adenovirus type 5 vector-induced memory CD8 T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Holst, Peter Johannes; Steengaard, Sanne Skovvang;

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that adenovirus (Ad) primed CD8 T cells may display a distinct and partially exhausted phenotype. Given the practical implications of this claim, we decided to analyze in detail the quality of Ad-primed CD8 T cells directly comparing these cells to CD8 T cells induced through...... adenoviral boosting and, importantly, the generated secondary memory cells cannot be qualitatively differentiated from those induced by primary infection with replicating virus. Quantitatively, DNA priming prior to Ad-vaccination will lead to even higher numbers of memory cells. In this case, the vaccination...... an effective means to induce a substantially expanded, long-lived population of high-quality transgene-specific memory CD8 T cells....

  10. CD8+ T Cells Complement Antibodies in Protecting against Yellow Fever Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassi, Maria R; Kongsgaard, Michael; Steffensen, Maria A;

    2015-01-01

    can still induce some antiviral protection, and in vivo depletion of CD8(+) T cells from these animals revealed a pivotal role for CD8(+) T cells in controlling virus replication in the absence of a humoral response. Finally, we demonstrated that effector CD8(+) T cells also contribute to viral......The attenuated yellow fever (YF) vaccine (YF-17D) was developed in the 1930s, yet little is known about the protective mechanisms underlying its efficiency. In this study, we analyzed the relative contribution of cell-mediated and humoral immunity to the vaccine-induced protection in a murine model...... of YF-17D infection. Using different strains of knockout mice, we found that CD4(+) T cells, B cells, and Abs are required for full clinical protection of vaccinated mice, whereas CD8(+) T cells are dispensable for long-term survival after intracerebral challenge. However, by analyzing the immune...

  11. Label Free Detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells Using the Optofluidic Ring Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Gohring

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated label free detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Lymphocyte whole cells and CD4+ T-Lymphocyte cell lysis using the optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR sensor. The OFRR sensing platform incorporates microfluidics and photonics in a setup that utilizes small sample volume and achieves a fast detection time. In this work, white blood cells were isolated from healthy blood and the concentrations were adjusted to match T-Lymphocyte levels of individuals infected with HIV. Detection was accomplished by immobilizing CD4 and CD8 antibodies on the inner surface of the OFRR. Sensing results show excellent detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Lymphocyte cells at medically significant concentrations with a detection time of approximately 30 minutes. This work will lead to a rapid and low-cost sensing device that can provide a CD4 and CD8 count as a measure of HIV progression.

  12. T cytotoxic-1 CD8+ T cells are effector cells against pneumocystis in mice.

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    McAllister, Florencia; Mc Allister, Florencia; Steele, Chad; Zheng, Mingquan; Young, Erana; Shellito, Judd E; Marrero, Luis; Kolls, Jay K

    2004-01-15

    Host defenses are profoundly compromised in HIV-infected hosts due to progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes. A hallmark of HIV infection is Pneumocystis carinii (PC) pneumonia. Recently, CD8+ T cells, which are recruited to the lung in large numbers in response to PC infection, have been associated with some level of host defense as well as contributing to lung injury in BALB/c mice. In this study, we show that CD8+ T cells that have a T cytotoxic-1 response to PC in BALB/c mice, as determined by secretion of IFN-gamma, have in vitro killing activity against PC and effect clearance of the organism in adoptive transfer studies. Moreover, non-T cytotoxic-1 CD8+ T cells lacked in vitro effector activity and contributed to lung injury upon adoptive transfer. This dichotomous response in CD8+ T cell response may in part explain the clinical heterogeneity in the severity of PC pneumonia.

  13. Praziquantel facilitates IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells (Tc1 and IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells (Tc17 responses to DNA vaccination in mice.

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    Qiang Zou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD8(+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs are crucial for eliminating hepatitis B virus (HBV infected cells. DNA vaccination, a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic virus infection, has been shown to induce CTL responses. However, accumulated data have shown that CTLs could not be effectively induced by HBV DNA vaccination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that praziquantel (PZQ, an anti-schistoma drug, could act as an adjuvant to overcome the lack of potent CTL responses by HBV DNA vaccination in mice. PZQ in combination with HBV DNA vaccination augmented the induction of CD8(+ T cell-dependent and HBV-specific delayed hypersensitivity responses (DTH in C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, the induced CD8(+ T cells consisted of both Tc1 and Tc17 subtypes. By using IFN-γ knockout (KO mice and IL-17 KO mice, both cytokines were found to be involved in the DTH. The relevance of these findings to HBV immunization was established in HBsAg transgenic mice, in which PZQ also augmented the induction of HBV-specific Tc1 and Tc17 cells and resulted in reduction of HBsAg positive hepatocytes. Adoptive transfer experiments further showed that PZQ-primed CD8(+ T cells from wild type mice, but not the counterpart from IFN-γ KO or IL-17 KO mice, resulted in elimination of HBsAg positive hepatocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that PZQ is an effective adjuvant to facilitate Tc1 and Tc17 responses to HBV DNA vaccination, inducing broad CD8(+ T cell-based immunotherapy that breaks tolerance to HBsAg.

  14. CD19 CAR–T cells of defined CD4+:CD8+ composition in adult B cell ALL patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Berger, Carolina; Gooley, Theodore A.; Cherian, Sindhu; Hudecek, Michael; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Melville, Katherine; Pender, Barbara; Budiarto, Tanya M.; Robinson, Emily; Steevens, Natalia N.; Chaney, Colette; Soma, Lorinda; Chen, Xueyan; Li, Daniel; Cao, Jianhong; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jensen, Michael C.; Riddell, Stanley R.; Maloney, David G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. T cells that have been modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) have antitumor activity in B cell malignancies; however, identification of the factors that determine toxicity and efficacy of these T cells has been challenging in prior studies in which phenotypically heterogeneous CAR–T cell products were prepared from unselected T cells. METHODS. We conducted a clinical trial to evaluate CD19 CAR–T cells that were manufactured from defined CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets and administered in a defined CD4+:CD8+ composition to adults with B cell acute lymph